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Sample records for dental study models

  1. Developing and pretesting case studies in dental and dental hygiene education: using the diffusion of innovations model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragun, Deborah L; DeBate, Rita DiGioacchino; Severson, Herbert H; Shaw, Tracy; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott L; Brown, Kelli McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A; Hendricson, William D

    2012-05-01

    Case-based learning offers exposure to clinical situations that health professions students may not encounter in their training. The purposes of this study were to apply the Diffusion of Innovations conceptual framework to 1) identify characteristics of case studies that would increase their adoption among dental and dental hygiene faculty members and 2) develop and pretest interactive web-based case studies on sensitive oral-systemic health issues. The formative study spanned two phases using mixed methods (Phase 1: eight focus groups and four interviews; Phase 2: ten interviews and satisfaction surveys). Triangulation of quantitative and qualitative data revealed the following positive attributes of the developed case studies: relative advantage of active learning and modeling; compatibility with a variety of courses; observability of case-related knowledge and skills; independent learning; and modifiability for use with other oral-systemic health issues. These positive attributes are expected to increase the likelihood that dental and dental hygiene faculty members will adopt the developed case study once it is available for use. The themes identified in this study could be applied to the development of future case studies and may provide broader insight that might prove useful for exploring differences in case study use across dental and dental hygiene curricula.

  2. Possibility of reconstruction of dental plaster cast from 3D digital study models

    OpenAIRE

    Kasparova, Magdalena; Grafova, Lucie; Dvorak, Petr; Dostalova,Tatjana; Prochazka, Ales; Eliasova, Hana; Prusa, Josef; Kakawand, Soroush

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare traditional plaster casts, digital models and 3D printed copies of dental plaster casts based on various criteria. To determine whether 3D printed copies obtained using open source system RepRap can replace traditional plaster casts in dental practice. To compare and contrast the qualities of two possible 3D printing options – open source system RepRap and commercially available 3D printing. Design and settings A method comparison study on 10 dental plaster casts from th...

  3. 3-dimensional orthodontics visualization system with dental study models and orthopantomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Ong, S. H.; Foong, K. W. C.; Dhar, T.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that provides 3-dimensional visualization of orthodontic treatments. Dental plaster models and corresponding orthopantomogram (dental panoramic tomogram) are first digitized and fed into the system. A semi-auto segmentation technique is applied to the plaster models to detect the dental arches, tooth interstices and gum margins, which are used to extract individual crown models. 3-dimensional representation of roots, generated by deforming generic tooth models with orthopantomogram using radial basis functions, is attached to corresponding crowns to enable visualization of complete teeth. An optional algorithm to close the gaps between deformed roots and actual crowns by using multi-quadratic radial basis functions is also presented, which is capable of generating smooth mesh representation of complete 3-dimensional teeth. User interface is carefully designed to achieve a flexible system with as much user friendliness as possible. Manual calibration and correction is possible throughout the data processing steps to compensate occasional misbehaviors of automatic procedures. By allowing the users to move and re-arrange individual teeth (with their roots) on a full dentition, this orthodontic visualization system provides an easy and accurate way of simulation and planning of orthodontic treatment. Its capability of presenting 3-dimensional root information with only study models and orthopantomogram is especially useful for patients who do not undergo CT scanning, which is not a routine procedure in most orthodontic cases.

  4. Comparative study of dental arch width in plaster models, photocopies and digitized images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Rosseto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to comparatively assess dental arch width, in the canine and molar regions, by means of direct measurements from plaster models, photocopies and digitized images of the models. The sample consisted of 130 pairs of plaster models, photocopies and digitized images of the models of white patients (n = 65, both genders, with Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions, treated by standard Edgewise mechanics and extraction of the four first premolars. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine and intermolar widths were measured by a calibrated examiner, prior to and after orthodontic treatment, using the three modes of reproduction of the dental arches. Dispersion of the data relative to pre- and posttreatment intra-arch linear measurements (mm was represented as box plots. The three measuring methods were compared by one-way ANOVA for repeated measurements (α = 0.05. Initial / final mean values varied as follows: 33.94 to 34.29 mm / 34.49 to 34.66 mm (maxillary intercanine width; 26.23 to 26.26 mm / 26.77 to 26.84 mm (mandibular intercanine width; 49.55 to 49.66 mm / 47.28 to 47.45 mm (maxillary intermolar width and 43.28 to 43.41 mm / 40.29 to 40.46 mm (mandibular intermolar width. There were no statistically significant differences between mean dental arch widths estimated by the three studied methods, prior to and after orthodontic treatment. It may be concluded that photocopies and digitized images of the plaster models provided reliable reproductions of the dental arches for obtaining transversal intra-arch measurements.

  5. Possibility of reconstruction of dental plaster cast from 3D digital study models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparova, Magdalena; Grafova, Lucie; Dvorak, Petr; Dostalova, Tatjana; Prochazka, Ales; Eliasova, Hana; Prusa, Josef; Kakawand, Soroush

    2013-05-31

    To compare traditional plaster casts, digital models and 3D printed copies of dental plaster casts based on various criteria. To determine whether 3D printed copies obtained using open source system RepRap can replace traditional plaster casts in dental practice. To compare and contrast the qualities of two possible 3D printing options--source system RepRap and commercially available 3D printing. A method comparison study on 10 dental plaster casts from the Orthodontic department, Department of Stomatology, 2nd medical Faulty, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. Each of 10 plaster casts were scanned by inEos Blue scanner and the printed on 3D printer RepRap [10 models] and ProJet HD3000 3D printer [1 model]. Linear measurements between selected points on the dental arches of upper and lower jaws on plaster casts and its 3D copy were recorded and statistically analyzed. 3D printed copies have many advantages over traditional plaster casts. The precision and accuracy of the RepRap 3D printed copies of plaster casts were confirmed based on the statistical analysis. Although the commercially available 3D printing enables to print more details than the RepRap system, it is expensive and for the purpose of clinical use can be replaced by the cheaper prints obtained from RepRap printed copies. Scanning of the traditional plaster casts to obtain a digital model offers a pragmatic approach. The scans can subsequently be used as a template to print the plaster casts as required. Using 3D printers can replace traditional plaster casts primarily due to their accuracy and price.

  6. Comparison of conventional study model measurements and 3D digital study model measurements from laser scanned dental impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugrahani, F.; Jazaldi, F.; Noerhadi, N. A. I.

    2017-08-01

    The field of orthodontics is always evolving,and this includes the use of innovative technology. One type of orthodontic technology is the development of three-dimensional (3D) digital study models that replace conventional study models made by stone. This study aims to compare the mesio-distal teeth width, intercanine width, and intermolar width measurements between a 3D digital study model and a conventional study model. Twelve sets of upper arch dental impressions were taken from subjects with non-crowding teeth. The impressions were taken twice, once with alginate and once with polivinylsiloxane. The alginate impressions used in the conventional study model and the polivinylsiloxane impressions were scanned to obtain the 3D digital study model. Scanning was performed using a laser triangulation scanner device assembled by the School of Electrical Engineering and Informatics at the Institut Teknologi Bandung and David Laser Scan software. For the conventional model, themesio-distal width, intercanine width, and intermolar width were measured using digital calipers; in the 3D digital study model they were measured using software. There were no significant differences between the mesio-distal width, intercanine width, and intermolar width measurments between the conventional and 3D digital study models (p>0.05). Thus, measurements using 3D digital study models are as accurate as those obtained from conventional study models

  7. A comparative study of the effect of probiotics on cariogenic biofilm model for preventing dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-08-01

    Dental caries is induced by oral biofilm containing Streptococcus mutans. Probiotic bacteria were mainly studied for effect on the gastrointestinal tract and have been known to promote human health. However, the information of probiotics for oral health has been lack yet. In this study, we investigated influence of various probiotics on oral bacteria or cariogenic biofilm and evaluated candidate probiotics for dental caries among them. The antimicrobial activity of the spent culture medium of probiotics for oral streptococci was performed. Probiotics were added during the biofilm formation with salivary bacteria including S. mutans. The oral biofilms were stained with a fluorescent dye and observed using the confocal laser scanning microscope. To count bacteria in the biofilm, the bacteria were plated on MSB and BHI agar plates after disrupting the biofilm and cultivated. Glucosyltransferases (gtfs) expression of S. mutans and integration of lactobacilli into the biofilm were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Among probiotics, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited growth of oral streptococci. Moreover, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited formation of cariogenic biofilm model. The expression of gtfs was significantly reduced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The integration of L. rhamnosus into the biofilm model did not exhibit. However, L. acidophilus and L casei integrated into the biofilm model. These results suggest that L. rhamnosus may inhibit oral biofilm formation by decreasing glucan production of S. mutans and antibacterial activity and did not integrate into oral biofilm, which can be a candidate for caries prevention strategy.

  8. Self-efficacy and oral hygiene beliefs about toothbrushing in dental patients: a model-guided study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Buchanan, Heather; Frousiounioti, Sofia; Niakas, Dimitris; Potamianos, Gregory

    2011-10-01

    Building on previous research on psychosocial variables associated with oral hygiene behavior, this study examined the ability of Health Belief Model variables (perceived benefits, barriers, susceptibility, severity) and self-efficacy beliefs about toothbrushing to inform prevalence of dental caries and toothbrushing frequency. To accomplish this goal, a sample of 125 dental patients completed self-report questionnaires and provided data on demographic and behavioral factors. A path analysis model with manifest variables was tested. Oral hygiene beliefs emerged as a multidimensional construct. Results suggested that stronger self-efficacy beliefs (β = .81) and greater perceived severity of oral diseases (β = .18) were related to increased toothbrushing frequency, which in turn was associated with better oral health status, as indicated by the total number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth due to dental caries (β = -.39). Possible strategies for improving oral health are discussed.

  9. A test of Berggren's model of dental fear and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; Schutjes, M.; Aartman, I.H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Berggren’s (1984) model of dental fear and anxiety predicts that dentally anxious individuals postpone treatment, leading to a deteriorating dental state and subsequently to fear of negative evaluations in relation to their oral condition. The present study aimed to test one of the core assumptions

  10. Dental arch relationships on three-dimensional digital study models and conventional plaster study models for patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, J A; McIntyre, G T

    2012-09-01

    To determine if three-dimensional (3D) digital study models could replace plaster study models for the evaluation of dental arch relationships for patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Observational study involving plaster study models from a records archive. U.K. National Health Service. Thirty sets of study models of 5-year-old patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate were identified and scanned to produce 3D digital study models by ESM Digital Solutions Ltd. (Swords, Co. Dublin, Ireland) using an R250 Orthodontic Study Model Scanner (3Shape A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark). None. The plaster and 3D digital study models were scored using the 5-year-olds' and modified Huddart Bodenham indices and analyzed using the Friedman test (p plaster and 3D digital models. Intra-observer and interobserver reproducibility were good (0.62 to 0.83 and 0.64 to 0.78, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences between the scores for the 3D digital study models when compared to the plaster study models for either the 5-year-olds' index (p  =  .12) or for the modified Huddart Bodenham index (p  =  .506). Three-dimensional digital models are a valid alternative to traditional plaster study models for the evaluation of dental arch relationships in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  11. Review and Recommendations for Zero-inflated Count Regression Modeling of Dental Caries Indices in Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, John W.; Long, D. Leann; Kincade, Megan E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past five to ten years, zero-inflated count regression models have been increasingly applied to the analysis of dental caries indices (e.g., DMFT, dfms, etc). The main reason for that is linked to the broad decline in children’s caries experience, such that dmf and DMF indices more frequently generate low or even zero counts. This article specifically reviews the application of zero-inflated Poisson and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models to dental caries, with emphasis on the description of the models and the interpretation of fitted model results given the study goals. The review finds that interpretations provided in the published caries research are often imprecise or inadvertently misleading, particularly with respect to failing to discriminate between inference for the class of susceptible persons defined by such models and inference for the sampled population in terms of overall exposure effects. Recommendations are provided to enhance the use as well as the interpretation and reporting of results of count regression models when applied to epidemiological studies of dental caries. PMID:22710271

  12. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Hernández-Cortés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA—assessed implant stability (ISQ values with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP (n=7 or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA (n=10. Sixty 4.5×13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA (P0.5 in all cases, and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P>0.08. Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA. This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies.

  13. Ketoprofen Dental Pain Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, L M; Cooper, S A; Betts, N J; Wedell, D; Hermann, D G; Lamp, C; Secreto, S A; Hersh, E V

    1997-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, recently approved as an over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic at a 12.5 mg dosage strength. This is the first published study which explores the analgesic efficacy and safety of ketoprofen 12.5 mg in patients experiencing pain following the removal of impacted third molars. This study was single-dose, double-blind and randomized utilizing a 6-hour in-patient evaluation period. Patients ingested a single dose of ketoprofen 12.5 mg (n = 30), ketoprofen 37.5 mg (n = 32) or placebo (n = 15) when their post-surgical pain reached at least a moderate intensity on a 5-point categorical (CAT) scale and greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Measures of pain intensity and relief were gathered every 20 minutes for the first 2 hours, and then hourly from hours 3 through 6. Adverse drug reactions were also recorded as they occurred. Both dosages of ketoprofen were significantly more efficacious than placebo (two way ANOVAs, p measures (SPID(VAS), SPID(CAT), TOTPAR) than placebo, with the exception of the 6-hr SPID(CAT) measure for ketoprofen 12.5 mg. No serious side effects were observed in this study. We conclude that ketoprofen in a dose range of 12.5 mg to 37.5 mg is a safe and effective analgesic for the relief of post-operative dental pain.

  14. Dental peculiarities in the silvery mole-rat: an original model for studying the evolutionary and biological origins of continuous dental generation in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Gomes Rodrigues

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Unravelling the evolutionary and developmental mechanisms that have impacted the mammalian dentition, since more than 200 Ma, is an intricate issue. Interestingly, a few mammal species, including the silvery mole-rat Heliophobius argenteocinereus, are able to replace their dentition by the addition of supernumerary molars at the back of jaw migrating then toward the front. The aim here was to demonstrate the potential interest of further studying this rodent in order to better understand the origins of continuous dental replacement in mammals, which could also provide interesting data concerning the evolution of limited dental generation occurring in first mammals. In the present study, we described the main stages of the dental eruptive sequence in the silvery mole-rat and the associated characteristics of horizontal replacement using X-ray microtomography. This was coupled to the investigation of other African mole-rats which have no dental replacement. This method permitted to establish evidence that the initial development of the dentition in Heliophobius is comparable to what it is observed in most of African mole-rats. This rodent first has premolars, but then identical additional molars, a mechanism convergent to manatees and the pygmy rock-wallaby. Evidence of continuous replacement and strong dental dynamics were also illustrated in Heliophobius, and stressed the need to deeply investigate these aspects for evolutionary, functional and developmental purposes. We also noticed that two groups of extinct non-mammalian synapsids convergently acquired this dental mechanism, but in a way differing from extant mammals. The discussion on the diverse evolutionary origins of horizontal dental replacement put emphasis on the necessity of focusing on biological parameters potentially involved in both continuous and limited developments of teeth in mammals. In that context, the silvery mole-rat could appear as the most appropriate candidate to do so.

  15. Introduction to Bayesian modelling in dental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilthorpe, M S; Maddick, I H; Petrie, A

    2000-12-01

    To explain the concepts and application of Bayesian modelling and how it can be applied to the analysis of dental research data. Methodological in nature, this article introduces Bayesian modelling through hypothetical dental examples. The synthesis of RCT results with previous evidence, including expert opinion, is used to illustrate full Bayesian modelling. Meta-analysis, in the form of empirical Bayesian modelling, is introduced. An example of full Bayesian modelling is described for the synthesis of evidence from several studies that investigate the success of root canal treatment. Hierarchical (Bayesian) modelling is demonstrated for a survey of childhood caries, where surface data is nested within subjects. Bayesian methods enhance interpretation of research evidence through the synthesis of information from multiple sources. Bayesian modelling is now readily accessible to clinical researchers and is able to augment the application of clinical decision making in the development of guidelines and clinical practice.

  16. A pilot study to assess the feasibility and accuracy of using haptic technology to occlude digital dental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Cen, Yuhai; Hong, Yang; Keeling, Andrew; Khambay, Balvinder

    2016-03-01

    The use of haptic technology as an adjunct to clinical teaching is well documented in medicine and dentistry. However its application in clinical patient care is less well documented. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility and accuracy of using a haptic device to determine the occlusion of virtual dental models. The non-occluded digital models of 20 pre-treatment individuals were chosen from the database of Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong. Following minimal training with the haptic device (Geomagic(®) Touch™), the upper model was occluded with the lower model until a stable occlusion was achieved. Seven landmarks were placed on each of the corners of the original and haptically aligned upper model bases. The absolute distance between the landmarks was calculated. Intra- and inter-operator errors were assessed. The absolute distance between the 7 landmarks for each original and corresponding haptically aligned model was 0.54 ± 0.40 mm in the x-direction (lateral), 0.73 ± 0.63 mm in the y-direction (anterior-posterior) and 0.55 ± 0.48 mm in the z-direction (inferior-superior). Based on initial collision detection to prevent interpenetration of the upper and lower digital model surfaces, and contact form resistance during contact, it is possible to use a haptic device to occlude digital study models. The use of 3D digital study models is routine, but new problems arise, such as the lack of "touch" in a virtual environment. Occluding study models requires the sense of touch. For the first time, using haptic technology, it is possible to occlude digital study models in a virtual environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro biofilm models to study dental caries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maske, T T; van de Sande, F H; Arthur, R A; Huysmans, M C D N J M; Cenci, M S

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to characterize and discuss key methodological aspects of in vitro biofilm models for caries-related research and to verify the reproducibility and dose-response of models considering the response to anti-caries and/or antimicrobial substances. Inclusion criteria were divided into Part I (PI): an in vitro biofilm model that produces a cariogenic biofilm and/or caries-like lesions and allows pH fluctuations; and Part II (PII): models showing an effect of anti-caries and/or antimicrobial substances. Within PI, 72.9% consisted of dynamic biofilm models, while 27.1% consisted of batch models. Within PII, 75.5% corresponded to dynamic models, whereas 24.5% corresponded to batch models. Respectively, 20.4 and 14.3% of the studies reported dose-response validations and reproducibility, and 32.7% were classified as having a high risk of bias. Several in vitro biofilm models are available for caries-related research; however, most models lack validation by dose-response and reproducibility experiments for each proposed protocol.

  18. A national econometric forecasting model of the dental sector.

    OpenAIRE

    Feldstein, P J; Roehrig, C S

    1980-01-01

    The Econometric Model of the the Dental Sector forecasts a broad range of dental sector variables, including dental care prices; the amount of care produced and consumed; employment of hygienists, dental assistants, and clericals; hours worked by dentists; dental incomes; and number of dentists. These forecasts are based upon values specified by the user for the various factors which help determine the supply an demand for dental care, such as the size of the population, per capita income, th...

  19. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijster, Denise; van Loveren, Cor; Dusseldorp, Elise; Verrips, Gijsbert H W

    2014-04-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) scores were extracted from dental records. A validated parental questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, and oral hygiene behaviours. Data on neighbourhood quality were obtained from the Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics. Structural equation modelling indicated that the model was valid after applying a few modifications. In the revised model, lower maternal education level was related to poorer family organization, lower levels of social support, lower dental self-efficacy, and an external dental health locus of control. These, in turn, were associated with poorer oral hygiene behaviours, which were linked to higher levels of childhood dental caries. In addition, lower maternal education level and poorer neighbourhood quality were directly associated with higher caries levels in children. This model advances our understanding of determinants of childhood dental caries and the pathways in which they operate. Conception of these pathways is essential for guiding the development of caries-preventive programmes for children. Clues for further development of the model are suggested.

  20. Dental Care Coverage and Use: Modeling Limitations and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined why older US adults without dental care coverage and use would have lower use rates if offered coverage than do those who currently have coverage. Methods. We used data from the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to estimate a multinomial logistic model to analyze the influence of personal characteristics in the grouping of older US adults into those with and those without dental care coverage and dental care use. Results. Compared with persons with no coverage and no dental care use, users of dental care with coverage were more likely to be younger, female, wealthier, college graduates, married, in excellent or very good health, and not missing all their permanent teeth. Conclusions. Providing dental care coverage to uninsured older US adults without use will not necessarily result in use rates similar to those with prior coverage and use. We have offered a model using modifiable factors that may help policy planners facilitate programs to increase dental care coverage uptake and use. PMID:24328635

  1. A study of dental anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sook; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to find out the prevalence of dental anomalies in 600 normal persons (male:363, female:237) at age 14 to 39 years, through history taking, oral examination, and radiographic observations of subjects. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence of individual dental anomalies were as follows; Congenitally missing teeth 7%; supernumerary teeth 1.33%; ectopic eruption 8.50%; transposition 0.33%; rotation 23.67%; microdontia 11.16% (peg lateral is 5.33%; third molar 5.83%); prolonged retention of deciduous teeth 1.33%; crowding 49.83%; and spacing 15.17%. 2. Alterations in numbers of teeth : The most frequently missing teeth were mandibular lateral incisors, followed by mandibular second premolars and maxillary second premolars. In numbers of congenitally missing teeth per person, 52.38% had one missing tooth and 30.95% had two missing teeth. In supernumerary teeth, there was higher rate in male than in female. Most supernumerary teeth were mesiodens of median area in maxilla and the eruption pattern of that teeth generally was unerupted state. 3. In transposition, exchange of position of teeth involved the canine and first premolar. 4. Congenital missing rate of permanent successors in prolonged retention of deciduous teeth was 69.23%. 5. Crowding and spacing had respectively higher rate in mandible and in maxilla.

  2. Rotating and translating anthropomorphic head voxel models to establish an horizontal Frankfort plane for dental CBCT Monte Carlo simulations: a dose comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, A.; Zhang, G.; Jacobs, R.; Bogaerts, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2016-12-01

    In order to carry out Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry studies, voxel phantoms, modeling human anatomy, and organ-based segmentation of CT image data sets are applied to simulation frameworks. The resulting voxel phantoms preserve patient CT acquisition geometry; in the case of head voxel models built upon head CT images, the head support with which CT scanners are equipped introduces an inclination to the head, and hence to the head voxel model. In dental cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, patients are always positioned in such a way that the Frankfort line is horizontal, implying that there is no head inclination. The orientation of the head is important, as it influences the distance of critical radiosensitive organs like the thyroid and the esophagus from the x-ray tube. This work aims to propose a procedure to adjust head voxel phantom orientation, and to investigate the impact of head inclination on organ doses in dental CBCT MC dosimetry studies. The female adult ICRP, and three in-house-built paediatric voxel phantoms were in this study. An EGSnrc MC framework was employed to simulate two commonly used protocols; a Morita Accuitomo 170 dental CBCT scanner (FOVs: 60  ×  60 mm2 and 80  ×  80 mm2, standard resolution), and a 3D Teeth protocol (FOV: 100  ×  90 mm2) in a Planmeca Promax 3D MAX scanner. Result analysis revealed large absorbed organ dose differences in radiosensitive organs between the original and the geometrically corrected voxel models of this study, ranging from  -45.6% to 39.3%. Therefore, accurate dental CBCT MC dose calculations require geometrical adjustments to be applied to head voxel models.

  3. Dental caries among children visiting a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky: a pooled cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases affecting a large portion of children in the United States. The prevalence of childhood dental caries in Kentucky is among the highest in the nation. The purposes of this study are to (1) compare sociodemographic differences between caries and no caries groups and (2) investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries among children who visited a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky. Methods Study subjects were children aged 6 to 15 years who participated in the school-based dental sealant program through the mobile dental clinic operated by the Institute for Rural Health at Western Kentucky University between September 2006 and May 2011 (n = 2,453). Descriptive statistics were calculated for sociodemographic factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and urban versus rural residential location) and caries status. We used chi-square tests to compare sociodemographic differences of children stratified by caries and no caries status as well as three levels of caries severity. We developed a logistic regression model to investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Results The proportion of children having untreated dental caries was 49.7% and the mean number of untreated dental caries was 2.0. The proportion of untreated dental caries was higher in older children, children with no insurance and living in rural residential locations, and caries severity was also higher in these groups. Odds ratio indicated that older ages, not having private insurance (having only public, government-sponsored insurance or no insurance at all) and rural residential location were associated with having untreated dental caries after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics of children. Conclusions Untreated dental caries was more likely to be present in older children living in rural areas without

  4. Dental caries among children visiting a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky: a pooled cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Erika; Michimi, Akihiko; Ellis-Griffith, Gregory; Peterson, Tina; Carter, Daniel; English, Gary

    2013-05-02

    Dental caries is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases affecting a large portion of children in the United States. The prevalence of childhood dental caries in Kentucky is among the highest in the nation. The purposes of this study are to (1) compare sociodemographic differences between caries and no caries groups and (2) investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries among children who visited a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky. Study subjects were children aged 6 to 15 years who participated in the school-based dental sealant program through the mobile dental clinic operated by the Institute for Rural Health at Western Kentucky University between September 2006 and May 2011 (n = 2,453). Descriptive statistics were calculated for sociodemographic factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and urban versus rural residential location) and caries status. We used chi-square tests to compare sociodemographic differences of children stratified by caries and no caries status as well as three levels of caries severity. We developed a logistic regression model to investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. The proportion of children having untreated dental caries was 49.7% and the mean number of untreated dental caries was 2.0. The proportion of untreated dental caries was higher in older children, children with no insurance and living in rural residential locations, and caries severity was also higher in these groups. Odds ratio indicated that older ages, not having private insurance (having only public, government-sponsored insurance or no insurance at all) and rural residential location were associated with having untreated dental caries after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics of children. Untreated dental caries was more likely to be present in older children living in rural areas without insurance. Health interventionists may use

  5. An evaluation of the PALS after treatment modelling intervention to reduce dental anxiety in child dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Karen E; Freeman, Ruth

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the passivity to activity through live symbolic (PALS) after treatment modelling intervention to reduce child dental anxiety. A convenience sample of consecutive 5- to 10-year-old dental patients were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Self-reported child dental anxiety was assessed at the start of each visit. At the end of each visit, children in the intervention group were introduced to a glove puppet, which acted as the PALS model. The intervention group children re-enacted the treatment they had just received on the puppet's teeth. At the end of each visit, the control children received motivational rewards only. The change in dental anxiety scores was examined by t-tests and analysis of covariance. The final analysis included 27 intervention children and 26 control children. For the intervention group, there were no statistically significant changes in dental anxiety over a course of treatment, between first and second preventive visits, between first and second invasive treatment visits, or between first attendance and subsequent recall attendance. For the control group, a statistically significant decrease in dental anxiety was observed between the first and second invasive dental treatment visits. The PALS after treatment modelling intervention was ineffective in reducing child dental anxiety.

  6. Dental Biofilm and Laboratory Microbial Culture Models for Cariology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollie Yiru Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries form through a complex interaction over time among dental plaque, fermentable carbohydrate, and host factors (including teeth and saliva. As a key factor, dental plaque or biofilm substantially influence the characteristic of the carious lesions. Laboratory microbial culture models are often used because they provide a controllable and constant environment for cariology research. Moreover, they do not have ethical problems associated with clinical studies. The design of the microbial culture model varies from simple to sophisticated according to the purpose of the investigation. Each model is a compromise between the reality of the oral cavity and the simplification of the model. Researchers, however, can still obtain meaningful and useful results from the models they select. Laboratory microbial culture models can be categorized into a closed system and an open system. Models in the closed system have a finite supply of nutrients, and are also simple and cost-effective. Models in the open system enabled the supply of a fresh culture medium and the removal of metabolites and spent culture liquid simultaneously. They provide better regulation of the biofilm growth rate than the models in the closed system. This review paper gives an overview of the dental plaque biofilm and laboratory microbial culture models used for cariology research.

  7. Dental anxiety reduction and dental attendance after treatment in a dental fear clinic: A follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartman, I.H.A.; de Jongh, A.; Makkes, P.C.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess treatment outcome in terms of dental anxiety reduction at a post-treatment assessment and dental anxiety reduction and dental attendance one year later. Furthermore, it was determined to what extent psychopathological characteristics were related to

  8. Immediate implant loading with fixed dental restorations: An animal model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špadijer-Gostović Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Immediate loading is considered to be the most innovative technique in contemporary implant dentistry. Recent clinical and experimental findings have demonstrated that only implants with high primary stability can be subjected to immediate loading protocol with predictable results. It is generally accepted that the most important prerequsite for successful osseointegration is achievement and maintenance of implant stability. The aim of this in vivo study was to investigate the possibility for successful application of immediate loading protocol in implant systems with different surface properties. Methods. In the experimental study 2 mongrel dogs were edentulated bilaterally in the mandibular and maxillary premolar areas. After 3 months implants were placed in a pattern 4 different commercially available implants per quadrant (n = 32: Mk III TiUnite (Nobel Biocare, Sweden, ITI TPS (Straumann, Switzerland, 3IOsseotite (Implant Innovation, USA and XiVE Cell-Plus (Friadent, Germany. Implants were subjected to immediate loading with 4 unit gold cast bridges, 2 days post implantation. The assessment of implant stability and immediate loading possibilities were done by performing Resonance frequency analysis (RFA. Results. After a 6- month loading period all bridges were in function and all implants occurred well osseointegrated. When summarizing the Implant Stability Quotient (ISQ values, it was noted that resonance frequency was significantly higher for mandibular implants. The results of this experimental setting showed that all evaluated surfaces achieved good implant stability. Increase of ISQ values was found for all implants in the mandible and partially decrease of ISQ values for maxillary implants after 6 months of functional loading with 4 unit bridges. Conclusions. Investigated endooseal implants did not show different degree of osseointegration, because there was not statisticaly significant difference among observed

  9. 3D space analysis of dental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Joon H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Kondo, Toshiaki; Foong, Kelvin W. C.; Yong, Than F.

    2001-05-01

    Space analysis is an important procedure by orthodontists to determine the amount of space available and required for teeth alignment during treatment planning. Traditional manual methods of space analysis are tedious and often inaccurate. Computer-based space analysis methods that work on 2D images have been reported. However, as the space problems in the dental arch exist in all three planes of space, a full 3D analysis of the problems is necessary. This paper describes a visualization and measurement system that analyses 3D images of dental plaster models. Algorithms were developed to determine dental arches. The system is able to record the depths of the Curve of Spee, and quantify space liabilities arising from a non-planar Curve of Spee, malalignment and overjet. Furthermore, the difference between total arch space available and the space required to arrange the teeth in ideal occlusion can be accurately computed. The system for 3D space analysis of the dental arch is an accurate, comprehensive, rapid and repeatable method of space analysis to facilitate proper orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

  10. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.; van Loveren, C.; Dusseldorp, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) sco

  11. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.; Loveren, C. van; Dusseldorp, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft)

  12. Reversal of dental fluorosis: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Dhaval N; Shah, Jigna

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical reversal of dental fluorosis with various combinations of calcium, vitamin D3, and ascorbic acid, along with changes in levels of certain biochemical parameters concerned with dental fluorosis. The role of fluoride level of drinking water in the etiology of dental fluorosis and the prevalence of dental fluorosis in both dentitions and teeth were also assessed. A total number of 50 patients with clinical features of dental fluorosis without trauma and any adverse habits were selected. Of these, in 30 co-operative patients, estimation of water fluoride level and pretreatment and post-treatment serum and urine fluoride levels were done with ion selective electrode method. The selected 30 patients were divided into three groups, that is, group A, group B, and group C, and were given various combinations of medications like calcium with vitamin D3 supplements, ascorbic acid with vitamin D3 supplements, and chlorhexidine mouthwash (placebo) for three months, respectively. These 30 patients were assessed for any change in the clinical grading of dental fluorosis. No change in clinical grading of dental fluorosis was noted. Considerable reduction in serum and urine fluoride levels was noted in both group A and group B patients. Dental fluorosis was noted in permanent teeth more commonly than deciduous teeth, and permanent maxillary central incisors had the highest prevalence rate. This study comprises only 30 patients with three months of follow-up. So, this sample of patients and duration of follow-up period are conclusive to observe changes in biochemical parameters but not sufficient to observe changes in clinical grading.

  13. Studying a dental pathology by finite elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mejía Umaña

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abfractives lesions or abfractions are non-cavity lesions of dental structures in which a biomechanical factor has been identified as being the most probable cause for it occurring. Even throught such lesion can be presented in any tooth, it occurs more frequently in people aged over 35. This article presents some results obtained by the Universidad Nacional de Colombia's multidisciplinary research group for studying "dental material's structure and propierties". The introduction describes such lesion's characteristics and possible causes. The results of various modelling exercises using finite elements (in two and three dimensions are presented regarding a first premolar tooth subjected to normal mastication load and also to abnormal loads produced by occlusion problems. The most important findings (accompanied by clinical observations were that: areas of high concentration of forces were identified where lesions were frequently presented, associated with loads whose line of action did not pass through the central part of the section of tooth at cervical level; a direct relationship between facets of wear being orientated with the direction of forces produced by a high concentration of force; and the presence of high compression forces in the cervical region.

  14. Childhood dental injuries: a resiliency model of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, Jenny M; Rodd, Helen D; Baker, Sarah R

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of research examining how children and their families adapt to traumatic dental injuries. This study examined how clinical and psychosocial factors influence adaptation to this oral stressor using a theoretical framework of resiliency and adaptation. Children with traumatised permanent teeth, who were attending a UK dental hospital, completed questionnaires at baseline and at a 6 month follow-up. Child questionnaires assessed coping styles, social support, and quality of life outcomes. Parents were also asked to complete questionnaires, which assessed previous stressors/strains on the family, social support, healthcare satisfaction, and family impacts. Data related to the child's dental injury were collected from clinical notes. Structural equation modelling and regression analyses were employed to analyse data. One hundred and eight children and 113 parents participated at baseline. Children's gender, coping style, social support, and family functioning significantly predicted children's oral health-related quality of life. Parents' satisfaction with their children's dental care significantly predicted parental quality of life outcomes. Children's close friend support and healthcare satisfaction remained significant predictors of positive outcomes at follow-up. The findings revealed important psychosocial factors that influence child and family adaptation to childhood dental trauma. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Theory analysis of the Dental Hygiene Human Needs Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, L; Bowen, D M

    2016-11-09

    Theories provide a structural knowing about concept relationships, practice intricacies, and intuitions and thus shape the distinct body of the profession. Capturing ways of knowing and being is essential to any professions' practice, education and research. This process defines the phenomenon of the profession - its existence or experience. Theory evaluation is a systematic criterion-based assessment of a specific theory. This study presents a theory analysis of the Dental Hygiene Human Needs Conceptual Model (DH HNCM). Using the Walker and Avant Theory Analysis, a seven-step process, the DH HNCM, was analysed and evaluated for its meaningfulness and contribution to dental hygiene. The steps include the following: (i) investigate the origins; (ii) examine relationships of the theory's concepts; (iii) assess the logic of the theory's structure; (iv) consider the usefulness to practice; (v) judge the generalizability; (vi) evaluate the parsimony; and (vii) appraise the testability of the theory. Human needs theory in nursing and Maslow's Hierarchy of Need Theory prompted this theory's development. The DH HNCM depicts four concepts based on the paradigm concepts of the profession: client, health/oral health, environment and dental hygiene actions, and includes validated eleven human needs that evolved overtime to eight. It is logical, simplistic, allows scientific predictions and testing, and provides a unique lens for the dental hygiene practitioner. With this model, dental hygienists have entered practice, knowing they enable clients to meet their human needs. For the DH HNCM, theory analysis affirmed that the model is reasonable and insightful and adds to the dental hygiene professions' epistemology and ontology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The effect of Filmed modeling on the anxious and cooperative behavior of 4-6 years old children during dental treatment: A randomized clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paryab, Mehrsa; Arab, Zeinab

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Filmed modeling in comparison with commonly used Tell-Show-Do technique (T.S.D) on the anxious and cooperative behavior of 4-6 years old children during dental practice. Forty six children aged 4-6 years were enrolled in this study and randomly allocated into two groups. Group I: At the first visit, the procedure of Tell-Show-Do, and at the second visit, the treatment procedures were performed by the dentist for the children. Group II: At the first visit, children watched a film consisting of the procedure of Tell-Show-Do performed on a child model. At the second visit, treatment procedures were performed. In both groups, during the treatment procedure, index of heart rate was measured and behaviors of children were recorded. The children's anxious and cooperative behaviors on the recordings were quantified according to Venham and Frankl rating scales, respectively. The data were compared between two groups using T-test method. All statistical references were made at 0.05. There were no statistically significant differences in heart rate measures, clinical anxiety and cooperative behavior scores of children between the two groups (P = 0.6). Filmed modeling can be an efficient alternative method to Tell-Show-Do technique in pre-appointment preparation of the 4-6 years old children during dental treatment.

  17. Accuracy and reproducibility of dental replica models reconstructed by different rapid prototyping techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazeveld, Aletta; Huddleston Slater, James J. R.; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Rapid prototyping is a fast-developing technique that might play a significant role in the eventual replacement of plaster dental models. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of physical dental models reconstructed from digital data by several rapid

  18. Challenges in Dental Statistics: Data and Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Matranga

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present the reflections and proposals derived from the first Workshop of the SISMEC STATDENT working group on statistical methods and applications in dentistry, held in Ancona (Italy on 28th September 2011. STATDENT began as a forum of comparison and discussion for statisticians working in the field of dental research in order to suggest new and improve existing biostatistical and clinical epidemiological methods. During the meeting, we dealt with very important topics of statistical methodology for the analysis of dental data, covering the analysis of hierarchically structured and over-dispersed data, the issue of calibration and reproducibility, as well as some problems related to survey methodology, such as the design and construction of unbiased statistical indicators and of well conducted clinical trials. This paper gathers some of the methodological topics discussed during the meeting, concerning multilevel and zero-inflated models for the analysis of caries data and methods for the training and calibration of raters in dental epidemiology.

  19. Development and evaluation of a new dental model at Tokyo Medical and Dental University for the practice of periodontal pocket probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaga, Masayo; Kondo, Keiko; Adachi, Toshiko; Miura, Yoshiko; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro

    2013-09-01

    Dental and dental hygiene students must acquire the skill of measuring periodontal pockets and learn to identify the bottom of a pocket, especially of deep periodontal pockets. A new dental model that would enable students to practice measuring deep periodontal pockets was developed at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this model. Twenty dental hygiene students in their third year at the school and twenty-four instructors or dental hygienists of the University Hospital measured periodontal pockets on the newly designed dental model. Feasibility and effectiveness of the model were evaluated based on periodontal probing by the students and instructors, as well as results of a questionnaire. The results demonstrated an intraexaminer agreement (within ±1 mm) averaging 91 percent. The mean percentages of correct answers of the students and instructors were 82 percent and 80 percent, respectively. More than 90 percent of the instructors and students reported that the new model would be suitable for pocket probing training. In the questionnaire, they responded that this practice using the new model would contribute to students' future and that they wanted to try other dental models with various probing depths. The new dental model designed for periodontal pocket probing training was reported to be feasible and effective for student practice.

  20. In vitro study of transmission of bacteria from contaminated metal models to stone models via impressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofou, A.; Larsen, T.; Öwall, B.

    2002-01-01

    Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory......Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory...

  1. Predictive modeling of dental pain using neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Yeob; Lim, Kun Ok; Rhee, Hyun Sill

    2009-01-01

    The mouth is a part of the body for ingesting food that is the most basic foundation and important part. The dental pain predicted by the neural network model. As a result of making a predictive modeling, the fitness of the predictive modeling of dental pain factors was 80.0%. As for the people who are likely to experience dental pain predicted by the neural network model, preventive measures including proper eating habits, education on oral hygiene, and stress release must precede any dental treatment.

  2. Applying the Cognitive Vulnerability Model to the analysis of cognitive and family influences on children's dental fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crego, Antonio; Carrillo-Diaz, Maria; Armfield, Jason M; Romero, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Negative experiences, cognitions, and family variables are involved in the etiology of child dental fear, but previous research has frequently considered them separately. This study uses the Cognitive Vulnerability Model to explore the influence of negative dental experiences and family members on children's dental anxiety. The participants were 185 children who completed a questionnaire comprising measures of dental fear and cognitive vulnerability-related perceptions. Measures were obtained for 88 of the participants' fathers and for 97 of the participants' mothers. Cognitive vulnerability perceptions had the strongest association with children's dental fear (β = 0.40), explaining 14-21% of the variance in dental fear scores beyond that explained by other variables. Furthermore, vulnerability perceptions mediated the relationship between negative dental experiences and dental fear. Children's dental fear and cognitive vulnerability perceptions were significantly associated with those of their fathers (r = 0.23 and r = 0.40, respectively) and mothers (r = 0.28 and r = 0.35, respectively). Moreover, fathers' (β = 0.24) and mothers' (β = 0.31) levels of cognitive vulnerability significantly predicted the children's levels of dental fear. The Cognitive Vulnerability Model offers a framework to understand child dental fear. Furthermore, this cognitive approach may help explain why some children develop dental fear problems after suffering a negative dental experience and how dental anxiety is passed on from parents to children.

  3. Reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography compared with digital dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, O. de; Rangel, F.A.; Fudalej, P.S.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Breuning, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on 2 types of dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans: CBCT images, and Anatomodels (InVivoDental, San Jose, Calif); these were compared with digital models gene

  4. Applying the model of excellence in dental healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekić Jasmina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Models of excellence are considered a practical tool in the field of management that should help a variety of organizations, including dental, to carry out the measurement of the quality of provided services, and so define their position in relation to excellence. The quality of healthcare implies the degree within which the system of healthcare and health services increases the likelihood of positive treatment outcome. Objective. The aim of the present study was to define a model of excellence in the field of dental healthcare (DHC in the Republic of Serbia and suggest the model of DHC whose services will have the characteristics of outstanding service in the dental practice. Methods. In this study a specially designed questionnaire was used for the assessment of the maturity level of applied management regarding quality in healthcare organizations of the Republic of Serbia. The questionnaire consists of 13 units and a total of 240 questions. Results. The results of the study were discussed involving four areas: (1 defining the main criteria and sub-criteria, (2 the elements of excellence of DHC in the Republic of Serbia, (3 the quality of DHC in the Republic of Serbia, and (4 defining the framework of the model of excellence for the DHC in the Republic of Serbia. The main criteria which defined the framework and implementation model of excellence in the field of DHC in Serbia were: leadership, management, human resources, policy and strategy, other resources, processes, patients’ satisfaction, employee’s satisfaction, impact on society and business results. The model had two main parts: the possibilities for the first five criteria and options for the other four criteria. Conclusion. Excellence in DHC business as well as the excellence of provided dental services are increasingly becoming the norm and good practice, and progressively less the exception.

  5. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  6. Numerical FEM modeling in dental implantology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roateşi, Iulia; Roateşi, Simona

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to a numerical approach of the stress and displacement calculation of a system made up of dental implant, ceramic crown and surrounding bone. This is the simulation of a clinical situation involving both biological - the bone tissue, and non-biological - the implant and the crown, materials. On the other hand this problem deals with quite fine technical structure details - the threads, tapers, etc with a great impact in masticatory force transmission. Modeling the contact between the implant and the bone tissue is important to a proper bone-implant interface model and implant design. The authors proposed a three-dimensional numerical model to assess the biomechanical behaviour of this complex structure in order to evaluate its stability by determining the risk zones. A comparison between this numerical analysis and clinical cases is performed and a good agreement is obtained.

  7. Utilization of dental health care services in context of the HIV epidemic- a cross-sectional study of dental patients in the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åstrøm Anne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infected patients should be expected in the Sudanese dental health care services with an increasing frequency. Dental care utilization in the context of the HIV epidemic is generally poorly understood. Focusing on Sudanese dental patients with reported unknown HIV status, this study assessed the extent to which Andersen's model in terms of predisposing (socio-demographics, enabling (knowledge, attitudes and perceived risk related to HIV and need related factors (oral health status predict dental care utilization. It was hypothesized that enabling factors would add to the explanation of dental care utilization beyond that of predisposing and need related factors. Methods Dental patients were recruited from Khartoum Dental Teaching Hospital (KDTH and University of Science and Technology (UST during March-July 2008. A total of 1262 patients (mean age 30.7, 56.5% females and 61% from KDTH were examined clinically (DMFT and participated in an interview. Results A total of 53.9% confirmed having attended a dental clinic for treatment at least once in the past 2 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that predisposing factors; travelling inside Sudan (OR = 0.5 were associated with lower odds and females were associated with higher odds (OR = 2.0 for dental service utilization. Enabling factors; higher knowledge of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6 and higher HIV related experience (OR = 0.7 were associated with lower odds, whereas positive attitudes towards infected people and high perceived risk of contagion (OR = 1.3 were associated with higher odds for dental care utilization. Among need related factors dental caries experience was strongly associated with dental care utilization (OR = 4.8. Conclusion Disparity in the history of dental care utilization goes beyond socio-demographic position and need for dental care. Public awareness of HIV infection control and confidence on the competence of dentists should be improved to

  8. Dental caries: an updated medical model of risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsch, V Kim

    2014-04-01

    Dental caries is a transmissible, complex biofilm disease that creates prolonged periods of low pH in the mouth, resulting in a net mineral loss from the teeth. Historically, the disease model for dental caries consisted of mutans streptococci and Lactobacillus species, and the dental profession focused on restoring the lesions/damage from the disease by using a surgical model. The current recommendation is to implement a risk-assessment-based medical model called CAMBRA (caries management by risk assessment) to diagnose and treat dental caries. Unfortunately, many of the suggestions of CAMBRA have been overly complicated and confusing for clinicians. The risk of caries, however, is usually related to just a few common factors, and these factors result in common patterns of disease. This article examines the biofilm model of dental caries, identifies the common disease patterns, and discusses their targeted therapeutic strategies to make CAMBRA more easily adaptable for the privately practicing professional.

  9. A Model Program for Dental Assisting Education in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Industrial Education.

    Intended to provide assistance for developing new programs and improving existing ones, the guide was constructed by dental assisting instructors and other professional participants in a 196 5 workshop conference. Elements of the model program were derived from a statistical analysis of California junior colleg e programs in dental assisting and…

  10. Dental Health Care Models of Southwest Cultures. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettibone, Timothy J.; Solis, Enrique, Jr.

    The major goal of this research was the development and validation of cultural models of dental health practices. The specific objectives were to determine if 3 cultural groups (American Indians, Mexican Americans, and Anglo Americans) differ in the dental health hygiene indices, characteristics, psychological factors, or social factors; to…

  11. Dental Hygiene Curriculum Model for Transition to Future Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paarmann, Carlene S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The establishment of the baccalaureate degree as the minimum entry level for dental hygiene practice centers around three main concerns: changes in health care delivery, awarding of a degree commensurate with students' educational background, and the credibility of dental hygiene as a profession. A curriculum model is discussed. (MLW)

  12. A new causal model of dental diseases associated with endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drangsholt, M T

    1998-07-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a serious disease that is associated with dental diseases and treatment. The objective of this study was to summarize the epidemiological information about IE and reevaluate previous causal models in light of this evidence. The world biomedical literature was searched from 1930 to 1996 for descriptive and analytic epidemiological studies of IE. Multiple searching strategies were performed on 9 databases, including MEDLINE, CATLINE, and WORLDCAT. Results show that: 1) the incidence of IE varies between 0.70 to 6.8 per 100,000 person-years: 2) the incidence of IE increases 20 fold with advancing age: 3) over 50% of all IE cases are not associated with either an obvious procedural or infectious event 3 months prior to developing symptoms; 4) about 8% of all IE cases are associated with periodontal or dental disease without a dental procedure: 5) the time from the diagnosis of heart valve deformities to the development of IE approaches 20 years: 6) the median time from identifiable procedures to the onset of IE symptoms is about 2 to 4 weeks: 7) the risk of IE after a dental procedure is probably in the range of 1 per 3,000 to 5,000 procedures: and 8) over 80% of all IE cases are acquired in the community, and the bacteria are part of the host's endogenous flora. The synthesis of these data demonstrates that IE is a disorder with the epidemiological picture of a chronic disease such as cancer, instead of an acute infectious disease, with a long latent period and possibly several definable intermediates or stages. A new causal model is proposed that includes early bacteremias that may "prime" the endothelial surface of the heart valves over many years, and a late bacteremia over days to weeks that allows adherence and colonization of the valve, resulting in the characteristic fulminant infection.

  13. A mathematical simulation approach to testing innovative models of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Marc; Kruger, Estie

    2010-03-01

    A combination of the increasing costs associated with providing a complex clinical program and an ever-reducing education-based income finds dental schools throughout Australia continuing to face serious financial risk. Even more important is the growing workforce crisis in academic staffing faced in almost all dental schools as the impact of the widening gap between private practice incomes and academic remuneration takes effect. This study developed a model of core variables and their relationship that was then transformed into a mathematical simulation tool that can be applied to test various scenarios and variable changes. The simulation model was tested against a theoretical dental education arrangement and found that this arrangement was a commercially viable pathway for new providers to enter the dental education market. This type of mathematical simulation approach is an important technique for analysis of the complex financial and operational management of modern dental schools.

  14. Evaluation of periodontal risk assessment model among adults aged 30-60 years attending KLE Dental College, Belgaum: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshwar Shruthi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of the present study was to evaluate the periodontal risk of individuals using the modified periodontal risk assessment model. Materials and Methods: Adult subjects aged 30-60 years attending the out patient department of Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum in a week′s period were screened and 30 among those who met the criteria were included in the study. Complete history and examination of the oral cavity was done using mouth mirror and community periodontal index probes. Periodontal status was recorded using community periodontal index. Systemic conditions like hypertension and diabetes was assessed by suitable investigations. All the risk factors were plotted on a model using Microsoft excel and periodontal risk was assessed based on the findings and categorized as low, moderate and high risk. Results: Among 30 patients 13 were in low risk group, 10 in moderate risk group, and 7 in high risk group identified by proposed model given by Vishwa Chandra whereas 20 patients were in low risk group, 5 in moderate risk group and 5 in high risk group when identified Lang and Tonetti model (2003. Conclusion: In conclusion the use of risk assessment tool would result in reduction of complex therapies and would prevent the future effects of periodontal disease such as bone and tooth loss.

  15. A questionnaire study regarding local anesthesia in dentistry and safety measures in dental clinics among dental students

    OpenAIRE

    オオケ, ハナコ; クドウ, マサル; シンヤ, ノボル; Hanako, OHKE; Masaru, KUDO; Noboru, SHINYA

    2005-01-01

    This reports the results of a questionnaire study of dental students on the awareness of "local anesthesia" and "use of patient monitoring systems" in dental clinics. Subjects participated in the present study included 96 sixth year dental students (D6) and 93 first year dental students (D1). The results indicate that the majority of respondents including both D6 and D1 support the notion that a "dentist" is the most suitable person to perform local anesthesia in dental treatment. With respec...

  16. Preventive Dental Practices Motivational Model for Elementary Teachers in Training Institutions; Dental Health Instruction Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Darwin

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of instruction upon the dental health behavior of university students. The experimental group of 68 subjects, all elementary education majors, were exposed to a three--stage dental health motivational model: Dental Health Skills Instruction (four hours of laboratory instruction), Cognitive…

  17. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions were stored under ambient conditions, and scanned by CBCT immediately after the impressions were taken, and then at 1 hour intervals for 6 hours. After reconstructing three-dimensional digital dental models, the models were measured and the data were analyzed to determine dimensional changes according to the elapsed time. The changes within the measurement error were regarded as clinically acceptable in this study. Results All measurements showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in the elapsed time after the impressions. Although the extended-pour alginate exhibited a less decreasing tendency than the other 2 materials, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials. Changes above the measurement error occurred between the time points of 3 and 4 hours after the impressions. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that digital dental models can be obtained simply from a CBCT scan of alginate impressions without sending them to a remote laboratory. However, when the impressions are not stored under special conditions, they should be scanned immediately, or at least within 2 to 3 hours after the impressions are taken. PMID:27226958

  18. Dental anxiety among university students at the University of Tromsø: a quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Storjord, Helene Persen; Teodorsen, Mari Mjønes

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrated that dental students have a lower degree of dental anxiety compared to psychology- and biology students. Senior dental students also have less dental anxiety than junior dental students. This indicates that the dentistry programme structure may influence dental anxiety levels.

  19. Public perceptions of dental implants: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward C M

    2015-07-01

    Dental implants have become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information on dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners at various levels/disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate the public's information acquisition and their perceptions of dental implants and the effects of these on their care-seeking and decision making. A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join six focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64 years of age, had never been engaged in dentally related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, and had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered into any dental consultation regarding dental implants. All of the focus groups discussions were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following a grounded theory approach. Participants acquired information on dental implants through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected dental implants to restore the patients' appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implants as a panacea for all cases of missing teeth, overestimated their functions and longevity, and underestimated the expertise needed to carry out the clinical procedures. They were deterred from seeking dental implant treatment by the high price, invasive procedures, risks, and complications. Members of the public were exposed to information of varying quality and had some unrealistic expectations regarding dental implants. Such perceptions may shape their care-seeking behaviours and decision-making processes in one way or another. The views and experiences gathered in this qualitative study could assist clinicians to better understand the public's perspectives, facilitate constructive patient-dentist communication, and contribute

  20. Continuum damage modeling and simulation of hierarchical dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-05-01

    Dental enamel exhibits high fracture toughness and stiffness due to a complex hierarchical and graded microstructure, optimally organized from nano- to macro-scale. In this study, a 3D representative volume element (RVE) model is adopted to study the deformation and damage behavior of the fibrous microstructure. A continuum damage mechanics model coupled to hyperelasticity is developed for modeling the initiation and evolution of damage in the mineral fibers as well as protein matrix. Moreover, debonding of the interface between mineral fiber and protein is captured by employing a cohesive zone model. The dependence of the failure mechanism on the aspect ratio of the mineral fibers is investigated. In addition, the effect of the interface strength on the damage behavior is studied with respect to geometric features of enamel. Further, the effect of an initial flaw on the overall mechanical properties is analyzed to understand the superior damage tolerance of dental enamel. The simulation results are validated by comparison to experimental data from micro-cantilever beam testing at two hierarchical levels. The transition of the failure mechanism at different hierarchical levels is also well reproduced in the simulations.

  1. Digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ning; Zhong, Yicheng; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Fusong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-04-01

    A dental defect is one of the most common oral diseases, and it often requires a full crown restoration. In this clinical operation, the dentist must manually prepare the affected tooth for the full crown so that it has a convergence angle between 4° and 10°, no undercuts, and uniform and even shoulder widths and depths using a high speed diamond bur in the patient׳s mouth within one hour, which is a difficult task that requires visual-manual operation. The quality of the tooth preparation has an important effect on the success rate of the subsequent prosthodontic treatment. This study involved research into digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation. First, the margin line of the tooth preparation was designed using a semi-automatic interactive process. Second, the inserting direction was automatically computed. Then, the characteristic parameters and the constraints on the tooth preparation were defined for the model. Next, the shoulder and axial surface of the tooth preparation were formed using parametric modeling. Finally, the implicit surface of a radial basis function was used to construct the tooth preparation׳s occlusal surface. The experimental results verified that the method of digital modeling for full crown preparation proposed in this study can quickly and accurately implement personalized designs of various parameters, such as the shoulder width and the convergence angle; it provides a digital design tool for full crown preparation.

  2. Experimental study on penetration of dental implants into the maxillary sinus in different depths

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ZHONG, Weijian; CHEN, Binke; LIANG, Xin; MA, Guowu

    2013-01-01

    ...: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the dental implant penetration into the maxillary sinus cavity in different depths on osseointegration and sinus health in a dog model...

  3. Dental optical tomography with upconversion nanoparticles—a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Feixiao; Intes, Xavier

    2017-06-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have the unique ability to emit multiple colors upon excitation by near-infrared (NIR) light. Herein, we investigate the potential use of UCNPs as contrast agents for dental optical tomography, with a focus on monitoring the status of fillings after dental restoration. The potential of performing tomographic imaging using UCNP emission of visible or NIR light is established. This in silico and ex vivo study paves the way toward employing UCNPs as theranostic agents for dental applications.

  4. Dental fear-related cognitive vulnerability perceptions, dental prevention beliefs, dental visiting, and caries: a cross-sectional study in Madrid (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Diaz, Maria; Crego, Antonio; Armfield, Jason M; Romero, Martin

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the role that psychosocial elements may play concerning dental attendance and oral health in children. In particular, we explored the associations among dental fear-related cognitive vulnerability perceptions, dental prevention beliefs, the pattern of dental visits, and the number of decayed teeth. A cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 250 Spanish schoolchildren who completed a questionnaire. Oral health status was evaluated by pediatric dentists. Statistical analyses were mainly based on binary logistic regression and multiple linear regression, which allowed us to test possible associations among variables as well as interaction and mediation effects. Children with more vulnerability-related cognitions (Adj. OR = 0.74 P dental prevention beliefs (Adj. OR = 1.47 P dental prevention beliefs and cognitive vulnerability perceptions was associated with more decayed teeth (β = -0.13 P dental visit, associated with fearful and unfavorable dental prevention cognitions, accounted for 20% of the effects of these variables on dental caries. The combination of greater cognitive vulnerability-related perceptions and low awareness of the benefits of dental prevention increased the risk of dental caries. Children with this profile also tended to demonstrate a more inadequate pattern of dental attendance. Preventive oral health programs would benefit from considering the role of children's cognitions on their oral health habits and dental health. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Validation of an osteoporotic animal model for dental implant analyses: an in vivo densitometric study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Monge, Elena; Tresguerres, Isabel F; Blanco, Luis; Khraisat, Ameen; Rodríguez-Torres, Rosa; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2011-01-01

    The achievement of primary stability in porous and soft bone, where implants are more likely to fail, is one of the unresolved challenges of implant dentistry. Therefore, the aim of the study was to validate an osteoporotic animal model for analysis of poor-quality bone. Sixteen female New Zealand rabbits, each 6 months old and weighing 4 to 5 kg, were used in this study. The animals were anesthetized, and an in vivo densitometric analysis was performed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to measure bone mineral density (BMD) in the calvaria, cervical spine, and tibia. Ovariectomy was then performed, and animals were fed a low-calcium diet that featured 0.07% calcium, rather than the 0.45% calcium of a standard diet, for 6 weeks. After this period, new densitometric measurements were carried out. Two-way analysis of variance was used for statistical evaluation. A P value of less than .05 was considered to be significant. Together, ovariectomy and a low-calcium diet were able to induce a quick decrease in BMD, as measured at 6 weeks by DEXA. This decrease was statistically significant in the calvaria (P < .001) and the cervical spine (P < .05) but not in the tibia. Based upon this study, ovariectomy and a low-calcium diet are able to induce experimental osteoporosis in rabbits in a short period of time.

  6. A model of psychosocial work environment, stress, and satisfaction among dental students in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schéle, Ingrid A; Hedman, Leif R; Hammarström, Anne

    2012-09-01

    Dental students are often described as stressed. The stress has, among other things, been connected to stressors in their psychosocial environment and inconsistent feedback. The hypothesis of this study was that the psychosocial work environment in dental schools leads to stress and affects the satisfaction of dental students and that tolerance for ambiguity shields students from stress. A web-based survey was sent to the entire Swedish dental student population in clinical training (N=805); the response rate was 40 percent. Structural equation modeling used in the analyses contains four main constructs: psychosocial work environment, tolerance for ambiguity, perceived stress, and student satisfaction (χ(2)=267.437, d.f.=174, pstress and satisfaction: it accounted for almost all of the explained variance in perceived stress for women, while about half of the variance for the men was explained by tolerance for ambiguity. This study concluded that about 40 percent of the total perceived stress of these female dental students was related to their psychosocial work environment. Tolerance for ambiguity shielded men but not women from stress. An improved psychosocial work environment in dental schools would decrease the stress of both male and female dental students.

  7. Dental caries among children visiting a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky: a pooled cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases affecting a large portion of children in the United States. The prevalence of childhood dental caries in Kentucky is among the highest in the nation. The purposes of this study are to (1) compare sociodemographic differences between caries and no caries groups and (2) investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries among children who visited a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky. Methods Study...

  8. Dental implants in medically complex patients-a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Yifat; Simon, Roy; Haim, Doron; Garfunkel, Adi; Moses, Ofer

    2017-03-01

    Dental implant insertion for oral rehabilitation is a worldwide procedure for healthy and medically compromised patients. The impact of systemic disease risks on the outcome of implant therapy is unclear, since there are few if any published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The objective of this study is to investigate the rate of complications and failures following dental implantation in medically compromised patients in order to elucidate risk factors and prevent them. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from patient files treated with dental implantation between the years 2008-2014. The study group consisted of medically complex patients while the control group consisted of healthy patients. Preoperative, intraoperative, and post operative clinical details were retrieved from patients' files. The survival rate and the success rate of the dental implants were evaluated clinically and radiographically. A total of 204 patients (1003 dental implants) were included in the research, in the study group, 93 patients with 528 dental implants and in the control group, 111 patients with 475 dental implants. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding implant failures or complications. The failure rate of dental implants among the patients was 11.8 % in the study group and 16.2 % in the control group (P = 0.04). It was found that patients with a higher number of implants (mean 6.8) had failures compared with patients with a lower number of implants (mean 4.2) regardless of their health status (P dental implantation in medically complex patients and in healthy patients. Medically complex patients can undergo dental implantation. There are similar rates of complications and failures of dental implants in medically complex patients and in healthy patients.

  9. Dental anxiety in relation to neuroticism and pain sensitivity. A twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassend, Olav; Røysamb, Espen; Nielsen, Christopher S

    2011-03-01

    Predisposing personality traits as well as heightened pain sensitivity and fear of pain have been hypothesized as central factors in the development of dental anxiety. The aim of the study was to estimate the heritability of dental anxiety, and to investigate the genetic and environmental sources of covariance between dental anxiety on one hand, and pain sensitivity and the neuroticism trait on the other. A sample comprising 188 twins, aged 23-35 years (53 monozygotic and 39 dizygotic twin pairs, and 4 single twins whose co-twin did not participate), was included in the study. Measures of dental anxiety and personality were obtained using Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and the NEO Personality Inventory Revised, respectively. Heat pain and cold pressor pain sensitivity were assessed using standard pain testing procedures. Bivariate Cholesky models were employed to decompose the correlations between phenotypes into genetic and environmental factors. Using models with common additive genetic (A) and individual-specific environmental (E) factors, moderate heritability (i.e., .41) for dental anxiety was demonstrated. Virtually all of the phenotypic correlation between neuroticism and dental anxiety could be accounted for by A. Furthermore, a substantial part of the variance in dental anxiety was due to specific genetic and individual environmental influences unrelated to neuroticism. The phenotypic correlations between dental anxiety and the pain sensitivity indices were close to zero. Thus, while neuroticism and dental anxiety share a sizeable proportion of genetic (but not environmental) risk factors, the results also suggest that these two attributes are distinct entities with overlapping, but not identical, etiologies.

  10. Interface structure and strength in model dental resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard

    Most composites for dental restoration are based on a methacrylate polymer matrix and a ceramic filler, often silanized silica or silicate glasses. A problem with these composites is the polymerization shrinkage, which causes the filling to loosen from the tooth under formation of a crack....... This will facilitate discoloration by colorants from e.g. coffee and red wine entering the crack, or even worse lead to secondary caries and infection of dental pulp due to bacteria. The aim of this study was to develop a low shrinkage dental composite based on an expandable metastable zirconia filler A metastable...... the polymer shrinkage and reduces the overall shrinkage of the composite. In this thesis the zirconia filler is characterized and tested for the potential as a filler for use in dental composites. The zirconia powder is composed of highly agglomerated particles of nanosized crystals. The average particle size...

  11. Evaluating components of dental care utilization among adults with diabetes and matched controls via hurdle models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Monica

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About one-third of adults with diabetes have severe oral complications. However, limited previous research has investigated dental care utilization associated with diabetes. This project had two purposes: to develop a methodology to estimate dental care utilization using claims data and to use this methodology to compare utilization of dental care between adults with and without diabetes. Methods Data included secondary enrollment and demographic data from Washington Dental Service (WDS and Group Health Cooperative (GH, clinical data from GH, and dental-utilization data from WDS claims during 2002–2006. Dental and medical records from WDS and GH were linked for enrolees continuously and dually insured during the study. We employed hurdle models in a quasi-experimental setting to assess differences between adults with and without diabetes in 5-year cumulative utilization of dental services. Propensity score matching adjusted for differences in baseline covariates between the two groups. Results We found that adults with diabetes had lower odds of visiting a dentist (OR = 0.74, p  0.001. Among those with a dental visit, diabetes patients had lower odds of receiving prophylaxes (OR = 0.77, fillings (OR = 0.80 and crowns (OR = 0.84 (p 0.005 for all and higher odds of receiving periodontal maintenance (OR = 1.24, non-surgical periodontal procedures (OR = 1.30, extractions (OR = 1.38 and removable prosthetics (OR = 1.36 (p  Conclusions Patients with diabetes are less likely to use dental services. Those who do are less likely to use preventive care and more likely to receive periodontal care and tooth-extractions. Future research should address the possible effectiveness of additional prevention in reducing subsequent severe oral disease in patients with diabetes.

  12. Comparison of two multiaxial fatigue models applied to dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM. Ayllon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two multiaxial fatigue life prediction models applied to a commercial dental implant. One model is called Variable Initiation Length Model and takes into account both the crack initiation and propagation phases. The second model combines the Theory of Critical Distance with a critical plane damage model to characterise the initiation and initial propagation of micro/meso cracks in the material. This paper discusses which material properties are necessary for the implementation of these models and how to obtain them in the laboratory from simple test specimens. It also describes the FE models developed for the stress/strain and stress intensity factor characterisation in the implant. The results of applying both life prediction models are compared with experimental results arising from the application of ISO-14801 standard to a commercial dental implant.

  13. Integrated Medical-Dental Delivery Systems: Models in a Changing Environment and Their Implications for Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judith A; Snyder, John J; Gesko, David S; Helgeson, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Models and systems of the dental care delivery system are changing. Solo practice is no longer the only alternative for graduating dentists. Over half of recent graduates are employees, and more than ever before, dentists are practicing in groups. This trend is expected to increase over the next 25 years. This article examines various models of dental care delivery, explains why it is important to practice in integrated medical-dental teams, and defines person-centered care, contrasting it with patient-centered care. Systems of care in which teams are currently practicing integrated oral health care delivery are described, along with speculation on the future of person-centered care and the team approach. Critical steps in the education of dental and other health care professionals and the development of clinical models of care in moving forward are considered. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  14. A Study of Nutrition in Entry-Level Dental Hygiene Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Deborah L; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to document the extent of nutritional content in U.S. dental hygiene program curricula; identify program directors' opinions, perceptions, and barriers to expanding nutritional content; and evaluate if a proposed nutrition curriculum model would be beneficial. This mixed methods study involved quantitative and qualitative aspects. An invitation letter was sent to all 335 directors of entry-level U.S. dental hygiene programs. In response, 55 directors submitted nutrition course syllabi from their programs (16.4% of the total) for the quantitative analysis. In addition, 14 nutrition instructors and ten program directors were interviewed regarding their perceptions and opinions of nutrition education for dental hygiene students. All aspects of the content analysis results revealed that nutrition content in entry-level dental hygiene programs is diverse. Some programs did not include nutrition content, while others provided oral and systemic nutrition intervention subject matter. Some programs offered multiple clinical nutrition applications and patient contact opportunities while most required none. The interview results disclosed a variety of opinions and perceptions of dental hygienists' role in nutrition. Several interviewees viewed dental hygienists' role in nutrition to be an integral part of patient care, while others indicated no role or providing caries prevention counseling only. Although dental hygienists are expected to provide nutrition assessments and interventions, no standards or standardized competencies exist for nutrition in dental hygiene education. A standardized nutrition model could be beneficial for entry-level programs to ensure dental hygienists possess basic knowledge to perform nutrition assessments and intervention to address Healthy People 2020's intervention initiatives.

  15. Developing explanatory models of health inequalities in childhood dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pine, Cynthia M; Adair, Pauline M; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2004-01-01

    protocol and development of two standardised measures. First, to investigate how parental attitudes may impact on their children's oral health-related behaviours and second, to assess how dentists' attitudes may impact on the provision of dental care. SUBJECTS: Core research team, lead methodologists, 44...... consortium members from 18 countries. To complete the development of the questionnaire, the initial set of items was administered to parents (n = 23) with children in nursery schools in Dundee, Scotland and sent to the same parents one week later. A standardised measure examining barriers to providing dental...... care for children aged 3 to 6 years was developed. 20 dentists working in primary dental care in Scotland completed the measure on two different occasions separated by one week. RESULTS: Explanatory models were developed. Family questionnaire: test-retest reliability excellent (r = 0.93 p

  16. The Humanistic Approach: A Model For Dental Health Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Sue; Hurley, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A special dental health curriculum, called the Tattletooth Curriculum, demonstrates the use of the humanistic model in health education and its concern for the learner as a total person. The main concept in the development of this curriculum is that the prospect for changing behavior is unlikely unless the health information is personally…

  17. Models for Delivering School-Based Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David A.; McManus, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) often are located in high-need schools and communities. Dental service is frequently an addition to existing comprehensive services, functioning in a variety of models, configurations, and locations. SBHCs are indicated when parents have limited financial resources or inadequate health insurance, limiting…

  18. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study of a Dental Handpiece Air Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Neng; Chiang, Hsiao-Wei D.; Chang, Ya-Yi

    2011-06-01

    Dental air turbine handpieces have been widely used in clinical dentistry for over 30 years, however, little work has been reported on their performance. In dental air turbine handpieces, the types of flow channel and turbine blade shape can have very different designs. These different designs can have major influence on the torque, rotating speed, and power performance. This research is focused on the turbine blade and the flow channel designs. Using numerical simulation and experiments, the key design parameters which influence the performance of dental hand pieces can be studied. Three types of dental air turbine designs with different turbine blades, nozzle angles, nozzle flow channels, and shroud clearances were tested and analyzed. Very good agreement was demonstrated between the numerical simulation analyses and the experiments. Using the analytical model, parametric studies were performed to identify key design parameters.

  19. A study among dental students regarding the factors influenced dental students to choose dentistry as career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobichetti Palayam Jagatheeswaran AnbuSelvan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Career choice is a complex decision for students since it determines the kind of profession that they intend to pursue in life. As students try to make a career choice while in secondary school, they face the problem of matching their career choices with their abilities and school performance. Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing career choice among dental college students in private dental collages in Tamil Nadu, India. Settings and Design: The study was conducted using descriptive survey design with a population of 989 students. The data for this study was collected using a questionnaire and interview schedules. Materials and Methods: The data for this study was collected using questionnaire previously used by Swati Shah and Rajaraman and interview schedules. The analysis of the study was based on the factors: Outcome expectations, gender, personal interests, and other factors. Results and Conclusion: The most common reason for among the dental students to choose dental science as their career choice was self-interested followed by didn′t get medicine degree, prestige and gives respect. The least common reasons observed in the study population were inspired by dentists. The findings of this study indicate that availability the most influential factors affecting career choices among students.

  20. A MODEL FOR INTEGRATED SOFTWARE TO IMPROVE COMMUNICATION POLICY IN DENTAL TECHNICAL LABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko M. Milev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated marketing communications (IMC are all kinds of communications between organisations and customers, partners, other organisations and society. Aim: To develop and present an integrated software model, which can improve the effectiveness of communications in dental technical services. Material and Methods: The model of integrated software is based on recommendations of a total of 700 respondents (students of dental technology, dental physicians, dental technicians and patients of dental technical laboratories in Northeastern Bulgaria. Results and Discussion: We present the benefits of future integrated software to improve the communication policy in the dental technical laboratory that meets the needs of fast cooperation and well-built communicative network between dental physicians, dental technicians, patients and students. Conclusion: The use of integrated communications could be a powerful unified approach to improving the communication policy between all players at the market of dental technical services.

  1. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  2. Cost savings from a teledentistry model for school dental screening: an Australian health system perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estai, Mohamed; Bunt, Stuart; Kanagasingam, Yogesan; Tennant, Marc

    2017-06-05

    Objective The aim of the present study was to compare the costs of teledentistry and traditional dental screening approaches in Australian school children.Methods A cost-minimisation analysis was performed from the perspective of the oral health system, comparing the cost of dental screening in school children using a traditional visual examination approach with the cost of mid-level dental practitioners (MLDPs), such as dental therapists, screening the same cohort of children remotely using teledentistry. A model was developed to simulate the costs (over a 12-month period) of the two models of dental screening for all school children (2.7million children) aged 5-14 years across all Australian states and territories. The fixed costs and the variable costs, including staff salary, travel and accommodation costs, and cost of supply were calculated. All costs are given in Australian dollars.Results The total estimated cost of the teledentistry model was $50million. The fixed cost of teledentistry was $1million and that of staff salaries (tele-assistants, charters and their supervisors, as well as information technology support was estimated to be $49million. The estimated staff salary saved with the teledentistry model was $56million, and the estimated travel allowance and supply expenses avoided were $16million and $14million respectively; an annual reduction of $85million in total.Conclusions The present study shows that the teledentistry model of dental screening can minimise costs. The estimated savings were due primarily to the low salaries of dental therapists and the avoidance of travel and accommodation costs. Such savings could be redistributed to improve infrastructure and oral health services in rural or other underserved areas.What is known about the topic? Caries is a preventable disease, which, if it remains untreated, can cause significant morbidity requiring costly treatment. Regular dental screening and oral health education have the great potential

  3. Comparative Clinical Study of Conventional Dental Implants and Mini Dental Implants for Mandibular Overdentures: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunmeungtong, Weerapan; Kumchai, Thongnard; Strietzel, Frank P; Reichart, Peter A; Khongkhunthian, Pathawee

    2017-04-01

    Dental implant-retained overdentures have been chosen as the treatment of choice for complete mandibular removable dentures. Dental implants, such as mini dental implants, and components for retaining overdentures, are commercially available. However, comparative clinical studies comparing mini dental implants and conventional dental implants using different attachment for implant-retained overdentures have not been well documented. To compare the clinical outcomes of using two mini dental implants with Equator(®) attachments, four mini dental implants with Equator attachments, or two conventional dental implants with ball attachments, by means of a randomized clinical trial. Sixty patients received implant-retained mandibular overdentures in the interforaminal region. The patients were divided into three groups. In Groups 1 and 2, two and four mini dental implants, respectively, were placed and immediately loaded by overdentures, using Equator(®) attachments. In Group 3, conventional implants were placed. After osseointegration, the implants were loaded by overdentures, using ball attachments. The study distribution was randomized and double-blinded. Outcome measures included changes in radiological peri-implant bone level from surgery to 12 months postinsertion, prosthodontic complications and patient satisfaction. The cumulative survival rate in the three clinical groups after one year was 100%. There was no significant difference (p dental implants with Equator attachments. However, there was a significant difference in marginal bone loss and patient satisfaction between those receiving mini dental implants with Equator attachments and conventional dental implants with ball attachments. The marginal bone resorption in Group 3 was significantly higher than in Groups 1 and 2 (p dental implants can be immediately used successfully for retaining lower complete dentures, as shown after a 1-year follow up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel.

  5. Dental Implants and General Dental Practitioners of Nepal: A study of existing knowledge and need for further education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhageshwar Dhami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The use of dental implants in partially or completely edentulous patients has proved effective and an accepted treatment modality with predictable long-term success. Dental implants are becoming a popular choice for replacing the missing teeth because of increased awareness about implants both in dentists and patients. The objective of the study was to assess the basic knowledge and education about dental implants among general dental practitioners (GDPs of Nepal.Materials & Methods:  A cross sectional questionnaire was carried out among 110 GDPs which consist of twenty questions that were divided into three categories; first with some basic knowledge in implant dentistry, second with clinical knowledge of dental implants and third with dental implant education and training.Results: Out of 110 GDPs, 72.7% had basic knowledge about implant dentistry and 65.5% were not aware about advance surgical procedures like sinus lift and guided bone regeneration. All the GDPs were positive regarding more training and education in dental implants and 95.5% of them would like to incorporate dental implant treatment in their practice in future. Conclusion: GDPs should have adequate knowledge and training of dental implants which can be incorporated at undergraduate or post doctoral level so that they are skilled to provide quality dental implant therapy to their patients confidently.

  6. Evaluating Stress Level Causes by Studying Environment and Related Factors in Dental Students of Yazd Dental College in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Mirsaifi; Daneshkazemi; Sadeghian; Vosooghi

    2015-01-01

    Background Studying dentistry environment is important to assess stress causes, which is harmful for educational system. Objectives The present study was accomplished to evaluate the level of stress caused by studying environment and related factors in dental students of Yazd, IR Iran. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study accomplished on 150 dental students. Data ...

  7. Relationship between untreated dental caries and dental neglect among mentally handicapped children: A cross-sectional study

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    Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries is the most prevalent disease among mentally handicapped (MH children worldwide. Dental neglect may throw light on complex relationships between individual behavior, environmental factors, and dental caries in children. Objectives: The objective was to assess the prevalence and severity of untreated dental caries and to explore the relationship between untreated dental caries and dental neglect among MH children and healthy children in Bangalore city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study was conducted on 130, 6-17 years MH and 152 healthy school children in Bangalore city. A questionnaire on the children′s sociodemographic background, oral health-related behaviors, and dental neglect scale was completed by the parents. Caries was assessed according to World Health Organization criteria (1997. Odontogenic infections were recorded using the pufa/PUFA index. Statistical tests such as Mann-Whitney U-test, Chi-square test, Spearmans correlation, and step-wise linear regression were performed at significance level P < 0.05. Results: Dental caries was present in 89.2% of MH children as compared with 88.15% of the healthy children. Caries experience significantly correlated with consequences of untreated dental caries in both the groups (P = 0.001. No statistical significant correlation was observed between dental neglect and dental caries experience and its consequences in both the groups. Conclusions: High prevalence of dental caries and dental neglect in both the groups calls for an integrated approach. Oral health promotion and intervention programs should be targeted and concentrated toward these risk groups.

  8. A qualitative study of extended care permit dental hygienists in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delinger, Janette; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando; Williams, Karen B

    2014-06-01

    Currently, 37 states allow some type of alternative practice settings for dental hygienists. This qualitative study was designed to explore the experiences of the Extended Care Permit (ECP) dental hygienist in the state of Kansas. As a first ever study of this workforce model, a qualitative research design was chosen to illuminate the education and experiences of extended dental hygiene practitioners in order to understand the impact ECP legislation has had on increasing the public's access to oral health care services and define the advantages and limitation of this model as one potential solution to access to oral care. Snowball sampling was used to identify study participants who were actively engaged in extended care practice. Nine subjects, which included one ECP consultant and eight ECP providers, participated in this study. Data obtained via personal interviews and through document analysis data were subsequently coded and thematically analyzed by three examiners. An independent audit was conducted by a fourth examiner to confirm dependability of results. Seven major categories emerged from the data analysis: entrepreneur dental hygienist, partnerships, funding, barriers, sustainability, models of care and the impact of the ECP. The findings of this study revealed that ECP hygienists are making an impact with underserved populations, primarily children, the elderly and special needs patients. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  9. CONSUMER’S ORIENTED DENTAL SERVICE QUALITY ASSESSMENT USING THE SERVQUAL MODEL

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    Zaura Anggraeni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Consumers oriented quality in dental health services has become more important in the era of free competition. Perceived quality by the community has been closely related with their previous experience level of satisfaction on the quality of services they received. The information on the perceived quality of dental services in Indonesia has been scarce. One of the reasons is lack of standardized method in measuring the consumer’s perspective on dental quality. Using the Service Quality (Servqual model cross-sectionally, this study is to investigate differences in patterns on perceived quality of different groups of Puskesmas (government owned and Syahid clinic (private owner consumers. The analysis of Servqual Kartesius diagram was carried out to assess the quality of service, based on various criteria namely Dimesntions of Physical Tangibles, Reliability, Responsiveness, Assurance and Empathy. Results showed differences in quality perception likely due to differences in level of education and income. It was concluded that the Servqual model has been adequately practical for assessing quality dental services based on level of consumer’s satisfaction and degree of importance as measured from the consumer’s perspective. Eventuallym the results of Servqual measurements can be used as guidance for quality improvements of dental services, based different characteristics of consumers.

  10. Improving the dental fitness of the British Army by changing the strategy for dental care provision for recruits from a vertically equitable model to a horizontally equitable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Sara Jane; Tuck, Jeremy

    2007-11-01

    BACKGROUNDd: The dental health of the British Army has been reported as being in decline for the past 10 years, and this is having a significant impact on operations. One of the major factors in the decline is the increasing number of recruits who enlist with outstanding dental treatment needs. The current policy for provision of routine dental care to recruits targets resources toward those with the worst dental health and provides only emergency dental care for the remainder.AIMSs: The goal was to review recruit dental care provision, to determine whether improvements in the overall dental health of the trained Army could be made during recruit training.RESULTSs: It was found that >85% of recruit dental treatment need could be met with the routine provision of 2 hours of dental treatment during training.CONCLUSIONn: A horizontally equitable model of recruit dental care, whereby all recruits access routine dental care during training, has been recommended to and accepted by the chain of command.

  11. Bioassay studies support the potential for iatrogenic transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease through dental procedures.

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    Elizabeth Kirby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence is required to quantify the potential risks of transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob (vCJD through dental procedures. Studies, using animal models relevant to vCJD, were performed to address two questions. Firstly, whether oral tissues could become infectious following dietary exposure to BSE? Secondly, would a vCJD-contaminated dental instrument be able to transmit disease to another patient? METHODS: BSE-301V was used as a clinically relevant model for vCJD. VM-mice were challenged by injection of infected brain homogenate into the small intestine (Q1 or by five minute contact between a deliberately-contaminated dental file and the gingival margin (Q2. Ten tissues were collected from groups of challenged mice at three or four weekly intervals, respectively. Each tissue was pooled, homogenised and bioassayed in indicator mice. FINDINGS: Challenge via the small intestine gave a transmission rate of 100% (mean incubation 157±17 days. Infectivity was found in both dental pulp and the gingival margin within 3 weeks of challenge and was observed in all tissues tested within the oral cavity before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Following exposure to deliberately contaminated dental files, 97% of mice developed clinical disease (mean incubation 234±33 days. INTERPRETATION: Infectivity was higher than expected, in a wider range of oral tissues, than was allowed for in previous risk assessments. Disease was transmitted following transient exposure of the gingiva to a contaminated dental file. These observations provide evidence that dental procedures could be a route of cross-infection for vCJD and support the enforcement of single-use for certain dental instruments.

  12. A three-dimensional finite element model of the polymerization process in dental restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barink, M.; Mark, P.C. van der; Fennis, W.M.M.; Kuys, R.H.; Kreulen, C.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    Restoration of dental restorations with resin composite is hampered by shrinkage of the material during the polymerization process. In this study, we simulated the polymerization process in a detailed three-dimensional finite element model of a human upper premolar with a cusp-replacing restoration.

  13. Dental injury after conventional direct laryngoscopy: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, J; Neto, J; Luís, C; Moreno, C; Barbosa, J; Carvalho, J; Tavares, J

    2013-10-01

    This observational study assessed the frequency and risk factors of dental damage after classic direct laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation in 536 adult patients. The patients' sex, age, height, weight, dental condition, dental mobility, Mallampati class, interincisor gap, thyromental distance, neck circumference, and head and neck extension were recorded. From anaesthesia records, the difficulty of intubation, the number of attempts, type of neuromuscular blocking agent used and duration of anaesthesia were recorded. After anaesthesia, examination revealed that 134 patients (25.0%) had dental damage affecting 162 teeth (147 maxillary; 15 mandibular). Enamel fracture was the commonest injury. In tooth number 21, the interincisor gap (OR 2.5 (95% CI 1.0-5.9)) and in tooth number 22, the number of intubation attempts (OR 5.3 (95% CI 1.3-22.0)) were considered a risk factor for dental injury. Conventional direct laryngoscopy is associated with a strikingly high incidence of dental damage, although specific risk factors remain unclear. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies in dental traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens O; Andersson, Lars

    2011-08-01

    In vivo studies are sometimes needed to understand healing processes after trauma. For several reasons, not the least ethical, such studies have to be carefully planned and important considerations have to be taken into account about suitability of the experimental model, sample size and optimizing the accuracy of the analysis. Several manuscripts of in vivo studies are submitted for publication to Dental Traumatology and rejected because of inadequate design, methodology or insufficient documentation of the results. The authors have substantial experience in experimental in vivo studies of tissue healing in dental traumatology and share their knowledge regarding critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies.

  15. Different study conditions between dental students in China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Yi, Zhe; Wang, Xu; Jinno, Yohei; Zhang, Xinwen; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ai, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the study conditions of dental students towards dental education in China and Japan. 60 students from the Stomatology School of China Medical University and 51 students from the Dental Faculty of Kyushu University, Japan, participated in this study. Information was derived from a self-answered questionnaire consisting of 10 items. More Japanese students (60%) compared to Chinese students (28%) were satisfied with their lives in dental school. For the main reason of discontent, 23.5% of the Japanese students attributed to busy study and lacking of spare time, while 38.3% of the Chinese students indicated small campus lacking of infrastructure. Both students of two countries think they were in big pressure. The main stressor of Japanese students was the examination, but that of Chinese students was anxiety of their future and obtains employment. The main source of tuition and maintenance was family in the both countries, but more Japanese students (25.5%) were dependent on scholarship compared with Chinese students (3.3%). The findings from this study enhance our understanding of study conditions among dental students and help to define strategies to improve student management in both Japan and China.

  16. Neurological symptoms among dental assistants: a cross-sectional study

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    Hollund BE

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental assistants help the dentist in preparing material for filling teeth. Amalgam was the filling material mostly commonly used in Norway before 1980, and declined to about 5% of all fillings in 2005. Amalgam is usually an alloy of silver, copper, tin and mercury. Copper amalgam, giving particularly high exposure to mercury was used in Norway until 1994. Metallic mercury is neurotoxic. Few studies of the health of dental assistants exist, despite their exposure to mercury. There are questions about the existence of possible chronic neurological symptoms today within this working group, due to this exposure. The aim of this study was to compare the occurrence of neurological symptoms among dental assistants likely to be exposed to mercury from work with dental filling material, compared to similar health personnel with no such exposure. Methods All dental assistants still at work and born before 1970 registered in the archives of a trade union in Hordaland county of Norway were invited to participate (response rate 68%, n = 41, as well as a similar number of randomly selected assistant nurses (response rate 87%, n = 64 in the same age group. The participants completed a self-administered, mailed questionnaire, with questions about demographic variables, life-style factors, musculoskeletal, neurological and psychosomatic symptoms (Euroquest. Results The dental assistants reported significant higher occurrence of neurological symptoms; psychosomatic symptoms, problems with memory, concentration, fatigue and sleep disturbance, but not for mood. This was found by analyses of variance, adjusting for age, education, alcohol consumption, smoking and personality traits. For each specific neurological symptom, adjusted logistic regression analyses were performed, showing that these symptoms were mainly from arms, hands, legs and balance organs. Conclusion There is a possibility that the higher occurrence of neurological symptoms

  17. CONSIDERATIONS UPON CONTACT STRESS MODELLING IN DENTAL ARTICULATOR PAIRS

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    Carmen Ciornei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A dental articulator is a mechanism which simulates the temporo-mandibular joint. The articulator is essential as it replicates the basic motions of the upper and lower mandibles, both revolve and translational motions. In the present paper the stresses from an articulator TMJ modelled as a bronze sphere into a cylindrical steel cavity are analyzed by two methods, first applying the Hertzian contact theory and then numerically, by means of finite element analysis using the simulation module in CATIA.

  18. A model for forensic dental education in the predoctoral dental school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Kenneth P; Johnson, J Dane

    2012-05-01

    Forensic odontologists play an important role locally and nationally in assisting in the identification of the victims of mass fatality incidents, whether natural or human-made. With the recent passage of legislation by Congress identifying dentists as a first-responder resource, knowledge of their expanding role in disaster response is particularly important. The purpose of this article is to describe the forensic dental course being taught at Creighton University School of Dentistry in Omaha, Nebraska, as a model for providing a fundamental education in forensic dentistry and disaster preparedness at the predoctoral dental level. This model is designed to 1) provide students with a broad view of forensic odontology; 2) give them a functional knowledge of the tools and techniques of the modern forensic dentist; 3) provide basic knowledge of their potential role in disaster preparedness and response; and 4) encourage students to pursue further forensic education, become active in national forensic organizations, and get involved in disaster preparedness/response in their home communities following graduation. This article includes lecture topics, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises being used at Creighton to teach students the fundamentals of forensic odontology and disaster preparedness.

  19. [Association between malocclusion and dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance: study with Brazilian adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Carolina Marques; Peres, Marco Aurélio; Peres, Karen Glazer

    2010-12-01

    In spite of the high prevalence of malocclusion in adolescents reported worldwide, there are few studies that have investigated the association between normative malocclusion and self-rated dental and gingival appearance among adolescents. The aim of this study was to identify the association between normative malocclusion and dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance among Brazilian adolescents. A cross-sectional study was carried out with adolescents aged 15 to 19 years (n= 16,126) living in 250 towns of all five Brazilian regions. Dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance was the outcome. The main explanatory variable was malocclusion assessed by using the Dental Aesthetic Index - DAI. The other explanatory variables included were per capita family income, schooling delay, study conditions, sex, age, skin color, dental outcomes (untreated dental caries, missing teeth due dental caries, dental calculus, fluorosis, and dental pain) and use of dental services. Simple and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were performed. Dissatisfaction with dental appearance reached 11.4% (95%CI: 10.4-12.5) of the entire sample. All levels of malocclusion were associated with dissatisfaction with dental appearance. Adjusted multivariable analysis showed that dissatisfaction with dental appearance among individuals affected by severe or very severe malocclusion was respectively 40% and 80% higher than among those with normal occlusion. Malocclusion was associated with dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance. The results contribute to include self-rated dental appearance criteria in orthodontic treatment decision, mainly within the National Health System - SUS.

  20. Dental Prophylaxis and Osteoradionecrosis: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C T; Liu, S P; Muo, C H; Tsai, C H; Huang, Y F

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of different dental prophylactic modalities and osteoradionecrosis (ORN) and determine the risk of ORN under different timing periods of scaling, with the use chlorhexidine mouth rinse after surgery and with different strategies of fluoride gel application in head and neck cancer (HNC) participants. A cohort of 18,231 HNC participants, including 941 ORN patients and 17,290 matched control cases, were enrolled from a Longitudinal Health Insurance Database for Catastrophic Illness Patients (LHID-CIP) in Taiwan. Based on different dental prophylactic modalities before radiotherapy, including chlorhexidine mouth rinse, scaling, and fluoride gel, all HNC subjects were stratified into different groups. The Cox proportional hazard regression was used to compare ORN incidences under different dental prophylactic modalities. The results revealed that scaling and chlorhexidine mouth rinse were significantly related to ORN risk ( P = 0.004 and P risk by 2.43-fold among oral cancer patients, regardless of whether they had received major oral surgery or not. Oral cancer patients receiving scaling within 2 wk before radiotherapy increased their incidence of ORN by 1.28-fold compared with patients who had not undergone scaling within 6 mo. There is no significance of fluoride application for dental prophylaxis in increasing ORN occurrence. In conclusion, dental prophylaxis before radiotherapy is strongly correlated to ORN in HNC patients. Chlorhexidine exposure and dental scaling within 2 wk before radiotherapy is significantly related to ORN risk, especially in oral cancer patients. The use of 1.1% NaF topical application did not significantly increase the risk of ORN in HNC patients. An optimal dental prophylaxis protocol to reduce ORN should concern cancer location, cautious prescription of chlorhexidine mouth rinse, and proper timing of scaling.

  1. Use of dental adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Piva, Evandro; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Resin adhesives (RA) have been applied between resin composite (RC) increments, but there is no consensus on the impact of this technique on the properties of the final restoration. This study evaluated the effect of the presence of RA between RC layers on physical properties, translucency and long-term color stability of the restorative material. Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose (bond, 3M ESPE) and Adper™ Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) were used as RA, and Filtek™ Z350 (3M ESPE) as RC. Specimens containing RA were prepared by applying 3 layers of the adhesive between 4 increments of RC; adhesive-free specimens were also used (control). Tests of water sorption and solubility, mechanical performance (microtensile cohesive strength, flexural strength, and flexural modulus, after immediate and long-term water storage), and translucency and color stability (after immediate and 1, 7, 90, and 180 days of water or wine storage) were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were also taken from the fractured specimens (flexural strength test). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (padhesive resin (SBMP). This study is the first to show positive results from the use of resin adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composite, which is common in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy and tolerability studies evaluating a sleep aid and analgesic combination of naproxen sodium and diphenhydramine in the dental impaction pain model in subjects with induced transient insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S; Laurora, I; Wang, Y; Venkataraman, P; An, R; Roth, T

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of novel combination naproxen sodium (NS) and diphenhydramine (DPH) in subjects with postoperative dental pain along with transient insomnia induced by 5 h sleep phase advance. The present studies aimed to demonstrate the added benefit and optimal dosages of the combination product over individual ingredients alone in improving sleep and pain. Each of the two studies was a two-centre, randomised, double-blind and double-dummy trial. In the first study, subjects were randomised into one of the following treatment arms: NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 220 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. In the second study, subjects received either NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. The co-primary end-points in both studies were wake time after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep latency (SL) measured by actigraphy. Other secondary sleep and pain end-points were also assessed. The intent-to-treat population included 712 and 267 subjects from studies one and two, respectively. In the first study, only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination showed significant improvements in both WASO vs. NS alone (-70.3 min p = 0.0002) and SL vs. DPH alone (25.50 and 41.50 min respectively, p sleep latency vs. DPH 50 mg and sleep maintenance (WASO) vs. NS 440 mg. There were no serious or unexpected adverse events reported in either study. NCT01280591 (study 1); NCT01495858 (study 2). © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Awareness of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai: A knowledge, attitude, practice study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethi, S; Einstein, A; Sivapathasundharam, B

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the study is to analyze the knowledge, attitude and practice of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 322 dental practitioners in Chennai and data was collected by means of a questionnaire. Twenty-one percent of the dental practitioners did not maintain dental records in their clinic/workplace, with only 12% of the practitioners maintaining complete records. Ninety-three percent of dental practitioners were not maintaining dental records for more than seven years. The significance of ante-mortem records in identifying deceased suspects was not known to 17% of the dental practitioners. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were not aware of child abuse and the actions to be taken. Dental age estimation was not known to 41% of the dental practitioners. Thirty-eight percent of the practitioners were unaware of the accurate method of individual identification. About 18% of the dental practitioners did not know the significance of bite mark patterns of the teeth. Ninety-three percent of the practitioners lacked formal training in collecting, evaluating and presenting dental evidence. Thirty percent of dental practitioners did not know they can testify as an expert witness in the court of law. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were unaware of identifying the age and gender of an individual in mass disasters. Our study revealed inadequate knowledge, poor attitude and lack of practice of forensic odontology prevailing among the dental practitioners in Chennai.

  4. Terahertz pulsed imaging study of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagoz, Burcu; Altan, Hakan; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç

    2015-07-01

    Current diagnostic techniques in dentistry rely predominantly on X-rays to monitor dental caries. Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI) has great potential for medical applications since it is a nondestructive imaging method. It does not cause any ionization hazard on biological samples due to low energy of THz radiation. Even though it is strongly absorbed by water which exhibits very unique chemical and physical properties that contribute to strong interaction with THz radiation, teeth can still be investigated in three dimensions. Recent investigations suggest that this method can be used in the early identification of dental diseases and imperfections in the tooth structure without the hazards of using techniques which rely on x-rays. We constructed a continuous wave (CW) and time-domain reflection mode raster scan THz imaging system that enables us to investigate various teeth samples in two or three dimensions. The samples comprised of either slices of individual tooth samples or rows of teeth embedded in wax, and the imaging was done by scanning the sample across the focus of the THz beam. 2D images were generated by acquiring the intensity of the THz radiation at each pixel, while 3D images were generated by collecting the amplitude of the reflected signal at each pixel. After analyzing the measurements in both the spatial and frequency domains, the results suggest that the THz pulse is sensitive to variations in the structure of the samples that suggest that this method can be useful in detecting the presence of caries.

  5. Mathematical modelling of tooth demineralisation and pH profiles in dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Olga; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Picioreanu, Cristian

    2012-09-21

    A mathematical model of dental plaque has been developed in order to investigate the processes leading to dental caries. The one-dimensional time-dependent model integrates existing knowledge on biofilm processes (mass transfer, microbial composition, microbial conversions and substrate availability) with tooth demineralisation kinetics. This work is based on the pioneering studies of Dibdin who, nearly two decades ago, build a mathematical model roughly describing the metabolic processes taking place in dental plaque. We extended Dibdin's model with: multiple microbial species (aciduric and non-aciduric Streptococci, Actinomyces and Veillonella), more metabolic processes (i.e., aerobic and anaerobic glucose conversion, low and high glucose uptake affinity pathways, formation and consumption of storage compounds), ion transport by Nernst-Planck equations, and we coupled the obtained pH and chemical component gradients inside the plaque with tooth demineralisation. The new model implementation was complemented with faster and more rigorous numerical methods for the model solution. Model results confirm the protective effect of Veillonella due to lactate consumption. Interestingly, on short term, the storage compounds may not necessarily have a negative effect on demineralisation. Individual feeding patterns can also be easily studied with this model. For example, slow ("social") consumption of sugar-containing drinks proves to be more harmful than drinking the same amount over a short period of time.

  6. Video modelling and reducing anxiety related to dental injections - a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Namankany, A; Petrie, A; Ashley, P

    2014-06-01

    This study was part of a successfully completed PhD and was presented at the IADR/AADR General Session (2013) in Seattle, Washington, USA. The report of this clinical trial conforms to the CONSORT statement. A randomised controlled trial to investigate if video modelling can influence a child's anxiety before the administration of local anaesthesia (LA). A sample of 180 (6- to 12-year-old) children due to have dental treatments under LA were randomly allocated to the modelling video or the control video (oral hygiene instruction). The level of anxiety was recorded before and after watching the video on the Abeer Children Dental Anxiety Scale (ACDAS) and the child's ability to cope with the subsequent procedure was assessed on the visual analogue scale (VAS). A two group chi-square test was used as the basis for the sample size calculation; a significance level of 0.025 was chosen rather than the conventional 0.05 to avoid spurious results arising from multiple testing. Children in the test group had significantly less anxiety after watching the video than children in the control group throughout the subsequent dental procedure; in particular at the time of the LA administration (p Video modelling appeared to be effective at reducing dental anxiety and has a significant impact on needle phobia in children.

  7. A retrospective study of traumatic dental injuries in a Brazilian dental trauma clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, A F; Burgos, M E

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyse data from the records of patients seen in the dental trauma emergency clinic in a general hospital in the city of Recife, Brazil, during the years 1997-1999, according to sex, age, cause, number of injured teeth, type of tooth and type of trauma. The records of all patients seen by dentists were collected. Altogether, 250 patients from 1 to 59 years of age presenting 403 dental injuries were examined and/or treated. The causes of dento-alveolar trauma were classified in five categories: home injuries, street injuries, school injuries, sports activities, violence. The type of trauma was classified by dentists working at the dental trauma clinic on the basis of Andreasen's classification. The gender difference in the number of cases of trauma was statistically significant (males 63.2% vs females 36.8) (PTrauma caused by violence was found to be statistically significant in the 6-15 years age group (P<0.0005).

  8. USE OF ORTHOPANTOMOGRAM IN DENTAL PRACTICE – A STATISTICAL STUDY

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    Mioara Decusara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The orthopantomogram is a very useful additional examination in dentistry, as a tool for the diagnosis and treatment plan, with medical-legal importance, assessing the health status of the dento-maxillary apparatus. As a long-time, non-degradable document, it shows the evolution of the therapy applied in various dental specialities, permitting checking of the prognosis of the detected disease. The present study aims at investigating the usability of this dental radiographic examination in the actual Romanian dental practice, based on an original questionnaire completed by 558 dentists, which gives a response rate of 3.9%. The collected data were loaded electronically and processed statistically using Excel and SPSS, the threshold limit of statistical significance used being p> 0.05.

  9. Natural history and long-term impact of dental fluorosis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Loc G; Ha, Diep H; Spencer, A John

    2016-01-18

    The study assessed longitudinal changes in the presentation of dental fluorosis and evaluated the impact of fluorosis on the perception of oral health among young adults. Prospective follow-up study during 2011-12 of a population-based study in South Australia conducted between 2003 and 2004. 8-13-year-old children initially examined in 2003 and 2004. Dental fluorosis was assessed with the Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF) Index. The impact on perceptions of oral health by the study participants and their parents was assessed with the Global Rating of Oral Health (GROH). Pairwise comparative analysis of the presentation of fluorosis was conducted at the individual and tooth levels. Multivariable models of changes in fluorosis were generated. An ordinal logistic regression model was used to evaluate the association between GROH with dental fluorosis, caries and other factors. A total of 314 participants completed the follow-up questionnaires and dental examination. Over 60% of teeth scored as TF 1 at baseline were scored as TF 0 at follow-up; 66% of teeth scored as TF 2 or 3 at baseline were scored as TF 0 or 1 at follow-up. In multivariable models, changes in fluorosis were not significantly associated with socio-economic factors or oral health behaviours, confirming that they were the result of a natural process. Perceptions of poor oral health were significantly associated with the number of untreated decayed tooth surfaces at follow-up, but not with fluorosis. Very mild and mild dental fluorosis diminished with time. Dental fluorosis did not have a negative impact on perceptions of oral health.

  10. Immortalized gingival fibroblasts as a cytotoxicity test model for dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeperuma, Rasika P; Park, Young J; Kim, Jin M; Bae, Jung Y; Che, Zhong M; Son, Hwa K; Han, Mi R; Kim, Kwang M; Kim, Jin

    2012-03-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity test is an initial step to identify the harmful effects of new dental materials. Aim of this study was to develop a stable human cell line derived from normal gingival fibroblasts (hNOF) and to assess its feasibility in in vitro cytotoxicity testing. Immortalized human gingival fibroblasts (hTERT-hNOF) were successfully established with human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene transfection, preserving its phenotypical characteristics, replicative potential and biological properties. Utilizing standard cytotoxicity test modeling and dental materials, hTERT-hNOF were evaluated for their feasibility in cytotoxicity testing, compared with hNOF and L929 cells. Similar pattern of cytotoxic response was observed among hNOF, hTERT-hNOF and L929 cells. Cytotoxicity response of hTERT-hNOF was significantly similar to hNOF, moreover hTERT-hNOF and hNOF were found to be more sensitive towards the tested dental materials compared to L929 cells. This study suggested that hTERT-hNOF is an effective cytotoxic test model for dental materials.

  11. Thermocamera studies of nitrous oxide dispersion in the dental surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, P.; Hallen, B.; Hallonsten, A.L.; Ljungqvist, B.

    1983-06-01

    Nitrous oxide is used in dentistry for sedation and analgesia. Chronic occupational exposure of dental personnel to trace concentrations of nitrous oxide has been reported as a potential health hazard. A new application of the thermocamera technique was used to study the dispersion of nitrous oxide during dental analgesia. Four breathing systems with different evacuation systems were tested and found to vary in scavenging efficiency. A local exhaust system ensured minimal exposure when nitrous oxide leaks contaminating the air in the dentist's breathing zone occur.

  12. A study of association between dental health status and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Gupta

    2013-08-01

    Results: In the study the prevalence of dental caries, gingivitis and periodontal disease were 90%, 98% and 90.33% respectively. The antenatal cases with poor oral hygiene were 2.5 times more likely to have dental caries. OR 0.0138, 95% CI (0.0033 to 0.0570 Z statistic 5.908, P<0.0001.The antenatal cases with poor oral hygiene were 20 times more likely to have gingivitis (OR 0.0045, 95% CI (0.0006-0.0365 Z statistic 5.077, P<0.0001. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(4.000: 521-523

  13. Caregiver's education level and child's dental caries in African Americans: A path analytic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heima, Masahiro; Lee, Wonik; Milgrom, Peter; Nelson, Suchitra

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of caregiver education level on children's dental caries mediated by both caregiver and child oral health behaviors. Participants were 423 low-income African American kindergarteners and their caregivers who were part of a school-based randomized clinical trial. Path analysis tested the hypothesis that caregiver education level affected untreated dental caries and cumulative overall caries experience (decayed or filled teeth) through the mediating influence of frequency of dental visits, use of routine care, and frequency of toothbrushing for both caregiver and child. The results supported the hypothesis: Caregivers who completed high school were 1.76 times more likely to visit dentists themselves compared with those who did not complete high school (e0.56=1.76, 95%CI: 1.03-2.99), which in turn was associated with 5.78 times greater odds of dental visits among their children (e1.76=5.78, 95%CI: 3.53-9.48). Children's dental visits, subsequently, were associated with 26% fewer untreated decayed teeth compared with children without dental visits (e-0.31=0.74, 95%CI: 0.60-0.91). However, this path was not present in the model with overall caries experience. Additionally, caregiver education level was directly associated with 34% less untreated decayed teeth (e-0.42=0.66, 95% CI: 0.54-0.79) and 28% less decayed or filled teeth (e-0.32=0.72, 95%CI: 0.60-0.88) among the children. This study overcomes important conceptual and analytic limitations in the existing literature. The findings confirm the role of caregiver education in child dental caries and indicate that caregiver's behavioral factors are important mediators of child oral health. PMID:25661111

  14. The Embedded Counseling Model: An Application to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David Francis

    2017-01-01

    Prior research has suggested that dental students experience high rates of stress, anxiety, and mood concerns, which have been linked to poor academic performance, health concerns, and substance abuse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an embedded counseling office at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics in its first three academic semesters. Data were gathered from students attending appointments, and two inventories were used to monitor students' counseling progress and gather psychological outcomes data: the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34 (CCAPS-34) and the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). In the three semesters, 55 students attended 251 counseling appointments, with an average of 4.5 appointments per student. Their presenting psychological concerns included academic concerns, time management, test anxiety, study skills, low self-esteem, self-care, interpersonal conflicts, anxiety, depression, stress management, sexual concerns, substance abuse, eating/body image concerns, work-life balance, and financial issues. The CCAPS-34 data showed that, at initial clinical assessment, students experienced moderate levels of depression, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, academic distress, and overall psychological distress; 45 (82%) showed clinically significant symptoms on at least one CCAPS-34 subscale. The ORS data further showed that the students entered counseling experiencing high levels of psychological distress. A positive relationship was found between number of counseling appointments and increased overall functioning. These results suggest that an embedded counseling office can help dental schools meet the needs of their students.

  15. Monitoring dental erosion by colour measurement : An in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, J. B.; Zijp, J. R.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a method to monitor dental erosion by evaluation of the colour change of teeth as a function of enamel loss, and to evaluate the reproducibility of the method used. Methods: Light reflectance spectra of 12 extracted human incisors were measured using

  16. Dental trauma in association with maxillofacial fractures: an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruslin, M.; Wolff, J.; Boffano, P.; Brand, H.S.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate the incidence and associated factors of dental trauma in patients with maxillofacial fractures at the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam. Material and methods Data from 707 patients who were treated surgically for maxillofacial fractures were

  17. Modelling dental implant extraction by pullout and torque procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A; Shemtov-Yona, K

    2017-07-01

    Dental implants extraction, achieved either by applying torque or pullout force, is used to estimate the bone-implant interfacial strength. A detailed description of the mechanical and physical aspects of the extraction process in the literature is still missing. This paper presents 3D nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations of a commercial implant extraction process from the mandible bone. Emphasis is put on the typical load-displacement and torque-angle relationships for various types of cortical and trabecular bone strengths. The simulations also study of the influence of the osseointegration level on those relationships. This is done by simulating implant extraction right after insertion when interfacial frictional contact exists between the implant and bone, and long after insertion, assuming that the implant is fully bonded to the bone. The model does not include a separate representation and model of the interfacial layer for which available data is limited. The obtained relationships show that the higher the strength of the trabecular bone the higher the peak extraction force, while for application of torque, it is the cortical bone which might dictate the peak torque value. Information on the relative strength contrast of the cortical and trabecular components, as well as the progressive nature of the damage evolution, can be revealed from the obtained relations. It is shown that full osseointegration might multiply the peak and average load values by a factor 3-12 although the calculated work of extraction varies only by a factor of 1.5. From a quantitative point of view, it is suggested that, as an alternative to reporting peak load or torque values, an average value derived from the extraction work be used to better characterize the bone-implant interfacial strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cross-sectional study of preventive dental knowledge among adult patients seeking dental care in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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    Salwa A. AlSadhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the current knowledge about oral health and preventive dentistry among adults seeking dental care in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in which 900 questionnaires were randomly distributed to adults seeking dental care in all health settings in Riyadh; 450 questionnaires were distributed in each of the governmental and the private sectors. The questionnaire included questions regarding socio-demographic factors (age, education, occupation, etc and others concerning the patient’s knowledge of preventive dental measures; the oral hygiene procedures, fluoride and sealant applications and the healthy dietary habits. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS and simple descriptive statistics as means and frequency distributions were calculated for the study variables. Comparisons were performed using Chi-square test. Results: Eighty-six percent of the study subjects knew that dental caries could be prevented. Almost 59% were aware of the relation between frequency of sugar intake and dental caries. The prevalence of patients who knew that fluoride prevents dental caries was 50.3%, however, only 34.2% reported previous applications of topical fluoride in dental clinics. About 16% of the participants had received fissure sealants although 42.4% knew about them. The study sample’s dietary knowledge had statistically significant relations with education and occupation (p < 0.0001. Correct knowledge of visiting the dental clinic was statistically significantly related to education (p < 0.0001. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the majority of adults in Riyadh have the correct preventive dental knowledge, which is mostly related to the individuals’ educational level and occupation.

  19. Dental Hygienists' Experiences with Motivational Interviewing: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry-Chiu, Margaret E; Catley, Delwyn; Voelker, Marsha A; Bray, Kimberly Krust

    2015-08-01

    The effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) to change health behaviors is well documented. Previous studies support use of MI to change oral health behaviors in the areas of early childhood caries and periodontal diseases, but research is limited due to the sparse number of oral health care providers with training in MI. The University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) formally integrated MI training into its dental hygiene curriculum five years ago. Summative program evaluation of UMKC's MI training shows that it effectively equips graduates with MI skills. The aim of this qualitative study was to use semi-structured interviews with nine program alumni to provide insight into the experiences of MI-trained dental hygienists in clinical practice. All interviews were captured with a digital voice recorder, were transcribed, and were resubmitted to the interviewees for checking. Five themes emerged from the data analysis: salience, best practices, barriers, facilitators, and lessons learned. These dental hygienists strongly valued and embraced the spirit of MI. They reported feeling strongly that it should be part of all dental hygiene curricula, and they upheld MI as a best practice. The participants approved of their MI instruction as a whole but felt it was difficult and sometimes not viable in practice. They reported that MI training had improved their communication skills and increased treatment acceptance. Time, difficulty, and managing patient resistance were the most often cited barriers, while a supportive climate and creating a routine were the most often cited facilitators.

  20. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  1. Evaluation of a Local Anesthesia Simulation Model with Dental Students as Novice Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica S; Graham, Roseanna; Bassiur, Jennifer P; Lichtenthal, Richard M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a local anesthesia (LA) simulation model in a facilitated small group setting before dental students administered an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for the first time. For this pilot study, 60 dental students transitioning from preclinical to clinical education were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (N=30) that participated in a small group session using the simulation model or a control group (N=30). After administering local anesthesia for the first time, students in both groups were given questionnaires regarding levels of preparedness and confidence when administering an IANB and level of anesthesia effectiveness and pain when receiving an IANB. Students in the experimental group exhibited a positive difference on all six questions regarding preparedness and confidence when administering LA to another student. One of these six questions ("I was prepared in administering local anesthesia for the first time") showed a statistically significant difference (pStudents who received LA from students who practiced on the simulation model also experienced fewer post-injection complications one day after receiving the IANB, including a statistically significant reduction in trismus. No statistically significant difference was found in level of effectiveness of the IANB or perceived levels of pain between the two groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that using a local anesthesia simulation model may be beneficial in increasing a dental student's level of comfort prior to administering local anesthesia for the first time.

  2. Pioneering Strategies for Relieving Dental Anxiety in Hearing Impaired Children: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Shalini; Madu, Ghanashyam Prasad; Ambati, Naga Radhakrishna; Suravarapu, Pavani Reddy; Uppu, Kalyani; Bolla, Deepthi

    2017-06-01

    Hearing impaired children have a problem in understanding and comprehending with dental treatments. Visual language is the sensible answer of how to improve communication with them. To evaluate the applicability of dental sign language in Hearing impaired children in relieving anxiety during stressful dental treatment by improving their means of communication. This randomized clinical trial was carried out in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry which included 40 Hearing Impaired children meeting inclusion criteria. The selected children were randomly divided into the study and control group comprising of 20 each. In the control group, initial oral examination and dental treatment (oral prophylaxis and class I restoration) were performed without the use of dental sign language. In the study group, the dental sign language specific to dental treatment was educated and during their subsequent visit to the dental clinic after dental sign language reinforcement, oral prophylaxis and class I restoration were done. Subjective and objective measurements of anxiety were recorded for both groups using facial image scale (FIS), pulse oximeter and electronic blood pressure apparatus to compare for correlation. The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. There was a statistically significant reduction in the anxiety levels (pcontrol group. Dental sign language was effective in reducing the level of anxiety in children who are hard of hearing. Dental sign language was able to improve behavior positively during dental treatment and may also aid in developing a positive dental attitude among children who are hard of hearing.

  3. Oynophagia in patients after dental extraction: surface electromyography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Nahlieli, Oded; Eliav, Eli

    2006-10-17

    Surface electromyographic (sEMG) studies were performed on 40 adult patients following extraction of lower third and second molars to research the approach and limitations of sEMG evaluation of their odynophagia complaints. Parameters evaluated during swallowing and drinking include the timing, number of swallows per 100 cc of water, and range (amplitude) of EMG activity of m. masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular group. The above mentioned variables (mean + standard deviation) were measured for the group of dental patients (n = 40) and control group of healthy adults (n = 40). The duration of swallows and drinking in all tests showed increase in dental patients' group, in which this tendency is statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between male and female adults' duration and amplitude of muscle activity during continuous drinking in both groups (p = 0.05). The mean of electric activity (in muV) of m. masseter was significantly lower in the dental patients' group in comparison with control group. The electric activity of submental-submandimular and infrahyoid muscle groups was the same in both groups. Surface EMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable noninvasive method for evaluation of odynophagia/dysphagia complaints following dental extraction with low level of discomfort of the examination. The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group. This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect. The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and in EMG monitoring during treatment of post-surgical oral

  4. Oynophagia in patients after dental extraction: surface electromyography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahlieli Oded

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Surface electromyographic (sEMG studies were performed on 40 adult patients following extraction of lower third and second molars to research the approach and limitations of sEMG evaluation of their odynophagia complaints. Methods Parameters evaluated during swallowing and drinking include the timing, number of swallows per 100 cc of water, and range (amplitude of EMG activity of m. masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular group. The above mentioned variables (mean + standard deviation were measured for the group of dental patients (n = 40 and control group of healthy adults (n = 40. Results The duration of swallows and drinking in all tests showed increase in dental patients' group, in which this tendency is statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between male and female adults' duration and amplitude of muscle activity during continuous drinking in both groups (p = 0.05. The mean of electric activity (in μV of m. masseter was significantly lower in the dental patients' group in comparison with control group. The electric activity of submental-submandimular and infrahyoid muscle groups was the same in both groups. Conclusion Surface EMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable noninvasive method for evaluation of odynophagia/dysphagia complaints following dental extraction with low level of discomfort of the examination. The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group. This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect. The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and

  5. Comparison of linear and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models for appraisal of risk factors associated with dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Batra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dental caries among children has been described as a pandemic disease with a multifactorial nature. Various sociodemographic factors and oral hygiene practices are commonly tested for their influence on dental caries. In recent years, a recent statistical model that allows for covariate adjustment has been developed and is commonly referred zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB models. Aim: To compare the fit of the two models, the conventional linear regression (LR model and ZINB model to assess the risk factors associated with dental caries. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 1138 12-year-old school children in Moradabad Town, Uttar Pradesh during months of February-August 2014. Selected participants were interviewed using a questionnaire. Dental caries was assessed by recording decayed, missing, or filled teeth (DMFT index. Statistical Analysis Used: To assess the risk factor associated with dental caries in children, two approaches have been applied - LR model and ZINB model. Results: The prevalence of caries-free subjects was 24.1%, and mean DMFT was 3.4 ± 1.8. In LR model, all the variables were statistically significant. Whereas in ZINB model, negative binomial part showed place of residence, father′s education level, tooth brushing frequency, and dental visit statistically significant implying that the degree of being caries-free (DMFT = 0 increases for group of children who are living in urban, whose father is university pass out, who brushes twice a day and if have ever visited a dentist. Conclusion: The current study report that the LR model is a poorly fitted model and may lead to spurious conclusions whereas ZINB model has shown better goodness of fit (Akaike information criterion values - LR: 3.94; ZINB: 2.39 and can be preferred if high variance and number of an excess of zeroes are present.

  6. Teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice for dental hygienists: an innovative oral health workforce model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfelt, Fred F

    2011-06-01

    The 2010 U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) calls for training programs to develop mid-level dental health care providers to work in areas with underserved populations. In 2004, legislation was passed in Arizona allowing qualified dental hygienists to enter into an affiliated practice relationship with a dentist to provide oral health care services for underserved populations without general or direct supervision in public health settings. In response, the Northern Arizona University (NAU) Dental Hygiene Department developed a teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice dental hygiene model that places a dental hygienist in the role of the mid-level practitioner as part of a digitally linked oral health care team. Utilizing current technologies, affiliated practice dental hygienists can digitally acquire and transmit diagnostic data to a distant dentist for triage, diagnosis, and patient referral in addition to providing preventive services permitted within the dental hygiene scope of practice. This article provides information about the PPACA and the Arizona affiliated practice dental hygiene model, defines teledentistry, identifies the digital equipment used in NAU's teledentistry model, give an overview of NAU's teledentistry training, describes NAU's first teledentistry clinical experience, presents statistical analyses and evaluation of NAU students' ability to acquire diagnostically efficacious digital data from remote locations, and summarizes details of remote applications of teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice dental hygiene workforce model successes.

  7. Dental Hygienists' Perceptions of Preparedness for Clinical Practice: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Lezlie M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify, compile, and describe how community college graduate dental hygienists perceived their initial dental hygiene curriculum preparation and how they subsequently adapted their curriculum preparation in order to perform their responsibilities in their first clinical dental hygiene job.…

  8. The Diversity Dilemma: A National Study of Minorities in Dental Hygiene Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tracye A.

    2012-01-01

    Given the predicted shortages of minority dental healthcare providers in the United States and the expanding diversity of the general population, it is important to recruit and retain an ethnically and culturally diverse allied dental workforce. The objectives of this study were to explore why the profession of dental hygiene exhibits minimal…

  9. Dental Hygienists' Perceptions of Preparedness for Clinical Practice: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Lezlie M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify, compile, and describe how community college graduate dental hygienists perceived their initial dental hygiene curriculum preparation and how they subsequently adapted their curriculum preparation in order to perform their responsibilities in their first clinical dental hygiene job.…

  10. The Diversity Dilemma: A National Study of Minorities in Dental Hygiene Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tracye A.

    2012-01-01

    Given the predicted shortages of minority dental healthcare providers in the United States and the expanding diversity of the general population, it is important to recruit and retain an ethnically and culturally diverse allied dental workforce. The objectives of this study were to explore why the profession of dental hygiene exhibits minimal…

  11. BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS IN COMMUNITY ORAL HEALTH PROBLEMS: A STUDY ON DENTAL TREATMENT DISCONTINUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Aryadi Joelimar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The low value of F/DMF-T ration on Performed Treatment Index in Indoneisa gives an indication of great problems in dental treatment utilization. Dental treatment utilization is affected by several obstacles, the greatest among which is psychosocial obstacles. In this study the psychosocial obstacles were detected through Intrinsic Obstacles, Obstacles in Transportation, and Obstacles in Dental Clinic related to their effects on their discontinuation of dental treatments at Balkesmas Kiara, Kecamatan Senen, Jakarta Pusat. The discontinuation of dental treatments was mostly affected by Intrinsic Obstacles, through its components as Types of Cases, Dental Anxiety Scale, and Intrinsic Motivation. Generally Obstacles in Transportation had no effects, excpet its components of Travel Time and Tiredness. Obstacles in Dental Clinic had a significant effect on the discontinuation of dental treatments through the unpleasant manner of the druggist, the hot waiting room, and the high expense on drugs.

  12. Hypnosis and dental anesthesia in children: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, Adeline; Lucas-Polomeni, Marie-Madeleine; Robert, Jean-Claude; Sixou, Jean-Louis; Wodey, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The authors of this prospective study initially hypothesized that hypnosis would lower the anxiety and pain associated with dental anesthesia. Thirty children aged 5 to 12 were randomly assigned to 2 groups receiving hypnosis (H) or not (NH) at the time of anesthesia. Anxiety was assessed at inclusion in the study, initial consultation, installation in the dentist's chair, and at the time of anesthesia using the modified Yale preoperative anxiety scale (mYPAS). Following anesthesia, a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a modified objective pain score (mOPS) were used to assess the pain experienced. The median mYPAS and mOPS scores were significantly lower in the H group than in the NH group. Significantly more children in the H group had no or mild pain. This study suggests that hypnosis may be effective in reducing anxiety and pain in children receiving dental anesthesia.

  13. MOTHERS' DENTAL HEAL TH BEHAVIORS AND MOTHER-CHILD'S DENTAL CARIES EXPERIENCES: STUDY OF A SUBURB AREA IN INDONESIA

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    Diah Ayu Maharani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of conducting regular epidemiological surveys to monitor dental health in lower socio-economic citizens especially of preschool children, only few papers were published respectively. The aims of this study were to describe preschool children's and their mother's dental caries experiences and to describe mothers' knowledge and behaviors' towards dental health in a suburb area near the capital city of Indonesia. The samples were 152 mother-childpairs with children age less than 5 years old. Intra oral examination by decay-missing-filling-teeth index was performed. Moreover, interviews were conducted to gain information regarding mothers’ oral health behavior and knowledge. 70% children had caries with mean dmf-t= 3.7, consisting 100% of component decay. 90% mothers had caries with DMF-T=7.8, consisting 99% of component decay. More than 50% of mothers had low knowledge and behaviors towards dental health, which comprises of: (1 never checked their children’s dental health, (2 starting to clean their child's teeth after child's age is more than 1 years old, (3 don’t know that caries is an infectious disease, (4 frequently using same feeding and drinking equipments together with their children, (5 considering deciduous teeth are not importantbecause it will be replaced with permanent teeth anyway. It could beconcluded that the prevalence of dental caries in studied sample were high, these were relevant to the findings that the mother's knowledge and behaviors' towards dental health were low. The results of this study demonstrated that mothers might have a high contribution in their child’s caries risk. Prevention should be undertaken at an early age and actively including caregivers is essential in planningand conducting any dental health interventions.

  14. Child dental fear and general emotional problems: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, J.B.; ten Cate, J.M.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: This was to investigate the relation between general emotional and behavioural problems of the child and dental anxiety and dental behavioural management problems. BACKGROUND: Dental treatment involves many potentially unpleasant stimuli, which all may lead to the development of dental anxiety

  15. Child dental fear and general emotional problems: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B. Krikken; J.M. ten Cate; J.S.J. Veerkamp

    2010-01-01

    AIM: This was to investigate the relation between general emotional and behavioural problems of the child and dental anxiety and dental behavioural management problems. BACKGROUND: Dental treatment involves many potentially unpleasant stimuli, which all may lead to the development of dental anxiety

  16. The estimation of patients' views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice by general dental practitioners: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truin Gert-Jan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the changes in dental healthcare, such as the increasing assertiveness of patients, the introduction of new dental professionals, and regulated competition, it becomes more important that general dental practitioners (GDPs take patients' views into account. The aim of the study was to compare patients' views on organizational aspects of general dental practices with those of GDPs and with GDPs' estimation of patients' views. Methods In a survey study, patients and GDPs provided their views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice. In a second, separate survey, GDPs were invited to estimate patients' views on 22 organizational aspects of a general dental practice. Results For 4 of the 22 aspects, patients and GDPs had the same views, and GDPs estimated patients' views reasonably well: 'Dutch-speaking GDP', 'guarantee on treatment', 'treatment by the same GDP', and 'reminder of routine oral examination'. For 2 aspects ('quality assessment' and 'accessibility for disabled patients' patients and GDPs had the same standards, although the GDPs underestimated the patients' standards. Patients had higher standards than GDPs for 7 aspects and lower standards than GDPs for 8 aspects. Conclusion On most aspects GDPs and patient have different views, except for social desirable aspects. Given the increasing assertiveness of patients, it is startling the GDP's estimated only half of the patients' views correctly. The findings of the study can assist GDPs in adapting their organizational services to better meet the preferences of their patients and to improve the communication towards patients.

  17. Italian multicenter study on infection hazards during dental practice: Control of environmental microbial contamination in public dental surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglia, Paolo; Liguori, Giorgio; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Napoli, Christian; Pasquarella, Cesira; Bergomi, Margherita; Fabiani, Leila; Monarca, Silvano; Petti, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Background The present study assessed microbial contamination in Italian dental surgeries. Methods An evaluation of water, air and surface microbial contamination in 102 dental units was carried out in eight Italian cities. Results The findings showed water microbial contamination in all the dental surgeries; the proportion of water samples with microbial levels above those recommended decreased during working. With regard to Legionella spp., the proportion of positive samples was 33.3%. During work activity, the index of microbial air contamination (IMA) increased. The level of microbial accumulation on examined surfaces did not change over time. Conclusion These findings confirm that some Italian dental surgeries show high biocontamination, as in other European Countries, which highlights the risk of occupational exposure and the need to apply effective measures to reduce microbial loads. PMID:18644099

  18. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  19. Biomechanical study of the bone tissue with dental implants interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navrátil P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the stress-strain analysis of human mandible in the physiological state and after the dental implant application. The evaluation is focused on assessing of the cancellous bone tissue modeling-level. Three cancellous bone model-types are assessed: Non-trabecular model with homogenous isotropic material, nontrabecular model with inhomogeneous material obtained from computer tomography data using CT Data Analysis software, and trabecular model built from mandible section image. Computational modeling was chosen as the most suitable solution method and the solution on two-dimensional level was carried out. The results show that strain is more preferable value than stress in case of evaluation of mechanical response in cancellous bone. The non-trabecular model with CT-obtained material model is not acceptable for stress-strain analysis of the cancellous bone for singularities occurring on interfaces of regions with different values of modulus of elasticity.

  20. Decontamination Methods Used for Dental Burs – A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugar, Deepa; Hugar, Santosh; Ranjan, Shashi; Kadani, Megha

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Infection control and modes of sterilizations are the key factors to avoid cross transmission of infection in the field of dentistry. Transmission of disease or infection is noted with improper sterilization of reused instruments. Dental burs are the most important tool in any endodontic or conservative procedures of teeth involving tooth contouring, restorative filling procedures and endodontic procedures. Hence, the present study is undertaken to assess the efficacy of different methods of sterilization or decontamination which are routinely used in dental clinics. Materials and Methods: For the present study 96 round diamond burs were selected and divided into 6 groups. These burs were used for the access cavity preparation to get contamination and subjected for bacteriological culture. After getting base line date burs were subjected to manual scrubbing, hot air oven, glass bead sterilizer, ultrasonic cleaner and autoclave to get post decontamination data. Results: The study revealed that mean colony forming units/ml of Streptococcus mutans decreased maximum for autoclave with 80% reduction, for Lactobacilli 76% reduction and for Candida albicans maximum reduction seen for glass bead sterilizer with 74%. Conclusion: Findings of our study revealed that none of the methods used were found to be absolutely efficacious in the decontamination of dental burs. However, among the experimental groups used in the present study, autoclave was found to be the relatively best method. PMID:25121062

  1. Levels of crystalline silica dust in dental laboratorium of Dental Health Technology Study Program of Vocational Faculty, Universitas Airlangga

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    Eny Inayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silicosis is an occupational lung disease caused by inhaling particles of crystalline silica in a long time. The disease then results in inflammation and defects in lung tissue. Prosthesis construction is usually conducted in dental laboratory using a lot of materials containing crystalline silica, such as gypsum, ceramics, planting material, sandblast and others. Purpose: This research aims to determine levels of crystalline silica dust in the dental laboratory of Dental Health Technology Diploma Study Program, Vocational Faculty, Universitas Airlangga. Method: Three measurement points was determined, namely point 1, point 2 and point 3 in each dental laboratory space (I and II. Suctioning dust was performed at those points using Low Volume Dust Sampler (LVDS. Samples taken were divided into two groups, namely X and Y. Taking dust samples were carried out for 30 minutes. Elements of crystalline silica contained in the dust were quantitatively measured using XR Defractometry tool, while size and morphology of silica were measured using SEM EDX tool. Data obtained were statistically analyzed by paired t test. Result: The results showed significant differences in the levels of the total dust measured and crystalline silica in the form of quartz and cristobalite among those two dental laboratory spaces. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the levels of the total dust and silica quartz dust in the dental laboratory spaces I and II were greater than the Threshold Limit Value (TLV determined.

  2. Pattern of dental diseases among patients attending outpatient department of dental: a hospital based cross-sectional study

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    Pitamber Datt Garkoti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The public health problems associated with oral disease are a serious burden in India and other countries of the world. The causes of oral diseases are primarily rooted in poor socioeconomic and physical environment; unhealthy lifestyles and oral health related behaviour accordingly the action towards improvement of oral health should be directed towards modification of unhealthy environment and behaviours. Objective: To know the pattern of dental diseases among the patients attending Dental OPD. Materials and Methods: A hospital based cross sectional study among patients attending dental OPD in a tertiary care centre of Kumaun region during a period of one year i.e. from 1st January 2012 to 31st December 2012. Results: A total of 8928 patients attended dental OPD. Majority of the patients (25.3% were in the age group 30-39 years. Mostly were males (51.54%. Most common disease was dental caries (54.54%, followed by gingivitis (37.62%, abrasion (3.82%, malocclusion (3.05%, pericoronitis (0.53% and jaw fracture (0.44%. Conclusion: Dental Caries was the most common disease. Majority of the patients were in 30-39 years of age group. Health education and awareness at school level and in the community might prevent tooth loss in later life. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(2.000: 112-115

  3. Development and Evaluation of an Endodontic Simulation Model for Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgin, Michael; Wiedemann, Paul; Frank, Wilhelm; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Kielbassa, Andrej M

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study were to develop an endodontic simulation model able to implement the electronic method of working length determination (electronic apex locators, EALs) in a dental school, to evaluate the practicality of this tool for dental students, and to compare the accuracy of working length measurements achieved by the EAL and the radiographic method. A new simulation model was constructed by embedding extracted human teeth in a self-cured resin, along with a conductive medium. After radiographic and electronic working length determinations, root canal instrumentation was performed by students at a dental school in Austria according to the working lengths obtained from the EAL. Subsequently, root apices (n=44) were longitudinally sectioned using a diamond coated bur. Measurements of the distance between the anatomical root apex (ARA) and the apical constriction (AC) as well as between ARA and the ascertained apical point of endodontic instrumentation were performed using digital photography and a 3D computer-assisted design software. The distance between ARA and the radiologic (ARA-R) or electrometric (ARA-EL) readings of the apical point of endodontic instrumentation was compared with the actual distance ARA-AC. The accuracy of both methods was determined. The difference between the actual distance ARA-AC and the targeted radiological distance was statistically significant (p=0.0001), as was the measured distance between ARA-R and ARA-EL (p=0.016). The electronic method seems to be more precisely referring to the AC (R(2)=0.0198) than the radiographic method (R(2)=0.0019). These results suggest that the endodontic simulation model described in this study can be successfully used in preclinical dental education.

  4. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  5. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  6. Numerical evaluation of bulk material properties of dental composites using two-phase finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianying; Li, Haiyan; Fok, Alex S L; Watts, David C

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to numerically evaluate the effects of filler contents and resin properties on the material properties of dental composites utilizing realistic 3D micromechanical finite element models. 3D micromechanical finite element models of dental composites containing irregular fillers with non-uniform sizes were created based on a large-scale, surrogate mixture fabricated from irregularly shaped stones and casting resin. The surrogate mixture was first scanned with a micro-CT scanner, and the images reassembled to produce a 3D finite element model. Different filler fractions were achieved by adjusting the matrix volume while keeping the fillers unchanged. Polymerization shrinkage, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and viscosity of the model composites were predicted using the finite element models, and their dependence on the filler fraction and material properties of the resin matrix were considered. Comparison of the numerical predictions with available experimental data and analytical models from the literature was performed. Increased filler fraction resulted in lower material shrinkage, higher Young's modulus, lower Poisson's ratio and higher viscosity in the composite. Predicted shrinkage and Young's modulus agreed well with the experimental data and analytical predictions. The McGee-McCullough model best fit the shrinkage and Young's modulus predicted by the finite element method. However, a new parameter, used as the exponent of the filler fraction, had to be introduced to the McGee-McCullough model to better match the predicted viscosity and Poisson's ratio with those from the finite element analysis. Realistic micro-structural finite element models were successfully applied to study the effects of filler fraction and matrix properties on a wide range of mechanical properties of dental composites with irregular fillers. The results can be used to direct the design of such materials to achieve the desired mechanical properties. Published by

  7. Educational material of dental anatomy applied to study the morphology of permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siéssere, Selma; Vitti, Mathias; de Sousa, Luiz Gustavo; Semprini, Marisa; Regalo, Simone Cecílio Hallak

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present educational material that would allow the dental student to learn to easily identify the morphologic characteristics of permanent teeth, and how they fit together (occlusion). In order to do this, macro models of permanent teeth with no attrition were carved in wax and later molded with alginate. These molds were filled with plaster, dental stone and/or cold-cured acrylic resin. The large individual dental stone tooth models were mounted on a wax base, thus obtaining maxillary and mandibular arches which were occluded. These dental arches were molded with plaster or dental stone. The authors suggest that these types of macro models allow an excellent visualization of the morphologic characteristics of permanent teeth and occlusion. Dental students are able to carve the permanent dentition in wax with great facility when they can observe macro models.

  8. [Constructing 3-dimensional colorized digital dental model assisted by digital photography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hong-qiang; Liu, Yu-shu; Liu, Yun-song; Ning, Jing; Zhao, Yi-jiao; Zhou, Yong-sheng

    2016-02-18

    To explore a method of constructing universal 3-dimensional (3D) colorized digital dental model which can be displayed and edited in common 3D software (such as Geomagic series), in order to improve the visual effect of digital dental model in 3D software. The morphological data of teeth and gingivae were obtained by intra-oral scanning system (3Shape TRIOS), constructing 3D digital dental models. The 3D digital dental models were exported as STL files. Meanwhile, referring to the accredited photography guide of American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), five selected digital photographs of patients'teeth and gingivae were taken by digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR) with the same exposure parameters (except occlusal views) to capture the color data. In Geomagic Studio 2013, after STL file of 3D digital dental model being imported, digital photographs were projected on 3D digital dental model with corresponding position and angle. The junctions of different photos were carefully trimmed to get continuous and natural color transitions. Then the 3D colorized digital dental model was constructed, which was exported as OBJ file or WRP file which was a special file for software of Geomagic series. For the purpose of evaluating the visual effect of the 3D colorized digital model, a rating scale on color simulation effect in views of patients'evaluation was used. Sixteen patients were recruited and their scores on colored and non-colored digital dental models were recorded. The data were analyzed using McNemar-Bowker test in SPSS 20. Universal 3D colorized digital dental model with better color simulation was constructed based on intra-oral scanning and digital photography. For clinical application, the 3D colorized digital dental models, combined with 3D face images, were introduced into 3D smile design of aesthetic rehabilitation, which could improve the patients' cognition for the esthetic digital design and virtual prosthetic effect. Universal 3D colorized

  9. Awareness of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai: A knowledge, attitude, practice study

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    S Preethi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study is to analyze the knowledge, attitude and practice of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 322 dental practitioners in Chennai and data was collected by means of a questionnaire. Results: Twenty-one percent of the dental practitioners did not maintain dental records in their clinic/workplace, with only 12% of the practitioners maintaining complete records. Ninety-three percent of dental practitioners were not maintaining dental records for more than seven years. The significance of ante-mortem records in identifying deceased suspects was not known to 17% of the dental practitioners. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were not aware of child abuse and the actions to be taken. Dental age estimation was not known to 41% of the dental practitioners. Thirty-eight percent of the practitioners were unaware of the accurate method of individual identification. About 18% of the dental practitioners did not know the significance of bite mark patterns of the teeth. Ninety-three percent of the practitioners lacked formal training in collecting, evaluating and presenting dental evidence. Thirty percent of dental practitioners did not know they can testify as an expert witness in the court of law. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were unaware of identifying the age and gender of an individual in mass disasters. Conclusion: Our study revealed inadequate knowledge, poor attitude and lack of practice of forensic odontology prevailing among the dental practitioners in Chennai.

  10. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental surgeons: A pilot study

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    Abdul Rahim Shaik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe the work-related musculoskeletal disorders among on-job dental surgeons. Objectives: To identify the musculoskeletal disorders in terms of perception of pain and stiffness experienced by the dental surgeons due to the rigors of dental work, to determine the prevailing working environment with particular reference to dental work station in relation to musculoskeletal disorders, and to find the association between pain and stiffness experienced by the dental surgeons and the selected socio-demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 30 graduated dental surgeons having a work experience of 1 year or more, post graduates and faculty members of various specialties at Yenepoya Dental College Hospital, Mangalore. The subjects were selected randomly from the hospital and they were given closed-ended questionnaire to find out perception of pain and stiffness experienced in the past 6 months. The observation of the working environment was done by walk-through observational survey. Results: The study showed that 6.6% dental surgeons always experienced shoulder pain, while 83.3% dental surgeons sometimes experienced back pain and 70% sometimes experienced neck pain. Majority of the dental surgeons (73.3% experienced stiffness in the back and 23.3% experienced severe pain in their neck. It was observed that the number of patients attended per day by the dental surgeons had a significant association (P = 0.024 with the pain they experienced in their hip/thigh region. The frequency of pain experienced by the dental surgeons in the hip/thigh and knee joints also showed a significant association (P = 0.037 with the height of the dental surgeons. Conclusion: The study revealed that various socio-demographic variables contributed to the musculoskeletal disorders experienced by the dental surgeons. However, the number of patients attended per day by the dental surgeons vis-à-vis pain experienced in the back, wrist, and

  11. Awareness of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai: A knowledge, attitude, practice study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethi, S; Einstein, A; Sivapathasundharam, B

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to analyze the knowledge, attitude and practice of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 322 dental practitioners in Chennai and data was collected by means of a questionnaire. Results: Twenty-one percent of the dental practitioners did not maintain dental records in their clinic/workplace, with only 12% of the practitioners maintaining complete records. Ninety-three percent of dental practitioners were not maintaining dental records for more than seven years. The significance of ante-mortem records in identifying deceased suspects was not known to 17% of the dental practitioners. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were not aware of child abuse and the actions to be taken. Dental age estimation was not known to 41% of the dental practitioners. Thirty-eight percent of the practitioners were unaware of the accurate method of individual identification. About 18% of the dental practitioners did not know the significance of bite mark patterns of the teeth. Ninety-three percent of the practitioners lacked formal training in collecting, evaluating and presenting dental evidence. Thirty percent of dental practitioners did not know they can testify as an expert witness in the court of law. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were unaware of identifying the age and gender of an individual in mass disasters. Conclusion: Our study revealed inadequate knowledge, poor attitude and lack of practice of forensic odontology prevailing among the dental practitioners in Chennai. PMID:22408322

  12. [Dental caries and early childhood development: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, F Loreto; Sanz, B Javier; Mejía, L Gloria

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between dental caries and early childhood development in 3-year-olds from Talca, Chile. A pilot study with a convenience sample of 3-year-olds from Talca (n = 39) who attend public healthcare centers. Child development was measured by the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI), a screening tool used nationally among pre-school children to assess language development, fine motor skills and coordination areas. Dental caries prevalence was evaluated by decayed, missing, filled teeth (DFMT) and decayed, missing, filled tooth surfaces (DFMS) ceo-d and ceo-s indexes. The children were divided into two groups according to the PDIscore: those with a score of 40 or more were considered developmentally normal (n = 32), and those with a score below 40 were considered as having impaired development (n = 7). The severity of caries (DMFT) was negatively correlated with PDI (r = -0.82), and children with the lowest TEPSI score had the highest DFMT values. The average DMFT in children with normal development was 1.31, and 3.57 for those with impaired development. This pilot study indicates that the severity of dental caries is correlated with early childhood development. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  13. Factors related to persons with health problems attributed to dental filling materials--part one in a triangular study on 65 and 75 years old Swedes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlnacke, Katri; Söderfeldt, Björn

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate persons having problems with dental filling materials in a Swedish population, their perceived oral health, and their reception from dental care personnel. The development over time (between 1992 and 2007) has also been studied concerning the presence of problems from dental filling materials. In two counties in Sweden, Orebro and Ostergötland, all persons born in 1942 have been surveyed by mail every fifth year since 1992. In the year 2007, all persons born in 1932 also received the same questionnaire. The total number of respondents in 2007 were 9813 persons (response rate 72.6%). Logistic regression models were constructed with those having had problems or not from dental filling materials as dependent variable. Multiple regression analysis was done with selfperceived oral health as dependent variable. There were about 10% (868) reporting problems from dental filling materials. There were clear differences between the two groups, having problems or not. The group reporting problems from dental filling materials perceived both their general and oral health as being worse compared with others. More frequently they had asked questions about adverse effects from dental filling materials, had changed dental fillings and crowns, and had amalgam present. They also felt less well treated by dental personnel and were not so pleased with dental care in general as others. In conclusion, there were many persons perceiving problems from dental filling materials. Forthose, both perceived general health and oral health was worse and they were less satisfied with dental care in general. No consistent common characteristic, neither as to socioeconomic nor lifestyle factors, could be shown for those having experienced problems from dental filling materials.

  14. A Model for Two-Year and Baccalaureate Clinical Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluch-Scranton, Joan; Gurenlian, JoAnn Rigolizzo

    1985-01-01

    Models for associate and bachelors degree programs training dental hygienists are proposed as a step in eliminating technical training for dental hygiene education and in delineating roles for the graduates of two- and four-year programs. They outline clinical and professional skills, practice settings, and supervision levels for each group. (MSE)

  15. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  16. Comparison of dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced from scanned impressions and scanned stone casts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subeihi, Haitham

    Introduction: Digital models of dental arches play a more and more important role in dentistry. A digital dental model can be generated by directly scanning intraoral structures, by scanning a conventional impression of oral structures or by scanning a stone cast poured from the conventional impression. An accurate digital scan model is a fundamental part for the fabrication of dental restorations. Aims: 1. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions versus scanning of stone casts. 2. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions made of three different materials (polyvinyl siloxane, polyether or vinyl polyether silicone). Methods and Materials: This laboratory study included taking addition silicone, polyether and vinyl polyether silicone impressions from an epoxy reference model that was created from an original typodont. Teeth number 28 and 30 on the typodont with a missing tooth number 29 were prepared for a metal-ceramic three-unit fixed dental prosthesis with tooth #29 being a pontic. After tooth preparation, an epoxy resin reference model was fabricated by duplicating the typodont quadrant that included the tooth preparations. From this reference model 12 polyvinyl siloxane impressions, 12 polyether impressions and 12 vinyl polyether silicone impressions were made. All 36 impressions were scanned before pouring them with dental stone. The 36 dental stone casts were, in turn, scanned to produce digital models. A reference digital model was made by scanning the reference model. Six groups of digital models were produced. Three groups were made by scanning of the impressions obtained with the three different materials, the other three groups involved the scanning of the dental casts that resulted from pouring the impressions made with the three different materials. Groups of digital models were compared using Root Mean Squares (RMS) in terms of their

  17. Genetic susceptibility to dental caries differs between the sexes: a family-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, John R; Wang, Xiaojing; McNeil, Daniel W; Weyant, Robert J; Crout, Richard; Marazita, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting susceptibility to dental caries are likely influenced by genetics. In fact, genetics accounts for up to 65% of inter-individual variation in dental caries experience. Sex differences in dental caries experience have been widely reported, with females usually exhibiting a higher prevalence and severity of disease across all ages. The cause for this sex bias is currently uncertain, although it may be partly due to the differential effects of genetic factors between the sexes: gene-by-sex interactions. In this family based study (N = 2,663; 740 families; ages 1-93 years), we assessed dental caries via intra-oral examination and generated six indices of caries experience (DMFS, dfs, and indices of both pit-and-fissure surface caries and smooth surface caries in both primary and permanent dentitions). We used likelihood-based methods to model the variance in caries experience conditional on the expected genetic sharing among relatives in our sample. This modeling framework allowed us to test two lines of evidence for gene-by-sex interactions: (1) whether the magnitude of the cumulative effect of genes differs between the sexes, and (2) whether different genes are involved. We observed significant evidence of gene-by-sex interactions for caries experience in both the primary and permanent dentitions. In the primary dentition, the magnitude of the effect of genes was greater in males than females. In the permanent dentition, different genes may play important roles in each of the sexes. Overall, this study provides the first direct evidence that sex differences in dental caries experiences may be explained, in part, by gene-by-sex interactions.

  18. Postural changes in dental hygienists. Four-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, R M; Woodall, W R; Mahan, J M

    1992-01-01

    Numerous surveys identify the occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints as a concern in dentistry. However, no longitudinal data exist to indicate whether postural changes occur as a result of practicing dental hygiene. The purpose of this preliminary, four-year longitudinal study was to investigate whether any postural changes developed during the hygienists' clinical education and/or during subsequent dental hygiene practice after one and/or two years. It was anticipated that the awkward positions and intense physical demands placed on hygienists might initiate musculoskeletal problems, but that no postural changes would occur over this short period of time. Nine of 10 dental hygienists in the graduating class of 1987 were surveyed for existing musculoskeletal complaints, and the subjects were photographed for a measurement of postural change. Responses from participants indicated an increase in musculoskeletal-related complaints in each of the six areas investigated. The photographic findings indicated that one of the nine hygienists showed an increase in forward head posture, a postural change.

  19. Outcome-Based Quality Control by a Dental Reference Profile of a Population-Based Study (SHIP-0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samietz, Stefanie; Söhnel, Andreas; Schwahn, Christian; Holtfreter, Birte; Mundt, Torsten; Meisel, Peter; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kocher, Thomas; Biffar, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to develop an instrument for quality control in dental practices. We compared the number of teeth of subjects of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-0) with those from patients of dental practices. Methods. Patients from seven dental practices (n = 1,497) were randomly sampled by age strata and gender for a period of two years. Dental status derived from patient files was transformed into practice profiles using age-specific number of teeth as a parameter. Practice profiles were compared with a nomogram, which was based on the age-specific number of teeth of 3,990 SHIP-0 participants regularly visiting the dentist. Further, negative binomial regression models were evaluated to model associations between the number of teeth with age and dental practices, including interactions. Results. The practice profiles ranged between the 45th and 95th quantile curves of the reference population SHIP-0. The rate ratios (RR) for the number of missing teeth ranged from 0.37 to 0.67 (p < 0.001) between the different dental practices, indicating lower risk for higher numbers of missing teeth in comparison to SHIP-0. Conclusions. This study showed considerable differences between dental practices and the reference population of SHIP-0 regarding the pattern of tooth loss and confirms the value of nomograms to compare age-specific numbers of teeth between patients of dental practices and a population-based-study as a tool for quality control. For further analyses, the socioeconomic status of patients and relevant risk factors will be used to adjust for structural differences in order to improve the validity of the comparisons. PMID:27347549

  20. Experience of dental caries and its effects on early dental occlusion: a descriptive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzi, Valeria; Fabbrizi, Miriam; Coloni, Camilla; Mastrantoni, Cristina; Mirra, Carla; Bossù, Maurizio; Vestri, Annarita; Polimeni, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Summary Aim Describe the occurrence of dental caries in a sample of pre-school children and school children, aged 3 and 12, and study the possible association between caries and malocclusion. Methods We selected and analyzed the medical records of a sample of 588 patients who had their first dental examination at the Pediatric Dentistry Unit, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences of Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome. Results In the sample, 55.4% of the children had no decayed deciduous elements, while 44.6% had at least one decayed deciduous element. The prevalence of decayed permanent teeth was 10.2%, while 89.8% had no decayed permanent teeth. In the sample, 9.4% of the children showed advanced carious lesions, that needed tooth extraction and 6.6% needed a space maintainer for post-extractive interceptive treatment. In the sample, 26.7% of the examined patients had increased overjet, while 3.7% had decreased overjet and 25.4% of the sample had an increased overbite, 11, 2% had reduced over-bite values. A percentage over 10% of the sample had an anterior openbite in centric occlusion. The prevalence of posterior crossbite among entire samples was 19.8%. Conclusions Although the incidence of caries disease was high in the selected samples, the study did not show a statistically significant association between caries and clinical orthodontic abnormalities, except for the association between the midline deviation and the severe carious diseases, necessitating extraction. PMID:22238717

  1. Knowledge of dental ethics and jurisprudence among dental practitioners in Chennai, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire study

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    R Kesavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ethics is a science of ideal human character and behavior in situations where the distinction should be made between what is right and wrong. Dental jurisprudence is a set of legal regulations set forth by each state's legislature describing the legal limitations and regulations related to the practice of dentistry. Objectives: (1 To assess the dental practitioners' awareness about dentists (Code of Ethics regulation and jurisprudence. (2 To assess the awareness of dentists regarding Consumer Protection Act (COPRA and its implications in dentistry. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted. A pilot study was conducted to validate the questionnaire and to get the required sample size which was 346. A specially designed questionnaire consisting of 24 close-ended questions divided into two sections was used. The resulting data were coded, and statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software version 17.0. Results: The results showed that about 65% of the dentists were aware that the Dentist Act was given in the year 1948 and 76% knew that the dentists (Code of Ethics regulation was given by the Dental Council of India. Only 33% knew that it is not unethical for a dental surgeon to supply or sell drugs related to dentistry in his clinic. Only 31% responded correctly that it is not necessary to obtain informed consent for clinical examination and routine radiography. Nearly, half of the respondents (43% were not aware of professional indemnity insurance. Conclusion: The study concludes that majority of the dental practitioners are aware of dental ethics but their knowledge on jurisprudence and COPRA needs to be enriched. Although recommendations can be made to the dental profession to alter their behavior, real improvement is unlikely without changes in legislation and social policy.

  2. Prevalence of dental caries and dental care utilisation in preschool urban children enrolled in a comparative-effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopycka-Kedzierawski, D T; Billings, R J

    2011-06-01

    To assess dental caries prevalence and dental care utilisation in pre-school children enrolled in urban childcare centres that participated in a comparative effectiveness study. Cross-sectional study. Caries prevalence was determined in a cohort of children 12-60 months of age. Eligible children were randomised into two groups: group one received a traditional visual/tactile oral examination and group two received a teledentistry examination. Questionnaires were administered to the children's parents/guardians to gather demographics and information about using dental and medical services. Of 234 children examined, approximately 28% had caries experience. The mean dfs score was 1.56 with a range of 0-34 carious surfaces. The mean dfs score for the children examined by means of teledentistry was 1.75 and for the children examined by means of the traditional visual/tactile method mean dfs was 1.40; the means between the two groups were not significantly different. Twenty-six children showed evidence of being treated for dental caries. According to the parents, 31.5% of the children had never had a dental check-up before, only 3% of the children were lacking dental insurance and majority of the parents (92%) did not perceive accessing dental care for the children as a problem. The Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used to assess statistical differences among groups of children. The data showed that 28% of the children had caries and, of these, 61% had never been treated for caries, thus indicating that continued efforts are needed to improve oral health care utilisation by inner-city preschool children.

  3. A case study on development of an integrated, multidisciplinary dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadershahi, Nader A; Bender, Daniel J; Beck, Lynn; Alexander, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Calls for fundamental reform of dental education were made twice in the twentieth century. More recently, spurred by the work of the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI), North American dental educators have again begun advocating for major curriculum reform in order to develop in students the higher order thinking skills required for the contemporary practice of dentistry. This case study describes the process of curricular reform at one school designed to move from a traditional siloed curriculum to one that uses case-based, integrated multidisciplinary courses to improve teaching and learning. The process was broad-based and comprehensive and included a schoolwide values clarification exercise and agreement on desired characteristics of an ideal graduate. Stakeholders agreed that the reform curriculum should incorporate inter- and multidisciplinary courses, case-based and active learning strategies, and concepts from adult learning theory. The new curriculum model is comprised of five unique but related curriculum "strands," each managed by a small group of interdisciplinary faculty content experts. Challenges in the development and implementation of the reform curriculum are discussed, and an assessment plan is presented.

  4. Impact of Prolonged Breastfeeding on Dental Caries: A Population-Based Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Karen Glazer; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Peres, Marco Aurelio; Mittinty, Murthy N; Demarco, Flavio Fernando; Santos, Ina Silva; Matijasevich, Alicia; Barros, Aluisio J D

    2017-07-01

    Few studies have assessed the effect of breastfeeding, bottle feeding, and sugar consumption on children's dental caries. We investigated whether the duration of breastfeeding is a risk factor for dental caries in the primary dentition, independently of sugar consumption. An oral health study (n = 1303) nested in a birth cohort study was carried out in southern Brazil. The average number of decayed, missing, and filled primary tooth surfaces (dmfs) and severe early childhood caries (S-ECC: dmfs ≥6) were investigated at age 5 years. Breastfeeding was the main exposure collected at birth and at 3, 12, and 24 months of age. Data on sugar consumption were collected at 24, 48, and 60 months of age. Marginal structural modeling was used to estimate the controlled direct effect of breastfeeding (0-12, 13-23, and ≥24 months) on dmfs and on S-ECC. The prevalence of S-ECC was 23.9%. The mean number of dmfs was 4.05. Children who were breastfed for ≥24 months had a higher number of dmfs (mean ratio: 1.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.5-2.4) and a 2.4 times higher risk of having S-ECC (risk ratio: 2.4; 95% confidence interval: 1.7-3.3) than those who were breastfed up to 12 months of age. Breastfeeding between 13 and 23 months had no effect on dental caries. Prolonged breastfeeding increases the risk of having dental caries. Preventive interventions for dental caries should be established as early as possible because breastfeeding is beneficial for children's health. Mechanisms underlying this process should be investigated more deeply. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Use and Application of Structural Models in Dental Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Rosario H. Yap; McDonald, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Latent abilities of dental students were analyzed as causes and professional achievements as effects, with preadmission performances as indicators of latent abilities. The results demonstrate that structural analysis focuses on the direct impact of the quality of dental school education. (Author/MLW)

  6. A register-based study of variations in services received among dental care attenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing, Kasper; Hede, Børge; Christensen, Lisa Bøge

    2016-01-01

    . Materials and methods . This retrospective register-based study followed two Danish cohorts, aged 25 and 40, with a dental examination in 2009 (n = 32,351). The dental service data were registered during 2005–2009. The number of dental examinations, individual preventive services (IPS), tooth extractions......Objectives . To investigate whether receipt of dental services, among attenders, reflects variations in dental health or whether and to what degree it is associated with socioeconomic status, with irregular or regular dental attendance and with the availability of dentists in residential areas......, root fillings and composite fillings were analyzed in relation to socioeconomic status, irregular/regular dental attendance, inhabitant/dentist ratio and to DMFT at age 15 (DMFT15) and change in DMFT (ΔDMFT) from age 15 to age 25 and age 40, respectively. Poisson regression and negative binomial...

  7. How to do a grounded theory study: a worked example of a study of dental practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Qualitative methodologies are increasingly popular in medical research. Grounded theory is the methodology most-often cited by authors of qualitative studies in medicine, but it has been suggested that many 'grounded theory' studies are not concordant with the methodology. In this paper we provide a worked example of a grounded theory project. Our aim is to provide a model for practice, to connect medical researchers with a useful methodology, and to increase the quality of 'grounded theory' research published in the medical literature. Methods We documented a worked example of using grounded theory methodology in practice. Results We describe our sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation. We explain how these steps were consistent with grounded theory methodology, and show how they related to one another. Grounded theory methodology assisted us to develop a detailed model of the process of adapting preventive protocols into dental practice, and to analyse variation in this process in different dental practices. Conclusions By employing grounded theory methodology rigorously, medical researchers can better design and justify their methods, and produce high-quality findings that will be more useful to patients, professionals and the research community.

  8. Dental anxiety among university students and its correlation with their field of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Mousa AL-Omari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the subjective ratings of dental anxiety levels among university students enrolled at Jordan University of Science and Technology. In addition, the present study aimed to explore the sources of dental anxiety and the impact of gender on the perceived dental anxiety and the correlation between field of study and dental anxiety level. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Modified Corah Dental Anxiety Scale was used to measure dental anxiety among the study population. Six hundred subjects were recruited into the study from Jordanian undergraduate students from the faculties of Medicine, Engineering, and Dentistry. RESULTS: Five hundred and thirty five complete questionnaires were returned, which accounts for a response rate of 89.2%. The totals of the mean anxiety scores were the following: Medical students, 13.58%; Engineering students, 13.27% and dental students, 11.22%. About 32% of the study population has scored 15 or more. Dental students had the lowest percentage of those who scored 15 or more. Surprisingly, the medical students were responsible for the highest percentage of those who scored 15 or above. Although women demonstrated statistically higher total dental anxiety scores than men (p= 0.03, the difference between both genders was small and could be clinically insignificant. The students were anxious mostly about tooth drilling and local anesthetic injection. CONCLUSIONS: Lack of adequate dental health education may result in a high level of dental anxiety among non-dental university students in Jordan. Further studies are required to identify the correlates of dental anxiety among university students.

  9. A BAYESIAN HIERARCHICAL SPATIAL MODEL FOR DENTAL CARIES ASSESSMENT USING NON-GAUSSIAN MARKOV RANDOM FIELDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ick Hoon; Yuan, Ying; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2016-01-01

    Research in dental caries generates data with two levels of hierarchy: that of a tooth overall and that of the different surfaces of the tooth. The outcomes often exhibit spatial referencing among neighboring teeth and surfaces, i.e., the disease status of a tooth or surface might be influenced by the status of a set of proximal teeth/surfaces. Assessments of dental caries (tooth decay) at the tooth level yield binary outcomes indicating the presence/absence of teeth, and trinary outcomes at the surface level indicating healthy, decayed, or filled surfaces. The presence of these mixed discrete responses complicates the data analysis under a unified framework. To mitigate complications, we develop a Bayesian two-level hierarchical model under suitable (spatial) Markov random field assumptions that accommodates the natural hierarchy within the mixed responses. At the first level, we utilize an autologistic model to accommodate the spatial dependence for the tooth-level binary outcomes. For the second level and conditioned on a tooth being non-missing, we utilize a Potts model to accommodate the spatial referencing for the surface-level trinary outcomes. The regression models at both levels were controlled for plausible covariates (risk factors) of caries, and remain connected through shared parameters. To tackle the computational challenges in our Bayesian estimation scheme caused due to the doubly-intractable normalizing constant, we employ a double Metropolis-Hastings sampler. We compare and contrast our model performances to the standard non-spatial (naive) model using a small simulation study, and illustrate via an application to a clinical dataset on dental caries. PMID:27807470

  10. A new approach to modelling and designing mono-block dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    R. Hunter; F. Alister; Möller, J.; J. Alister

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is present a new approach to modelling and design the low cost mono-block dental implants based on the integration of the computer aided techniques. This approach provides the automation of the design process of the mono-block dental implants.Design/methodology/approach: The approach used to develop the modelling and design of the mono-block dental implants are based on the parametrization of the main geometric features of the implants. This approach allows to generate ...

  11. A simplified model for biomedical waste management in dental practices - A pilot project at Thane, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om N Baghele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of biomedical waste (BMW is generated in dental practices, which can be hazardous to the environment as well as to those who come in contact with the materials, if not dealt with appropriately. Most of the rules world-wide are not specific for dental BMW management and hinder easy understanding by dental practitioners. Because of lack of clear-cut guidelines either from Dental Council of India or Government of India or Indian Dental Association (IDA on disposal of dental wastes, this article is designed to explore and review on these issues and formulate a simplified scheme. The guidelines by the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board from the directives of The Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India through BMW (Management and Handling Rules, 1998, (BMW-MH-98, similar guidelines being followed elsewhere in the world, the local BMW disposal company′s rules and the IDA′s Clinic Standardization Program guidelines. We developed and implemented a simplified waste segregation protocol for practicing dentists and dental hospitals. A methodological dental waste segregation protocol was required considering its disposal and ill-effects on health and the environment. The simplified scheme provided a good model to be followed in developing countries like India. The scheme improved understanding among dentists because of its self-explanatory nature.

  12. Sugar, dental caries and the incidence of acute rheumatic fever: a cohort study of Māori and Pacific children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Simon; Marshall, Roger J; Bach, Katie; Koopu, Pauline; Reynolds, Gary; Sundborn, Gerhard; Ei, Win Le Shwe Sin

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether dental caries, as an indicator of cumulative exposure to sugar, is associated with the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease, in Māori and Pacific children aged 5 and 6 years at their first dental visit. A cohort study was undertaken which linked school dental service records of caries with national hospital discharge and mortality records. Cox models were used to investigate the strength of the association between dental caries and rheumatic fever incidence. A total of 20 333 children who were free of rheumatic heart disease at enrolment were available for analysis. During a mean follow-up time of 5 years, 96 children developed acute rheumatic fever or chronic rheumatic heart disease. After adjustment for potential confounders, children with five or more primary teeth affected by caries were 57% (95% CI: 20% to 106%) more likely to develop disease during follow-up, compared to children whose primary teeth were caries free. The population attributable to the risk for caries in this cohort was 22%. Dental caries is positively associated with the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in Māori and Pacific children. Sugar intake, an important risk factor for dental caries, is also likely to influence the aetiology of rheumatic fever. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  14. Development of a discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-12-01

    To develop an enhanced, reproducible and discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys, prepared to a clinically relevant surface finishing condition, using TR146 oral keratinocyte cells.

  15. Radiographic study of delayed tooth development in patients with dental agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mealin, Erika V; Parekh, Susan; Jones, Steven P; Moles, David R; Gill, Daljit S

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the radiographic development of permanent teeth in a group of children affected by dental agenesis with an unaffected control group and to determine the effects of confounding factors including the severity of the dental agenesis, age, sex, ethnicity, and the number of stages used to estimate dental age. A single-center retrospective cross-sectional study of dental panoramic tomographs was undertaken between July 2007 and April 2008 in a postgraduate teaching school. A total of 139 patients (aged 9-18 years) were recruited from the orthodontic clinic on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria to either a dental agenesis group or a control group. Dental panoramic tomograms were assessed, and the stages of development of the permanent teeth in the left maxillary and left mandibular regions were scored by using the 12 stages of Haavikko and the 8 stages of Demirjian and Goldstein. For each tooth scored, the mean dental age and standard error were determined by using the dental age assessment method, and an estimated dental age for each subject was derived by using the weighted average method. A statistically significant delay in dental age was found in the patients with dental agenesis compared with the control group. The dental age assessment method of Haavikko showed a delay of 1.20 years (SD, 1.74), and the method of Demirjian and Goldstein showed a delay of 1.64 years (SD, 1.75). It was also observed that older patients with dental agenesis had greater delays in tooth formation (P tooth, the dental age was delayed by 0.13 year (lower confidence interval, -0.22; upper confidence interval, 0.35). There was no evidence that sex or ethnicity has an effect on the delay in dental age in patients with dental agenesis. The development of permanent teeth in children with dental agenesis is delayed when compared with a matched control group. The severity of dental agenesis affected the magnitude of the delay (P <0

  16. Some insights for a relationship marketing model integrating SERVQUAL and customer loyalty in dental clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas Perez, Ana Maria; Grijalvo Martin, Maria Mercedes; Mercado Idoeta, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    The demand of new services, the emergence of new business models, insufficient innovation, underestimation of customer loyalty and reluctance to adopt new management are evidence of the deficiencies and the lack of research about the relations between patients and dental clinics. In this article we propose the structure of a model of Relationship Marketing (RM) in the dental clinic that integrates information from SERVQUAL, Customer Loyalty (CL) and activities of RM and combines the vision of...

  17. Comparison of oral health behavior among dental students, students of other disciplines, and fashion models in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Julien; Filippi, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Self-reliant oral health behavior exert great influence on the oral health of our society. The aim of the present study was to find out whether there is an occupation-related difference in the oral health behavior between dental students, students of other disciplines, and fashion models in German-speaking Switzerland. The survey comprised 19 questions which were asked using a web-based anonymous questionnaire. The investigation particularly inquired about employed auxiliaries and their application for an improvement of oral hygiene. In addition, the satisfaction with the own teeth and smile as well as the influence of the occupation or the study on oral hygiene were examined. Included in this evaluation were 204 dental students, 257 students of other disciplines, and 117 fashion models aged between 21 and 25 years. The evaluation reveals that the state of knowledge and the professional relationship affect the practice of oral hygiene, in particular among dental students. Fashion models, however, are most intensively concerned with body care and oral hygiene. Their attention is directed particularly to means supposed to improve the smile as well as to ensure fresh breath. Dental students and fashion models constitute a selected minority clearly demarcated from students of other disciplines regarding a higher awareness of self-reliant oral hygiene. The comparatively minor rating of oral health in a group of basically well-trained individuals suggests great need of educational work in the general population.

  18. Prevalence Of Dental Problems In School Children - A Study In A Rural Community In Haryana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajaj M

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out by 13 undergraduate students during their rural posting in Community Medicine at Ballabgarh (Haryana. The Study was performed in a High School to find out the prevalence of dental problems and their probable etiology in 490 school children between 4-17 years of age. The prevalence of caries was found to be 65% and that of dental fluorosis was 40.4%. Consumption of refined sugar in the form of sweets between meals greatly enhanced the problem of dental caries. Plaque, Inadequate cleaning practices leading to poor dental hygiene, flurosis and the lack of earl medical intervention were other contributing factors. There was a lack of awareness about dental hygiene. Community therapy in the form of distribution of pamphlets, posters, giving health talks and a health talks and a health march was imparted with the aim of aiding the primary prevention of dental diseases.

  19. Friendship Network and Dental Brushing Behavior among Middle School Students: An Agent Based Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghipour, Maryam; Khoshnevisan, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Afshin; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman

    2017-01-01

    By using a standard questionnaire, the level of dental brushing frequency was assessed among 201 adolescent female middle school students in Tehran. The initial assessment was repeated after 5 months, in order to observe the dynamics in dental health behavior level. Logistic Regression model was used to evaluate the correlation among individuals' dental health behavior in their social network. A significant correlation on dental brushing habits was detected among groups of friends. This correlation was further spread over the network within the 5 months period. Moreover, it was identified that the average brushing level was improved within the 5 months period. Given that there was a significant correlation between social network's nodes' in-degree value, and brushing level, it was suggested that the observed improvement was partially due to more popularity of individuals with better tooth brushing habit. Agent Based Modeling (ABM) was used to demonstrate the dynamics of dental brushing frequency within a sample of friendship network. Two models with static and dynamic assumptions for the network structure were proposed. The model with dynamic network structure successfully described the dynamics of dental health behavior. Based on this model, on average, every 43 weeks a student changes her brushing habit due to learning from her friends. Finally, three training scenarios were tested by these models in order to evaluate their effectiveness. When training more popular students, considerable improvement in total students' brushing frequency was demonstrated by simulation results.

  20. Thermal-lens study of semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in restorative dental resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Leandro P.; Pilla, Viviane; Iwazaki, Adalberto N.; Barja, Paulo R.; Munin, Egberto

    2013-02-01

    Thermal Lens (TL) and spectroscopic characterizations were performed in CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) embedded into two commercial dental resin composites. The thermal-optical studies were performed in CdSe/ZnS QDs (core size Φ= 4.1 nm) and PMMA-encapsulated CdSe/ZnS (Φ= 3.7 nm) embedded in restorative dental resins at concentration of 0.025 and 0.42 % in mass, respectively. The thermal diffusivity (D) results are characteristics of the dental resin composites studied. Photoacoustic (PA) technique results for the dental resin composites support the TL results.

  1. Radiographic study of dental anomalies in brazilian patients with neuropsychomotor disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Erick Nelo Pedreira; Marina Cury Gallotini Magalhães; Camila Lopes Cardoso; Luís Antônio de Assis Taveira; Cláudio Froes de Freitas

    2007-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate radiographically the dental and maxillomandibular in patients with neuropsychomotor disorders and determine the role of panoramic radiographs for quantitative and qualitative analyses of dental alterations. A total of 322 panoramic radiographs from 190 males and 132 females aged 4 to 57 years were obtained from the files of the Center for Care to Patients with Special Needs (CAPE; Dental School, University of São Paulo) and subdivided into syndro...

  2. Critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies in dental traumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens O; Andersson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    the accuracy of the analysis. Several manuscripts of in vivo studies are submitted for publication to Dental Traumatology and rejected because of inadequate design, methodology or insufficient documentation of the results. The authors have substantial experience in experimental in vivo studies of tissue...... healing in dental traumatology and share their knowledge regarding critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies....

  3. A cone-beam CT based technique to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennen, G R J; Mommaerts, M Y; Abeloos, J; De Clercq, C; Lamoral, P; Neyt, N; Casselman, J; Schutyser, F

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for maxillofacial imaging. 3D virtual planning of orthognathic and facial orthomorphic surgery requires detailed visualisation of the interocclusal relationship. This study aimed to introduce and evaluate the use of a double CBCT scan procedure with a modified wax bite wafer to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface. The impressions of the dental arches and the wax bite wafer were scanned for ten patient separately using a high resolution standardized CBCT scanning protocol. Surface-based rigid registration using ICP (iterative closest points) was used to fit the virtual models on the wax bite wafer. Automatic rigid point-based registration of the wax bite wafer on the patient scan was performed to implement the digital virtual dental arches into the patient's skull model. Probability error histograms showed errors of wax bite wafer to set-up a 3D virtual augmented model of the skull with detailed dental surface.

  4. Social capital and dental pain in Brazilian northeast: a multilevel cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence on possible associations between social determinants and dental pain. This study investigated the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain in adolescents, adults and the elderly. Methods A population-based multilevel study was conducted involving 624 subjects from 3 age groups: 15–19, 35–44 and 65–74 years. They were randomly selected from 30 census tracts in three cities in the State of Paraíba, Brazil. A two-stage cluster sampling was used considering census tracts and households as sampling units. The outcome of study was the presence of dental pain in the last 6 months. Information on dental pain, demographic, socio-economic, health-related behaviors, use of dental services, self-perceived oral health and social capital measures was collected through interviews. Participants underwent a clinical examination for assessment of dental caries. Neighborhood social capital was evaluated using aggregated measures of social trust, social control, empowerment, political efficacy and neighborhood safety. Individual social capital assessment included bonding and bridging social capital. Multilevel logistic regression was used to test the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain after sequential adjustment for covariates. Results Individuals living in neighborhoods with high social capital were 52% less likely to report dental pain than those living in neighborhoods with low social capital (OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.27-0.85). Bonding social capital (positive interaction) was independently associated with dental pain (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.80-0.91). Last dental visit, self-perceived oral health and number of decayed teeth were also significantly associated with dental pain. Conclusions Our findings suggest that contextual and individual social capital are independently associated with dental pain. PMID:23289932

  5. Social capital and dental pain in Brazilian northeast: a multilevel cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Bianca Marques

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited evidence on possible associations between social determinants and dental pain. This study investigated the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain in adolescents, adults and the elderly. Methods A population-based multilevel study was conducted involving 624 subjects from 3 age groups: 15–19, 35–44 and 65–74 years. They were randomly selected from 30 census tracts in three cities in the State of Paraíba, Brazil. A two-stage cluster sampling was used considering census tracts and households as sampling units. The outcome of study was the presence of dental pain in the last 6 months. Information on dental pain, demographic, socio-economic, health-related behaviors, use of dental services, self-perceived oral health and social capital measures was collected through interviews. Participants underwent a clinical examination for assessment of dental caries. Neighborhood social capital was evaluated using aggregated measures of social trust, social control, empowerment, political efficacy and neighborhood safety. Individual social capital assessment included bonding and bridging social capital. Multilevel logistic regression was used to test the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain after sequential adjustment for covariates. Results Individuals living in neighborhoods with high social capital were 52% less likely to report dental pain than those living in neighborhoods with low social capital (OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.27-0.85. Bonding social capital (positive interaction was independently associated with dental pain (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.80-0.91. Last dental visit, self-perceived oral health and number of decayed teeth were also significantly associated with dental pain. Conclusions Our findings suggest that contextual and individual social capital are independently associated with dental pain.

  6. Predictors of Dental Care Use: Findings from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Garcia, Raul I.; Visotcky, Alexis (Dye); Szabo, Aniko

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine longitudinal trends and associated factors in dental service utilization by adolescents progressing to early adulthood in the United States. Data Source The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health from Waves I (1994-95), II (1996), III (2001-2002) and IV (2007-2008). Study Design This is a retrospective, observational study of adolescents' transition to early adulthood. We obtained descriptive statistics and performed logistic regression analyses to identify the effects of baseline and concurrent covariates on dental service utilization from adolescence to early adulthood over time. Principal Findings Dental service utilization within the prior 12 months peaked at age 16 (72%), gradually decreased until age 21 (57%), and thereafter remained flat. Whites and Asians had a 10-20 percentage points higher proportion of dental service utilization at most ages compared to Blacks and Hispanics. Dental service utilization at later follow-up visits was strongly associated with baseline utilization with OR= 10.7, 2.4 and 1.5 at the 1-year, 7-year and 13-year follow-ups respectively. These effects decreased when adjusted for current income, insurance and education. Compared to Whites, Blacks were consistently less likely to report any dental examination. Conclusion Dental service utilization was highest in adolescents. Gender, education, health insurance and income in young adulthood were significant predictors of reporting a dental examination. Blacks had lower odds of reporting a dental examination either as adolescents or as young adults. PMID:23850156

  7. Stress distribution of dental zirconia layered structure: a finite element model study%郎溪县0~6岁儿童出生缺陷调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫维翠

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study stress distribution of dental zirconia layered structure. Methods On the constructed three-dimensional finite element model of zirconia layered structure of the first maxillary molar, veneer layer is 70 GPa and 1.5mm, core layer is 205 GPa and 0.5 mm, respectively. Load of 200 N was applied over a lmm diameter circle at the tip of the mesial-diszal cusp ridge, simulating typical occlusional contact areas. Then maximum principal stress was calculated. Results The maximum principal stress varied throughout the geometry of the full crown configuration. For veneer, one concentration district of maximum principal stress occurred on the occlusal surface closely proximal to the loading position, several sub-maximum principal stress areas were observed, such as, margin regions of the mesial face, lingual face, distal face, buccal face and fossa of the occlusal face. Concentration of maximum principal stress occurred in the inner-face of the core near the mesial-distal cusp, and a small maximum principal stress area was also observed at the margin of the mesial face. Conclusion The stress distribution observed is similar with other studies, and is in coincidence with clinical failure model of all-ceramic crowns.%@@ 出生缺陷不仅影响出生人口素质,并且给家庭和社会带来沉重的经济负担,已引起社会和各级政府的高度重视.为了解郎溪县近几年出生缺陷病因及分布,作者对郎溪县0~6岁儿童进行了回顾性调查.

  8. Association Between Dental Students' Emotional Intelligence and Academic Performance: A Study at Six Dental Colleges in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Puranik, Manjunath P; Sowmya, K R

    2016-05-01

    Since the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in achieving academic excellence requires further research, the aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess EI and its associated factors and to determine any association between EI and academic performance among final-year dental students in Bengaluru, India. In 2015, 208 dental students from six dental colleges in Bengaluru were invited to participate in the study. Their demographic and lifestyle data were collected, and EI was assessed with the 30-item Emotional Quotient Self-Assessment Checklist developed by Sterrett. Academic performance was assessed using grades obtained in the final-year undergraduate examination. The response rate was 96% (N=200). Overall, 54.5% of the participants had high EI scores (≥120), although only 51 (25.5%) had a high EI score in all the domains (≥20). EI was significantly greater in females than males. Gender, sleep, meeting friends, physical exercise, recreational activities, and academic performance were significantly associated with EI and accounted for 42% variance in hierarchical regression analysis. EI was also positively associated with academic performance. Gender and healthy lifestyle habits were positively associated with EI, which in turn influenced these students' academic performance. These findings suggest a possible need for attention to developing dental students' EI.

  9. Children's experiences of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Annie G; Rodd, Helen D; Porritt, Jenny M; Baker, Sarah R; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Williams, Chris; Marshman, Zoe

    2017-03-01

    Dental anxiety is common among children. Although there is a wealth of research investigating childhood dental anxiety, little consideration has been given to the child's perspective. This qualitative study sought to explore with children their own experiences of dental anxiety using a cognitive behavioural therapy assessment model. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with dentally anxious children aged 11-16 years. The Five Areas model was used to inform the topic guide and analysis. Data were analysed using a framework approach. In total, 13 children were interviewed. Participants described their experiences of dental anxiety across multiple dimensions (situational factors and altered thoughts, feelings, physical symptoms, and behaviours). Participants placed considerable value on communication by dental professionals, with poor communication having a negative influence on dental anxiety and the dentist-patient relationship. This study confirms the Five Areas model as an applicable theoretical model for the assessment of childhood dental anxiety. Children provided insights about their own dental anxiety experiences that have not previously been described. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Characteristics of dental fear among Arabic-speaking children: a descriptive study

    OpenAIRE

    El-Housseiny, Azza A; Alamoudi, Najlaa M; Farsi, Najat M.; El Derwi, Douaa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental fear has not only been linked to poor dental health in children but also persists across the lifespan, if unaddressed, and can continue to affect oral, systemic, and psychological health. The aim of this study was to assess the factor structure of the Arabic version of the Children’s Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), and to assess the difference in factor structure between boys and girls. Methods Participants were 220 consecutive paediatric dental patients 6–12...

  11. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

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    Karin Tanja-Dijkstra

    Full Text Available Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b uses a Virtual Reality (VR representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions. Participants (n = 69 took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control. In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  12. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  13. Dental Students' Perceptions of Learning Value in PBL Groups with Medical and Dental Students Together versus Dental Students Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Maryam; Zulla, Rosslynn; Gaudet-Amigo, Gisele; Patterson, Steven; Murphy, Natalie; Ross, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    At a dental school in Canada, problem-based learning (PBL) sessions were restructured from an integrated dental-medical model to a separate dental model, resulting in three groups of students available for study: those who had participated in the two-year dental and medical combined, the one-year dental and medical combined, the one-year dental alone, and the two-year dental alone. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the extent to which the PBL structure affected the dental students' perceptions of the learning value of PBL in the different models. A total of 34 first-, second-, and third-year dental students participated in six focus groups in May and June 2011 (34% of students in those total classes). Semistructured questions explored their experiences in the different PBL structures. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was employed. The results showed positive and negative perceptions for both the combined dental and medical settings and the settings with dental students alone. For students in the combined PBL groups, positive perceptions included gaining information from medical peers, motivation to learn, and interdisciplinary collaborations. The negative perceptions mainly related to irrelevant content, dominating medical students, and ineffective preceptors. Members of the separate dental groups were more positive about the content and felt a sense of belonging. They appreciated the dental preceptors but were concerned about the inadequacy of their medical knowledge. Overall, the dental students valued the combined PBL experience and appreciated the opportunity to learn with their medical colleagues. Close attention, however, must be paid to PBL content and the preceptor's role to optimize dental students' experience in combined medical and dental groups.

  14. pH landscapes in a novel five-species model of early dental biofilm.

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    Sebastian Schlafer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite continued preventive efforts, dental caries remains the most common disease of man. Organic acids produced by microorganisms in dental plaque play a crucial role for the development of carious lesions. During early stages of the pathogenetic process, repeated pH drops induce changes in microbial composition and favour the establishment of an increasingly acidogenic and aciduric microflora. The complex structure of dental biofilms, allowing for a multitude of different ecological environments in close proximity, remains largely unexplored. In this study, we designed a laboratory biofilm model that mimics the bacterial community present during early acidogenic stages of the caries process. We then performed a time-resolved microscopic analysis of the extracellular pH landscape at the interface between bacterial biofilm and underlying substrate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Strains of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus downei and Actinomyces naeslundii were employed in the model. Biofilms were grown in flow channels that allowed for direct microscopic analysis of the biofilms in situ. The architecture and composition of the biofilms were analysed using fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both biofilm structure and composition were highly reproducible and showed similarity to in-vivo-grown dental plaque. We employed the pH-sensitive ratiometric probe C-SNARF-4 to perform real-time microscopic analyses of the biofilm pH in response to salivary solutions containing glucose. Anaerobic glycolysis in the model biofilms created a mildly acidic environment. Decrease in pH in different areas of the biofilms varied, and distinct extracellular pH-microenvironments were conserved over several hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The designed biofilm model represents a promising tool to determine the effect of potential therapeutic agents on biofilm growth

  15. Exfoliative cytology and titanium dental implants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Nalli, Gabriela; Verdú, Sergio; Paparella, María L; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2013-01-01

    Oral exfoliative cytology is a diagnostic method that involves the study of cells exfoliated from the oral mucosa. Ions/particles released from metallic implants can remain in the peri-implant milieu. The aim of the present study is to assess the presence of metal particles in cells exfoliated from peri-implant oral mucosa around titanium dental implants. The study comprised 30 patients carrying titanium dental implants, who had neither a metallic prosthesis nor metal restorations in neighboring teeth. Individuals undergoing orthodontic therapy and those who had oral piercing were also excluded from the study. The study sample included patients with and without peri-implantitis. Cytologic samples of the peri-implant area were collected. Samples of the marginal gingiva on the contralateral side of the implant were taken from the same individuals to serve as control. Cytologic analysis was performed using light microscopy. Titanium concentration was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometry. Metal-like particles were observed inside and outside epithelial cells and macrophages in cytologic smears of peri-implant mucosa of both patients with and without peri-implantitis. No particles were found in the control cytologic samples. The concentration of titanium was higher in the peri-implantitis group compared with the group without peri-implantitis; no traces of titanium were observed in controls. Regardless of an inflammatory response, ions/particles are released from the surface of the implant into the biologic milieu. Exfoliative cytology is a simple technique that may be used to detect metal particles in cells exfoliated from the peri-implant mucosa.

  16. A Multilevel Approach on Self-Reported Dental Caries in Subjects of Minority Ethnic Groups: A Cross-Sectional Study of 6440 Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Carlos M; Posada-López, Adriana; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés A

    2016-02-01

    Regional contextual factors and dental caries using multilevel modeling related to adults in minority ethnic groups have been scantily explored. The influence of the socioeconomic context on self-reported dental caries (SRDC) in individuals of minority ethnic groups (IEG) in Colombia was studied. Data from the 2007 National Public Health Survey were collected in 34,843 participants of the population. The influence of different factors on SRDC in IEG was investigated with logistic and multilevel regression analyses. A total of 6440 individuals belonged to an ethnic group. Multilevel analysis showed a significant variance in SRDC that was smaller in IEG level than between states. Multilevel multivariate analysis also associated SRDC with increasing age, lower education level, last dental visit >1 year, unmet dental need and low Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Minority ethnic groups were at risk to report higher dental caries, where low GDP was an important variable to be considered.

  17. A model for a children's dental health carnival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harn, S D; Kuster, C G

    1991-01-01

    A children's dental health carnival can yield many benefits. Some of these are: The general public becomes better informed regarding the importance of dentistry for children; children are presented with preventive-dentistry information in an entertaining environment; and students gain experience in organizing and participating in a community service project. The Children's Dental Health Carnivals have provided the children of Lincoln, Nebraska and the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry with these benefits. The authors would be pleased to share additional information with interested parties.

  18. Cognitive vulnerability and dental fear

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    Spencer A John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cognitive Vulnerability Model proposes that perceptions of certain characteristics of a situation are critical determinants of fear. Although the model is applicable to all animal, natural environment and situational fears, it has not yet been applied specifically to dental fear. This study therefore aimed to examine the association between dental fear and perceptions of dental visits as uncontrollable, unpredictable and dangerous. Methods The study used a clustered, stratified national sample of Australians aged 15 years and over. All participants were asked in a telephone interview survey to indicate their level of dental fear. Participants who received an oral examination were subsequently provided with a self-complete questionnaire in which they rated their perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness associated with dental visiting. Results 3937 participants were recruited. Each of the three vulnerability-related perceptions was strongly associated with the prevalence of high dental fear. In a logistic regression analysis, uncontrollability and dangerousness perceptions were significantly associated with high dental fear after controlling for age and sex. However, unpredictability perceptions did not have a statistically significant independent association with dental fear after controlling for all other variables. Conclusion Results are mostly consistent with the Cognitive Vulnerability Model of the etiology of fear, with perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness each showing a strong bivariate relationship with high dental fear prevalence. However, more extensive measures of vulnerability perceptions would be valuable in future investigations.

  19. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Study on the Biomechanical Simulation of Various Structured Dental Implants and Their Surrounding Bone Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Hai; Chen, Xianshuai; Wang, Weijun; Chen, Jianyu; Liang, Jimin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. This three-dimensional finite element study observed the stress distribution characteristics of 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues with various structured abutments, implant threads, and healing methods under different amounts of concentrated loading. Materials and Methods. A three-dimensional geometrical model of a dental implant and its surrounding bone tissue was created; the model simulated a screw applied with a preload of 200 N or a torque...

  20. Substrate Creep on The Fatigue Life of A Model Dental Multilayer Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J; Huang, M; Niu, X; soboyejo, W

    2006-10-09

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of substrate creep on the fatigue behavior of a model dental multilayer structure, in which a top glass layer was bonded to a polycarbonate substrate through a dental adhesive. The top glass layers were ground using 120 grit or 600 grit sand papers before bonding to create different sub-surface crack sizes and morphologies. The multilayer structures were tested under cyclic Hertzian contact loading to study crack growth and obtain fatigue life curves. The experiment results showed that the fatigue lives of the multilayer structures were impaired by increasing crack sizes in the sub-surfaces. They were also significantly reduced by the substrate creep when tested at relatively low load levels i.e. P{sub m} < 60 N (Pm is the maximum magnitude of cyclic load). But at relatively high load levels i.e. P{sub m} > 65 N, slow crack growth (SCG) was the major failure mechanisms. A modeling study was then carried out to explore the possible failure mechanisms over a range of load levels. It is found that fatigue life at relatively low load levels can be better estimated by considering the substrate creep effect (SCE).

  1. Pretreatment modeling. A technique for reducing children's fear in the dental operatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, P E; Melamed, B G

    1988-10-01

    Research on modeling indicates that this technique offers dentists a means of reducing fear in child patients of all ages. As a preventive measure used with children who have had no prior exposure to dental treatment, it can be particularly efficacious. Based on the assumption that much of adult dental avoidance is based on dental fears acquired in childhood treatment, the reduction of children's dental fear would have a positive effect on the individual's tendency to seek out dental health care throughout his or her lifespan. For the dentist, there are also short- and long-term benefits. Dental management of the child is prerequisite to providing good dental care. Pedodontics as a specialty recognizes behavioral management of the child cannot be separated from the quality of the dentist's work. Fear has been identified as an important factor in disruptive behavior of school age children in the dental office. Practicing dentists consider the fearful, disruptive child to be among the most troublesome of problems in their clinical work. The child must cooperate or at least passively comply with the dentist's procedures in order to have the technical work completed. By reducing disruptive patient behavior (crying, screaming children whose peripheral and gross motor movements often make direct contact with the dentist or his equipment) the most unpalatable aspect of pediatric dentistry is minimized. Further, the actual time for treatment becomes shorter rather than longer. Although modeling is not restricted to videotape media, the emergence of current videotape technology provides the practitioner with the means for incorporating patient viewing of prerecorded modeling tapes as part of the usual waiting period. Such a procedure would mean that in the long run, the dentist will spend more time doing dentistry and less in behavioral management tasks.

  2. Biology and cytotoxicity of dental materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gociu, M; Pătroi, D; Prejmerean, Cristina; Păstrăv, O; Boboia, Stanca; Prodan, Doina; Moldovan, Marioara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to determine the degree of biocompatibility of a sealer (RO, laboratory made product) dental material in terms of cytotoxicity and animal tests. In the present study, the biological compatibility of eight experimental composite materials was examined by in vitro methods. The bio-composites used for the cytotoxicity test were placed into direct contact with normal human fibroblasts in a cell-culture dish. After fibroblast bioassay was performed, a duplicate sample of biomaterial was placed in each well, and then the fibroblasts were incubated for 48 hours at 37°C and 5% carbon dioxide. Local reactions after the implantation of the material regarding preclinical evaluation have been carried out within the Biobase Laboratory of the "Iuliu Hatieganu" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The biocompatibility was studied using the tolerance test by the subcutaneous and intramuscular implantation of the cured specimens. The sealant C3 scored the highest value to the cell viability. The results of the present study showed that different dental materials had different effects on cells. The resin monomer TEGDMA, present in the sealer's composition, increased the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Resin-based composites are cytotoxic before polymerization and immediately thereafter, whereas already set specimens cause almost no reaction. The test of tolerance showed that the composite materials do not contain any toxic, irritant substances or destructive ones for the living cells or tissues. The tests with experimental composite materials revealed that they are not cytotoxic for the living cells, in all versions of the materials used. All the samples of composite materials have maintained their integrity during the experiment, allowing the testing together with the embedded cells, which proved good viability, so they are suitable for dentistry use.

  3. Experimental study on penetration of dental implants into the maxillary sinus in different depths

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    Weijian ZHONG

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The exposing of dental implant into the maxillary sinus combined with membrane perforation might increase risks of implant failure and sinus complications. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the dental implant penetration into the maxillary sinus cavity in different depths on osseointegration and sinus health in a dog model. Material and Methods: Sixteen titanium implants were placed in the bilateral maxillary molar areas of eight adult mongrel dogs, which were randomly divided into four groups according to the different penetrating extents of implants into the sinus cavities (group A: 0 mm; group B: 1 mm; group C: 2 mm; group D: 3 mm. The block biopsies were harvested five months after surgery and evaluated by radiographic observation and histological analysis. Results: No signs of inflammatory reactions were observed in any maxillary sinus of the eight dogs. The tips of the implants with penetrating depth of 1 mm and 2 mm were found to be fully covered with newly formed membrane and partially with new bone. The tips of the implants with penetrating depth over 3 mm were exposed in the sinus cavity and showed no membrane or bone coverage. No significant differences were found among groups regarding implant stability, bone-to-implant contact (BIC and bone area in the implant threads (BA. Conclusions: Despite the protrusion extents, penetration of dental implant into the maxillary sinus with membrane perforation does not compromise the sinus health and the implant osseointegration in canine.

  4. STUDY OF PREVALENCE OF DENTAL CARIES AMONG THE POPULATION OF JAGDALPUR, CHHATTISGARH

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    Raichoor Anil Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dental caries is a major and significant oral health condition that affects about 50 to 60% of the population in India among oral diseases. Unfortunately in rural areas oral health care is often limited due to lack of perceived need for dental care among the rural population, financial constraints as well as shortage of dental manpower. AIM This study aims to determine the prevalence of dental caries among the general population of Jagdalpur and also determine the important factors that could have contributed to the disease. SETTING AND DESIGN Case records of patients who reported to the Department of Dentistry were studied retrospectively. Information about decayed, missed, filled teeth, occupation, oral hygiene techniques as well as dental visits was recorded. METHODS AND MATERIAL Retrospective data of 100 patients who visited the Department of Dentistry was collected from the medical records division. Case sheets having incomplete information or patients who were aged below 5 years and above 75 years were not considered for the study. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Was done using software SPSS 17.0 version. Chi square test (Descriptive Statistics was done to test the significance of nonparametric analysis. P values were considered significant at 0.05% level. RESULTS Of the 100 case records that were examined, dental caries was more prevalent in males than females with asymptomatic significance of both dental caries and missing teeth to be statistically significant. Restored teeth contributed to almost 72.72% of the population. CONCLUSION The prevalence of dental caries among the rural general population is significantly high. Less frequent dental visits and improper or inadequate brushing technique/methods could have contributed to the high incidence of dental caries. Creating awareness regarding proper oral hygiene methods as well as regular dental checkup is recommended.

  5. A comparison of the clinical and experimental characteristics of four acute surgical pain models: dental extraction, bunionectomy, joint replacement, and soft tissue surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neil K; Desjardins, Paul J; Chang, Phoebe D

    2014-03-01

    When a clinical trial of an analgesic produces a negative finding, it is important to consider the influence (if any) of experimental error on the validity of that result. Although efforts to identify and minimize experimental error in chronic pain investigations have begun in earnest, less work has been performed on the optimization of acute pain methodology. Of the acute surgical pain methodology articles that have been published over the last decade, almost all focus on either the dental or bunion model. Analgesics are typically evaluated in a variety of surgical models that eventually include hospital-based models (eg, joint replacement and soft tissue surgery). Every surgical procedure has unique clinical characteristics that must be considered to optimize study design and conduct. Much of the methodological knowledge garnered from bunion and dental studies is applicable to other surgical models, but some extrapolations are hazardous. The purposes of this review were (1) to qualitatively describe the clinical and experimental characteristics of the 4 classic surgical models: dental extraction, bunionectomy, joint replacement, and soft tissue surgery; and (2) to quantitatively compare the models by analyzing 3 factors: effect size, enrollment rate, and demographics. We found that the dental extraction and bunionectomy models had higher assay sensitivity than the joint replacement and soft tissue surgery models. It is probable that this finding is secondary to the superior experimental conditions under which the dental and bunion models are executed (utilization of few centers that have the ability to reduce surgical, anesthetic, and postoperative confounders).

  6. A new chemical formulation for control of dental unit water line contamination: An 'in vitro' and clinical 'study'

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    Dolci Giovanni

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water delivered by dental units during routine dental practice is highly contaminated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a new chemical solution flushed through Dental Unit Water Lines (DUWL for the control of contamination inside dental units. Materials and methods Six old dental units equipped with a device designed to automatically flush disinfecting solutions through the water system (Castellini Autosteril were selected. Water samples from DUWL effluents were collected in each dental unit for 10 randomly selected days, before and after a 5 minute DUWL disinfecting cycle with TetraAcetylEthileneDiamine (TAED and persalt (Ster4spray produced by Farmec spa, and distributed by Castellini spa. Water samples were plated in R2A Agar and cultured at room temperature for 7 days, and the total number of heterotrophic microorganisms counted and expressed in Log10 CFU/mL A general linear model was fitted and multiple regression ANOVA for repeated measures was used for the statistical analysis. Results The mean contamination in DUWL effluent at baseline was 5.45 ± 0.35 CFU/mL (range 4.79 to 5.93 CFU/mL. When water samples were tested "in vitro" against the chemical, no growth of heterotrophic bacteria was detected after a 5 minute contact in any of the water samples tested. After undergoing a 5 minute disinfecting cycle with the chemical, DUWL mean contamination in water effluents was 2.01 ± 0.32 CFU/mL (range 1.30 to 2.74 CFU/mL (significant difference with respect to baseline. Conclusions An inbetween patient disinfecting procedure consisting of flushing DUWL with TAED and persalt equivalent to 0.26% peracetic acid could be useful in routine dental practice for cross-contamination control.

  7. A Retrospective Longitudinal Study Regarding The Dental Anomalies Of Position With Eruptive Etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Muica (Nagy-Bota) Monica-Cristina; Păcurar Mariana; (Chibelean) Cireș-Marginean Manuela; Jurcă Anamaria; (Coșarcă) Lup Adina Simona; A Tudor

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Given the high frequency of dental anomalies of position and the lack of preventive measures of surveillance and monitoring of the eruption of permanent teeth, the aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency of dental anomalies of position in children.

  8. [Dental fluorosis in San Luis Potosi and its solution alternatives (pilot study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Prieto, M; Vázquez Guerrero, V; Silva Romo, E; Moreno Vélez, R; Ochoa Flores, L; Hernández, M J

    1988-12-01

    A study exposing the situation affecting the population of San Luis Potosí in central México, caused by dental fluorosis. Findings point to the need of implementing devices capable of regulating the concentrations of Fluorine ion (generating the efficient prevention of dental cavity incidence), to maintain them at optimal levels and without deletereal effects.

  9. A Retrospective Longitudinal Study Regarding The Dental Anomalies Of Position With Eruptive Etiology

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    (Nagy-Bota Muica Monica-Cristina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Given the high frequency of dental anomalies of position and the lack of preventive measures of surveillance and monitoring of the eruption of permanent teeth, the aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency of dental anomalies of position in children.

  10. Impact of Curriculum on Understanding of Professional Practice: A Longitudinal Study of Students Commencing Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Jules A.; Dall'Alba, Gloria; Livingstone, Vicki

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines changes in understanding of dental practice among a cohort of students in the early years of a dentistry programme. In their first two professional years, we identified five distinct understandings of dental practice that we have ordered from least to most comprehensive: "relieving pain or generally caring for…

  11. Dental development in Down syndrome and healthy children: a comparative study using the Demirjian method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, M.S. van der; Vucic, S.; Marrewijk, D.J.F. van; Ongkosuwito, E.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In children with Down syndrome, the timing of dental eruption is important for orthodontics treatment planning. Aim of this study was to determine whether tooth eruption and development of the dentition in children with Down syndrome are impaired. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dental development

  12. Biomechanical model produced from light-activated dental composite resins: a holographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelić, Dejan; Vasiljević, Darko; Blažić, Larisa; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Nikolić, Marko

    2013-11-01

    Light-activated dental composites, commonly applied in dentistry, can be used as excellent material for producing biomechanical models. They can be cast in almost any shape in an appropriate silicone mold and quickly solidified by irradiation with light in the blue part of the spectrum. In that way, it is possible to obtain any number of nearly identical casts. The models can be used to study the behavior of arbitrary structure under mechanical loads. To test the technique, a simple mechanical model of the tooth with a mesio-occluso-distal cavity was manufactured. Composite resin restoration was placed inside the cavity and light cured. Real-time holographic interferometry was used to analyze the contraction of the composite resin and its effect on the surrounding material. The results obtained in the holographic experiment were in good agreement with those obtained using the finite element method.

  13. Moderate sedation helps improve future behavior in pediatric dental patients – a prospective study

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    Denise Espíndola ANTUNES

    Full Text Available Abstract There is little evidence on the long-term effects of pharmacological management in children undergoing dental treatment. This study aimed to assess children’s behavior in consecutive dental sessions following oral rehabilitation using different pharmacological regimens for behavioral control. Participants were preschoolers who were previously treated for caries under one of the following: no sedative, oral sedation with midazolam, oral sedation with midazolam/ketamine, or general anesthesia. The children’s behavior in the follow-up sessions was assessed using the Ohio State University Behavioral Rating Scale (OSUBRS; higher scores represented less cooperative behavior (range 5–20. Follow-up assessments were conducted on 50 children under four years old for up to 29 months. Data were analyzed by the Friedman/Wilcoxon tests and Cox regression model. OSUBRS mean (standard deviation scores for the whole sample decreased from 11.9 (5.4 before treatment to 6.8 (3.2 at the final recall session (p < 0.001. Moderate sedation with midazolam (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.2–6.9 or midazolam/ketamine (OR 4.3, 95%CI 1.6–11.4 improved children’s future behavior. The general anesthesia group (n = 4 had a small sample size and the results should be considered with caution. Although invasive dental treatment negatively affected the child’s behavior in the dental chair, they became more cooperative over time. Moderately sedated children showed better prospective behavior than those in the non-sedation group.

  14. Detection of Dental Pathologies in Routine Paranasal CT Scans: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Erdogan; Yanik, Bahar; Demirpolat, Gulen

    2017-07-01

    Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) is a widespread method for evaluating paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity in daily practice. The maxillary teeth are in field of view in a paranasal sinus CT scan and it is possible to detect dental pathologies with CT. To determine the incidence of maxillary teeth pathologies in routine paranasal sinus CT scans. A retrospective study was conducted. Consecutive 395 paranasal sinus CT scans were evaluated. All CT images were obtained with a 64 detector-CT. Patients with previous facial trauma, operation, invasive tumors and repeated exams were excluded. Detected findings were classified as "tooth loss, dental restorations or procedures and dental pathologies (carious lesions, dental developmental anomalies, periapical lesions and periodontal diseases). The proportion of findings was reported as simple percentiles. Three hundred and eighty-four CT scans were included in the study. Dental restorations or procedures were determined in 129 (33.5%) patients. A total of 34 (8.8%) patients had normal teeth count and morphology. A total of 264 (64.3%) patients had at least one tooth loss. A total of 195 (51%) patients had at least one or more dental pathology. Number of dental carious lesions, dental developmental anomalies, periapical lesions and periodontal disease were 104 (27.0%), 78 (14.3%), 46 (11.9%), 44 (11.4%), respectively. Dental pathologies were encountered in more than half of the patients. Detecting dental pathologies may prevent tooth loss and improve oral health. The radiologist should keep in mind dental pathologies while evaluating paranasal sinus CT in daily practice.

  15. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  16. Topics of internal medicine for undergraduate dental education: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunde, A; Harendza, S

    2015-08-01

    Due to the ageing population, internal medicine has become increasingly important for dental education. Although several studies have reported dentists' dissatisfaction with their internal medicine training, no guidelines exist for internal medicine learning objectives in dental education. The aim of this study was to identify topics of internal medicine considered to be relevant for dental education by dentists and internists. Eight dentists from private dental practices in Hamburg and eight experienced internal medicine consultants from Hamburg University Hospital were recruited for semi-structured interviews about internal medicine topics relevant for dentists. Internal diseases were clustered into representative subspecialties. Dentists and internists were also asked to rate medical diseases or emergencies compiled from the literature by their relevance to dental education. Coagulopathy and endocarditis were rated highest by dentists, whilst anaphylaxis was rated highest by internists. Dentists rated hepatitis, HIV, organ transplantation and head/neck neoplasm significantly higher than internists. The largest number of different internal diseases mentioned by dentists or internists could be clustered under cardiovascular diseases. The number of specific diseases dentists considered to be relevant for dental education was higher in the subspecialties cardiovascular diseases, haematology/oncology and infectiology. We identified the internal medicine topics most relevant for dental education by surveying practising dentists and internists. The relevance of these topics should be confirmed by larger quantitative studies to develop guidelines how to design specific learning objectives for internal medicine in the dental curriculum. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Caries risk assessment in young adults using Public Dental Service guidelines and the Cariogram-a comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänsel Petersson, Gunnel; Ericson, Ewa; Isberg, Per-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives. To investigate the caries risk profiles in young adults and to compare the risk classification using the Public Dental Service (PDS) guidelines with a risk assessment program, the Cariogram. Materials and methods. All 19-year-old patients registered at eight public dental...... classification was predominantly based on past caries and/or present caries activity. The majority was classified as 'some risk', while 16.7% were assessed as being of 'high' or 'very high risk'. The corresponding value for the two highest risk groups in the Cariogram model was 17.4%. The agreement between...... clinics were invited to participate (n = 1699). The study group who completed the baseline examination consisted of 1295 subjects representing 10% of all 19 year-olds attending dental care at the PDS in Skåne, Sweden. A risk classification of each patient was made by the patient's regular team according...

  18. Electrochemical study of insulating properties of dental amalgam bonding polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumelin-Chemla, F; Degrange, M

    1998-06-01

    The standard techniques used for amalgam restorations often result in a lack of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. The bonding of amalgam with polymer has been suggested to improve its adaptation to dental tissues. Moreover the polymer involved in the bonding should inhibit the corrosion and the diffusion of metallic ions. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the capacity of bonded amalgam to prevent ionic diffusion and migration. In this respect, an original method employing electrochemical techniques was used to determine the leakage current of bonded amalgam restorations. The electrochemical behaviour of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations was compared using a potentiostat driven by a computerized system (Voltamaster, Radiometer Analytical) with software for specific applications such as chronoamperometry or cyclic voltammetry. Samples of recently extracted teeth of young patients were first examined, and then the results were checked by other experimental assays using protected and unprotected copper sticks. The measurements obtained with chronoamperometry (E = +300 mV/SCE) in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C showed that after polarization for 30 h the oxidation current decreased threefold for bonded samples (10 microA cm(-2)) as compared with the unprotected samples (35 microA cm(-2)). These results, as well as those obtained with the copper wires, demonstrated that even with two layers of adhesive the bonded joint is permeable to ions probably as a result of the hydrophylic properties of HEMA, a component of the adhesive. However, using five layers of adhesive reduced the ionic current by a factor as large as 10(6).

  19. Electrochemical study of insulating properties of dental amalgam bonding polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toumelin-Chemla, Florence; Degrange, Michel [Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire de Paris V, Montrouge (France)

    1998-06-01

    The standard techniques used for amalgam restorations often result in a lack of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. The bonding of amalgam with polymer has been suggested to improve its adaptation to dental tissues. Moreover the polymer involved in the bonding should inhibit the corrosion and the diffusion of metallic ions. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the capacity of bonded amalgam to prevent ionic diffusion and migration. In this respect, an original method employing electrochemical techniques was used to determine the leakage current of bonded amalgam restorations. The electrochemical behaviour of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations was compared using a potentiostat driven by a computerized system (Voltamaster, Radiometer Analytical) with software for specific applications such as chronoamperometry or cyclic voltammetry. Samples of recently extracted teeth of young patients were first examined, and then the results were checked by other experimental assays using protected and unprotected copper sticks. The measurements obtained with chronoamperometry (E=+300 mV/SCE) in Ringer's solution at 37 deg. C showed that after polarization for 30 h the oxidation current decreased threefold for bonded samples (10 {mu}A cm{sup -2}) as compared with the unprotected samples (35 {mu}A cm{sup -2}). These results, as well as those obtained with the copper wires, demonstrated that even with two layers of adhesive the bonded joint is permeable to ions probably as a result of the hydrophylic properties of HEMA, a component of the adhesive. However, using five layers of adhesive reduced the ionic current by a factor as large as 10{sup 6}. (author)

  20. Incidence of dental caries in primary dentition and risk factors: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia CORRÊA-FARIA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objectives of this prospective, longitudinal, population-based study were to estimate the incidence of dental caries in the primary dentition, identify risk factors and determine the proportion of children receiving dental treatment, through a two-year follow up. The first dental exam was conducted with 381 children aged one to five years, at health centers during immunization campaigns; 184 of them had dental caries and 197 had no caries experience. The second exam was carried out two years later at a nursery or at home with the same individuals who participated in the first exam. The diagnosis of dental caries was performed using the dmft criteria. Parents were interviewed regarding socioeconomic indicators. Descriptive, bivariate and adjusted Poisson regression analyses were performed. Among the 381 children, 234 were reexamined after two years (non-exposed: 139; exposed: 95. The overall incidence of dental caries was 46.6%. The greatest incidence of dental caries was found in the group of children with previous caries experience (61.1%. Among the children without dental caries in the first exam, 36.7% exhibited caries in the second exam. The majority of children (72.6% received no treatment for carious lesions in the two-year interval between examinations. Children with previous dental caries (RR: 1.52, 95%CI: 1.12–2.05 had a greater risk of developing new lesions, compared with the children without previous dental caries. The incidence of dental caries was high and most of children’s caries were untreated. Previous caries experience is a risk factor for developing new carious lesions in children.

  1. Incidence of dental caries in primary dentition and risk factors: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa-Faria, Patrícia; Paixão-Gonçalves, Suzane; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2016-05-20

    The objectives of this prospective, longitudinal, population-based study were to estimate the incidence of dental caries in the primary dentition, identify risk factors and determine the proportion of children receiving dental treatment, through a two-year follow up. The first dental exam was conducted with 381 children aged one to five years, at health centers during immunization campaigns; 184 of them had dental caries and 197 had no caries experience. The second exam was carried out two years later at a nursery or at home with the same individuals who participated in the first exam. The diagnosis of dental caries was performed using the dmft criteria. Parents were interviewed regarding socioeconomic indicators. Descriptive, bivariate and adjusted Poisson regression analyses were performed. Among the 381 children, 234 were reexamined after two years (non-exposed: 139; exposed: 95). The overall incidence of dental caries was 46.6%. The greatest incidence of dental caries was found in the group of children with previous caries experience (61.1%). Among the children without dental caries in the first exam, 36.7% exhibited caries in the second exam. The majority of children (72.6%) received no treatment for carious lesions in the two-year interval between examinations. Children with previous dental caries (RR: 1.52, 95%CI: 1.12-2.05) had a greater risk of developing new lesions, compared with the children without previous dental caries. The incidence of dental caries was high and most of children's caries were untreated. Previous caries experience is a risk factor for developing new carious lesions in children.

  2. Attitude toward Public Health Dentistry as a career among dental students in Odisha: A Cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Nupur; Jain, Kittu; Kabasi, Soumik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of dental students' expectations of their profession as well as their attitudes to study a particular specialty of dentistry is of great importance. These attitudes and expectations make studying dentistry meaningful to dental students and society and understanding these factors facilitate workforce planning in the dental sector The aim of the study was to assess the attitude of dental students towards considering Public Health Dentistry as their future career. Materials...

  3. Accuracy and reproducibility of dental measurements on tomographic digital models: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jamille B; Christovam, Ilana O; Alencar, David S; da Motta, Andréa F J; Mattos, Claudia T; Cury-Saramago, Adriana

    2017-04-26

    The aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of dental measurements obtained from digital study models generated from CBCT compared with those acquired from plaster models. The electronic databases Cochrane Library, Medline (via PubMed), Scopus, VHL, Web of Science, and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe were screened to identify articles from 1998 until February 2016. The inclusion criteria were: prospective and retrospective clinical trials in humans; validation and/or comparison articles of dental study models obtained from CBCT and plaster models; and articles that used dental linear measurements as an assessment tool. The methodological quality of the studies was carried out by Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) tool. A meta-analysis was performed to validate all comparative measurements. The databases search identified a total of 3160 items and 554 duplicates were excluded. After reading titles and abstracts, 12 articles were selected. Five articles were included after reading in full. The methodological quality obtained through QUADAS-2 was poor to moderate. In the meta-analysis, there were statistical differences between the mesiodistal widths of mandibular incisors, maxillary canines and premolars, and overall Bolton analysis. Therefore, the measurements considered accurate were maxillary and mandibular crowding, intermolar width and mesiodistal width of maxillary incisors, mandibular canines and premolars, in both arches for molars. Digital models obtained from CBCT were not accurate for all measures assessed. The differences were clinically acceptable for all dental linear measurements, except for maxillary arch perimeter. Digital models are reproducible for all measurements when intraexaminer assessment is considered and need improvement in interexaminer evaluation.

  4. Fit accuracy of metal partial removable dental prosthesis frameworks fabricated by traditional or light curing modeling material technique: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tarek M. Anan

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the fit of the LCMT-fabricated frameworks was better than the fit of the TT-fabricated frameworks. The framework fit can differ according to the span of the edentate ridge and the fabrication technique for the metal framework.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF MERCURY RELEASE FROM DENTAL AMALGAM: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty Aditya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to mercury from dental amalgam restoration, with possible negative health effects, has generally been considered to occur via either erosion or evaporation directly from the surface of fillings, followed by ingestion. This study aims to assess the mercury release from dental amalgam and provide a basis for comparison between mercury release in oral cavities with single and multiple amalgam restorations at different time intervals. This study was conducted in A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, and included three groups I , II and III containing one, four and eight teeth respectively. The level of mercury vapors released from dental amalgam restorations was calculated from artificial saliva and measured using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The obtained results concluded that the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations decreases as the restoration ages, after 30 days there was no significant difference between the amount of mercury released from multiple and single tooth restorations.

  6. STUDY OF DENTAL STATUS, QUALITIES OF INDIVIDUAL ORAL HYGIENE AND LEVEL OF DENTAL TREATMENT IN STUDENTS FROM SARATOV AND SARATOV REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Glybochko

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The comparative study of dental status, quality of individual oral hygiene realization and level of dental treatment rendering for students of stomatological faculty from Saratov and for students having no relation to dentistry from Saratov region has been carried out.

  7. Child′s dental fear: Cause related factors and the influence of audiovisual modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthi Mungara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Delivery of effective dental treatment to a child patient requires thorough knowledge to recognize dental fear and its management by the application of behavioral management techniques. Children′s Fear Survey Schedule - Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS helps in identification of specific stimuli which provoke fear in children with regard to dental situation. Audiovisual modeling can be successfully used in pediatric dental practice. Aim: To assess the degree of fear provoked by various stimuli in the dental office and to evaluate the effect of audiovisual modeling on dental fear of children using CFSS-DS. Materials and Methods: Ninety children were divided equally into experimental (group I and control (group II groups and were assessed in two visits for their degree of fear and the effect of audiovisual modeling, with the help of CFSS-DS. Results: The most fear-provoking stimulus for children was injection and the least was to open the mouth and having somebody look at them. There was no statistically significant difference in the overall mean CFSS-DS scores between the two groups during the initial session (P > 0.05. However, in the final session, a statistically significant difference was observed in the overall mean fear scores between the groups (P < 0.01. Significant improvement was seen in group I, while no significant change was noted in case of group II. Conclusion: Audiovisual modeling resulted in a significant reduction of overall fear as well as specific fear in relation to most of the items. A significant reduction of fear toward dentists, doctors in general, injections, being looked at, the sight, sounds, and act of the dentist drilling, and having the nurse clean their teeth was observed.

  8. 77 FR 20648 - Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental... of certain digital models, digital data, and treatment plans for use in making incremental dental... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain digital models, digital...

  9. Dental solid waste characterization and management in Iran: a case study of Sistan and Baluchestan Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafshan, Edris; Mohammadi, Leili; Mostafapour, Ferdos Kord; Moghaddam, Alireza Ansari

    2014-02-01

    The management of dental solid waste continues to be a major challenge, particularly in most healthcare facilities of the developing world. In Iran, few studies on management of dental solid waste and its composition are available. An effort has been made through this study to evaluate the hazardous and infectious status of dental solid waste, keeping in mind its possible role in cross-infection chain. For this study, 123 private dental centres and 36 public dental centres were selected and the composition and generation rate of dental solid waste produced were measured. Dental solid waste was classified to four main categories: (i) domestic-type; (ii) potentially infectious; (iii) chemical and pharmaceutical; and (iv) toxic, which constituted 11.7, 80.3, 6.3, and 1.7%, respectively, of the total. Also, the results indicated that the dental solid waste per patient per day generation rate for total, domestic-type, potentially infectious, chemical and pharmaceutical, and toxic wastes were 169.9, 8.6, 153.3, 11.2, and 3.3 g/patient/d, respectively. Furthermore, the per day generation rates for total, domestic-type, potentially infectious, chemical and pharmaceutical, and toxic wastes were 194.5, 22.6, 156.1, 12.3, and 3.4 kg/d, respectively. According to findings of this study, for best management of dental waste it is suggested that source reduction, separation, reuse, and recycling programmes be implemented and each section of dental waste be collected and disposed of separately and in accordance with related criteria.

  10. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  11. Occurrence and timing of complications following traumatic dental injuries: A retrospective study in a dental trauma department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Pilosof, Nir; Karawani, Munir; Wigler, Ronald; Kaufman, Arieh Y.; Teich, Sorin T.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study explores the pattern of complications occurrence resulting from traumatic dental injuries, the relation of this pattern to the number of years from the time of the injury to its first diagnosis, and other contributing characteristics such as root development and trauma characteristic. Material and Methods Patients’ data treated following dental trauma from 2002 to 2014 were classified and grouped according to age, gender, tooth type, injury type, diagnosis and the time that elapsed between the traumatic event and the diagnosis of complications (TIC). The distribution function of the quantitative parameters was determined with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Fisher exact test was used to test differences between categorical parameters. Results The review identified 166 patients (114 male and 52 female), with a total of 287 traumatized teeth, and a mean of 1.8 injured teeth per incident. Maxillary teeth were involved significantly more often in traumatic dental injuries. The follow-up period range (TIC) had a mean of 2.99 years. The most frequent complication was pulp necrosis (34.2%). The most frequent complication related to avulsion was ankylotic root resorption (50%) diagnosed after a median TIC of 1.18 years. Open apices at the occurrence of trauma were observed in 52 teeth. Of these, 54.9% experienced pulp necrosis and 9.8% inflammatory root resorption with a median TIC of 1.63 years. Teeth that experienced multiple traumatic events showed significantly more late pulp necrosis compared to teeth that experienced a single traumatic injury (61.9% vs. 25.3%, respectively, p<0.0001). Conclusions Follow-up periods should be based on the type of traumatic dental injury and the severity of the potential complications for the tooth. Current recommendations for follow-up after traumatic dental injury should be revised to reflect the need for more frequent and overall prolonged follow-up. Key words:Dental trauma, avulsion, open apex, pulp necrosis

  12. Keeping up with Dental Literature: A Study on Continuing Professional Development among Dental Practitioners in Hubli-Dharwad, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nandita Subba; Ali, Anzil K S; Thadeethra, Mathews Jude

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Continuing Professional Development (CPD) refers to skills and knowledge attained for both personal development and career advancement. In India, very few studies have been documented to discover the patterns of information update by dental practitioners. Aim To discover the educational tools that dentists of Hubli - Dharwad, Karnataka, India, prefer for updating their knowledge on new therapeutic methods and to assess the perceived usefulness of these CPD activities. Materials and Methods Face to face interview was carried out using questionnaire comprising questions on various CPD activities among all the practicing dentists. Pearson’s chi-square test was used to evaluate any association between the frequency of information update and perceived usefulness with gender, qualification, practice types and academic attachments. Results Out of 112 practicing dentists in Hubli-Dharwad, 104 consented for the study. Mean age group of the study population was 32.3±7.56 (SD) years. Discussion with colleagues and discussion with medical sales representatives were the most frequently utilized information sources. On the other hand, attending dental fairs was found to be the most rarely utilized method of information access. Discussion with colleagues, reading textbooks and accessing internet were rated as most useful CPD activities and discussion with sales representatives and attending dental fairs were rated as least useful CPD activities. Conclusion Both conventional methods of information sources like discussions with colleagues and textbook reading as well as contemporary information sources like accessing internet were the preferred methods of information update by dental practitioners of Hubli-Dharwad. PMID:28571256

  13. Community-Based Dental Education Models: An Analysis of Current Practices at U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Keith A

    2016-10-01

    Community-based dental education (CBDE) enhances students' clinical expertise, improves their cultural competence, increases access to care, and fosters community engagement. As emphasis on CBDE has increased over the last decades, the aim of this survey study was to determine how CBDE is currently being implemented in U.S. dental schools. The study used a 20-item, author-designed survey emailed in April to August 2015 to 60 of the 65 U.S. dental schools, excluding those that had been recently established. Of the 60 schools, representatives of 33 responded, resulting in a 55% response rate: 70% public and 30% private. These respondents reported that the extramural sites being used the most were community clinics (90.9%), Federally Qualified Health Clinics (66.7%), public health clinics (54.5%), and Indian Health Service clinics (42.4%). The majority of responding schools (63.6%) had ten or more sites available for rotations, and the rotation lengths were 1-2 weeks (29%), 2-4 weeks (25%), 4-6 weeks (29%), 6-8 weeks (3.2%), and 8-10 weeks (12.9%). Most of the respondents (78.8%) reported that their students were unable to be assessed for clinical competencies at external clinical sites, but roughly half allowed students to receive clinical credit. After students completed their rotations, the majority of the respondents (81.8%) reported that students were required to produce a reflection, and 87.9% reported that students completed a post-rotation survey. Considering the benefits of CBDE for students' education and for improving access to oral health care, it is encouraging that over 45% of the responding schools required their students to spend four weeks or longer on external rotations.

  14. Political or dental power in private and public service provision: a study of municipal expenditures for child dental care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L. B.; Bech, M.; Lauridsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Both professionals and politicians may affect expenditures for highly professional services provided in the public and private sector. We investigated Danish publicly financed child dental care with a special focus on the influence of politicians and dentists on the expenditure level. By studying...... spatial patterns in expenditure levels across municipalities, we are able to test the influences of these two main actors and the networks through which learning is achieved. Four hypotheses on the existence of different spatial spillover effects are tested. The empirical analysis is based on annual data...... from 1996 to 2001 for 226 Danish municipalities, thus allowing for the control for heterogeneity between municipalities and for intra-municipal correlations across time. The results point to differences in expenditures between municipalities with privately and publicly produced dental care. Furthermore...

  15. The study of temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain from the perspective of the predoctoral dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Ron

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses questions 2 to 6 posed in the charge to the conference to discuss the study of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orofacial pain from the perspective of the predoctoral dental curriculum. This paper lends itself to an additional query: how much diagnostic and therapeutic skill relative to TMD and orofacial pain should a new graduate possess and demonstrate to be deemed competent in accordance with the definition of competence of the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation? Although much of the content of this and the accompanying articles from the conference pertain to the TMD and orofacial pain curricula of dental schools in North America, most of what is presented here is universal to the teaching of the subject matter; therefore, it could be applied to educational institutions in other parts of the world. Indeed, an international survey relative to the teaching of TMD and orofacial pain would be of interest and value to dental schools worldwide.

  16. Clinical studies of dental erosion and erosive wear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M; Chew, H.P; Ellwood, R.P

    2011-01-01

    We define erosion as a partial demineralisation of enamel or dentine by intrinsic or extrinsic acids and erosive tooth wear as the accelerated loss of dental hard tissue through the combined effect...

  17. The use of dental services for children: implications of the 2010 dental reform in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri; Machnes, Yaffa; Gal, Assaf

    2015-02-01

    Routine dental examinations for children are important for early diagnosis and treatment of dental problems. The level of dental morbidity among Israeli children is higher than the global average. A July 2010 reform of Israel's National Health Insurance Law gradually offers free dental services for children up to age 12. The study examines the use of dental services for children and the factors affecting mothers' decision to take their children for routine checkups. In addition, the study examines the impact of the reform on dental checkups for children in various populations groups. A national representative sample comprising 618 mothers of children aged 5-18 was surveyed by telephone. The survey integrated the principles of the health beliefs model and socio-demographic characteristics. The results show that mothers' decision to take their children for dental checkups is affected by their socio-demographic status and by their health beliefs with respect to dental health. After the reform, the frequency of children's dental checkups significantly increased among vulnerable populations. Therefore, the reform has helped reduce gaps in Israeli society regarding children's dental health. Raising families' awareness of the reform and of the importance of dental health care together with expanding national distribution of approved dental clinics can increase the frequency of dental checkups among children in Israel.

  18. The Dental Needs of Army Family Members, 1986: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-10

    pediatric dentistry programs as well as larger families appear to value access to free dental care. Since the DoD had not announced details of its dental insu...Category of Care and by Age Group: --For Children (age 4-14): Diagnostic & Preventive $27-$80 Restorations, stainless steel crowns , and extractions (Basic... crowns , and extractions. Comprehensive services consist of basic care, space maintenance, and orthodon- tics. For youths and adults, average costs were

  19. Comparison of maxillary and mandibular dental arch forms by studying Fourier series developed from mathematically estimated dentitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Hiroko; Nakatsuka, Michiko; Iwai, Yasutomo

    2010-11-01

    We conducted a Fourier analysis on data obtained using correlation and principal component analyses of parallel-standardized dental study models; both maxillary and mandibular dental arches were predominantly round square in shape. The present study compared and determined the contribution ratio and reproducible coefficients of amplitudes (factors affecting dental arch forms), and demonstrated that the 1st to 4th and the 1st to 6th Fourier harmonics reproduced maxillary and mandibular dental arch forms, respectively. The correlation analyses of the constant term and amplitudes demonstrated that significant differences in the 2nd harmonic amplitude was strongly correlated with the curvature of anterior teeth and the length-to-width ratio in maxillary dentitions. By comparison of the constant term and amplitudes between different arch types, we did not observe significant differences in the constant term and the 1st amplitude of maxillary dentitions and in constant term and all amplitudes of mandibular dentitions. Nevertheless, the study revealed high contribution ratios of the 1st (in mandibular dentitions) and the 2nd (in maxillary dentitions) amplitudes essentially affecting the reproducibility of arch forms. The 1st amplitudes demonstrated a bow-like arrangement of all arch types, while the 2nd amplitudes adjusted the anterior-teeth curvature and in particular demonstrated the length-to-width ratio of maxillary dentitions. The 3rd and the 4th amplitudes were also determinants of the anterior-teeth curvature of maxillary dentitions. The 6th amplitude was necessary for reproduction, but showed no difference between varying mandibular dental arch types. Collectively, we conclude that the establishment of a Fourier series significantly reproduced maxillary but not mandibular dental arch forms.

  20. Oral health in Brazil: the challenges for dental health care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Sônia Cristina Lima

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses adult oral health in Brazil according to three perspectives: 1) the available epidemiological evidence about the population's oral-health-related epidemiological situation, especially adults and the elderly population, in relation to two high prevalence oral injuries (dental caries and tooth loss), 2) the main health care models for dealing with this situation, by analyzing the related historical processes in order to reveal the likely social, political and epidemiological implications of the different models, and 3) lastly, the possible challenges to Brazilian dentistry or collective oral health in overcoming these obstacles. The main results of the study indicate that, from an epidemiological point of view, Brazil is undergoing a transition in dental caries and tooth loss, which is not yet reflected in the profile of the elderly, but which is tentatively evidenced in young adults. Tooth loss remains high. Certain aspects of society's economic and political superstructure have an important impact on oral health indicators and existing inequalities. Oral health care models have a relative importance and must not be neglected. Vestiges of ideological movements, like preventive medicine, may explain the current impasse in collective oral health practices, such as the preeminence of Finalized Treatment (FT) in clinics and of preventive care in schools fostered by community-based programs. It is therefore important to develop conceptual, theoretical reflections and to increase the objects of intervention, their purposes and their modus operandi. The practice of dentistry according to these alternative models is still being constructed. New studies related to the different formats of these new practices are recommended.

  1. Framework for e-learning assessment in dental education: a global model for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Carolina R; Bayne, Stephen C; Beeley, Josie A; Brayshaw, Christine J; Cox, Margaret J; Donaldson, Nora H; Elson, Bruce S; Grayden, Sharon K; Hatzipanagos, Stylianos; Johnson, Lynn A; Reynolds, Patricia A; Schönwetter, Dieter J

    2013-05-01

    The framework presented in this article demonstrates strategies for a global approach to e-curricula in dental education by considering a collection of outcome assessment tools. By combining the outcomes for overall assessment, a global model for a pilot project that applies e-assessment tools to virtual learning environments (VLE), including haptics, is presented. Assessment strategies from two projects, HapTEL (Haptics in Technology Enhanced Learning) and UDENTE (Universal Dental E-learning), act as case-user studies that have helped develop the proposed global framework. They incorporate additional assessment tools and include evaluations from questionnaires and stakeholders' focus groups. These measure each of the factors affecting the classical teaching/learning theory framework as defined by Entwistle in a standardized manner. A mathematical combinatorial approach is proposed to join these results together as a global assessment. With the use of haptic-based simulation learning, exercises for tooth preparation assessing enamel and dentine were compared to plastic teeth in manikins. Equivalence for student performance for haptic versus traditional preparation methods was established, thus establishing the validity of the haptic solution for performing these exercises. Further data collected from HapTEL are still being analyzed, and pilots are being conducted to validate the proposed test measures. Initial results have been encouraging, but clearly the need persists to develop additional e-assessment methods for new learning domains.

  2. Study of dental occlusion in ancient human remains: a methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorin, Elena; Cadafalch, Joan; Ceperuelo, Dolors; Adserias Adserias, Maria José; Chimenos-Küstner, Eduard; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2014-09-01

    The anthropological dental and maxillary study in human skeletal remains usually refers to alterations or conditions of the oral cavity. These alterations could have repercussions on life style, dietary habits and diseases. In this particular context, dental occlusion is not often analyzed due to the fragmented condition of the remains, and especially due to the lack of methodology adapted to study ancient remains. The aim of this study is to propose an anthropological method based on clinical dental practice. In the method presented in this work, odontological parameters such as overjet, overbite, and Angle's Classification of Malocclusion, are evaluated.

  3. Modeling Dental Health Care Workers' Risk of Occupational Infection from Bloodborne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilouto, Eli; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The brief paper offers a model which permits quantification of the dental health care workers' risk of occupationally acquiring infection from bloodborne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus. The model incorporates five parameters such as the probability that any individual patient is infected and number of patients…

  4. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits A to F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits A through F. Among the information included in the exhibits is the experimental model schedule, the schematic representation, the content display, and the course outlines for all courses in the program.…

  5. Musculoskeletal neck and back pain in undergraduate dental students at a UK dental school - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, S; Ide, M

    2016-09-09

    Objective Limited data exist on musculoskeletal problems within dental students: we aimed to determine the prevalence of these disorders.Design Single centre cross-sectional study.Setting A UK Dental School 2015.Methods Students completed a modified Nordic pain questionnaire.Main outcome measures Self-reported frequency and severity of pain, fitness and coping strategies.Results 63% of 390 respondents were female and 75% aged under 23. Seventy-nine percent experienced pain with 42% experiencing pain for 30 or more days in the past year. Lower back pain was most common (54%) and was most frequently the worst area of pain (48%). Thirty-six percent reported pain lasting at least four hours. The mean 'average pain intensity' VAS score was 3.81/10 (sd = 1.75) and mean 'worst pain intensity' was 5.56 (sd = 2.10). More females reported neck pain (58% versus 37%, P pain intensity' (mean 4.02, sd 1.82 versus 3.43 sd 1.55, P = 0.012. Daily stretching was used by 55.7% of respondents, and this positively correlated with 'average' and 'worst pain intensity' (P = 0.096 and P = 0.001) scores. Eighteen percent sought professional help to manage pain.Conclusion Musculoskeletal pain is a problem for dental students. Education in self-care may be helpful; however, assessments of possible interventions are needed.

  6. Political or dental power in private and public service provision: a study of municipal expenditures for child dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Bech, Mickael; Lauridsen, Jørgen

    2012-07-01

    Both professionals and politicians may affect expenditures for highly professional services provided in the public and private sector. We investigated Danish publicly financed child dental care with a special focus on the influence of politicians and dentists on the expenditure level. By studying spatial patterns in expenditure levels across municipalities, we are able to test the influences of these two main actors and the networks through which learning is achieved. Four hypotheses on the existence of different spatial spillover effects are tested. The empirical analysis is based on annual data from 1996 to 2001 for 226 Danish municipalities, thus allowing for the control for heterogeneity between municipalities and for intra-municipal correlations across time. The results point to differences in expenditures between municipalities with privately and publicly produced dental care. Furthermore, dentists appear to be the most important actors for the spatial spillover effects, and these effects are especially strong for municipalities situated in the same county that use private dental clinics. There is no evidence of political spatial spillover effects between municipalities.

  7. Assessing Critical Thinking Outcomes of Dental Hygiene Students Utilizing Virtual Patient Simulation: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Joanna L

    2015-09-01

    Dental hygiene educators must determine which educational practices best promote critical thinking, a quality necessary to translate knowledge into sound clinical decision making. The aim of this small pilot study was to determine whether virtual patient simulation had an effect on the critical thinking of dental hygiene students. A pretest-posttest design using the Health Science Reasoning Test was used to evaluate the critical thinking skills of senior dental hygiene students at The University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston Dental Hygiene Program before and after their experience with computer-based patient simulation cases. Additional survey questions sought to identify the students' perceptions of whether the experience had helped develop their critical thinking skills and improved their ability to provide competent patient care. A convenience sample of 31 senior dental hygiene students completed both the pretest and posttest (81.5% of total students in that class); 30 senior dental hygiene students completed the survey on perceptions of the simulation (78.9% response rate). Although the results did not show a significant increase in mean scores, the students reported feeling that the use of virtual patients was an effective teaching method to promote critical thinking, problem-solving, and confidence in the clinical realm. The results of this pilot study may have implications to support the use of virtual patient simulations in dental hygiene education. Future research could include a larger controlled study to validate findings from this study.

  8. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-07-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities.

  9. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-01-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities. PMID:24082719

  10. DISR: Dental Image Segmentation and Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilevar, Abdol Hamid

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose novel algorithms for retrieving dental images from databases by their contents. Based on special information of dental images, for better content-based dental image retrieval and representation, the image attributes are used. We propose Dental Image Segmentation and Retrieval (DISR), a content-based image retrieval method that is robust to translation and scaling of the objects in the images. A novel model is used to calculate the features of the image. We implemented the dentition plaster casts and proposed a special technique for segmenting teeth in our dental study models. For testing the efficiency of the presented algorithm, a software system is developed and 60 dental study models are used. The models are covering different kinds of malocclusions. Our experiments show that 95% of the extracted results are accurate and the presented algorithm is efficient.

  11. 78 FR 46610 - Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental... models, digital data, and treatment plans for use in making incremental dental appliances, the...

  12. 78 FR 46611 - Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental... models, digital data, and treatment plans for use in making incremental dental appliances, the...

  13. [Experimental study of osseointegration of zirconium and titanium dental implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakov, O B; Doktorov, A A; D'iakova, S V; Denisov-Nikol'skiĭ, Iu I; Grötz, K A

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment performed on pigs, methods of light and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the interaction of zirconium and titanium dental implants with bone 6 months following their insertion. Distinct features of integration of both implant types with bone structures were detected. Sites of direct contact of bone structures with metal were found to undergo constant remodeling according to biochemical and metabolic conditions in each zone of an implant surface. Statistically the degree of interactive properties of zirconium implants significantly exceeded similar parameter for titanium screws. Along the perimeter of the zones of bone contact with zirconium implants greater numbers of forming and formed bone areas were revealed as compared to the zones of bone contact with titanium implants, where erosion lacunae were more numerous. The complex of research methods used in this study have not revealed distinct changes in the structure of osteocytes, located in immediate proximity to the metal surface in comparison with more distant sites in the bone.

  14. Medical care transition planning and dental care use for youth with special health care needs during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood: a preliminary explanatory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L

    2014-05-01

    The aims of the study were to test the hypotheses that youth with special health care needs (YSHCN) with a medical care transition plan are more likely to use dental care during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and that different factors are associated with dental utilization for YSHCN with and YSHCN without functional limitations. National Survey of CSHCN (2001) and Survey of Adult Transition and Health (2007) data were analyzed (N = 1,746). The main predictor variable was having a medical care transition plan, defined as having discussed with a doctor how health care needs might change with age and having developed a transition plan. The outcome variable was dental care use in 2001 (adolescence) and 2007 (young adulthood). Multiple variable Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate covariate-adjusted relative risks (RR). About 63 % of YSHCN had a medical care transition plan and 73.5 % utilized dental care. YSHCN with a medical care transition plan had a 9 % greater RR of utilizing dental care than YSHCN without a medical care transition plan (RR 1.09; 95 % CI 1.03-1.16). In the models stratified by functional limitation status, having a medical care transition plan was significantly associated with dental care use, but only for YSHCN without functional limitations (RR 1.11; 95 % CI 1.04-1.18). Having a medical care transition plan is significantly associated with dental care use, but only for YSHCN with no functional limitation. Dental care should be an integral part of the comprehensive health care transition planning process for all YSHCN.

  15. Evaluation of linear dimensional stability of various combinations of dental stone and plaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbulugbe, I C; Oderinu, O H; Shaba, O P; Oremosu, O A

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that due to the cheaper cost of dental plaster compared to dental stone, casts on which most of the dental prostheses and appliances were being fabricated in various laboratories were often mixtures of dental stone and dental plaster in order to reduce production cost. To evaluate the dimensional stability of various combinations of Dental Stone and Dental Plaster mixtures used to make dental casts. Alginate impressions of a master model of truncated metal cones were made and casts were produced by pouring with various combinations of dental stone and dental plaster mixtures. The linear dimensional differences between the inter-abutment distances on the casts were measured with an electronic caliper. One sample t-test and percentage differences were calculated. Dimensional variations for the distances measured using either 50% dental stone or 25% dental stone with plaster were statistically significant (p d" 0.05). Mixture of 75% dental stone and 25% dental plaster produced casts with no statistically significant dimensional variation from the master model (p e" 0.05). A mixture of 75% dental stone and 25% dental plaster could be used for procedures not requiring very accurate replica like mounting of teeth for dental training and for study models.

  16. Application of third molar development and eruption models in estimating dental age in Malay sub-adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yusmiaidil Putera; Cauwels, Rita; Deschepper, Ellen; Martens, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The third molar development (TMD) has been widely utilized as one of the radiographic method for dental age estimation. By using the same radiograph of the same individual, third molar eruption (TME) information can be incorporated to the TMD regression model. This study aims to evaluate the performance of dental age estimation in individual method models and the combined model (TMD and TME) based on the classic regressions of multiple linear and principal component analysis. A sample of 705 digital panoramic radiographs of Malay sub-adults aged between 14.1 and 23.8 years was collected. The techniques described by Gleiser and Hunt (modified by Kohler) and Olze were employed to stage the TMD and TME, respectively. The data was divided to develop three respective models based on the two regressions of multiple linear and principal component analysis. The trained models were then validated on the test sample and the accuracy of age prediction was compared between each model. The coefficient of determination (R²) and root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated. In both genders, adjusted R² yielded an increment in the linear regressions of combined model as compared to the individual models. The overall decrease in RMSE was detected in combined model as compared to TMD (0.03-0.06) and TME (0.2-0.8). In principal component regression, low value of adjusted R(2) and high RMSE except in male were exhibited in combined model. Dental age estimation is better predicted using combined model in multiple linear regression models.

  17. A study of the bone healing kinetics of plateau versus screw root design titanium dental implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Gary

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the bone healing process around plateau root from (PRF) and screw root from (SRF) titanium dental implants over the immediate 12 week healing period post implant placement.

  18. Eliciting students′ perceptions of integrated clinical dental education in Saudi Arabia: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Al-Dajani

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In the integrated curriculum, our study highlights the importance of clinical training not only in making dental students competent but also in increasing their confidence in performing clinical procedures.

  19. Studies of dental anomalies in a large group of school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, Erika C; Risso, Patrícia A; Costa, Marcelo de Castro; Modesto, Adriana; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2008-10-01

    The identification of specific patterns of dental anomalies would allow testing the hypothesis that certain genetic and environmental factors contribute to distinct dental anomaly subphenotypes. A sexual dimorphism in tooth agenesis and its association with other dental anomalies has been suggested. The aim of this study was to investigate a large group of children to define dental anomaly subphenotypes that may aid future genetic studies. Orthopantamograms of 1198 subjects were examined and 1167 were used in this study. The frequency of tooth agenesis in the studied population was 4.8%. Male:female ratios varied from 2:1 in the agenesis of upper lateral incisors to 0.5:1 in premolar agenesis. The risk of infra-occlusion of primary molars and double formation of primary incisors was increased in individuals with tooth agenesis.

  20. Maternal dental anxiety as a risk factor for dental caries in children: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem S. Ain

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: It was concluded that occurrence of dental caries was more in children of highly anxious mother's and hence there exists the association between the mother's dental anxiety and their children's dental caries prevalence. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(11.000: 4867-4872

  1. Dental erosion among South Brazilian adolescents: A 2.5-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusius, C D; Alves, L S; Susin, C; Maltz, M

    2017-07-20

    This population-based longitudinal study investigated the incidence, progression and risk factors for dental erosion among South Brazilian adolescents. Eight hundred and one schoolchildren attending 42 public and private schools were clinically examined at 12 years of age; clinical examinations were repeated after 2.5 years (SD=0.3). After tooth cleaning and drying, permanent incisors and first molars were classified using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) scoring criteria. Questionnaires were used to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics, dietary habits, toothbrushing frequency and general health. Poisson regression analysis was used to assess the association between dental erosion incidence and explanatory variables, with adjusted incidence risk ratios (IRR) and 95% CI estimated. Among those who did not have dental erosion at baseline, 49 of 680 schoolchildren (7.1%; 95% CI=5.2-9.1) developed erosive lesions over the follow-up period. Among schoolchildren who had dental erosion at baseline, 31 of 121 (25.4%; 95% CI=17.6-33.3) had new or more severe lesions. Boys were more likely to develop dental erosion than girls (IRR=1.88; 95% CI=1.06-3.32). A moderate incidence of dental erosion was observed among South Brazilian adolescents, with boys being at higher risk. The high progression rate of 25% observed here is very concerning, and it should be taken in consideration when designing preventive strategies for dental erosion. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Validation of ICMR index for identification of dental fluorosis in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ashima; Verma, Mahesh; Toteja, G S; Gauba, K; Mohanty, Vikrant; Mohanty, Utkal; Kaur, Rupinder

    2016-07-01

    The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) formulated a Task Force on dental fluorosis and recommended the subgroup to develop a simplified index for identification and grading of dental fluorosis to be used by the health workers. This study was conducted to pre-test the 'ICMR Index for Dental Fluorosis' in the field to check its reliability and reproducibility. A total of 600 photographs were taken, 150 in each grade of fluorosis by screening 14-17 yr school children from eight schools of Hisar (Haryana) and South west Delhi. Eighty photographs were finalized (20 in each grade) before calibration to be used for training of field workers. Calibration exercise was conducted involving the five member survey team on 100 diagnosed cases of dental fluorosis. The members again screened 74 children with dental fluorosis in the field to categorize in to different grades of fluorosis for assessment of inter-examiner reliability. The ICMR criteria showed more difference in agreement in very mild and mild categories during calibration. The inter-examiner reliability (κ) ranged from 0.59-1. The criteria was further modified and inter- examiner reliability (κ) found to be 0.83-0.98 which was almost perfect agreement. The tool developed by the ICMR to assess dental fluorosis can be used in a field set up by non-dental personnel reliably with high degree of reproducibility.

  3. Influence of scanning and reconstruction parameters on quality of three-dimensional surface models of the dental arches from cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, B.; Souza, P.C.; Jacobs, R.; Berti, S.D.; van der Stelt, P.

    2010-01-01

    The study aim is to investigate the influence of scan field, mouth opening, voxel size, and segmentation threshold selections on the quality of the three-dimensional (3D) surface models of the dental arches from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). 3D models of 25 patients scanned with one image in

  4. A centralised, automated dental hospital water quality and biofilm management system using neutral Ecasol maintains dental unit waterline output at better than potable quality: a 2-year longitudinal study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, M J

    2009-10-01

    Most studies addressing biofilm formation in dental chair unit waterlines (DUWLs) have focused on a range of individual dental chair units (DCUs) and no studies on a centralised approach in a large number of DCUs have been reported to date.

  5. Feeding frequency in infancy and dental caries in childhood: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldens, Carlos Alberto; Rodrigues, Priscila Humbert; de Anastácio, Gislaine; Vítolo, Márcia Regina; Chaffee, Benjamin W

    2017-09-03

    Feeding patterns in infancy are plausible contributors to dental caries later in childhood, yet relatively few cohort studies have examined potential dietary risk factors at this age. This study aimed to investigate the associations between feeding frequency at age 12 months and caries prevalence at age 3 years. In this prospective birth cohort of 345 Brazilian children, all foods and drinks consumed at age 12 months, including bottle-use and breastfeeding, were recorded using two 24-hour infant dietary recalls with mothers. The prevalence of early childhood caries (ECC) and severe ECC (S-ECC) at age 38 months were compared in groups defined according to 12-month feeding frequency, using regression models to adjust for sociodemographic characteristics and total carbohydrate intake. Independent of other variables, compared with children with infrequent bottle-use and breastfeeding at 12 months, at 38 months the ECC prevalence was 1.8-times higher in children breastfed more than three times/day (P = 0.001), 1.4-times higher in children bottle-fed more than three times/day (P = 0.07) and 1.5-times higher with combined high frequency of bottle and breastfeeding together (P = 0.04), but the association with consumption of other foods or drinks more than five times/day [risk ratio (RR) = 1.2; P = 0.10] was not statistically significant. Prevalence of S-ECC was significantly associated with frequent breastfeeding (RR = 2.4; P < 0.001) and with greater frequency of consumption of other foods or drinks (RR = 1.7, P = 0.001). High-frequency feeding in late infancy, including both bottle use and breastfeeding, were positively associated with dental caries in early childhood, suggesting possible early-life targets for caries prevention. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  6. Important considerations for designing and reporting epidemiologic and clinical studies in dental traumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lars; Andreasen, Jens O

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest important considerations for epidemiologic and clinical studies in the field of dental traumatology. The article is based on the authors' experiences from research in this field and editorial board work for the scientific journal Dental Traumatology....... Examples are given of issues where development is important. The importance of planning ahead of the study and consulting with experts in other fields is emphasized....

  7. Evaluation of anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Bathla; Manpreet Singh; Paramanand Kulhara; Shalu Chandna; Jitender Aneja

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing amount of stress in undergraduate dental students leading to anxiety, depression, and suicidal attempts/suicide. Aims: This study aims to evaluate anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students and to find out the various areas of stress. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire (to assess academic and nonacademic areas of stress) and three scales-Hamilton scale for anxiety (...

  8. Retrospective study of dental trauma in children with autism spectrum disorders: a paired study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Natália Silva; Dutra, Thaís Torres Barros; Fernandes, Regina Fátima; Moita Neto, José Machado; Mendes, Regina Ferraz; Prado Júnior, Raimundo Rosendo

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate the history of traumatic dental injury (TDI) among children with and without autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at the Centro Integrado de Educação Especial (CIES), in Teresina, Brazil. The dental records of 228 children, 114 with ASD (SG = study group) and 114 without ASD (CG = control group), paired by age, gender and socioeconomic characteristics between January 2007 and September 2014 were reviewed. Data were analyzed using chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression (alpha = 5.0%). Dental trauma in SG was lower than in the CG (24.6% and 41.2%, respectively, p = 0.007). The risk of trauma was lower among males in SG (OR: 0.35; 95%CI: 0.18 to 0.67). The likelihood of TDI in SG was 3.17 higher in females than that of males (p = 0.040). The prevalence of TDI was lower in ASD individuals compared to controls. Dental trauma was higher among ASD girls than ASD boys.

  9. A new primary dental care service compared with standard care for child and family to reduce the re-occurrence of childhood dental caries (Dental RECUR): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Cynthia; Adair, Pauline; Burnside, Girvan; Robinson, Louise; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Albadri, Sondos; Curnow, Morag; Ghahreman, Marjan; Henderson, Mary; Malies, Clare; Wong, Ferranti; Muirhead, Vanessa; Weston-Price, Sally; Whitehead, Hilary

    2015-11-04

    In England and Scotland, dental extraction is the single highest cause of planned admission to the hospital for children under 11 years. Traditional dental services have had limited success in reducing this disease burden. Interventions based on motivational interviewing have been shown to impact positively dental health behaviours and could facilitate the prevention of re-occurrence of dental caries in this high-risk population. The objective of the study is to evaluate whether a new, dental nurse-led service, delivered using a brief negotiated interview based on motivational interviewing, is a more cost-effective service than treatment as usual, in reducing the re-occurrence of dental decay in young children with previous dental extractions. This 2-year, two-arm, multicentre, randomised controlled trial will include 224 child participants, initially aged 5 to 7 years, who are scheduled to have one or more primary teeth extracted for dental caries under general anaesthesia (GA), relative analgesia (RA: inhalation sedation) or local anaesthesia (LA). The trial will be conducted in University Dental Hospitals, Secondary Care Centres or other providers of dental extraction services across the United Kingdom. The intervention will include a brief negotiated interview (based on the principles of motivational interviewing) delivered between enrollment and 6 weeks post-extraction, followed by directed prevention in primary dental care. Participants will be followed up for 2 years. The main outcome measure will be the dental caries experienced by 2 years post-enrollment at the level of dentine involvement on any tooth in either dentition, which had been caries-free at the baseline assessment. The participants are a hard-to-reach group in which secondary prevention is a challenge. Lack of engagement with dental care makes the children and their families scheduled for extraction particularly difficult to recruit to an RCT. Variations in service delivery between sites have

  10. Dental age estimation using Willems method: A digital orthopantomographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezwana Begum Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, age estimation has become increasingly important in living people for a variety of reasons, including identifying criminal and legal responsibility, and for many other social events such as a birth certificate, marriage, beginning a job, joining the army, and retirement. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the developmental stages of left seven mandibular teeth for estimation of dental age (DA in different age groups and to evaluate the possible correlation between DA and chronological age (CA in South Indian population using Willems method. Materials and Methods: Digital Orthopantomogram of 332 subjects (166 males, 166 females who fit the study and the criteria were obtained. Assessment of mandibular teeth (from central incisor to the second molar on left quadrant development was undertaken and DA was assessed using Willems method. Results and Discussion: The present study showed a significant correlation between DA and CA in both males (r = 0.71 and females (r = 0.88. The overall mean difference between the estimated DA and CA for males was 0.69 ± 2.14 years (P 0.05. Willems method underestimated the mean age of males by 0.69 years and females by 0.08 years and showed that females mature earlier than males in selected population. The mean difference between DA and CA according to Willems method was 0.39 years and is statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study showed significant relation between DA and CA. Thus, digital radiographic assessment of mandibular teeth development can be used to generate mean DA using Willems method and also the estimated age range for an individual of unknown CA.

  11. Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for the Treatment of Dental Phobia: A Controlled Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjar, Kumar Raghav; van Wijk, Arjen; Sharma, Ratika; de Jongh, Ad

    2017-09-14

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has been used to treat a variety of fears and phobias. To determine the feasibility (i.e. safety and efficacy) of using VRET to treat dental phobia. Safety was evaluated by determining any adverse events or symptom exacerbation. Efficacy of VRET was evaluated by comparing the reduction in dental anxiety scores (measured 16 times within a 14-week study period, and at 6-month follow-up), and its behavioural effects with that of an informational pamphlet (IP) on ten randomized patients with dental phobia using a controlled multiple baseline design. Participants' heart rate response during VRET, and their experience post-VRET, were indexed. No personal adverse events or symptom exacerbation occurred. Visual analysis and post-hoc intention-to-treat analysis showed a significantly greater decrease in dental anxiety scores [higher PND (percentage of non-overlap data) scores of 100% and lower POD (percentage of overlap data) of 0%, Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, F (1,8) = 8.61, p = 0.019, and Dental Fear Scale, F (1,8) = 10.53, p = 0.012], and behavioural avoidance in the VRET compared with the IP group [d = 4.2 and -1.4, respectively). There was no increase in average heart rate during VRET. Of the nine treatment completers, six (four from the VRET group and two from the IP group) no longer had dental phobia at 6-month follow-up. Four of the five VRET participants, but none of the IP participants, scheduled a dental treatment appointment following the intervention. VRET is a feasible alternative for patients with dental phobia.

  12. An Articulation Model in Dental Assisting for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A Continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylves, Jane M.; Boody, Sandra

    A curriculum development project was conducted to generate additional competency-based modules to be used within the articulation model for Pennsylvania dental assisting programs, established in 1988. Project activities included reviewing, modifying, and providing parallel competency-based structure for the courses at the A.W. Beattie Technical…

  13. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits G to L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits G through L. Among the information included in the exhibits is the evaluation reports of the commission on accreditation, the detailed curriculum, and the accredited program's scope, sequence, and course…

  14. Biocompatibility study of lithium disilicate and zirconium oxide ceramics for esthetic dental abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The increasing demand for esthetically pleasing results has contributed to the use of ceramics for dental implant abutments. The aim of this study was to compare the biological response of epithelial tissue cultivated on lithium disilicate (LS2) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramics. Understanding the relevant physicochemical and mechanical properties of these ceramics will help identify the optimal material for facilitating gingival wound closure. Methods Both biomaterials were prepared with 2 different surface treatments: raw and polished. Their physicochemical characteristics were analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning white-light interferometry, and scanning electron microscopy. An organotypic culture was then performed using a chicken epithelium model to simulate peri-implant soft tissue. We measured the contact angle, hydrophobicity, and roughness of the materials as well as the tissue behavior at their surfaces (cell migration and cell adhesion). Results The best cell migration was observed on ZrO2 ceramic. Cell adhesion was also drastically lower on the polished ZrO2 ceramic than on both the raw and polished LS2. Evaluating various surface topographies of LS2 showed that increasing surface roughness improved cell adhesion, leading to an increase of up to 13%. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that a biomaterial, here LS2, can be modified using simple surface changes in order to finely modulate soft tissue adhesion. Strong adhesion at the abutment associated with weak migration assists in gingival wound healing. On the same material, polishing can reduce cell adhesion without drastically modifying cell migration. A comparison of LS2 and ZrO2 ceramic showed that LS2 was more conducive to creating varying tissue reactions. Our results can help dental surgeons to choose, especially for esthetic implant abutments, the most appropriate biomaterial as well as the most appropriate surface treatment to use in accordance with specific clinical

  15. Biocompatibility study of lithium disilicate and zirconium oxide ceramics for esthetic dental abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunot-Gohin, Céline; Duval, Jean-Luc; Verbeke, Sandra; Belanger, Kayla; Pezron, Isabelle; Kugel, Gérard; Laurent-Maquin, Dominique; Gangloff, Sophie; Egles, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    The increasing demand for esthetically pleasing results has contributed to the use of ceramics for dental implant abutments. The aim of this study was to compare the biological response of epithelial tissue cultivated on lithium disilicate (LS2) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramics. Understanding the relevant physicochemical and mechanical properties of these ceramics will help identify the optimal material for facilitating gingival wound closure. Both biomaterials were prepared with 2 different surface treatments: raw and polished. Their physicochemical characteristics were analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning white-light interferometry, and scanning electron microscopy. An organotypic culture was then performed using a chicken epithelium model to simulate peri-implant soft tissue. We measured the contact angle, hydrophobicity, and roughness of the materials as well as the tissue behavior at their surfaces (cell migration and cell adhesion). The best cell migration was observed on ZrO2 ceramic. Cell adhesion was also drastically lower on the polished ZrO2 ceramic than on both the raw and polished LS2. Evaluating various surface topographies of LS2 showed that increasing surface roughness improved cell adhesion, leading to an increase of up to 13%. Our results demonstrate that a biomaterial, here LS2, can be modified using simple surface changes in order to finely modulate soft tissue adhesion. Strong adhesion at the abutment associated with weak migration assists in gingival wound healing. On the same material, polishing can reduce cell adhesion without drastically modifying cell migration. A comparison of LS2 and ZrO2 ceramic showed that LS2 was more conducive to creating varying tissue reactions. Our results can help dental surgeons to choose, especially for esthetic implant abutments, the most appropriate biomaterial as well as the most appropriate surface treatment to use in accordance with specific clinical dental applications.

  16. A comparative study of oral health attitudes and behavior using the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) between dental and civil engineering students in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jorge A; Jaramillo, Fredy; Kador, Itzjak; Masuoka, David; Tong, Liyue; Ahn, Chul; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use the Hiroshima University - Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of dental and civil engineering students in Colombia. The HU-DBI's survey consisting of twenty dichotomous responses (agree-disagree) regarding tooth brushing, was completed at University Antonio Narino for the dental students and the University of Cauca for the civil engineering students. The Spanish version of the HU-DBI questionnaire was taken by 182 of 247 dental students and 411 of 762 engineering students. The data was-statistically analyzed by the chi-square test and backward logistic regression. Compared to the engineering students, the dental students were more likely to agree with questions such as "I am bothered by the color of my gums"(OR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.7),"I think I can clean my teeth well without using toothpaste" (OR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.5-5.9), "I have used a dye to see how clean my teeth are" (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9-4.3), and "I have had my dentist tell me that I brush very well" (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.1). The dental education curriculum in a dental school compared to a civil engineering school in Colombia indicated that a three-phase curriculum in didactics and clinics increased oral health attitudes and behavior from entry to graduation.

  17. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, M; Croharé, L; Ibañez, J C

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm(2) was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces..

  18. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  19. Dishabituation processes in height fear and dental fear: an indirect test of the non-associative model of fear acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, R; Waldie, K E; Craske, M G; Menzies, R G; McGee, R

    2000-09-01

    The fear dishabituation hypothesis described in the non-associative model of fear acquisition was tested in a longitudinal birth cohort study. Results were consistent with height fear and phobia dishabituation. That is, 're-emergence' of a fear of heights occurred between age 11 and 18 years among individuals who reported higher levels of non-specific stress at age 15. Interestingly, there was no evidence for dental fear dishabituation--a finding consistent with the non-associative model of fear acquisition. Strengths and weaknesses of the study were considered and the results discussed in relation to laboratory-based findings on (dis)habituation.

  20. TOOTH (The Open study Of dental pulp stem cell Therapy in Humans): Study protocol for evaluating safety and feasibility of autologous human adult dental pulp stem cell therapy in patients with chronic disability after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Anjali; Kremer, Karlea L; Hamilton-Bruce, Monica A; Kaidonis, Xenia; Milton, Austin G; Levi, Christopher; Shi, Songtao; Carey, Leeanne; Hillier, Susan; Rose, Miranda; Zacest, Andrew; Takhar, Parabjit; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-07-01

    Stroke represents a significant global disease burden. As of 2015, there is no chemical or biological therapy proven to actively enhance neurological recovery during the chronic phase post-stroke. Globally, cell-based therapy in stroke is at the stage of clinical translation and may improve neurological function through various mechanisms such as neural replacement, neuroprotection, angiogenesis, immuno-modulation, and neuroplasticity. Preclinical evidence in a rodent model of middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke as reported in four independent studies indicates improvement in neurobehavioral function with adult human dental pulp stem cell therapy. Human adult dental pulp stem cells present an exciting potential therapeutic option for improving post-stroke disability. TOOTH (The Open study Of dental pulp stem cell Therapy in Humans) will investigate the use of autologous stem cell therapy for stroke survivors with chronic disability, with the following objectives: (a) determine the maximum tolerable dose of autologous dental pulp stem cell therapy; (b) define that dental pulp stem cell therapy at the maximum tolerable dose is safe and feasible in chronic stroke; and (c) estimate the parameters of efficacy required to design a future Phase 2/3 clinical trial. TOOTH is a Phase 1, open-label, single-blinded clinical trial with a pragmatic design that comprises three stages: Stage 1 will involve the selection of 27 participants with middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke and the commencement of autologous dental pulp stem cell isolation, growth, and testing in sequential cohorts (n = 3). Stage 2 will involve the transplantation of dental pulp stem cell in each cohort of participants with an ascending dose and subsequent observation for a 6-month period for any dental pulp stem cell-related adverse events. Stage 3 will investigate the neurosurgical intervention of the maximum tolerable dose of autologous dental pulp stem cell followed by 9 weeks of intensive task

  1. Perceived Mistreatment of Graduating Dental Students: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Thomas M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 38 graduating dental students assessed the types and sources of perceived mistreatment. Students perceived an average of 35 separate incidents. Psychological mistreatment was most common; physical mistreatment was relatively infrequent. Classmates and clinical faculty were the most common sources. Sexual harassment was perceived by…

  2. Plasma treatment of dental cavities : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sladek, REJ; Stoffels, E; Walraven, R; Tielbeek, PJA; Koolhoven, Ruben A.

    2004-01-01

    Much effort is invested in the development of tissue-saving methods in dentistry. Cleaning and sterilization of infected tissue in a dental cavity or in a root channel can be accomplished using mechanical or laser techniques. However, with both approaches, heating and destruction of healthy tissue c

  3. A study of statistics anxiety levels of graduate dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Paul S; Jacks, Mary E; Smiley, Lynn A; Walden, Carolyn E; Clark, William D; Nguyen, Carol A

    2015-02-01

    In light of increased emphasis on evidence-based practice in the profession of dental hygiene, it is important that today's dental hygienist comprehend statistical measures to fully understand research articles, and thereby apply scientific evidence to practice. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate statistics anxiety among graduate dental hygiene students in the U.S. A web-based self-report, anonymous survey was emailed to directors of 17 MSDH programs in the U.S. with a request to distribute to graduate students. The survey collected data on statistics anxiety, sociodemographic characteristics and evidence-based practice. Statistic anxiety was assessed using the Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale. Study significance level was α=0.05. Only 8 of the 17 invited programs participated in the study. Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale data revealed graduate dental hygiene students experience low to moderate levels of statistics anxiety. Specifically, the level of anxiety on the Interpretation Anxiety factor indicated this population could struggle with making sense of scientific research. A decisive majority (92%) of students indicated statistics is essential for evidence-based practice and should be a required course for all dental hygienists. This study served to identify statistics anxiety in a previously unexplored population. The findings should be useful in both theory building and in practical applications. Furthermore, the results can be used to direct future research. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  4. Effect of year of study on stress levels in male undergraduate dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzahem AM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Alzahem,1 Henk T van der Molen,2 Benjamin J de Boer31Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD Residency Program, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center/King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences/National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Clinical Psychology, Princess Nora University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjective: Stress among dental students can be a significant threat, resulting in physical and/or mental illness, and have a negative effect on students' performance and the professional practice of dentistry. Stress can occur from different sources. The purpose of this study is to test whether the year of study has an effect on the stress levels of dental students.Method: Our study consisted of a cross-sectional survey using a modified version of the Dental Environment Stress (DES questionnaire. The questionnaires were filled out by male undergraduate dental students at King Saud University in Riyadh City during the 2010–2011 academic year (n = 214.Results: The results show the most common sources of stress: examinations and completing clinical requirements. Moreover, in the five-year lecture-based traditional curriculum, the third year students reported the highest level of stress, whereas the first year reported the lowest level of stress.Conclusion: Third year undergraduate dental students reported the highest level of stress. This stress could be reduced by reviewing and modifying the dental curriculum by allowing students to have contact with patients more gradually, starting from the first year, in addition to adding stress prevention and intervention programs in dental curricula.Keywords: dental, education, students, stress, study year

  5. Patient satisfaction relating to implant treatment by undergraduate and postgraduate dental students--a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, P

    2009-08-01

    Recordings of patient satisfaction with provision of dental implant treatment are scarce. This study aimed to evaluate satisfaction amongst patients attending for provision of implant treatment by training undergraduate and postgraduate students at Dublin Dental School and Hospital (DDSH). A questionnaire was formulated and distributed to 100 individuals randomly selected from records of patients who had received implant treatment via student clinics in the previous 5 years. The response rate was 68%. Results showed a high overall level of satisfaction with treatment received.

  6. Orthodontics as a prospective career choice among undergraduate dental students: A prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Sam, George

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purposes of this study were to investigate the factors influencing the career choice of dental students and to identify the future life plans of the students at Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University Dental College who had chosen orthodontics as their future specialty. Materials and Methods: An epidemiological descriptive survey was conducted using a set of questionnaire among the second year to fourth year students at Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al Kharj, Saudi Ar...

  7. Impact of internet supported dental education: Initial outcomes in a study sample

    OpenAIRE

    Fırat Sarsar; Mehmet Emin Kaval; Gary D. Klasser; Pelin Güneri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary mixed method study was to understand dental students’ thoughts on internet supported learning environment (ISLE) and to investigate its’ impact on their academic success. The research was designed to enroll the students from the 7th semester of School of Dentistry. The lecturer taught dental students for four hours (within four weeks) on the topics of "anamnesis, extraoral and intraoral examination". Voluntary twenty-four students participated actively to the ISLE....

  8. 氧化锆全瓷叠层冠样结构应力分布的有限元分析%Stress distribution of dental zirconia layered structure: a finite element model study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余婵媛; 伊元夫; 唐旭炎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study stress distribution of dental zirconia layered structure. Methods On the constructed three-dimensional finite element model of zireonia layered structure of the first maxillary molar, veneer layer is 70 GPa and 1.5mm, core layer is 205 GPa and 0.5 mm, respectively. Load of 200 N was applied over a lmm diameter circle at the tip of the mesial-distal cusp ridge, simulating typical occlusional contact areas. Then maximum principal stress was calculated. Results The maximum principal stress varied throughout the geometry of the full crown configuration. For veneer, one concentration district of maximum principal stress occurred on the occlusal surface closely proximal to the loading position, several sub-maximum principal stress areas were observed, such as, margin regions of the mesial face, lingual face, distal face, buceal face and fossa of the occlusal face. Concentration of maximum principal stress occurred in the inner-face of the core near the mesial-distal cusp, and a small maximum principal stress area was also observed at the margin of the mesial face. Conclusion The stress distribution observed is similar with other studies, and is in coincidence with clinical failure model of all-ceramic crowns.%目的 分析氧化锆全瓷叠层冠样结构应力分布情况.方法 在已建立的上领第一磨牙全瓷叠层冠样结构有限元模V上,设定饰面瓷厚度1.5 mm,弹性模量70 GPa,核瓷层厚度0.5 mm,弹性模量205 GPa.在Abaqus软件中,在模型斜峪距近中舌尖约0.5mm处,直径1 mm的圆形面积上施加与牙长轴平行的200 N静态载荷,然后,对模型各部分最大主应力进行计算,导出最大主应力云纹图及应力集中区最大主应力的值.结果 进行载荷计算后,全瓷冠模型表面各节点的最大主应力各不相同,饰面瓷位于加载区形成最大的应力集中区,并产生几个次应力集中区:近中邻面边缘应力集中区、舌面应力集中区、远中邻面应力集中

  9. Damage modeling of small-scale experiments on dental enamel with hierarchical microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, I; Xiao, T; Yilmaz, E; Schneider, G A; Huber, N; Bargmann, S

    2015-03-01

    Dental enamel is a highly anisotropic and heterogeneous material, which exhibits an optimal reliability with respect to the various loads occurring over years. In this work, enamel's microstructure of parallel aligned rods of mineral fibers is modeled and mechanical properties are evaluated in terms of strength and toughness with the help of a multiscale modeling method. The established model is validated by comparing it with the stress-strain curves identified by microcantilever beam experiments extracted from these rods. Moreover, in order to gain further insight in the damage-tolerant behavior of enamel, the size of crystallites below which the structure becomes insensitive to flaws is studied by a microstructural finite element model. The assumption regarding the fiber strength is verified by a numerical study leading to accordance of fiber size and flaw tolerance size, and the debonding strength is estimated by optimizing the failure behavior of the microstructure on the hierarchical level above the individual fibers. Based on these well-grounded properties, the material behavior is predicted well by homogenization of a representative unit cell including damage, taking imperfections (like microcracks in the present case) into account. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. What do patients expect from treatment with Dental Implants? Perceptions, expectations and misconceptions: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Li, Ming; Tang, Hua; Wang, Peng-Lai; Zhao, Yu-Xiao; McGrath, Colman; Mattheos, Nikos

    2017-03-01

    While research in terms of patient-centered care in implant therapy is growing, few studies have investigated patients' initial perceptions prior to consultation with the implant dentist. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to capture patients' initial information level, perceptions, as well as expectations from the implant therapy. A 34-item questionnaire was developed to investigate patients' preoperative information, perceptions and expectations from treatment with Dental Implants. The study was conducted in three locations (Hong Kong, SiChuan and JiangSu) during 2014-2015 with 277 patients. The main information source about implant therapy was the dentist or hygienist for less than half of the patients (n = 113, 42%). About 62.8% of participants considered that they were in general informed about implants, but only 17.7% felt confident with the information they had. More than 30% of the sample appeared to maintain dangerous misperceptions about Dental Implants: "Dental Implants require less care than natural teeth"; "Treatment with Dental Implants is appropriate for all patients with missing teeth"; "Dental Implants last longer than natural teeth"; and "Treatments with Dental Implants have no risks or complications." Patients were divided when asked whether "Dental Implants are as functional as natural teeth" (agreement frequency = 52.7%). Expectations from treatment outcome were commonly high, while there was a significant correlation between the overall mean of perception scores and outcome expectation scores (r = 0.32, P dental team would need to diagnose and correct prior to initiating implant treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Mobile and portable dental services catering to the basic oral health needs of the underserved population in developing countries: a proposed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganavadiya, R; Chandrashekar, Br; Goel, P; Hongal, Sg; Jain, M

    2014-05-01

    India is the second most populous country in the world with an extensive rural population (68.8%). Children less than 18 years constitute about 40% of the population. Approximately, 23.5% of the urban population resides in urban slums. The extensive rural population, school children and the urban slum dwellers are denied of even the basic dental services though there is continuous advancement in the field of dentistry. The dentist to population ratio has dramatically improved in the last one to two decades with no significant improvement in the oral health status of the general population. The various studies have revealed an increasing trend in oral diseases in the recent times especially among this underserved population. Alternate strategies have to be thought about rather than the traditional oral health-care delivery through private dentists on fee for service basis. Mobile and portable dental services are a viable option to take the sophisticated oral health services to the doorsteps of the underserved population. The databases were searched for publications from 1900 to the present (2013) using terms such as Mobile dental services, Portable dental services and Mobile and portable dental services with key articles obtained primarily from MEDLINE. This paper reviews the published and unpublished literature from different sources on the various mobile dental service programs successfully implemented in some developed and developing countries. Though the mobile and portable systems have some practical difficulties like financial considerations, they still seem to be the only way to reach every section of the community in the absence of national oral health policy and organized school dental health programs in India. The material for the present review was obtained mainly by searching the biomedical databases for primary research material using the search engine with key words such as mobile and/or portable dental services in developed and developing countries

  12. Mobile and Portable Dental Services Catering to the Basic Oral Health Needs of the Underserved Population in Developing Countries: A Proposed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganavadiya, R; Chandrashekar, BR; Goel, P; Hongal, SG; Jain, M

    2014-01-01

    India is the second most populous country in the world with an extensive rural population (68.8%). Children less than 18 years constitute about 40% of the population. Approximately, 23.5% of the urban population resides in urban slums. The extensive rural population, school children and the urban slum dwellers are denied of even the basic dental services though there is continuous advancement in the field of dentistry. The dentist to population ratio has dramatically improved in the last one to two decades with no significant improvement in the oral health status of the general population. The various studies have revealed an increasing trend in oral diseases in the recent times especially among this underserved population. Alternate strategies have to be thought about rather than the traditional oral health-care delivery through private dentists on fee for service basis. Mobile and portable dental services are a viable option to take the sophisticated oral health services to the doorsteps of the underserved population. The databases were searched for publications from 1900 to the present (2013) using terms such as Mobile dental services, Portable dental services and Mobile and portable dental services with key articles obtained primarily from MEDLINE. This paper reviews the published and unpublished literature from different sources on the various mobile dental service programs successfully implemented in some developed and developing countries. Though the mobile and portable systems have some practical difficulties like financial considerations, they still seem to be the only way to reach every section of the community in the absence of national oral health policy and organized school dental health programs in India. The material for the present review was obtained mainly by searching the biomedical databases for primary research material using the search engine with key words such as mobile and/or portable dental services in developed and developing countries

  13. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  14. Adhesiveness of opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus to materials used in dental office: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Bekir, Karima; Kadmi, Yassine; Dallel, Ines; Janel, Sébastien; Bovio, Simone; Barois, Nicolas; Lafont, Frank; Mastouri, Maha

    2017-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of several opportunistic microbial pathogens associated with many healthcare problems. In the present study, S. aureus was assessed for its biofilm-forming ability on materials routinely used in dental offices, including stainless steel (SS), polyethylene (PE), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Materials that were tested were characterized for roughness (Ra) and surface free energy (SFE). The adhesion forces exerted by S. aureus to each substratum were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and biofilm formation was quantitatively assessed by crystal violet staining assay. AFM measurements demonstrated that the strongest adhesion forces (20 nN) were exerted on the PE surfaces (P materials when compared to the other materials (P materials used in dental practices is of crucial importance for preventing biofilm formation on dental materials to be used for patients' dental care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A prospective study of prenatal mercury exposure from maternal dental amalgams and autism severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, David A; Kern, Janet K; Geier, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    Dental amalgams containing 50% mercury (Hg) have been used in dentistry for the last 150 years, and Hg exposure during key developmental periods was associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This study examined increased Hg exposure from maternal dental amalgams during pregnancy among 100 qualifying participants born between 1990-1999 and diagnosed with DSM-IV autism (severe) or ASD (mild). Logistic regression analysis (age, gender, race, and region of residency adjusted) by quintile of maternal dental amalgams during pregnancy revealed the ratio of autism:ASD (severe:mild) were about 1 (no effect) for or =6 amalgams. Subjects with > or =6 amalgams were 3.2-fold significantly more likely to be diagnosed with autism (severe) in comparison to ASD (mild) than subjects with < or =5 amalgams. Dental amalgam policies should consider Hg exposure in women before and during the child-bearing age and the possibility of subsequent fetal exposure and adverse outcomes.

  16. The role of mesoscopic modelling in understanding the response of dental enamel to mid-infrared radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verde, A Vila [Department of Chemical Engineering, Fenske Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ramos, M M D [Department of Physics, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Stoneham, A M [London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-21

    Human dental enamel has a porous mesostructure at the nanometre to micrometre scales that affects its thermal and mechanical properties relevant to laser treatment. We exploit finite-element models to investigate the response of this mesostructured enamel to mid-infrared lasers (CO{sub 2} at 10.6 {mu}m and Er:YAG at 2.94 {mu}m). Our models might easily be adapted to investigate ablation of other brittle composite materials. The studies clarify the role of pore water in ablation, and lead to an understanding of the different responses of enamel to CO{sub 2} and Er:YAG lasers, even though enamel has very similar average properties at the two wavelengths. We are able to suggest effective operating parameters for dental laser ablation, which should aid the introduction of minimally-invasive laser dentistry. In particular, our results indicate that, if pulses of {approx}10 {mu}s are used, the CO{sub 2} laser can ablate dental enamel without melting, and with minimal damage to the pulp of the tooth. Our results also suggest that pulses with 0.1-1 {mu}s duration can induce high stress transients which may cause unwanted cracking.

  17. Anthropometric measurements and dental caries in children: a systematic review of longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive.

  18. Anthropometric Measurements and Dental Caries in Children: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive. PMID:25593143

  19. Pulpa dentis D30 for acute reversible pulpitis: A prospective cohort study in routine dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Harald Johan; Mittag, Inge; Glockmann, Anja; Kiene, Helmut; Tröger, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Pulpa dentis D30 (PD: dental pulp of the calf, prepared in a homeopathic D30 potency) has been used in acute reversible pulpitis for pain relief and to avoid or postpone invasive dental treatment. To study short-term clinical outcomes of PD therapy for acute reversible pulpitis in routine dental practice. Prospective, observational, open-label, single-arm cohort study. Eleven dental primary care practices in Germany. Thirty-two patients starting monotherapy with PD for acute reversible pulpitis without visible or radiological abnormalities. PD was applied as 1-mL submucous injections into the mucobuccal fold, repeated daily as needed. Avoidance of invasive dental treatment (pulp capping, root canal therapy, tooth extraction) and remission of pain, measured on a 0-10 point scale (partial remission: reduction by > or =3 points; complete remission: reduction from > or =4 points to 0-1 points) during the 10-day follow-up period. Median pain duration was 14.0 days. The patients received a median of two PD applications (range 1-7). A total of 81% (n=26/32) of patients did not require invasive dental treatment, and 19% (n= 6) had root canal therapy. Remission status was evaluable in 24 patients. Of these, 63% (n = 15/24) achieved pain remission, 58% (n = 14) remitted without invasive dental treatment (complete remission: n=12, partial remission: n=2), and 29% (n= 7) had a close temporal relationship between PD and remission (ratio "time to remission after first PD application vs pain duration prior to first PD application" dental treatment. The open-label pre-post design does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness. However, more than one-fourth of evaluable patients remitted with a close temporal relationship between the first PD application and pain remission, suggesting a causal relationship between therapy and remission.

  20. [Study of remains and dental wastes of a First World War German rest camp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, R; Tzortzis, S; Desfosses, Y; Signoli, M; Tardivo, D

    2014-12-01

    This article presents the analysis of dental remains and waste from the dental office of a German rest camp of the First World War in order to study the living conditions of the soldiers, the care policy and the prosthetic rehabilitation techniques used in this context. The study included both dental and prosthetic remains, revealed during the excavation. The criteria to determine dental and periodontal health were the presence or absence of caries, wear, tartar and periodontal lesion. Location, severity and frequency of each of these parameters were examined. Regarding the prosthetic remains, the type of prosthesis and the materials used were determined. Three hundred and twenty seven (327) dental remains were analyzed. A high prevalence of large caries, especially in the molar areas, was highlighted. The incisal areas had however more wear and tartar. 183 casts of plaster dental arcade allowed to highlight a significant proportion of posterior edentulous. Prosthetic remains and laboratory waste revealed the use of vulcanite and porcelain for making dentures.

  1. Occurrence of trigeminocardiac reflex during dental implant surgery: An observational prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, James I-Sheng; Yu, Hui-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2017-10-01

    Trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) is a clinical phenomenon that manifests as s sudden onset of hemodynamic perturbations. TCR has been reported in cranio-maxillofacial surgery resulting in severe medical risks. Monitoring the hemodynamic changes during cranio-maxillofacial surgery can provide important information to ensure the continuous evaluation of patient's physical conditions. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine the hemodynamic alterations related to the possibly of occurrence of TCR in patients during dental implant surgery. One hundred and thirty-five patients (69 males and 66 females) received dental implant placement were enrolled in this study. The hemodynamic changes were evaluated by monitoring heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and pulse oximetry (SpO2). The above data were collected before, during, and after dental implant surgery. The data demonstrated that the minimal values of HR, SBP, and DBP as well as MABP decreased significantly during operation comparing with the corresponding values before operation (p implant placement in the mandible, patients received dental implant placement in the maxilla had more risks to confront with MABP reduction (OR = 3.98; 95% confidence interval: 1.12-13.2). A significant HR and BP reduction possibly due to TCR can occur during dental implant surgery. Therefore, the dentists should monitor the hemodynamic changes during dental implant surgery to prevent the possible occurrence of medical risks related to TCR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Librarian-facilitated problem-based learning course in a school of dental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasman, Linda

    2012-01-01

    While problem-based learning has been used in medical practice for several decades, dental education was slower to adapt this education model. However, as dental curricula are embracing this pedagogy, dental and other health sciences librarians are in a position to provide important curricular support. This article will detail one dental liaison librarian's experience with facilitating a problem-based, case-based studies course within the curriculum of a dental school.

  3. Study of radiation exposure dose in young dental patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, Atsushi (Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1983-08-01

    In order to clarify the trend in dental radiography for young patients up to 18 years old and the accompanying radiation exposures, surveys were made at Fukuoka Dental College Hospital and thirty-five dental offices in Fukuoka city and Kitakyushu city. Each kind of radiography increased in average number with age and 16-18 group was given 4.60 times of radiography of one kind or another in the clinic of college hospital. In the dental offices, the number of radiography taken was about one-fourth that of the clinic of college hospital. Although exposure dose varies with exposure factors, distance and angle of exposure, in addition to time factor, were found to affect doses subtly. In the clinic of college hospital the average of estimated doses to organs per person per year were 105.4 mrad (25.2 mrad for 5-year-old children) in the salivary gland, 55.9 mrad (18.9 mrad for 5-year-old) in the thyroid gland, 52.1 mrad (15.0 mrad for 5-year-old) in the lens of the eye and 52.2 mrad (8.7 mrad for 5-year-old) in the sella turcica. In the dental offices, the same average of estimated doses to organs were 40.5 mrad (7.4 mrad for 5-year-old) in the salivary gland, 17.4 mrad (8.0 mrad for 5-year-old) in the thyroid gland, 12.2 mrad (6.1 mrad for 5-year-old) in the lens of eye and 13.1 mrad (1.3 mrad for 5-year-old) in the sella turcica. In all kinds of radiograpy, the estimated doses in genital glands were in ..mu..rad. In the dental offices, both the percentage of young patients to all patients and the radiographing rate were lower as compared with those in the clinic of college hospital. The estimated doses were also lower at one-half to one-fifth and those by age and by organ were found to be one-tenth or lower.

  4. [Microbiological composition of dental plaque using Sprague Dawley rats as an experimental model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, F R; Perrone, M; Acevedo, A M

    1990-01-01

    In this study, the microbiological composition of the dental plaque in 12 male Sprague-Dawley rats was determined. Analysis using the light microscope showed the presence of nine colonies which suggested the presence of cocci, (6) diplococci (1) and rods. (2) Five of the bacteria were Gram positive and three were Gram negative. The morphological characteristic suggested the presence of Actinomyces in the case of Gram positive rods; Fusobacterium in the case of Gram negative rods; Neisseria and Veillonella in the of Gram negative cocci and Streptococci for the rest of the colonies. The biochemical characterization of the bacteria suggested the absence of Streptococcus mutans in the dental plaque of this animals.

  5. Relationship between risk assessment and payment models in Swedish Public Dental Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Gunnel Hänsel; Twetman, Svante

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To a) compare risk categories in patients selecting a capitation payment (CP) model with those in fee-for-service (FFS), b) determine the 3-year caries increment in the two groups, and c) compare the amount of delivered preventive care in the two groups. METHODS: A comprehensive risk...... the dental records. RESULTS: More patients in the low risk category preferred the CP model (74% vs. 26%) while >80% with high risk selected FFS. The baseline caries level was significantly higher in the FFS group as well as the 3-year caries increment (1.6 vs. 0.8 DFS: p ... preventive care delivered to each patient was generally lower in the FFS model; it was most frequent among patients with "some" risk in the CP model (83.8%) while the lowest delivery rates were found among low risk patients in the FFS system (32.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Young adults in public dental care with low...

  6. Traumatic dental injuries in a university hospital: a four-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Benjamin; Rahimi-Nedjat, Roman; Weusmann, Jens; Azaripour, Adriano; Walter, Christian; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-11-04

    Traumatic dental injuries present complex injuries of the dentoalveolar system. Aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and patterns of traumatic dental injuries in a University dental emergency service over four years. A retrospective investigation on all dental trauma patients presenting at the dental emergency service of the University Medical Center Mainz, Germany between 01/2010 and 12/2013 was conducted. Demographic data, the cause and type of trauma and the initial therapy were analyzed. Out of 16,301 patients, 1,305 patients (8 %; average age 14.7 years ±15.7; 60.1 % male, 39.9 % female) came due to trauma. 63.9 % of the traumas occurred on weekends. The most frequent reason for injuries was falls (54.6 %). No correlation could be found between the cause and the kind of trauma. In 48.6 % of the cases only one tooth was involved, in 33.5 % two. The permanent dentition was traumatized in 56.6 % of cases, the deciduous teeth in 41.1 %. The most frequently affected tooth was the central upper incisor (61.0 %). Hard-tissue injuries were significantly more frequent in the permanent dentition, while periodontal injuries were seen significantly more often in the deciduous dentition. Eight percent of all patients seeking help at the dental emergency service presented with trauma, meaning that dental traumatology is one of the major topics in emergencies. To improve the quality of care, further public education, expert knowledge among dental professionals and a well-structured emergency service are necessary.

  7. Convergent methods assessing bone growth in an experimental model at dental implants in the minipig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Anton; Friedmann, Asisa; Grize, Leticia; Obrecht, Marcel; Dard, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Implant dentistry demonstrated its reliability in treating successfully an increased amount of patients with dental implants exhibiting hydrophilic (modSLA) or non-hydrophilic (SLA) surfaces. Objectives of this minipig study consisted in assessing bone regeneration at both types of dental implants in a new experimental model (lateral bone defects) by implementing a convergent analysis approach combining histology and contact radiography. In six adult female minipigs standardized acute alveolar defects were created, then receiving two implants in the mandibles bilaterally (modSLA and SLA, one of each combined with Guided Bone Regeneration). Animals were sacrificed after 28 days of healing. Mid-crestal specimen were analyzed assessing missing BIC to implant shoulder (fBIC); vertical bone growth upon implant surface, bone:tissue ratio and grafting material area occupied by material remnants for GBR sites. Values obtained from both analyses were compared and statistical correlations scrutinized. Although dimensions of mean differences and adjusted means given by radiographic method were lower than histological ones, comparison of different implants yielded similar results. Statistical analyses of correlation and concordance coefficients used to evaluate radiological method of measurement showed high level of concordance (concordance coefficient=0.912 and correlation coefficient=0.939) for fBIC. Similar results were observed for vertical new bone and for remnants of graft. Discrepancies for new bone and for mineralized tissue resulted in concordance coefficient of 0.182 and 0.054. The results indicate that contact X-rays can be used for morphometric assessments regarding defect fill; however, histological staining remains beneficial if greater resolution for distinguishing qualitative differences in the tissues is required.

  8. Disinfection of dental unit water line using aloe vera: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Sonia; Nagaraj, Anup; Sharma, Prateek; Atri, Mansi; Walia, Satinder; Naidu, Shravani; Yousuf, Asif

    2013-01-01

    Context. Dental unit waterlines may be heavily contaminated with microorganisms and are a potential source of infection for both practicing staff and immunocompromised patients particularly. Contamination of dental unit water lines could be inhibited with the use of disinfectants. The present study investigates the effect of aloe-vera-based disinfectant in reducing the microbial growth in dental unit water lines (DUWLs). Aims. To compare the efficacy of aloe vera, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in controlling microbial contamination of DUWLs. Materials and Methods. After obtaining baseline water samples, the dental unit waterlines were treated with aloe vera, 10% hydrogen peroxide, and 5% sodium hypochlorite. Each of the three disinfectants was used in increasing concentrations and their inhibiting effect was compared. Water samples were analyzed for microbiological quality by the total viable count (TVC) method. Statistical Analysis Used. SPSS 16. Results. There was significant reduction in mean CFU/ml when treated with disinfectants each for a period of one week. Aloe-vera solution was found to be the most effective in reducing the microbial colonies. Conclusions. Improving the water quality from dental unit water lines is of considerable importance; chemical-based disinfectants can be replaced with herbal disinfectants for treating microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines.

  9. Disinfection of Dental Unit Water Line Using Aloe Vera: In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Pareek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Dental unit waterlines may be heavily contaminated with microorganisms and are a potential source of infection for both practicing staff and immunocompromised patients particularly. Contamination of dental unit water lines could be inhibited with the use of disinfectants. The present study investigates the effect of aloe-vera-based disinfectant in reducing the microbial growth in dental unit water lines (DUWLs. Aims. To compare the efficacy of aloe vera, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl in controlling microbial contamination of DUWLs. Materials and Methods. After obtaining baseline water samples, the dental unit waterlines were treated with aloe vera, 10% hydrogen peroxide, and 5% sodium hypochlorite. Each of the three disinfectants was used in increasing concentrations and their inhibiting effect was compared. Water samples were analyzed for microbiological quality by the total viable count (TVC method. Statistical Analysis Used. SPSS 16. Results. There was significant reduction in mean CFU/ml when treated with disinfectants each for a period of one week. Aloe-vera solution was found to be the most effective in reducing the microbial colonies. Conclusions. Improving the water quality from dental unit water lines is of considerable importance; chemical-based disinfectants can be replaced with herbal disinfectants for treating microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines.

  10. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  11. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  12. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in the district of Salem, Tamil Nadu, South India: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tamil Nadu is one of the 18 states affected by fluorosis in India. The maximum tolerance limit of fluoride in drinking water specified by the World Health Organization (WHO, 1984 is 1.5 mg/l while it is proved to be above in many areas of Salem. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the following study is to identify the prevalence of dental fluorosis among children in the district of Salem. To compare the prevalence of dental fluorosis between different sexes and age groups. Materials and Methods: A pilot study was conducted in a private school where oral examination was done using mouth mirror and probe under sunlight in 965 students, for the presence or absence of dental fluorosis. As it was a pilot study, the fluorosis indexes were not taken into consideration. Results: In our study, 965 students were examined for dental fluorosis out of which, 624 were boys and 341 were girls. Dental fluorosis was present in 31.1% of boys, and 30.3% of girls 297 students out of 965 (30.8% showed the presence of dental fluorosis. Conclusion: The present study showed that Salem is one of the districts affected by dental fluorosis in Tamil Nadu. An extensive study including the grades of fluorosis and estimation of water fluoride levels in different areas is required for better evaluation of the situation. Government should take actions to prevent fluorosis. Awareness should be given to the population to drink only the water supplied by the government.

  13. TO STUDY THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PREGNANCY, GINGIVITIS, DENTAL CARIES AND PERIODONTAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pregnancy is associated with profound dental biological processes as a result of hormonal interactions within the mother’s body, which result in both reversible and irreversible dental changes. The periodontal disease is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Increased public awareness, health education and medical intervention can improve the maternal and fetal outcome. The cohort study was carried out in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Integral institute of medical sciences and research, Lucknow from January 2012 to February 2014, for the period of 2 year. The objective was to study the relationship between pregnancy, gingivitis, dental caries and periodontal disease. METHODS: The cohort study was carried out in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Integral institute of medical sciences and research, Lucknow from January 2012 to February 2014, for the period of 2 year. The dental health status of 1200 antenatal cases were studied. The prevalence of gingivitis, dental caries and periodontal disease and the relationship with pregnancy was studied. RESULT: The oral hygiene was a significant determining factor in the disease process. The antenatal cases with poor oral hygiene were 2.5 times more likely to have dental caries. OR 0.0138, 95% CI (0.0033 to 0.0570 Z statistic 5.908, P<0.0001.The antenatal cases with poor oral hygiene were 20times more likely to have gingivitis. OR 0.0045, 95% CI (0.0006-0.0365 Z statistic 5.077, P<0.0001. In the study the prevalence of dental caries, gingivitis and periodontal disease were 90%, 98% and 90.33% respectively. The oral disease process was characteristically noticed in the second trimester and/or pre-existing disease got aggravated in the second trimester

  14. The relationship of dental caries and dental fear in Malaysian adolescents: a latent variable approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate the role of geography (place of residence) as a moderator in the relationship between dental caries disease and treatment experience and dental fear in 16-year-olds living in Malaysia. Methods A multi-stage-stratified sampling method was employed. Five hundred and three, 16-year-olds from 6 government secondary schools participated in this study. The questionnaire examined participants’ demographic profile and assessed their dental fear using the Dental Fear Survey (DFS). The clinical examination consisted of the DMFT as the outcome measure of dental caries disease and treatment experience by a single examiner (ICC = 0.98). Structural equation modelling inspected the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience. Results The mean DMFT was 2.76 (SD 3.25). The DT, MT and FT components were 0.64 (SD 1.25), 0.14 (SD 0.56) and 1.98 (SD 2.43) respectively. Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly greater mean numbers of decayed and missing teeth. The mean DFS score was 40.8 (SD 12.4). Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly higher mean scores for physical symptoms of dental fear. The correlation between dental fear (DFS) and dental caries disease and treatment experience (DMFT) was 0.29, p dental caries disease and treatment experience. The strength of the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience varied in accordance with place of residence. Conclusion In conclusion a relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience was shown to exist in 16-year-old adolescents living in Malaysia. This study showed that the rural–urban dichotomy acted as a moderator upon this relationship. PMID:24621226

  15. HIV and AIDS related knowledge, sources of information, and reported need for further education among dental students in Sudan- a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Åstrøm Anne; Nasir Elwalid; David Jamil; Ali Rouf

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Information on the HIV and AIDS-related knowledge among dental students provides a crucial foundation for efforts aimed at developing an appropriate dental curriculum on HIV and AIDS, and for attracting the attention of dental school educators towards the subject. Purposes Focusing on a census of dental students attending their 3rd, 4th and 5th study year at publicly – and privately funded dental faculties in Khartoum, this study aimed to assess the prevalence and socio-ec...

  16. Impact of Radiation and Chemotherapy on Risk of Dental Abnormalities: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaste, Sue C.; Goodman, Pamela; Leisenring, Wendy; Stovall, Marilyn; Hayashi, Robert; Yeazel, Mark; Beiraghi, Soraya; Hudson, Melissa M.; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Baker, K. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Describe frequencies and risk factors of altered oral health and odontogenesis in childhood cancer survivors. Patients and Methods 9308 survivors, diagnosed between 1970–1986, and 2951 siblings from Childhood Cancer Survivor Study completed a survey containing oral-dental health information. We analyzed treatment impact, socioeconomic data and patient demographics on dental outcomes using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR). Results In multivariate analysis, survivors more likely reported microdontia (OR 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–3.8), hypodontia (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4–2.0), root abnormalities (OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.2–4.0), abnormal enamel (OR 2.4, 95% CI 2.0–2.9), teeth loss ≥6 (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.9–3.6), severe gingivitis (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0–1.5), xerostomia (OR 9.7, 95% CI 4.8–19.7). Controlling for chemotherapy and socio-economic factors, radiation exposure of ≥20Gy to dentition was significantly associated with increased risk of ≥1 dental abnormality. Dose-dependent alkylating agent therapy significantly increased risk ≥1 anatomic/developmental dental abnormalities in survivors diagnosed <5 years of age (OR 1.7, 2.7, 3.3 for alkylating agent score of 1, 2, 3, respectively). Conclusion Radiation and chemotherapy are independent risk factors for adverse oral-dental sequelae among childhood cancer survivors. Patients receiving alkylating agents at < 5 years should be closely monitored. PMID:19834960

  17. Dental emergencies in a university-based pediatric dentistry postgraduate outpatient clinic: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, F G; Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and types of dental emergencies occurring in a university-based, pediatric dentistry postgraduate outpatient clinic. All patients presenting for emergency dental care during scheduled clinic hours over a three year were identified, and their charts were retrieved. Each record was reviewed for demographic information, chief complaint and clinical diagnosis. Only those charts with both chief complaints and clinical diagnoses recorded were included in this study. A total of 816 patients received emergency care, representing 15.3 percent of all patient treated during the study period. The patient population had a slight female predilection (53 percent female, 47 percent male) and a mean age of 5.1 years (range 10 days to 15 years). Ethnicity (39 percent African-American, 36 percent Hispanic, 24 percent Caucasian emergency visit was their first dental visit. Reasons for seeking emergency included 1) pain or discomfort due to caries [30.1 percent] with 27 percent due to early childhood caries; 2) dental trauma [23 percent];3) eruption difficulties [18 percent] with 27 percent due to early childhood caries; 2) dental trauma [23 percent];3 eruption difficulties [18 percent];4) soft tissue pathoses [16 percent]; 5) problems with orthodontic appliances or space maintainers [10 percent]; and 6) lost restorations [2 percent]. Pain and bleeding were the most common reasons for seeking emergency dental care. Most causes for seeking outpatient emergency dental care are disease processes which may be avoided by infant oral health and preventive dentistry programs and early treatment intervention.

  18. [Microbiological study of dental clinic air at the University Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo Dental School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M C; de Campos, A C; Tommasi, D; dos Santos, M A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the environmental microbiote and to verify its occurrence in different areas. During 3 months, from April to June 1986, several air samples of working areas of the Dental Clinic of Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo were analised. The study consisted of 10 exposures in strategically selected points during 10 minutes each, blood-agar plates and Sabouraud-agar plates. It was done the identification in genera and in some cases at species, according to the conventional methods. The plates were incubated, and the colonies isolated and identified. It was done the statistical analysis (Z test) and it was observed bigger incidence of bacteria than fungi and more diversity of the fungi than bacteria. From the Odontological health point of view, the isolated microorganisms (ubiquitous in the air) do not reveal patogenicity however the determinants of the local hygiene.

  19. Computers and internet in dental education system of Kerala, South India: A multicentre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakath Harikumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computers and internet have exerted a tremendous effect on dental education programs all over the world. A multicenter study was done to assess trends in computer and internet usage among the dental students and faculty members across the South Indian state, Kerala. A total of 347 subjects participated in the study. All participants were highly competent with the use of computers and internet. 72.3% of the study subjects preferred hard copy textbooks to PDF format books. 81.3% of the study subjects thought that internet was a useful adjunct to dental education. 73.8% of the study subjects opined that computers and internet could never be a replacement to conventional classroom teaching. Efforts should be made to provide greater infrastructure with regard to computers and internet such as Wi-Fi, free, unlimited internet access to all students and faculty members.

  20. Mesoscopic modeling of the response of human dental enamel to mid-infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, Ana; Ramos, Marta; Stoneham, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    Ablation of human dental enamel, a composite biomaterial with water pores, is of significant importance in minimally invasive laser dentistry but progress in the area is hampered by the lack of optimal laser parameters. We use mesoscopic finite element models of this material to study its response to mid-infrared radiation. Our results indicate that the cost-effective, off-the-shelf CO2 laser at λ = 10.6 μm may in fact ablate enamel precisely, reproducibly and with limited unwanted side effects such as cracking or heating, provided that a pulse duration of 10 μs is used. Furthermore, our results also indicate that the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm), currently popular for laser dentistry, may in fact cause unwanted deep cracking in the enamel when regions with unusually high water content are irradiated, and also provide an explanation for the large range of ablation threshold values observed for this material. The model may be easily adapted to study the response of any composite material to infrared radiation and thus may be useful for the scientific community.

  1. Effect of culture on oral health attitudes, behaviour and values among the dental students of two dental colleges in Chennai city- a cross sectional study

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    N Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify similarities and differences in oral health attitudes, behavior and values among 1 st year dental students studying in two dental colleges of Chennai city. Materials & Method: The study was carried out in two dental colleges of Chennai city among 120 first year dental students aged 18-19 years. They were grouped under different zones (north, East, South and West and those who responded to the self-administered questionnaire were included in the study. An 18 item closed ended questionnaire primarily associated with oral health attitude, behaviour and tooth brushing was used. This questionnaire is a modified version of the Hiroshima University Dental Behavior Inventory (HU-DBI. Results: About 64% of the study subjects agreed that they were worried about visiting the dentist; 73.3% of the study subjects were concerned about the color of their teeth; the students from south and north were more concerned compared to the people from east. Significant differences (p<0.05 were seen among students of different zones regarding not worrying much about visiting the dentist, about bleeding gums while brushing, worrying about having a bad breath and the thought that it was impossible to prevent gum disease with tooth brushing alone. Conclusions: Statistically significant differences in the oral health attitude/behavior were recorded among 120 first year dental students from the two dental colleges in Chennai city yielding plausible results, using the HU-DBI. Oral health education needs to be provided in those areas where there are deficits in knowledge.

  2. Dental caries and associated factors among primary school children in Bahir Dar city: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Demilie, Tazebew; Yimer, Mulat; Meshesha, Kassaw; Abera, Bayeh

    2014-12-23

    Dental caries is the most common chronic infectious disease of childhood caused by the interaction of bacteria, mainly Streptococcus mutans and sugary foods on tooth enamel. This study aimed at determining the prevalence and associated factors of dental caries among primary school children at Bahir Dar city. A school based cross-sectional study was conducted at Bahir Dar city from October 2013 to January 2014. Systematic random sampling technique was used to select the children. Structured questionnaire was used to interview children and/or parents to collect socio demographic variables. Clinical dental information obtained by experienced dentist using dental caries criteria set by World Health Organization. Binary and multiple logistic regression analysis were computed to investigate factors associated with dental caries. Of the 147 children, 82 (55.4%) were girls. Majority of the children (67.6%) cleaned their teeth using traditional method (small stick of wood made of a special type of plant). The proportion of children having dental caries was 32 (21.8%). Primary tooth decay accounted for 24 (75%) of dental caries. The proportion of missed teeth was 7 (4.8%). The overall proportion of toothache and dental plaque among school children were 40 (27.2%) and 99 (67.3%), respectively. Grade level of 1-4 (AOR = 3.9, CI = 1.49 -10.4), poor habit of tooth cleaning (AOR = 2.6, CI = 1.08 - 6.2), dental plaque (AOR = 5.3, CI = 1.6 - 17.7) and toothache (AOR = 6.3, CI = 2.4 - 15.4) were significantly associated with dental caries. Dental caries is a common public health problem in school children associated with poor oral hygiene, dietary and dental visit habits. Therefore, prevention measures such as health education on oral hygiene, dietary habits and importance of dental visit are obligatory for children.

  3. Cultural Competency Education in Academic Dental Institutions in Australia and New Zealand: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Sheree L; Hayes, Melanie J; Taylor, Jane A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the status of cultural competency education in Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy programs. The study sought to explore the extent to which cultural competence is included in these programs' curricula, building on similar studies conducted in the United States and thus contributing to the international body of knowledge on this topic. A 12-item instrument was designed with questions in four areas (demographics, content of cultural competency education, organization of overall program curriculum, and educational methods used to teach cultural competence) and was sent to all Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy educational programs. Of the total 24 programs, 15 responded for a response rate of 62.5%. The results showed that lectures were the most frequent teaching method used in cultural competency education; however, the variation in responses indicated inconsistencies across study participants, as discussions and self-directed learning also featured prominently in the responses. The majority of respondents reported that cultural competence was not taught as a specific course but rather integrated into their programs' existing curricula. The variations in methods may indicate the need for a standardized framework for cultural competency education in these countries. In addition, the notion of cultural competency education in academic dental institutions demands additional evaluation, and further research is required to develop a solid evidence base on which to develop cultural competency education, specifically regarding content, most effective pedagogies, and assessment of student preparedness.

  4. A longitudinal study of Greek dental students' perceived sources of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronopoulou, Argy; Divaris, Kimon

    2010-05-01

    The aims of this prospective study were to examine the variation of dental students' perceived stressors throughout the course of their dental studies and to explore the role of gender on stress. A thirty-item modified version of the Dental Environment Stress Questionnaire (DES) was administered annually between 2003 and 2007 to a cohort of 109 Greek dental students enrolled in a five-year D.D.S. curriculum. Descriptive and multivariate longitudinal methods were utilized to examine variations in perceived stressors by year of study and by gender. Response rates ranged from 61 to 97 percent. Mean scores for the DES factors "workload" and "clinical training" decreased over the study period, while "faculty and administration" increased. Males reported substantially lower perceived stress in the "self-efficacy beliefs" (adjusted DES difference=-0.40; 95 percent CI=-0.63, -0.16), "workload," and "performance pressure" domains. Longitudinal analysis revealed substantial changes for numerous individual stressors. Most concerns for "examinations and grades" were expressed in year three (OR=2.7; 95 percent CI=1.4, 5.0; reference: first year), whereas "lack of self-confidence" items peaked in the second year. Marked gender differences in stress appraisal persisted over time. Longitudinal changes in dental students' stress perceptions corresponded with transitions in the didactic, preclinical, and clinical phases of the curriculum.

  5. Dental x-rays and the risk of thyroid cancer: A case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memon, Anjum (Div. of Primary Care and Public Health, Brighton and Sussex Medical School (United Kingdom)), E-mail: a.memon@bsms.ac.uk; Godward, Sara (Dept. of Public Health and Primary Care, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Williams, Dillwyn (Thyroid Carcinogenesis Research Group, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Siddique, Iqbal (Dept. of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait)); Al-Saleh, Khalid (Kuwait Cancer Control Centre, Ministry of Health (Kuwait))

    2010-05-15

    The thyroid gland is highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis and exposure to high-dose ionising radiation is the only established cause of thyroid cancer. Dental radiography, a common source of low-dose diagnostic radiation exposure in the general population, is often overlooked as a radiation hazard to the gland and may be associated with the risk of thyroid cancer. An increased risk of thyroid cancer has been reported in dentists, dental assistants, and x-ray workers; and exposure to dental x-rays has been associated with an increased risk of meningiomas and salivary tumours. Methods. To examine whether exposure to dental x-rays was associated with the risk of thyroid cancer, we conducted a population-based case-control interview study among 313 patients with thyroid cancer and a similar number of individually matched (year of birth +- three years, gender, nationality, district of residence) control subjects in Kuwait. Results. Conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for other upper-body x-rays, showed that exposure to dental x-rays was significantly associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 3.1) (p=0.001) with a dose-response pattern (p for trend <0.0001). The association did not vary appreciably by age, gender, nationality, level of education, or parity. Discussion. These findings, based on self-report by cases/controls, provide some support to the hypothesis that exposure to dental x-rays, particularly multiple exposures, may be associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer; and warrant further study in settings where historical dental x-ray records may be available.

  6. Heavy consumption of dental services; a longitudinal cohort study among Finnish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihtilä, Annamari; Widström, Eeva; Elonheimo, Outi

    2013-04-24

    A reform to Dental Care legislation in 2002 abolished age limits restricting adults' use of public dental services in Finland. In the Public Dental Service (PDS) unit of Espoo, the proportion of adult patients rose from 36% to 57%. The aim of this study was to investigate heavy use of dental services by adults and its determinants. A longitudinal cohort study was undertaken based on a PDS patient register. Of all adults who attended the PDS in Espoo in 2004, those who had six or more visits (n=3,173) were assigned to the heavy user group and a comparison group of low users (n=22,820) had three or fewer dental visits. A sample of 320 patients was randomly selected from each group. Baseline information (year 2004) on age, sex, number and type of visit, oral health status and treatment provided was collected from treatment records. Each group was followed-up for five years and information on the number and types of visit was recorded for each year from 2005 to 2009. Most heavy users (61.6%) became low users and only 11.2% remained chronic heavy users. Most low users (91.0%) remained low users. For heavy users, the mean number of dental visits per year (3.0) during the follow-up period was significantly lower than initially in 2004 (8.3) (pdental services. Treatment planning was inadequate, probably partly due to the many dentists involved and too many patients requesting care. Better local management and continuous education are needed to ensure good quality adult dental care and to reduce heavy consumption.

  7. Effects of Untreated Periodontitis on Osseointegration of Dental Implants in a Beagle Dog Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehyun; Sohn, Byungjin; Kim, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Sungtae; Koo, Ki-Tae; Kim, Tae-Il; Seol, Yang-Jo; Lee, Yong-Moo; Rhyu, In-Chul; Ku, Young

    2016-10-01

    There have been previous studies on the relationship between periodontitis and peri-implantitis, but limited information is available on how periodontitis affects osseointegration and wound healing of newly placed dental implants adjacent to natural teeth. The objective of the present experiment is to evaluate healing around dental implants adjacent to teeth with untreated experimental periodontitis. The study included six male beagle dogs. Scaling and plaque control procedures were performed on three dogs (control group). In the other three dogs (experimental group), retraction cords and ligature wires were placed subgingivally around all premolars and the first molars. Induced experimental periodontitis was confirmed after 3 months. Each control or experimental group was divided into two subgroups depending on the timing of implant placement (immediate/delayed). Twelve dental implants (two implants for each dog) were placed immediately, and the other 12 dental implants (two implants for each dog) were placed 2 months after extraction. The animals were sacrificed 2 months after implant placement. Histologic and histometric analyses were performed. Four implants (three from the immediate placement group and one from the delayed placement group) failed in the experimental group. There were significant differences in the percentage of bone-to-implant contact and marginal bone volume density between the control and experimental groups. Both parameters were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P implants is associated with a higher failure rate compared with delayed placement. Untreated experimental periodontitis was correlated with compromised osseointegration in the implants with delayed placement.

  8. Chipping fracture resistance of dental CAD/CAM restorative materials: Part 2. Phenomenological model and the effect of indenter type

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A.A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    The edge chipping resistances of six CAD/CAM dental restoration materials are analyzed and correlated to other mechanical properties. A new quadratic relationship that is based on a phenomenological model is presented.

  9. Implementation of a flipped classroom educational model in a predoctoral dental course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang E; Howell, T Howard

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of a flipped classroom model to promote student-centered learning as part of a predoctoral dental course. This model redesigns the traditional lecture-style classroom into a blended learning model that combines active learning pedagogy with instructional technology and "flips" the sequence so that students use online resources to learn content ahead of class and then use class time for discussion. The dental anatomy portion of a second-year DMD course at Harvard School of Dental Medicine was redesigned using the flipped classroom model. The 36 students in the course viewed online materials before class; then, during class, small groups of students participated in peer teaching and team discussions based on learning objectives under the supervision of faculty. The utilization of pre- and post-class quizzes as well as peer assessments were critical motivating factors that likely contributed to the increase in student participation in class and helped place learning accountability on the students. Student feedback from a survey after the experience was generally positive with regard to the collaborative and interactive aspects of this form of blended learning.

  10. HIV/AIDS-related attitudes and oral impacts on daily performances: a cross-sectional study of Sudanese adult dental patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir, Elwalid Fadul; Marthinussen, Mihaela C.; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the relationships between HIV-related knowledge, fear of contagion in dental environments and Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) among dental patients. Our objectives were to investigate the associations between HIV-related knowledge and fear of contagion in dental environments and OIDP among dental patients, and to evaluate whether those associations were modified by the frequency of dental service attendance.Methods A total of 1262 patients (me...

  11. PILOT STUDY OF CONTACT SENSITIZATION OF FORMALDEHYDE-RELEASERS, FORMALDEHYDE AND GLUTARALDEHYDE IN DENTAL STUDENTS

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    Lyapina Maya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occupational allergic contact sensitization is common in dental personnel. Some of the most common occupational allergens in dental practice are some formaldehyde-releasers, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde. Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the rate of contact sensitization to formaldehyde, quaternium-15, imidazolidinyl urea, diazolidinyl urea, and to glutaraldehyde in students of dental medicine and dental patients. Material and methods: A total of 50 participants were included in the study: 40 students of dental medicine exposed to formaldehyde-releasers, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde during the course of their education; 10 dental patients without occupational exposure to the latter substances served as a control group. All of them were patch-tested with the studied allergens. Results: The sensitization rate to formaldehyde was significantly higher in the group of dental patients if compared to the one of dental students (χ2=5.37; p=0.021. Positive skin patch test reactions to quaternium-15 and to imidazolidinyl urea were observed only in the group of dental students. A significantly higher rate of sensitization to diazolidinyl urea, if compared to the one to imidazolidinyl urea (χ2=5.4; p=0.02 and to quaternium-15 (χ2=6.76; p=0.009, as well as to glutaraldehyde, if compared to the one to quaternium-15 (χ2=3.96; p=0.04 for the whole studied population was established. For the whole studied population, significantly increased rate of concomitant sensitization to formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde (χ2=6.18 p=0.013, as well as to diazolidinyl urea and to glutaraldehyde was established (χ2=9.12 p=0.003. Conclusions: We consider the importance of exposure to diazolidinyl urea, quaternium-15, imidazolidinyl urea and glutaraldehyde during the course of practical education in dentistry for the onset of sensitization. The exposure to formaldehyde is ubiquitous and is difficult to distinguish the roles of

  12. Factors affecting dental service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Ravangard, Ramin; Baldacchino, Donia

    2015-01-01

    Measuring dental clinic service quality is the first and most important factor in improving care. The quality provided plays an important role in patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors affecting dental service quality from the patients' viewpoint. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study was conducted in a dental clinic in Tehran between January and June 2014. A sample of 385 patients was selected from two work shifts using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. The data were collected, a self-administered questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study, based on the Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model of service quality which consisted of two parts: the patients' demographic characteristics and a 30-item questionnaire to measure the five dimensions of the service quality. The collected data were analysed using SPSS 21.0 and Amos 18.0 through some descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, as well as analytical methods, including confirmatory factor. Results showed that the correlation coefficients for all dimensions were higher than 0.5. In this model, assurance (regression weight=0.99) and tangibility (regression weight=0.86) had, respectively, the highest and lowest effects on dental service quality. The Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model is suitable to measure quality in dental services. The variables related to dental services quality have been made according to the model. This is a pioneering study that uses Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model and CFA in a dental setting. This study provides useful insights and guidance for dental service quality assurance.

  13. Forensic revolution need maintenance of dental records of patients by the dentists: A descriptive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anamika; Mishra, Gaurav; Bhutani, Hemant; Hoshing, Chetan; Bhalla, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With the growth of forensic odontology, dental records have become an essential source of information, especially for medicolegal cases in general practice. It is mandated by the law that every dentist must keep some kind of records for every patient they treat. After the death of an individual, remnants of teeth are usually damaged at the last among all body parts. Dental records assist in personal identification in cases of mass disasters, criminal investigations, and medicolegal issues. However, in India, rules for maintaining dental records are not very strictly followed. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding the maintenance of dental records among dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed via a questionnaire. The study population responded to the questions pertaining to knowledge regarding forensic odontology methods and the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice through a personal interview. A descriptive analysis was carried out for the data. The data were summarized and analyzed using the statistical software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18.0. Results: A very low percentage (22%) of the dentists were seen to be maintaining records on a regular basis. Seventy-eight percent of the dentists were not maintaining any records. Conclusion: This study clearly indicates that the dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh need to be properly trained for any kind of forensic and medicolegal needs. PMID:27583219

  14. 三维数字化牙模的牙弓线探测%Dental Arch Detection of 3D Dental Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁天然; 廖文和; 戴宁; 崔海华; 王长伟; 俞青

    2008-01-01

    提出了一种在三维数字化牙颌模型上直接探测牙弓线的方法.首先,根据给定的顶点法向和咬合面的夹角阈值过滤出初始特征点,并拟和得到初始牙弓线;其次,对初始特征点集进行等分并找出对应的局部最高顶点,对局部最高顶点进行拟和得到最终的牙弓线.通过对多副牙颌模型的实验表明,所提方法稳定、有效.%A robust detection method for dental arch directly applied on 3D dental model was proposed which could be easily acquired through intra or extra oral measurement methods. Firstly, the initial dental arch was obtained through fitting the initial feature points filtered out according to the given threshold of the angle between the normal of the model point and the occlusal plane. Then the set of the initial feature points was divided into subsets using planes perpendicular to the initial dental arch with equal arch length between each two adjacent planes. The local peak point was found out for each subset according to the distance value between the point of the corresponding subset and the occlusal plane, and the curve fitting to the local peak points was also the final dental arch. The method was tested on models with various types of malocclusions and is proved to be robust and accurate.

  15. Child′s dental fear: Cause related factors and the influence of audiovisual modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jayanthi Mungara; Madhulika Injeti; Elizabeth Joseph; Arun Elangovan; Rajendran Sakthivel; Girija Selvaraju

    2013-01-01

    Background: Delivery of effective dental treatment to a child patient requires thorough knowledge to recognize dental fear and its management by the application of behavioral management techniques. Children...

  16. Dynamic Systems (Complexity) theory as a new conceptual model for researching PBL in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, G C; Kim, M; Sankey, D

    2012-02-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) was introduced into dental education some 20 years ago, there have been relatively few well-designed studies carried out to clarify whether, how or why it works in a dental context. This paper introduces the Dynamic Systems (Complexity) theory as a new and potentially productive theoretical framework for researching PBL in dental education. This framework emphasises the importance of emergent self-organisation, perception and brain plasticity in learning. In this paper, a brief overview of the history of PBL in dentistry is presented and then the fundamentals of a Dynamic Systems Approach (DSA) are explained, drawing on two recently published papers advocating the DSA in medical education and teacher education. We focus on three key points related to this new approach: emergent self-organisation rather than simple construction of knowledge; the notion that perception drives the learning process; and the brain as the substrate of all learning. The paper also suggests how the DSA can help us move forward, both in terms of the future application of PBL in dental education and also in relation to posing new types of research questions.

  17. Frequency of Dental Implants Placed in the Esthetic Zone in Dental Clinic of Tehran University: A Descriptive Study

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    Amir Alireza Rasouli Ghahroudi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Anterior maxilla, known as the esthetic zone, plays an important role in facial and smile esthetics. This study assessed the frequency of implant treatments in the esthetic zone of patients presenting to Dental Implant Department of Tehran University during 2002-2012.Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on dental records of patients receiving implant treatment during 2002-2012. Patient records were retrieved from the archives and patient demographics, implant characteristics, failure rate, prevalence of complications and implant systems were collected. The data were reported as frequency and percentage.Results: Of a total of 2,381 implants placed in the mentioned time period, 492 (20.8% had been placed in the anterior maxilla and 531 (22.3% had been placed in the anterior mandible from canine to canine.  Timing of implant placement was immediate in 12.0%, early in 0.5% and late in 87.4%. Survival rate was 99.1%. Rate of failure was 0.8%. Failure rate was 0.4% in the maxillary and 1.1% in the mandibular canine to canine region. Complications were reported in 10.1% of patients. Rate of complications was 18.3% in the maxillary canine to canine, 8.9% in the mandibular canine to canine, 18.1% in the maxillary first premolar to first premolar and 9.5% in the mandibular first premolar to first premolar. The frequency of bone grafts placed in these areas was 17.6%, 33.9%, 13.6%, 32.1% and 14.3%, respectively.Conclusion: Of implants placed in our center, around 20% were in the anterior maxilla, and delayed implant placement was the most commonly adopted technique.

  18. Dental anxiety: An understudied problem in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Laura D; Hovey, Joseph D; Chacon, Karina; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2017-07-01

    Dental anxiety and dental phobia typically emerge during childhood; the associated avoidance of dental care can result in oral health problems and is associated with lower quality of life. In this review, we discuss the definition of dental phobia and dental anxiety and issues related to their differentiation. We then review the literature on dental anxiety and dental phobia, including its prevalence, assessment, and sequalae. Moreover, we provide a synthesis of findings on the etiology and maintenance of dental phobia and propose a comprehensive cognitive behavioral model to guide further study. We also present a systematic qualitative and a quantitative review of the treatment literature, concluding that although we have made strides in learning how to prevent dental anxiety in youth, the methods effective in preventing anxiety may not be equally effective in treating youth with dental phobia. We propose a multidisciplinary approach, including those with expertise in pediatric anxiety as well as pediatric dentistry, is likely required to move forward. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Comparative Study on Dental Caries Prevalence in Diabetic Children in Isfahan in the Summer of 2000

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    P Samimi

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a relationship between dental caries and high blood sugar. This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of dental caries among diabetic children in Isfahan, Iran. Methods: Diabetic children from pediatric ward of hospitals were compared to a control healthy group of children. Results: The mean DMFT was significantly higher in diabetic children compared to the control group. Conclusion: The result of this study confirms previous researches on prevalence of dental caries in children. Keywords: Dental Caries, Diabetes Mellitus, Pediatrics

  20. Development of an inexpensive optical method for studies of dental erosion process in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, A. M. T.; Noerjanto, B.; Triwanto, L.

    2008-09-01

    Teeth have important roles in digestion of food, supporting the facial-structure, as well as in articulation of speech. Abnormality in teeth structure can be initiated by an erosion process due to diet or beverages consumption that lead to destruction which affect their functionality. Research to study the erosion processes that lead to teeth's abnormality is important in order to be used as a care and prevention purpose. Accurate measurement methods would be necessary as a research tool, in order to be capable for quantifying dental destruction's degree. In this work an inexpensive optical method as tool to study dental erosion process is developed. It is based on extraction the parameters from the 3D dental visual information. The 3D visual image is obtained from reconstruction of multiple lateral projection of 2D images that captured from many angles. Using a simple motor stepper and a pocket digital camera, sequence of multi-projection 2D images of premolar tooth is obtained. This images are then reconstructed to produce a 3D image, which is useful for quantifying related dental erosion parameters. The quantification process is obtained from the shrinkage of dental volume as well as surface properties due to erosion process. Results of quantification is correlated to the ones of dissolved calcium atom which released from the tooth using atomic absorption spectrometry. This proposed method would be useful as visualization tool in many engineering, dentistry, and medical research. It would be useful also for the educational purposes.

  1. A retrospective study on related factors affecting the survival rate of dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Kyung; Lee, Ki; Lee, Yong-Sang; Park, Pil-Kyoo

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the relationship between local factors and survival rate of dental implant which had been installed and restored in Seoul Veterans Hospital dental center for past 10 years. And when the relationship is found out, it could be helpful to predict the prognosis of dental implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study of patients receiving root-shaped screw-type dental implants placed from January 2000 to December 2009 was conducted. 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients. The following data were collected from the dental records and radiographs: patient's age, gender, implant type and surface, length, diameter, location of implant placement, bone quality, prosthesis type. The correlations between these data and survival rate were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis, Chi-square test and odds ratio. RESULTS In all, 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients (3120 male, 635 female; mean age 65 ± 10.58 years). 108 implants failed and the cumulative survival rate was 96.33%. There were significant differences in age, implant type and surface, length, location and prosthesis type (P.05). CONCLUSION Related factors such as age, implant type, length, location and prosthesis type had a significant effect on the implant survival. PMID:22259704

  2. Assessment of knowledge, practices, and work place condition related to ergonomics among dental students of Bhopal city - A questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    Swapna Munaga; Manjusha Rawtiya; Sheeba Khan; Rajkiran Chitumalla; Satheesh Kumar Reddy Kubagiri; Parappa Sajjan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dental profession is susceptible to various postural and nonpostural occupational risks. Aim : To determine knowledge, practice, and condition of work place regarding ergonomic posture among dental students from Bhopal city, Central India. Also to observe any correlation among knowledge, practice, and condition of work place scores. Materials and Methods : A self-administered questionnaire study was conducted among 231 dental students. The questionnaire consisted of three parts: K...

  3. Knowledge, attitude, and perception of mothers towards emergency management of dental trauma in Salem district, Tamil Nadu: A questionnaire study

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    Kruthika Murali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental trauma is one of the main oral health problems in childhood, and can cause pain and distress. It is important to provide emergency care to combat the aftermaths of trauma. Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge and attitude of mothers regarding dental trauma and its management. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 33 closed-ended questions were used to interview 150 mothers who participated in the study. The questions assessed the knowledge and attitude of mothers towards their child′s dental visit, dental trauma, and its management. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 17.0. Results: Mother′s previous experience of dental trauma when associated with the preservation of avulsed tooth of the child, those mothers who had the experience of dental trauma reported that they would discard the tooth which was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05 when compared to the mothers with no experience of trauma. The education status of the study population when associated with the knowledge variables of avulsion, it was found that most of the variables had statistically significant association with P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study reveals that there is a lack of awareness among the mothers regarding the emergency management of dental trauma. This warrants the need of an effective communication between dental professionals and mothers for better handling of dental emergencies.

  4. Evaluation of an integrative model for professional development and research in a dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditmyer, Marcia M; Mobley, Connie C; Davenport, William D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate a Research, Professional Development, and Critical Thinking Integrative Model developed for use in a dental curriculum. This article outlines strategies used in developing a competency-based pedagogical model designed to provide a tailored student learning environment with objective, measurable, and calibrated assessment outcomes. The theoretical model integrated elements of critical thinking, professionalism, and evidence-based dentistry across dental school disciplines; implementation was based on consensus of dental faculty and student representatives about course content, faculty allocation, and curriculum alignment. Changes introduced included the following: 1) conversion and integration of previously siloed course content taught in Years 1 and 2 to sequential two-year combined courses; 2) reduction of course and content redundancies; 3) delivery of courses by teams of faculty members in biomedical, behavioral, and clinical sciences; and 4) reduction of total curriculum credit/contact hours from 13.5 (201 contact hours) to 5.0 (60 contact hours), allowing the Curriculum Committee to accommodate additional courses. These changes resulted in improvement in student satisfaction.

  5. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

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    Tzu-Pu Chang

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation.Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls.In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001. After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.47. This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39-2.26.Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should consider dental procedures to be a

  6. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

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    Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Methods Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Results In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.26). Conclusions Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should

  7. Factors associated with utilization of dental services in a long-term care facility: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

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    Scannapieco, Frank A; Amin, Summar; Salme, Marc; Tezal, Mine

    2017-03-01

    To describe factors associated with the utilization of dental services in a long-term care facility (LTCF) in Western New York. A descriptive cross-sectional study reviewed the dental and medical records of residents of an LTCF discharged between January 1, 2008 and December 30, 2012. Information on demographic and health variables at admission was extracted from electronic health records. Information on oral health variables was extracted from patient charts. A total of 2,516 residents were discharged between 2008 and 2012. From those, 259 (10.3%) utilized dental services at least once during their stay. Those who utilized dental services were significantly older at admission (78.5 vs. 82.0 years, p dental services. Dental services appear to be underutilized by residents of LTCF. Significant differences exist in demographic and health variables between residents who utilize these services compared to those who do not. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Improved classification and visualization of healthy and pathological hard dental tissues by modeling specular reflections in NIR hyperspectral images

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    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots, which are difficult to diagnose. Near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization which can classify healthy and pathological dental tissues. However, due to non-ideal illumination of the tooth surface the hyperspectral images can exhibit specular reflections, in particular around the edges and the ridges of the teeth. These reflections significantly affect the performance of automated classification and visualization methods. Cross polarized imaging setup can effectively remove the specular reflections, however is due to the complexity and other imaging setup limitations not always possible. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on modeling the specular reflections of hard dental tissues, which significantly improves the classification accuracy in the presence of specular reflections. The method was evaluated on five extracted human teeth with corresponding gold standard for 6 different healthy and pathological hard dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized regions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. The classification was performed by employing multiple discriminant analysis. Based on the obtained results we believe the proposed method can be considered as an effective alternative to the complex cross polarized imaging setups.

  9. Intra-arch dimensional measurement validity of laser-scanned digital dental models compared with the original plaster models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca Canto, G; Pachêco-Pereira, C; Lagravere, M O; Flores-Mir, C; Major, P W

    2015-05-01

    A systematic review was undertaken to evaluate the validity of intra-arch dimensional measurements made from laser-scanned digital dental models in comparison with measurements directly obtained from the original plaster casts (gold standard). Finally included articles were only those reporting studies that compared measurements from digital models produced from laser scanning against their plaster models. Measurements from the original plaster models should have been made using a manual or digital caliper (gold standard). Articles that used scans from impressions or digital photographs were discarded. Detailed individual search strategies for Cochrane, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed, and LILACS were developed. The references cited in the selected articles were also checked for any references that could have been missed in the electronic database searches. A partial gray literature search was undertaken using Google Scholar. The methodology of selected studies was evaluated using the 14-item quality assessment tool for diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS). Only 16 studies were finally included for the qualitative/quantitative synthesis. The selected studies consistently agree that the validity of measurements obtained after using a laser scanner from plaster models is similar to direct measurements. Any stated differences would be unlikely clinically relevant. There is consistent scientific evidence to support the validity of measurements from digital dental models in comparison with intra-arch dimensional measurements directly obtained from them. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Treatment outcomes and dental anxiety in 18-year-olds with MIH, comparisons with healthy controls - a longitudinal study.

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    Jälevik, Birgitta; Klingberg, Gunilla

    2012-03-01

    In a previous study, 9-year-old children with severe Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) had undergone dental treatment of their first molars nearly ten times as often as children in a control group. They also showed more management problems (BMP) and fear and anxiety (DFA). To assess the long-term outcomes of dental treatments, dental anxiety, and patients' satisfaction in adolescents with MIH. Sixty-seven patients, identical with those in the baseline study, were studied at age 18-years. The participants answered the Children's Fear Survey Schedule - Dental Subscale the Dental Visit Satisfaction Scale (DVSS). Data were compiled from the dental records concerning dental health, number of restorative treatments and BMP. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization group had a significantly higher DMFT, and had undergone treatment of their permanent first molars 4.2 times as often as the controls. BMP was still significantly more common in the MIH group. However, DFS was reduced in MIH group and increased in the control groups. The DVSS scores did not differ between the groups. Conclusions.  Patients with severe MIH had a poorer dental health and were still more treatment consuming at age 18-years. However, their dental fear was now at the same level as the controls. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Radiographic study of dental anomalies in Brazilian patients with neuropsychomotor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Erick Nelo; Magalhães, Marina Cury Gallotini; Cardoso, Camila Lopes; Taveira, Luís Antônio de Assis; de Freitas, Cláudio Froes

    2007-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate radiographically the dental and maxillomandibular in patients with neuropsychomotor disorders and determine the role of panoramic radiographs for quantitative and qualitative analyses of dental alterations. A total of 322 panoramic radiographs from 190 males and 132 females aged 4 to 57 years were obtained from the files of the Center for Care to Patients with Special Needs (CAPE; Dental School, University of São Paulo) and subdivided into syndromes, special needs, neurological, neuromuscular or cerebral disorders, and sequels of diseases. 32% of dental alterations were in tooth position, with 69% of this group associated with tooth rotation. The mandible accounted for 54.62% of alterations. The male gender (55.85%) and the permanent dentition (78.7%) were most affected. Panoramic radiographs were proved to be well suited for quantitative evaluation of dental anomalies of epidemiological nature. Panoramic radiographs are important diagnostic resources when applied to patients with special needs because of the difficulty to place intraoral films and held them correctly positioned during the radiographic technique.

  12. Radiographic study of dental anomalies in brazilian patients with neuropsychomotor disorders

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    Erick Nelo Pedreira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to investigate radiographically the dental and maxillomandibular in patients with neuropsychomotor disorders and determine the role of panoramic radiographs for quantitative and qualitative analyses of dental alterations. A total of 322 panoramic radiographs from 190 males and 132 females aged 4 to 57 years were obtained from the files of the Center for Care to Patients with Special Needs (CAPE; Dental School, University of São Paulo and subdivided into syndromes, special needs, neurological, neuromuscular or cerebral disorders, and sequels of diseases. 32% of dental alterations were in tooth position, with 69% of this group associated with tooth rotation. The mandible accounted for 54.62% of alterations. The male gender (55.85% and the permanent dentition (78.7% were most affected. Panoramic radiographs were proved to be well suited for quantitative evaluation of dental anomalies of epidemiological nature. Panoramic radiographs are important diagnostic resources when applied to patients with special needs because of the difficulty to place intraoral films and held them correctly positioned during the radiographic technique.

  13. Challenges faced by dental undergraduates during clinical training: A qualitative study

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    Vaibhav Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental health-care professionals are expected to provide a wide range of dental care contributing to the quality of their patient's day-to-day lives, for which they are trained clinically during undergraduate (UG course. Owing to scarcity of literature pertaining to challenges faced by dental UGs during their clinical training, research was conducted. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess challenges faced by dental UGs during the first patient encounter with patients in clinical posting. Materials and Methods: Four focused group discussions (FGDs were conducted among 34 dental UGs using an FGD guide to facilitate the discussion process. A phenomenological approach was used to explore the lived experience of UGs. The recorded data were transcribed, translated, anonymized, and coded using Qualitative Data Analysis Miner software. Results: UGs were facing challenges related to communication, professionalism, and ethics every other day while treating patients. FGD conducted was able to explore the challenges faced by UGs during clinical posting such as language barrier, optimum utilization of material, and uphold confidentiality. Conclusions: Improving current state of UGs by taking care of all the mentioned challenges will help them become professionals with good communication skills.

  14. Dental Students' Learning Experiences and Preferences Regarding Orofacial Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Sorin T; Alonso, Aurelio A; Lang, Lisa; Heima, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Pain is a global health problem, the effects of which range from diminished quality of life to pain management costs and loss of work and productivity. Pain in the head and neck region is defined as a separate entity: orofacial pain (OFP). However, some graduates from dental schools have reported feeling less competent in their ability to diagnose OFP than in other areas of dentistry. The aims of this study were to assess how students at one U.S. dental school had learned about OFP and to identify the teaching methods and venues they would like to see enhanced in the school's OFP curriculum. A cross-sectional four-question survey was administered to 140 dental students in their third and fourth years; the survey had a response rate of 53%. Most students reported having gained their OFP knowledge mainly in dental school, and 91.9% selected didactic courses as the main teaching method in which they had learned about this topic. Clinical education was the main teaching venue these students said they would like to see enhanced in order to gain more knowledge in most forms of OFP; this result aligned with their learning preferences in general. These findings may help dental schools design their OFP curricula to take account of students' preferences as well as practical limitations regarding availability of clinical experiences.

  15. [Pilot study on the presence of Legionella spp in 6 Italian cities' dental units].

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    Montagna, M T; Tatò, D; Napoli, C; Castiglia, P; Guidetti, L; Liguori, G; Petti, S; Tanzi, M L

    2006-01-01

    Among the microorganism involved in environmental contamination, Legionella spp is actually considered an important infectious hazard. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of Legionella spp in water samples collected from 138 dental unit selected from public outpatient clinics of 6 Italian cities. The samples were taken from oral rinsing cup, air-water syringe, ultrasonic scaler and the turbine to investigate Legionella spp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the total heterotrophic count at 36 degrees and 22 degrees. Legionella spp was present in 33,3% dental unit water; but a significant difference was shown among the enrolled cities. In 43,5% of water sample Legionella concentration was 1.000-10.000 CFU/L and in 30,4% was >10.000 CFU/L. L. pneumophila 1 was found in 23,9% of water samples. The results demonstrate that the concentration of Legionella spp in dental unit water lines could be high and this suggests that the exposure to these micoorganism during the dental practise could be a potential health risk both for dental personnel and for the patients too, especially when immunocompromised.

  16. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy.

  17. Dental manpower development in the Pacific: case study in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

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    Tut, Ohnmar K; Langidrik, Justina R; Milgrom, Peter M

    2007-03-01

    This case study reports the ongoing progress and results of a manpower development program to expand indigenous dental personnel at four levels in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The program was designed to: 1) increase the number of Marshallese students who successfully complete dentistry training; 2) recruit and train a group of Marshallese high school graduates in dental assisting for service in new preventive outreach programs within the community; 3) enhance the dental training of health assistants providing primary medical care to outer islands away from the main population centers of Majuro and Ebeye; and 4) provide in-service training on tooth decay prevention for Head Start teachers. The program resulted in the training of one Marshallese dentist and two Marshallese dental therapist, 16 primary care health aides who received oral health training for work in the outer island dispensaries, and 200 Head Start and kindergarten teachers who completed in-service training in oral health. Additional expertise was shared with other United States Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) to enhance the dental workforce throughout the Pacific.

  18. Study on frequency of dental developmental alterations in a Mexican school-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Montes, C; Garcés-Ortíz, M; Salcido-García, J-F; Hernández-Flores, F

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to know the distribution of dental developmental alterations in the population requesting stomatological attention at the Admission and Diagnosis Clinic of our institution in Mexico City. We reviewed the archives and selected those files with developmental dental alterations. Analyzed data were diagnoses, age, gender, location and number of involved teeth. Of the 3.522 patients reviewed, 179 (5.1%) harbored 394 developmental dental alterations. Of them, 45.2% were males and 54.8% were females with a mean age of 16.7 years. The most common were supernumeraries, dental agenesia and dilaceration. Adults were 30.7% of the patients with dental developmental alterations. In them, the most common lesions were agenesia and supernumeraries. Mesiodens was the most frequently found supernumerary teeth (14.7%). Our finding that 30.7% of the affected patients were adults is an undescribed and unusually high proportion of patients that have implications on planning and prognosis of their stomatological treatment.

  19. Oral health attitude, knowledge, and behaviour of dental students of Jaipur, Rajasthan: A comparative study

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    Shruti Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attitudes of dental students toward their own oral health affect their oral health habits and also have a possible influence on the improvement of the oral health of their patients and society. Aim: To evaluate self-reported oral health attitude, knowledge, and behavior among a group of dental students of one of the dental colleges of Rajasthan and to compare differences in oral health attitudes between years of study and gender. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a self-administered structured questionnaire consisting of 19 questions on attitudes toward dental care, oral health practice and knowledge of oral health was distributed to 200 dental students of different years of course. Data collected was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: In the present study, 142 students were from preclinical years and 58 students were from clinical years. Most of the students brush their teeth once daily for 2 min following roll technique of brushing before breakfast using only toothpaste as a cleaning aid. All students from clinical years routinely examined their oral cavity while most of the students visited the dentist only when required. Majority of students considered oral health as important as general health and believed that oral health affects the general health. Students were also aware of the harmful effects of tobacco while only few of them were indulged in them. Conclusions: With increasing years of the study, some aspects of dental student's oral health attitude and behavior improved but this improvement was limited. Thus, the students should be motivated to become an example of oral health for the society, for which few steps to motivate them toward better oral health are proposed.

  20. Stereo imaging and cytocompatibility of a model dental implant surface formed by direct laser fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Carlo; Raspanti, Mario; Traini, Tonino; Piattelli, Adriano; Sammons, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    Direct laser fabrication (DLF) allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by sintering metal powder particles in a focused laser beam. In this study, 10 Ti6Al4V alloy model dental root implants were obtained by DLF, and surface characterization was carried out using stereo scanning electron microscopy to produce 3D reconstructions. The surfaces were extremely irregular, with approximately 100 microm deep, narrow intercommunicating crevices, shallow depressions and deep, rounded pits of widely variable shape and size, showing ample scope for interlocking with the host bone. Roughness parameters were as follows: R(t), 360.8 microm; R(z), 358.4 microm; R(a), 67.4 microm; and R(q), 78.0 microm. Disc specimens produced by DLF with an identically prepared surface were used for biocompatibility studies with rat calvarial osteoblasts: After 9 days, cells had attached and spread on the DLF surface, spanning across the crevices, and voids. Cell density was similar to that on a commercial rough microtextured surface but lower than on commercial smooth machined and smooth-textured grit-blasted, acid-etched surfaces. Human fibrin clot extension on the DLF surface was slightly improved by inorganic acid etching to increase the microroughness. With further refinements, DLF could be an economical means of manufacturing implants from titanium alloys.

  1. Innovative interventions to promote positive dental health behaviors and prevent dental caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward Chin Man; McGrath, Colman; Ho, Samuel Mun Yin

    2013-04-30

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is highly prevalent and is largely attributable to unhealthy self-care behaviors (diet and oral hygiene). The conventional (health) education (CE), focusing on disseminating information and giving normative advice, often fails to achieve sustained behavioral changes. This study incorporates two innovative elements into CE: (i) motivational interviewing (MI), a client-centered counseling for changing behaviors, and (ii) an interactive caries risk assessment (RA) tool, which is devised to facilitate dental counseling and may enhance MI in several ways. Through a randomized, controlled, evaluator-blinded trial, three intervention schemes (CE, CE+MI, and CE+MI+RA) will be compared for their effectiveness in eliciting dentally healthy behaviors and preventing caries in preschool children. This study targets 3-year-old children who are at a critical stage for embedding health habits. Children with unfavorable dental behaviors (insufficient toothbrushing and/or frequent snacking) and their parents will be recruited from 12 participating kindergartens. Parent-child dyads (n=690) will be randomly assigned into three groups. In the first group (CE), oral health information and advice will be delivered to parents through pamphlets. In the second group (CE+MI), in addition to the pamphlets, individual MI counseling with each parent will be performed by one of two trained dental hygienists. In the third group (CE+MI+RA), besides pamphlets and MI, interactive RA will be integrated into MI to motivate parents and facilitate their informed decision making and goal planning. At baseline and after 12 and 24 months, parents will complete a questionnaire and children will undergo a dental examination. The effectiveness of the intervention schemes will be compared over 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome will be caries increment in children and proportion of caries-free children. Secondary outcomes will be changes in parental efficacy for protecting

  2. Assessment of oral self-care in patients with periodontitis: a pilot study in a dental school clinic in Japan

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    Masuda Hitomi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral hygiene education is central to every stage of periodontal treatment. Successful management of periodontal disease depends on the patient's capacity for oral self-care. In the present study, the oral self-care and perceptions of patients attending a dental school clinic in Japan were assessed using a short questionnaire referring to existing oral health models. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. The study population consisted of sixty-five patients (age range 23-77 with chronic periodontitis. The pre-tested 19-item questionnaire comprised 3 domains; 1 oral hygiene, 2 dietary habits and 3 perception of oral condition. The questionnaire was used as a part of the comprehensive assessment. Results Analyses of the assessment data revealed no major problems with the respondents' perceived oral hygiene habits, although their actual plaque control levels were not entirely adequate. Most of the respondents acknowledged the importance of prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases, but less than one third of them were regular users of the dental care system. Twenty-five percent of the respondents were considered to be reluctant to change their daily routines, and 29% had doubts about the impact of their own actions on oral health. Analyzing the relationships between patient responses and oral hygiene status, factors like 'frequency of tooth brushing', 'approximal cleaning', 'dental check-up' and 'compliance with self-care advice' showed statistically significant associations (P Conclusion The clinical utilization of the present questionnaire facilitates the inclusion of multiple aspects of patient information, before initiation of periodontal treatment. The significant associations that were found between some of the self-care behaviors and oral hygiene levels document the important role of patient-centered oral health assessment in periodontal care.

  3. Characteristics and Dental Experiences of Autistic Children in Saudi Arabia: Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Ebtissam Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report base line information about characteristics, and dental experiences of a group of autistic children in three major cities of Saudi Arabia. Most of the children (76.2%) included in the study were diagnosed with autism before the age of 5 years. More than half of the children (53.7%) had no previous dental…

  4. A Study of Mathematics Needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Keith J.

    A study was conducted to determine what mathematics skills were needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Data obtained from studies, course outlines, textbooks, and reports were used to construct a 79-item mathematics skill questionnaire. This questionnaire was administered to employers,…

  5. Characteristics and Dental Experiences of Autistic Children in Saudi Arabia: Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Ebtissam Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report base line information about characteristics, and dental experiences of a group of autistic children in three major cities of Saudi Arabia. Most of the children (76.2%) included in the study were diagnosed with autism before the age of 5 years. More than half of the children (53.7%) had no previous dental…

  6. Equivalence study of a dental anatomy computer-assisted learning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacki, Russell E; Best, Al; Abbey, Louis M

    2004-08-01

    Tooth Morphology is a computer-assisted learning program designed to teach the anatomy of the adult dentition. The purpose of this study was to test whether Tooth Morphology could teach dental anatomy to first-year dental students as well as the traditional lecture. A randomized controlled trial was performed with forty-five first-year dental students. The students were randomly assigned to either the Tooth Morphology group (n=23), which used the computer-assisted learning program and did not attend lecture, or the lecture group (n=22), which attended the traditional lecture and did not use Tooth Morphology. The Tooth Morphology group had a final exam average of 90.0 (standard deviation=5.2), and the lecture group had a final exam average of 90.9 (sd=5.3). Analysis showed that the two groups' scores were statistically equivalent (pdental anatomy lectures.

  7. Luminescence characteristics of dental ceramics for retrospective dosimetry: a preliminary study

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    Bailiff, I.K.; Correcher, V.; Delgado, A.; Goksu, Y.; Huebner, S

    2002-07-01

    Ceramic materials that are widely employed in dental prosthetics and repairs exhibit luminescent properties. Because of their use in the body, these materials are potentially of interest in situations where retrospective dosimetry for individuals is required but where monitoring was not planned. The luminescent properties of dental ceramics obtained in Germany, Spain and the UK were examined. Linear dose-response characteristics were obtained in the range <100 mGy to 10 Gy using thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence and infrared-stimulated luminescence measurement techniques. Measurements of time-resolved luminescence were also performed to examine the nature of the luminescence recombination under visible (470 nm) and IR (855 nm) stimulation. The results obtained by TL and optically stimulated techniques suggest that there may be deeper traps than previously observed in certain types of dental ceramic. Such traps may be less susceptible to optical and athermal fading than was reported in earlier studies. (author)

  8. Time until first dental caries for young children first seen in Federally Qualified Health Centers: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthy, RA; Jones, M; Kavand, G; Momany, E; Askelson, N; Chi, D; Wehby, G; Damiano, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study assessed the time until first dental caries for young children seen at 5 Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) in Iowa and the relationship with the frequency and gaps (in months) of dental episodes, the number of topical fluoride treatments, and the number of dentists caring for the subject. Methods Forty children were randomly selected at each FQHC (n=200). All children were continuously enrolled in the Medicaid program and had their first dental visit prior to age 6. Dental chart findings, claims data for the child and family, and birth certificate information were merged into one dataset. Dental visits were followed for a minimum of 36 months, including dental visits external to the FQHCs. Using time until first caries as the dependent variable, the data were subject to left, interval, and right censoring and were analyzed via Weibull regression. Results Slightly more than half of the 200 children experienced caries. Regression analysis indicated that the hazard rate of first dental caries increased by approximately 2% with each additional month that transpired between preventive recall examinations. In addition, children with older siblings who had a dental visit at the same center during the previous year prior to the subject’s first visit were more likely to have a longer time until first dental caries. Conclusions Timing of dental care episodes was associated with caries experience in young children from low income families. Dental professionals should focus on regularity of dental care in order to prevent or delay caries experience in young children. PMID:24483730

  9. Chemical or microbiological models of secondary caries development around different dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Maristela M; Gonçalves, Reginaldo B; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria B; Pimenta, Luiz André F

    2005-08-01

    This study evaluated artificial secondary caries around restorative materials, induced by means of chemical or microbiological models. The following materials were used randomly to restore 130 dental blocks: (1) zinc-oxide eugenol-free temporary filling: Coltosol (Coltène/Whaledent Inc.; n = 30), (2) silver amalgam: Permite C (SDI Limited, n = 20), (3) composite resin: Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE; n = 20), (4) glass-ionomer cement: Fuji II (GC America Inc.; n = 20), (5) resin-modified glass ionomer: Vitremer (3M ESPE; n = 20), and (6) polyacid modified resin: Dyract AP (Dentsply; n = 20). Ten specimens of Group 1 were kept in humidity, and had no carious formation (NC). Ten specimens of each group were submitted to pH cycling (CG, n = 60), and the others were immersed in a medium containing Streptococcus mutans and sucrose (BG, n = 60). Mineral content was determined by microhardness assessment, and lesion depth was measured in polarized light photomicrographs. In the chemical model (CG), mineral content values in the vicinities of restoration were high for Groups 5 (75.7 +/- 11.9), 4 (70.8 +/- 14.2), and NC (95.4 +/- 3.8); intermediate for Groups 1 (55.8 +/- 18.5), 6 (45.6 +/- 11.0), and 2 (44.3 +/- 11.2); and reduced for Group 3 (34.7 +/- 9.7). In the microbiological model (BG), results were similar to CG, although there was less demineralization. The highest lesion depths were found for Groups 3 (182.3 +/- 33.2) in CG and 6 (126.5 +/- 42.8) in BG, when compared to Group 5 (114.6 +/- 26.0 and 56.2 +/- 33.2, respectively). In both models of caries induction, ionomeric materials showed a superior cariostatic effect when compared to the other restorative materials.

  10. Identifying service quality strengths and weaknesses using SERVQUAL: a study of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldenberg, D; Becker, B W; Browne, B A; Browne, W G

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine responses among dental patients to the most recent version of SERVQUAL, and to evaluate that instrument as a tool for measuring satisfaction in a dental practice. Items on the reliability and responsiveness dimensions produced the lowest satisfaction ratings, while improvements in providing services as promised and instilling confidence have the greatest potential for producing higher satisfaction among patients. Finally, using open-ended questions, we identified a number of patient events or experiences which caused either high or low scores on individual SERVQUAL items.

  11. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  12. Psychosocial Aspects of Dental Anxiety and Clinical Pain Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    This Danish Doctoral Dissertation in the science of Odontology contains 7 chapters: 1) Introduction to a social perspective on dental treatment, anxiety and pain throughout time, 2) research models and methods to study dental anxiety and clinical pain phenomena, 3) the fear of dental treatment...... .. what it is and what it is not and how many have it, 4) clinical pain treatment, psychosocial aspects in relation to anxiety, 4) patients and dentists' roles, pain perception and anxiety, 6) psychosocial aspects of managing anxiety and pain phenomena, and 7) Conclusions and proposals for the future...... of dental education and necessary changes in dental practice....

  13. A study of patient attitudes towards fasting prior to intravenous sedation for dental treatment in a dental hospital department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenna, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous sedation is the most commonly used method of sedation for the provision of adult dental care. However, disparity exists in pre-operative fasting times in use for patients throughout the United Kingdom.

  14. AUTHORITARIANISM AND DENTAL CARIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    in particular. If so, dental decay among nonauthoritarians might well progress further than among authoritarians. To determine whether or not there...is any relationship between dental decay and authoritarianism is the purpose of the present study. (Author)

  15. Understanding the motivation: a qualitative study of dental students' choice of professional career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J; Clarke, W; Wilson, N

    2008-05-01

    Given the changing nature of the dental workforce, and the need to retain the services of future members, it is important to understand why current dental students perceive that they were motivated to study dentistry. Qualitative research provides the opportunity to explore the underlying issues in addition to informing subsequent quantitative research. The objectives of this research were to investigate final-year dental students' motivation for studying dentistry and how they perceive this has been modified during their undergraduate degree programme. Purposive sampling of a representative group of 35 final-year dental students at King's College London Dental Institute to participate in audio-taped focus groups. Qualitative data were analysed using Framework Methodology. The findings suggest a strong emphasis on having a career, providing 'professional status', 'financial benefits', 'job security, flexibility and independence' and 'good quality of life'. Students reported being attracted by features of the job, supported to a greater or lesser extent by personal experience, family and friends. It appears however that students' initial motivation is being tempered by their experiences during their undergraduate degree programme, in particular, the 'responsibilities of an intensive professional education', their 'mounting student debt' and the perception of 'feeling undervalued'. This perception related to dentistry in general and National Health Service dentistry in particular, being undervalued, by government, patients, the public and members of the dental profession. Students' vision of a 'contained professional career' within health care, providing status and financial benefits, appears to have influenced their choice of dentistry. Pressures relating to student life and policy changes are perceived as impacting on key components of professional life, particularly status in the social and economic order. The implications for educators, professional leaders and

  16. Dental students' perceptions of and attitudes about poverty: a Canadian participatory case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Clarice M R; Rodriguez, Charo; Macaulay, Ann C; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    This qualitative case study was conducted in a Canadian dental school using a participatory approach and was based on Paulo Freire's theoretical concept of conscientização, a form of critical consciousness that involves awareness of social reality and fosters action towards social justice. The aim of the study was to understand dental students' perceptions of and attitudes about poverty and dental care provided to people living in poverty. It also examined how these perceptions shape students' plans for their professional careers, as well as their opinions on educational strategies to prepare them to work with poor patients. The sources of data generation were semistructured interviews, participant observations, and document analysis. A deductive-inductive thematic strategy was used to analyze the data. Out of a class of thirty-five senior dental students, the authors interviewed a convenience sample of twelve: five male and seven female. The findings suggest that the students had incipient conscientização about poverty-related themes. They perceived poverty as a distant issue and as the responsibility of the government or of the poor individuals themselves. The students did not have plans to work with patients living in poverty in the future and struggled to envision ways to address these patients' needs other than volunteer work. This research supports the need for academic dental institutions to adopt strategies to increase students' critical consciousness about oral health inequities. Reducing oral health inequities is a matter of social justice, and dental care providers are key actors in this endeavor.

  17. Photodynamic therapy on bacterial reduction in dental caries: in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Alessandra; Araujo Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Amaral, Marcello Magri; Zanardi de Freitas, Anderson; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2010-04-01

    The reduction of pathogenic microorganisms in supragingival plaque is one of the principal factors in caries prevention and control. A large number of microorganisms have been reported to be inactivated in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to develop a rat model to investigate the effects of PDT on bacterial reduction in induced dental caries. Twenty four rats were orally inoculated with Streptococcus mutans cells (ATCC 25175) for three consecutive days. The animals were fed with a cariogenic diet and water with 10% of sucrose ad libitum, during all experimental period. Caries lesion formation was confirmed by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) 5 days after the beginning of the experiment. Then, the animals were randomly divided into two groups: Control Group: twelve animals were untreated by either light or photosensitizer; and PDT Group: twelve animals were treated with 100μM of methylene blue for 5min and irradiated by a Light Emitting Diode (LED) at λ = 640+/-30nm, fluence of 172J/cm2, output power of 240mW, and exposure time of 3min. Microbiological samples were collected before, immediately after, 3, 7 and 10 days after treatment and the number of total microaerophiles was counted. OCT images showed areas of enamel demineralization on rat molars. Microbiological analysis showed a significant bacterial reduction after PDT. Furthermore, the number of total microaerophiles in PDT group remained lower than control group until 10 days posttreatment. These findings suggest that PDT could be an alternative approach to reduce bacteria in dental caries.

  18. Nanohydroxyapatite Silicate-Based Cement Improves the Primary Stability of Dental Implants: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Khorshidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Insufficient cortical bone volume when placing implants can lead to lack of primary stability. The use of cement as a bone fill material in bone defects around dental implant could result in better clinical outcome. HA has shown excellent biological properties in implant dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of nanohydroxyapatite powder (Nano-HA in combination with accelerated Portland cement (APC on implant primary stability in surgically created circumferential bone defects in a bovine rib in vitro model. Materials and Methods. Sixteen bovine rib bones and thirty-six implants of same type and size (4 mm × 10 mm were used. Implants were divided into six groups: no circumferential bone defect, defect and no grafting, bone chips grafting, Nano-HA grafting, APC grafting, and Nano-HA mixed to APC grafting (Nano-HA-APC. Circumferential defects around the implants were prepared. The implant stability quotient (ISQ values were measured before and after the grafting. Results. APC exhibited the highest ISQ values. A significant increase of ISQ values following the grafting of Nano-HA-APC (18.08±5.82 and APC alone (9.50±4.12 was achieved. Increase of ISQ values after 72 hours was 24.16±5.01 and 17.58±4.89, respectively. Nano-HA grafting alone exhibited the least rise in ISQ values. Conclusions. Nanohydroxyapatite silicate-based cement could improve the primary stability of dental implants in circumferential bone defect around implants.

  19. Numerical modelling of tooth enamel subsurface lesion formation induced by dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, O; van Turnhout, A G; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Picioreanu, C

    2014-01-01

    Using a one-dimensional mathematical model that couples tooth demineralisation and remineralisation with metabolic processes occurring in the dental plaque, two mechanisms for subsurface lesion formation were evaluated. It was found that a subsurface lesion can develop only as the result of alternating periods of demineralisation (acid attack during sugar consumption) and remineralisation (resting period) in tooth enamel with uniform mineral composition. It was also shown that a minimum plaque thickness that can induce an enamel lesion exists. The subsurface lesion formation can also be explained by assuming the existence of a fluoride-containing layer at the tooth surface that decreases enamel solubility. A nearly constant thickness of the surface layer was obtained with both proposed mechanisms. Sensitivity analysis showed that surface layer formation is strongly dependent on the length of remineralisation and demineralisation cycles. The restoration period is very important and the numerical simulations support the observation that often consumption of sugars is a key factor in caries formation. The calculated profiles of mineral content in enamel are similar to those observed experimentally. Most probably, both studied mechanisms interact in vivo in the process of caries development, but the simplest explanation for subsurface lesion formation remains the alternation between demineralisation and remineralisation cycles without any pre-imposed gradients.

  20. Financial planning and computer modeling in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, C A

    1986-10-01

    The financial plan describes the practice's financial strategy, projects the strategy's future effect on the practice, and establishes goals by which the practice's manager can measure subsequent performance. The act of putting together a financial plan is called the financial planning process. It is a process that consists of analyzing the practice; projecting future outcomes of decisions that have to be made regarding finances, investments, and day to day operations; deciding which alternatives to undertake; and measuring performance against goals that are established in the financial plan. Computer financial planning models can aid the practice manager in projecting future outcomes of various financial, investment, and operational decisions. These models can be created inexpensively by noncomputer programmers with the aid of computer software on the market today. The financial planning process for a hypothetical practice was summarized, and the financial model used to test out various alternatives available to the practice was described.

  1. Dental procedures, antibiotic prophylaxis, and endocarditis among people with prosthetic heart valves: nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, Sarah; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Hoen, Bruno; Lesclous, Philippe; Millot, Sarah; Rudant, Jérémie; Weill, Alain; Coste, Joel; Alla, François; Duval, Xavier

    2017-09-07

    Objective To assess the relation between invasive dental procedures and infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci among people with prosthetic heart valves.Design Nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.Setting French national health insurance administrative data linked with the national hospital discharge database.Participants All adults aged more than 18 years, living in France, with medical procedure codes for positioning or replacement of prosthetic heart valves between July 2008 and July 2014.Main outcome measures Oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was identified using primary discharge diagnosis codes. In the cohort study, Poisson regression models were performed to estimate the rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis during the three month period after invasive dental procedures compared with non-exposure periods. In the case crossover study, conditional logistic regression models calculated the odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals comparing exposure to invasive dental procedures during the three month period preceding oral streptococcal infective endocarditis (case period) with three earlier control periods.Results The cohort included 138 876 adults with prosthetic heart valves (285 034 person years); 69 303 (49.9%) underwent at least one dental procedure. Among the 396 615 dental procedures performed, 103 463 (26.0%) were invasive and therefore presented an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis, which was performed in 52 280 (50.1%). With a median follow-up of 1.7 years, 267 people developed infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci (incidence rate 93.7 per 100 000 person years, 95% confidence interval 82.4 to 104.9). Compared with non-exposure periods, no statistically significant increased rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was observed during the three months after an invasive dental procedure (relative rate 1.25, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1

  2. In vitro study of transmission of bacteria from contaminated metal models to stone models via impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofou, A; Larsen, T; Owall, B; Fiehn, N-E

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of microbiological transmission into the dental laboratory via impressions and dental stone models. Metal master models were contaminated with Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus sanguis. Impressions in alginate, polyvinylsiloxane, and polyether were used, and models were cast in two brands of dental stone. Samples were taken from the impression surfaces before and after casting, and sections from the stone models were taken by a technique developed for this study. After incubation, the numbers of colonies were counted and the numbers of colony-forming units per milliliter were calculated. The reductions were statistically significant but considered to be clinically insignificant. The conclusion is that even after severe contamination, the risks to dental laboratory personnel are minimal. "Normal" hygienic procedures are recommended instead of disinfection.

  3. The State of Veterinary Dental Education in North America, Canada, and the Caribbean: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jamie G; Goldstein, Gary; Boudreaux, Karen; Ilkiw, Jan E

    2016-07-14

    Dental disease is important in the population of pets seen by veterinarians. Knowledge and skills related to oral disease and dentistry are critical entry-level skills expected of graduating veterinarians. A descriptive survey on the state of veterinary dental education was sent to respondents from 35 veterinary schools in the United States, Canada, and the Caribbean. Using the online SurveyMonkey application, respondents answered up to 26 questions. Questions were primarily designed to determine the breadth and depth of veterinary dental education from didactic instruction in years 1-3 to the clinical year programs. There was an excellent response to the survey with 86% compliance. Learning opportunities for veterinary students in years 1-3 in both the lecture and laboratory environments were limited, as were the experience in the clinical year 4, which were divided between community-type practices and veterinary dentistry and oral surgery services. The former provided more hands-on clinical experience, including tooth extraction, while the latter focused on dental charting and periodontal debridement. Data on degrees and certifications of faculty revealed only 12 programs with board-certified veterinary dentists. Of these, seven veterinary schools had residency programs in veterinary dentistry at the time of the survey. Data from this study demonstrate the lack of curricular time dedicated to dental content in the veterinary schools participating in the survey, thereby suggesting the need for veterinary schools to address the issue of veterinary dental education. By graduation, new veterinarians should have acquired the needed knowledge and skills to meet both societal demands and professional expectations.

  4. Users’ dissatisfaction with dental care: a population-based household study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; dos Santos, Pedro Eleutério; Carreiro, Danilo Lima; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigênia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care are associated with users’ dissatisfaction with such are. METHODS Cross-sectional study of 781 people who required dental care in Montes Claros, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2012, a city with of medium-sized population situated in the North of Minas Gerais. Household interviews were conducted to assess the users’ dissatisfaction with dental care (dependent variable), demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care (independent variables). Sample calculation was used for the finite population, with estimates made for proportions of dissatisfaction in 50.0% of the population, a 5.0% error margin, a non-response rate of 5.0% and a 2.0% design effect. Logistic regression was used, and the odds ratio was calculated with a 5% significance level and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Of the interviewed individuals, 9.0% (7.9%, with correction for design effect) were dissatisfied with the care provided. These were associated with lower educational level; negative self-assessment of oral health; perception that the care provider was unable to give dental care; negative evaluation of the way the patient was treated, the cleanliness of the rooms, based on the examination rooms and the toilets, and the size of the waiting and examination rooms. CONCLUSIONS The rate of dissatisfaction with dental care was low. This dissatisfaction was associated with socioeconomic conditions, subjectivity of oral health, skill of the health professionals relating to the professional-patient relationship and facility infrastructure. Educational interventions are suggested that aim at improving the quality of care among professionals by responsible agencies as is improving the infrastructure of the care units. PMID:26270017

  5. Comparison of Dental Students' Self-Directed, Faculty, and Software-Based Assessments of Dental Anatomy Wax-Ups: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Pauline H; Faraone, Karen L; Patzelt, Sebastian B M; Keaser, Michael L

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about self-directed and self-reflective assessment in preclinical dental curricula. The aim of this study was to evaluate a visual dental anatomy teaching tool to train dental students to self-assess their dental anatomy wax carving practical examinations. The students self-assessed two waxing practical examinations (tooth #8 and tooth #19) using high-quality digital images in an assessment tool incorporated into a digital testing program. Student self-assessments were compared to the faculty evaluations and the results of a software-based evaluation tool (E4D Compare). Out of a total 130 first-year dental students at one U.S. dental school, wax-ups from 57 participants were available for this study. The assessment data were submitted to statistical analyses (p<0.05). For tooth #8, the student self-assessments were significantly different from the faculty and software assessments at a 400 micrometer level of tolerance (p=0.036), whereas the faculty assessment was not significantly different from the software assessment at a 300 micrometer level of tolerance (p=0.69). The evaluation of tooth #19 resulted in no significant differences between faculty members (p=0.94) or students (p=0.21) and the software at a level of tolerance of 400 micrometers. This study indicates that students can learn to self-assess their work using self-reflection in conjunction with faculty guidance and that it may be possible to use software-based evaluation tools to assist in faculty calibration and as objective grading tools.

  6. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of high-palladium dental alloys. Part I: behavior at open-circuit potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, D; Monaghan, P; Brantley, W A; Johnston, W M

    2002-05-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to study the in vitro corrosion of three representative high-palladium alloys and a gold-palladium alloy for comparison. The corrosion resistances (measured as the charge transfer resistance R(CT) from an equivalent circuit) of the high-palladium alloys and the gold-palladium alloy were comparable in simulated body fluid and oral environments, and under simulated dental plaque. The great similarity in corrosion behavior for the three high-palladium alloys is largely attributed to their substantial palladium content and passivity in the laboratory test media, and possibly to their similar structure at the submicron level. Differences in composition and microstructure at the micron level and greater, including the effects of heat treatment simulating the firing cycles for dental porcelain, do not have noteworthy effects on the in vitro corrosion of the three high-palladium alloys. Good accuracy and convenience of extracting corrosion characteristics from equivalent circuit modeling, along with the capability of providing intrinsic information about the corrosion mechanism, enable EIS to be an excellent alternative method to conventional potentiodynamic polarization for evaluating the corrosion behavior of noble dental alloys.

  7. [The Bambuí Project: a population-based study of factors associated with regular utilization of dental services in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, D L; Lima-Costa, M F; Guerra, H L; Marcenes, W

    2001-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Bambuí, Minas Gerais, to identify factors associated with regular use of dental services. Participants were interviewed with a structured questionnaire and previously validated questions. 999/1,221 (81.8%) randomly selected individuals aged > 18 years participated in the Bambuí dental survey. Of these, 654 out of 656 individuals who had at least one natural tooth and had visited a dentist during their lifetime participated in the study. Results adjusted by multiple logistic regression showed that regular use of dental services was significantly related to having > 8 and 4-7 years of schooling (OR = 9.90; 95% CI = 2.90-33.77 and OR = 3.87; 95% CI = 1.11-13.51, respectively), having a preference for restorative treatment rather than extraction (OR = 4.91; 95% CI = 2.23-10.79), having no present need of dental treatment (OR = 4.87; 95% CI = 3.17-7.49), and belief that visiting the dentist prevents tooth decay and gum disease (OR = 1.73; 95% CI = 1.13-2.65). The results show that regular use of dental services was related to factors distributed in the Andersen and Newman model (1973) explaining use of dentistry services.

  8. Factors Affecting Oral-Dental Health in Children in the Viewpoints of Mothers Referred to the Health Centers in Qom City: Using the Health Belief Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Gharlipour

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Many dental problems such as tooth decay starts from childhood. In this regard, attitudes and beliefs of mothers about oral-dental health are important. The aim of this study was to determine the factors affecting oral-dental health in children of the mothers who referred to the Qom health centers by using of the Health Belief Model. Materials and Methods This is cross-sectional descriptive analytic study that was performed among mothers who had Children's health dossier in the Qom health centers, Iran. By using of multi-stage sampling and sample size formula, 300 mothers were selected randomly from health assessment centers. Required data from target group were collected by the questionnaire about Health Belief Model in the field of oral health. The data were analyzed using SPSS -20. Results The results showed that there was a positive and significant relationship between the mothers' behavior towards oral-dental health with perceived benefits and self-efficacy (r=0.16, P

  9. The relationship between parenting, family interaction and childhood dental caries: a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Jong-Lenters; D. Duijster; M.A. Bruist; J. Thijssen; C. de Ruiter

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to explore the relationship between parenting practices, parent-child interaction and childhood dental caries, using a sample of 5-8-year old children from the Netherlands. Cases were defined as children with four or more decayed, missing or filled teeth and co

  10. Mandibular Overdentures Supported by 6-mm Dental Implants : A 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulje, Felix; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Ter Meulen, Jan-Willem P.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Guljé, Felix

    Background: The extremely resorbed edentulous mandible, with a bone height of 8 mm or less, is still a challenge in implant dentistry. Recently, dental implants of 6 mm in length have been developed. Purpose: The purpose of this 1-year prospective cohort study was to evaluate treatment outcome of

  11. Access Barriers to Dental Health Care in Children with Disability. A Questionnaire Study of Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerreth, Karolina; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: A patient's with disability everyday life is rife with many limitations such as architectural, transport, information as well as medical, psychological, legal, economic and social barriers. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental health care of special-care schoolchildren with intellectual disability on the basis of…

  12. Dental status and oral health-related quality of life. A population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C. M.; Lobbezoo, F.; Schuller, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) is associated with tooth wear and tooth loss. This study investigated the association between OHRQoL and dental status (in terms of natural dentition, partial or complete dentures, or edentulism). Sixteen hundred and twenty-two persons who participated in

  13. The relationship between parenting, family interaction and childhood dental caries: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong-Lenters, M. de; Duijster, D.; Bruist, M.A.; Thijssen, J.; Ruiter, C. de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to explore the relationship between parenting practices, parent-child interaction and childhood dental caries, using a sample of 5-8-year old children from the Netherlands. Cases were defined as children with four or more decayed, missing or filled teeth and co

  14. The relationship between parenting, family interaction and childhood dental caries: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong-Lenters, M. de; Duijster, D.; Bruist, M.A.; Thijssen, J.; Ruiter, C. de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to explore the relationship between parenting practices, parent-child interaction and childhood dental caries, using a sample of 5-8-year old children from the Netherlands. Cases were defined as children with four or more decayed, missing or filled teeth and co

  15. An epidemiological study of malocclusion and occlusal traits related to different stages of dental development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Redžepagić Vražalica

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Various types of malocclusions present one of the most common dental problems of today’s population. Planning the implementation of orthodontic therapy, especially preventive and interceptive measures is one of many activities of public sector health, and it requires information regarding the prevalence of malocclusion in different parts of our country. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusion of preschool and school children in the city of Sarajevo. Materials and methods: This study was comprised of 373 children out of which 200 preschool and school children were included in the final sample according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria for participation. 100 children were five-year-olds with complete deciduous dentition, and 100 children were 14-year-olds with permanent dentition. The examined variables in the study were: dental status and existence of caries, overjet, depth of overbite, a presence of premature contacts, a presence of diastemas, crowding of teeth in the dental arch (for 14-year-olds and rotation of teeth in the dental arch (for 14-year-olds. Results: The prevalence of malocclusion was 58% in the group of preschool children and 83% in the group of school children. Conclusion: Results of this study demonstrate a need for the implementation of preventive and interceptive orthodontic methods in primary health care, which would reduce the need for expensive and long term orthodontic therapy.

  16. Mandibular Overdentures Supported by 6-mm Dental Implants : A 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulje, Felix; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Ter Meulen, Jan-Willem P.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Guljé, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Background: The extremely resorbed edentulous mandible, with a bone height of 8 mm or less, is still a challenge in implant dentistry. Recently, dental implants of 6 mm in length have been developed. Purpose: The purpose of this 1-year prospective cohort study was to evaluate treatment outcome of ma

  17. The relationship between parenting, family interaction and childhood dental caries: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong-Lenters, M. de; Duijster, D.; Bruist, M.A.; Thijssen, J.; Ruiter, C. de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to explore the relationship between parenting practices, parent-child interaction and childhood dental caries, using a sample of 5-8-year old children from the Netherlands. Cases were defined as children with four or more decayed, missing or filled teeth and

  18. Hydroxyapatite induces spontaneous polymerization of model self-etch dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Ningjing; Bai, Xinyan; Xu, Changqi; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to report for the first time the spontaneous polymerization phenomenon of self-etch dental adhesives induced by hydroxylapatite (HAp). Model self-etch adhesives were prepared by using a monomer mixture of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The initiator system consisted of camphorquinone (CQ, 0.022 mmol/g) and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E, 0.022-0.088 mmol/g). HAp (2-8 wt.%) was added to the neat model adhesive. In a dark environment, the polymerization was monitored in-situ using ATR/FT-IR, and the mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives were evaluated using nanoindentation technique. Results indicated that spontaneous polymerization was not observed in the absence of HAp. However, as different amounts of HAp were incorporated into the adhesives, spontaneous polymerization was induced. Higher HAp content led to higher degree of conversion (DC), higher rate of polymerization (RP) and shorter induction period (IP). In addition, higher 4E content also elevated DC and RP and reduced IP of the adhesives. Nanoindentation result suggested that the Young's modulus of the polymerized adhesives showed similar dependence on HAp and 4E contents. In summary, interaction with HAp could induce spontaneous polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. This result provides important information for understanding the initiation mechanism of the self-etch adhesives, and may be of clinical significance to strengthen the adhesive/dentin interface based on the finding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An observational cohort study on shortened dental arches--clinical course during a period of 27-35 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, A.E.; Witter, D.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical course of shortened dental arches ('SDA group') compared to SDAs plus removable denture prosthesis ('SDA plus RDP group') and complete dental arches ('CDA group', controls). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data (numbers of direct and

  20. Characteristics of undergraduate dental students in Japan: English competency and willingness to study abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Sachiko; Wright, Fac; Kawaguchi, Yoko; Ishida, Yuji; Morio, Ikuko; Tagami, Junji

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to acquire a deeper understanding of Japanese students' motivation to study abroad and to provide baseline information for nurturing globally-minding dental students. Students from the first to the sixth year (n = 332), at the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, were invited to participate in the study and were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire, written in Japanese. Self-reported English competency was assessed in four areas: reading; writing; speaking; and listening. Students were asked to score their competencies in these areas using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS). Of the total eligible students, 312 (94%) participated. The results of the study suggest that competency and confidence in the English language could be one of the biggest obstacles for students to study abroad. Students with an interest in studying abroad were highly motivated and studied English independently. Japanese educational authorities and dental schools may need to consider a range of incentives and motivational strategies to nurture clinicians, educators and researchers who can function confidently in an increasingly borderless world. These could include increasing exposure to English language skills through mandatory lectures and seminars in English, increasing the range of inbound international students through student exchange programmes and encouraging students to develop and communicate with international colleagues. The Faculty of Dentistry at Tokyo Medical and Dental University has begun to increase exposure of students to English through the regular curriculum. Outcomes will be followed and evaluated. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  1. Prevalence of dental erosion among young competitive swimmers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghele, Om N; Majumdar, Indranil A; Thorat, Manojkumar S; Nawar, Ramchandra; Baghele, Mangala O; Makkad, Snehal

    2013-02-01

    The objective of the study presented was to determine the prevalence of oral problems--eg, dental erosion, rough surfaces, pain--among young competitive swimmers in India, because no such studies are reported. Its design was a cross-sectional study with a questionnaire and clinical examination protocols. It was conducted in a community setting on those who were involved in regular swimming in pools. Questionnaires were distributed to swimmers at the 25th State Level Swimming Competition, held at Thane Municipal Corporation's Swimming Pool, India. Those who returned completed questionnaires were also clinically examined. Questionnaires were analyzed and clinical examinations focused on either the presence or absence of dental erosions and rough surfaces. Reported results were on 100 swimmers who met the inclusion criteria. They included 75 males with a mean age of 18.6 ± 6.3 years and 25 females with a mean age of 15.3 ± 7.02 years. Among them, 90% showed dental erosion, 94% exhibited rough surfaces, and 88% were found to be having tooth pain of varying severity. Erosion and rough surfaces were found to be directly proportional to the duration of swimming. The authors concluded that the prevalence of dental erosion, rough surfaces, and pain is found to be very common among competitive swimmers. They recommend that swimmers practice good preventive measures and clinicians evaluate them for possible swimmer's erosion.

  2. Dental extraction without stopping single or dual antiplatelet therapy: results of a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S-Y; Tsai, C-Y; Lin, L-H; Lu, S-N

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of bleeding after dental extraction without stopping antiplatelet therapy. Postoperative bleeding was assessed in a total of 1271 patients who were divided into two groups: a study group comprising 183 patients on antiplatelet therapy (aspirin 125 patients/185 occasions; clopidogrel 42 patients/65 occasions; dual therapy 16 patients/24 occasions) who underwent 548 dental extractions on 274 occasions, and a control group comprising 1088 patients who were not receiving any antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy and underwent 2487 dental extractions on 1472 occasions. The incidence of postoperative bleeding was higher in the study group (5/274, 1.8%) than in the control group (10/1472, 0.7%), and also in the dual antiplatelet subgroup (1/24, 4.2%) than in the single antiplatelet subgroups (clopidogrel: 2/65, 3.1%; aspirin: 2/185, 1.1%); however, these differences were not significant. Postoperative bleeding was managed successfully by repacking with Gelfoam impregnated with tranexamic acid powder in 12 patients and by resuturing in three of the control patients undergoing extraction of impacted teeth with flap elevation. These findings indicate that there is no need to interrupt antiplatelet drugs before dental extraction. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An epidemiological study of dental agenesis in a primary health area in Spain: estimated prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallón-Walton, Victòria; Nieminen, Pekka; Arte, Sirpa; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Ustrell-Torrent, Josep Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of dental agenesis and its possible association with other developmental dental anomalies and systemic entities. Descriptive transversal study, for which 1518 clinical records, of patients visited by the Odontological Service of the Primary Health Centre of Cassà de la Selva (Girona-Spain) between December 2002 and February 2006 were reviewed. The data were recorded in relation to the oral and dental anomalies and the associated systemic entities, between the ones referred as concomitant in literature. Values of 9.48% (7.25% excluding the third molars) for dental agenesis and 0.39% for oligodontia were obtained. The presence of dental agenesis concomitant with some other forms of oral and dental anomalies was observed. Attention must be drawn to the fact that a greater number of concomitant systemic entities were observed in those patients that presented a severe phenotypical pattern of dental agenesis. The results of the present study do not differ from the ones reported in studies of similar characteristics among Occidental and Spanish populations. The relationship observed between certain systemic entities and developmental dental anomalies suggest a possible common genetic etiology.

  4. The Development of Dental Anesthesiology As a Discipline and Its Role As a Model of Interdisciplinary Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannitti, Joseph A; Montandon, Richard J; Herlich, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The majority of dental procedures can be performed with an awake patient and the use of a local anesthetic, but when deep sedation and general anesthesia are needed, they typically are provided by those dentists with advanced training in anesthesiology, i.e., oral and maxillofacial surgeons and dentist anesthesiologists. Dental anesthesiology began with the discovery of anesthesia by a dentist in 1844 and has been recognized as a separate discipline in dentistry for nearly 70 years. Training over this time evolved from apprenticeships to one-year training programs, and in 2007, the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) began accrediting two-year dental anesthesiology training programs. Since 2015, in recognition of the increasing complexity of the discipline, training has required three years of postgraduate study. The number of dentist anesthesiologists has grown with the increasing demand for anesthesia services by both the public and the profession. However, the present number of dentist anesthesiologists is not sufficient to meet the demand, so additional programs and growth in current programs are needed. Another valuable aspect of this discipline is its role as a positive example of interdepartmental collaboration since dental anesthesiology faculty, as members of a support discipline, typically work across many of the other departments in a dental school. This article reviews the history of the discipline, describes the educational goals and CODA standards for dental anesthesiology programs, using one program as an example, and discusses the needs and challenges that will shape the discipline's development in the future.

  5. Effect of anti-asthmatic drugs on dental health: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Chellaih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Bronchial asthma constitutes important problem worldwide. This chronic lung disease has detrimental effect in the oral cavity like reduction of salivary secretion, change in salivary composition and pH. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to compare the prevalence of dental caries in asthmatic children and healthy children, and also to evaluate the correlation between the Streptococcus mutans , Lactobacillus and dental caries in both the groups. Results: In this study, the mean decayed, missing, filled teeth score of children in the study group was (4.53 ± 3.38 higher than the control group (1.51 ± 1.58 (P < 0.01. The S. mutans count of the study group was (59574.47 ± 28510.67 higher than the control group (19777.78 ± 17899.83 P < 0.01. The Lactobacillus count in study group was (43553.19 ± 58776.96 higher than the control group (8843.84 ± 7982.72 P < 0.01. Subjects using inhaled corticosteroids were more prone to develop dental caries than the control group with odds ratio = 6.26 and 95% confidence interval. Conclusions: The dental caries prevalence increases with the usage of β2agonist and corticosteroid inhalers for the treatment of asthma. Thus in asthmatic children, increase in caries prevalence might be due to the drug treatment and not due to the disease by itself. It can be concluded that asthmatic children have a higher prevalence of dental caries than healthy children. Hence, special oral health care is needed for asthmatic children.

  6. Effect of anti-asthmatic drugs on dental health: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellaih, P.; Sivadas, G.; Chintu, S.; Vaishnavi Vedam, V. K.; Arunachalam, Rajeev; Sarsu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Bronchial asthma constitutes important problem worldwide. This chronic lung disease has detrimental effect in the oral cavity like reduction of salivary secretion, change in salivary composition and pH. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to compare the prevalence of dental caries in asthmatic children and healthy children, and also to evaluate the correlation between the Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus and dental caries in both the groups. Results: In this study, the mean decayed, missing, filled teeth score of children in the study group was (4.53 ± 3.38) higher than the control group (1.51 ± 1.58) (P S. mutans count of the study group was (59574.47 ± 28510.67) higher than the control group (19777.78 ± 17899.83) P < 0.01. The Lactobacillus count in study group was (43553.19 ± 58776.96) higher than the control group (8843.84 ± 7982.72) P < 0.01. Subjects using inhaled corticosteroids were more prone to develop dental caries than the control group with odds ratio = 6.26 and 95% confidence interval. Conclusions: The dental caries prevalence increases with the usage of β2 agonist and corticosteroid inhalers for the treatment of asthma. Thus in asthmatic children, increase in caries prevalence might be due to the drug treatment and not due to the disease by itself. It can be concluded that asthmatic children have a higher prevalence of dental caries than healthy children. Hence, special oral health care is needed for asthmatic children. PMID:27829752

  7. Initial Stability Study of Calcium Phosphate Coated Dental Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Thin film of biodegradable calcium phosphate coated on threaded commercially pure titanium( cp- Ti) dental implants has been investigated as one of alternatives to eliminate the problem of the long-term instability of plasma sprayed HA coated implants. In order to compare in-vivo hone-to-implant response behavior among as-machined, HA coated and CMP coated groups, each group was implanted into New Zealand white mature male rabbits for 2 and 6 weeks, and then in- vivo biological behavior was examined in terms of H&E staining. Initial stability and removable torques of implants were compared among three groups. Measured removable torque of CMP coated specimen at 6 wceks after implantation was significantly higher than that of non-coated group, but slightly lower than that of HA coated group, without any inflammatory response at the surrounding of the implants. The initial stability (ISQ value; implant stability quotient ) of CMP coated specimen at 2 weeks after implantation was slightly lower than that of HA coated group and significantly higher than that of non-coated group. However, after 6 weeks, ISQ value of CMP coated group was slightly higher than that of HA coated group and significantly higher than that of non-coated group.

  8. Dental Student Study Strategies: Are Self-Testing and Scheduling Related to Academic Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Maureen; Morrow, Christina S; Atiyeh, Lindsey; Pierre, Gaëlle C

    2016-05-01

    Self-testing, a strategy wherein a student actively engages in creating questions and answers from study materials to assist with studying, has been found to be especially advantageous because it enhances future retrieval of information. Studies have found correlations among students' grade point averages (GPAs), self-testing, and rereading study strategies, as well as the spacing of study sessions over time. The aim of this study was to assess relationships among dental students' study strategies, scheduling of study time, and academic achievement. A 16-item survey requesting information on study habits, study schedules, and GPAs was distributed to 358 second-year dental students at New York University College of Dentistry. Additionally, the survey asked students to report the average number of hours per week they devoted to studying for didactic courses and preparing for hands-on preclinical courses. Of the 358 students, 94 (26%) responded to the survey. The vast majority of the respondents reported utilizing self-testing and rereading study strategies. High performers (with higher GPAs) were more likely to use self-testing, especially with flashcards, and to space their studying over multiple sessions. Lower performing students were more likely to highlight or underline their notes and to mass their study sessions or cram. Longer hours devoted to studying and practicing for simulation courses were associated with stronger performance; lower performers reported spending significantly fewer hours practicing for simulation courses. Half of the dental students surveyed said that they felt their studying would be more productive in the morning, although 84% reported doing most of their studying in the evening or late night. Sound study decisions depend on accurate regulation of ongoing learning and appropriate use and timing of evidence-based study strategies, so these results suggest that dental students may require guidance in these areas.

  9. Dental Caries and the Associated Factors Influencing It in Tribal, Suburban and Urban School Children of Tamil Nadu, India: A Cross Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    J Baby John; Sharath Asokan; Aswanth KP; Geetha Priya, P. R.; Shanmugaavel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The study was planned to assess the prevalence of dental caries among tribal, suburban and urban children of Tiruchengode and Erode of Tamil Nadu state, India. The objective of the study was to assess the association of dental caries with family background, dental service availability, transportation and knowledge on preventive dental measures among these three groups Design and methods Cross-sectional study. A total of 1028 school children in the age range of 9-12 years from vario...

  10. Predictors of academic performance for applicants to an international dental studies program in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitigoi-Aron, Gabriela; King, Patricia A; Chambers, David W

    2011-12-01

    The number of U.S. and Canadian dental schools offering programs for dentists with degrees from other countries leading to the D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree has increased recently. This fact, along with the diversity of educational systems represented by candidates for these programs, increases the importance of identifying valid admissions predictors of success in international dental student programs. Data from 148 students accepted into the international dental studies program at the University of the Pacific from 1994 through 2004 were analyzed. Dependent variables were comprehensive cumulative GPA at the end of both the first and second years of the two-year program. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and both Parts I and II of the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) were significant positive predictors of success. Performance on laboratory tests of clinical skill in operative dentistry and in fixed prosthodontics and ratings from interviewers were not predictive of overall success in the program. Although this study confirms the predictive value of written tests such as the TOEFL and NBDE, it also contributes to the literature documenting inconsistent results regarding other types of predictors. It may be the case that characteristics of individual programs or features of the applicant pools for each may require use of admissions predictors that are unique to schools.

  11. Sources of stress in Canadian dental students: a prospective mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elani, Hawazin W; Bedos, Christophe; Allison, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe sources of stress in predoctoral dental students and first-year residents at one dental school and to understand how these sources evolved during the four-year curriculum and in the first year after graduation. The study used a mixed methods design. Quantitative data were collected from subjects in each of the five cohorts of students and residents, every month for a period of one year (other than the summer holiday period; N varied each month from 77 to 127). Sources of stress were measured using the Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES). The investigators administered the DES twice, once at the end of each academic semester, and used DES categories that emerged from factor analysis to assess monthly sources of stress. Qualitative data collected through individual interviews (N=6) were aimed at understanding the main sources of stress in each year of the curriculum. Results from both quantitative and qualitative phases demonstrated that the main stressors for all dental students throughout the year were examinations and grades as well as workload. Students in the clinical years were also concerned about patient treatment. The residents and final-year students reported future plans as an additional stressor. Over the year, there was a significant increase for workload stress in the fourth year (pstress (pstress in these students and first-year residents varied according to their stage in the program and the period of the year.

  12. Stress Reduction through Audio Distraction in Anxious Pediatric Dental Patients: An Adjunctive Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Firoza; Jaiswal, JN; Tripathi, Abhay Mani

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the eff-cacy of ‘audio distraction’ in anxious pediatric dental patients. Materials and methods: Sixty children were randomly selected and equally divided into two groups of thirty each. The first group was control group (group A) and the second group was music group (group B). The dental procedure employed was extraction for both the groups. The children included in music group were allowed to hear audio presentation throughout the treatment procedure. Anxiety was measured by using Venham's picture test, pulse rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation. Results: ‘Audio distraction’ was found efficacious in alleviating anxiety of pediatric dental patients. Conclusion: ‘Audio distraction’ did decrease the anxiety in pediatric patients to a significant extent. How to cite this article: Singh D, Samadi F, Jaiswal JN, Tripathi AM. Stress Reduction through Audio Distraction in Anxious Pediatric Dental Patients: An Adjunctive Clinical Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):149-152. PMID:25709291

  13. A cross-sectional study to assess the effect of dental fluorosis on periodontal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effect of fluoride in the reduction of dental caries is well established, its effect on periodontal tissues is enigmatic. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between dental fluorosis and the periodontal status. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 600 subjects suffering from fluorosis. Variables such as age, gender, and smoking, which could act as covariates for the periodontal disease were recorded. The oral examination included assessment of oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S, community periodontal index and treatment need, and assessment of dental fluorosis by Jackson's fluorosis index. Results: Periodontitis was more common in females than in males. As the age advances, the rate of periodontal disease increases steadily. Periodontitis was significantly associated with poor oral hygiene and tobacco usage. As the degree of fluorosis increased, the severity of gingivitis reduced and periodontitis increased. Conclusion: There is a strong association between the degree of dental fluorosis and periodontal disease along with other factors such as age, gender, OHI-S, and tobacco usage.

  14. Fear Processing in Dental Phobia during Crossmodal Symptom Provocation: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Hilbert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While previous studies successfully identified the core neural substrates of the animal subtype of specific phobia, only few and inconsistent research is available for dental phobia. These findings might partly relate to the fact that, typically, visual stimuli were employed. The current study aimed to investigate the influence of stimulus modality on neural fear processing in dental phobia. Thirteen dental phobics (DP and thirteen healthy controls (HC attended a block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI symptom provocation paradigm encompassing both visual and auditory stimuli. Drill sounds and matched neutral sinus tones served as auditory stimuli and dentist scenes and matched neutral videos as visual stimuli. Group comparisons showed increased activation in the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and thalamus in DP compared to HC during auditory but not visual stimulation. On the contrary, no differential autonomic reactions were observed in DP. Present results are largely comparable to brain areas identified in animal phobia, but also point towards a potential downregulation of autonomic outflow by neural fear circuits in this disorder. Findings enlarge our knowledge about neural correlates of dental phobia and may help to understand the neural underpinnings of the clinical and physiological characteristics of the disorder.

  15. Effect of treatment with fixed and removable dental prostheses. An oral health-related quality of life study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzhayat, Esben Boeskov; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate patient-reported effects of treatment with fixed dental prostheses (FDP) and removable dental prostheses (RDP) and relate the change in Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) to the type of treatment and objective dental variables of aesthetics...... and mastication. Additionally, the purpose of the study was to identify aspects of impairment and improvement that the treatments caused. Fixed dental prostheses treatment was performed in 200 patients and RDP treatment in 107 patients. Gender, age, region of replacement, and number of teeth present and replaced...... were obtained. The participants completed the Oral Health Impact Profile 49 (OHIP-49) before and after treatment. A control group with no need for dental treatment also completed the OHIP-49. All participants had a significant improvement in OHRQoL. The improvement was higher for the RDP group than...

  16. Systemically Transplanted Bone Marrow-derived Cells Contribute to Dental Pulp Regeneration in a Chimeric Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenan; Jiang, Shan; Chen, Qiuyue; Ye, Yanyan; Chen, Jiajing; Heng, Boon Chin; Jiang, Qianli; Wu, Buling; Ding, Zihai; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-02-01

    Migratory cells via blood circulation or cells adjacent to the root apex may potentially participate in dental pulp tissue regeneration or renewal. This study investigated whether systemically transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to pulp regeneration in a chimeric mouse model. A chimeric mouse model was created through the injection of bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic C57BL/6 mice into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 8.5 Gy from a high-frequency linear accelerator. These mice were subjected to pulpectomy and pulp revascularization. At 1, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery, in vivo animal imaging and histologic analyses were conducted. In vivo animal imaging showed that the green biofluorescence signal from the transplanted GFP+ cells increased significantly and was maintained at a high level during the first 4 weeks after surgery. Immunofluorescence analyses of tooth specimens collected at 8 weeks postsurgery showed the presence of nestin+/GFP+, α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)/GFP+, and NeuN/GFP+ cells within the regenerated pulplike tissue. These data confirm that transplanted bone marrow-derived cells can contribute to dental pulp regeneration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative photoelastic study of dental and skeletal anchorages in the canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Aparecida de Assis Claro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare dental and skeletal anchorages in mandibular canine retraction by means of a stress distribution analysis. METHODS: A photoelastic model was produced from second molar to canine, without the first premolar, and mandibular canine retraction was simulated by a rubber band tied to two types of anchorage: dental anchorage, in the first molar attached to adjacent teeth, and skeletal anchorage with a hook simulating the mini-implant. The forces were applied 10 times and observed in a circular polariscope. The stresses located in the mandibular canine were recorded in 7 regions. The Mann-Whitney test was employed to compare the stress in each region and between both anchorage systems. The stresses in the mandibular canine periradicular regions were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS: Stresses were similar in the cervical region and the middle third. In the apical third, the stresses associated with skeletal anchorage were higher than the stresses associated with dental anchorage. The results of the Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the highest stresses were identified in the cervical-distal, apical-distal, and apex regions with the use of dental anchorage, and in the apical-distal, apical-mesial, cervical-distal, and apex regions with the use of skeletal anchorage. CONCLUSIONS: The use of skeletal anchorage in canine retraction caused greater stress in the apical third than the use of dental anchorage, which indicates an intrusive component resulting from the direction of the force due to the position of the mini-implant and the bracket hook of the canine.

  18. A novel implantation model for evaluation of bone healing response to dental implants: the goat iliac crest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, C.; Meijer, G.J.; Beucken, J.J.J.P. van den; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite the availability of numerous animal models for testing the biological performance of dental and orthopedic implants, the selection of a suitable model is complex. This paper presents a new model for objective and standardized evaluation of bone responses to implants using the ili

  19. Modelling the Longevity of Dental Restorations by means of a CBR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio J. Aliaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network.

  20. The Cardiff dental study: a 20-year critical evaluation of the psychological health gain from orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenealy, Pamela M; Kingdon, Anne; Richmond, Stephen; Shaw, William C

    2007-02-01

    Despite the widespread belief that orthodontics improves psychological well-being and self-esteem, there is little objective evidence to support this (Kenealy et al., 1989a; Shaw, O'Brien, Richmond, & Brook, 1991). A 20 year follow-up study compared the dental and psychosocial status of individuals who received, or did not receive, orthodontics as teenagers. A prospective longitudinal cohort design with four studies of the effect of orthodontic treatment. Secondary analysis of outcome data incorporated orthodontic need at baseline and treatment received in a 2 x 2 factorial design. A multidisciplinary research programme studied a cohort of 1,018, 11-12 year old participants in 1981. Extensive assessment of dental health and psychosocial well-being was conducted; facial and dental photographs and plaster casts of dentition were obtained and rated for attractiveness and pre-treatment need. No recommendations about orthodontic treatment were made, and an observational approach was adopted. At the third follow-up 337 (30-31 year olds) were re-examined in 2001. Participants with a prior need for orthodontic treatment as children who obtained treatment demonstrated better tooth alignment and satisfaction. However when self-esteem at baseline was controlled for, orthodontics had little positive impact on psychological health and quality of life in adulthood. Lack of orthodontic treatment where there was a prior need did not lead to psychological difficulties in later life. Dental status alone was a weak predictor of self-esteem at outcome explaining 8% of the variance. Self-esteem in adulthood was more strongly predicted (65% of the variance) by psychological variables at outcome: perception of quality of life, life satisfaction, self-efficacy, depression, social anxiety, emotional health, and by self-perception of attractiveness. Longitudinal analysis revealed that the observed effect of orthodontic treatment on self esteem at outcome was accounted for by self esteem at

  1. The Responsiveness of Patients’ Quality of Life to Dental Caries Treatment—A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ding-Yu; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Yang, Yi-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the responsiveness of oral health–related quality of life (OHRQoL) (oral health impact profile [OHIP] and oral impact on daily performance [OIDP]) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (World Health Organization quality of life scale, brief [WHOQOL-BREF]) in dental caries restoration treatment. The study also aimed to assess the influence of treatment on the responsiveness of patients’ quality of life (QoL). A total of 126 patients (aged 16–40 years) received dental caries restoration treatment with a 2-week follow-up and pre- and posttreatment interviews by questionnaire. Patients were assessed for their perceptions of OHRQoL and HRQoL by using the OHIP, OIDP, and WHOQOL-BREF measures. The responsiveness of all outcome measurements was assessed by effect size (ES). Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to examine the association with the responsiveness of all outcome measurements. Significant differences were found between OIDP (ES = 0.39), OHIP (ES = 0.54), and WHOQOL-BREF (ES = 0.13) with regard to pretreatment and posttreatment (p-values: <0.0001, <0.0001, and 0.0120, respectively). Sex and dental caries status at baseline were significantly associated with responsiveness by all measurements. This study suggests that dental caries treatment moderately improves OHRQoL, but is less related to HRQoL. Furthermore, the number of dental caries and restoration are important factors affecting the improvement of patients’ perceived OHRQoL. PMID:27776148

  2. Evaluation of anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Bathla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increasing amount of stress in undergraduate dental students leading to anxiety, depression, and suicidal attempts/suicide. Aims: This study aims to evaluate anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students and to find out the various areas of stress. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire (to assess academic and nonacademic areas of stress and three scales-Hamilton scale for anxiety (HAM-A; Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS and Beck′s Suicide Intent Scale (BSI. Descriptive statistics; Pearson′s Chi-square test; Multiple ANOVA; Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test were used to analyze the data at the significant level of P ≤ 0.05. Results: In a total of 258 dental undergraduate students, academic areas of stress that were found to be statistically significant were long teaching hours (P = 0.002; high workload (P ≤ 0.001; frequency of tests (P ≤ 0.001 and competition/fear of failure (P = 0.009. Lack of interest in the profession was a statistically significant nonacademic area for stress (P ≤ 0.001. The students of first and final year reported higher anxiety (HAM-A 13.93 ± 6.908 and 16.44 ± 7.637 respectively and depression (HDRS 14.29 ± 6.302 and 14.22 ± 5.422; whereas suicidal intent was reported almost the same throughout the study sample (BSI 5.65 ± 5.465. Conclusion: An increasing level of anxiety, depression and suicidal intent due to various stressors in undergraduate dental students indicate a need to modify current education system and timely help to have psychological healthy dental professionals in future.

  3. Dental emergencies in a university pediatric dentistry clinic: a retrospective study

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    Ayah Qassem Shqair

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of children visit a dentist for the first time due to emergency situations. However, little is known regarding the prevalence, etiology, and treatment provided for children at emergency dental visits. This study aimed to evaluate the profile of children attending a dental school emergency clinic, the reasons for seeking dental care, and the treatment provided. Records of 270 patients who attended an emergency clinic during 2010 were analyzed, and 253 were selected. Demographic, diagnostic, and procedural information was collected. The mean child age was 7.8 years. For 208 children (82%, pain was the main reason for the emergency visit. Nearly 79% of the visits were due to caries, and the most frequently required treatment was endodontic intervention (31.22%. Of the decayed teeth, 61.70% were primary posterior teeth and 31.9% permanent posterior teeth. Pain caused by dental decay was the most frequent chief complaint. A large number of children were brought to the dentist with complaints that had started long before, for which over-the-counter medications had been used.

  4. Hyperactive Children are at Risk of Dental Caries -An Analytical Study

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    C Jeevika

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is well recognized in western countries, but there were no much reports of ADHD from India. Aim: To determine the relationship of ADHD with dental caries. Materials & Method : A cross-sectional analytical study was carried out among 120 children aged around 8-15 years who were randomly selected from normal and special schools located in Chennai city. The children were categorized as ADHD according to the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV.The questionnaire was given to parents and teachers. It included details of DSM- IV criteria, age, sex, demographic details, past dental history, hours diet chart and any medication taken previously. The oral hygiene status was assessed using Oral Hygiene index simplified (OHI-S and the caries experience was recorded using DMFT index. Categorical data were compared by the Chi-square test. The odds ratio (OR was calculated with logistic regression. A multivariate analysis was carried out to adjust for gender, dental caries status of primary and permanent teeth. Results : Males are more in ADHD group when compared to females. Oral Hygiene Status of ADHD group was significantly better than control group. ADHD children were 3.1 times more odds of getting dental caries than children in the control group.

  5. Micro-PIXE study of metal loss from dental amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Guibert, Edouard; Wang, Liping; Chappuis, Thibault; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2017-08-01

    Mercury amalgams have been a topic of controversy ever since their introduction over 150 years ago as a dental material. An interesting question is if metals are released from the amalgam into the enamel and dentine tissue. To elucidate this PIXE mapping was used to investigate metal redistribution in an extracted molar tooth with a ∼30 year old high-Cu content amalgam filling. The tooth was sectioned and polished, and elemental mapping carried out on the amalgam/enamel, bulk amalgam and the wear surface of the amalgam. As expected, the amalgam was multiphase amalgam comprising of Cu-rich and Ag-rich grains with non-uniform distribution of Hg. The amalgam/dentine interface was clearly defined with amalgam elements on one side and C and P from hydroxyapatite on the other side with evidence of only slight interface corrosion. The peaks for Cu Hg and Zn were isolated from interfering signals with concentrations in the enamel tissue, observed to be at, or below the method detection limit. The proximity in energy of the Sn L α and Ca K α , peaks and the background on the Hg M α gave signal overlap which increased the MDL for these elements. Remarkably, a course grain texture in the amalgam was observed just below the biting surface of the amalgam which might be associated with tribochemical processes from mastication. This coupled with the clear absence of the amalgam metals from tooth tissue, even in close proximity to the interface, suggests that for this sample, release of Hg occurred via erosion or dissolution in saliva.

  6. Dental care provided to sickle cell anemia patients stratified by age: A population-based study in Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cyrene Piazera Silva; Aires, Bárbara Tamires Cruz; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Souza, Soraia de Fátima Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess differences in the dental care provided to sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients depending on age. This retrospective study used secondary data from the dental records of the Center of Hematology and Hemotherapy in Maranhão (HEMOMAR). Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from 574 dental records of patients with SCA treated or under treatment in the Dental Department of HEMOMAR from 2000 to 2011. Data on the gender, age, duration of dental treatment, number of patients submitted to periodontal treatment (PT), number of filled teeth (FT), teeth extracted (EX), endodontically treated teeth (ET), and reason for the dental procedures were collected. The Kruskal–Wallis test together with Dunn's post hoc test, Chi-square test, and Spearman's correlation was used for statistical analysis. An alpha error of 5% was considered acceptable. Results: Significant differences were found for FT, EX (P dental caries (100%) and irreversible pulpitis (55.6%), respectively. The main reasons for teeth extractions were residual roots (21.3%), chronic apical periodontitis (19.7%), and crown destruction (19.3%). There were positive correlations between age and EX (r = 0.93; P = 0.025) and ET (r = 0.92; P = 0.028). Conclusions: FT, ET, EX, and PT procedures become more common in older patients. Tooth decay is the main reason for dental treatment in SCA patients. PMID:27403053

  7. New Dental Materials Reinforced by Carbon Nanotubes: the Technology of Obtaining and the Study of Properties

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    Zaporotskova Irina Vladimirovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials (plastics are widely used in dentistry for implants and dental fillings. Therefore, the development of new dental materials with improved characteristics, is a very important task. In the last decade special expectations in the field of creation of new materials are associated with the use of unique carbon nanomaterials – carbon nanotubes, which have unique characteristics. That is why they can be used as an effective means of improving strength properties of polymeric materials obtained by the reinforcement of the polymer matrix and carbon nanotubes. The authors propose the technology of creating new dental materials based on the basis of rapid-hardening dental plastic material “Karbodent” by reinforcing carbon nanotubes. The samples of new polymer materials with different percentages of nanotubes were obtained, the results of measurement of their strength characteristics were provided. The mechanism of interaction of the basic components of “Karbodent” and single-wall carbon nanotubes are theoretically studied. The various orientations of the main components of “Karbodent” were analyzed in relation to the surface of carbon nanotubes. A semi empirical quantum chemical MNDO method is the main method of calculation. On the basis of the analysis of theoretical and practical studies, the authors made conclusions about the feasibility of a new dental material using carbon nanotubes with unique strength characteristics. The composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes polymers can be recommended for use not only in the practice of orthodontics, but also in creating high-strength seals. Such polymer systems are useful for creating prosthetic fabrication of orthodontic appliances, temporary prostheses.

  8. The relationship between parenting, family interaction and childhood dental caries: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong-Lenters, M; Duijster, D; Bruist, M A; Thijssen, J; de Ruiter, C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to explore the relationship between parenting practices, parent-child interaction and childhood dental caries, using a sample of 5-8-year old children from the Netherlands. Cases were defined as children with four or more decayed, missing or filled teeth and controls were caries free. Cases (n = 28) and controls (n = 26) were recruited from a referral centre for paediatric dental care and a general dental practice, respectively. Parenting practices and parent-child interactions of the child's primary caregiver were observed using Structured Interaction Tasks and subsequently rated on seven dimensions: positive involvement, encouragement, problem-solving, discipline, monitoring, coercion and interpersonal atmosphere. All Structured Interaction Tasks were videotaped, and coded by trained and calibrated observers blind to the dental condition. Differences in parenting dimensions between cases and controls were analysed using multivariate analysis of variance, independent samples T-tests, χ(2)-tests and multiple logistic regression analyses. Controls had significantly higher scores on the dimensions positive involvement, encouragement, problem-solving and interpersonal atmosphere, compared to cases. Parents of controls were also less likely to show coercive behaviours. These associations remained statistically significant after adjustment for the mother's education level, tooth brushing frequency and the frequency of consuming sugary foods and drinks, except for coercion. There was no significant difference in discipline between cases and controls. In conclusion, this case-control study found a significant relationship between parenting practices, parent-child interaction quality and childhood dental caries. Our findings suggest that parenting practices may be an important factor to consider in caries preventive programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis.

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    Fan Zhang

    Full Text Available Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models.Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model.There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm.The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models.

  10. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Suh, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models. Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model) of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model. There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm. The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models.

  11. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  12. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  13. The efficacy of screening for common dental diseases by hygiene-therapists: a diagnostic test accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, R; Glenny, A; Walsh, T; Tickle, M; Worthington, H; Ashley, J; Brocklehurst, P

    2015-03-01

    Regularly attending adult patients are increasingly asymptomatic and not in need of treatment when attending for their routine dental examinations. As oral health improves further, using the general dental practitioner to undertake the "checkup" on regular "low-risk" patients represents a substantial and potentially unnecessary cost for state-funded systems. Given recent regulatory changes in the United Kingdom, it is now theoretically possible to delegate a range of tasks to hygiene-therapists. This has the potential to release the general dental practitioner's time and increase the capacity to care. The aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic test accuracy of hygiene-therapists when screening for dental caries and periodontal disease in regularly attending asymptomatic adults who attend for their checkup. A visual screen by hygiene-therapists acted as the index test, and the general dental practitioner acted as the reference standard. Consenting asymptomatic adult patients, who were regularly attending patients at 10 practices across the Northwest of England, entered the study. Both sets of clinicians made an assessment of dental caries and periodontal disease. The primary outcomes measured were the sensitivity and specificity values for dental caries and periodontal disease. In total, 1899 patients were screened. The summary point for sensitivity of dental care professionals when screening for caries and periodontal disease was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.87) and 0.89 (0.86 to 0.92), respectively. The summary point for specificity of dental care professionals when screening for caries and periodontal disease was 0.87 (0.78 to 0.92) and 0.75 (0.66 to 0.82), respectively. The results suggest that hygiene-therapists could be used to screen for dental caries and periodontal disease. This has important ramifications for service design in public-funded health systems.

  14. Study of the impacts of patient-educators on the course of basic sciences in dental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, E; Alliot-Licht, B; Gross, O; Roger-Leroi, V; Marchand, C

    2015-02-01

    Ever since 2006, Nantes University dental educators have started organising lectures led by the mother of a young patient suffering from ectodermic dysplasia (patient-educator) to help second-year students to better understand how important it is for their future dental work to better understand basic sciences. In this study, we have analysed this training experience on students' motivation. For this purpose, students were asked to complete questionnaires 10 days after the patient-educator's lecture (early assessment; n = 193) and 4 years later, during the last year of their dental studies (delayed assessment; n = 47). Moreover, 3 years after the first lecture, we analysed the ability of students to diagnose a mother carrying the ectodermic dysplasia genetic disorder, using a case-based learning exercise with a patient showing dental features similar to those exposed by the patient-educator (measure of knowledge; n = 42). Ten days after the lecture, the early assessment shows that all the students were interested in the lecture and 59% of the students declared being motivated to find out more about genetics whilst 54% declared the same thing about embryology courses. Moreover, 4 years later, 67% of the students remembered the patient-educator's lecture a little or very well. Three years after the course, 83% of the students diagnosed ectodermal dysplasia whilst studying the case-based example that listed typical dental phenotypes. In conclusion, this study shows that this original educational approach enhances dental students' motivation in learning basic sciences and that patient-educators could offer many benefits for students and patients.

  15. Dental professionals' knowledge and perceived need for education in bioterrorism preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoopathi, Vinodh; Mashabi, Samar Omar; Scott, Thayer E; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina

    2010-12-01

    Dental professionals should be well prepared to provide care during bioterrorist events. In this study, we assessed the knowledge, opinions about playing various roles during a bioterrorist event, and perceived need for education of dental professionals (dentists and dental hygienists) from one region (Oregon) that had been exposed to bioterrorism and from another region (New England) not exposed. This cross-sectional study used an eighteen-item pretested, self-administered questionnaire distributed at the 2005 Oregon Dental Conference (n=156) and 2005 Yankee Dental Conference (n=297). Dental professionals' knowledge and perceived need for education on bioterrorist preparedness were quantified by multivariate linear and logistic modeling. More than 90 percent of the dental professionals were willing to provide care during bioterrorist events. Perceived knowledge was high; however, actual knowledge was low. Dental professionals who wanted to attend a continuing education course and who thought dental professionals should play more roles during a bioterrorist attack had higher actual knowledge. Willingness to provide care was not supported by adequate knowledge. No significant differences between New England and Oregon dental professionals were observed in terms of actual knowledge or perceived need for bioterrorism education. Integrating training and education into the predoctoral dental and dental hygiene curricula and developing continuing education courses would improve knowledge and better prepare dental professionals to effectively perform American Dental Association-recommended roles during any future bioterrorism events.

  16. Studying the issues in the additive manufacturing of dental implants by Electron Beam MeltingRTM (EBM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidinia, Mahdi

    properties of lattice abutments in response to a static compression load were analyzed. However, the mechanical behavior of a structure could be considerably different under cyclic loads where fatigue failure could occur at stresses far below the static failure stress. Therefore, experimental and numerical analyses were performed in order to investigate the fatigue properties of the lattice dental abutment. Beside the design of a structure, some numerical models were developed to investigate the effects of Electron Beam MeltingRTM (EBM) process parameters on the heat distribution and the mentioned issues such as surface roughness and residual stress. A moving electron beam heat source and the temperature dependent properties of Ti-6Al- 4V were used in order to provide a 3D thermal-fluid flow model of EBMRTM, where the influence of process parameters as well as fluid convection on heat distribution were studied. Also, a coupled Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) - Finite Element Method (FEM) model was developed for studying the heat and thermal stress distribution in EBMRTM. The coupled CFD-FEM model combines the ability of CFD in considering the effects of fluid convection with the ability of FEM in calculating the thermal stress. The influences of the spacing distance between the Ti-6Al-4V plates produced by EBMRTM on the heat accumulation and the resultant surface roughness were investigated numerically and experimentally. An equation was derived from experimental data to predict the values of surface roughness as a function of the spacing distance. Finally, the influence of a novel design of heat sinks on the minimization of anisotropy was investigated, where the heat sinks were built in-situ during the EBMRTM process. Three sets of coupons with different numbers of heat sinks were designed and produced by EBMRTM. Another set of coupons was produced without a heat sink for comparison purposes. The results of the study could be used as the supportive experimental

  17. Comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia with 2% lignocaine in various minor pediatric dental procedures: A clinical study

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    Abhishek Dhindsa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most distressing aspects of dentistry for pediatric patients is the fear and anxiety caused by the dental environment, particularly the dental injection. The application and induction of local anesthetics has always been a difficult task, and this demands an alternative method that is convenient and effective. Electronic dental anesthesia, based on the principal of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS, promises to be a viable mode of pain control during various pediatric clinical procedures. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of TENS and to compare its efficacy with 2% lignocaine during various minor pediatric dental procedures. Pain, comfort and effectiveness of both the anesthetics were evaluated using various scales and no significant difference was observed between 2% lignocaine and TENS in the various pain scales, while TENS was perceived to be significantly effective in comfort and efficacy as judged by the operator and quite comfortable as judged by the patient himself/herself.

  18. A Retrospective Study of Treatment Complexity and Efficiency in a Brazilian Undergraduate Comprehensive Dental Care Program

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    Sandra Cristina Guimarães Bahia Reis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore treatment efficiency in an undergraduate comprehensive dental care program (CDCP. The study sample consisted of the records of 652 patients from the CDCP of the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Goias, Brazil, who were treated in the period from 2004 through 2009. A total of 45 clinical procedures performed by the students was listed and a panel of 19 judges, graded the perceived complexity of each procedure on a 11-point scale using an adaptation of the Thurstone method. Spearman's correlation, one-way Anova, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression were used to build a predictive model for time-to-event data—completion of treatment (CT. Treatment time for CT was correlated with complexity scores (=0.60; <0.001. The average estimated median months for CT was 23.0 (95%CI = 19.6–26.3 and was significantly different (<0.001 among complexity levels (low 13.0, intermediary 19.0, high 47.0. When low complexity was the reference category, estimated changes in risk for incomplete treatment were greater for intermediary (HR=0.54; 95%CI = 0.40–0.75 and high complexity cases (HR=0.32; 95%CI = 0.23–0.45. The results indicated that treatment complexity has a large influence on undergraduate CDCP efficiency and should be considered when planning organizational strategies for the clinical environment.

  19. A structural equation model to investigate the impact of missing occlusal units on objective masticatory function in patients with shortened dental arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueki, K; Yoshida, E; Igarashi, Y

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of missing occlusal units (MOUs) on objective masticatory function with respect to food comminuting and mixing ability. Sixty partially dentate patients (mean age, 64·1 years) with shortened dental arches participated in the study. Food comminuting ability was assessed using a masticatory performance test with peanuts as a test food. Food mixing ability was assessed using a mixing ability test with a two-coloured wax cube. Maximum bite force (MBF) was measured using a pressure-sensitive film as a mediator for food comminuting and mixing ability. A structural equation model was constructed based on a hypothesis that MOUs would be associated with reduced MBF and impairment of food comminuting and mixing ability. Structural equation modelling analysis found significant direct effects of MOU on median particle size and mixing ability index (MAI) (P dental arches.

  20. The Effect of a Keratin Hydrogel Coating on Osseointegration: An Histological Comparison of Coated and Non-coated Dental Titanium Implants in an Ovine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan I; Duncan, Warwick J

    2014-06-01

    Bioactive substances may be used to enhance the rate and quantity of bone healing during osseointegration of titanium dental implants. A pilot observational study was undertaken to assess a novel keratin hydrogel in six adult sheep utilising the femoral condyles as the surgical site to assess osseointegration. Implants and osteotomy sites were coated with the keratin gel prior to implant placement (test implants) whereas the opposite knee received unmodified control implants in each animal. Fifty 3.5 mm × 7 mm Neoss dental implants were surgically implanted with a range of 3-5 Neoss dental implants placed per surgical site in each knee and allowed to heal for 5 days or 2, 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks prior to the sheep being sacrificed. Of the 50 placed implants, 24 were used for this study and analysed via resin-embedded, undemineralised sections from test and control implants to assess the range of healing around the unloaded dental implants. These dental implants were analysed using histomorphometric methods for the best 3 consecutive threads on each side and the percentage of bone to implant contact (%BIC) was used to determine the degree of osseointegration between test and control dental implants at each time point. All implants appeared osseointegrated at the time of sacrifice. One each of the pairs of control implants at 2, 4 and 12 weeks demonstrated minimal integration histologically, with %BIC implants had %BIC implants was higher than controls at all time points except 5 days and 2 weeks. The range from 2 to 16 weeks healing was 39.7 % [SD 25.5 %] to 85.4 % [14.2 %] for test implants and 35.6 % [43.4 %] to 46.6 % [23.1 %] for controls. %BIC appeared to increase earlier in the test implants (from 4 weeks onwards) compared to controls. After 16 weeks, %BIC was almost twice as great in test implants as controls. This pilot observational study suggests that keratin hydrogel may promote earlier osseointegration around titanium dental implants

  1. Translucency and color stability of resin composite and dental adhesives as modeling liquids - A one-year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of modeling liquids on the translucency and color shade of resin composites (RCs) after one year of storage. RC specimens were prepared using either a conventional insertion technique (control; without modeling liquid) or a restorative dental modeling insertion technique (RDMIT) with dental adhesives as modeling liquids (Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose [SBMP; 3M ESPE] or Adper™ Single Bond 2 [SB; 3M ESPE]). The initial colors of the specimens were obtained with a digital spectrophotometer and the CIEL*a*b* color system, after which specimens were stored (37°C) in distilled water or red wine for 12 months. Color measurements were reassessed after 6 and 12 months of storage, and scanning electron microscopy was performed after 12 months. Translucency and color change (ΔE*) were calculated and analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). RC samples prepared via RDMIT showed a translucency similar to that of control samples. ΔE* was also less intense for RCs containing SBMP than for RCs containing SB. Specimens stored in wine showed a clear pattern of degradation, especially in the control group, and surface degradation seemed to be less intense for specimens prepared with SBMP and SB than for specimens without. Specimens stored in water did not show clear evidence of surface degradation. RDMIT appears to be an interesting approach to reduce ΔE* in RCs over time without negative effects on the translucency of the material. However, the modeling liquid should feature a hydrophobic composition, similar to that used in the SBMP group, the achieve the best results.

  2. Dental responsibility loadings and the relative value of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, D N; Ju, X; Brennan, D S

    2017-09-01

    To estimate responsibility loadings for a comprehensive list of dental services, providing a standardized unit of clinical work effort. Dentists (n = 2500) randomly sampled from the Australian Dental Association membership (2011) were randomly assigned to one of 25 panels. Panels were surveyed by questionnaires eliciting responsibility loadings for eight common dental services (core items) and approximately 12 other items unique to that questionnaire. In total, loadings were elicited for 299 items listed in the Australian Dental Schedule 9th Edition. Data were weighted to reflect the age and sex distribution of the workforce. To assess reliability, regression models assessed differences in core item loadings by panel assignment. Estimated loadings were described by reporting the median and mean. Response rate was 37%. Panel composition did not vary by practitioner characteristics. Core item loadings did not vary by panel assignment. Oral surgery and endodontic service areas had the highest proportion (91%) of services with median loadings ≥1.5, followed by prosthodontics (78%), periodontics (76%), orthodontics (63%), restorative (62%) and diagnostic services (31%). Preventive services had median loadings ≤1.25. Dental responsibility loadings estimated by this study can be applied in the development of relative value scales. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  3. Dental enamel roughness with different acid etching times: Atomic force microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective: An important characteristic of human dental enamel not yet studied in detail is its surface roughness in mesoscopic scale. This study evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively the surface topography of acid etched enamel with different etching times. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six human maxillary bicuspids were randomly distributed into three groups (n=32): T0 (control), pumiced; T15, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 15 s; T30, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 30 s. R...

  4. Assessment of Myeloperoxidase and Nitric Levels around Dental Implants and Natural Teeth as a Marker of Inflammation: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Gayithri H; Jadhav, Prashant; Kulkarni, Kiran; Shinde, Sachin V; Patil, Yojana B; Kumar, Manish

    2016-11-01

    Dental implants form the mainstay of dental treatment involving rehabilitation of missing teeth. One of the major concerns for the clinicians doing dental implants is the postsurgical failure of dental implants. Success of dental implants is dependent upon the skills of the surgeon and the amount and quality of the bone remaining at the edentulous area where dental implant has to be placed. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and nitrites are few of the enzymes and molecules which are said to be altered in inflammation. However, their exact role in the inflammatory processes around natural tooth and dental implant is still unclear. Hence we comparatively evaluated the levels of MPO and nitrites in the areas around the dental implants and natural teeth. The present study comprises 42 patients who underwent prosthetic rehabilitation by dental implants from 2011 to 2014. Depth of probing value (DP), score of plaque index (SPI), gingival index (GI), and index of gingival bleeding time (GBT) were evaluated for the assessment of the periimplant soft tissue changes. Assessment of inflammation around the dental implant surface and around natural tooth was done based on the readings of these parameters. For the measurement of the MPO levels, spectrophotometric MPO assay was used. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. The mean plaque index values were 1.56 and 0.97 in periodontitis cases of natural teeth and inflamed cases of dental implants respectively. While comparing mean plaque index, mean probing depth, and mean gingival bleeding index in between the two groups, significant difference was obtained. Mean MPO concentration in periodontitis and gingivitis cases in natural teeth were 0.683 and 0.875 U/μL, while in inflamed dental implant cases, the mean value was 0.622 U/μL. While comparing the total MPO levels, total nitrite levels, and total nitrite concentration in between two study groups, significant difference was obtained

  5. Prevalence, Severity and Related Factors of Dental Caries in School Going Children of Vadodara City – An Epidemiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Niyanta; Sujan, SG; Joshi, Keyur; Parekh, Harshik; Dave, Bhavna

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Among dental diseases, dental caries is an important dental public health problem in India which is irreversible in nature, and is predominantly a disease of childhood. Till date no study has been carried out in Vadodara. As baseline data of caries is required to improve oral health of children, the present study was undertaken to determine the pattern of dental caries in school children of Vadodara city in the mixed dentition period considering age, sex and dietary patterns. Methods: An epidemiological cross sectional descriptive study was carried out among 1600 school children aged 6-12 years in Vadodara city. A closed ended questionnaire according to World Health Organisation 1997 methodology was used to collect the data. The children were examined for the presence of dental caries using decayed missing filled teeth/decayed missing filled surfaces and Decayed Missing Filled Teeth/Decayed Missing Filled Surfaces index. Related factors which predispose caries such as age, sex and dietary patterns were recorded. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was 69.12%. The mean dmft/dmfs and DMFT/DMFS were 3.00/4.79 and 0.45/0.56 respectively. The prevalence was higher in deciduous teeth than in permanent teeth. Positive association was found between dental caries and age, sex, frequency of sugar consumption in between meals. Conclusion: The study concludes that the prevalence and severity of dental caries in Vadodara city is high. So, in developing country like India, it is imperative to introduce primary prevention and increased restorative care for the purpose of both reducing the caries prevalence and maintaining those caries free children. How to cite this article: Joshi N, Sujan SG, Joshi K, Parekh H, Dave B. Prevalence, Severity and Related Factors of Dental Caries in School Going Children of Vadodara City – An Epidemiological Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):40-48. PMID:24155618

  6. Demand study for advanced dental hygiene educational degrees: part 2: assessing educational demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Annelise Ydstebo; Fottler, Myron; Liberman, Aaron; Pitts, Louise; Wan, Thomas T H

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the debate over the addition of the midlevel provider position for dental hygienists rages on. The midlevel provider (similar to the physician's assistant) in dentistry exists in a handful of states in various forms, but is hotly contested in many other states. This is the second half of a 2-part study undertaken to add to the current body of knowledge by addressing the clinical needs changing in our population and the associated demand study for additional educational degrees for dental hygienists to address these changing needs. Part 1 addressed a literature update on oral health and systemic correlations contributing to our populations' declining health conditions, whereas part 2 illustrates the results of the demand study. It attempts to benchmark "adequate demand" and applies the stakeholder theory as its theoretical framework.

  7. A Correlational Study of Preadmission Predictor Variables and Dental School Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Gerard C.; Dogon, I. Leon

    1981-01-01

    Undergraduate performance and standardized test scores were correlated with dental school performance for 131 members of nine Harvard School of Dental Medicine classes to determine the predictive validity of the earlier variables. The only significant positive correlation was of the Dental Admission Test and dental National Board Examination, part…

  8. A Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Dental Anxiety for People with Learning Disabilities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prangnell, Simon J.; Green, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Dental anxiety is a common form of anxiety problem, and research suggests that more people with learning disabilities experience dental anxiety than in the general population. Very little work has been done to investigate effective non-medical approaches for supporting people with a learning disability and dental anxiety to access dental care.…

  9. Type of treatment, prognosis, and estimation of time spent to manage dental trauma in late presentation cases at a dental teaching hospital: a longitudinal and retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jundi, Suhad H

    2004-02-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are emergencies that must be treated promptly and properly in order to reduce the suffering, costs, and time for patients, parents, and health care providers. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment, long-term prognosis, and number of visits needed to manage cases resulting from complications of late presentation of traumatic dental injuries. The sample consisted of 195 children, all presented with complications of dental trauma at the Pediatric Dentistry Clinics in the Dental Teaching Hospital of Jordan University of Science and Technology in Irbid city, Jordan. Retrospective data relied on trauma forms as well the clinical notes and radiographs in the patients' records. Prospective data was collected by examining patients at recall appointments. The treatment of traumatized teeth in this sample ranged from no active treatment to extraction and prosthetic replacement. It was estimated that the number of visits needed to carry out the planned treatment for these patients ranged between 3 and 17.2 visits according to the type of treatment. Apexification procedure was the most time consuming. Thirty-two per cent of teeth with apexification ended up with root fracture mainly subsequent to another minor trauma episode (in 85%), the rest were reported to be spontaneous fractures. Almost half of the teeth with luxation injuries became necrotic after 3 years. Teeth with avulsion actually kept on deteriorating even at the 36-month follow-up appointment. The long-term prognosis of teeth with middle root fracture was favorable in (80%) of the teeth in the sample, despite the fact that they were splinted late. Luxation injuries led to more necrotic teeth (50%) than uncomplicated crown fractures. Multiple dental trauma episodes (MDTE) were reported in about 30% of the patients in the sample and were responsible for some of the complications noticed in this report. As all cases followed up in this report are late presentation of dental

  10. Fístulas dentales en el perro: estudio epidemiológico Dental fistulae in the dog: epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Z Hernández

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo analítico de las fístulas odontogénicas en el perro atendidas en el Servicio de Cirugía del Hospital Escuela (FCV - UBA durante el período 1996-2006, las que representaron el 1,18% del total de casos quirúrgicos. El número de pacientes incluidos fue 136, pero la cantidad de fístulas fue mayor (n=152, al presentarse bilateralmente en 16 perros (11,76%. Se observó una mayor prevalencia en perros de raza indefi nida (58,82%, en hembras (69.85% y en animales de entre 6 a 12 años (62,49%. De las razas puras, el ovejero alemán fue la más afectada (8.82% y, respecto de la conformación craneana, se presentaron fístulas en sólo cinco perros braquicefálicos (3.68%. El diente más involucrado fue el cuarto premolar superior (84.21%, seguido por el primer molar superior (11.84%, el canino superior (1.97% y el primer molar inferior (1,97%. Respecto de las raíces de la muela carnicera superior, la distal estuvo involucrada en 86 casos (67.18%, la mesiovestibular en 17 casos (13.28% y ambas conjuntamente en 25 casos (19.53%. Desde un punto de vista clínico-quirúrgico, ante un paciente con fístula odontogénica es imprescindible efectuar un adecuado diagnóstico radiológico a fi n de determinar fehacientemente su origen y poder establecer un tratamiento adecuado (exodoncia o endodoncia.An epidemiological study of dental fistulae was carried out at the Surgical Service of the Veteriary Teaching Hosiptal (FVC - UBA from 1996 to 2006. The patients affected with dental fistulae represented 1.18% of the total dogs attended. 152 fistulae in 136 dogs were observed, the condition was presented bilaterally in 16 dogs (11.76%. The most fistulae prevalence was observed in mongrel dogs (58.82%, female (69.85% between 6 and 12 years old (62.49%. The German Sheperd was the most affected pure breed (8.82%, only fi ve brachycephalic dogs presented fistulae (3.68%. The most affected tooth was the upper fourth premolar (84

  11. Salivary IgA and dental caries in HIV patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sonu; Mandal, Pradip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The interrelationship of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and dental caries, as well as Salivary IgA (S-IgA) level, appear to remain underexplored while a manual and electronic search of the literature was made. Hence, this study was undertaken to assess the relationship of S-IgA and dental caries status in HIV +ve children. The aim of this study was to find out the relationship of S-IgA antibody with dental caries by measuring the concentration of IgA in saliva of HIV +ve and HIV -ve children and to determine the dental caries status in HIV +ve and HIV -ve children, which may help in treatment planning and prevention of the same. Twenty-eight HIV +ve children aged between 6 and 14 years and 28 age matched HIV -ve children were included in this study, and both samples were randomly selected from the same nongovernmental organization (NGO). The HIV status of both these samples was confirmed from their medical records provided by the NGO. 2 cc of unstimulated saliva was collected from both groups in special tubes coded numerically using the method described by Collins and Dawes, and the samples were analyzed to measure the concentration of IgA using commercially available ELISA kit (DRG Diagnostics, Germany). Examination of dental caries was carried out according to the WHO criteria (1997) using a flat mouth mirror and Community periodontal index (CPI) probe. In HIV +ve group, mean salivary IgA level was calculated as 81.61 ± 6.20 μg/ml, mean decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) was 3.86 ± 3.37, mean decayed, extracted and filled teeth (deft) was 4.75 ± 2.86. In HIV -ve group, the mean salivary IgA level was calculated as 145.57 ±17.83 μg/ml, mean DMFT was 2.54 ± 0.69, mean deft was 2.43 ± 2.01. Strong -ve correlation between S-IgA and DMFT (r = -0.781, t = 6.38, P 0.05) between S-IgA and deft was found in HIV +ve group. Strong -ve correlation between S-IgA and DMFT (r = -0.655, t = 4.42, P IgA and deft (r = -0.942, t = 14.32, P IgA deficiency in

  12. [The study on chemical composition and crystalline structure of hypoplastic primary dental enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S; Deng, H; Gao, X

    1997-11-01

    The present study, firstly, analyzed chemical composition of hypoplastic primary teeth by electron probe analyzer and compared the hypoplastic part with the normal part in the same tooth; secondly, by X-ray diffraction analyzer, studied the hypoplastic dental enamel and the normal dental enamel, and compared the crystalline structure between different dental enamel and with that of the hydroxyapatite. The aim was to find out any change of crystalline structure. Two exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth were used for the electron probe study. The normal part of each tooth served as control. Determinations of weight percentage (wt%) were made for P, Al, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sr, Na, K and F. Four exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth and eight exfoliated normal deciduous anterior teeth were used for the X-ray diffraction study. We found by X-ray diffraction that the length of the alpha-axis of enamel crystallite and the distance of lattice plane (corresponding 300) were increased in defective enamel and could be associated with the increased content of magnesium detected by electron probe. Thus, the present study demonstrated that there were both quantity and quality changes in the enamel hypoplasia lesion, which may increase the susceptibility of the defective teeth to caries.

  13. Repeat film analysis and its implications for quality assurance in dental radiology: An institutional case study

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    Shruthi Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The goal of any radiologist is to produce the highest quality diagnostic radiographs, while keeping patient exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA. Aims: The aim of this study was to describe the reasons for radiograph rejections through a repeat film analysis in an Indian dental school. Settings and Design: An observational study conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month study period, a total of 9,495 intra-oral radiographs and 2339 extraoral radiographs taken in the Radiology Department were subjected to repeat film analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS Version 16. Descriptive analysis used. Results: The results showed that the repeat rates were 7.1% and 5.86% for intraoral and extraoral radiographs, respectively. Among the causes for errors reported, positioning error (38.7% was the most common, followed by improper angulations (26.1%, and improper film placement (11.2% for intra-oral radiographs. The study found that the maximum frequency of repeats among extraoral radiographs was for panoramic radiographs (49% followed by lateral cephalogram (33%, and paranasal sinus view (14%. It was also observed that repeat rate of intraoral radiographs was highest for internees (44.7%, and undergraduate students (28.2%. Conclusions: The study pointed to a need for more targeted interventions to achieve the goal of keeping patient exposure ALARA in a dental school setting.

  14. Motivating and Inhibiting Factors to Oral-Dental Health Behavior in Adolescents: a Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hosseini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Oral-dental diseases, especially tooth decay, are among the most common diseases in the world which usually begin in adolescence. Oral health during this period of life has a huge impact on the reduction of dental problems. This study aimed to determine motivating and inhibiting factors to oral-dental health behavior in adolescents. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional which had a descriptive and analytical design was conducted on 10-12th grade students in Kashan city, Iran. Using multi-stage sampling method and based on sampling size formula, a total of 290 of the students were randomly selected from the schools and were enrolled into the study. Then they received a research-made questionnaire containing questions about the knowledge and motivating and inhibiting factors to oral-dental health behavior. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS V.20 by independent t-test, ANOVA, and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results Of all, 62.8% of students brushed their teeth at least once a day. Moreover, 11.7% used dental floss once a day and 6.6% visited a dentist every six months. Oral-dental health behavior had a significant relationship with gender (P0.05. Conclusion When designing educational plans and interventions for improving oral-dental health behavior in students, it is necessary to adopt measures to enhance motivating factors and eliminate inhibiting factors.

  15. Orthodontics as a prospective career choice among undergraduate dental students: A prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, George

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purposes of this study were to investigate the factors influencing the career choice of dental students and to identify the future life plans of the students at Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University Dental College who had chosen orthodontics as their future specialty. Materials and Methods: An epidemiological descriptive survey was conducted using a set of questionnaire among the second year to fourth year students at Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al Kharj, Saudi Arabia. Data were categorized by demographic variables and were analyzed with statistical methods using descriptive statistical analysis. Results: The most important factor influencing the decision to pursue specialty in orthodontics was considering that “orthodontics is intellectually challenging” (23%), followed by “previous positive experience” (15%). The decision to become an orthodontist was made by 3.7% of the respondents in the first year of their course, 44.4% in the second year of their study, 11.1% during the third year of their study, 25.9% during the fourth year of their study, while none of them had made their decision during the final year of their dental school studies. Only one student (3.7) said he planned to work in a private college in an academic setting, five students (18.5%) had plans to do private practice, two students indicated that they would work for the Ministry of Health, while most students (40.7%) reported that they were planning to try a combination of all of the above. Six students (22.2%) remained undecided. Conclusions: Majority of the students who had chosen orthodontics as their future specialty of choice at Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University Dental College, Saudi Arabia had taken up this specialty as they felt that orthodontics was intellectually challenging. PMID:26312228

  16. Orthodontics as a prospective career choice among undergraduate dental students: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, George

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the factors influencing the career choice of dental students and to identify the future life plans of the students at Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University Dental College who had chosen orthodontics as their future specialty. An epidemiological descriptive survey was conducted using a set of questionnaire among the second year to fourth year students at Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al Kharj, Saudi Arabia. Data were categorized by demographic variables and were analyzed with statistical methods using descriptive statistical analysis. The most important factor influencing the decision to pursue specialty in orthodontics was considering that "orthodontics is intellectually challenging" (23%), followed by "previous positive experience" (15%). The decision to become an orthodontist was made by 3.7% of the respondents in the first year of their course, 44.4% in the second year of their study, 11.1% during the third year of their study, 25.9% during the fourth year of their study, while none of them had made their decision during the final year of their dental school studies. Only one student (3.7) said he planned to work in a private college in an academic setting, five students (18.5%) had plans to do private practice, two students indicated that they would work for the Ministry of Health, while most students (40.7%) reported that they were planning to try a combination of all of the above. Six students (22.2%) remained undecided. Majority of the students who had chosen orthodontics as their future specialty of choice at Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University Dental College, Saudi Arabia had taken up this specialty as they felt that orthodontics was intellectually challenging.

  17. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

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    Alvaro Della Bona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different substrates, which has offered a great challenge to dental zirconia research and development. This study characterizes zirconia as a dental biomaterial, presenting the current consensus and challenges to its dental applications.

  18. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallardo, Maria Godoy; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10 units), Ti......_Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10 units), and Ti_TSP (silanization treatment, 10 units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated...... by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2 months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy...

  19. Evaluation of preparedness for medical emergencies among dental practitioners in Khammam town: A cross-sectional study

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    L Surya Chandra Varma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical emergencies can occur frequently in the dental setting. Effective management of an emergency situation in the dental office is ultimately the dentist responsibility. The assessment of preparedness of dental practitioners would help to bring about required changes in the teaching aspects of dental institutions, which would ultimately help dental graduates to improve knowledge regarding management of medical emergencies. This would also make dental offices available with required emergency drugs. Aim: To evaluate the preparedness for medical emergencies among the dental practitioners in Khammam town. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study with a sample of 301 was conducted among dental clinicians at Khammam to evaluate their knowledge regarding medical emergencies. The questionnaire consisted of nineteen questions. First nine questions are objective questions, requiring a simple yes or no reply. Next ten questions are multiple choice questions regarding Emergency Medical Services and basic life support. Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 is considered significant. Results: The results of this study showed that almost all the participants (94.02% enquired about medical and drug history, but only 67.11% of them obtained a complete health history proforma of the patient. About 83.06% record vital signs, 74.09% of members report about attending workshops on emergency training and management, and 50.5% of members were either not sure or not in a position to handle the emergency condition. Conclusion: The results of this study reflect an alarming situation of the capability of dentists to deal with medical emergencies at dental offices and make available all the emergency drugs at their offices.

  20. Dental Fear Survey: A Cross-Sectional Study Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of the Brazilian Portuguese Version

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    Maurício Antônio Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the Dental Fear Survey (DFS, previously translated to the Brazilian Portuguese language and validated. Methods. A cross-sectional study with 1,256 undergraduates from the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, was carried out. The DFS and a questionnaire about previous dental experiences were self-administered. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, principal components analysis (PCA, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and construct, discriminant, and convergent validity. Results. PCA identified a three-factor structure. CFA confirmed the multidimensionality of the Brazilian version of the DFS. A modified model of the Brazilian version of the DFS fits better than the hypothesized model. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the total DFS scale was 0.95. Conclusion. The DFS demonstrated acceptable construct validity, convergent validity, and discriminant validity. These results supported the reliability and validity of the DFS among Brazilian undergraduates.

  1. Dental enamel defects in Italian children with cystic fibrosis: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzano, G F; Sangianantoni, G; Cantile, T; Amato, I; Orlando, S; Ingenito, A

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between cystic fibrosis (CF) and caries experience has already been explored, but relatively little information is available on dental enamel defects prevalence among children affected by cystic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate this issue in deciduous and permanent teeth of children with CF resident in southern Italy. This cross sectional observational study was undertaken between October 2009 and March 2010. 88 CF patients and 101 healthy age-matched participated in this study. The prevalence of dental enamel defects was calculated using a modified Developmental Defects of Enamel (DDE) index. The comparison of dental enamel defects prevalence among groups was carried out using regression binary logistic analysis. In the CF subjects there was a higher prevalence (56%) of enamel defects in comparison to the healthy group (22%). The most prevalent enamel defect was hypoplasia with loss of enamel (23% of CF patients vs 1 1/2% of control group) in permanent teeth. This study confirms that children with cystic fibrosis are at increased risk of developing hypoplastic defects on their permanent teeth.

  2. A pilot study of the efficacy of oral midazolam for sedation in pediatric dental patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, D. A.; Nenniger, S. A.; Yacobi, R.; Magathan, J. G.; Grad, H. A.; Copp, P. E.; Charendoff, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Oral midazolam is being used for conscious sedation in dentistry with little documentation assessing its efficacy. In order to accumulate preliminary data, a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover, multi-site pilot study was conducted. The objective was to determine if 0.6 mg/kg of oral midazolam was an equally effective or superior means of achieving conscious sedation in the uncooperative pediatric dental patient, compared with a commonly used agent, 50 mg/kg of oral chloral hydrat...

  3. STUDY OF OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY IN DENTAL STUDENTS IN A TEACHING COLLEGE

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Kiran Kohli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obesity is found to be strongest risk factor for persistent hypertension, which is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease and stroke. Urbanisation, unhealthy eating and reduced physical activity are the important reasons. Prevention of obesity is always better than its treatment. The aim of this study is to find out relation of overweight and obesity in dental students with their changed lifestyle and lack of physical activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS ...

  4. Impact of dental implant insertion method on the peri-implant bone tissue: Experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatović Novak; Matić Smiljana; Tatić Zoran; Petković-Ćurčin Aleksandra; Vojvodić Danilo; Rakić Mia

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. The function of dental implants depends on their stability in bone tissue over extended period of time, i.e. on osseointegration. The process through which osseointegration is achieved depends on several factors, surgical insertion method being one of them. The aim of this study was to histopathologically compare the impact of the surgical method of implant insertion on the peri-implant bone tissue. Methods. The experiment was performed on 9 dogs. Eight weeks following t...

  5. Barriers to standard precautions adherence in a dental school in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Hamidreza; Marjadi, Brahmaputra; Askarian, Mehrdad

    2014-07-01

    Setting up good infection control practices in educational institutions is crucial in shaping future health professionals. The implementation of standard precautions (SPs) in Iranian dental schools has not been explored qualitatively to identify barriers to good practice. Twelve focus group discussions and 8 semistructured interviews were conducted with students, residents, and staff members (n = 83) of the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences Dental School. The interview guide addressed performance, subjective norms, and behavioral control domains of SP-related behaviors. Thematic analysis was performed manually to identify barriers to SP practices. Proximal factors of poor SP adherence were a lack of knowledge and technical difficulties. These factors were compounded by intermediate factors in the work environment: lack of facilities, heavy workload, patient expectations, interprofessional conflicts, and lack of good role models. Two underlying distal factors were financial issues and unsupportive organizational culture. The social constructionism theory was useful in analyzing the situation and suggesting an educational approach as part of the solution. Complex and intertwined barriers of SP adherence were found in this dental school. A social construction approach may assist in addressing these problems by shifting the culture through education to construct a contextual new knowledge. Further research in medical sociology of SP practices would be useful. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control