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Sample records for dental scaling

  1. An assessment of dental anxiety in nonclinical setting among Saudi Arabian children using Abeer Children Dental Anxiety Scale

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    Shabina Shafi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental anxiety is an abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures. It is a common problem that affects people of all ages and appears to develop mostly in childhood and adolescence. The present study assesses dental anxiety among children in a nonclinical setting among Saudi Arabian children who underwent preventive treatment procedure using Abeer Children Dental Anxiety Scale (ACDAS. Materials and Methods: The children attending an oral health program were screened for oral health problems and preventive treatment such as topical fluoride applications. The dental anxiety among children was assessed using ACDAS. Results: A total of 51 children participated in the research. The results showed that maximum children were not scared of dentist in nonclinical setting and had low dental anxiety levels. Overall, 74% of the child subjects had ACDAS scores below 26. Conclusions: Knowing the degree of anxiety of dental children is important to guide them through their dental experience and carry on the preventive dental treatments at an early age in nonclinical setting. Their level of cooperation will improve, and anxiety will be reduced as well. Further research is required to compare dental anxiety levels in children between clinical and nonclinical setting.

  2. Effects of tooth scaling reminders for dental outpatients.

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    Cheng, Chi-Chia J; Li, Chung-Yi; Hu, Yih-Jin; Shen, Hsi-Che; Huang, Shay-Min

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the effect of sending reminders for patients to attend appointments for tooth scaling. A total of 389 outpatients were assigned to three intervention groups (reminders sent by postcard, mobile-phone text message or telephone call) and one control group. Reminders accompanied by short health education messages were sent to patients in each of the intervention groups. The outpatient revisiting behaviour of the patients was monitored. Patients who were reminded to come in for tooth scaling were 2.6 (95% CI 1.3-5.4) to 2.9 (CI 1.1-7.8) times more likely to revisit compared to those who were not reminded. For every one point increase in the patient satisfaction score, patients were 3.8 (CI 1.2-11.6) times more likely to revisit. Patients with a high level of patient satisfaction and who had also received a reminder had the highest return rates (26%). Most patients (89-96%) had good feelings regarding the reminders; 65% of the patients agreed that reminders had enhanced their intention to revisit; 91% of patients hoped to continue to receive reminders concerning broader dental health information. A reminder combined with health education is an effective way of improving preventative dental visiting behaviour.

  3. Prevalence of dental fear and its causes using three measurement scales among children in New Delhi.

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    Rajwar, Anju Singh; Goswami, Mridula

    2017-01-01

    There is a great need for identifying fearful children, who often present problems in patient management, thus affecting the quality of dental care rendered to them. This study is unique in the way that dental fear was assessed through three fear scales as research has suggested the use of more than one scale because each scale has its own restrictions and is open to criticism. The aim of this study was to evaluate dental fear and anxiety (DFA) among children aged 3-14 years using three fear measurement scales. The study was conducted on children (3-14 years) who visited the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry at Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. The DFA levels were measured using three fear measurement scales, i.e., facial image scale (FIS), dental fear scale (DFS), and children's fear survey schedule-dental subscale (CFSS-DS). The dental behavior was estimated using the Frankl's behavior rating scale (FBRS). The prevalence of dental fear according to FIS was 14.3%, according to DFS was 22.6%, and according to CFSS-DS was 7.4%. In assessment of the behavior of children in the clinics through FBRS, it was observed that he maximum number of respondents (69.8%) showed Frankl's Rating 3 i.e. positive. In the DFS and CFSS-DS, the factor which caused most fear was "feeling the needle injected" and "injections," respectively. Assessment of dental fear is an extremely useful tool for the dental practitioner, who can use it to customize the behavioral treatment and management for child patients.

  4. Prevalence of dental fear and its causes using three measurement scales among children in New Delhi

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    Anju Singh Rajwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a great need for identifying fearful children, who often present problems in patient management, thus affecting the quality of dental care rendered to them. This study is unique in the way that dental fear was assessed through three fear scales as research has suggested the use of more than one scale because each scale has its own restrictions and is open to criticism. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate dental fear and anxiety (DFA among children aged 3–14 years using three fear measurement scales. Methods: The study was conducted on children (3–14 years who visited the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry at Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. The DFA levels were measured using three fear measurement scales, i.e., facial image scale (FIS, dental fear scale (DFS, and children's fear survey schedule-dental subscale (CFSS-DS. The dental behavior was estimated using the Frankl's behavior rating scale (FBRS. Results: The prevalence of dental fear according to FIS was 14.3%, according to DFS was 22.6%, and according to CFSS-DS was 7.4%. In assessment of the behavior of children in the clinics through FBRS, it was observed that he maximum number of respondents (69.8% showed Frankl's Rating 3 i.e. positive. In the DFS and CFSS-DS, the factor which caused most fear was “feeling the needle injected” and “injections,” respectively. Conclusion: Assessment of dental fear is an extremely useful tool for the dental practitioner, who can use it to customize the behavioral treatment and management for child patients.

  5. Changes in dental care access upon health care benefit expansion to include scaling.

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    Park, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jun Hyup; Park, Sujin; Kim, Tae-Il

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a policy change to expand Korean National Health Insurance (KNHI) benefit coverage to include scaling on access to dental care at the national level. A nationally representative sample of 12,794 adults aged 20 to 64 years from Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2010-2014) was analyzed. To examine the effect of the policy on the outcomes of interest (unmet dental care needs and preventive dental care utilization in the past year), an estimates-based probit model was used, incorporating marginal effects with a complex sampling structure. The effect of the policy on individuals depending on their income and education level was also assessed. Adjusting for potential covariates, the probability of having unmet needs for dental care decreased by 6.1% and preventative dental care utilization increased by 14% in the post-policy period compared to those in the pre-policy period (2010, 2012). High income and higher education levels were associated with fewer unmet dental care needs and more preventive dental visits. The expansion of coverage to include scaling demonstrated to have a significant association with decreasing unmet dental care needs and increasing preventive dental care utilization. However, the policy disproportionately benefited certain groups, in contrast with the objective of the policy to benefit all participants in the KNHI system.

  6. RMS Pictorial Scale (RMS-PS: An innovative scale for the assessment of child′s dental anxiety

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    R M Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental anxiety assessment for young children is as important as performing their treatment. Appropriate knowledge of patient′s anxiety boosts confidence and will help us to review potential management options specific to every child. Aim: This study aimed to validate (RMS Pictorial Scale (RMS-PS and to compare it with Venham Picture Test (VPT and Facial image scale (FIS in measuring dental anxiety for young children during their first dental visit. Materials and Methods: A total of 102 healthy children aged between 4 and 14 years during their first dental visit were randomly selected for the study. Childs anxiety level was measured using three different scales namely (i RMS-PS (ii VPT, and (iii FIS. Statistical Analysis: Student t test was used to compare the scores obtained from all the three scales. Pearson correlation test was used to obtain correlation among the scales used in the study. Results: A strong correlation (0·76 was found between the VPT and RMS-PS, and a moderate correlation (0.5 was found between RMS-PS and FIS, indicating good validity for the RMS-PS. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that the RMS-PS can be a newer and easiest means for the assessment of dental anxiety for young children in a clinical context.

  7. Psychometric Validation of the Academic Motivation Scale in a Dental Student Sample.

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    Orsini, Cesar; Binnie, Vivian; Evans, Phillip; Ledezma, Priscilla; Fuentes, Fernando; Villegas, Maria J

    2015-08-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale is one of the most frequently used instruments to assess academic motivation. It relies on the self-determination theory of human motivation. However, motivation has been understudied in dental education. Therefore, to address the lack of valid instruments to assess academic motivation in dental education and contribute to future research in the field, the aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of this instrument in a sample of dental students. Participants were 989 Chilean undergraduate dental students (86% response rate) who completed a survey containing a Chilean face-valid version of the Spanish Academic Motivation Scale and three other motivation-related instruments to assess the survey's construct and criterion validity. Later, 76 of the students (out of 100 invited) took the survey again to assess its test-retest stability. The instrument's construct validity was supported by the superior goodness of fit of the seven-subscale Academic Motivation Scale over competing models through confirmatory factor analysis and by the expected correlations among its subscales. The concurrent criterion validity was supported by the confirmation of correlations between its subscales and external criteria. Adequate internal consistency and test-retest correlations were also found. The evidence from this study suggests that the Academic Motivation Scale is a preliminarily valid and reliable instrument to assess motivation in the predoctoral dental context. Future research in this area is needed to confirm or refute these results.

  8. The biomechanical demands of manual scaling on the shoulders & neck of dental hygienists.

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    La Delfa, Nicholas J; Grondin, Diane E; Cox, Jocelyn; Potvin, Jim R; Howarth, Samuel J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the postural and muscular demands placed on the shoulders and neck of dental hygienists when performing a simulated manual scaling task. Nineteen healthy female dental hygienists performed 30-min of simulated manual scaling on a manikin head in a laboratory setting. Surface electromyography was used to monitor muscle activity from several neck and shoulder muscles, and neck and arm elevation kinematics were evaluated using motion capture. The simulated scaling task resulted in a large range of neck and arm elevation angles and excessive low-level muscular demands in the neck extensor and scapular stabilising muscles. The physical demands varied depending on the working position of the hygienists relative to the manikin head. These findings are valuable in guiding future ergonomics interventions aimed at reducing the physical exposures of dental hygiene work. Practitioner Summary: Given that this study evaluates the physical demands of manual scaling, a procedure that is fundamental to dental hygiene work, the findings are valuable to identify ergonomics interventions to reduce the prevalence of work-related injuries, disability and the potential for early retirement among this occupational group.

  9. Psychometric assessment of anxiety with the Modified Dental Anxiety scale among central Indian adults seeking oral health care to a dental school

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    Suryakant C Deogade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety toward dental treatment can cause people to delay or avoid seeking oral health care despite being in need of treatment. Therefore, recognizing such anxious patients and their appropriate management plays important aspects in clinical practice. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the level of dental anxiety (DA, factors affecting it, and anxiety toward dental extraction among adults seeking dental care to a dental school in Central India. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 1360 consecutive patients aged 18–70 years. Participants completed a questionnaire while in the waiting room, which included the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS to assess the level of DA. An additional item was included which asked participants to rate the anxiety felt on having a tooth extracted. Results: Among the study group, 65.1% were men and 34.9% were women. Based on the MDAS score, 41.8% of the participants were identified to be less anxious, 53.2% were moderately or extremely anxious, and 5% were suffering from dental phobia. Female participants and younger patients were more anxious (P = 0.0008. Patients who were anxious had postponed their dental visit (P = 0.0008. Participants who had negative dental experience were more anxious (P = 0.03. Nearly, 83% reported anxiety toward extraction procedure. A significant association was observed between anxiety toward dental extraction and the patients' gender (P = 0.03, age (P = 0.0007, education level (P = 0.03, employment status (P = 0.0006, income (P = 0.0007, self-perceived oral health status (P = 0.03, and their history of visit to dentist (P = 0.02. Conclusion: Majority of patients in this population revealed high levels of DA. Factors such as age, gender, education level, occupation, financial stability, and previous bad dental experience influence DA to various levels. Extraction followed by injection of local anesthetics and drilling of tooth provoked more anxiety.

  10. Adaptation of the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS) to dental students.

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    Laurence, Brian; Bertera, Elizabeth M; Feimster, Tawana; Hollander, Roberta; Stroman, Carolyn

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt the twenty-six-item Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS) developed for medical students for use among dental students and to test the psychometric properties of the modified instrument. The sample consisted of 250 students (an 80.1 percent response rate) in years D1 to D4 at a dental school in Washington, DC. The mean age of participants was 26.6 years with a range from twenty-one to forty-two years. Slightly more than half of the participants were female (52.4 percent) and were African American or of African descent (51.7 percent). Principal components analysis was used to test the psychometric properties of the instrument. The index that resulted measured both positive and negative attitudes toward learning communications skills. The final twenty-four-item scale had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.87), and the study obtained four important factors-Learning, Importance, Quality, and Success-that explained a significant portion of the variance (49.1 percent). Stratified analysis by demographic variables suggested that there may be gender and ethnic differences in the students' attitudes towards learning communication skills. The authors conclude that the CSAS modified for dental students, or DCSAS, is a useful tool to assess attitudes towards learning communication skills among dental students.

  11. [Correlation between dental pulp demyelination degree and pain visual analogue scale scores data under acute and chronic pulpitis].

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    Korsantiia, N B; Davarashvili, X T; Gogiashvili, L E; Mamaladze, M T; Tsagareli, Z G; Melikadze, E B

    2013-05-01

    The aim of study is the analysis of pulp nerve fibers demyelination degree and its relationship with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score that may be measured as objective criteria. Material and methods of study. Step I: electron micrografs of dental pulp simples with special interest of myelin structural changes detected in 3 scores system, obtained from 80 patients, displays in 4 groups: 1) acute and 2) chronic pulpitis without and with accompined systemic deseases, 20 patients in each group. Dental care was realized in Kutaisi N1 Dental clinic. Step II - self-reported VAS used for describing dental pain. All data were performed by SPSS 10,0 version statistics including Spearmen-rank and Mann-Whitny coefficients for examine the validity between pulp demyelination degree and pain intensity in verbal, numbered and box scales. Researched Data were shown that damaged myelin as focal decomposition of membranes and Schwann cells hyperthrophia correspond with acute dental pain intensity as Spearman index reported in VAS numbered Scales, myelin and axoplasm degeneration as part of chronic gangrenous pulpitis disorders are in direct correlation with VAS in verbal, numbered and behavioral Rating Scales. In fact, all morphological and subjective data, including psychomotoric assessment of dental painin pulpitis may be used in dental practice for evaluation of pain syndrome considered personal story.

  12. Effectiveness of DIAGNOdent in Detecting Root Caries Without Dental Scaling Among Community-dwelling Elderly.

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    Zhang, Wen; McGrath, Colman; Lo, Edward C M

    The purpose of this clinical research was to analyze the effectiveness of DIAGNOdent in detecting root caries without dental scaling. The status of 750 exposed, unfilled root surfaces was assessed by visual-tactile examination and DIAGNOdent before and after root scaling. The sensitivity and specificity of different cut-off DIAGNOdent values in diagnosing root caries with reference to visual-tactile criteria were evaluated on those root surfaces without visible plaque/calculus. The DIAGNOdent values from sound and carious root surfaces were compared using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. On root surfaces without plaque/calculus, significantly different (p 0.05). Furthermore, on root surfaces with visible calculus, all DIAGNOdent readings obtained from sound root surfaces were > 50, which might be misinterpreted as carious. After scaling, the DIAGNOdent readings obtained from sound root surfaces (8.1 ± 11.3), active carious root surfaces (37.9 ± 31.9) and inactive carious root surfaces (24.9 ± 11.5) presented significant differences (p calculus before scaling, but the combined sensitivity and specificity are both around 70%. These findings suggest that on exposed, unfilled root surfaces without visible plaque/calculus, DIAGNOdent can be used as an adjunct to the visual-tactile criteria in detecting root-surface status without pre-treatment by dental scaling.

  13. Identifying Dental Anxiety in Children's Drawings and correlating It with Frankl's Behavior Rating Scale.

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    Mathur, Jyoti; Diwanji, Amish; Sarvaiya, Bhumi; Sharma, Dipal

    2017-01-01

    To develop a simple method to assess the level of anxiety by using children's drawings and correlating them with Frankl's behavior rating scale. A total of 178 patients aged of 3 to 14 years were handed out two-page forms which contained three sections on coloring and drawing, along with general information, and Frankl's behavior rating scale for the visit. The three types of drawing exercises given to the patients were geometric copy drawings, coloring a nonthreatening figure, and an empty sheet for freehand drawing. Out of 178 patients, 60 showed definitely positive behavior, 73 exhibited positive behavior, 37 showed negative behavior, and 8 were definitely negative on Frankl's behavior rating scale; 133 children had none or, 1 stress marker and 45 exhibited 2 or 3 stress markers in their drawings. Chi-square (χ 2 ) analysis was done with a 2 × 2 contingency table. Observed χ 2 value was 46.166, which at 1 degree of freedom was much greater than that at 0.995 percentile. Therefore, the result was highly significant. Children requiring specialized behavioral techniques can be identified by the presence of stress markers in their drawings. This nonverbal activity by itself can have an overall positive effect on the behavior displayed in the dental clinic. Mathur J, Diwanji A, Sarvaiya B, Sharma D. Identifying Dental Anxiety in Children's Drawings and correlating It with Frankl's Behavior Rating Scale. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):24-28.

  14. Dental scaling and risk reduction in infective endocarditis: a nationwide population-based case-control study.

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    Chen, Su-Jung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Chao, Tze-Fan; Wang, Kang-Ling; Wang, Fu-Der; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chiang, Chern-En

    2013-04-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening disease. Poor oral hygiene has been assumed as an important risk factor for IE. We aimed to investigate whether the improvement of oral hygiene through dental scaling could reduce the risk of IE. From January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009, a total of 736 patients with newly diagnosed IE were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database. On the same date of enrollment, 10 patients (without IE) with matched age, sex, and underlying diseases were selected to be the control group for each study patient. The frequency of dental scaling before the enrollment was analyzed and compared between the study and the control groups. The percentages of patients who ever received dental scaling before the enrollment were higher in the control group than that in the study group. For patients who received dental scaling once in 2 years, the risk of IE can be reduced by about 15% (odds ratio, 0.845; 95% confidence interval, 0.693-1.012) with a borderline P value (P = 0.058). Moreover, the risk of IE decreased significantly among patients who received dental scaling at least once per year, with an odds ratio of 0.696 (95% confidence interval, 0.542-0.894; P = 0.005). Improvement of oral hygiene by dental scaling may reduce the risk of IE. More frequent and regular dental scaling (at least once per year) was associated with a significant decrease in IE. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cross-Cultural adaption, validity and reliability of a Hindi version of the Corah’s Dental Anxiety Scale

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    Meena Jain

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: An appropriate scale to assess the dental anxiety of Hindi speaking population is lacking. This study, therefore, aims to evaluate the psychometric properties of Hindi version of one of the oldest dental anxiety scale, Corah’s Dental Anxiety Scale (CDAS in Hindi speaking Indian adults.Methods: A total of 348 subjects from the outpatient department of a dental hospital in Indiaparticipated in this cross-sectional study. The scale was cross-culturally adapted by forward and backward translation, committee review and pretesting method. The construct validity of the translated scale was explored with exploratory factor analysis. The correlation of the Hindi version of CDAS with visual analogue scale (VAS was used to measure the convergent validity.Reliability was assessed through calculations of Cronbach’s alpha and intra class correlation 48 forms were completed for test-retest.Results: Prevalence of dental anxiety in the sample within the age range of 18-80 years was 85.63% [95% CI: 0.815-0.891]. The response rate was 100 %. Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO test value was 0.776. After factor analysis, a single factor (dental anxiety was obtained with 4 items.The single factor model explained 61% variance. Pearson correlation coefficient between CDASand VAS was 0.494. Test-retest showed the Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.814. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient of the total CDAS score was 0.881 [95% CI: 0.318-0.554].Conclusion: Hindi version of CDAS is a valid and reliable scale to assess dental anxiety in Hindi speaking population. Convergent validity is well recognized but discriminant validity is limited and requires further study.

  16. Cross-Cultural adaption, validity and reliability of a Hindi version of the Corah’s Dental Anxiety Scale

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    Jain, Meena; Tandon, Shourya; Sharma, Ankur; Jain, Vishal; Rani Yadav, Nisha

    2018-01-01

    Background: An appropriate scale to assess the dental anxiety of Hindi speaking population is lacking. This study, therefore, aims to evaluate the psychometric properties of Hindi version of one of the oldest dental anxiety scale, Corah’s Dental Anxiety Scale (CDAS) in Hindi speaking Indian adults. Methods: A total of 348 subjects from the outpatient department of a dental hospital in India participated in this cross-sectional study. The scale was cross-culturally adapted by forward and backward translation, committee review and pretesting method. The construct validity of the translated scale was explored with exploratory factor analysis. The correlation of the Hindi version of CDAS with visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure the convergent validity. Reliability was assessed through calculations of Cronbach’s alpha and intra class correlation 48 forms were completed for test-retest. Results: Prevalence of dental anxiety in the sample within the age range of 18-80 years was 85.63% [95% CI: 0.815-0.891]. The response rate was 100 %. Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) test value was 0.776. After factor analysis, a single factor (dental anxiety) was obtained with 4 items.The single factor model explained 61% variance. Pearson correlation coefficient between CDASand VAS was 0.494. Test-retest showed the Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.814. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient of the total CDAS score was 0.881 [95% CI: 0.318-0.554]. Conclusion: Hindi version of CDAS is a valid and reliable scale to assess dental anxiety in Hindi speaking population. Convergent validity is well recognized but discriminant validity is limited and requires further study. PMID:29744307

  17. Cross-Cultural adaption, validity and reliability of a Hindi version of the Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale.

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    Jain, Meena; Tandon, Shourya; Sharma, Ankur; Jain, Vishal; Rani Yadav, Nisha

    2018-01-01

    Background: An appropriate scale to assess the dental anxiety of Hindi speaking population is lacking. This study, therefore, aims to evaluate the psychometric properties of Hindi version of one of the oldest dental anxiety scale, Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (CDAS) in Hindi speaking Indian adults. Methods: A total of 348 subjects from the outpatient department of a dental hospital in India participated in this cross-sectional study. The scale was cross-culturally adapted by forward and backward translation, committee review and pretesting method. The construct validity of the translated scale was explored with exploratory factor analysis. The correlation of the Hindi version of CDAS with visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure the convergent validity. Reliability was assessed through calculations of Cronbach's alpha and intra class correlation 48 forms were completed for test-retest. Results: Prevalence of dental anxiety in the sample within the age range of 18-80 years was 85.63% [95% CI: 0.815-0.891]. The response rate was 100 %. Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) test value was 0.776. After factor analysis, a single factor (dental anxiety) was obtained with 4 items.The single factor model explained 61% variance. Pearson correlation coefficient between CDASand VAS was 0.494. Test-retest showed the Cronbach's alpha value of 0.814. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient of the total CDAS score was 0.881 [95% CI: 0.318-0.554]. Conclusion: Hindi version of CDAS is a valid and reliable scale to assess dental anxiety in Hindi speaking population. Convergent validity is well recognized but discriminant validity is limited and requires further study.

  18. Are dentists happy? A study among dental practitioners in coastal Andhra Pradesh using subjective happiness scale

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    Sudhakar Kaipa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of dental professionals in the society is vital. This profession allows the flexibility to balance a professional and personal life. Practice of dentistry at times is quite stressful, and stress impedes happiness and subjective well-being. Several studies have reported about stress among dental professionals and their various effects; however, studies evaluating the level of happiness (happiness index among dentists are few and lack in this geographic region. Objectives: The present study was conducted to assess the subjective happiness level among dental professionals. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 194 dentists in Andhra Pradesh, India. A questionnaire measuring dimensions of professional satisfaction by Subjective Happiness Scale was used to assess the happiness level. The results were expressed in percentages, means, and mean rank. Independent samples nonparametric tests (Mann–Whitney U-test and Kruskal–Wallis test and multivariable analyses were used to assess the determinants of happiness. Results: The mean happiness index of the respondents was 21.71 (0.26 standard error. Overall 67% of the respondents had an above average happiness score. Higher happiness score was found to be significantly associated with age, postgraduate degree, male gender, type of professional attachment, duration of practice, urban location of practice, and spouse employment status in univariate analysis. However, multivariable analysis showed association with type of professional attachment only. Conclusion: Although dentistry has been recognized as a stressful profession, majority of the dentists under study had a happiness score above the mean, and the level of satisfaction was influenced by various sociodemographic factors.

  19. The transformation of ordinal scale for parametric statistic analysis on dental health questionnaire

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    Adi Hapsoro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Questioner Measurement is very customize, it means that researchers make very individual based on the aim of the research. Frequently, the results of questioner measurements are numeric rank and index or both of them. Numeric rank and index are categorical data. Beside of validity and reliability problems, they have analytical problems as well. So, they need transformation to scale type (ratio, interval data in order to minimize their problems. Purpose: This article reviews the effectiveness of two type data transformation in dental health research measurement. reviews: There are two type data transformations, i.e. interval equivalency and sum of rating transformation method. Conclusion: Interval equivalency transformation method is more effective for the data come from index, and sum of rating transformation method is more effective for the data come from numeric rank.

  20. Additional psychometric data for the Spanish Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, and psychometric data for a Spanish version of the Revised Dental Beliefs Survey.

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    Coolidge, Trilby; Hillstead, M Blake; Farjo, Nadia; Weinstein, Philip; Coldwell, Susan E

    2010-05-13

    Hispanics comprise the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. Previous work with the Spanish Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) yielded good validity, but lower test-retest reliability. We report the performance of the Spanish MDAS in a new sample, as well as the performance of the Spanish Revised Dental Beliefs Survey (R-DBS). One hundred sixty two Spanish-speaking adults attending Spanish-language church services or an Hispanic cultural festival completed questionnaires containing the Spanish MDAS, Spanish R-DBS, and dental attendance questions, and underwent a brief oral examination. Church attendees completed the questionnaire a second time, for test-retest purposes. The Spanish MDAS and R-DBS were completed by 156 and 136 adults, respectively. The test-retest reliability of the Spanish MDAS was 0.83 (95% CI = 0.60-0.92). The internal reliability of the Spanish R-DBS was 0.96 (95% CI = 0.94-0.97), and the test-retest reliability was 0.86 (95% CI = 0.64-0.94). The two measures were significantly correlated (Spearman's rho = 0.38, p Spanish MDAS was higher. The significant relationships between dental attendance and questionnaire scores, as well as the difference in caries severity seen in those with high fear, add to the evidence of this scale's construct validity in Hispanic samples. Our results also provide evidence for the internal and test-retest reliabilities, as well as the construct validity, of the Spanish R-DBS.

  1. Evidence-based dentistry: analysis of dental anxiety scales for children.

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    Al-Namankany, A; de Souza, M; Ashley, P

    2012-03-09

    To review paediatric dental anxiety measures (DAMs) and assess the statistical methods used for validation and their clinical implications. A search of four computerised databases between 1960 and January 2011 associated with DAMs, using pre-specified search terms, to assess the method of validation including the reliability as intra-observer agreement 'repeatability or stability' and inter-observer agreement 'reproducibility' and all types of validity. Fourteen paediatric DAMs were predominantly validated in schools and not in the clinical setting while five of the DAMs were not validated at all. The DAMs that were validated were done so against other paediatric DAMs which may not have been validated previously. Reliability was not assessed in four of the DAMs. However, all of the validated studies assessed reliability which was usually 'good' or 'acceptable'. None of the current DAMs used a formal sample size technique. Diversity was seen between the studies ranging from a few simple pictograms to lists of questions reported by either the individual or an observer. To date there is no scale that can be considered as a gold standard, and there is a need to further develop an anxiety scale with a cognitive component for children and adolescents.

  2. Examining related influential factors for dental calculus scaling utilization among people with disabilities in Taiwan, a nationwide population-based study.

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    Lai, Hsien-Tang; Kung, Pei-Tseng; Su, Hsun-Pi; Tsai, Wen-Chen

    2014-09-01

    Limited studies with large samples have been conducted on the utilization of dental calculus scaling among people with physical or mental disabilities. This study aimed to investigate the utilization of dental calculus scaling among the national disabled population. This study analyzed the utilization of dental calculus scaling among the disabled people, using the nationwide data between 2006 and 2008. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression were performed to analyze related influential factors for dental calculus scaling utilization. The dental calculus scaling utilization rate among people with physical or mental disabilities was 16.39%, and the annual utilization frequency was 0.2 times. Utilization rate was higher among the female and non-aboriginal samples. Utilization rate decreased with increased age and disability severity while utilization rate increased with income, education level, urbanization of residential area and number of chronic illnesses. Related influential factors for dental calculus scaling utilization rate were gender, age, ethnicity (aboriginal or non-aboriginal), education level, urbanization of residence area, income, catastrophic illnesses, chronic illnesses, disability types, and disability severity significantly influenced the dental calculus scaling utilization rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of ultrasonic dental scaling on pulp vitality in dogs: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vérez-Fraguela, J L; Vives Vallés, M A; Ezquerra Calvo, L J

    2000-06-01

    We investigated whether dental pulpal damage is produced as a result of the application of an ultrasonic scaler commonly used in clinical veterinary dentistry. Using methods developed in preliminary studies, we examined six dogs. The radiographic thickness of the dentin and pulp cavity was measured. The ultrasonic scaler was applied to maxillary and mandibular premolar teeth for 30, 60, or 90 seconds, without the use of water as a coolant. The temperatures of the room, the pulp canal on untreated incisor teeth, the cheek, the gingival sulcus, and the dentin of the affected teeth were recorded using a probe with a thermistor attached to a resistivity meter and inserted in the dentin to a depth of 1 mm. Two weeks following scaling, the teeth were extracted for microscopic examination. In another dog serving as a control, the temperature of the dentin was increased to between 45 degrees C (113 degrees F) and 47 degrees C (117 degrees F) and the premolar teeth were removed for microscopic examination 15 days later. We concluded that the application of an uncooled ultrasonic scaler for 90 seconds did not increase the temperature of the dentin. However, damage comparable with acute pulpitis resulted as a consequence of the ultrasonic effect, similar to the effects produced by the 45-47 degrees C heat applied in the control animal.

  4. Monitoring scaling and dental calculus removal with an optical fluorescence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivieri-Araujo, G; Fontana, C R; Costa, M M; Kurachi, C; Bagnato, V S; Rastelli, A N S; Pereira, L P C

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence results from a process that occurs under certain conditions in molecules known as fluorophores, fluorochromes or fluorescent dyes when they absorb light. The molecule is excited to a higher energy state and emits fluorescent light. The emission wavelength is always higher than the excitation wavelength. Optical diagnoses by fluorescence can be used in medicine and dentistry. It does not cause injury to tissues because it is a noninvasive method and can add benefits to clinical treatments. The aim of this case report was to apply an optical fluorescence system for wide-field image viewing and visual monitoring of the management of plaque and dental calculus before and after periodontal scaling to improve the diagnoses and follow-up of patients with periodontal disease. The results suggest that it is possible to observe, with a fluorescence system, residual plaque and calculus that were not easily seen by the naked eye during oral inspection. Thus, the optical technique can potentially improve periodontal screening efforts, especially in patients undergoing periodontal maintenance. (paper)

  5. Monitoring scaling and dental calculus removal with an optical fluorescence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivieri-Araujo, G.; Fontana, C. R.; Costa, M. M.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pereira, L. P. C.; Kurachi, C.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence results from a process that occurs under certain conditions in molecules known as fluorophores, fluorochromes or fluorescent dyes when they absorb light. The molecule is excited to a higher energy state and emits fluorescent light. The emission wavelength is always higher than the excitation wavelength. Optical diagnoses by fluorescence can be used in medicine and dentistry. It does not cause injury to tissues because it is a noninvasive method and can add benefits to clinical treatments. The aim of this case report was to apply an optical fluorescence system for wide-field image viewing and visual monitoring of the management of plaque and dental calculus before and after periodontal scaling to improve the diagnoses and follow-up of patients with periodontal disease. The results suggest that it is possible to observe, with a fluorescence system, residual plaque and calculus that were not easily seen by the naked eye during oral inspection. Thus, the optical technique can potentially improve periodontal screening efforts, especially in patients undergoing periodontal maintenance.

  6. Expanded Disability Status Scale-Based Disability and Dental-Periodontal Conditions in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Hasan; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel; Gungor Hatipoglu, Mujgan; Ozden, Hilmi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between different disability states in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) as determined by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and dental-periodontal measures. Eighty patients with MS (64 females and 16 males) were included in this study. Data on MS types, attack frequency, disease duration, EDSS scores and orofacial complaints prior to an MS attack were obtained from medical records. The plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), gingival index (GI), decayed-missing-filled teeth (DMFT) index and number of present teeth were measured during one dental examination for each subject. The MS patients were divided into the following 2 groups based on their EDSS scores: low physical disability (L-DS) and high physical disability (H-DS). Differences in dental parameters between groups of low and high disability were investigated. p disability in MS patients. In addition, some maxillofacial-oral complaints prior to an MS attack were observed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. [Children's intelligence quotient following general anesthesia for dental care: a clinical observation by Chinese Wechsler young children scale of intelligence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, B; Wang, J H; Xiao, Y M; Liu, K Y; Yang, X D; Ge, L H

    2016-04-18

    It has been demonstrated that anesthetics exposure may lead to neurocognitive impairment in developing brain of animal models. However, for the limitation that the animal models cannot fully mimic the dose and duration in clinical settings especially for dental general anesthesia, the clinical significance of anesthetics exposure on developing central nervous system remains undetermined. Therefore, we conducted the current study in order to observe the fluctuation of intelligence quotient (IQ) after the administration of dental general anesthesia comparing to that before surgery. We conducted the current study in order to observe the fluctuation of intelligence quotient (IQ) after the administration of dental general anesthesia compared with that before surgery. Thirty two patients, ASA I, who were exposed to dental general anesthesia in Department of Pediatric Dentistry Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, aged 4 to 6.5 years, were enrolled in this prospective study. Patients with severe learning difficulties or communication disorders were excluded. Written and informed consent was obtained from each patients' family which was fully explained of the purpose and method of study. Their intelligence quotients were evaluated with the Chinese Wechsler young children scale of intelligence (Urban version) before and 2 weeks after dental anesthesia. They were treated by experienced pediatric dentists and the sevoflurane, propofol and nitrous oxide were used for general anesthesia by anesthetist. Articaine hydrochloride and epinephrine tartrate injections were used for their pulp treatment or extraction. The examiners and scorers for IQ had technical training in the test administration. All the patients were tested by the same examiner and with standardized guide language. Each subtest was scored according to the tool review. Verbal IQ and performance IQ consisted of relevant 5 subtests and full scale IQ. Statistical analyses were performed by SPSS 18

  8. Propiedades Psicométricas de la Versión Española de la Abeer Children DentalAnxiety Scale (ACDAS) para la Medición de Ansiedad Dental en Niños

    OpenAIRE

    Mafla, Ana Cristina; Villalobos, Fredy Hernán; Pinchao Ramírez, Wilson Marino; Lucero Yela, Diego Fernando

    2017-01-01

    El proceso de validez y fiabilidad de las escalas de ansiedad dental en español para niños ha sido escasa. El objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar las propiedades psicométricas de la adaptación española de la Abeer Children Dental Anxiety Scale (ACDAS) como una medida de auto-reporte de ansiedad dental en niños. El ACDAS incluye 13 ítems sobre las reacciones de ansiedad a estímulos de la atención odontológica y un componente cognitivo evaluado a los niños, padres y operadores. Se adaptó...

  9. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  10. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (OES-NL) in dental patients with and without self-reported tooth wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, P.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Larsson, P.; John, M.T.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (OES) in dental patients with and without self-reported tooth wear. The English version of the OES was translated into Dutch, following established guidelines for cross-cultural

  11. The Greek version of the Gagging Assessment Scale in children and adolescents: psychometric properties, prevalence of gagging, and the association between gagging and dental fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouda, Maria; Provatenou, Efthymia; Arapostathis, Konstantinos; Coolidge, Trilby; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2017-03-01

    No studies assessing the association between gagging and dental fear are available in pediatric samples. To assess the psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Gagging Assessment Scale (GAS), to explore the prevalence of gagging, and to evaluate the relationship between gagging and dental fear in a pediatric sample. A total of 849 8- and 14-year-old children filled out a questionnaire consisting of demographic items, the Greek version of the GAS, and the Greek Children's Fear Survey Schedule Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS); the older children also completed the Greek version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS). The short form of dentist part of the Gagging Problem Assessment (GPA-de-c/SF) was used to objectively assess gagging. A total of 51 children (6.0%) demonstrated gagging on the GPA-de-c/SF. Children rated as gaggers on the GPA-de-c/SF had significantly higher GAS scores. There were no relationships between GPA-de-c/SF and the CFSS-DS or MDAS. The GAS ratings were significantly correlated with the CFSS-DS (rho = 0.420, P fear was correlated with the self-report gagging assessment, but not with the objective gagging assessment. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Utility of a summative scale based on the Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) Screener to identify CSHCN with special dental care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hiroko; Lewis, Charlotte W

    2012-08-01

    Our objective was to determine if a summative scale reflecting the number of positive criteria on the Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) Screener is useful in identifying subgroups of CSHCN at risk for poorer oral health and unmet dental care needs and who should be considered to have special dental care needs. Data were analyzed for a population-based sample of 91,642 US children needs in the past 12 months. Descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed for each outcome using the survey command in Stata to account for the sampling design. A summative scale based on the number of positive CSHCN Screener criteria was independently associated with various parent-perceived poorer oral health outcomes in children. CSHCN who met 4 or 5 screener criteria had 4 and 4.5 times, respectively, the odds of having fair-poor condition of teeth and bleeding gums relative to non-CSHCN. They also had 87% higher odds for parent-perceived toothache and 2 and 2.5 times the odds of having recent broken teeth and unmet dental care needs relative to non-CSHCN, respectively. There was no dose-dependent association between summative number of positive CSHCN Screener criteria and reported cavities in children. Application of a summative score based on the CSHCN Screener has utility in identifying the CSHCN subgroup with special dental care needs.

  13. Periodontitis and dental scaling associated with pyogenic liver abscess: A population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Y-T; Wang, B-Y; Lin, C-W; Yang, S-F; Ho, S-W; Yeh, H-W; Huang, J-Y; Chang, Y-C; Yeh, C-B

    2018-05-18

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between periodontitis, dental scaling (DS) and pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs). A nationwide population-based case-control study was applied using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We identified and enrolled 691 PLA patients, who were individually matched by age and sex to 2764 controls. Conditional logistic regression was applied to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) in patients with exposure to periodontitis and DS before PLA. After adjusting for other confounding factors, periodontitis remained a risk factor for PLA among patients aged 20-40 years, with an aOR of 2.31 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.37-3.90, P = .0018). In addition, the average aOR for PLA was significantly lower among patients with one DS (aOR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.59-0.96) and more than one DS (aOR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.39-0.95) within 1 year before the index date. According to these results, we concluded that adult patients with periodontitis aged periodontal patients subjected to at least 2 DS per year are less at risk for PLA than controls. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Edentulism and dental prostheses in the elderly: impact on quality of life measured with EuroQol--visual analog scale (EQ-VAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Gutiérrez, Carlos; Borda, Miguel G; Arciniegas, Antonio J; Borda, Claudia X

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the impact of edentulism and dental prostheses on quality of life (QOL) in older adults in Bogota, Colombia. Edentulism is a frequent condition in older adults and has great impact on their QOL. No epidemiological data are currently available on edentulism among older adults in Colombia. Data were obtained from the SABE-Bogota study, a cross-sectional study conducted in 2012, and used to analyze the EQ-VAS (Visual Analog Scale) from the EuroQol instrument to measure the perception of quality of life (QOL) in relation to edentulism. The study included 2,000 individuals over 60 years old. The Spearman-Rho correlation was used to analyze the correlation between EQ-VAS and edentulism. Chi-Square, ANOVA and t-test were used to study the differences in EQ-VAS scores between edentulous and healthy subjects. Statistical significance was set at peducation were related to edentulism. Individuals with fewer teeth and dental prostheses had lower EQ-VAS scores (pmeasuring the perception of QOL in dental health scenarios. Edentulism significantly affects QOL in older adults and the use of dental prosthesis does not improve the perception of QOL.

  15. Trends in the utilization of dental outpatient services affected by the expansion of health care benefits in South Korea to include scaling: a 6-year interrupted time-series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jun Hyup; Park, Sujin; Kim, Tae-Il

    2018-02-01

    This study utilized a strong quasi-experimental design to test the hypothesis that the implementation of a policy to expand dental care services resulted in an increase in the usage of dental outpatient services. A total of 45,650,000 subjects with diagnoses of gingivitis or advanced periodontitis who received dental scaling were selected and examined, utilizing National Health Insurance claims data from July 2010 through November 2015. We performed a segmented regression analysis of the interrupted time-series to analyze the time-series trend in dental costs before and after the policy implementation, and assessed immediate changes in dental costs. After the policy change was implemented, a statistically significant 18% increase occurred in the observed total dental cost per patient, after adjustment for age, sex, and residence area. In addition, the dental costs of outpatient gingivitis treatment increased immediately by almost 47%, compared with a 15% increase in treatment costs for advanced periodontitis outpatients. This policy effect appears to be sustainable. The introduction of the new policy positively impacted the immediate and long-term outpatient utilization of dental scaling treatment in South Korea. While the policy was intended to entice patients to prevent periodontal disease, thus benefiting the insurance system, our results showed that the policy also increased treatment accessibility for potential periodontal disease patients and may improve long-term periodontal health in the South Korean population.

  16. Trends in the utilization of dental outpatient services affected by the expansion of health care benefits in South Korea to include scaling: a 6-year interrupted time-series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Purpose This study utilized a strong quasi-experimental design to test the hypothesis that the implementation of a policy to expand dental care services resulted in an increase in the usage of dental outpatient services. Methods A total of 45,650,000 subjects with diagnoses of gingivitis or advanced periodontitis who received dental scaling were selected and examined, utilizing National Health Insurance claims data from July 2010 through November 2015. We performed a segmented regression analysis of the interrupted time-series to analyze the time-series trend in dental costs before and after the policy implementation, and assessed immediate changes in dental costs. Results After the policy change was implemented, a statistically significant 18% increase occurred in the observed total dental cost per patient, after adjustment for age, sex, and residence area. In addition, the dental costs of outpatient gingivitis treatment increased immediately by almost 47%, compared with a 15% increase in treatment costs for advanced periodontitis outpatients. This policy effect appears to be sustainable. Conclusions The introduction of the new policy positively impacted the immediate and long-term outpatient utilization of dental scaling treatment in South Korea. While the policy was intended to entice patients to prevent periodontal disease, thus benefiting the insurance system, our results showed that the policy also increased treatment accessibility for potential periodontal disease patients and may improve long-term periodontal health in the South Korean population. PMID:29535886

  17. Measuring team-based interprofessional education outcomes in clinical dentistry: psychometric evaluation of a new scale at an Australian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrs, Mark J; Alexander, Heather; Sun, Jing; Kroon, Jeroen; Evans, Jane L

    2015-03-01

    Previous research on interprofessional education (IPE) assessment has shown the need to evaluate the influence of team-based processes on the quality of clinical education. This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate the effectiveness of interprofessional team-based treatment planning (TBTP) on the quality of clinical education at the Griffith University School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Queensland, Australia. A scale was developed and evaluated to measure interprofessional student team processes and their effect on the quality of clinical education for dental, oral health therapy, and dental technology students (known more frequently as intraprofessional education). A face validity analysis by IPE experts confirmed that items on the scale reflected the meaning of relevant concepts. After piloting, 158 students (61% response rate) involved with TBTP participated in a survey. An exploratory factor analysis using the principal component method retained 23 items with a total variance of 64.6%, suggesting high content validity. Three subscales accounted for 45.7%, 11.4%, and 7.5% of the variance. Internal consistency of the scale (α=0.943) and subscales 1 (α=0.953), 2 (α=0.897), and 3 (α=0.813) was high. A reliability analysis yielded moderate (rs=0.43) to high correlations (0.81) with the remaining scale items. Confirmatory factor analyses verified convergent validity and confirmed that this structure had a good model fit. This study suggests that the instrument might be useful in evaluating interprofessional or intraprofessional team-based processes and their influence on the quality of clinical education in academic dental institutions.

  18. Investigation of the structure of human dental tissue at multiple length scales using high energy synchrotron X-ray SAXS/WAXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2011-10-01

    High energy (>50keV) synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments were carried out on beamline I12 JEEP at the Diamond Light Source (DLS, Oxford, UK). Although a complete human tooth could be studied, in the present study attention was focused on coupons from the region of the Dentin-Enamel Junction (DEJ). Simultaneous high energy SAXS/WAXS measurements were carried out. Quantitative analysis of the results allows multiple length scale characterization of the nano-crystalline structure of dental tissues. SAXS patterns analysis provide insight into the mean thickness and orientation of hydroxyapatite particles, while WAXS (XRD) patterns allow the determination of the crystallographic unit cell parameters of the hydroxyapatite phase. It was found that the average particle thickness determined from SAXS interpretation varies as a function of position in the vicinity of the DEJ. Most mineral particles are randomly orientated within dentin, although preferred orientation emerges and becomes stronger on approach to the enamel. Within the enamel, texture is stronger than anywhere in the dentin, and the determination of lattice parameters can be accomplished by Pawley refinement of the multiple peak diffraction pattern. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using high energy synchrotron X-ray beams for the characterization of human dental tissues. This opens up the opportunity of studying thick samples (e.g., complete teeth) in complex sample environments (e.g., under saline solution). This opens new avenues for the application of high energy synchrotron X-ray scattering to dental research.

  19. The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety and Validation of the Modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , not much work has been documented on dental anxiety. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of dental anxiety and determine the reliability and validity of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) in screening for ...

  20. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  1. Dental anxiety and salivary cortisol levels before urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Kazue; Penha, Sibele S; Munhoz, Carolina D; Rocha, Rodney G

    2009-12-01

    Dental anxiety is still prevalent, despite advances in treatment, and affects the utilization of health care services. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if patients with different degrees of dental anxiety and pain undergoing emergency dental care have different stress reactions as measured by salivary cortisol. Seventy three patients completed the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and described any previous dental traumatic experience. Their socio-demographic characteristics were also recorded. They also rated pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A saliva sample was collected before the procedure, and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Thirty patients were dentally anxious and forty one complained of pain. In this sample, dental anxiety was not related to gender, age, educational level and family income; however, a previous traumatic event was related to dental anxiety. There was no association between salivary cortisol concentrations and gender or dental anxiety. Patients with pain showed higher cortisol levels. When gathering patient information, the dentist should note patients' negative dental experiences in order to provide more effective, less traumatic treatment.

  2. How are teeth better than bone? An investigation of dental tissue diagenesis and state of preservation at a histological scale (with photo catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege I. Hollund

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Teeth are often the preferred substrate for isotopic and genetic assays in archaeological research. Teeth can yield isotopic signals from different periods of an individual's lifetime, useful in dietary reconstruction, climate research, and investigation into mobility of people and animals in the past. Additionally, it is generally accepted that teeth preserve biomolecules (e.g. DNA, collagen and isotopic signals better. Despite the importance of dental tissue in archaeological research, no systematic study has been carried out concerning diagenetic alterations at histological scale. This article reports the results of a thorough histological characterisation of post-mortem alterations observed in 34 ancient teeth. Such alterations are well described in bone whereas similar analyses of teeth are scant and highlight the need for diagenetic screening before analysis. Micrographs have been made, illustrating typical diagenetic features occurring within the dental tissues cementum, dentine and enamel including bioerosion, cracking, etching and staining. The photo catalogue produced can be used within fields such as archaeology, forensics and palaeontology.

  3. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  4. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  5. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  6. Dental negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C S

    2000-02-01

    Medical and dental errors and negligence are again in the spotlight in recent news report. Dead because of doctor's bad handwriting Prescribing drug overdoses Germ-infested soap pumps--infections in hospitals This articles explains dental negligence including dental duty of care and the standard of care expected of dentists in relation to the Bolam principle.

  7. Correlation and comparative analysis of discriminative validity of the Scale of Oral Health Outcomes for Five-Year-Old Children (SOHO-5) and the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) for dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Izabella Barbosa; Ramos-Jorge, Joana; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Bönecker, Marcelo; Abanto, Jenny; Marques, Leandro Silva; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2015-03-10

    The perceptions of parents and children regarding oral health are useful to oral public health and clinical practice in pediatric dentistry. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between the total and item scores of the Scale of Oral Health Outcomes for Five-Year-Old Children (SOHO-5) (parental version and child's self-reports) and the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). Subsequently, the discriminative validity of these assessment tools regarding dental caries was compared. One hundred twenty-one children randomly selected in the city of Diamantina (Brazil) were submitted to oral examinations. Parents answered the ECOHIS and SOHO-5p (parental version) and children answered the SOHO-5c (child's self-reports). Statistical analysis involved the Mann-Whitney test as well as the calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficients. A significant correlation was found between the SOHO-5p and ECOHIS (r = 0.85), whereas no significant correlations were found between the SOHO-5c and SOHO-5p (r = 0.00) or between the SOHO-5c and ECOHIS (r = -0.41). Significant differences in the impact on quality of life were found between children with severe decay and no severe decay (caries free, with initial or established caries) both the ECOHIS and SOHO-5p (p ≤ 0.05), whereas no difference was found in SOHO-5c (p > 0.05). The ECOHIS and SOHO-5p were correlated with each other. The accounts of the children differed from their parents' reports and were not capable of discriminating dental caries in advanced stages of progression.

  8. Adult Dental Anxiety: Recent Assessment Approaches and Psychological Management in a Dental Practice Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Gerry; Spyt, James; Herbison, Alice G; Kelsey, Thomas W

    2016-05-01

    Dental anxiety of patients is a common feature of the everyday experience of dental practice. This article advocates the use of regular assessment of this psychological construct to assist in patient management. Various tools, such as the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS), are available to monitor dental anxiety that are quick to complete and easy to interpret. Patient burden is low. A new mobile phone assessment system (DENTANX) is being developed for distribution. This application and other psychological interventions are being investigated to assist patients to receive dental care routinely. Clinical relevance: This article provides evidence and expert opinion on the worth of regular dental anxiety assessment in dental practice using structured tools, such as the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, and consideration of psychological intervention development.

  9. Dental Fear and Avoidance in Treatment Seekers at a Large, Urban Dental Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Richard E; Slep, Amy M Smith; White-Ajmani, Mandi; Bulling, Lisanne; Zickgraf, Hana F; Franklin, Martin E; Wolff, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and correlates of dental fear have been studied in representative population studies, but not in patients presenting for dental treatment. We hypothesized that dental fear among patients presenting at a large, urban college of dentistry would be similar to that of the population (e.g. 11% high dental fear, 17% to 35% moderate or higher fear) and that fear would be associated with avoidance of routine dental care, increased use of urgent dental care and poor oral health. Participants were 1070 consecutive patients at a large, urban dental care center. All patients completed a clinical interview, including demographics, medical history, dental history and presenting concerns, and behavioral health history. Patients were also asked to rate their dental anxiety/fear on a 1 (none) to 10 (high) scale. Over 20% of patients reported elevated anxiety/fear, of which 12.30% reported moderate and 8.75% high fear. Severity of dental anxiety/fear was strongly related to the likelihood of avoiding dental services in the past and related to myriad presenting problems. As hypothesized, the prevalence of moderate or higher fear in dental patients was considerable and closely matched that found in general population surveys. Thus, the 'dental home' is an ideal location to treat clinically significant dental anxiety/fear.

  10. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  11. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  12. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human t...

  13. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  14. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life......, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  15. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  16. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  17. Dental students' part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorterman, J H G; Dikkes, B T; Brand, H S

    2010-08-01

    In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental students, amongst other non-qualified individuals, to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental students have part-time employment in dental practice and which professional tasks they carry out. We also asked the dental students their opinion about the IHCP Act. All the enrolled dental students at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA) in the Netherlands received a questionnaire by e-mail. Within 1 month, two reminders were sent. The response was 44% (427 students). Of the responding students, 71% had paid employment in addition to their study. Twenty-five per cent of all students worked in a dental practice, usually 8 h a week. Study year and age were positively related to working part-time in dental practice. Activities frequently performed were providing chair side assistance, giving oral hygiene instruction, fluoride applications, scaling and root planning. The self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was positively related to study year and working in a dental practice. Hardly any information about the requirements of the IHCP Act with regard to delegation of tasks was provided by the employer. Many Dutch dental students work in a dental practice, taking over a variety of tasks. Although the self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was relatively high, many dental students expressed the need for more detailed information about the legal aspects of their tasks.

  18. Dental and Dental Hygiene Intraprofessional Education: A Pilot Program and Assessment of Students' and Patients' Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Vickie E; Karydis, Anastasios; Hottel, Timothy L

    2017-10-01

    Interprofessional and intraprofessional education (when students from two or more professions or within the same profession, respectively, learn about, from, and/or with each other) is crucial for effective interdisciplinary collaboration. The aims of this study were to assess the effectiveness of a clinical intraprofessional education program for dental and dental hygiene students, based on students' expectations and satisfaction with the program and patients' satisfaction with the team-based care. The pilot program was developed at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, where dental hygiene students were paired randomly with dental students scheduled for prophylaxis, scaling and root planing, or periodontal maintenance. Surveys with questions about the students' expectations and satisfaction were distributed to 89 senior dental students and 27 senior dental hygiene students before and after team-based procedures. Another survey was distributed to 17 patients asking about their satisfaction with the team-based care. All 27 dental hygiene students (100% response rate), 51 dental students (57.3% response rate), and all 17 patients (100% response rate) participated in the surveys. The results showed that both the dental and dental hygiene students had high expectations and were overall satisfied with the intraprofessional education. The students' expectations and perceived educational gap (difference between expectations and satisfaction) differed for the dental and dental hygiene students (ppatients were overwhelmingly satisfied with the team-based care. These results suggest that this intraprofessional practice model provided an effective educational experience for both dental and dental hygiene students and patients. The differences between the dental hygiene and dental students' expectations will help in the design of more effective training that promotes intraprofessional and interprofessional teamwork.

  19. Dental root periapical resorption caused by orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental root resorption especially in maxillary incisive region almost always happens simultaneously with orthodontic treatment, and it gained researchers attention, in particular after the use of periapical radiography. However, the fundamental etiology of dental root resorption is still dubious. Multifactoral causes are mentioned, among others are hormonal, nutritition, trauma, dental root form and dental root structure anomalies, genetic, while from treatment side are duration, types, strength scale and dental movement types. Based on these findings, orthodontic treatment was proven to cause dental root resorption in maxillary incisive teeth.

  20. Dental responsibility loadings and the relative value of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, D N; Ju, X; Brennan, D S

    2017-09-01

    To estimate responsibility loadings for a comprehensive list of dental services, providing a standardized unit of clinical work effort. Dentists (n = 2500) randomly sampled from the Australian Dental Association membership (2011) were randomly assigned to one of 25 panels. Panels were surveyed by questionnaires eliciting responsibility loadings for eight common dental services (core items) and approximately 12 other items unique to that questionnaire. In total, loadings were elicited for 299 items listed in the Australian Dental Schedule 9th Edition. Data were weighted to reflect the age and sex distribution of the workforce. To assess reliability, regression models assessed differences in core item loadings by panel assignment. Estimated loadings were described by reporting the median and mean. Response rate was 37%. Panel composition did not vary by practitioner characteristics. Core item loadings did not vary by panel assignment. Oral surgery and endodontic service areas had the highest proportion (91%) of services with median loadings ≥1.5, followed by prosthodontics (78%), periodontics (76%), orthodontics (63%), restorative (62%) and diagnostic services (31%). Preventive services had median loadings ≤1.25. Dental responsibility loadings estimated by this study can be applied in the development of relative value scales. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  1. Postoperative dental morbidity in children following dental treatment under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Aileen; Ou-Yang, Li-Wei; Chuang, Li-Chuan; Chang, Pei-Ching

    2018-05-10

    General anesthesia has been widely used in pediatric dentistry in recent years. However, there remain concerns about potential postoperative dental morbidity. The goal of this study was to identify the frequency of postoperative dental morbidity and factors associated with such morbidity in children. From March 2012 to February 2013, physically and mentally healthy children receiving dental treatment under general anesthesia at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry of the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan were recruited. This was a prospective and observational study with different time evaluations based on structured questionnaires and interviews. Information on the patient demographics, anesthesia and dental treatment performed, and postoperative dental morbidity was collected and analyzed. Correlations between the study variables and postoperative morbidity were analyzed based on the Pearson's chi-square test. Correlations between the study variables and the scale of postoperative dental pain were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Fifty-six pediatric patients participated in this study, with an average age of 3.34 ± 1.66 years (ranging from 1 to 8 years). Eighty-two percent of study participants reported postoperative dental pain, and 23% experienced postoperative dental bleeding. Both dental pain and bleeding subsided 3 days after the surgery. Dental pain was significantly associated with the total number of teeth treated, while dental bleeding, with the presence of teeth extracted. Patients' gender, age, preoperative dental pain, ASA classification, anesthesia time, and duration of the operation were not associated with postoperative dental morbidity. Dental pain was a more common postoperative dental morbidity than bleeding. The periods when parents reported more pain in their children were the day of the operation (immediately after the procedure) followed by 1 day and 3 days after the treatment.

  2. Dental hygiene students' part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorterman, J H G; Dikkes, B T; Brand, H S

    2010-05-01

    Many students have paid employment while studying. In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental hygiene students to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental hygiene students have part-time job employment in dental practice and which professional tasks they carry out. We also asked the dental hygiene students their opinion of the IHCP Act. All the enrolled dental hygiene students (n = 341) at a School of Health in the Netherlands received a questionnaire by email. The response was 52% (176 students). Of the responding students, 75% had paid employment in addition to their study. A proportion of the students (35%) worked in a dental practice. The median number of hours worked per week was eight. Study year, age and prior education were positively related to working part-time in dental practice. Activities frequently performed were giving oral hygiene instruction, fluoride applications, scaling and root planning, providing chair side assistance and giving local anaesthesia. Although the self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was high, almost half of the students expressed the need for more detailed legal information. Many dental hygiene students work in a dental practice, taking over a number of tasks usually performed by the dentist. More information in the dental hygiene curriculum about the requirements of the IHCP Act seems desirable.

  3. Clareamento Dental

    OpenAIRE

    Sossai, Najara; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Verdinelli, Ellen Carla; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Bassegio, Wagner; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR

    2011-01-01

    O clareamento dental já é utilizado há bastante tempo na Odontologia e atualmente é um dos tratamentos odontológicos mais solicitados para obtenção de um sorriso mais estético. Classificado em clareamento caseiro e/ou de consultório, ambas as técnicas são motivo de polêmica quanto aos seus benefícios, riscos, limitações e efeito clareador, bem como sobre qual é a melhor técnica existente para a promoção de um clareamento dental eficaz e seguro. Neste contexto, o presente estudo tem por objeti...

  4. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  5. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  6. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  7. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  8. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  9. Dental neglect among children in Chennai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Deepa; Shanmugaavel, Arunachalam Karthikeyan

    2016-01-01

    Child dental neglect is the failure of a parent or guardian to meet the child's basic oral health needs such that the child enjoys adequate function and freedom from pain and infection, where reasonable resources are available to family or caregiver. The aim of the study is to evaluate the phenomenon of dental neglect among children in Chennai and to associate dental neglect with oral health status of children aged 3-12 years. This is a cross-sectional study involving 478 pairs of parents and children. Dental neglect scale and a questionnaire were used to assess the dental neglect score among parents of the children involved in the study. Oral health status of children was clinically assessed using oral hygiene index, decayed, extracted, filled teeth (def(t)), pulp, ulcers, fistula, abscess (pufa), decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT), PUFA as per the World Health Organization criteria and pufa/PUFA index. Student's t-test and one-way ANOVA were used appropriately for statistical analysis using SPSS software version 20.0. A significant higher dental neglect score was reported among the parents who reside in the suburban location (P 3 years (P = 0.001). A significant higher DMFT (P = 0.003), deft (P = 0 Child dental neglect is seen among the parents whose educational qualification was secondary, who reside in the suburban location, and who have not utilized the dental services for more than 3 years in Chennai. This dental neglect results in poorer oral health of children.

  10. Dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhdar, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiography must comply with the same regulations with which conventional radiography complies. Radiation doses to individual patients are low but, because of the large number of patients X-rayed, the collective dose to the population is not negligible. Care in siting and regular maintenance of the equipment will reduce doses to both staff and patients. To produce X-ray films with a good image quality using a low radiation dose requires attention to film processing; this is often a neglected area. (Author)

  11. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  12. Dental anxiety among children of age between 5 to 10 years visiting a teaching dental hospital Islamabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, G.H.; Malik, F.S.; Attaullah, M.; Bashir, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The assessment of dental anxiety among children will aid in dealing with management issues related to dental treatment. There is no study available from Pakistan on dental anxiety in children. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental anxiety in children attending a teaching dental hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 252 children aged between 5-10 years attending a dental clinic in a dental hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. Dental anxiety was assessed by using the Faces Version of the Modified Child Dental Anxiety Scale. This scale uses faces as pictograms to indicate the levels of dental anxiety making it easier for children to answer the questionnaire. Results: A total of 252 children were observed for assessment of dental anxiety having mean age of 7.88±1.55 years with 123 (48.8 percentage) males and 129 (51.2 percentage) females. Out of these children 150 (59.5 percentage) had previously visited a dentist and 102 (40.5 percentage) had no experience with a dentist before; 38 percentage (95/252) of children had moderate and severe dental anxiety. Dental anxiety decreased significantly with age (p=0.0003). The difference in anxiety levels was not statistically significant between males and females and in different socio-economic status. Conclusion: This study has highlighted dental anxiety as a potential public health concern regarding children in Pakistan. Assessment of dental anxiety is a useful way to identify anxious dental patients. (author)

  13. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  14. Group therapy compared with individual desensitization for dental anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R.; Brødsgaard, I.

    1994-01-01

    Results of group therapy (GT) for extreme dental anxiety were compared with individual treatment (IT). Scales used measured dental anxiety, beliefs or trust in dentists, and fear of the next dentist after specialist treatment which showed reduced dental anxiety and improved dental beliefs compared...... with a static control group of 45 patients. The 30 GT patients showed no significant difference in dropouts during training compared with the 68 IT patients, but for patients who completed treatment, GT (n = 24) had greater dental anxiety reduction than IT subjects (n = 60). GT patients required fewer therapist...

  15. CMOS Flat-Panel CBCT for Dental Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Han Bean; Cho, Min Kook; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Hyun Ji; Cho, Bong Hye; Heo, Sung Kyn

    2009-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become one of the most frequently used imaging modalities for the preoperative evaluation of the jaw for dental implants. Sometimes dental Implant surgery needs histologic information of the regeneration of bone structure However conventional dental CT cannot serve these information because of its resolution limit. Hence we suggest dental CT which has micro scale resolution with high magnification factor. In these regards, We investigated micro dental CT with optimal magnification factor about our hardware system and evaluated along the 2D and 3D performance experimentally

  16. Dental anxiety and personality: investigating the relationship between dental anxiety and self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, George C

    2003-09-01

    This study investigated whether personality plays a role in a condition called dental anxiety. Specifically, the study examined the relationship between dental anxiety (the negative response to the stress elicited from a dental interaction) and self-consciousness (the tendency to evaluate aspects of oneself that are subject to private and public display). The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics possessed by dentally anxious individuals who face potential health risks because of their avoidance. Sixty York University undergraduate students were recruited by convenience sampling to participate. These subjects completed Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and the Self-Consciousness Scale. The Self-Consciousness Scale consists of three subscales, including private self-consciousness, public self-consciousness, and social anxiety. Results indicated an 0.54 significant correlation between dental anxiety and self-consciousness. The public self-consciousness and social anxiety subscales correlated the most with dental anxiety. Furthermore, the data did not indicate a significant moderating relationship for gender between the two aforementioned variables. These results contribute to the establishment of personality characteristics as one of the dimensions determining dental anxiety.

  17. Personality and psychological factors: Effects on dental beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhi Hathiwala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental treatment can be highly unpleasant for anxious patients. Despite all advancements, dental anxiety continues to upset the dentist-patient relationship. The psychological factors like individual personality and familial and peer influence may alter the dental beliefs of a patient. Aim: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among young adolescents to investigate the relationship among various psychological factors and the dental beliefs of an individual. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among higher secondary school children, aged 15−17 years in Udupi district. The dental anxiety of the participants was measured using Modified Dental Beliefs scale and the personality traits were assessed using the Ten-Item Personality Inventory. Pearson′s correlation and chi-square analysis were performed among these scales. Independent t-test was performed to compare dental anxiety scores with different socio-demographic and psychological characteristics. Results: In all 198 students, with a mean age of 16.6 years, completed the questionnaire. A majority of the participants had lower MDBS scores. The personality traits like Emotional Stability and Openness to New Experiences showed a negative correlation with the Dental Belief scores. Apart from these, the experience at first dental visit and peer support also affected the dental beliefs of the adolescents. Conclusion: Various psychological traits of adolescents influence their dental anxiety.

  18. Child dental fear and behavior: The role of environmental factors in a hospital cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Suprabha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Information on the origin of dental fear and uncooperative behavior in a child patient is important for behavior management strategy. The effects of environmental factors have been comparatively less studied, especially in an Indian scenario. Objectives: To find the association of (1 age, gender, family characteristics, previous medical, and dental experiences with dental fear and behavior (2 dental fear with dental behavior. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study involving 125 children aged between 7 and 14 years undergoing dental treatment under local anesthesia. The parent completed a questionnaire on family situation, medical history, and past dental experiences of the child. Child′s dental fear was recorded using Children′s Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale and behavior was rated using Frankl Behaviour Rating Scale. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using chi square test and binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Unpleasant experience in dental clinic and age of the child significantly influenced dental behavior. Visited pediatrician in the past one year, prior history of hospital admission, previous visit to dentist, experience at the first dental visit, and age of the child were contributing factors for dental fear. There was also significant association between dental fear levels and behavior. Conclusions: In 7 to 14 year olds, dental fear influences dental behavior, but the factors affecting them are not the same. Although dental fear decreases and dental behavior improves with age, experiences at the previous dental visits seem to influence both dental fear and behavior. Past medical experiences are likely to influence dental fear but not dental behavior.

  19. Relationship between Dental Anxiety and Health Locus of Control among Physiotherapy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Materials & Method: A total of 152 students participated in the study. Dental anxiety was assessed using the 5 item Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS and Locus of Control was assessed using the 18 item Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC scale. Results: A Statistically significant positive correlation was found between the internal dimension of MHLC and dental anxiety. Conclusions: HLC was found to play an important role in predicting the dental anxiety among physiotherapy students.

  20. Depression, anxiety and stress in dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Basudan, Sumaya; Binanzan, Najla; Alhassan, Aseel

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To measure the occurrence and levels of depression, anxiety and stress in undergraduate dental students using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in November and December of 2014. A total of 289 dental students were invited to participate, and 277 responded, resulting in a response rate of 96%. The final sample included 247 participants. Eligible participants were surveyed via a self-reported questionnaire that includ...

  1. Dental neglect among children in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Gurunathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child dental neglect is the failure of a parent or guardian to meet the child′s basic oral health needs such that the child enjoys adequate function and freedom from pain and infection, where reasonable resources are available to family or caregiver. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the phenomenon of dental neglect among children in Chennai and to associate dental neglect with oral health status of children aged 3-12 years. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study involving 478 pairs of parents and children. Dental neglect scale and a questionnaire were used to assess the dental neglect score among parents of the children involved in the study. Oral health status of children was clinically assessed using oral hygiene index, decayed, extracted, filled teeth (def(t, pulp, ulcers, fistula, abscess (pufa, decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT, PUFA as per the World Health Organization criteria and pufa/PUFA index. Student′s t-test and one-way ANOVA were used appropriately for statistical analysis using SPSS software version 20.0. Results: A significant higher dental neglect score was reported among the parents who reside in the suburban location (P 3 years (P = 0.001. A significant higher DMFT (P = 0.003, deft (P = 0 < 0.001, pufa (P = 0.011, and debris index (P = 0.002 scores were seen in the higher dental neglect group. Conclusion: Child dental neglect is seen among the parents whose educational qualification was secondary, who reside in the suburban location, and who have not utilized the dental services for more than 3 years in Chennai. This dental neglect results in poorer oral health of children.

  2. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  3. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  4. American Dental Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CE providers and find CE courses. Commission on Dental Accreditation Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations Learn about the examinations used in licensing ...

  5. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  6. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Autumn Giving: ‘Fall’ into the Future of Dental Hygiene Support the Institute for Oral Health! Give ... best for your patients! Learn More Sidebar Menu Dental Hygiene Programs Continuing Education Career Center Annual Conference ...

  7. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  8. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  9. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  10. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  11. Dental Anxiety among Medical and Paramedical Undergraduate Students of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunjal, Shilpa; Pateel, Deepak Gowda Sadashivappa; Parkar, Sujal

    2017-01-01

    Aim . To assess the dental anxiety level among dental, medical, and pharmacy students of MAHSA University, Malaysia. Materials and Methods . A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 1500 undergraduate students of MAHSA University. The Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) was used to measure dental anxiety among the study population. The responses were assessed by 5-point likert scale ranging from 1 to 5. The level of anxiety was categorized into lowly anxious (5-11), moderately anxious (12-18), and severely anxious ≥19. Out of 1500 students enrolled, 1024 students (342 males and 682 females) completed and returned the questionnaire having response rate of 68.26%. Results . There was a statistically significant difference ( P students had lowest mean score (11.95 ± 4.21). The fifth year (senior) dental students scored significantly ( P = 0.02) lower mean anxiety score as compared to the first dental students (junior). The students were anxious mostly about tooth drilling and local anesthetic injection. Conclusions . Dental students have a significantly low level of dental anxiety as compared with medical and pharmacy students. Incorporation of dental health education in preuniversity and other nondental university curriculums may reduce dental anxiety among the students.

  12. Perception and understanding of dental practitioners in provision of dental treatment to pregnant women in Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Wali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to that assess the perceptions and understanding of dental practitioners in the provision of dental treatment to pregnant women. Materials and Methods: The study was a quantitative, cross-sectional type. A sample size of 200 dental practitioners were included in the study between the period of 6 months, i.e. June–December. A cluster sampling technique was employed covering four different dental institutes. A structured questionnaire was designed to assess the perception and understanding of dental practitioners in providing treatment to the pregnant women. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 19. Chi-square test was done to analyze the association of perception of dental practitioners in treating pregnant women in relation to gender. Results: A total of 200 dental practitioners filled the questionnaire out of which 43% (86 were males and 57% (114 were females. Eighty-two percent of the total participants said that it is safe to provide dental treatment during pregnancy, almost 90.4% of the total dentist interviewed was aware of the special position in which to place a pregnant woman on a dental chair. 85.5% of the study population do not prefer taking radiographs of a pregnant woman, 63% of the entire dentist surveyed prefers to use local anesthesia before any dental procedure on a pregnant patient. 96.5% care to educate their pregnant patient about improving dental health care. 59.5% of the dental practitioners said that they would consult the patient's gynecologist as a mandatory requirement before treating the patient. 57% of the dental practitioners answered with gingivitis. 70.5% agreed on scaling. The majority of the dentists prescribed paracetamol 85.5%. Conclusion: Little is known about the perception and utilization of dental practitioners in providing dental treatment to pregnant women in Pakistan. The present survey concluded that dental practitioners lack

  13. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  14. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to

  15. Dental occlusion and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J Caitlin; Hannah, Andrew; Nagar, Nathan

    2017-10-27

    Data sourcesMedline, Scopus and Google Scholar.Study selectionTwo reviewers selected studies independently. English language clinical studies assessing the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and features of dental occlusion were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudy quality was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and a narrative synthesis was presented.ResultsIn all 25 studies (17 case-control, eight comparative) were included. Overall there was a high variability between occlusal features and TMD diagnosis. Findings were consistent with a lack of clinically relevant association between TMD and dental occlusion. Only two studies were associated with TMD in the majority (≥50%) of single variable analyses in patient populations. Only mediotrusive interferences are associated with TMD in the majority of multiple variable analyses.ConclusionsThe findings support the absence of a disease-specific association, there is no ground to hypothesise a major role for dental occlusion in the pathophysiology of TMDs. Dental clinicians are thus encouraged to move forward and abandon the old-fashioned gnathological paradig.

  16. Dental anxiety among adult patients and its correlation with self-assessed dental status and treatment needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, S.; Bilal, S.; Dawani, N.; Rizvi, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dental anxiety levels and to assess its correlation with self-assessed dental status and treatment needs of patients. Methods: The study was conducted at the Out Patient Department of Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Karachi. Using non-probability quota sampling, the study included the first 32 patients between 18 and 35 years of age, visiting the facility. Over a period of one month (22 working days) 704 patients comprised the study population. They were interviewed using a structured questionnaire to self-assess their dental anxiety levels, oral health status and treatment needs. The data was analysed using SPSS 17.0 with descriptive frequencies and chi-square test. Results: Of the total participants, 650 (92.32%) patients provided consent. Average dental anxiety scale score was 12.46, representing high anxiety score. There were 174 (26.8%) smokers; only 234 (36%) had visited a dentist less than a year ago; 385 (59.2%) considered their dental health to be satisfactory; 306 (47.1%) thought of their treatment needs to be little'; 222 (34.2%) brushed their teeth twice daily. Dental anxiety was statistically significant with treatment needs and dental status. Relation of tooth-brushing with last dental visit and treatment needs was also found to be significant. Conclusion: A high level of dental anxiety was observed among the study population. The dental professionals should seek ways to help dentally anxious individuals. (author)

  17. Marketing Dental Services | Tuominen | Tanzania Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Dental Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Marketing Dental Services. R Tuominen. Abstract. No Abstract.

  18. Dental Radiographs Ordered by Dental Professionals: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Even in resource limited settings dental caries is still the regular indication for taking dental radiographs, and periapical views are the most frequent type of radiograph ordered. Maxillary central incisors and mandibular molars were types of teeth commonly x-rayed mainly due to the aesthetic importance of the ...

  19. Dental education in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Sato, Manuel; Rodiguez, Lyly; Sato, Doris; Bird, William F

    2008-09-01

    This paper provides information about Peru's dental history and dental school system, including the curriculum and dental licensure. With the increase in the number of dental schools in Peru, the number of dentists is also increasing. Until 1965, Peru had only three dental schools; currently, there are 14. Four of these dental schools are public, and ten are private. A five- or six-year dental program leads to the B.D.S. degree. After successful completion of a thesis defense or competency examination, the D.D.S. degree is awarded. The D.D.S. is mandatory for practicing dentistry in Peru. Currently, there are approximately 14,000 active dentists, with a dentist-patient ratio of approximately 1:2,000.

  20. Disinfection of Dental Impressions Prior to Handling at Muhimbili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All four dental technicians who handled the received impressions were interviewed. Questions asked were on practice and attitudes and responses were on different point scales. Results are based on information gathered from the dental technicians. Results: Of the 1,453 impressions received none were reported to have ...

  1. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  2. Bio-inspired dental fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyhle, Hans; Bunk, Oliver; Buser, Stefan; Krastl, Gabriel; Zitzmann, Nicola U.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weiger, Roland; Müller, Bert

    2009-08-01

    Human teeth are anisotropic composites. Dentin as the core material of the tooth consists of nanometer-sized calcium phosphate crystallites embedded in collagen fiber networks. It shows its anisotropy on the micrometer scale by its well-oriented microtubules. The detailed three-dimensional nanostructure of the hard tissues namely dentin and enamel, however, is not understood, although numerous studies on the anisotropic mechanical properties have been performed and evaluated to explain the tooth function including the enamel-dentin junction acting as effective crack barrier. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a spatial resolution in the 10 μm range allows determining the size and orientation of the constituents on the nanometer scale with reasonable precision. So far, only some dental materials, i.e. the fiber reinforced posts exhibit anisotropic properties related to the micrometer-size glass fibers. Dental fillings, composed of nanostructures oriented similar to the natural hard tissues of teeth, however, do not exist at all. The current X-ray-based investigations of extracted human teeth provide evidence for oriented micro- and nanostructures in dentin and enamel. These fundamental quantitative findings result in profound knowledge to develop biologically inspired dental fillings with superior resistance to thermal and mechanical shocks.

  3. Dental calculus formation in children and adolescents undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carla; Siqueira, Walter Luiz; Oliveira, Elizabeth; Nicolau, José; Primo, Laura Guimarães

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether dental calculus formation is really higher among patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis than among controls. Furthermore, the study evaluated correlations between dental calculus formation and dental plaque, variables that are related to renal disease and/or saliva composition. The Renal Group was composed of 30 patients undergoing hemodialysis, whereas the Healthy Group had 30 clinically healthy patients. Stimulated whole saliva and parotid saliva were collected. Salivary flow rate and calcium and phosphate concentrations were determined. In the Renal Group the saliva collection was carried out before and after a hemodialysis session. Patients from both groups received intraoral exams, oral hygiene instructions, and dental scaling. Three months later, the dental calculus was measured by the Volpe-Manhold method to determine the rate of dental calculus formation. The Renal Group presented a higher rate of dental calculus formation (p dental calculus formation and whole saliva flow rate in the Renal Group after a hemodialysis session (r = 0.44, p dental calculus was associated with phosphate concentration in whole saliva from the Renal Group (p dental calculus formation, probably due to salivary variables.

  4. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    .... FDA-2008-N-0163] (formerly Docket No. 2001N-0067) RIN 0910-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam... the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II...

  5. Perception of Dental Professionals towards Biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Manu; Gupta, Mudit; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Biostatistics is becoming an integral part of dental sciences. Awareness regarding the subject is not thoroughly assessed in the field of dentistry. So the study was conducted to assess dental professionals' knowledge, attitude, and perception toward biostatistics at an academic dental institution. An anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among all the faculty and postgraduate students of two dental colleges in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh. The responses were assessed on 5-point likert scale. The survey response rate was 73.71%. Two-thirds of respondents believed biostatistics to be a difficult subject and at the same time half of them did not consider it to be more difficult than other subjects in dentistry. Females were less competent than males in applying biostatistical skills which was found to be statistically significant. Results suggested that dentists with research or academics as an adjunct to their clinical practice had better command over the subject. The current study shows that there is lack of command over the subject of biostatistics among dental professionals although they were aware of its importance in dentistry. There is a need of changing the training pattern of biostatistics for dental professionals which would make them confident enough to apply biostatistics in their clinical practice.

  6. Case based dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

  7. The 'simple' general dental anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dental anaesthesia should not be underestimated. Eddie Oosthuizen .... dental surgeon has limited training in airway management. ... primary teeth to hours for extensive dental conservation .... options after the extraction of permanent teeth ...

  8. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  9. Dental radiology for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation

  10. Evaluation of dental solid waste in Hamedan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabizadeh R.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Today, one of the most important environmental issues is dental solid wastes which are of great importance because of the presence of hazardous, toxic and pathogen agents. In this survey, solid waste produced in Hamedan general dental offices is evaluated. "nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive study, from 104 general dental offices in Hamedan , 10 offices were selected in simple random way. From each offices, 3 sample at the end of successive working day (Sunday, Monday and Tuesday were analyzed. Samples were manually sorted into different 74 components and measured by means of laboratory scale. Then, measured components were classified in the basis of characteristic and hazardous potential as well as material type. "nResults: Total annual waste produced in general dental offices in Hamadan is 14662.67 Kg (9315.45>95.0% Confidence Interval>20009.88. Production percentages of infectious, domestic type, chemical and pharmaceutical and toxic wastes were 51.93, 38.16, 9.47, 0.44 respectively. Main components of produced dental waste were 14 components that consist of more than 80 percents of total dental solid waste. So, waste reduction, separation and recycling plans in the offices must be concentrated on these main components. "nConclusion: In order to dental waste proper management, it is suggested that in addition to educate dentists for waste reduction, separation and recycling in the offices, each section of dental waste(toxic,chemical and pharmaceutical, infectious and domestic type wastes separately and according to related criteria should be managed.

  11. Tooth extraction education at dental schools across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; van der Cammen, C.C.J.; Roorda, S.M.E.; Baart, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Aims: To explore students’ opinion about theoretical and clinical training in tooth extraction at different European dental schools. Materials and Methods: An online questionnaire, containing 36 dichotomous, multiple choice and Likert scale rating questions, was distributed among students

  12. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  13. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  14. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  15. BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS IN COMMUNITY ORAL HEALTH PROBLEMS: A STUDY ON DENTAL TREATMENT DISCONTINUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Aryadi Joelimar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The low value of F/DMF-T ration on Performed Treatment Index in Indoneisa gives an indication of great problems in dental treatment utilization. Dental treatment utilization is affected by several obstacles, the greatest among which is psychosocial obstacles. In this study the psychosocial obstacles were detected through Intrinsic Obstacles, Obstacles in Transportation, and Obstacles in Dental Clinic related to their effects on their discontinuation of dental treatments at Balkesmas Kiara, Kecamatan Senen, Jakarta Pusat. The discontinuation of dental treatments was mostly affected by Intrinsic Obstacles, through its components as Types of Cases, Dental Anxiety Scale, and Intrinsic Motivation. Generally Obstacles in Transportation had no effects, excpet its components of Travel Time and Tiredness. Obstacles in Dental Clinic had a significant effect on the discontinuation of dental treatments through the unpleasant manner of the druggist, the hot waiting room, and the high expense on drugs.

  16. Tanzania Dental Association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Committee of Tanzania Dental. Association would like to Thank. [fUfNJfNJU[[j)~ for its magnanimity towards meeting the cost of this Journal ... ceps is token out of the dental kit and the tooth is removed out of its socket. The tooth is dropped into the waste bucket. The fareceps is placed in the water basin. The socket site is ...

  17. Nigerian Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... needs of dental practitioners in Nigeria, Africa and international community interested in the dental practice in the developing world. The NDJ is published biannually and accepts reports of original research, review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques related to dentistry and allied subjects ...

  18. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...

  19. Dental anxiety among university students and its correlation with their field of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omari, Wael Mousa; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud Khalid

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the subjective ratings of dental anxiety levels among university students enrolled at Jordan University of Science and Technology. In addition, the present study aimed to explore the sources of dental anxiety and the impact of gender on the perceived dental anxiety and the correlation between field of study and dental anxiety level. The Modified Corah Dental Anxiety Scale was used to measure dental anxiety among the study population. Six hundred subjects were recruited into the study from Jordanian undergraduate students from the faculties of Medicine, Engineering, and Dentistry. Five hundred and thirty five complete questionnaires were returned, which accounts for a response rate of 89.2%. The totals of the mean anxiety scores were the following: Medical students, 13.58%; Engineering students, 13.27% and dental students, 11.22%. About 32% of the study population has scored 15 or more. Dental students had the lowest percentage of those who scored 15 or more. Surprisingly, the medical students were responsible for the highest percentage of those who scored 15 or above. Although women demonstrated statistically higher total dental anxiety scores than men (p= 0.03), the difference between both genders was small and could be clinically insignificant. The students were anxious mostly about tooth drilling and local anesthetic injection. Lack of adequate dental health education may result in a high level of dental anxiety among non-dental university students in Jordan. Further studies are required to identify the correlates of dental anxiety among university students.

  20. The professional role of the dental hygienist as viewed by accreditation commissioners and consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanable, E D

    1977-12-01

    Members of the Commission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary Educational Programs and of its associated Committee D (Committee on Dental Hygiene) were asked a series of questions designed to elicit their positions on (1) the occupational status of dental hygiene in society at large and in the social prestige hierarchy of the dental profession, (2) reference groups for dental hygienists, (3) ethical norms for the hygienist role, (4) revivalism movements within dental hygiene, and (5) images of the "ideal dental hygienist." Results indicate that commissioners and consultants see dental hygienists as (1) ranking 7.1 on a ten-point scale of professional status in the community-at-large, (2) somewhat lower than dentists but higher than other auxiliaries in the social hierarchy of the dental profession, (3) socially referenced to dentists rather than hygienists, (4) primarily oral health educators with strong clinical skills, (5) better educated and more skilled now than they have ever been before, (6) bound to essentially the same ethics as dentists, except for self-regulation, and (7) much too aggressive at the national level for their own good. The ideal dental hygienist was seen as a behavioral change specialist with (1) clinical skills, (2) an attitude of service to patients (3) a willingness to work with dentists to increase the scope of dental hygiene duties in the preventive and periodontal areas, and (4) a willingness to leave the decisions regarding the profession of dental hygiene to dentists.

  1. Patients' satisfaction with dental care provided by public dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Tanzania, patient satisfaction with dental services has received only minor attention. Objective: To assess patients' satisfaction with public dental health services in Dar es Salaam. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Five public dental clinics randomly selected from a list of all the nine public dental ...

  2. Dental fluorosis and dental caries prevalence among 12 and 15 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fluoride is a double edged sword. The assessment of dental caries and fluorosis in endemic fluoride areas will facilitate in assessing the relation between fluoride concentrations in water with dental caries, dental fluorosis simultaneously. Aim: The objective of the following study is to assess the dental caries ...

  3. Awareness of dental implants among dental patients in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of awareness of dental implant in Nigerian patients and their willingness to choose dental implant as a tooth replacement option. A survey was conducted among patients presenting for dental treatment in 3 teaching hospitals and private dental clinics in 3 urban cities of ...

  4. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Ethnicity and perception of dental shade esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Muhammad Omar; Naseem, Mustafa; Elcock, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether or not people from different ethnic backgrounds have different attitudes towards dental esthetics and chose different dental appearances in terms of tooth shade, and to determine whether the dental professional's choice and the individual's own choice have any relationship with what the individual ideally perceives as esthetically pleasing. For this cross-sectional analytical study, 120 volunteer students from the University of Sheffield (excepting dental students) from various ethnic backgrounds, of different ages, of both genders, and with varying degree/educational levels were recruited from the campus. The volunteers were asked to complete a questionnaire containing 9 adapted attitudinal statements regarding positive or negative dental esthetic perceptions in terms of tooth shade, with responses on a 5-point Likert scale from "Entirely agree" to "Entirely disagree". Scores for all attitudinal statements were summed up to give an attitudinal score. The participants' ideal, perceived, and actual (self-assessed and investigatorassessed) tooth shade was also determined using a shade guide and a facial mirror. No association between ethnicity and attitudinal score was found. However, statistically significant associations were found between the participants' degree/educational level (P=0.004, 95% Confidence Interval (CI)=-4.18 to -0.82) and their ideal tooth shade value (P=0.038, 95% CI=-3.53 to -0.11). There were strong correlations between self-assessed and professionally assessed tooth shade value in all ethnic groups, with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho) being ρ>0.6. Regarding ideally desired and perceived tooth shade value, weak correlations were found in all ethnic groups (Spearman's rho being ρethnicity and attitude towards dental esthetics with regard to tooth shade, both ethnicity and dental esthetics are very diverse terms with multiple dimensions, each of which needs further investigation with regard to their mutual

  6. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... produce dental materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental... materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other... Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix...

  7. Group therapy compared with individual desensitization for dental anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R.; Brødsgaard, I.

    1994-01-01

    Results of group therapy (GT) for extreme dental anxiety were compared with individual treatment (IT). Scales used measured dental anxiety, beliefs or trust in dentists, and fear of the next dentist after specialist treatment which showed reduced dental anxiety and improved dental beliefs compared...... with a static control group of 45 patients. The 30 GT patients showed no significant difference in dropouts during training compared with the 68 IT patients, but for patients who completed treatment, GT (n = 24) had greater dental anxiety reduction than IT subjects (n = 60). GT patients required fewer therapist...... hours per patients than did either of the two IT methods, but time saved in GT did not reach significance over clinical rehearsal IT. Results at 1- yr follow-up after specialist treatment indicated that dropouts were significantly greater in group therapy. Rehearsal IT performed best for sustained...

  8. Dental Anomalies: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jahanimoghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anomalies are usual congenital malformation that can happen either as isolated findings or as a part of a syndrome. Developmental anomalies influencing the morphology exists in both deciduous and permanent dentition and shows different forms such as gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens evaginatus (DE, enamel pearls, taurodontism or peg-shaped laterals. All These anomalies have clinical significance concerning aesthetics, malocclusion and more necessary preparing of the development of dental decays and oral diseases. Through a search in PubMed, Google, Scopus and Medline, a total of eighty original research papers during 1928-2016 were found with the keywords such as dental anomaly, syndrome, tooth and hypodontia. One hundred review titles were identified, eighty reviews were retrieved that were finally included as being relevant and of sufficient quality. In this review, dental anomalies including gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens invaginatus, DE, taurodontism, enamel pearls, fluorosis, peg-shaped laterals, dentinal dysplasia, regional odontodysplasia and hypodontia are discussed. Diagnosing dental abnormality needs a thorough evaluation of the patient, involving a medical, dental, familial and clinical history. Clinical examination and radiographic evaluation and in some of the cases, specific laboratory tests are also needed. Developmental dental anomalies require careful examination and treatment planning. Where one anomaly is present, clinicians should suspect that other anomalies may also be present. Moreover, careful clinical and radiographical examination is required. Furthermore, more complex cases need multidisciplinary planning and treatment.

  9. Stress and burnout among Swiss dental residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Lai, Caroline S; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Stress and burnout have been well-documented in graduate medical and undergraduate dental education, but studies among dental graduate students and residents are sparse. The purpose of this investigation was to examine perceived stressors and three dimensions of burnout among dental residents enrolled in the University of Bern, Switzerland. Thirty-six residents enrolled in five specialty programmes were administered the Graduate Dental Environment Stress (GDES30) questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Individual stress items and overall GDES30 scores were used to quantify perceived stress. To measure burnout, proportions of burnout "cases" and MBI subscale scores were computed in the domains of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) and reduced personal accomplishment (PA). Analyses relied on descriptive and bi-variate methods. The mean GDES30 score was 2.1 (SD = 0.4). "Lack of leisure time", "meeting the research requirement of the programme" and "completing graduation requirements" emerged as the top three stressors. Thirty-six percent of respondents were burnout "cases" on the PA scale, while this proportion was 17% for EE and 8% for DP. Both stress and burnout levels increased according to year of study, whereas younger residents and females had consistently higher stress and burnout scores compared to older ones and males. Overall, low levels of perceived stress and burnout were found among this group of Swiss dental residents.

  10. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  11. Dental biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2017-01-01

    and cause gingival inflammation and breakdown of supporting periodontal fibers and bone and ultimately tooth loss, i.e., gingivitis, chronic or aggressive periodontitis, and around dental implants, peri-implantitis. Furthermore, bacteria from the dental biofilm may spread to other parts of the body......-fermenting bacteria causing demineralization of teeth, dental caries, which may further lead to inflammation and necrosis in the pulp and periapical region, i.e., pulpitis and periapical periodontitis. In supra- and subgingival biofilms, predominantly gram-negative, anaerobic proteolytic bacteria will colonize...

  12. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.Dental...

  13. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  14. Economic impact of dental hygienists on solo dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental practices that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from practices that do not? This article explores differences among dental practices that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental Practice, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in practice characteristics--such as hours spent in the practice and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.

  15. Behavioral changes during dental appointments in children having tooth extractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gonzalez Cademartori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tooth extractions are associated with anxiety-related situations that can cause behavioral problems in pediatric dental clinics. Aim: We aimed to describe the behavior of children during tooth extraction appointments, compare it to their behavior in preceding and subsequent dental appointments, and assess the behavioral differences according to gender, age, type of dentition, and reason for extraction. Settings and Design: This was a retrospective study based on information obtained from records of children between 6 and 13 years of age who were cared for at the Dentistry School in Pelotas, Brazil. Materials and Methods: Child behavior was assessed during the dental appointment that preceded the tooth extraction, during the tooth extraction appointment, and in the subsequent dental appointment using the Venham Behavior Rating Scale. Statistical Analysis: Results were analyzed using the Pearson Chi-square and McNemar tests. Results: Eighty-nine children were included. Cooperative behavior prevailed in all the dental appointments. The prevalence of “mild/intense protest” was higher in the tooth extraction appointments than in the previous or subsequent dental appointments (P < 0.001. No significant differences in behavior were detected between the type of dentition (primary or permanent teeth, reason for extraction or gender. Conclusion: In this sample of children treated at a dental school, the occurrence of uncooperative behavior was higher during the tooth extraction appointments than in the preceding and subsequent dental appointments.

  16. [Influence of the fluoride releasing dental materials on the bacterial flora of dental plaque].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płuciennik, Małgorzata; Sakowska, Danuta; Krzemiński, Zbigniew; Piatowska, Danuta

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of influence of silver-free, fluor releasing dental materials on dental plaque bacteria quantity. 17 patients were included into the study. 51 restorations were placed following manufacturers recommendations. Following materials were used: conventional glassionomer Ketac-Molar ESPE, resin modified glassionomer Fuji II LC GC and fluor containing composite Charisma Heraeus Kulzer Class V restorations were placed in following teeth of upper and lower jaw: canines, first bicuspids, second bicuspids. Sound enamel was a control. After 10 weeks the 72 hours old dental plaque was collected from surface of restorations and control using sterile probe. Total amount of 68 dental plaques were investigated. Each plaque was placed on scaled and sterile aluminum foil. The moist weight of dental plaque was scaled. Dental plaque was moved into 7 ml 0.85% NaCl solution reduced by cystein chlorine hydrogen and disintegrated by ultrasounds (power:100 Watt, wave amplitude: 5 micorm). The suspension of dental plaque was serially diluted from 10(-4) to 10(-5) in sterile 0,85% NaCl solution, and seeded with amount of 0.1 ml on appropriate base. In dental plaque trials the amount of cariogenic bacteria was calculated--Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Neisseria, and also total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was measured. Microbiologic studies were performed in Institute of Microbiology, Medical University, Łódź. Statistical analysis of collected data was accomplished. In 72 hours old dental plaques collected from the surfaces of Ketac -Molar, Fuji II LC, Charisma after 10 weeks since being placed into the class V cavity, results show no statistically significant differences in the amount of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Veillonella spp., Neisseria spp, in total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and in the quantity proportion of Streptococcus mutans versus Streptococcus spp. in comparison

  17. Dental education in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, J M

    2003-01-01

    For a long time there has been a need to establish a dental school in Kuwait, due to the fact that the majority of dentists working in Kuwait are expatriates from various countries. An Amiri decree in 1996 made it possible, and the first dental students were admitted to the Kuwait University Faculty of Dentistry in 1998. The mission of the Faculty of Dentistry is 'to promote oral health in Kuwait through education, research and cooperation with other professional health care institutions as well as the community at large'. A 6.5-year dental curriculum was completed after 2 years of committee work and was accepted by the University Council in 2001. This curriculum incorporates current trends in medical and dental education, such as the evidence-based and community-based approaches, problem-solving methodology for outcome-based learning, and competency achieved through comprehensive patient care. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  19. Advances in dental imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E

    2001-04-01

    The number of dental radiographs taken in the UK has steadily increased over the past 20 years--recently estimating around 18 million taken in the general dental services alone, and dental radiographs now account for nearly 25% of all medical radiographic exposures. Radiographs remain our most useful diagnostic aid. Their strength is in demonstrating hard tissue pathology, which makes radiographs particularly effective in the maxillofacial region. Although well accepted in this capacity, there remain a number of limitations and drawbacks to conventional radiographs which recent developments have begun to overcome. There have been improvements in the scope and capabilities of dental imaging equipment. There has also been a continuing effort to reduce radiation-induced harm by limiting our exposure to it. This has been possible both through the introduction of new methods and protocols for reducing individual radiation exposures and by the creation of guidelines for selecting radiographs more effectively and thereby reducing the total number of radiographs taken.

  20. Glossary of Dental Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more... Coffee and Doughnuts: A Disastrous Combo for Teeth? The sugars in doughnuts have been identified as ... More print this article enlarge text Glossary of Dental Terms Oral Health Defined Amalgam silver/mercury alloy ...

  1. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Proper care of your child's teeth and gums includes brushing and rinsing daily. It ...

  2. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risks associated with tobacco, substance abuse and oral piercings. Why it's done Regular dental exams help protect ... sugary beverages Smoking Chewing tobacco Eating disorders Oral piercings Not wearing a mouthguard during contact sports The ...

  3. Nigerian Dental Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS AND CONTRIBUTORS The Nigerian Dental ... review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques ... figures and illustrations, including one copy stored in a 3.5” floppy should be sent to ...

  4. Dental Assisting Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the dental assisting program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  5. Workplace health in dental care - a salutogenic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindmark, U; Wagman, P; Wåhlin, C; Rolander, B

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to explore self-reported psychosocial health and work environments among different dental occupations and workplaces from a salutogenic perspective. A further purpose was to analyse possible associations between three salutogenic measurements: The Sense of Coherence questionnaire (SOC), the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and the Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS). Employees in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish county council (n = 486) were invited to respond to a self-reported web survey including demographics, work-related factors, the SOC, the SHIS and the WEMS. This study showed positive associations between employee characteristics and self-reported overall psychosocial health as well as experienced work environment. Autonomy was reported more among men than women (P better health (SOC, SHIS) and experienced more autonomy, better management and more positive to reorganization than other dental professions. Dental hygienists and nurses experienced less time pressure than dentists (P ≤ 0.007). Better health and positive work experiences were also seen in smaller clinics (P ≤ 0.29). Dental professionals reported a high degree of overall psychosocial health as well as a positive work experience. Some variations could be seen between employee characteristics such as gender, years in dental care, professionals, managing position and workplace size. Identify resources and processes at each workplace are important and should be included in the employee's/employers dialogue. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Dental Hygiene Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Children acceptance of laser dental treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazea, Andreea; Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the dental anxiety level and the degree of acceptance of laser assisted pedodontic treatments from the children part. Also, we want to underline the advantages of laser use in pediatric dentistry, to make this technology widely used in treating dental problems of our children patients. Methods: Thirty pediatric dental patients presented in the Department of Pedodontics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Victor Babeş", Timişoara were evaluated using the Wong-Baker pain rating scale, wich was administered postoperatory to all patients, to assess their level of laser therapy acceptance. Results: Wong-Baker faces pain rating scale (WBFPS) has good validity and high specificity; generally it's easy for children to use, easy to compare and has good feasibility. Laser treatment has been accepted and tolerated by pediatric patients for its ability to reduce or eliminate pain. Around 70% of the total sample showed an excellent acceptance of laser dental treatment. Conclusions: Laser technology is useful and effective in many clinical situations encountered in pediatric dentistry and a good level of pacient acceptance is reported during all laser procedures on hard and soft tissues.

  7. Panoramic dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, R.H.; Kircher, D.R.; Hart, F.W.; Ciavattoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for improving the handling rate of patients in panoramic dental radiography when tube head-camera assembly of a low silhouette panoramic dental X-ray machine is rotated for a scan in one direction only. This is effected by fast return of the tube head-camera assembly with its simultaneous elevation, thus facilitating the radiographed patient's exit from the machine and the entrance of another patient. Fast speed is about twice the scanning speed. (author)

  8. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  9. Saliva and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Hannas, Angélicas Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  10. Managing dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  11. Serious psychological distress as a barrier to dental care in community-dwelling adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiaoling; Lee, Wonik; Kang, Sung-wan

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether serious psychological distress (SPD), a nonspecific indicator of past year mental health problems, was associated with subsequent dental care utilization, dental expenditures, and unmet dental needs. We analyzed data from panel 13 thru 15 of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey -Household Component (n=31,056). SPD was defined as a score of 13 or higher on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6). Logistic regression, zero-inflated negative binomial model, and generalized linear model (GLM) with a gamma distribution were used to test the study hypotheses. Adults with SPD had, in the subsequent year, 35 percent lower odds of adhering to annual dental checkups and a twofold increase in the odds of having unmet dental needs. Although adults with SPD did not have significantly more dental visits than those without SPD, they spent 20 percent more on dental care. SPD was a modest independent risk factor for lack of subsequent preventive dental care, greater unmet dental needs, and greater dental expenditures. In addition to expanding adult dental coverage, it is important to develop and evaluate interventions to increase the utilization of dental care particularly preventive dental services among people with mental illness in order to improve oral health and reduce dental expenditures among this vulnerable population. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  12. American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New Research AADSM Highlights Members More news... Dental Sleep Medicine: An area of dental practice that focuses on ... SomnoMed Silver Sponsors Copyright © American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

  13. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  14. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  15. Dental school finances: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, W H

    1986-05-01

    Total expenditures and revenues of 58 US dental school were derived from reports of the ADA Division of Educational Measurements. These financial data were studied by type of dental school (public, state-related private, and private) and by expenditure/revenue categories. Dental schools showed little diversity in expenditures: most were directed toward instruction; few were directed toward research or continuing education. Several distinctive patterns among the three types of dental schools in revenues were observed. Two configurations emerged: public and state-related private dental schools receive more than 75% of their revenues from government and tuition, and private dental schools, more than 50%.

  16. Patient Satisfaction in Military Dental Treatment Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-07

    the variance in regards to overall satisfaction. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dentistry, Patient Satisfaction, Military, Consumer Satisfaction, Dental... patient satisfaction in military dental treatment facilities. Dental health is extremely important for the military as dental assets are not always... customer satisfaction is an important component of military dental care. Quarterly patient satisfaction reports are generated for each dental treatment

  17. Management of dental trauma in primary care: a postal survey of general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, N G; Waterhouse, P J; Maguire, A

    2005-03-12

    To determine the self-perceived knowledge and attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) concerning management of dental trauma in primary care. To identify potential barriers to the management of dental trauma in primary care. A self-completion postal questionnaire survey of 417 GDPs in six local health authority districts in northeast England. Likert scale responses to 20 statements designed to test self-perceived knowledge and attitudes. Following descriptive statistical analysis. Factor analysis with principle components analysis was undertaken to identify areas of correlation in questionnaire responses, followed by Chi squared test, Spearman's Rank Correlation and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to measure association between variables. The response rate was 74%. Enamel and dentine fractures were the most common injury, with 45% of GDPs responding seeing more than 10 cases of dental trauma in the preceding year and 53% of respondents seeing one to three cases of complicated crown fracture. Seventy-eight per cent believed that NHS remuneration was inadequate, but only 8% would refer patients with dental trauma to secondary care for this reason. Half of the GDPs believed that trauma could be treated more effectively in practice if NHS payments were greater. GDPs were significantly more likely to agree with this statement if they had previously undertaken a postgraduate course in the treatment of dental trauma (p=0.002). Single handed GDPs were statistically significantly more likely to agree with the statements 'I would not treat dental trauma cases at my practice because the NHS payment is inadequate' (p=0.008) and 'Treating dental trauma at my practice requires too much of my clinical time to be worthwhile' (p=0.002). Ninety-six per cent of GDPs disagreed that treatment of dental trauma rested solely within secondary care. Ninety-six per cent of GDPs agreed that they had a responsibility to provide initial emergency treatment for trauma patients prior to

  18. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  19. Hand hygiene amongst dental professionals in a tertiary dental clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate hand washing attitude and practices among Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in a Nigerian Tertiary Dental Clinic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in University of Benin Teaching Hospital was conducted between February ...

  20. Reasons for late seeking of dental care among dental patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons for delayed reporting for oral care were negligence (53.5%); poor dental services or visited but not treated (19.4%); financial reasons (14.8%); and dental fear (12.3%). Seventy seven percent of respondents who had toothache due to advanced dental caries were aware that the aching tooth was decayed, of which, ...

  1. Diagnostic methods for dental caries used by private dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the preference profiles of various types of diagnostic tools and methods used by private dental practitioners in Ankara for detecting dental caries. Methods: Private dental practitioners, in five districts of Ankara, were provided with questionnaires comprising demographic ...

  2. Dental Education in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Dental education in the Netherlands is reviewed in terms of dental practice, overall development, structure and functioning of a typical school of dentistry, admissions, student finances, curriculum, certification, postgraduate education, and education for related professions. (MSE)

  3. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...

  4. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  5. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  6. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Health THE BASIC FACTS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Kim, diagnosed in 1986 People with a chronic disease may neglect their general health and wellness, research shows. Dental care is no exception. A tendency to focus ...

  7. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... a sticky substance that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where ...

  8. Radiation protection in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide provides the dentist and dental support personnel with basic information on the safe use of x-rays in dental radiography. Included in this CODE are specific recommendations for eliminating unnecessary radiation exposure of both patients and staff

  9. Visualisation of dental images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion Salikin; Azuhar Ripin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Mohd Isa; Suriany Sarmid

    2005-01-01

    Since the invention and the discovery of x-rays, physicians, surgeons and life scientists have been using images to diagnose and subsequently treat diseases. X-ray is also widely used in many imaging techniques to better understand basics anatomy, physiology and biology as well as testing and analytical work in physical science. In dentistry, x-ray technique has been employed to get a panoramic view of the whole teeth of a particular patient. A panoramic dental radiograph is very useful in dentistry for diagnostic purpose, denture preparation, as well as for orthodontic. Image visualisation is an important aspect especially for the dentists to analyse and proceed with a particulate dental treatment. In this project panoramic dental image obtained by using a standard phantom is visualised by using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software. A panoramic dental x-ray machine, Cranex3, is used to get a panoramic radiograph, which is subsequently digitized, by using Vidar digitizer (Sierra Plus). The 2D digitized image is enhance and apply other visualising techniques such as surface rendering and volume rendering technique using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software as a first step in 3D visualisation. In this paper, visualising of panoramic dental radiograph by using IDL is discussed in brief. (Author)

  10. Perceived oral health status and treatment needs of dental auxiliaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, Clement C; Ehizele, Adebola O; Umoh, Agnes; Ojehanon, Patrick I; Akhionbare, Osagie; Okechukwu, Robinson; Igbinosa, Lawrence

    2010-03-15

    To determine the perceived oral health status and treatment needs of Nigerian dental therapists in training and dental technology students. A descriptive cross-sectional study of students from Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology Enugu, Nigeria was conducted using self-administered questionnaire to obtain information on demography, self-reported oral health status, knowledge of impact of oral health on daily life activity, dental attendance and perceived dental need. The perception of oral health status and treatment need of the two groups of dental auxiliaries was the same. Fewer respondents (27.3%) rated their oral health as excellent, while 50.4% rated their oral health as good. Majority (95.5%) agreed that oral health is a part of general health and 94.6% agreed that oral health has a role in daily life. Out of 81.4% that had previous dental treatment, scaling and polishing accounted for 66.1%. Presently, 48.8% think they need dental treatment ranging from scaling and polishing (33.9%), tooth restoration (10.3%), to extraction (1.2%). This survey revealed that most of the students are aware that oral health is a component of general health and that it has an impact on an individual's daily life. More than half of the students perceived their oral health as good, but only a few knew that there is a need for a preventive approach to oral health as evident by the percentage that perceived scaling and polishing as a treatment need.

  11. Perceived oral health status and treatment needs of dental auxiliaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement C. Azodo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the perceived oral health status and treatment needs of Nigerian dental therapists in training and dental technology students. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study of students from Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology Enugu, Nigeria was conducted using self-administered questionnaire to obtain information on demography, self-reported oral health status, knowledge of impact of oral health on daily life activity, dental attendance and perceived dental need. Results: The perception of oral health status and treatment need of the two groups of dental auxiliaries was the same. Fewer respondents (27.3% rated their oral health as excellent, while 50.4% rated their oral health as good. Majority (95.5% agreed that oral health is a part of general health and 94.6% agreed that oral health has a role in daily life.Out of 81.4% that had previous dental treatment, scaling and polishing accounted for 66.1%. Presently, 48.8% think they need dental treatment ranging from scaling and polishing (33.9%, tooth restoration (10.3%, to extraction (1.2%. Conclusion: This survey revealed that most of the students are aware that oral health is a component of general health and that it has an impact on an individual's daily life. More than half of the students perceived their oral health as good, but only a few knew that there is a need for a preventive approach to oral health as evident by the percentage that perceived scaling and polishing as a treatment need.

  12. Does dental caries affect dental development in children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamo, Brunilda; Elezi, Besiana; Kragt, Lea; Wolvius, Eppo B; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M

    2018-01-01

    Although a link between dietary changes, caries, and dental development has been observed, the literature provides little insight about this relationship. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between dental caries and dental development in a clinical sample of Albanian children and adolescents. In total, 118 children and adolescents, born between 1995 and 2004 and aged 6–15 years, were included. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Filled Teeth (dft) index and dental caries in the permanent dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Dental development during the permanent dentition was determined using the Demirjian method. Linear and ordinal regression models were applied to analyze the associations of dental caries with dental age and developmental stages of each left mandibular tooth. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition, estimated as a median dft of 2.0 (90% range, 0.0–9.1), was significantly associated with lower dental age (β = -0.21; 90% CI: -0.29, -0.12) and with delayed development of the canine, both premolars, and the second molar. Untreated dental caries (dt) was associated with lower dental age (β = -0.19; 90% CI: -0.28, -0.10). Dental caries in the permanent dentition, estimated as a median DMFT of 1.0 (90% range, 0.0–8.0), was not significantly associated with dental age (β = 0.05; 90% CI: -0.04, 0.14). However, the DMFT was associated with the advanced stages of development of both premolars and the second molar. The untreated dental caries in the deciduous dentition delays the development of permanent teeth. PMID:29659350

  13. Dental anxiety: a comparison of students of dentistry, biology, and psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storjord HP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helene Persen Storjord,1 Mari Mjønes Teodorsen,1 Jan Bergdahl,1 Rolf Wynn,2,3 Jan-Are Kolset Johnsen1 1Department of Clinical Dentistry, 2Department of Clinical Medicine, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, 3Division of Addictions and Specialized Psychiatric Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway Introduction: Dental anxiety is an important challenge for many patients and clinicians. It is thus of importance to know more about dental students' own experiences with dental anxiety and their understanding of dental anxiety. The aim was to investigate differences in dental anxiety levels between dental students, psychology students, and biology students at a Norwegian university. Materials and methods: A total of 510 students of dentistry, psychology, and biology at the University of Tromsø received a questionnaire consisting of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, demographic questions, and questions relating to their last visit to the dentist/dental hygienist; 169 students gave complete responses. Nonparametric tests were used to investigate differences between the student groups. Results: The respondents were 78% female and 22% male; their mean age was 24 years. The dental students showed a significantly lower degree of dental anxiety than the psychology (P<0.001 and biology students (P<0.001. A significant decrease in dental anxiety levels was found between novice and experienced dentistry students (P<0.001. Discussion: The dental students had less dental anxiety compared to psychology students and biology students. Experienced dental students also had less dental anxiety than novice dental students. This could indicate that the dentistry program structure at the university may influence dental anxiety levels. Conclusion: Dental anxiety seemed to be less frequent in dentistry students compared to students of biology or clinical psychology. The practice-oriented dentistry education at the university might contribute to

  14. Guidelines on radiology standards for primary dental care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A Joint Working Party (JWP) on patient dose reduction in diagnostic radiology was established between the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) and the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) towards the end of 1988. JWP identified a large potential for patient dose reduction on a national scale, and a report of its findings was published in 1990. This guidance was only generally applicable to dental radiology and in 1992 a further joint venture between RCR and NRPB resulted in the formation of a Working Party (WP) to consider all aspects of dental radiology applicable to primary dental care. Dental radiology is one of the largest single groups of radiographic examination performed, although the effective dose per radiograph is small. This means that individual risks from dental radiology are low, but WP has identified a significant potential for reduction in the collective dose and for improvements in the diagnostic quality of radiographs. The WP recommendations cover all aspects of dental radiology: training and examination regimes for dentists and staff, patient selection and clinical justification for radiography, diagnostic interpretation, equipment and procedural aspects, and finally the question of quality assurance in dental radiology. The economic impact of the many recommendations by WP has been considered in some detail. The benefits and cost of each recommendation either have been assigned a monetary value or have been assessed more qualitatively. The conclusion is that there is a strong economic justification for implementation of the full package of recommendations. (Author)

  15. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  16. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  17. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  18. 76 FR 14600 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... qualify for VHA dental treatment, including any claim for treatment of periodontal disease or calculus... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental conditions for treatment purposes...

  19. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  20. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... rule the proposal to amend its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental... Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of...

  1. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health.

  2. Role of Colors in Pediatric Dental Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubna, Ketan; Hegde, Sapna; Rao, Dinesh

    This study evaluated the association between colors and emotions in a pediatric dental population. In this randomized cross-sectional study, 100 children aged 6-12 years were categorized as non-anxious and anxious using Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale-Revised. They were then instructed to color two cartoon faces, one depicting happiness emotion and the other, sadness, with any of six colors provided. Data obtained were statistically analyzed. The mean Corah's Dental Anxiety scores were 11.7 and 4.97 for the anxious and non-anxious children, respectively. Both groups expressed the highest preference for the color yellow for happiness emotion. No significant differences were observed between color choices in either group (p>0.05), except for black which was not chosen by any child for happiness (pcolor choices in the anxious group (p>0.05). In the non-anxious group, yellow assumed significant preference over green (pcolor and black, the least-preferred, for happiness emotion, whereas, for sadness emotion, red and green were the most- and least-preferred colors, respectively. Color preference was not affected by the presence of dental anxiety.

  3. Stereoscopy in Dental Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stereoscopy can play a meaningful role in dental education. The study used an anaglyph technique in which two images were presented separately to the left and right eyes (using red/cyan filters), which, combined in the brain, give enhanced depth...... perception. A positional judgment task was performed to assess whether the use of stereoscopy would enhance depth perception among dental students at Osaka University in Japan. Subsequently, the optimum angle was evaluated to obtain maximum ability to discriminate among complex anatomical structures. Finally...... practice, they did recognize its merits for education. These results suggest that using stereoscopic images in dental education can be quite valuable as stereoscopy greatly helped these students' understanding of the spatial relationships in complex anatomical structures....

  4. Risks from dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Tamara Goularte

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the risks and consequences of exposure to dental X-ray. The methodology used was the survey of bibliographic literature on this matter. First, we tried to understand the operation and characteristics of dental X-rays. Afterwards, we tried to know about the risks that this procedure offers to workers and patients. And concluded with the consequences of such exposure. The results showed that dental x-rays only offer risks in prolonged exposure, can affect the worker or patient to pathologies such as cancer or a life-time decreased due to the stochastic effect. Therefore, radiological protection standards must be respected and practised. (author)

  5. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  7. Dental fear and caries in 6-12 year old children in Greece. Determination of dental fear cut-off points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boka, V; Arapostathis, K; Karagiannis, V; Kotsanos, N; van Loveren, C; Veerkamp, J

    2017-03-01

    To present: the normative data on dental fear and caries status; the dental fear cut-off points of young children in the city of Thessaloniki, Greece. Study Design: This is a cross-sectional study with two independent study groups. A first representative sample consisted of 1484 children from 15 primary public schools of Thessaloniki. A second sample consisted of 195 randomly selected age-matched children, all patients of the Postgraduate Paediatric Dental Clinic of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. First sample: In order to select data on dental fear and caries, dental examination took place in the classroom with disposable mirrors and a penlight. All the children completed the Dental Subscale of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-DS). Second sample: In order to define the cut-off points of the CFSS-DS, dental treatment of the 195 children was performed at the University Clinic. Children⁁s dental fear was assessed using the CFSS-DS and their behaviour during dental treatment was observed by one calibrated examiner using the Venham scale. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with IBM SPSS Statistics 20 at a statistical significance level of fear. Mean differences between boys and girls were not significant. Caries was not correlated with dental fear. Second sample: CFSS-DSfear', scores 33-37 as 'borderline' and scores > 37 as 'dental fear'. In the first sample, 84.6% of the children did not suffer from dental fear (CFSS-DSfear was correlated to age and not to caries and gender. The dental fear cut-off point for the CFSS-DS was estimated at 37 for 6-12 year old children (33-37 borderlines).

  8. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Rubberloid Van R Dental Prod. Surgident Lactona Corp. Alginates Coe Alginate Coe Labs o Jeltrate L.D. Caulk Kerr Alginate Kerr/Sybron Alginate S.S. White Co...Surgident- Alginate Lactona Corp. Unijel II Unitek Corp. O Combination Agar/a ig inate Colloid 80 U.S. Shiza Corp. Dentloid Denterials, Ltd...66061 (215) 277-3800 (913) 782-2200 Shofu Dental Corp. Lactona Corp. (subsidary of 4025 Bohannon Dr. Warner-Lambert Co.) Menlo Park, CA 94025 . Academy

  9. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  10. Perceived Dentist and Dental Hygienist Task Distribution After Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Team Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  11. Perceived dentist and dental hygienist task distribution after dental and dental hygiene students' team intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J; Krijnen, Wim P; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  12. Manifestations, acquisition and diagnostic categories of dental fear in a self-referred population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R; Brødsgaard, I; Birn, H

    1991-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify how manifestations and acquisition relate to diagnostic categories of dental fear in a population of self-referred dental fear patients, since diagnostic criteria specifically related to dental fear have not been validated. DSM III-R diagnostic criteria for phobias were used to compare with four existing dental fear diagnostic categories, referred to as the Seattle system. Subjects were 208 persons with dental fear who were telephone interviewed, of whom a subsample of 155 responded to a mailed Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a modified FSS-II Geer Fear Scale (GFS). Personal interviews and a Dental Beliefs Scale of perceived trust and social interaction with dentists were also used to evaluate a subsample of 80 patients selected by sex and high dental fear. Results showed that the majority of the 80 patients (66%), suffered from social embarrassment about their dental fear problem and their inability to do something about it. The largest cause of their fear (84%) was reported to be traumatic dental experiences, especially in childhood (70%). A minority of patients (16%) could not isolate traumatic experiences and had a history of general fearfulness or anxiety. Analysis of GFS data for the 155 subjects showed that fear of snakes and injuries were highest among women; heights and injections among men. Fear of blood was rarely reported. Spearman correlations between GFS individual items and DAS scores indicated functional independence between dental fear and common fears such as blood, injections and enclosures in most cases. Only in specific types of dental fear did these results support Rachman and Lopatka's contention that fears are thought to summate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  14. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  15. Dental PACS development in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung

    2008-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is an image information technology system for the transmission and storage of medical images. In Korea the first full PACS was installed at Samsung Medical Center in 1994, but, the rate of distribution was very slow. The government's approval for the medical insurance reimbursement for full PACS examinations in November 1999 became the turning point. Thereafter the number of hospitals with full PACS has steeply increased. In September of this year, PACS was installed at 906 medical institutes, including most of university hospitals and general hospitals. The first full dental PACS was installed at Wonkwang University Dental Hospital in 2002. Now ten out of eleven university dental hospitals implemented full dental PACS. The current status and technological factors of dental PACS in Korean university dental hospitals and the future perspectives of dental PACS are described.

  16. Predicting children's behaviour during dental treatment under oral sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço-Matharu, L; Papineni McIntosh, A; Lo, J W

    2016-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess whether parents' own anxiety and their perception of their child's dental fear and child's general fear can predict preoperatively their child's behaviour during dental treatment under oral sedation. The secondary aim was to assess whether the child's age, gender and ASA classification grade are associated with a child's behaviour under oral sedation. Cross-sectional prospective study. The Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), Children's Fear Survey Schedule Dental-Subscale (CFSS-DS) and Children's Fear Survey Schedule Short-Form (CFSS-SF) questionnaires were completed by parents of children undergoing dental treatment with oral midazolam. Behaviour was rated by a single clinician using the overall behaviour section of the Houpt-Scale and scores dichotomised into acceptable or unacceptable behaviour. Data were analysed using χ (2), t test and logistic regression analysis. In total 404 children (215 girls, 53 %) were included, with the mean age of 4.57 years, SD = 1.9. Behaviour was scored as acceptable in 336 (83 %) and unacceptable in 68 (17 %) children. The level of a child's dental fear, as perceived by their parent, was significantly associated with the behaviour outcome (p = 0.001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that if the parentally perceived child's dental fear (CFSS-DS) rating was high, the odds of the child exhibiting unacceptable behaviour under oral sedation was two times greater than if their parents scored them a low dental fear rating (OR 2.27, 95 % CI 1.33-3.88, p = 0.003). CFSS-DS may be used preoperatively to help predict behaviour outcome when children are treated under oral sedation and facilitate treatment planning.

  17. Dental Hygiene Students' Perceptions of Themselves and Their Professional Role in Regard to Feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christine M.

    Dental hygiene students' perceptions of themselves and the "typical dental hygienist" were assessed in relation to feminist attitudes at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Dempewolff's (1972) 56-item Feminism II Scale was administered to all first-year, second-year, and…

  18. Dental Hygiene Student Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynda J.; Fellows, Avis L.

    1981-01-01

    A study to determine differences between graduating and withdrawing students in the University of Minnesota Dental Hygiene program is discussed. The identification of differences may prove useful in the selection process for future classes through identification of students likely to complete their education. (MLW)

  19. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  1. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  2. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more impressions made of your mouth and remaining teeth. These impressions are used to make the crown — your realistic-looking artificial tooth. The crown can't be placed until your jawbone is strong ... and your dental specialist can choose artificial teeth that are either ...

  3. Mouth and dental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, C.; van der Waal, I.; Jackson, S.H.D.; Jansen, P.A.F.; Mangoni, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: • Introduction • Periodontal disease • Dental caries • Odontogenic infections • Alveolar osteitis • Xerostomia and hyposalivation • Candidiasis • Angular cheilitis • Denture stomatitis • Burning mouth syndrome • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis • Recurrent

  4. Dental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Resource Center Burmese (myanma bhasa) Expand Section Betel Nut - English PDF Betel Nut - myanma bhasa (Burmese) PDF Orange County North ... California Dental Association Karen (S’gaw Karen) Expand Section Betel Nut - English PDF Betel Nut - S’gaw Karen (Karen) ...

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Croatian Language Version of the Dental Environment Stress Questionnaire on Dental Medicine Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laktić, Martina; Kuftinec, Krešimir; Čelebić, Asja; Kovačić, Ines; Alhajj, Mohamed Nasser; Kiršić, Sanja Peršić

    2017-09-01

    To develop the Croatian version of the 41-item Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES) for stress assessment of dental students in both, preclinical and clinical years of study and to test its psychometric properties in Croatian dental student population. The English version of the 41-Item DES questionnaire was first translated into the Croatian language. Subsequently, it was set on the google drive and filled out by a total of 202 students from the School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb and 30 additional students from other Faculties. Students also assessed their overall level of stress on the Likert scale (1=no stress, 5=highest level of stress). Internal consistency was tested on 202 dental students; test-retest reliability on 30 dental students who filled out the same questionnaire twice; convergent validity on 202 dental students; and divergent validity on 202 dental students and 30 students from faculties not belonging to the biomedicine group. Internal consistency showed high Cronbach alpha coefficient (0.9) and test-retest reliability showed no significant difference (P>0.05) within the period of 14 days when stress level had not changed (vacation). Convergent validity was confirmed by the significant association between the DES summary scores and the self- perceived level of stress (Spearman's rho=0.881; P <0.001). Divergent validity was confirmed by significantly lower DES summary scores in students not belonging to the Biomedicine group (t=7.5, P<0.001). Excellent psychometric properties of the Croatian version of the DES questionnaire enable its utilization for assessment of stress level in Croatian dental students.

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Croatian Language Version of the Dental Environment Stress Questionnaire on Dental Medicine Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Laktić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop the Croatian version of the 41-item Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES for stress assessment of dental students in both, preclinical and clinical years of study and to test its psychometric properties in Croatian dental student population. Materials and Methods: The English version of the 41-Item DES questionnaire was first translated into the Croatian language. Subsequently, it was set on the google drive and filled out by a total of 202 students from the School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb and 30 additional students from other Faculties. Students also assessed their overall level of stress on the Likert scale (1=no stress, 5=highest level of stress. Internal consistency was tested on 202 dental students; test-retest reliability on 30 dental students who filled out the same questionnaire twice; convergent validity on 202 dental students; and divergent validity on 202 dental students and 30 students from faculties not belonging to the biomedicine group. Results: Internal consistency showed high Cronbach alpha coefficient (0.9 and test-retest reliability showed no significant difference (P>0.05 within the period of 14 days when stress level had not changed (vacation. Convergent validity was confirmed by the significant association between the DES summary scores and the self- perceived level of stress (Spearman’s rho=0.881; P<0.001. Divergent validity was confirmed by significantly lower DES summary scores in students not belonging to the Biomedicine group (t=7.5, P<0.001. Conclusion: Excellent psychometric properties of the Croatian version of the DES questionnaire enable its utilization for assessment of stress level in Croatian dental students.

  7. Exploring Dental Providers' Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N; Ye, Zhan; Acharya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR.

  8. Radiographic Assessment of Dental Maturation in Children With Dental Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Aida Carolina; Pozo, Rodrigo Del; de Cedres, Lucila Blanco

    Dental agenesis is the most common developmental anomaly in humans, frequently associated with disorders in dental development and maturation. The purpose of this study is to determine radiographic variations in dental maturation in a group of Venezuelan children with dental agenesis. 1,188 panoramic radiographs, from healthy patients ages 5 to 12 years old were studied for agenesis of permanent teeth. Dental maturation was assessed by relative eruption and dental age according to Nolla, comparing children affected with dental agenesis to a stratified control group selected from the same population, excluding children with premature loss of primary teeth in the left quadrants and unclear radiographs. Descriptive analysis, and differences between means and medians (Student t test, Kruskall-Wallis p=0.05) were performed. Medians for Nolla stages were similar between groups, with delay in tooth formation in the agenesis group for second molars (p<0.05) and maxillary lateral incisors and second premolars. Dental age was significantly underestimated for both groups, -0.89 (±0.78) for the control group and -1.20 (±0.95) for the study group. Tooth eruption was similar between groups. Dental age was significantly delayed in Venezuelan children with dental agenesis, with variable significance for tooth formation of studied teeth.

  9. Public attitude towards dentists and dental services in Bangalore city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagashree Savanur Ravindranath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding public attitude towards dentists and dental services helps both dental service providers and planners. Hence, this study was conducted to assess public attitude toward dentists and dental services in Bangalore city, India. Methods: Two thousand residents of Bangalore city were selected through multistage cluster sampling method. A structured questionnaire containing statements pertaining to public attitude toward dentists and dental services in Bangalore city was administered to the subjects. Five point Likert scale was used to measure the attitude. Results: About 67.8% of the study subjects had visited a dentist in their lifetime. Negative attitudes were observed regarding waiting time, cleanliness of instruments and dentist advising patients to give up unhealthy practices such as smoking, drinking and pan chewing. Positive attitude was found regarding availability of dental services near place of residence or work, modern equipments being used for treatment and the nobleness of the dental professionals. About 67% of study subjects felt that dental services are expensive. Only 65% agree that regular check-ups prevent dental diseases and 33% of the study subjects agree that dental treatment can be delayed if there are other expenses. Conclusions: Subjects generally had positive attitude toward dentists and dental services. Certain factors like waiting time and cleanliness elicited negative response.

  10. Predictors of Job Satisfaction in Dental Professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhic, Edin; Plancak, Darije; Lajnert, Vlatka; Muhic, Asja

    2016-09-01

    Working in a healthy work environment is the ultimate goal of every employee. Dentistry is a stressful career, and the reasons for dissatisfaction are numerous. The aim of this study was to determine the factors of work satisfaction in dental professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation. A total of 134 dental professionals selected randomly from the Registry of Dental Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation were included in the study. All of them filled out the Demographic Questionnaire and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). An increase in the influence of work on the quality of life as well as an increase in its frequency results in leaving the job and significantly reducing the overall job satisfaction. General dental practitioners are significantly more satisfied as compared with specialists. Significant predictors of the job satisfaction are employment status, type of the practice, and availability of dental assistants. General dental practitioners with a dental assistant employed at a private practice are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. Employment status, practice type and availability of dental assistants are significant predictors of job satisfaction. General dental practitioners working in a private practice with a dental assistant are most likely to be satisfied.

  11. Predictors of Job Satisfaction in Dental Professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Lajnert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Working in a healthy work environment is the ultimate goal of every employee. Dentistry is a stressful career, and the reasons for dissatisfaction are numerous. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the factors of work satisfaction in dental professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation. Materials and methods: A total of 134 dental professionals selected randomly from the Registry of Dental Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation were included in the study. All of them filled out the Demographic Questionnaire and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS. Results: An increase in the influence of work on the quality of life as well as an increase in its frequency results in leaving the job and significantly reducing the overall job satisfaction. General dental practitioners are significantly more satisfied as compared with specialists. Significant predictors of the job satisfaction are employment status, type of the practice, and availability of dental assistants. General dental practitioners with a dental assistant employed at a private practice are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. Conclusions: Employment status, practice type and availability of dental assistants are significant predictors of job satisfaction. General dental practitioners working in a private practice with a dental assistant are most likely to be satisfied.

  12. Needs assessment for emerging oral microbiome knowledge in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R Constance; Shockey, Alcinda Trickett

    The curricula of dental hygiene education reflect the knowledge gained through research and clinical advances. Emerging knowledge is often complex and tentative. The purpose of this study is to assess dental hygiene students' confidence in their knowledge about the oral microbiome and to conduct a knowledge needs assessment for expanding their exposure to emerging knowledge about the oral microbiome. Sixty dental hygiene students were surveyed, using a Likert-type scale about their confidence and about current and emerging bacteriological research. The majority of students (60%) reported being confident in their knowledge. The mean score for the ten items was 35.2% (standard deviation, 20.6%). The results of this study indicate a need for emphasis on emerging oral microbiome research in dental hygiene education. This is important so that dental hygiene students can properly share information with their patients about advances in dental care.

  13. Comparing personality traits of male and female dental students: a study of two freshman classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershen, J A; McCreary, C P

    1977-10-01

    The marked increase in women enrolled in dental school warrants a reassessment of dental student personality profiles. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to compare personality profiles of two first-year dental classes, (2) to compare male and female dental student profiles to their respective norm populations, and (3) to compare male and female dental student personality traits with each other. The Comrey Personality Scales were administered to two first-year dental classes at the University of California at Los Angeles. Between sex and within sex comparisons were made over ten inventory scales. Results indicated that the collective personality profiles of male and female dental students were markedly similar to each other for both classes. These results do not reflect the differences encountered between the sexes in the norm population. It was also noted that the "average" male dental student differed from the male norms on Orderliness versus Lack of Compulsion, Social Conformity versus Rebelliousness, and Emotional Stability versus Neuroticism. In addition, "average" female dental student differed from the female norms on Masculinity versus Femininity.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a... dental cavity or a broken tooth. (b) Classification. Class I. ...

  16. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Home › Medicaid › Benefits › Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Related Resources Learn How to Report the ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  17. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  18. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  19. High fear of intra-oral injections: prevalence and relationship to dental fear and dental avoidance among 10- to 16-yr-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Karin G; Agdal, Maren L; Vika, Margrethe; Skeie, Marit S

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to: (i) estimate the prevalence of self-reported high fear of intra-oral injections, high blood-injury fear, and injection fear; (ii) explore the overlap between high fear of intra-oral injections and high fear of dental treatment; and (iii) evaluate the possible consequence of high fear of intra-oral injections in terms of avoidance of dental care. The sample included 1,441 subjects, 10- to 16-yr of age, attending elementary schools in a county of Norway. Data were collected using questionnaires that were completed in classrooms. The survey instruments used were the Intra-Oral Injection Fear-scale, the Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale, the Injection Phobia scale for children, and the Mutilation Questionnaire for children. In total, 13.9% of the children reported high intra-oral injection fear. A strong association was found between fear of intra-oral injections and dental fear. When an intra-oral injection was needed, 10.6% would avoid dental treatment. In multiple regression analysis, high intra-oral injection fear was found to be associated with avoidance of dental treatment (OR = 6.52; 95% CI: 3.99-10.67). It was concluded that high fear of intra-oral injections was prevalent and might lead to avoidance of necessary dental treatment. Hence, intra-oral injection fear should be addressed before treatment of dental fear. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  20. Advancing education in dental hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battrell, Ann; Lynch, Ann; Steinbach, Pam; Bessner, Sue; Snyder, Josh; Majeski, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The changing health care environment and societal imperatives indicate the need for transformative change within the dental hygiene profession to serve the emerging needs of the public. The American Dental Hygienists' Association is leading the way toward meaningful change. The American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) has as its vision the integration of dental hygienists into the health care delivery system as essential primary care providers to expand access to oral health care. This article provides data on current dental hygiene education programs and those in development. Also included is a discussion regarding how the dental hygiene profession can better serve the health and wellness needs of society by transforming the way graduates are prepared for the future. ADHA's dental hygiene survey center data, policies and a futuristic analysis plus a review of the professional literature describe the current state of dental hygiene education and the profession. A discussion of societal, health care and educational trends that creates the imperative for transformation of the dental hygiene profession is provided. Ultimately, the purpose of advancing education in dental hygiene is to achieve better oral and overall health for more people. The profession's responsibility to the public includes evaluating its own ability to provide care and taking the steps necessary to ensure its maximum effectiveness. ADHA is leading this process for dental hygienists in diverse ways. It is imperative that the dental hygiene profession understands and embraces the changing health care environment. Through open dialog and the sharing of evidence the professional path will be determined along with forward movement for the benefit of society and the dental hygiene profession. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Measuring the efficiency of dental departments in medical centers: a nonparametric analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su-Chen; Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shun-Te; Hong, Yu-Jue

    2002-12-01

    Data envelopment analysis (DEA), a cross-sectional study design based on secondary data analysis, was used to evaluate the relative operational efficiency of 16 dental departments in medical centers in Taiwan in 1999. The results indicated that 68.7% of all dental departments in medical centers had poor performance in terms of overall efficiency and scale efficiency. All relatively efficient dental departments were in private medical centers. Half of these dental departments were unable to fully utilize available medical resources. 75.0% of public medical centers did not take full advantage of medical resources at their disposal. In the returns to scale, 56.3% of dental departments in medical centers exhibited increasing returns to scale, due to the insufficient scale influencing overall hospital operational efficiency. Public medical centers accounted for 77.8% of the institutions affected. The scale of dental departments in private medical centers was more appropriate than those in public medical centers. In the sensitivity analysis, the numbers of residents, interns, and published papers were used to assess teaching and research. Greater emphasis on teaching and research in medical centers has a large effect on the relative inefficiency of hospital operation. Dental departments in private medical centers had a higher mean overall efficiency score than those in public medical centers, and the overall efficiency of dental departments in non-university hospitals was greater than those in university hospitals. There was no information to evaluate the long-term efficiency of each dental department in all hospitals. A different combination of input and output variables, using common multipliers for efficiency value measurements in DEA, may help establish different pioneering dental departments in hospitals.

  2. The social gradient in oral health: Is there a role for dental anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, Eduardo; Humphris, Gerry; Freeman, Ruth

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the contribution of dental anxiety to social gradients in different oral health outcomes and whether social gradients in oral health persist once dental anxiety is removed from the population examined. Data from 9035 British adults were analysed. Participants' socioeconomic position (SEP) was measured through education and household income. Dental anxiety was measured with the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale. Poor subjective oral health, oral impacts on quality of life and edentulism among all adults and the number of teeth, the number of decayed, missing and filled surfaces (DMFS) and sextants with pocketing among dentate adults were the oral health outcomes. The contribution of dental anxiety to absolute and relative social inequalities in each oral health outcome (measured with the Slope and Relative Index of Inequality [SII and RII], respectively) was estimated from regression models without and with adjustment for dental anxiety and quantified with the percentage attenuation. Interactions between each SEP indicator and dental anxiety were used to test what would happen if dental anxiety were removed from the whole population. The largest contribution of dental anxiety to explaining oral health inequalities was found for education gradients in perceived outcomes (11%-13%), but dental anxiety explained social gradients in edentulism. Among dentate adults, dental anxiety accounted for anxiety-free adults but were significant at higher levels of dental anxiety. Little support was found for the role of dental anxiety in explaining social inequalities in various perceived and clinical oral health measures. Oral health inequalities were found among both nondentally anxious and anxious participants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Minimal intervention dentistry for early childhood caries and child dental anxiety: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, P; Klobas, E

    2017-06-01

    To compare changes in child dental anxiety after treatment for early childhood caries (ECC) using two treatment approaches. Children with ECC were randomized to test (atraumatic restorative treatment (ART)-based approach) or control (standard care approach) groups. Children aged 3 years or older completed a dental anxiety scale at baseline and follow up. Changes in child dental anxiety from baseline to follow up were tested using the chi-squared statistic, Wilcoxon rank sum test, McNemar's test and multinomial logistic regression. Two hundred and fifty-four children were randomized (N = 127 test, N = 127 control). At baseline, 193 children completed the dental anxiety scale, 211 at follow up and 170 completed the scale on both occasions. Children who were anxious at baseline (11%) were no longer anxious at follow up, and 11% non-anxious children became anxious. Multinomial logistic regression found each increment in the number of visits increased the odds of worsening dental anxiety (odds ratio (OR), 2.2; P < 0.05), whereas each increment in the number of treatments lowered the odds of worsening anxiety (OR, 0.50; P = 0.05). The ART-based approach to managing ECC resulted in similar levels of dental anxiety to the standard treatment approach and provides a valuable alternative approach to the management of ECC in a primary dental care setting. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appukuttan DP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deva Priya Appukuttan Department of Periodontics, Sri Ramakrishna Mission Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, India Abstract: Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The initial interaction between the dentist and the patient can reveal the presence of anxiety, fear, and phobia. In such situations, subjective evaluation by interviews and self-reporting on fear and anxiety scales and objective assessment of blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, finger temperature, and galvanic skin response can greatly enhance the diagnosis and enable categorization of these individuals as mildly, moderately, or highly anxious or dental phobics. Broadly, dental anxiety can be managed by psychotherapeutic interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of both, depending on the level of dental anxiety, patient characteristics, and clinical situations. Psychotherapeutic interventions are either behaviorally or cognitively oriented. Pharmacologically, these patients can be managed using either sedation or general anesthesia. Behavior-modification therapies aim to change unacceptable behaviors through learning, and involve muscle relaxation and relaxation breathing, along with guided imagery and physiological monitoring using biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, distraction, positive reinforcement, stop-signaling, and exposure-based treatments, such as systematic desensitization, “tell-show-do”, and modeling. Cognitive strategies aim to alter and restructure the content of negative cognitions and enhance control over the negative thoughts. Cognitive behavior therapy is a combination of behavior therapy and cognitive therapy

  5. Udbredelse og opfattelse af angst for tandbehandling blandt voksne danskere.[Prevalence and perceptions of dental anxiety among Danish adults.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Birn, H.; Brødsgaard, I.

    1993-01-01

    anxiety by the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) indicated significant associations between high dental anxiety and gender (women) (Table 2) and low education (Table 3), but not income or age (Table 2). Other significant relationships with high dental fear were fear of specific dental procedures, negative......English summary: This telephone survey showed that 4.2% of Danish adults over 16 years old have extreme dental anxiety and 6% have moderate fear in a sample of 565 adults from Århus (Table 1). Common perceptions as to the causes of dental fear indicated that most believed it to be due to pain......, especially from drilling and thereafter trauma or negative experiences leading to distrust of the dentist (Table 1). It was interesting to note that although up to 40% of the sample expressed some degree of fear for dentistry, 81.1% said that they know of at least two persons who have dental fear (16.2% know...

  6. Diabetes, Gum Disease, and Other Dental Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too ... What if my mouth is sore after my dental work? A sore mouth is common after dental ...

  7. Teething & Dental Hygiene for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health & Hygiene for Young Children Page Content Article ... and lead to future dental problems. Teaching Good Dental Habits The best way to protect your child's ...

  8. Milestones of dental history

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Mahant; S Vineet Agrawal; Sonali Kapoor; Isha Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Since ages, human beings suffer from the dental problems. With the journey as time elapsed the person treating the teeth changed (i.e., from barbers and monks to present dentists), equipment changed (i.e., from bow drills to airotor and laser handpieces), materials changed (i.e., from ground mastic alum/honey to tooth colored composite and ceramics). There has been drastic change in treatment planning from extraction to the conservation of teeth and from manual restoration to computerized res...

  9. Ergonomics in dental pratice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Quaresemin de Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of ergonomics is critical so that you can get a suitable working environment for professional, it is safe, healthy and comfortable. The objective was to identify whether the dental students followed the principles of ergonomics during clinical visits, evaluating, through photographs, compliance with ergonomic principles applied in dental practice, and finally identify the most affected sites by RSI / WMSDs of students enrolled in the dental clinic of the Faculdade IMED. Snapshots were made and only considered the position of the student operator, the same taken by the researcher using the mobile device. For each clinical procedure were taken two photographs in hidden angles to the student operator so that it did not change its ergonomic position to be observed. After obtaining the photos, they were evaluated and classified in scores from 0 to 3 according to the adequacy of the work placement, and then inserted into Excel and later in a database (SPSS 15.0. The following work is a cross-sectional, observational study, they were conducted in dental clinics IMED college. Among the 66 respondents, 14 were male and 52 female. It was found that 57 (86,3% reported feeling pain somewhere in the body, being the most affected sites neck (36.4%, and consecutively lower back (30.3% and higher than the back (27.3%. The results of the 63 procedures performed by the photographic shots were classified as “inadequate” in 49 procedures, “partially adequate” in 12 and “impossible to evaluate” in 2 procedures. The research results have shown a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and do not follow the ergonomic principles, emphasizing the need for more attention to ergonomics of the students.

  10. Ethical checklist for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchuse, D J; Rinchuse, D J; Deluzio, C

    1995-01-01

    A checklist for verification of unethical business practices, originally formulated by Drs. Blanchard and Peale, is adapted to dental practice. A scenario is used as a model to demonstrate the applicability of this instrument to dental practice. The instrument asks three questions in regards to an ethical dilemma: 1) Is it legal? 2) Is it fair? 3) How does it make you feel? The paper concludes the giving of gifts to general dentists by dental specialists for the referral of patients is unethical.

  11. Federally qualified health center dental clinics: financial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Howard L; Devitto, Judy; Myne-Joslin, Ronnie; Beazoglou, Tryfon; McGowan, Taegan

    2013-01-01

    Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) dental clinics are a major component of the dental safety net system, providing care to 3.75 million patients annually. This study describes the financial and clinical operations of a sample of FQHCs. In cooperation with the National Network for Oral Health Access, FQHC dental clinics that could provide 12 months of electronic dental record information were asked to participate in the study. Based on data from 28 dental clinics (14 FQHCs), 50 percent of patients were under 21 years of age. The primary payers were Medicaid (72.4 percent) and sliding-scale/self-pay patients (17.5 percent). Sites averaged 3.1 operatories, 0.66 dental hygienists, and 1.9 other staff per dentist. Annually, each FTE dentist and hygienist provided 2,801 and 2,073 patient visits, respectively. Eighty percent of services were diagnostic, preventive, and restorative. Patient care accounted for 82 percent of revenues, and personnel (64.2 percent) and central administration (13.4 percent) accounted for most expenses. Based on a small convenience sample of FQHC dental clinics, this study presents descriptive data on their clinical and financial operations. Compared with data from the UDS (Uniform Data System) report, study FQHCs were larger in terms of space, staff, and patients served. However, there was substantial variation among clinics for almost all measures. As the number and size of FQHC dental clinics increase, the Health Resources and Services Administration needs to provide them access to comparative data that they can use to benchmark their operations. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  12. Assessment of empathy among clinical dental students in a teaching dental institution in Telangana State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Siva Kalyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The understanding of patient's view is considered as an important component in doctor–patient relationship. The health-care provider with an empathetic understanding may perceive patient's need as more reasonable and thus therapeutic. Aim: To assess empathy among clinical dental students in a teaching dental institution. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among clinical dental students during the period between June 2016 and July 2016 in a teaching dental institution in Khammam town. Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Care Provider Student version was used to assess empathy among the students in this study. Gender differences were analyzed using t-test, and one-way ANOVA was used for comparison of empathy scores across year of study. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 364 students participated in the study with a mean age of 22.76 ± 2.4 years. Males exhibited more empathy (86.54 ± 7 compared to females. The mean empathy level was found to be highest for the postgraduates (85.92 ± 6.5 followed by 3rd year students (P = 0.0943. Conclusion: There is a need to train these students not only from technical point of view but also in “life skills” such as communication, interpersonal relationship and empathy.

  13. Dental Students', Alumni, and Dentists' Perspectives on Leadership: Impact of the Scholars Program in Dental Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemchick, Audrey L; Delgado, Jessica; Taichman, Russell S; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, the Scholars Program in Dental Leadership (SPDL) was created at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry with the aim of preparing dental students to take on leadership roles in their profession and communities. The aims of this quantitative study were to investigate how SPDL alumni and current participants evaluated this program; to assess whether SPDL alumni evaluated their leadership-related educational experiences, leadership perceptions, and attitudes towards leadership activities in dentistry more positively than did non-SPDL dental students and general dentists; and to explore if leadership-related educational/clinical experiences were correlated with these constructs. Participants were 218 of 431 dental students across all four years (response rate 51%), 32 of whom were participants in the SPDL; 32 of 53 SPDL alumni (response rate 60%); and 595 of 3,000 general dentists invited to participate (response rate 20%). Both current and past SPDL participants evaluated the program on average positively (3.75 and 3.92, respectively, on a five-point scale). Non-SPDL students and alumni evaluated leadership-related educational experiences more positively than did the dentists (3.65/3.61 vs. 2.49; pleadership differed as well. Students and alumni evaluated being recognized (4.40/4.60 vs. 4.20; ppractice efficiency (4.61/4.53 vs. 4.36; pleadership-related constructs. These results showed that the SPDL positively affected alumni perceptions of leadership indicators and attitudes.

  14. The efficacy of video monitoring-supported student self-evaluation of dental explorer skills in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tano, R; Takaku, S; Ozaki, T

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether having dental hygiene students monitor video recordings of their dental explorer skills is an effective means of proper self-evaluation in dental hygiene education. The study participants comprised students of a dental hygiene training school who had completed a module on explorer skills using models, and a dental hygiene instructor who was in charge of lessons. Questions regarding 'posture', 'grip', 'finger rest' and 'operation' were set to evaluate explorer skills. Participants rated each item on a two-point scale: 'competent (1)' or 'not competent (0)'. The total score was calculated for each evaluation item in evaluations by students with and without video monitoring, and in evaluations by the instructor with video monitoring. Mean scores for students with and without video monitoring were compared using a t-test, while intraclass correlation coefficients were found by reliability analysis of student and instructor evaluations. A total of 37 students and one instructor were subject to analysis. The mean score for evaluations with and without video monitoring differed significantly for posture (P Dental Hygiene Published by John Wiley& Sons Ltd.

  15. Influence of skin cold sensation threshold in the occurrence of dental sensitivity during dental bleaching: a placebo controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Vanessa; Gallinari, Marjorie de Oliveira; Barbosa, Juliana Stuginski; Martins-Junior, Reynaldo Leite; Santos, Paulo Henrique Dos; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2018-01-18

    This study verified the occurrence of dental sensitivity in patients submitted to a 35% hydrogen peroxide based product (Whiteness HP Maxx 35% - FGM), skin cold sensation threshold (SCST) and its influence on dental sensitivity. Sixty volunteers were divided into 4 groups (n = 15), according to SCST (low: GI and GIII, and high: GII and IV) and bleaching treatment (hydrogen peroxide: GI and GII, and placebo: GIII and GIV). SCST was determined in the inner forearm for 6 different times using a neurosensory analyzer, the TSA II (Medoc Advanced Medical Systems, Ramat Yishai, Northern District, Israel). Dental sensitivity measurements were performed 10 different times using a thermal stimulus and an intraoral device attached to TSA II, positioned in the buccal surface of the upper right central incisor. Spontaneous dental sensitivity was also determined using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Data were submitted to Student's t-test and Pearson's Correlation Test (α=0.05). SCST remained the same during bleaching treatment. Distinct responses of dental sensitivity were found in patients with low and high SCST during the first and third bleaching session (p≤0.05). The teeth submitted to the bleaching treatment became more sensitive to cold than those treated with placebo. Moreover, data obtained with TSA and VAS presented moderate correlation. Bleaching treatment increased dental sensitivity and skin cold sensation threshold might represent a determining factor in this occurrence, since low and high SCST patients had different responses to the thermal stimulus in the teeth.

  16. Confronting shibboleths of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-10-01

    Shibboleths are common expressions presented as indisputable truths. When used in educational discussions, they reflect "motherhood and apple pie" viewpoints and tend to bring debate to a halt. Use of shibboleths may precede a desired imposition of "locksteps" in educational programming and are easily perceived as paternalistic by recipients. Nine shibboleths are presented as common beliefs of dental faculty and administrators. Evidence contradicting the veracity of the "obvious truths" is offered. The traditional "splendid isolation" of dentistry contributes to parochialism and belief in false shibboleths. Sound principles of higher and health professions education, student learning, and dental practice apply to dental education as to all health disciplines. Student passivity in dental education is not the best preparation for proficiency in dental practice. The master teacher possesses a repertoire of methodologies specific to meeting defined educational objectives. Active learning experiences bear close resemblances to professional duties and responsibilities and internally motivate future doctors of dental medicine. The difficulty in achieving curricular change leads to curricular entrenchment. Dentistry and dental education should not trade their ethical high ground for the relatively low ethical standards of the business world. Principles of professional ethics should govern relationships between dentists, whether within the dental school workplace or in practice. Suggestions are made on how to confront shibboleths in dental school settings.

  17. Children's experiences of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Annie G; Rodd, Helen D; Porritt, Jenny M; Baker, Sarah R; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Williams, Chris; Marshman, Zoe

    2017-03-01

    Dental anxiety is common among children. Although there is a wealth of research investigating childhood dental anxiety, little consideration has been given to the child's perspective. This qualitative study sought to explore with children their own experiences of dental anxiety using a cognitive behavioural therapy assessment model. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with dentally anxious children aged 11-16 years. The Five Areas model was used to inform the topic guide and analysis. Data were analysed using a framework approach. In total, 13 children were interviewed. Participants described their experiences of dental anxiety across multiple dimensions (situational factors and altered thoughts, feelings, physical symptoms, and behaviours). Participants placed considerable value on communication by dental professionals, with poor communication having a negative influence on dental anxiety and the dentist-patient relationship. This study confirms the Five Areas model as an applicable theoretical model for the assessment of childhood dental anxiety. Children provided insights about their own dental anxiety experiences that have not previously been described. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Medical emergencies in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, M H

    2009-06-01

    Serious medical emergencies are fortunately a rare occurrence in the dental practice environment; however, if an emergency situation is encountered a delay in treatment may result in potentially avoidable consequences. The risk of mortality or serious morbidity can be reduced by ensuring that basic emergency equipment and medications are in place, and that the dental team is appropriately trained in basic life support measures. This article aims to provide an overview of the basic emergency medications and equipment that should be present in dental practices, and to discuss specific responses to some of the more common adverse medical events that can present while providing dental treatment.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal dental pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Most dental pain is caused by an organic problem such as dental caries, periodontitis, pulpitis, or trauma. Diagnosis and treatment of these symptoms are relatively straightforward. However, patients often also complain of abnormal dental pain that has a non-dental origin, whose diagnosis is challenging. Such abnormal dental pain can be categorized on the basis of its cause as referred pain, neuromodulatory pain, and neuropathic pain. When it is difficult to diagnose a patient's dental pain, ...

  20. Mandatory Clinical Practice for Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty should maintain their clinical skills through regular practice, to improve their ability to relate to students through instruction, provide an additional source of income, and improve their image in the community. Institutional policies fostering and regulating faculty practice plans are suggested. (Author/MSE)

  1. Pattern of dental caries in Mulago Dental School clinic, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on dental caries among patients attending Mulago Hospital is scarce. Yet knowledge of the pattern of caries can be used to plan preventive and treatment interventions. This study describes the pattern of dental caries (in terms of age group, tooth and tooth surface and gender) among patients attending the ...

  2. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  3. 24-hour evaluation of dental plaque bacteria and halitosis after consumption of a single placebo or dental treat by dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeusette, Isabelle C; Román, Aurora Mateo; Torre, Celina; Crusafont, Josep; Sánchez, Nuria; Sánchez, Maria C; Pérez-Salcedo, Leire; Herrera, David

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether consumption of a single dental treat with specific mechanical properties and active ingredients would provide a 24-hour effect on dental plaque bacteria and halitosis in dogs. ANIMALS 10 dogs of various breeds from a privately owned colony that had received routine dental scaling and polishing 4 weeks before the study began. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 1 placebo or dental treat first. A 4-week washout period was provided, and then dogs received the opposite treatment. Oral plaque and breath samples were collected before and 0.5, 3, 12, and 24 hours after treat consumption. Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) concentration was measured in breath samples. Total aerobic, total anaerobic, Porphyromonas gulae, Prevotella intermedia-like, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum bacterial counts (measured via bacterial culture) and total live bacterial counts, total live and dead bacterial counts, and bacterial vitality (measured via quantitative real-time PCR assay) were assessed in plaque samples. RESULTS Compared with placebo treat consumption, dental treat consumption resulted in a significant decrease in breath VSCs concentration and all plaque bacterial counts, without an effect on bacterial vitality. Effects of the dental treat versus the placebo treat persisted for 12 hours for several bacterial counts and for 24 hours for breath VSCs concentration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Although clinical benefits should be investigated in larger scale, longer-term studies, results of this study suggested that feeding the evaluated dental treat may help to decrease oral bacterial growth in dogs for 12 hours and oral malodor for 24 hours. A feeding interval of 12 hours is therefore recommended.

  4. Influence of Mothers’ Dental Anxiety and Perception of Child’s OHRQoL Towards Utilization of Dental Services − A Questionnaire Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruthika Murali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries is one of the most common oral health problems in childhood. As a child depends entirely on the parents, its dental visit could be influenced by various psychosocial factors such as parental perceptions of the child’s oral health and maternal anxiety. Aim: To assess the influence of children’s clinical condition, mothers’ dental anxiety and their use of dental services, maternal perception of child’s oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL on the child’s utilization of dental services. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 600 mothers of children between 2 and 5 years of age. The questionnaire included the background characteristics, mothers and child’s dental visit, mothers’ dental anxiety using Corah’s Dental Anxiety Scale and maternal perceptions of the child’s OHRQoL using Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale. Clinical examination for assessing the dental caries among the children was performed. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17.1 software. Results: Using the final model of Poisson regression analysis with robust variance and forward stepwise procedure, it was found that the age of mother, the age of child, the income of the family, poor OHRQoL, the presence of caries and pain in child significantly influenced the visit of the child to dentist (P ≤ 0.05. No statistically significant association was found between the anxiety of mother and the child’s visit. Conclusion: Lack of maternal knowledge, low socio-economic reasons and maternal perception of child’s oral health could be the important reasons for a child’s less number of dental visits.

  5. Effect of aromatherapy on dental patient anxiety: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental anxiety is a common and potentially distressing problem, both for the patients and for dental practitioners. It is considered to be the main barrier and affects the working lives of dental professional potentially compromising their performance. Aim: To know the effect of aromatherapy in the reduction of dental anxiety and to compare the anxiety levels of dental patients with the control group. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial design was used. Of 40 dental clinics in Khammam town, 10 dental clinics were selected by simple random sampling method. A total of 100 patients attending the dental clinic for the first time were included in the study. Ambient odor of lavender was maintained with a candle warmer. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, smoking status, Modified dental anxiety scale (Humphries et al. in 1995, was given to the patients when they were waiting in the waiting room. Student's t-test and ANOVA test were used for data analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Considerable decrease in anxiety scores in 3 age groups was observed. A statistically significant (P = 0.002 decrease with age in mean anxiety score. A significant difference in anxiety scores of lavender group, a significant decrease of anxiety scores with an increase of age. Conclusion: Lavender decreased the current anxiety scores of patients effectively.

  6. Changes in personality among male and female dental graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, C P; Gershen, J A

    1982-05-01

    This study examines changes in personality traits in male and female dental students and recent graduates. The Comrey Personality Scales were administered to two freshman classes, and the test was readministered two months after graduation for one class and twenty-six months after graduation for the other class. Sex. class, and test/retest scores were analyzed using a three-way analysis of variance with repeated measures for each scale. Significant test/retest differences consisted of increases on the Orderliness versus Lack of Compulsion Scale and Conformity versus Rebelliousness Scale and a decrease on the Activity versus Lack of Energy Scale. There were significant sex differences on the Activity versus Lack of Energy, Emotional Stability versus Neuroticism, and Masculinity versus Femininity Scales; a decrease on the Empathy versus Egocentrism Scale occurred among females in one of the classes. Dental students became increasingly more orderly and identified with established social values; they also became less competitive and less driven to excel. The dental school experience may partially explain these changes; however, other conditions, such as maturation and societal influences, may have been involved.

  7. Characteristics of dental fear among Arabic-speaking children: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Housseiny, Azza A; Alamoudi, Najlaa M; Farsi, Najat M; El Derwi, Douaa A

    2014-09-22

    Dental fear has not only been linked to poor dental health in children but also persists across the lifespan, if unaddressed, and can continue to affect oral, systemic, and psychological health. The aim of this study was to assess the factor structure of the Arabic version of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), and to assess the difference in factor structure between boys and girls. Participants were 220 consecutive paediatric dental patients 6-12 years old seeking dental care at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. Participants completed the 15-item Arabic version of the CFSS-DS questionnaire at the end of the visit. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Factor analysis (principal components, varimax rotation) was employed to assess the factor structure of the scale. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.86. Four factors with eigenvalues above 1.00 were identified, which collectively explained 64.45% of the variance. These factors were as follows: Factor 1, 'fear of usual dental procedures' consisted of 8 items such as 'drilling' and 'having to open the mouth', Factor 2, 'fear of health care personnel and injections' consisted of three items, Factor 3, 'fear of strangers', consisted of 2 items. Factor 4, 'fear of general medical aspects of treatment', consisted of 2 items. Notably, four factors of dental fear were found in girls, while five were found in boys. Four factors of different strength pertaining to dental fear were identified in Arabic-speaking children, indicating a simple structure. Most items loaded high on the factor related to fear of usual dental procedures. The fear-provoking aspects of dental procedures differed in boys and girls. Use of the scale may enable dentists to determine the item/s of dental treatment that a given child finds most fear-provoking and guide the child's behaviour accordingly.

  8. Exploring Dental Providers’ Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N.; Ye, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. Objective The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. Methods A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Results Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). Conclusions On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR. PMID:27437058

  9. Basic emotions evoked by eugenol odor differ according to the dental experience. A neurovegetative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, O; Alaoui-Ismaïli, O; Dittmar, A; Vernet-Maury, E

    1999-06-01

    Subjective individual experiences seem to indicate that odors may form strong connections with memories, especially those charged with emotional significance. In the dental field, this could be the case with the odorant eugenol, responsible for the typical clinging odor impregnating the dental office. The odor of eugenol could evoke memories of unpleasant dental experiences and, therefore, negative feelings such as anxiety and fear, since eugenates (cements containing eugenol) are used in potentially painful restorative dentistry. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating the emotional impact of the odor of eugenol through autonomic nervous system (ANS) analysis. The simultaneous variations of six ANS parameters (two electrodermal, two thermovascular and two cardiorespiratory), induced by the inhalation of this odorant, were recorded on volunteer subjects. Vanillin (a pleasant odorant) and propionic acid (an unpleasant one) served as controls. After the experiment, subjects were asked to rate the pleasantness versus unpleasantness of each odorant on an 11-point hedonic scale. The patterns of autonomic responses, obtained for each odorant and each subject, were transcribed into one of the six basic emotions defined by Ekman et al. (happiness, surprise, sadness, fear, anger and disgust). Results were compared between two groups of subjects divided according to their dental experience (fearful and non-fearful dental care subjects) and showed significant differences only for eugenol. This odorant was rated as pleasant by non-fearful dental subjects but unpleasant by fearful dental subjects. The evoked autonomic responses were mainly associated with positive basic emotions (happiness and surprise) in non-fearful dental subjects and with negative basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust) in fearful dental subjects. These results suggest that eugenol can be responsible for different emotional states depending on the subjects' dental experience, which seems to confirm the

  10. Psychological distress and its correlates among dental students: a survey of 17 Colombian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Mafla, Ana Cristina; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sánchez-Molina, Marisol; Gallego-Gómez, Clara Liliana; Vélez-Jaramillo, Luis Fernando; Tamayo-Cardona, Julián Andrés; Pérez-Cepeda, David; Vergara-Mercado, Martha Ligia; Simancas-Pallares, Miguel Ángel; Polychronopoulou, Argy

    2013-06-26

    Links between the demanding nature of studies in the health sciences, students' personality traits and psychological distress have been well-established. While considerable amount of work has been done in medicine, evidence from the dental education arena is sparse and data from Latin America are lacking. The authors conducted a large-scale investigation of psychological distress among dental students in Colombia and sought to determine its curriculum and student-level correlates. The Spanish version of the Derogatis' Symptoms Checklist Revised (SCL-90-R) was administered to all students officially registered and attending classes or clinics in 17 dental schools in 4 geographic districts of Colombia between January and April 2012. Additional information was collected on participants' socio-demographic information and first career choice, as well as school's characteristics such as class size. The Global Severity Index (GSI) score, a measure of overall psychological distress, served as the primary analytical endpoint. Analyses relied on multilevel mixed-effects linear and log-binomial regression, accounting for study design and sample characteristics. A total of 5700 dental students completed the survey, a response rate of 67%. Pronounced gradients were noted in the association between socio-economic status and psychological distress, with students in higher strata reporting fewer problems. After adjustment for all important covariates, there was an evident pattern of increasing psychological distress corresponding to the transition from the didactic, to the preclinical and clinical phases of training, with few differences between male and female students. Independent of other factors, reliance on own funds for education and having dentistry as the first career choice were associated with lower psychological distress. Levels of psychological distress correlated with students' socio-economic and study-level characteristics. Above and beyond the influence of person

  11. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  12. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  13. Dental technician of the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, W.; Wismeijer, D.; Hanssen, S.; Tahmaseb, A.

    2015-01-01

    The new technologies in the field of dental science have not only changed the way in which dentists run their practice but have also dramatically changed the procedures carried out in dental laboratories. Mechanical engineering, incorporated CMM, laser milling, 3D printing and 3D design in a

  14. New dental applications with LEDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, A.; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  15. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... Oral diseases qualify as a major public health concern owing to their high prevalence and incidence in all regions of the world (1). Dental caries and gingivitis are the two most common dental diseases affecting children worldwide. These two diseases are, to a large extent, the result of the presence of ...

  16. Drawing Links within Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines results of a practical drawing task given to a cohort of first year dental surgery students at Kings College Dental Institute, London. It compares and relates their success in drilling and removing caries and pulp tissue from a virtual tooth using the hapTEL virtual learning system, with each individuals' drawing skills.…

  17. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2018-04-01

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [The impact of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the introduction of dental implants can only be understood when the historical context is clarified. In the past, the main treatment carried out by dentists consisted of filling or, in unfortunate cases, removal of painful teeth. Only since the introduction of dental implants did

  19. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Advanced Dental Students' Use, Knowledge, and Beliefs Regarding Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearston, Jenni A; Shah, Krina; Cheng, Eric; Moosvi, Rizvan; Park, Su Hyun; Patel, Naiya; Spielman, Andrew I; Weitzman, Michael L

    2017-11-01

    Using cigarettes and alternative tobacco products (ATPs) is associated with negative oral health outcomes, and dental health professionals are poised to help patients quit. The aim of this study was to determine dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students' use, knowledge, and beliefs about cigarettes and ATPs, including perceptions about their education in tobacco dependence treatment and counseling experience. All 1,783 students enrolled in the dental, dental hygiene, and postdoctoral dental programs at the New York University College of Dentistry were invited to participate in the survey in 2016. A total of 708 students at least partially completed the survey, for a response rate of 39.7%. In the results, 146 of the students (20.1%) reported ever using cigarettes, while 253 (35.7%) reported ever using any ATP. Regarding tobacco use intervention, the students reported they had not received enough training on ATPs, were neutral about cigarettes, and were somewhat confident and not so confident counseling a cigarette smoker or ATP user, respectively. By their fourth year, 77.8% of the dental students reported they had counseled someone to stop smoking cigarettes, but only 40.7% had counseled someone to stop using ATPs. Overall, all groups of students reported feeling more confident and had received more education on interventions for cigarettes than for ATPs (ptobacco and did not perceive they had received enough training on intervening with patients on use of cigarettes and ATPs. These findings call for a revised tobacco education curriculum for dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students, focused on building knowledge and confidence for promoting tobacco dependence treatment.

  20. Competition and dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, J; Sørensen, R

    2000-07-01

    Dental services for adults are different from all other Norwegian health services in that they are provided by private producers (dentists) who have full freedom to establish a practice. They have had this freedom since the end of World War II. A further liberalization of the market for dental services occurred in November 1995, when the so-called normal tariff was repealed. The system changed from a fixed fee system to a deregulated fee system. In principle, the market for dental services for adults operates as a free competitive market, in which dentists must compete for a market share. The aim of this study was to study the short-term effects of competition. A comprehensive set of data on fees, practice characteristics, treatment profiles and factors that dentists take into account when determining fees was analysed. The main finding was that competition has a weak effect. No support was found for the theory that the level of fees is the result of monopolistic competition or monopoly. The results also provided some evidence against the inducement hypothesis. At this stage, it is interesting to notice that dentists do not seem to exploit the power they have to control the market. One explanation, which is consistent with the more recent literature, is that physicians' behaviour to a large extent is influenced by professional norms and caring concerns about their patients. Financial incentives are important, but these incentives are constrained by norms other than self-interest. The interpretation of the results should also take into account that the deregulation has operated for a short time and that dentists and patients may not yet have adjusted to changes in the characteristics of the market. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  2. The attitudes of dental interns to the use of the rubber dam at Riyadh dental colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bander Mohammed Al-Abdulwahhab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The rubber dam is one of the best tools for tooth isolation and infection control in the dental field. Our aim is to evaluate the attitudes toward the use of rubber dams by dental interns in Riyadh Dental Colleges (RCsDP and determine the barriers to their use. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and used for data collection. 150 questionnaires were distributed by hand to the dental interns of RCsDP over a period of two weeks. Information sought included the attitudes toward and difficulties for the use of the rubber dam, the time needed to apply the rubber dam, and the patients′ allergic history of the rubber dam. Respondents were asked to state their preference on a five point Likert type scale ranging from "strongly dislike" to "strongly like". The information and data of the completed questionnaires were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and Friedman test. Results: Of 150 questionnaires distributed, 150 were completed and returned (response rate = 100%. Of those, 46.7% were males and 53.3% were females. In general; (43.3%, interns strongly liked the use of the rubber dam and the rest (46.7% liked the use of the rubber dam. The majority of respondents liked to use rubber dam in direct restorations more than in indirect restorations and 46.7% strongly liked to use it in posterior teeth for composite restoration. Most dental interns felt that they would strongly like to use a rubber dam for endodontic treatment whether in posterior teeth (73.3% or anterior teeth (68.7%. 66.7% of interns asked their patients if they had an allergy to latex prior to the use of the rubber dam. Child behavior (mean rank about seven is the most important reason for not using rubber dam. The time is taken to apply the rubber dam was less than five minutes in most cases. Conclusion: Most dental interns prefer to use rubber dams in the general dental field and are enthusiastic to use it in future.

  3. Ergonomic design for dental offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, David J; Sanders, Martha J; Turcotte, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the dental office environment influences productivity and workflow for dental clinicians. Advances in technology, and with it the range of products needed to provide services, have led to sprawl in operatory setups and the potential for awkward postures for dental clinicians during the delivery of oral health services. Although ergonomics often addresses the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders for specific populations of workers, concepts of workflow and productivity are integral to improved practice in work environments. This article provides suggestions for improving workflow and productivity for dental clinicians. The article applies ergonomic principles to dental practice issues such as equipment and supply management, office design, and workflow management. Implications for improved ergonomic processes and future research are explored.

  4. The american dental dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth.

  5. Adhesive dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, N.

    2005-01-01

    Two main classes of material are involved, the glass-ionomer cements and the composite resins. This investigation describes the way they are bonded to the tooth and highlights their differences. Glass ionomers develop a zone of interaction with the tooth as they age which ultimately gives an extremely strong bond, and results in excellent retention rates. By contrast, bonding of composite resins is more complicated and possibly less effective, though these materials have better wear resistance and better aesthetics than glass ionomers. Assessment of bond durability is difficult. This is because a dental restorative can fail by a number of mechanisms apart from de bonding: for example, through wear or fracture

  6. General dental practitioner's views on dental general anaesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, A G; King, D; Milsom, K M; Blinkhom, A S; Tickle, M

    2007-06-01

    Policy has recently changed on provision of dental general anaesthetic services in England. The aim of this study was to investigate general dental practitioners' views about dental general anaesthetics, the reduction in its availability and the impact on care of children with toothache. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and clinical case scenarios. General dental practitioners providing NHS services in the North West of England. 93 general dental practitioners were interviewed and 91 answered a clinical case scenario about the care they would provide for a 7-year-old child with multiple decayed teeth presenting with toothache. Scenario responses showed variation; 8% would immediately refer for general anaesthesia, 25% would initially prescribe antibiotics, but the majority would attempt to either restore or extract the tooth causing pain. Interview responses also demonstrated variation in care, however most dentists agree general anaesthesia has a role for nervous children but only refer as a last resort. The responses indicated an increase in inequalities, and that access to services did not match population needs, leaving some children waiting in pain. Most general dental practitioners support moving dental general anaesthesia into hospitals but some believe that it has widened health inequalities and there is also a problem associated with variation in treatment provision. Additional general anaesthetic services in some areas with high levels of tooth decay are needed and evidence based guidelines about caring for children with toothache are required.

  7. Trajectories of dental anxiety in a birth cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, W. M.; Broadbent, J. M.; Locker, D.; Poulton, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine predictors of dental anxiety trajectories in a longitudinal study of New Zealanders. Methods Prospective study of a complete birth cohort born in 1972/73 in Dunedin, New Zealand, with dental anxiety scale (DAS) scores and dental utilization determined at ages 15, 18, 26 and 32 years. Personality traits were assessed at a superfactor and (more fine-grained) subscale level via the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire at age 18 years. Group-based trajectory analysis was used to identify dental anxiety trajectories. Results DAS scores from at least three assessments were available for 828 participants. Six dental anxiety trajectories were observed: stable nonanxious low (39.6%); stable nonanxious medium (37.9%); recovery (1.6%); adult-onset anxious (7.7%); stable anxious (7.2%) and adolescent-onset anxious (5.9%). Multivariate analysis showed that males and those with higher DMFS at age 15 years were more likely to be in the stable nonanxious low trajectory group. Membership of the stable nonanxious medium group was predicted by the dental caries experience at age 15 years. Participants who had lost one or more teeth between ages 26 and 32 years had almost twice the relative risk for membership of the adult-onset anxious group. Personality traits predicted group membership. Specifically, high scorers (via median split) on the ‘stress reaction’ subscale had over twice the risk of being in the stable anxious group; low scorers on the traditionalism subscale were more likely to be members of the recovery trajectory group; and high scorers on the ‘social closeness’ subscale had half the risk of being in the stable anxious group. Dental caries experience at age 5 years was also a predictor for the stable anxious group. Membership of the late-adolescent-onset anxious group was predicted by higher dental caries experience by age 15 years, but none of the other predictors was significant. Conclusion Six discrete trajectories of dental anxiety

  8. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment.

  9. Involving Parents in Their Children's Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Donna

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that parent education is vital to good dental hygiene for the whole family. Discusses what Head Start staffers can do to ensure that children's dental needs are being met, particularly in assisting parents with taking responsibility for children's dental hygiene. Covers dental care tips for parents, questions and answers about dental…

  10. Dental photography today. Part 1: basic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaglia, A; DE Dominicis, P; Arcuri, L; Gargari, M; Ottria, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the first article in a new series on digital dental photography. Part 1 defines the aims and objectives of dental photography for examination, diagnosis and treatment planning, legal and forensic documentation, publishing, education, marketing and communication with patients, dental team members, colleagues and dental laboratory.

  11. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is a...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  13. Dental Curriculum Development in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phantumvanit, Prathip

    1996-01-01

    Since establishment of formal dental education in Southeast Asia, changes stemming from research and technology have led to dental curriculum changes. Development of the dental curriculum can be divided into three phases: disease oriented; health oriented; and community oriented. Evolution of these phases is traced in the dental curricula of Laos,…

  14. The dental calculus metabolome in modern and historic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velsko, Irina M; Overmyer, Katherine A; Speller, Camilla; Klaus, Lauren; Collins, Matthew J; Loe, Louise; Frantz, Laurent A F; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Lewis, Cecil M; Martinez, Juan Bautista Rodriguez; Chaves, Eros; Coon, Joshua J; Larson, Greger; Warinner, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Dental calculus is a mineralized microbial dental plaque biofilm that forms throughout life by precipitation of salivary calcium salts. Successive cycles of dental plaque growth and calcification make it an unusually well-preserved, long-term record of host-microbial interaction in the archaeological record. Recent studies have confirmed the survival of authentic ancient DNA and proteins within historic and prehistoric dental calculus, making it a promising substrate for investigating oral microbiome evolution via direct measurement and comparison of modern and ancient specimens. We present the first comprehensive characterization of the human dental calculus metabolome using a multi-platform approach. Ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) quantified 285 metabolites in modern and historic (200 years old) dental calculus, including metabolites of drug and dietary origin. A subset of historic samples was additionally analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography-MS (GC-MS) and UPLC-MS/MS for further characterization of metabolites and lipids. Metabolite profiles of modern and historic calculus were compared to identify patterns of persistence and loss. Dipeptides, free amino acids, free nucleotides, and carbohydrates substantially decrease in abundance and ubiquity in archaeological samples, with some exceptions. Lipids generally persist, and saturated and mono-unsaturated medium and long chain fatty acids appear to be well-preserved, while metabolic derivatives related to oxidation and chemical degradation are found at higher levels in archaeological dental calculus than fresh samples. The results of this study indicate that certain metabolite classes have higher potential for recovery over long time scales and may serve as appropriate targets for oral microbiome evolutionary studies.

  15. Environmental and perceived stress in Australian dental undergraduates: Preliminary outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Astill

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dental students have reported a high prevalence of psychological stress and the causes are associated with the challenging dental environmental and demographic factors. This study aimed to conduct a preliminary investigation on dental students’ stress status, using a sample of first-to-third-year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students in an Australian university. Special interests included causes of dental environmental stress and access to help services. Methods. A sample of 145 students was surveyed with a modified Dental Environmental Survey and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale in 2014. The participants’ demographic information was also collected. Results. The response rate was 95.4%. Second-year (P = 0.042, third-year (P < 0.001 and employed students (P = 0.027 were more likely to report stress resulting from transition to clinical learning. Third-year students were more often stressed about communicating and approaching staff (P = 0.023 as well as different opinions between staff (P < 0.001 and reduced holidays (P < 0.001. Students that were younger than 21 years of age (P = 0.001, that were first years (P < 0.001, and that were not in a relationship (P = 0.010 more often found difficulty of course work stressful. Students who were not in a relationship more often considered learning manual dexterity a source of stress (P = 0.034. Students previously seeking professional help were more likely to be stressed (P = 0.010. Conclusion. Causes of dental environment stress varied among years of study and demographic backgrounds. Professional support to stressed students should be enhanced. Further investigation is indicated.

  16. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  17. Cones for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M J [National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK)

    1977-04-01

    Dental radiographic techniques are summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of the use of both the conventional plastic pointer cone and the open-ended cylinders or divergent cones favoured both by the ICRP (Protection against Ionizing Radiation from External Sources, Oxford, Pergamon Press, 1973, ICRP Publication 15), and in the Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons against Ionizing Radiation arising from Medical and Dental Use (1972, 3rd edition, London, HMSO) are discussed. The use of the word 'should' in these recommendations to signify a desirable requirement, not an essential one, is noted. This wording is currently of interest both nationally and internationally in relation to regulations, standards and notes for guidance. The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) has been reviewing the position, and has concluded that open-ended cones have disadvantages which may sometimes outweigh their advantages. Although open-ended cones are preferable under some circumstances, the recommendation that they should be used ought not to be followed without an understanding of the issues involved. The hazards associated with the use of interchangeable cones are considered. The NRPB now proposes that the requirement for the replacement of pointer cones (for both new and existing equipment) should be withdrawn.

  18. Applications of Nanomaterials in Dental Science: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Jitendra; Singh, Shivani; Lale, Shantanu V; Mishra, Monu; Koul, Veena; Kharbanda, P

    2017-04-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized health care industry in a large scale and its applications are a boon to modern medicine and dental science. It is expected to pervade and further revolutionize the art and science of dentistry and may well have important applications spanning all the aspects of oral diseases, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Materials science in dentistry has embraced the technology to produce nanomaterials that are being used in caries inhibitors, antimicrobial resins, hard tissue remineralizing agents, targeted drug delivery, scaffolds, bio-membranes, nanocrystalline hydroxyl apatite, restorative cements, adhesion promoters and boosters, bioactive glass, tissue conditioners, reinforced methacrylate resins, root canal disinfectants, friction free orthodontic arch wires and nano composites life. These upcoming technologies have potential to bring about significant benefits in the form of improvement in dental science and to society. The present review presents the latest recent developments in this interdisciplinary field bridging nanotechnology and dental science.

  19. On dental caries and dental erosion in Swedish young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Helén

    2013-01-01

    All children in Sweden are entitled to regular, free dental care up to 20 years of age. While dental caries generally continues to decline, still there is a pronounced skewness in caries prevalence. Furthermore, the reported increase in dental erosion in young adults is cause for concern. The aim was to study the prevalence of dental caries and dental erosion in a cohort of Swedish 20 year-olds, with special reference to the influence of previous caries experience and lifestyle as well as parental, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors. The study was prospective, longitudinal and cross-sectional in design and based on registration of caries lesions, dental erosion, body adiposity status, saliva sampling, interviews, and questionnaires at 20 years of age. Data were available for the same cohort at 1, 3, 6 and 15 years of age. 499 subjects (74 percent of the original cohort) were included. Five individuals were subsequently excluded, leaving a final sample of 494. 74 percent of the subjects had initial and/or manifest caries lesions and/or restorations. The mean number of DimFS was 5.8 and the mean number of DmFS on occlusal surfaces of molars was 1.1. There was a strong relationship between caries activity at 3 and 6 years of age and approximal caries prevalence in premolars and molars at 20 years of age. Overweight/obese individuals had significantly higher caries prevalence than normal weight individuals. Parental, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors during infancy were related to approximal caries at age 20. Dental erosion was found in 75 percent of the individuals: 18 percent of these had extensive erosion. There was a significant association between caries and dental erosion. A relationship was found between dental erosion and lifestyle factors and overweight/obesity. There is a strong relationship between caries prevalence at age 20 and caries experience in early childhood. Young adults show a high prevalence of dental erosion, but the severity is

  20. Depression, anxiety and stress in dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basudan, Sumaya; Binanzan, Najla; Alhassan, Aseel

    2017-05-24

    To measure the occurrence and levels of depression, anxiety and stress in undergraduate dental students using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). This cross-sectional study was conducted in November and December of 2014. A total of 289 dental students were invited to participate, and 277 responded, resulting in a response rate of 96%. The final sample included 247 participants. Eligible participants were surveyed via a self-reported questionnaire that included the validated DASS-21 scale as the assessment tool and questions about demographic characteristics and methods for managing stress. Abnormal levels of depression, anxiety and stress were identified in 55.9%, 66.8% and 54.7% of the study participants, respectively. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed multiple predictors: gender (for anxiety b=-3.589, p=.016 and stress b=-4.099, p=.008), satisfaction with faculty relationships (for depression b=-2.318, p=.007; anxiety b=-2.213, p=.004; and stress b=-2.854, prelationships (for depression b=-3.527, panxiety b=-2.213, p=.004; and stress b=-2.854, pstress b=-2.648, p=.045). The standardized coefficients demonstrated the relationship and strength of the predictors for each subscale. To cope with stress, students engaged in various activities such as reading, watching television and seeking emotional support from others. The high occurrence of depression, anxiety and stress among dental students highlights the importance of providing support programs and implementing preventive measures to help students, particularly those who are most susceptible to higher levels of these psychological conditions.

  1. Students' perceptions of a blended learning experience in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varthis, S; Anderson, O R

    2018-02-01

    "Flipped" instructional sequencing is a new instructional method where online instruction precedes the group meeting, allowing for more sophisticated learning through discussion and critical thinking during the in-person class session; a novel approach studied in this research. The purpose of this study was to document dental students' perceptions of flipped-based blended learning and to apply a new method of displaying their perceptions based on Likert-scale data analysis using a network diagramming method known as an item correlation network diagram (ICND). In addition, this article aimed to encourage institutions or course directors to consider self-regulated learning and social constructivism as a theoretical framework when blended learning is incorporated in dental curricula. Twenty (second year) dental students at a Northeastern Regional Dental School in the United States participated in this study. A Likert scale was administered before and after the learning experience to obtain evidence of their perceptions of its quality and educational merits. Item correlation network diagrams, based on the intercorrelations amongst the responses to the Likert-scale items, were constructed to display students' changes in perceptions before and after the learning experience. Students reported positive perceptions of the blended learning, and the ICND analysis of their responses before and after the learning experience provided insights into their social (group-based) cognition about the learning experience. The ICNDs are considered evidence of social or group-based cognition, because they are constructed from evidence obtained using intercorrelations of the total group responses to the Likert-scale items. The students positively received blended learning in dental education, and the ICND analyses demonstrated marked changes in their social cognition of the learning experience based on the pre- and post-Likert survey data. Self-regulated learning and social constructivism

  2. Students' perceptions of materials and techniques used at European dental schools in the education of fixed prosthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Kamell, H.; Kharbanda, A.; Dozic, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the materials and procedures used by students in dental schools across Europe for teaching fixed prosthodontics. An online questionnaire, containing twenty-eight dichotomous, multiple-choice, and Likert scale rating questions, was sent to students in forty dental

  3. Clinical use of dental classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    The Dental Classification system used by the uniformed services is supposed to predict the incidence of dental emergencies in the operational setting, at least on the unit level. Since most Sailors and Marines are deployed without close dental support, the sea services have adopted a policy of early treatment of class 3 dental conditions during recruit training. The other services are beginning to do the same. Recently, two factors have emerged that are affecting this early dental class 3 treatment. These factors must be considered when planning to provide early dental treatment. First, changing population and dentist provider demographics in the civilian sector are beginning to affect the class 3 treatment needs of incoming military recruits. Second, attrition from recruit training results in treatment provided to recruits who leave military service before finishing their training. Some view this as a waste of resources, others as a cost of doing business. As operational jointness increases, the three services must develop and use a single dental classification terminology, as well as unified standards and guidelines, both for better research in this area and for the readiness and well-being of our patients.

  4. Dental imaging characterization of micropigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.Y.; Choi, M.H.; Chang, J.H.; Jung, J.H.; Kim, M.E.; Lee, N.S.; Kim, J.Y.; Choi, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently the micropig has been developed as human disease model. The dental and orofacial region of micropig is similar to that of humans, so it has been used for testing implant materials and techniques. The purpose of this study is on dental image at each age using radiography and computed tomography. Total twenty-two male micropigs, two or three animals of each 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months old, were given radiographic examinations. After general anesthesia, extra- and intra-oral radiographic technique and computed tomographic scans were performed to assess the dental characterization of micropigs. The total deciduous dental formula comprised 28 teeth and was depicted as Di 3/3, Dc 1/1, Dp 3/3. The total permanent dental formula comprised 44 teeth and was depicted as I 3/3, C 1/1, P 4/4, M 3/3. Hypodontia of the first premolars was common in the micropig. The permanent teeth erupted from 3 to 24 month after birth. The sequence of eruption of the permanent teeth was M1, P1, I3, C, M2, I1 + P3 + P4, P2, I2, M3. Dental imaging enables visualization of the unerupted teeth and gives more information about the development of the teeth. The growth pattern of the teeth obtained through radiographic and computed tomographic examination provides basic data in the micropig as animal model for dental research

  5. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarpour, Aida; Ghavam, Maryam; Saffarpour, Anna; Dayani, Rozita; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharazi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS) chart for scoring (1–10). After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test. Results: No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc. Conclusions: Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments. PMID:27928236

  6. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarpour, Aida; Ghavam, Maryam; Saffarpour, Anna; Dayani, Rozita; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharazi

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth. A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS) chart for scoring (1-10). After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test. No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc. Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments.

  7. Dental Procedures and the Risk of Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Tung, Ying-Chang; Wu, Patricia W.; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Chee-Jen; Kung, Suefang; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon but potentially devastating disease. Recently published data have revealed a significant increase in the incidence of IE following the restriction on indications for antibiotic prophylaxis as recommended by the revised guidelines. This study aims to reexamine the basic assumption behind the rationale of prophylaxis that dental procedures increase the risk of IE. Using the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database of Taiwan, we retrospectively analyzed a total of 739 patients hospitalized for IE between 1999 and 2012. A case-crossover design was conducted to compare the odds of exposure to dental procedures within 3 months preceding hospitalization with that during matched control periods when no IE developed. In the unadjusted model, the odds ratio (OR) was 0.93 for tooth extraction (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54–1.59), 1.64 for surgery (95% CI 0.61–4.42), 0.92 for dental scaling (95% CI 0.59–1.42), 1.69 for periodontal treatment (95% CI 0.88–3.21), and 1.29 for endodontic treatment (95% CI 0.72–2.31). The association between dental procedures and the risk of IE remained insignificant after adjustment for antibiotic use, indicating that dental procedures did not increase the risk of IE. Therefore, this result may argue against the conventional assumption on which the recommended prophylaxis for IE is based. PMID:26512586

  8. Low-dose Dental-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, A.; Imhof, H.; Homolka, P.; Fuerhauser, R.; Freudenthaler, J.; Watzek, G.

    2000-01-01

    Dental-CT is a relatively new, increasingly used investigation technique in dental radiology. Several authors have stated that the indication for Dental-CT has to be chosen on a strict basis, due to high dose values. This article describes the technique of performing dental-CT and calculates the effective dose based on published data and own measurements as well as the dose reduction potential to achieve an optimized protocol for Dental-CT investigations. (orig.) [de

  9. Current State of Dental Education: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J

    2017-08-01

    This executive summary for Section 1 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century" project provides a composite picture of information from 12 background articles on the current state of dental education in the United States. The summary includes the following topics: the current status of the dental curriculum, the implications of student debt and dental school finances, the expansion of enrollment, student diversity, pre- and postdoctoral education, safety net status of dental school clinics, and trends in faculty.

  10. Dental implants in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  11. Advances in dental public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R D

    2001-07-01

    Dental public health has been defined as 'the science and art of preventing oral diseases, promoting oral health and improving the quality of life through the organised efforts of society'. Dental practitioners most often have the oral health of individual patients as their primary focus but the aim of public health is to benefit populations. Early developments in dental public health were concerned largely with demonstrating levels of disease and with treatment services. With greater appreciation of the nature of oral health and disease, and of their determinants has come recognition of the need for wider public health action if the effects of prevention and oral health promotion are to be maximized.

  12. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide...... provides prognoses for teeth with traumatic injuries based on the Copenhagen trauma database: http://www.dentaltraumaguide.org The database includes 2191 traumatized permanent teeth from 1282 patients that were treated at the dental trauma unit at the University Hospital in Copenhagen (Denmark...

  13. Bioinspired design of dental multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M; Wang, R; Thompson, V; Rekow, D; Soboyejo, W O

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the use of bioinspired functionally graded structures in the design of dental multi-layers that are more resistant to sub-surface crack nucleation. Unlike existing dental crown restorations that give rise to high stress concentration, the functionally graded layers (between crown materials and the joins that attach them to dentin) are shown to promote significant reductions in stress and improvements in the critical crack size. Special inspiration is drawn from the low stress concentrations associated with the graded distributions in the dentin-enamel-junction (DEJ). The implications of such functionally graded structures are also discussed for the design of dental restorations.

  14. Is there a relation between dental anxiety, fear and general psychological status?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Talo Yildirim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Dental anxiety is a widespread problem in many populations. This problem can be a barrier to dental care and may lead to poor oral health. Dental anxiety may be related to psychological status. Aims The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of dental anxiety, dental fear, Beck Depression, and state-trait anxiety according to age, gender and education level in patients at the periodontology clinic in the Diyarbakır Mouth and Dental Health Center. Study Design A total of 231 patients (115 males, 116 females filled out dental fear scale (DFS, dental anxiety scale (DAS, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, state-trait anxiety inventory-state (STAI-S, and state-trait anxiety inventory–trait (STAI-T questionnaires, and evaluations of DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T were conducted according to age, gender, and education level. Results The mean DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-T, and STAI –S were 45.64, 9.15, 13.16, 38.90, and 40.18, respectively. There was a significant association among DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T (p < 0.05. These surveys scores were significantly higher in females than males (p < 0.05. The results of this study indicated that gender age and education level have important effects on DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T (p < 0.05. Conclusion Dental anxiety and dental fear were found to be related to psychological status (BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T over time. There are some patients with unaddressed psychological distress.

  15. Entrepreneurship in continuing dental education: a dental school perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Vincent N

    2005-01-01

    The definition of continuing dental education is presented, along with its benefits to the profession. The preeminence of dental schools in providing lifelong learning opportunities and freedom from commercial involvement that existed even twenty years ago has changed. Less than a quarter of CE takes place in school, and the focus there is increasingly on material with deep scientific background and hands-on learning. The newest innovations and those with the greatest commercial potential are taught elsewhere. Proposed changes in the ADA CERP standards would take on a "purist" approach that could place dental schools at a severe disadvantage while allowing "for profit" institutes to flourish and thus further undermine the role dental schools can play in providing quality professional development experiences.

  16. Dental anxiety among patients visiting a University Dental Centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Dental Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. An audit of dental prescriptions between clinics and dental laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C A

    2011-08-12

    To discover the quality of written instructions from dentists to dental technicians and the nature of non-compliant prescriptions. An audit of laboratory prescription compliance was conducted within an NHS Trust Dental Teaching Hospital to determine the level of communication between dentists and dental technicians. One hundred and fifty prescriptions were audited from dental undergraduates and qualified dentists throughout the different departments. A total of two-thirds of prescriptions were considered non-compliant and failed to meet relevant ethical and legal guidelines. This problem was seen throughout all departments and at all professional levels. A breakdown in communication between dentists and technicians through the use of prescriptions is evident even within a close working environment.

  18. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and red...

  19. Dental Mold: A Novel Formulation to Treat Common Dental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Soma; Roy, Gopa; Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2009-01-01

    Oral administration of antibiotics to treat dental problems mostly yields slow actions due to slow onset and hepatic “first-pass.” Again, commonly used dental paints are generally washed out by saliva within few hours of application. To overcome the challenges, polymeric molds to be placed on an affected tooth (during carries and gum problems) were prepared and evaluated in vitro for sustained drug release for prolonged local action. Here, amoxicillin trihydrate and lidocaine hydrochloride we...

  20. Quantity and quality of solid wastes produced in dental offices of babol city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoliman Amouei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental wastes due to having bacterial disease-causing agents and toxic chemicals are categorized in hazardous wastes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantity and composition of dental waste produced by general and specialized dental offices in babol city. Materials &Methods: From all dental offices (170 and 40 dental offices were related to general and specialized respectively in Babol city, 20 general and 5 specialized offices were randomly selected. Waste samples were collected three times a week (Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, 50 sub-groups were separated and weighted by a digital scale with accuracy of 0.01 gram. The data were presented by excel and word software in figures and tables. Results: The total wastes of general and specialized offices were 11829 and 2831.5 kg/year, respectively. The percentages of domestic-type, infectious, pharmaceutical and toxic wastes in general dental offices were 52.5%, 42.5%, 4.7% and 0.3%; and in specialized offices were 42.5%, 50%, 7% and 0.5%, respectively. Most components in a variety of dental waste included plastic, paper, plaster molds, glass and metal. Conclusion: Due to the large contents of plastic, paper, plaster molds, glass and metals in domestic- type and infectious wastes produced in the general and specialized dental offices, it is necessary to manage the wastes and their separation and recycling in source place.

  1. Efficacy trial of Camouflage Syringe to reduce dental fear and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujaoney, S; Mamtani, M; Thakre, T; Tote, J; Hazarey, V; Hazarey, P; Kulkarni, H

    2013-12-01

    Dental fear and anxiety in early childhood are widely prevalent and contribute to dental problems and behaviour in adulthood. Novel ways to reduce dental fear and anxiety in children are needed. Our aim was to conduct an efficacy trial of a novel Camouflage Syringe to reduce dental fear and anxiety in children. randomised controlled trial of efficacy of the Camouflage Syringe. We designed a Camouflage Syringe with a toy-like appearance that veils the conventional syringe to permit topical application and injection of local anaesthesia and ensure more involvement of the patient in the treatment process. We conducted a concurrent parallel, randomised controlled trial (NCT01398007) on the efficacy of this Camouflage Syringe to reduce the dental fear and anxiety in children seeking dental treatment who required the use of local anaesthesia. Using Venham's clinical rating scale, Venham's picture test, parental stress questionnaire and recall questionnaire, the efficacy of the Camouflage Syringe to reduce dental fear and anxiety ranged from 82% to 97% for various outcomes and from 60% to 100% for prevention of related adverse outcomes. For all outcomes, the number needed to treat was close to unity. Our results strongly favour the use of Camouflage Syringe to reduce dental fear and anxiety in children.

  2. Magnetic resonance tomography and dental radiology (Dental-MRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, A.; Wien Univ.; Solar, P.; Ertl, L.; Nasel, C.; Homolka, P.; Youssefzadeh, S.; Schick, S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the usefulness of Dental-MRT for imaging of anatomic and pathologic conditions of the mandible and maxilla. Methods: Seven healthy volunteers, 5 patients with pulpitis, 9 patients with dentigerous cysts, 5 patients after tooth transplantation and 12 patients with atrophic mandibles were evaluated. Studies of the jaws using axial T1- and T2-weighted gradient echo and spin echo sequences in 2D and 3D technique have been to performed. The acquired images were reconstructed with a standard dental software package on a workstation as panoramic and cross sectional views of the mandible or maxilla. Results: The entire maxilla and mandibula, teeth, dental pulp and the content of the mandibular canal were well depicted. Patients with inflammatory disease of the pulp chamber demonstrate bone marrow edema in the periapical region. Dentigerous cysts and their relation to the surrounding structures are clearly shown. After contrast media application marked enhancement of the dental pulp can be found. Conclusion: Dental-MRT provides a valuable tool for visualization and detection of dental diseases. (orig.) [de

  3. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  4. CT in dental osseointegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, D.

    1992-01-01

    Computerised tomography (CT) plays a key role in the pre-surgical evaluation of the alveolar process for titanium dental implants. The successful replacement of lost teeth by tissue integrated tooth root implants is a major advance in clinical dentistry. The paper will discuss briefly the history of osseointegration and how CT is now involved in helping the edentulous patient. CT is considered as a quick and convenient method of obtaining excellent anatomical information about the maxilla. Conventional tomography is difficult to obtain and does not provide valuable cross-sectional images. Exact height and width calculations can be made as well as screening out patients with advanced bone resorption. 3 refs. 6 figs

  5. Dental therapeutic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zeenat; Jain, Nilu; Jain, Gaurav K; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahuja, Alka; Khar, Roop K; Ahmad, Farhan J

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of periodontal diseases as amenable to local antibiotherapy has resulted in a paradigmatic shift in treatment modalities of dental afflictions. Moreover the presence of antimicrobial resistance, surfacing of untoward reactions owing to systemic consumption of antibiotics has further advocated the use of local delivery of physiologically active substances into the periodontal pocket. While antimicrobials polymerized into acrylic strips, incorporated into biodegradable collagen and hollow permeable cellulose acetate fibers, multiparticulate systems, bio-absorbable dental materials, biodegradable gels/ointments, injectables, mucoadhesive microcapsules and nanospheres will be more amenable for direct placement into the periodontal pockets the lozenges, buccoadhesive tablets, discs or gels could be effectively used to mitigate the overall gingival inflammation. Whilst effecting controlled local delivery of a few milligram of an antibacterial agent within the gingival crevicular fluid for a longer period of time, maintaining therapeutic concentrations such delivery devices will circumvent all adverse effects to non- oral sites. Since the pioneering efforts of Goodson and Lindhe in 1989, delivery at gingival and subgingival sites has witnessed a considerable progress. The interest in locally active systems is evident from the patents being filed and granted. The present article shall dwell in reviewing the recent approaches being proffered in the field. Patents as by Shefer, et al. US patent, 6589562 dealing with multicomponent biodegradable bioadhesive controlled release system for oral care products, Lee, et al. 2001, US patent 6193994, encompassing a locally administrable, biodegradable and sustained-release pharmaceutical composition for periodontitis and process for preparation thereof and method of treating periodontal disease as suggested by Basara in 2004via US patent 6830757, shall be the types of intellectual property reviewed and presented in

  6. Dental Fear and Delayed Dental Care in Appalachia-West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R Constance

    2015-08-01

    The people of Appalachia-West Virginia are culturally unique and are known to have oral health disparities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental fear in relation to delayed dental care as a factor influencing oral health behaviors within this culture. A cross sectional study design was used. Participants were urgent care patients in a university dental clinic. The sample included 140 adults over age 18 years. The Dental Fear Survey was used to determine dental fear level. Self-report of delayed dental care was provided by the participants. The Dental Fear Survey was dichotomized at score 33, with higher scores indicating dental fear. The prevalence of dental fear was 47.1% (n=66). There was a significant association of dental fear and dental delay. The unadjusted odds ratio was 2.87 (95% CI: 1.17, 7.04; p=0.021). The adjusted odds ratio was 3.83 (95%CI: 1.14, 12.82; p=0.030), controlling for tobacco use, perceived oral health status, pain, and last dental visit. A difference in dental delay between men and women was not present in this sample. The only significant variable in delayed dental care was dental fear. In Appalachia-West Virginia, there remains a high level of dental fear, despite advances in dental care, techniques, and procedures. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  7. The Phenomenon of Dental Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle...... of dental fear (see fig. 1). The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists (see table 1 for examples). The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2......) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has...

  8. Blood Thinners and Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of contact after hours (i.e.: office or cell phone number, on-call pager), and failing that, you ... Eric Stoopler Featured in the Bulletin of Dental Education AAOM Board Member Featured in PennCurrent AAOM Featured ...

  9. Musculoskeletal dysfunction in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakim A. Larbi and Dmitry Ye. Suyetenkov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights the comparative statistics of musculoskeletal system deseases depending on a type of dental method. The practical recommendations on prevention of diseases of joints, ligaments and spine were done.

  10. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi SS Toor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008 focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company.

  11. ARUSHA SCHOOL DENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS. 1. Pain due to ... increased intake of sweets and sweet snacks, ... to restrain production, import and marketing of modern sweets ... STRATEGY .... water we drink and bathe In. They are always ready to heip us or ...

  12. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed.

  13. The working practices and career satisfaction of dental therapists in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, K M S; Meldrum, A; Thomson, W M; Newton, J T

    2007-12-01

    To describe the working practices and level of career satisfaction of dental therapists in New Zealand. Postal survey of dental therapists identified from the New Zealand Dental Council's dental therapy database. One mailing with one follow-up. Questionnaires were sent to 683 registered dental therapists. Replies were received from 566 (82.9%). Current working practice, career breaks, continuing education, career satisfaction. Respondents had a high career satisfaction, but were much less satisfied with their remuneration. After controlling for age and income satisfaction, therapists who felt that they were valued members of the dental community had over four times the odds of having higher overall job satisfaction. There were no differences in the mean career satisfaction scale score by age, but respondents aged 45 and over had a lower mean income satisfaction scale score than their younger counterparts (pmanagement/coordination (ppractice than their older colleagues (pproductivity of this workforce. Remuneration and career progression are key issues; therapists need to feel that they are valued members of the dental profession.

  14. PREVALENCE OF DENTAL CARIES AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN IN SULUR - COIMBATORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhirami Kannan

    2017-10-01

    caries in female was 12% and male was 13%. The malocclusion in female 14% and 1% MFA (myofunctional appliance, male were about 15%. The percentage of calculus in female was 8% and male 13% and the follow up procedure for these conditions will be restoration, extraction, braces and MFA appliance and scaling. CONCLUSION The high prevalence rate shows further follow up and awareness among teachers, parents and students regarding dental caries and dental hygiene is needed. Awareness among students can be generated by the school teachers because they are role model for the students.

  15. Effect of magnification loupes on dental hygiene student posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, J Peggy; Millar, A Michele; Burke, Jillian M; Maillet, Michelle A; Maillet, Wayne A; Neish, Nancy R

    2008-01-01

    The chair-side work posture of dental hygienists has long been a concern because of health-related problems potentially caused or exacerbated by poor posture. The purpose of this study was to investigate if using magnification loupes improved dental hygiene students' posture during provision of treatment. The treatment chosen was hand-scaling, and the effect of the timing of introduction of the loupes to students was also examined. Thirty-five novice dental hygiene students took part in the study. Each student was assessed providing dental hygiene care with and without loupes, thus controlling for innate differences in natural posture. Students were randomized into two groups. Group one used loupes in the first session and did not use them for the second session. Group two reversed this sequence. At the end of each session, all students were videotaped while performing scaling procedures. Their posture was assessed using an adapted version of Branson et al.'s Posture Assessment Instrument (PAI). Four raters assessed students at three time periods for nine posture components on the PAI. A paired t-test compared scores with and without loupes for each student. Scores showed a significant improvement in posture when using loupes (ppostural benefit is realized by requiring students to master the use of magnification loupes as early as possible within the curriculum.

  16. Factors affecting dental service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Ravangard, Ramin; Baldacchino, Donia

    2015-01-01

    Measuring dental clinic service quality is the first and most important factor in improving care. The quality provided plays an important role in patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors affecting dental service quality from the patients' viewpoint. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study was conducted in a dental clinic in Tehran between January and June 2014. A sample of 385 patients was selected from two work shifts using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. The data were collected, a self-administered questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study, based on the Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model of service quality which consisted of two parts: the patients' demographic characteristics and a 30-item questionnaire to measure the five dimensions of the service quality. The collected data were analysed using SPSS 21.0 and Amos 18.0 through some descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, as well as analytical methods, including confirmatory factor. Results showed that the correlation coefficients for all dimensions were higher than 0.5. In this model, assurance (regression weight=0.99) and tangibility (regression weight=0.86) had, respectively, the highest and lowest effects on dental service quality. The Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model is suitable to measure quality in dental services. The variables related to dental services quality have been made according to the model. This is a pioneering study that uses Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model and CFA in a dental setting. This study provides useful insights and guidance for dental service quality assurance.

  17. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enam...

  18. LED Technology for Dental Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Ou, Yiyu; Soerensen, L. H.

    LEDs have a large potential in many dental and oral applications. Areas such as photo polymerization, fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for LED based diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......LEDs have a large potential in many dental and oral applications. Areas such as photo polymerization, fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for LED based diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  19. Soft skills and dental education

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, M. A. G.; Abu Kasim, N. H.; Naimie, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses ...

  20. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Graduate Students' and Faculty Perspectives on Dental Hygienists' Professional Role and the Potential Contribution of a Peer Teaching Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Martha J; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    The changing role of dental hygienists deserves dental and dental hygiene educators' attention. The first aim of this survey study was to assess University of Michigan dental, dental hygiene, and graduate students' and faculty members' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles; their attitudes and behaviors related to clinical interactions between dental and dental hygiene students; and perceived benefits of engaging dental hygiene students as peer teachers for dental students. The second aim was to assess whether one group of dental students' experiences with dental hygiene student peer teaching affected their perceptions of the dental hygiene profession. Survey respondents were 57 dental hygiene students in all three years of the program (response rate 60% to 100%); 476 dental students in all four years (response rate 56% to 100%); 28 dental and dental hygiene graduate students (response rate 28%); and 67 dental and dental hygiene faculty members (response rate 56%). Compared to the other groups, dental students reported the lowest average number of services dental hygienists can provide (p≤0.001) and the lowest average number of patient groups for which dental hygienists can provide periodontal care (ppeer teaching (ppeer teaching. After experiencing dental hygiene student peer teaching, the dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles, attitudes about clinical interactions with dental hygienists, and perceived benefits of dental hygiene student peer teachers improved and were more positive than the responses of their peers with no peer teaching experiences. These results suggest that dental hygiene student peer teaching may improve dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles and attitudes about intraprofessional care.

  1. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  2. [Social medicine and dental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünfeld, B

    1976-03-01

    Some socio-medical aspects of preventive and curative dental care. Preventive and early curative dental care is considered as an integral part of general health behavior in the individual. Different variables possibly determining such behavior are discussed. Demographic factors as age, sex, place of residence, as well as family and educational background, income and vocation seem to be of importance. A dental health delivery system free of charge to everyone in the age group 6-18, eventually up to 21 years has been available for several years in Norway. We assume that this has had a great impact upon the motivations for a positive atitude towards preventive care, particularly since economic barriers have been reduced simultaneously with shift in the popular value aspects of having good dental health status. Plans for a future incorporation of dental care into a total national health service, comprising the entire population, in order to make the delivery system feasible for everyone, will probably stimulate a still wider interest and motivation for preventive and early dental care.

  3. The Association Between Dental Anxiety and Oral Health Related Quality of Life Among Individuals with Mild Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Keleş

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the oral health related quality of life and the effect of dental anxiety on the oral health related quality of life in young, mildly intellectually disabled individuals who are attending a special school. Materials and Methods: Eighty six mildly intellectually disabled students participated this cross-sectional study. Oral health-related quality of life-United Kingdom Scale and Oral Health Impact Profile-14 were used to evaluate the effects of oral health of the individuals on their quality of life. Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was used to determine the dental anxiety levels of the individuals. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: The mean age of the participants was 17.12±1.40 years and the mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT score of the students was 3.10±2.76. According to the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, 28.0% of the students had dental anxiety. A significant inverse relationship was detected between dental anxiety levels and oral health-related quality of life (r=-0.239; p=0.028. Conclusion: Nearly 30% of individuals with mild intellectual disabilities were determined to have dental anxiety. Considering that the oral health-related quality of life decreases with increasing dental anxiety, it may be beneficial for dentists to administer premedication before treatment to decrease the anxiety levels of these patients.

  4. Introducing regular formative assessment to enhance learning among dental students at Islamic International Dental College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Fatima; Yasmin, Shahina; Yasmin, Raheela

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Formative Assessment in enhancing learning among dental students, and to interpret the assessment from students' perspective in this regard. The experimental non-randomised controlled study was conducted from January to June 2013 at Islamic International Dental College, Islamabad, and comprised first year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students attending regular physiology lectures and tutorials. Summative assessments conducted at the end of each unit were included as pre-intervention tests. After one month's planning, central nervous system unit was delivered in a month's trial with four formative assessment and feedback sessions (one per week). Likert scale-based student feedback questionnaire was administered. Post-intervention summative assessment was done by Multiple Choice and Short Essay Questions. Data was analysed using SPSS 17. Out of 68 students, 64(94.1%) agreed that a conducive environment was maintained and 62(90%) agreed that such sessions should be continued throughout the year; 59(87%) reflected that the feedback provided by the teacher was timely and positive and ensured equitable participation; 56(82%)agreed that it enhanced their interest in the subject; 56(68%) agreed that they were now more focussed; and43(63%)were of the opinion that they have progressed in the subject through these sessions. There was highly significant improvement in the monthly post-intervention test scores compared to pre-intervention test (p=0.000). Formative assessment sessions enhanced motivation and learning in first year dental students. Organised regular sessions with students' feedback may contribute to the development of pedagogic practice.

  5. Surface modifications of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, C M

    2008-06-01

    Dental implant surface technologies have been evolving rapidly to enhance a more rapid bone formation on their surface and hold a potential to increase the predictability of expedited implant therapy. While implant outcomes have become highly predictable, there are sites and conditions that result in elevated implant loss. This paper reviews the impact of macro-retentive features which includes approaches to surface oxide modification, thread design, press-fit and sintered-bead technologies to increase predictability of outcomes. Implant designs that lead to controlled lateral compression of the bone can improve primary stability as long as the stress does not exceed the localized yield strength of the cortical bone. Some implant designs have reduced crestal bone loss by use of multiple cutting threads that are closely spaced, smoothed on the tip but designed to create a hoop-stress stability of the implant as it is completely seated in the osteotomy. Following the placement of the implant, there is a predictable sequence of bone turnover and replacement at the interface that allows the newly formed bone to adapt to microscopic roughness on the implant surface, and on some surfaces, a nanotopography (<10(-9) m scale) that has been shown to preferably influence the formation of bone. Newly emerging studies show that bone cells are exquisitely sensitive to these topographical features and will upregulate the expression of bone related genes for new bone formation when grown on these surfaces. We live in an exciting time of rapid changes in the modalities we can offer patients for tooth replacement therapy. Given this, it is our responsibility to be critical when claims are made, incorporate into our practice what is proven and worthwhile, and to continue to support and provide the best patient care possible.

  6. Dental pain and dental treatment of young children attending the general dental service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsom, K M; Tickle, M; Blinkhorn, A S

    2002-03-09

    The objective was to examine the relationship between dental pain (and its sequelae), and the extent of restorative care provided for primary molars, amongst children who regularly attend a general dental practitioner. A retrospective review of the clinical case notes of 677 children with caries who attended 50 general dental practitioners on a regular basis. Analyses were performed at the subject level. Logistic regression models were fitted for the dependent variables whether or not pain, a dental extraction for pain or sepsis and a course of antibiotics was recorded, after taking into account the proportion of carious teeth that were restored, the total number of carious teeth, the age caries was first recorded, gender and the clustering of the subjects within dental practices. Almost half of the children in the study (48%) were recorded as having at least one episode of pain. Total decay experience in the primary molars was a significant predictor of pain, extraction due to pain or sepsis and prescription of antibiotics. There was no significant association between the proportion of carious teeth restored and each of the three dependent variables. For those children who regularly attend their general dental practitioner and who have decay in their primary molars, dental pain is a common finding. Total decay experience in primary molars is the principal predictor of pain, extraction due to pain and the need for antibiotics, whilst the level of restorative care in the primary dentition is less important. In order to reduce the incidence of dental pain in young children, effective methods of preventing caries at the individual and public health levels need to be expanded.

  7. Organisational aspects of dental practices: do dental students think like patients or like general dental practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, R E; Brands, W G; Bronkhorst, E M; Welie, J V M; Truin, G J

    2013-02-01

    In view of transparency in health care, the widespread desire for more patient-centred care, and in an attempt to facilitate educational programmes that effectively respond to these changes, two research questions are formulated: (i) How do dental students rate the importance of various organisational aspects of dental practices compared with dental patients and general dental practitioners (GDPs), and what prescripts, defined as specific operational responsibilities of GDPs in these matters, do dental students propose? and (ii) In doing so, do students resemble patients or GDPs? In two survey studies, dental students (n = 198), patients (n = 3127) and GDPs (n = 303) were asked to rate by questionnaire the importance of 41 organisational aspects of a general dental practice and proposed specific operational responsibilities ('prescripts'). Seven of 41 aspects were rated as important by the majority of the students. Although in a different rank order, three aspects were predominantly selected by all three groups: continuing education, accessibility by telephone and Dutch-speaking GDP. For most aspects, significant differences were found between the prescripts proposed by students and those proposed by patients, and few differences were found between students and GDPs. The findings do not permit the general conclusion that the views of dental students resemble those of patients or GPDs. Looking at the overall rank order, the three respondent groups showed a great resemblance although significant differences were found for specific aspects. With regard to the proposed prescripts, students showed realistic views and the majority wants to participate in continuing education and work with protocols and guidelines. In this, they tend to resemble GDPs more than they resemble patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Dentists' use of validated child dental anxiety measures in clinical practice: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammasi, Hussain; Buchanan, Heather; Ashley, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Assessing anxiety is an important part of the assessment of a child presenting for dental treatment; however, the use of dental anxiety scales in practice is not well-documented. To introduce child dental anxiety scales, and to monitor the extent to which dentists used them; to explore the experience and views of dentists regarding anxiety assessment. A mixed-methods design was employed. A protocol for child anxiety assessment was introduced to paediatric dentists in Eastman Dental Hospital. After 6 months, 100 patient files were audited to examine compliance with the protocol. Fourteen dentists were interviewed to explore their experience and views regarding anxiety assessment. Only five patients were assessed using the scales. Thematic analysis of the dentist interviews revealed three themes: 'Clinical observations and experience: The gold standard'; 'Scales as an estimate or adjunct'; and 'Shortcomings and barriers to using scales'. The dentists in our study did not use anxiety scales, instead they rely on their own experience/judgement. Therefore, scales should be recommended as an adjunct to judgement. Brief scales are recommended as clinicians lack time and expertise in administering anxiety questionnaires. Advantages of using scales and hands-on experience could be incorporated more in undergraduate training. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Saffarpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth.Materials and Methods: A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS chart for scoring (1-10. After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test.Results: No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc.Conclusions: Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments.Keywords: Smiling; Perception; Esthetics, Dental

  10. Dental waste characterization in the city of Ilam in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Kazemi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental wastes are one of the environmental issues due to toxic and pathogenic agents such as pathological wastes, pharmaceutical and chemical etc have particular sensitivity. The aim of this study was to determine the dental waste management and related factors in the city of Ilam. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the studied community was all the sixteen dental clinics in Ilam. Five samples of each clinic per week (Saturday, Sunday and Wednesday were selected. Thereafter waste sample was manually separated into 36 components and were weighed using a laboratory scale with an accuracy of 0.01 g. Each component was weighed five times and the mean value obtained for each component was considered. Production per capita was calculated for each person. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, SPSS and Excel software. Results: The per capita percent for infectious waste section was 51%. The average of infectious waste is 201.13 g. The per capita percent for chemical, pharmaceutical waste section was 36% with an average of 142.48 g. The per capita percent for toxicity section was 13% in the dental clinics with the weighted average of 48.78 g. According to the results of the checklist, further dental clinics have been poorly managed. Conclusion: According to the presence of various materials and different components with different characteristics in the dental wastes, the optimal management of this type of wastes should be carried out based on the specific characteristics, which include programs to reduce waste production, segregation, recycle and reuse.

  11. Association between Childhood Dental Experiences and Dental Fear among Dental, Psychology and Mathematics Undergraduates in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júnia M. Serra-Negra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between childhood dental experiences and dental fear in adulthood among dentistry, psychology and mathematics undergraduate students. A cross-sectional study of 1,256 students from the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, was performed. Students responded to the Brazilian version of the Dental Fear Survey (DFS and a questionnaire regarding previous dental experiences. Both the DFS and the questionnaire were self-administered. Association was tested using descriptive, bivariate and multivariate linear regression analysis, with a 5% significance level. Dentistry undergraduates reported lower scores than psychology (p < 0.001 and mathematics undergraduates (p < 0.05 for all three dimensions of the DFS. Negative dental experiences in childhood was associated with dimensions of Avoidance (B = 2.70, p < 0.001, Physiological arousal (B = 1.42, p < 0.001 and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 3.44, p < 0.001. The reason for first visit to dentist was associated with dimensions of Physiological arousal (B = 0.76, p < 0.01 and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 1.29, p < 0.01. Dentists should be encouraged to evaluate the dental fear of their patients before treatment. The DFS has been found to be an effective instrument for this purpose.

  12. An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Rachlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

    1980-01-01

    To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology

  13. [Men who have sex with men and human immunodeficiency virus testing in dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Jesús Eduardo; Treviño, Ana Cecilia; Violant, Deborah; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María; Álvarez, Mario Moisés

    To explore the attitudes of men who have sex with men (MSM) towards the implementation of rapid HIV-1/2 testing in the dental practice, and to evaluate MSM's perceptions of stigma and discrimination related to sexual orientation by dental care professionals. Cross-sectional study using a self-administered, anonymous, structured analytical questionnaire answered by 185 MSM in Mexico. The survey included sociodemographic variables, MSM's perceptions towards public and private dental providers, and dental services, as well as their perception towards rapid HIV-1/2 testing in the dental practice. In addition, the perception of stigma and discrimination associated with their sexual orientation was explored by designing a psychometric Likert-type scale. The statistical analysis included factor analysis and non-hierarchical cluster analysis. 86.5% of the respondents expressed their willingness to take a rapid HIV-1/2 screening test during their dental visit. Nevertheless, 91.9% of them considered it important that dental professionals must be well-trained before administering any rapid HIV-1/2 tests. Factor analysis revealed two factors: experiences of sexual orientation stigma and discrimination in dental settings, and feelings of concern about the attitude of the dentist and dental staff towards their sexual orientation. Based on these factors and cluster analysis, three user profiles were identified: users who have not experienced stigma and discrimination (90.3%); users who have not experienced stigma and discrimination, but feel a slight concern (8.1%), and users who have experienced some form of discrimination and feel concern (1.6%). The dental practice may represent a potential location for rapid HIV-1/2 testing contributing to early HIV infection diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Dental anxiety and behavioral problems: A study of prevalence and related factors among a group of Iranian children aged 6-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Paryab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence and also some related demographic and dental factors of dental anxiety and behavioral problems in school-aged children. Subjects and Methods: A total of 150 children of 6-12 years old were selected according to the inclusion criteria. Prior to the dental visit, the mothers were asked to answer a questionnaire of dental and demographic background and a Corah dental anxiety scale (CDAS. At the same time, a faces version of the modified child dental anxiety scale (MCDAS was completed by the child. Next, the child was guided to the operating room. According to the treatment plan, local anesthesia solution was injected and the child′s cooperative behaviors were quantified based on the Frankle index duration the injection stage. Analysis of Variance and Linear regression models were used for the statistical analysis. Results: The mean scores of the child′s dental anxiety and cooperative behavior were 20.81 (±6.97 and 3.04 (±0.86, respectively. Forty four children (29.33% had severe dental anxiety. Child′s age and regular dental visit are predictive factors for the child′s dental anxiety (P < 0.05. Dental behavioral problems had been identified in 43 children (28.67%. Unpleasant previous dental experience is an important factor affecting the child′s cooperative behaviors (P < 0.05. Conclusion: High prevalence of severe dental anxiety may be seen in early years of school. It seems that general factors such as family factors have less impact on behavior of school aged children in a dental visit.

  15. State-sponsored dental terrorism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, M

    2017-11-24

    Has the state's manipulation of the NHS dental contract systems deliberately, or accidentally, had corrupting effects on the behaviours of some members of the dental profession? If the answer is 'possibly' or 'probably', then obvious questions that follow include, 'was this done deliberately' and if so, 'why'? Could this have been done for largely altruistic reasons, or was it done to achieve government control for minimum cost? Might this have been undertaken for political, financial or ideological reasons - regardless of any adverse longer term consequences for some patients or for some dental professionals? Might it have been done to take greater control of the dental profession on the grounds that all professions are a conspiracy against the laity, as the mildly paranoid George Bernard Shaw once alleged? Is it possible that some of this manipulation might have been done to help to disempower yet another profession, allegedly to 'modernise it', but perhaps to enslave it for its own reasons? Was this just another example of some statist politicians wanting to interfere in all aspects of UK society, regardless of their lack of specific understanding, or any proven expertise, in many areas? Could the state's manipulation of contracts and processes be regarded as an abuse of power by a virtual monopoly, which has been used to control a largely altruistic profession by imposing corrupting NHS dental contract systems with the most recent one involving 'units of dental activity' (UDAs)? Perhaps it was really about some politicians wanting ever more power, control or money - their usual drivers - with the dental and medical professions accidentally becoming casualties?

  16. Health promotion and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Marisa; Jardim, Juliana Jobim; Alves, Luana Severo

    2010-01-01

    The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene), among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene) should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  17. Health promotion and dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Maltz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene, among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  18. Dental Education in Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L. Eubanks

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is among the most prevalent canine dis-eases affecting over 75% of dogs. Strengthening of the human-animal bond and the increasing education of the aver-age pet owner, have fostered a heightened awareness of periodontal care in dogs and cats. Industry support has further assisted the small animal veterinarian in providing quality dental treatments and prevention. As recently as the 1990’s, veterinary curriculums contained little or no dental training. That trend is changing as nearly every one of the 28 US Colleges of Veterinary Medicine offers some level of small animal dentistry during the four-year curriculum. Primary areas of focus are on client education, the treatment of periodontal disease, dental prophylaxis, dental radiology, endodontics, exodontics and pain control. Students receive instruction in dental anatomy during their di-dactic curriculum and later experience clinical cases. Graduate DVMs can attend a variety of continuing education courses and even choose to specialize in veterinary dentistry in both small animals and horses. Through the efforts of organizations such as the American Veterinary Dental So-ciety, The American Veterinary Dental College and The Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, many veterinarians have been able to advance their skills in dentistry and improve animal welfare. Increasing ex-pectations of the pet-owning public coupled with the recent advancements of training opportunities available for vete-rinary students, graduate DVMs and certified veterinary technicians make veterinary dentistry an emerging practice-builder among the most successful small animal hospitals.

  19. Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for the Treatment of Dental Phobia: A Controlled Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjar, Kumar Raghav; van Wijk, Arjen; Sharma, Ratika; de Jongh, Ad

    2018-05-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has been used to treat a variety of fears and phobias. To determine the feasibility (i.e. safety and efficacy) of using VRET to treat dental phobia. Safety was evaluated by determining any adverse events or symptom exacerbation. Efficacy of VRET was evaluated by comparing the reduction in dental anxiety scores (measured 16 times within a 14-week study period, and at 6-month follow-up), and its behavioural effects with that of an informational pamphlet (IP) on ten randomized patients with dental phobia using a controlled multiple baseline design. Participants' heart rate response during VRET, and their experience post-VRET, were indexed. No personal adverse events or symptom exacerbation occurred. Visual analysis and post-hoc intention-to-treat analysis showed a significantly greater decrease in dental anxiety scores [higher PND (percentage of non-overlap data) scores of 100% and lower POD (percentage of overlap data) of 0%, Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, F (1,8) = 8.61, p = 0.019, and Dental Fear Scale, F (1,8) = 10.53, p = 0.012], and behavioural avoidance in the VRET compared with the IP group [d = 4.2 and -1.4, respectively). There was no increase in average heart rate during VRET. Of the nine treatment completers, six (four from the VRET group and two from the IP group) no longer had dental phobia at 6-month follow-up. Four of the five VRET participants, but none of the IP participants, scheduled a dental treatment appointment following the intervention. VRET is a feasible alternative for patients with dental phobia.

  20. Influence of skin cold sensation threshold in the occurrence of dental sensitivity during dental bleaching: a placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Rahal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study verified the occurrence of dental sensitivity in patients submitted to a 35% hydrogen peroxide based product (Whiteness HP Maxx 35% – FGM, skin cold sensation threshold (SCST and its influence on dental sensitivity. Material and Methods Sixty volunteers were divided into 4 groups (n = 15, according to SCST (low: GI and GIII, and high: GII and IV and bleaching treatment (hydrogen peroxide: GI and GII, and placebo: GIII and GIV. SCST was determined in the inner forearm for 6 different times using a neurosensory analyzer, the TSA II (Medoc Advanced Medical Systems, Ramat Yishai, Northern District, Israel. Dental sensitivity measurements were performed 10 different times using a thermal stimulus and an intraoral device attached to TSA II, positioned in the buccal surface of the upper right central incisor. Spontaneous dental sensitivity was also determined using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Data were submitted to Student's t-test and Pearson's Correlation Test (α=0.05. SCST remained the same during bleaching treatment. Results Distinct responses of dental sensitivity were found in patients with low and high SCST during the first and third bleaching session (p≤0.05. The teeth submitted to the bleaching treatment became more sensitive to cold than those treated with placebo. Moreover, data obtained with TSA and VAS presented moderate correlation. Conclusions Bleaching treatment increased dental sensitivity and skin cold sensation threshold might represent a determining factor in this occurrence, since low and high SCST patients had different responses to the thermal stimulus in the teeth.

  1. Nano materials for Medical and Dental Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yub Kwon, T.; Oh, D.S.; Narayanan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Welcome to this special issue. Nano science and nano technology concepts are applicable across all fields of science and a more widespread application of nano materials and nano technologies is imminent or already occurring in many areas, including health care. Today is scientists take those cutting-edge technologies and concepts and apply them to medicine and dentistry. They are finding a wide variety of ways to make medical and dental materials at the nano scale to take advantage of their enhanced physical and biological properties.The purpose of this special issue is to publish high-quality research papers as well as review articles addressing recent advances in the field of nano materials for medical and dental applications. A particular interest is given to papers exploring or discussing nano materials and nano technologies related to delivery system, bonding substitutes, and surface modification techniques applicable in these areas. For this special issue, several investigators were invited to contribute original research findings that can stimulate continuing efforts to understand the cutting-edge applications of nano materials in medicine and dentistry.

  2. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  3. THERMOVISION IN DENTAL ALLERGOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to optimize the thermal imaging method for evaluation of skin patch test reactions in dental clinical allergology. A total of 30 patients without a history of allergic diseases were included in the study - 12 men and 18 women, age 21 - 32 years. Skin patch testing was performed with a set of 20 standardized allergens. The thermographic investigations were performed with the FlirT620 infrared camera with a temperature resolution of 0,06°C. Thermograms were analysed using the Flir Reporter Professional software 2013. The statistical analysis of the results revealed an average correlation between the clinical evaluation of the results according to the cheme of ICDRG and the thermal image diagnostic (rphi = 0.538, p = 0.001. Absolute matching of clinical and thermal image results was observed only for the negative ones. For the clinically positive skin patch results matching with thermal image method was observed in 60.7% of the cases. Optimization of thermal imaging as a method for evaluation of skin patch test results could serve as a safe, accurate and non-invasive method, especially to distinguish weak (+, doubtful and irritant reactions, although not standardized criteria to distinguish these reactions have been elaborated yet. Crucial factor for the accurate interpretation of results is the precise diagnosing performed by well-trained physicians in this area, with clinical relevance, to minimize the role of subjective factors.

  4. High resolution ultrastructure imaging of fractures in human dental tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Sui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human dental hard tissues are dentine, cementum, and enamel. These are hydrated mineralised composite tissues with a hierarchical structure and versatile thermo-mechanical properties. The hierarchical structure of dentine and enamel was imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB milling. High resolution TEM was carried out in the vicinity of a crack tip in dentine. An intricate “random weave” pattern of hydroxyapatile crystallites was observed and this provided a possible explanation for toughening of the mineralized dentine tissue at the nano-scale. The results reported here provide the basis for improved understanding of the relationship between the multi-scale nature and the mechanical properties of hierarchically structured biomaterials, and will also be useful for the development of better prosthetic and dental restorative materials.

  5. Utilization of dental health services by Danish adolescents attending private or public dental health care systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Petersen, Poul Erik; Bastholm, Annelise

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the study were: 1) to describe the choice of dental care system among 16-year-olds, 2) to describe the utilization of dental services among 16-17-year-olds enrolled in either public or private dental care systems, and to compare the dental services provided by the alternative...

  6. The etiology of childhood dental fear: The role of dental and conditioning experiences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berge, M.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relative importance of invasive treatment experiences in the acquisition of dental fear in children. For this purpose, the complete dental history of 401 children (aged 5-10 years) was studied. The level of dental fear in these children was assessed using the Dental

  7. 78 FR 2647 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    .... FDA-2012-N-0677] Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant AGENCY: Food...) is proposing to reclassify the blade- form endosseous dental implant, a preamendments class III... proposing to revise the classification of blade-form endosseous dental implants. DATES: Submit either...

  8. Dental anxiety reduction and dental attendance after treatment in a dental fear clinic: A follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartman, I.H.A.; de Jongh, A.; Makkes, P.C.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess treatment outcome in terms of dental anxiety reduction at a post-treatment assessment and dental anxiety reduction and dental attendance one year later. Furthermore, it was determined to what extent psychopathological characteristics were related to

  9. Assessment of the amount of tooth wear on dental casts and intra-oral photographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, P.; Wetselaar-Glas, M.J.M.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial condition, leading to the loss of dental hard tissues. Many grading scales are available to assess the amount of tooth wear, one of which is the tooth wear evaluation system (TWES). A grading scale can be used chairside, on casts and on photographs. The aim was to test

  10. Curriculum Guidelines for Clinical Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for clinical dental hygiene include definitions, notes on the interrelationship of courses, an overview of course objectives, and suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific objectives, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  11. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    DENTAL CARE EVERY DAY A Caregiver’s Guide U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Contents Getting Started ................................................................................ 2 Three ...

  12. Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digestive System & How it Works Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Celiac disease manifestations ... affecting any organ or body system. One manifestation—dental enamel defects—can help dentists and other health ...

  13. FastStats: Oral and Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Oral and Dental Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... States, 2016, table 60 [PDF – 9.8 MB] Dental visits Percent of children aged 2-17 years ...

  14. A concise overview of dental implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrewaju Abdurrazaq Taiwo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of osseointegrated dental implants has resulted in several applications in diverse clinical settings. Hence, has contributed to the suitable replacement of missing teeth and the realization of an optimal facial appearance. This paper describes the benefits, applications, contraindications, and complications of dental implants in contemporary dental practice. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was undertaken in PUBMED without time restriction for appropriate English papers on dental implants based on a series of keywords in different combinations. Results: Fifty-eight acceptable, relevant articles were selected for review. The review identified the various components of dental implants, classification, and brands. It also looked at osseointegration and factors promoting and inimical to it. It also explored primary and secondary stability; and patients' selection for a dental implant. Complications of dental implants were also highlighted. Conclusion: With over 95% success rate, dental implants remain the gold standard for achieving aesthetic and functional oral rehabilitation.

  15. Chronic Cutaneous Draining Sinus of Dental Origin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endodontics, JSS Dental College and Hospital, Mysore, Karnataka, India. Abstract ... Keywords: Dental fistula, Localized drug delivery, Root canal treatment. Access this article ... combination of intra-canal irrigants was selected. Hypochlorite.

  16. Development of dental anxiety in schoolchildren

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Fernanda C.; Lima, Rodrigo A.; de Barros, Mauro V.G.

    2017-01-01

    's health-related behaviours. Additionally, the children's dental caries experience was clinically evaluated to obtain information about DMFT/dmft (decayed, filled and missing teeth) indices. Using the Dental Anxiety Question, children whose parents responded “yes” to the prompt “Is he/she very afraid...... used medication chronically had a 2.1 times greater likelihood of having high dental anxiety. Furthermore, children whose parents reported high dental anxiety had a 2.6 times greater likelihood of having high dental anxiety themselves. A one-unit increase in a child's dmft score increased the risk...... of high dental anxiety by 1.1 times at follow-up. Conclusion: After two years, the incidence of high dental anxiety was 15.0%. Poor oral health, unstable general health and parents with high dental anxiety were factors that were associated with this type of anxiety in schoolchildren. It is important...

  17. The stress of clinical dental training: A cross-sectional survey among dental students and dentists of a dental college in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychological disturbances in clinical dental students and teachers remain largely unknown. Aim: To describe the psychological health of clinical dental students and their trainers in an institution in India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted among clinical dental students and faculty of an Indian dental college in November 2014. The questionnaire consisted of depression anxiety stress scales-21 (DASS 21, a short version of the original 42-item DASS. Data were compiled on SPSS version 21. Group comparisons were done and P values were obtained. All tests were two-tailed with significance set at P< 0.05. Results: Stress scores were found to be higher in students as compared to trainers (P = 0.040, with the highest scores for undergraduate students. Statistically, significant difference was seen in stress scores between graduate and postgraduate trainers (P = 0.015, undergraduates and postgraduate trainers (P = 0.005, and postgraduate trainers and students (P = 0.029. A significant difference was also observed between depression scores in graduate and postgraduate trainers (P = 0.006 as well as postgraduate trainers and students (P = 0.041. Females had significantly higher level of stress (P = 0.007 and anxiety (P = 0.003 scores as compared to males. Conclusion: Stress, anxiety, and depression scores in dental students are higher than trainers. Undergraduate students among all showed the highest scores for all three parameters. Different approaches to reduce them should be further investigated and utilized at the earliest.

  18. Treatment outcomes and dental anxiety in 18-year-olds with MIH, comparisons with healthy controls - a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jälevik, Birgitta; Klingberg, Gunilla

    2012-03-01

    In a previous study, 9-year-old children with severe Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) had undergone dental treatment of their first molars nearly ten times as often as children in a control group. They also showed more management problems (BMP) and fear and anxiety (DFA). To assess the long-term outcomes of dental treatments, dental anxiety, and patients' satisfaction in adolescents with MIH. Sixty-seven patients, identical with those in the baseline study, were studied at age 18-years. The participants answered the Children's Fear Survey Schedule - Dental Subscale the Dental Visit Satisfaction Scale (DVSS). Data were compiled from the dental records concerning dental health, number of restorative treatments and BMP. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization group had a significantly higher DMFT, and had undergone treatment of their permanent first molars 4.2 times as often as the controls. BMP was still significantly more common in the MIH group. However, DFS was reduced in MIH group and increased in the control groups. The DVSS scores did not differ between the groups. Conclusions.  Patients with severe MIH had a poorer dental health and were still more treatment consuming at age 18-years. However, their dental fear was now at the same level as the controls. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Research in a dental practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardal, Oystein

    2004-09-01

    There is a shortage of research from dental practice. The aim of this article is to stimulate more interest in dental research. This is done by explaining the basic principles of doing research in a dental practice setting. Examples are taken from the author's own practice. Emphasis is placed on the following points: how to develop and research ideas; factors specific to dental practice; how articles and journals are rated; making a protocol for the study; examiners' reliability and statistical analysis.

  20. Nutrition and Experimental Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    田村, 俊吉; タムラ, シュンキチ; Shunkichi, TAMURA

    1983-01-01

    Nutrition is an effective factor for the inhibition of the development of dental caries. The constitution of diet has a strong bearing on the development of dental caries. However the theoretical background regarding the development of dental caries has not been sastifactorily established. Experimentally, we have clarified the relation of nutrition and dental caries in rats. Experimental animals used in this study were Wistar strain Albino rats (closed colony, Tamura, 1950). Young rats of 21 ...

  1. Perception of Dental Professionals towards Biostatistics

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Manu; Gupta, Mudit; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Biostatistics is becoming an integral part of dental sciences. Awareness regarding the subject is not thoroughly assessed in the field of dentistry. So the study was conducted to assess dental professionals' knowledge, attitude, and perception toward biostatistics at an academic dental institution. An anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among all the faculty and postgraduate students of two dental colleges in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh. The responses were assessed on 5-...

  2. Premature dental eruption: report of case.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    2011-08-05

    This case report reviews the variability of dental eruption and the possible sequelae. Dental eruption of the permanent teeth in cleft palate children may be variable, with delayed eruption the most common phenomenon. A case of premature dental eruption of a maxillary left first premolar is demonstrated, however, in a five-year-old male. This localized premature dental eruption anomaly was attributed to early extraction of the primary dentition, due to caries.

  3. Stress and burnout among Swiss dental residents

    OpenAIRE

    Divaris, Kimon; Lai, Caroline S; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Stress and burnout have been well-documented in graduate medical and undergraduate dental education, but studies among dental graduate students and residents are sparse. The purpose of this investigation was to examine perceived stressors and three dimensions of burnout among dental residents enrolled in the University of Bern, Switzerland. Thirty-six residents enrolled in five specialty programmes were administered the Graduate Dental Environment Stress (GDES30) questionnaire and the Maslach...

  4. Development of a mobile device optimized cross platform-compatible oral pathology and radiology spaced repetition system for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Wisam; Easterling, Lauren; Edwards, Paul C

    2015-04-01

    Combining active recall testing with spaced repetition increases memory retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare students' perception and utilization of an electronic spaced repetition oral pathology-radiology system in dental hygiene education and predoctoral dental education. The study employed an open-source suite of applications to create electronic "flashcards" that can be individually adjusted for frequency of repetition, depending on a user's assessment of difficulty. Accessible across multiple platforms (iOS, Android, Linux, OSX, Windows) as well as via any web-based browser, this framework was used to develop an oral radiology-oral pathology database of case-based questions. This system was introduced in two courses: sophomore oral pathology for dental students and sophomore radiology for dental hygiene students. Students were provided free software and/or mobile tablet devices as well as a database of 300 electronic question cards. Study participants were surveyed on frequency and extent of use. Perception-based surveys were used to evaluate their attitudes towards this technology. Of the eligible students, 12 of 22 (54.5%) dental hygiene and 49 of 107 (45.8%) dental students responded to the surveys. Adoption rates and student feedback were compared between the two groups. Among the respondents, acceptance of this technology with respect to educational usefulness was similar for the dental and dental hygiene students (median=5 on a five-point scale; dental hygiene interquartile range (IQR)=0; dental IQR=1). Only a minority of the survey respondents (25% dental, 33% dental hygiene) took advantage of one of the main benefits of this technology: automated spaced repetition.

  5. Perception of tobacco use prevention and cessation among faculty members in Latin American and Caribbean dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamí-Maury, Irene; Aigner, Carrie J; Hong, Judy; Strom, Sara; Chambers, Mark S; Gritz, Ellen R

    2014-12-01

    Rates of tobacco use are increasing in the regions of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Unfortunately, tobacco cessation education is not a standard component of the dental curriculum in LAC dental schools. The objective of this study was to identify the perceptions of LAC dental faculty members regarding the tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) competencies that should be addressed in the dental curricula. Dental deans and faculty completed a web-based questionnaire in Spanish, Portuguese, French, or English. The questionnaire contained 32 competencies grouped into the five A's (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) of tobacco cessation and six supplementary questions for identifying barriers to providing TUPAC education to dental students. Respondents indicated the degree to which they believed each competency should be incorporated into the dental curricula using a five-point Likert scale ("1" = strongly disagree to "5" = strongly agree). Responses were obtained from 390 faculty members (66 % South America, 18 % Mexico/Central America, 16 % the Caribbean). Of the respondents, 2, 12, and 83 % reported that smoking was allowed in clinical environments, other indoor environments, and outdoor environments of their dental schools, respectively. Mean importance ratings for each of the competencies were as follows: Ask (4.71), Advise (4.54), Assess (4.41), Assist (4.07), and Arrange (4.01). Overall, LAC dental educators agree that TUPAC training should be incorporated into the dental curricula. Assist and Arrange competencies were rated lower, relative to other competencies. Tobacco use among dental educators and high rates of on-campus smoking could potentially pose barriers to promoting cessation interventions in the LAC dental schools.

  6. Factors associated with dental behaviour management problems in children aged 2-8 years in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bin; Wang, Chun-Li; Ge, Li-Hong

    2011-05-01

    This study determined the prevalence of children's dental behaviour management problems (BMP) in our clinic, investigated the influence of non-dental and dental background variables on BMP, and analysed the predictive power of these variables. The study group included 209 children aged 2-8 years who received dental treatment. Interviews were conducted with accompanying guardians. Children's dental behaviour was rated by a modified Venham's clinical anxiety scale and a cooperative behaviour rating scale. Regression models were used to analyse behavioural and interview data and to calculate the power of background variables to predict children's dental behaviour. During the first treatment, 29.7% of children displayed BMP. Four variables were found to predict BMP in 87.9% of cases. The risk factors for BMP were younger age, negative guardian expectations of the child's behaviour during treatment, anxiety or shyness around strangers, and presence of toothache. Children aged 2.5-3.5 years who attended kindergarten showed better dental behaviour than those who did not. This study is the first to report BMP prevalence in mainland China. Our results indicate that a simple pre-treatment interview could provide data allowing the dentist to identify children with special dental behavioural needs. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Dental Environmental Noise Evaluation and Health Risk Model Construction to Dental Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Kuen Wai; Wong, Hai Ming; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2017-01-01

    Occupational noise is unavoidably produced from dental equipment, building facilities, and human voices in the dental environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of occupational noise exposure on the dental professionals’ health condition. The psychoacoustics approach noise exposure assessment followed by the health risk assessment was carried on at the paediatric dentistry clinic and the dental laboratory in the Prince Philip Dental Hospital of Hong Kong. The A-weigh...

  8. Dental Workforce Availability and Dental Services Utilization in Appalachia: A Geospatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Wiener, R. Constance

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is considerable variation in dental services utilization across Appalachian counties, and a plausible explanation is that individuals in some geographical areas do not utilize dental care due to dental workforce shortage. We conducted an ecological study on dental workforce availability and dental services utilization in Appalachia. Methods We derived county-level (n = 364) data on demographic, socio-economic characteristics and dental services utilization in Appalachia from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) using person-level data. We obtained county-level dental workforce availability and physician-to-population ratio estimates from Area Health Resource File, and linked them to the county-level BRFSS data. The dependent variable was the proportion using dental services within the last year in each county (ranging from 16.6% to 91.0%). We described the association between dental workforce availability and dental services utilization using ordinary least squares regression and spatial regression techniques. Spatial analyses consisted of bivariate Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) and geographically weighted regression (GWR). Results Bivariate LISA showed that counties in the central and southern Appalachian regions had significant (p dental workforce availability, low percent dental services utilization). GWR revealed considerable local variations in the association between dental utilization and dental workforce availability. In the multivariate GWR models, 8.5% (t-statistics >1.96) and 13.45% (t-statistics >1.96) of counties showed positive and statistically significant relationships between the dental services utilization and workforce availability of dentists and dental hygienists, respectively. Conclusions Dental workforce availability was associated with dental services utilization in the Appalachian region; however, this association was not statistically significant in all counties. The findings suggest

  9. Dental Anomalies and Dental Age Assessment in Treated Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Khojastepour, L; Zareifar, S; Ebrahimi, M

    2014-01-01

    Background This cross sectional study was performed to evaluate dental ages and incidence of dental anomalies in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods and materials A total of 25 ALL patient who passed at least 2 years of chemotherapy and 25 healthy sex and age matched children were evaluated. Dental age as well as dental anomalies in shape, size, number, and structure was recorded based on their panoramic radiographies which were taken for dental purposes. Results ...

  10. Orofacial esthetics and dental anxiety: associations with oral and psychological health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Viktor; Hakeberg, Magnus; Blomkvist, Klas; Wide Boman, Ulla

    2014-11-01

    Severe dental anxiety (DA) is associated with both oral health and psychosocial consequences in what has been described as a vicious circle of DA. The aim of this study was to investigate self-rated orofacial esthetics in patients with DA and its relationship to psychological and oral health. A consecutive sample of 152 adult patients who were referred or self-referred to a specialized dental anxiety clinic filled out the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (OES) as well as measurements on DA, self-rated oral health and general anxiety and depression. Clinical measures of dental status were also obtained. Compared with the general population, patients with DA had lower ratings of satisfaction on all aspects of their orofacial esthetics, which included the teeth, gingiva, mouth and face, as well as a global orofacial assessment. Furthermore, the perception of the orofacial appearance was related both to dental status and self-rated oral health, as well as to general anxiety and depression. The level of dissatisfaction with the orofacial appearance was similar for both genders, but women reported more regular dental care and better dental status. The results of this study clearly show less satisfaction with dental and facial appearance in patients with DA, and that the self-rating of orofacial esthetics is related to both oral and psychological health. The OES can be used to assess orofacial esthetics in patients with DA.

  11. Oral health quality-of-life among undergraduate Malaysian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsh, P; Arunima, C; Manoj, K

    2012-06-01

    To assess the oral health quality of life among Malaysian dental students using the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) scale. Malaysian dental students of Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal campus, Manipal University, Manipal answered a structured questionnaire recording the demographic characteristics, behavioral characteristics and eight items of OIDP. The mean OIDP ADD and OIDP SC scores were respectively, 4.10 (sd = 5.16, range 8 - 40) and 2. 3 (sd = 2.3, range 0-8). A total of 50%, 32.9% and 28.6% of the dental students confirmed difficulties with eating, cleaning teeth and sleeping and relaxing, respectively. Statistically significant relationships were observed between OIDP (ultimate oral impact) and a count of non-clinical oral health indicators representing the second (intermediate) levels of oral impact. Logistic regression analysis revealed that dental students who were dissatisfied with their oral health had greater oral impact than their counterparts. The odds ratios for satisfaction with oral health, dental visits and frequency of brushing teeth were respectively 1.74 (0.58-5.32), 0.59 (0.11-3.24) and 1.33 (0.41-4.30). The study reports the Oral Impact on Daily Performance among Malaysian dental students and provides evidence of importance of social and behavioral characteristics in shaping dental students response.

  12. Nigerian Dental Technology Students and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study of dental technology students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology. Enugu, Nigeria ... HIV-infected individuals is also known to be achieved through the provision of ... to care for HIV-infected patients among this group of dental professionals ..... Table 7: Willingness to care versus training needs on care.

  13. First-Aid Algorithms in Dental Avulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginska, Joanna; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Almost one fourth of traumatic dental injuries occur at schools or in their surroundings. Prevalence of tooth avulsion varies from 0.5% to 16% of all cases of dental trauma. Children with dental avulsion may seek help from school nurses so they should be able to provide first-aid treatment. However, many studies showed that the general level of…

  14. A Cognitive Task Analysis for Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; Beemsterboer, Phyllis L.; Johnson, Lynn A.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Steinberg, Linda S.; Breyer, F. Jay

    2000-01-01

    As part of the development of a scoring algorithm for a simulation-based dental hygiene initial licensure examination, this effort conducted a task analysis of the dental hygiene domain. Broad classes of behaviors that distinguish along the dental hygiene expert-novice continuum were identified and applied to the design of nine paper-based cases…

  15. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-01-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities. PMID:24082719

  16. Dental anxiety: Investigative and management techniques often ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Information on the pattern of dental anxiety management in Nigeria is currently not available. Aim: The study was designed to determine the awareness and frequency of application of dental anxiety assessment questionnaires as well as the current pattern in the management of dental anxiety in Nigeria.

  17. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Procedure‑related and patient‑related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants to a major extent. Hence, we aimed to evaluate and analyze various systemic factors in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: Fifty‑one patients were included in the study, in which a total of 110 dental ...

  18. Dental erosion: prevalence, incidence, and distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, D.H.J.; Amaechi, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erosion is one of the most common dental diseases and it is a growing problem. Numerous epidemiological studies have investigated the prevalence of dental erosion. For these studies different cross sections of the population are investigated. Large differences were found between countries,

  19. Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2017-07-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, in collaboration with the American Dental Association, has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications of patients with orthopaedic implants presenting for dental procedures, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The 64 patient scenarios and 1 treatment were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  20. Management of periodontal destruction caused by overhanging dental restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misnova Misnova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal tissue inflammations are occasionally caused by positions of restoration margins, particularly if they are placed subgingivally. A 44-year old male was referred to the Dental and Mouth Hospital of Dentistry Faculty Hasanuddin University with the chief complaint of severe pain at right posterior maxillary. Clinical examinations demonstrate a 7-mm periodontal pocket at buccal aspect of 16 teeth with tooth mobility °2. Overhanging dental composite restorations of Class V were detected at the subgingival areas of 15, 16, and 17. Radiographic results show vertically and horizontally alveolar bone loss. This case report is aimed to describe the management of periodontal tissue destruction as a result of overhanging dental composite restorations. Scaling and root planing were conducted as the initial therapy. The periodontal surgery was performed a week after the initial therapy. A full-thickness flap design with sulcular incision from 14 to 18 was made before the pocket curretage and necrotic tissue debridement along with restoration recontouring. The flap was sutured with simple suture technique. Periodontal dressing was packed for a week. Antibiotics, analgetics and antiinflammatory drugs were prescribed per orally. There was no history of pain a week after the surgical procedure. Tooth mobility was decreased to °1 and the periodontal pocket was reduced to 3 mm. Overhanging dental restorations may lead to periodontal tissue destruction. The subgingivally placement of those restorations should consider the health of periodontal tissues.

  1. Sella turcica bridging and dental anomalies: is there an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Cassani, Marco; Fraticelli, Danilo; Beccari, Sergio; Gandini, Paola

    2017-11-01

    Sella turcica bridging (STB), or calcification of the interclinoid ligament of sella turcica, has been reported to be associated with some dental anomalies (palatal canine impaction and transposition). The aim of the study was to find any association between canine impaction, hyperdontia or hypodontia and sellar dimensions or bridging. Lateral cephalometric radiographs from 78 patients with impacted canines, 68 with dental agenesis and 17 with hyperdontia were collected. Linear dimensions of sella turcica were calculated and compared to those of a control group (47 individuals). A standardize scoring scale was used to quantify the extent of STB from each radiographs. The frequency of partial and complete calcifications of sella in patients with dental anomalies is increased when compared to controls. STB can influence the interclinoid distance but does not affect other linear dimensions of sella. No statistically significant difference has been found in sellar dimensions and STB expression when evaluating radiographs at different ages. STB is frequently found in patients with dental abnormalities. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Caries detection in dental radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Caries, or the decay of teeth are difficult to automatically detect in dental radiographs because of the small area of the image that is occupied by the decay. Images of dental radiographs has distinct regions of homogeneous gray levels, and therefore naturally lead to a segmentation based automatic caries detection algorithm. This paper describes a method for caries detection based on a multiclass, area independent thresholding and segmenting scheme. This multiclass thresholding algorithm is an extension of the uniform error threshold, an area independent, distribution free thresholding method used for images of only two classes of objects. The authors first consider the problem of caries detection and the image features that characterize the presence of caries. Next, the uniform error threshold is reviewed, and the general multiclass uniform error threshold algorithm is presented. This algorithm is used to automatically detect caries in dental radiographs

  3. Improving osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; Meirelles, Luiz

    2010-03-01

    In the beginning of implantology, the procedures adopted for treating patients were performed in two surgical phases with an interval of 3-6 months. Nowadays, it is possible to insert and load a dental implant in the same surgical procedure. This change is due to several factors, such as improvement of surgical technique, modifications of the implant design, increased quality of implant manufacturing, development of the surgical instruments' quality, careful patient screening and adequate treatment of the implant surface. The clinical results show that adequate treatment of surfaces is crucial for reducing healing time and treating at-risk patients. The surface properties of dental implants can be significantly improved at the manufacturing stage, affecting cells' activity during the healing phase that will ultimately determine the host tissue response, a fundamental requirement for clinical success. This review focuses on different types of dental implant surfaces and the influence of surface characteristics on osseointegration.

  4. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyonyi, Kristina L; Radford, David R; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2017-01-01

    This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England. Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008-2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients' individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status) and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence), with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments. Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (care in the form of 'instruction and advice', compared with 46% of working age adults (18-64 years); p = 0.001. The odds of receiving treatment increased with each increasing year of age amongst adults (p = 0.001): 'partial dentures' (7%); 'scale and polish' (3.7%); 'tooth extraction' (3%; p = 0.001), and 'instruction and advice' (3%; p = 0.001). Smokers had a higher likelihood of receiving all treatments; and were notably over four times more likely to receive 'instruction and advice' than non-smokers (OR 4.124; 95% CI: 3.088-5.508; p = 0.01). A further new finding from the multilevel models was a significant difference in treatment related to area of residence; adults from the most deprived quintile were more likely

  5. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina L Wanyonyi

    Full Text Available This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England.Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008-2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients' individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence, with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments.Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (<18 years and older adults (≥65 years received preventive care in the form of 'instruction and advice', compared with 46% of working age adults (18-64 years; p = 0.001. The odds of receiving treatment increased with each increasing year of age amongst adults (p = 0.001: 'partial dentures' (7%; 'scale and polish' (3.7%; 'tooth extraction' (3%; p = 0.001, and 'instruction and advice' (3%; p = 0.001. Smokers had a higher likelihood of receiving all treatments; and were notably over four times more likely to receive 'instruction and advice' than non-smokers (OR 4.124; 95% CI: 3.088-5.508; p = 0.01. A further new finding from the multilevel models was a significant difference in treatment related to area

  6. Dental worm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Fiorino, Sirio

    2016-12-01

    During human evolution, the period in which groups of humans stopped harvesting fruits and seeds growing wild and introduced the cultivation of cereals as well as the domestication of animals represents a very important event. This circumstance had a considerable impact on human pathocenosis, increasing the risk of infectious diseases of animal origin. The aim of this review was to summarise the archaeological and palaeo-pathological evidence in the literature concerning this topic. Starting from early prehistory (about 1.5 million years ago) up to the historical period, several authors have described the changes in human habits and the consequent changes in food supply, leading to the transition from a protein- to a carbohydrate-rich diet across a broad interval of time. This led to additional problems for human health. The increased accumulation of carbohydrate debris in the odonto-stomatological apparatus, without the appropriate use of hygiene in the oral cavity, increased the risk of infectious disease involving the mouth. Therefore, since the Neolithic period there has been a higher risk of tooth caries, abscesses, deep infection of the teeth roots, reaching also the mandibular and maxillary bone. Several hypotheses have been proposed by the distinct civilizations, which have alternated in the different ages, to explain the cause of these human health problems, including the idea that a "dental worm" could be involved in this process, such as in the Sumerian period. We describe and discuss further modifications of this theory, developed in Egypt, Assyria, Babylon, China, Greece, in Etruscan cities and in Rome in ancient times as well as in the Middle Ages, and the evolution of scientific thought on this topic in the past 300 years. In addition, the results of some palaeo-pathological studies, which were performed on human remains, such as the maxillary bone and teeth, mainly in different geographical areas in Italy, are examined and reported.

  7. Creation of a scholars program in dental leadership (SPDL) for dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S; Green, Thomas G; Polverini, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    There is a great need for leaders in the dental profession. As technological advances make our world smaller and our lives faster and more complex, we as a profession face challenges and opportunities that are evolving. Many of the changes in the scope and mode of practice will require new and different approaches. Meeting these challenges will require changes in how we as dental professionals do business; interact with our patients, other stakeholders, and health care providers; and educate our future colleagues. The purposeful incorporation of leadership education into dental and dental hygiene curricula represents an important departure from existing paradigms-but will help prepare our students to address these challenges. This article provides an overview of the development of a Scholars Program in Dental Leadership (SPDL) at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Our aim for the program is to create a learning environment that fosters leadership development, so that students are prepared and motivated to assume leadership positions in the profession and their communities.

  8. Low-dose dental CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustemeyer, P.; Eich, H.T.; John-Mikolajewski, V.; Mueller, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The intention of this study was to reduce patient dose during dental CT in the planning for osseointegrated implants. Methods and Materials: Dental CTs were performed with a spiral CT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens) and a dental software package. Use of the usual dental CT technique (120 kVp; 165 mA, 1 s rotation time, 165 mAs; pitch factor 1) was compared with a new protocol (120 kVp; 50 mA; 0.7 s rotation time; 35 mAs; pitch factor 2) which delivered the best image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose, as tested in a preceding study. Image quality was analysed using a human anatomic head preparation. Four radiologists analysed the images independently. A Wilcoxon rank pair-test was used for statistic evaluation. The doses to the thyroid gland, the active bone marrow, the salivary glands, and the eye lens were determined in a tissue-equivalent phantom (Alderson-Rando Phantom) with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters at the appropriate locations. Results: By mAs reduction from 165 to 35 and using a pitch factor of 2, the radiation dose could be reduced by a factor of nine (max.) (e.g., the bone marrow dose could be reduced from 23.6 mSv to 2.9 mSv, eye lens from 0.5 mSv to 0.3 mSv, thyroid gland from 2.5 mSv to 0.5 mSv, parotid glands from 2.3 mSv to 0.4 mSv). The dose reduction did not lead to an actual loss of image quality or diagnostic information. Conclusion: A considerable dose reduction without loss of diagnostic information is achievable in dental CT. Dosereducing examination protocols like the one presented may further expand the use of preoperative dental CT. (orig.) [de

  9. Uranium determination in dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, I.; Gamboa, I.; Espinosa, G.; Moreno, A.

    1984-01-01

    There are many reports of high uranium concentration in dental ceramics, so they require to be controlled. The SSNTD is an optional method to determine the uranium concentration. In this work the analysis of several commercial dental ceramics used regularly in Mexico by dentists is presented. The chemical and electrochemical processes are used and the optimal conditions for high sensitivity are determined. CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) was used as detector. The preliminary results show some materials with high uranium concentrations. Next step will be the analysis of equivalent dose and the effects in the public health. (author)

  10. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Biryukova, T.; Sukhinina, A.; Vdovin, Yu

    2010-11-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 - 645 nm and 340 - 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy.

  11. Radiological protection in dental practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Intended to be complementary to the more comprehensive document, ''Code of Practice for the protection of persons against ionizing radiations arising from medical and dental use'' (CIS 74-423), the purpose of this booklet is to give dentists some basic information on the safe use of X-rays. Contents: why protection from X-rays; responsibility for radiation protection; protection during a dental examination; ensuring a safe installation; sources of further information. Appendices: maximum permissible doses; useful addresses; summary of relevant recommendations from the Code of Practice; notes on film processing.

  12. Radiation protection in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jozani, F.; Parnianpour, H.

    1976-08-01

    In considering the special provisions required in dental radiography, investigations were conducted in Iran. Radiation dose levels in dental radiography were found to be high. Patient exposure from intraoral radiographic examination was calculated, using 50kV X-ray. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were fastened to the nasion, eyes, lip, philtrum, thyroid, gonads and to the right and left of the supra-orbital, infra-orbital temporomandibular joints of live patients. The highest exposure value was for the lower lip. Recommendations concerning educational training and protection of staff and patients were included

  13. [Constructing 3-dimensional colorized digital dental model assisted by digital photography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hong-qiang; Liu, Yu-shu; Liu, Yun-song; Ning, Jing; Zhao, Yi-jiao; Zhou, Yong-sheng

    2016-02-18

    To explore a method of constructing universal 3-dimensional (3D) colorized digital dental model which can be displayed and edited in common 3D software (such as Geomagic series), in order to improve the visual effect of digital dental model in 3D software. The morphological data of teeth and gingivae were obtained by intra-oral scanning system (3Shape TRIOS), constructing 3D digital dental models. The 3D digital dental models were exported as STL files. Meanwhile, referring to the accredited photography guide of American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), five selected digital photographs of patients'teeth and gingivae were taken by digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR) with the same exposure parameters (except occlusal views) to capture the color data. In Geomagic Studio 2013, after STL file of 3D digital dental model being imported, digital photographs were projected on 3D digital dental model with corresponding position and angle. The junctions of different photos were carefully trimmed to get continuous and natural color transitions. Then the 3D colorized digital dental model was constructed, which was exported as OBJ file or WRP file which was a special file for software of Geomagic series. For the purpose of evaluating the visual effect of the 3D colorized digital model, a rating scale on color simulation effect in views of patients'evaluation was used. Sixteen patients were recruited and their scores on colored and non-colored digital dental models were recorded. The data were analyzed using McNemar-Bowker test in SPSS 20. Universal 3D colorized digital dental model with better color simulation was constructed based on intra-oral scanning and digital photography. For clinical application, the 3D colorized digital dental models, combined with 3D face images, were introduced into 3D smile design of aesthetic rehabilitation, which could improve the patients' cognition for the esthetic digital design and virtual prosthetic effect. Universal 3D colorized

  14. Relationships between dental hygienists' career attitudes and their retention of practice. Part II. From the results of the Ohio Dentist and Dental Hygiene Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S S; Langhout, K J; Scheid, R C

    1993-01-01

    This article utilizes findings from the Ohio Dental Hygiene Survey and Ohio Dentist Survey to uncover what specific dental hygiene attitudes exist relative to employment and what factors have led to job termination and to re-entry. Ohio dental hygiene employees are most satisfied with patient relationships, co-worker relationships, and flexible working hours. The dental hygienists are least satisfied with fringe benefits, financial growth, and career creativity. Salary, benefits, nor career longevity were significant factors in determining satisfaction. Dental hygienists who were not working when surveyed, said they would consider returning to practice if a better salary were available, if they could find part-time work, if there were a good wage scale with benefits, or if their own financial need changed. Thirty-six percent of the non-practitioners said they would not ever consider returning to practice due to working conditions, establishment of a new career, or inadequate compensation. Dentist employers stated that they were satisfied or very satisfied with their dental hygienists' patient care and contribution to the practice.

  15. A study of statistics anxiety levels of graduate dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Paul S; Jacks, Mary E; Smiley, Lynn A; Walden, Carolyn E; Clark, William D; Nguyen, Carol A

    2015-02-01

    In light of increased emphasis on evidence-based practice in the profession of dental hygiene, it is important that today's dental hygienist comprehend statistical measures to fully understand research articles, and thereby apply scientific evidence to practice. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate statistics anxiety among graduate dental hygiene students in the U.S. A web-based self-report, anonymous survey was emailed to directors of 17 MSDH programs in the U.S. with a request to distribute to graduate students. The survey collected data on statistics anxiety, sociodemographic characteristics and evidence-based practice. Statistic anxiety was assessed using the Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale. Study significance level was α=0.05. Only 8 of the 17 invited programs participated in the study. Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale data revealed graduate dental hygiene students experience low to moderate levels of statistics anxiety. Specifically, the level of anxiety on the Interpretation Anxiety factor indicated this population could struggle with making sense of scientific research. A decisive majority (92%) of students indicated statistics is essential for evidence-based practice and should be a required course for all dental hygienists. This study served to identify statistics anxiety in a previously unexplored population. The findings should be useful in both theory building and in practical applications. Furthermore, the results can be used to direct future research. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  16. Effects of early dental office visits on dental caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, Heather; Rozier, R Gary; Preisser, John S; Stearns, Sally C; Lee, Jessica Y

    2014-10-01

    We determined the association between timing of a first dentist office visit before age 5 years and dental disease in kindergarten. We used North Carolina Medicaid claims (1999-2006) linked to state oral health surveillance data to compare caries experience for kindergarten students (2005-2006) who had a visit before age 60 months (n=11,394) to derive overall exposure effects from a zero-inflated negative binomial regression model. We repeated the analysis separately for children who had preventive and tertiary visits. Children who had a visit at age 37 to 48 and 49 to 60 months had significantly less disease than children with a visit by age 24 months (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.81, 0.95; IRR=0.75; 95% CI=0.69, 0.82, respectively). Disease status did not differ between children who had a tertiary visit by age 24 months and other children. Medicaid-enrolled children in our study followed an urgent care type of utilization, and access to dental care was limited. Children at high risk for dental disease should be given priority for a preventive dental visit before age 3 years.

  17. Diagnostic Methods for Dental Caries Used by Private Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... methods used for diagnosis and treatment of dental caries can exhibit considerable differences. Oral health markedly contributes to the maintenance of general health and ..... may be attributed to the deterioration of eye function with the advanced ... meticulous visual examination of a dry tooth and the lack.

  18. The National Institute of Dental Research Clinical Dental Staff Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Bruce J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program in one of the National Institutes of Health offers clinical training fellowships as a means of training potential dental school faculty by providing both unique clinical skills and high-quality research experience. The program was developed in response to a perceived need for change in academic dentistry. (MSE)

  19. Oral Health, Dental Insurance and Dental Service use in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Preety; Chen, Gang; Harris, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    This study uses data from the 2004-2006 Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health and a simultaneous equation framework to investigate the interrelationships between dental health, private dental insurance and the use of dental services. The results show that insurance participation is influenced by social and demographic factors, health and health behaviours. In turn, these factors affect the use of dental services, both directly and through insurance participation. Our findings confirm that affordability is a major barrier to visiting the dentist for oral health maintenance and treatment. Our results suggest that having supplementary insurance is associated with some 56 percentage points higher probability of seeing the dentist in the general population. For those who did not have private insurance cover, we predict that conditional on them facing the same insurance conditions, on average, having insurance would increase their visits to the dentist by 43 percentage points. The uninsured in the survey have lower income, worse oral health and lower rates of preventive and treatment visits. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Hypnosis compared with group therapy and individual desensitization for dental anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Abrahamsen, Randi; Brødsgaard, I

    1996-01-01

    Effects of hypnotherapy (HT) and self-hypnosis training on extreme dental anxiety in adults aged 19-65 years were compared with group therapy (GT) and individual desensitization (SD) using scales of dental anxiety, dental beliefs, and fear of a next dentist (after specialist treatment). All...... experimental groups were demographically comparable and showed reduced anxiety and improved dental beliefs compared with 51 control patients. The 25 HT patients did not differ significantly in numbers of dropouts during training compared with the 30 GT patients or 68 SD patients. For patients completing...... (8/32), but not GT (15/30). Hypnotizability was found to vary from patient to patient, with a direct relationship to time saved. But hypnotizability had an inverse relationship to STAI general anxiety level for those who went on to dentists after 1 year. Transference effects were noted for most HT...

  1. Knowledge, attitude and practices of Indian dental surgeons towards tobacco control: advances towards prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddichha, Sahoo; Rekha, Dorothy P; Patil, Basanagouda K; Murthy, Pratima; Benegal, Vivek; Isaac, Mohan K

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the knowledge, attitude and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Bangalore, Karnataka, concerning use of tobacco in their patients. A self-administered questionnaire was administered to all dental surgeons prior to a sensitization program on nicotine dependence. The dental surgeons who responded (n=100) reported a need for increasing sensitization on the issue of tobacco especially among health professionals. Only 33% knew that nicotine is the most addictive drug and knowledge was poor about pharmacological as well as non pharmacological methods of treatment of nicotine dependence. Only 52% asked all their patients about tobacco use. However, almost all dental surgeons agreed that there should be a ban on public use of tobacco. The results of this study call for sensitizing health professionals on a larger scale on the issue of tobacco use and its treatment.

  2. Dental lesions and restorative treatment in molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghiu Irina-Maria

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article review specific clinical issues of the molar teeth, as well as the therapeutic approach of their pathology. The dental pathology we face in the group of molars is related to: dental caries, dental trauma (crown and crown-root fractures, dental wear phenomena. The therapeutic approach of the molar teeth is represented by: restoration of the loss of hard dental tissues; endodontic treatments of pulpal and periapical complications; surgical treatment. The restorative treatments in molars are: direct restorations, with or without supplementary anchorage for obturations; inlay, onlay; prosthetic crown.

  3. The Crisis at Christmas Dental Service: a review of an annual volunteer-led dental service for homeless and vulnerably housed people in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, J; Stagnell, S; Shah, N; Vasey, A; Gillard, C

    2018-01-01

    Background The UK charity Crisis originated in 1967 as a response to the increasing numbers of homeless people in London, and the first Crisis at Christmas event for rough sleepers was established in 1971. Since then, Crisis has provided numerous services over the Christmas period to the most vulnerable members of society. One of these is the Crisis at Christmas Dental Service (CCDS) which provides emergency and routine dental care from 23-29 of December each year. The charity is entirely dependent on voluntary staffing and industry donations including materials and facilities. This paper aims to assess the impact of the service over the last six years of clinical activity from 2011-2016.Method Anonymised data were collected from the annual CCDS delivered over the last six consecutive years. Services included: dental consultations; oral hygiene instruction; scale and polishes; permanent fillings; extractions; and fluoride varnish applications. In addition, anonymised patient feedback was collected after each dental attendance.Results On average, 80-85% of the patients were male and the majority were between 21 and 60 years of age. The most common nationality was British (46%). Over the six-year data collection period intervention treatments (restorations and extractions) remained fairly consistent, while the number of fluoride varnish applications and oral hygiene instruction have increased. The majority of patients reported positive satisfaction with their treatment and would have recommended the service to others. Approximately 75% of patients did not regularly attend a dentist outside of Crisis and a similar proportion were given information on where to access year round dental services for homeless people in London. The majority of dental volunteers felt that they enjoyed the experience and would consider volunteering again for Crisis in the future.Conclusion The Crisis at Christmas Dental Service has emerged as a valuable asset to the portfolio of resources

  4. Dental hygiene work in a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, H S; Morgado, I; Assunção, V; Bernardo, M F; Leroux, B; Martin, M D; DeRouen, T A; Leitão, J

    2008-08-01

    Dental hygiene activities were developed as part of a randomized clinical trial designed to assess the safety of low-level mercury exposure from dental amalgam restorations. Along with dental-hygiene clinical work, a community programme was implemented after investigators noticed the poor oral hygiene habits of participants, and the need for urgent action to minimize oral health problems in the study population. Clinical and community activity goal was to promote oral health and prevent new disease. Community activities involved participants and their fellow students and were aimed at providing education on oral health in a school environment. Dental hygienists developed clinical work with prophylaxis, sealants application and topical fluoride and implemented the community programme with in-class sessions on oral health themes. Twice a month fluoride mouthrinses and bi-annual tooth brushing instructional activity took place. Participation at dental-hygiene activities, sealed teeth with no need of restoration and dental-plaque-index were measures used to evaluate success of the programme for the participants. Improvement in dental hygiene is shown by the decrease in dental plaque index scores (P dental hygiene activities. Teachers became aware of the problem and included oral-health in school curricula. Dental hygiene activities have shown to be helpful to promote dental hygiene, promote oral health and to provide school-age children with education on habits that will be important for their future good health.

  5. The virtual dental home: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jay W; Nash, David A; Mathu-Muju, Kavita R

    2017-09-01

    The Virtual Dental Home is a concept of the Pacific Center for Special Care of the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. It is designed to improve access to dental care for underserved populations, specifically children and institutionalized adults. This article describes the development and implementation of the Virtual Dental Home, subsequently critiquing the concept. The criteria for a dental home are not met by the program. It is the equivalent of a traditional public oral health prevention and screening program, with the additional dimension of allowing dental hygienists and assistants to place interim glass ionomer restorations in dental cavities. The critique questions the need to insert a "cloud" dentist into the process. The routine utilization of radiographs is also challenged. The VDH not only lacks the attributes of a dental home, it has not been shown to be as efficient and effective as traditional programs staffed by dental hygienists and dental therapists. The article concludes by describing how programs utilizing dental therapists could address the deficiencies of the Virtual Dental Home, effectively improving access to oral health care for underserved populations. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Dental Age Difference in Children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Puneet; Yu, Qingzhao; Zhu, Han; Townsend, Janice A

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in dental development are associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or ADHD medications. This retrospective chart review evaluated the dental age of 128 patients between 6 and 16 years of age using the Demirjian method from the following two groups a) children with ADHD b) unaffected children. The ADHD group was further stratified into four groups according to the medication type. The impact of ADHD on dental age difference (the difference between dental age and chronologic age) was analyzed using T-test and the association between medication type and dental age difference was analyzed through one way ANOVA. The mean difference between estimated dental age and chronologic age (dental age difference) for all subjects was 0.80 years. There was no significant dental age difference in subjects with ADHD and the control group (0.78±1.28vs. 0.84 ±1.09 years respectively; P=0.75) and there was no significant difference in dental age difference and type of medication (P=0.84). No significant difference was found between children with ADHD and unaffected children with respect to dental age difference. No significant differences were found in dental age difference in the four medication groups.

  7. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellows, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats

  8. Recent trends in dental visits and private dental insurance, 1989 and 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Thomas P; Brown, L Jackson

    2003-05-01

    This article describes recent trends in dental visits and private dental insurance in the United States. This study is based on the analyses of data regarding dental visits and private dental insurance among the population 2 years of age or older from the 1989 and 1999 National Health Interview Surveys. Overall, the percentage of the population with a dental visit rose from 57.2 percent in 1989 to 64.1 percent in 1999, while the percentage with private dental insurance fell from 40.5 percent to 35.2 percent. Although a higher percentage of people with private dental insurance reported having a dental visit than did those without private dental insurance in both years, the increase from 1989 to 1999 in the percentage of those with a visit was larger among the uninsured. If this trend persists, a smaller portion of practicing dentist's clientele will be insured. This may affect demand for services, as well as front office operations.

  9. Reconstruction of pseudo three-dimensional dental image from dental panoramic radiograph and tooth surface shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, Masataka; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Oshiro, Osamu; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kagiyama, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Masakazu; Takada, Kenji; Azuma, Hiroko

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional volume data set is useful for diagnosis in dental treatments. However, to obtain three-dimensional images of a dental arch in general dental clinics is difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional dental images from a dental panoramic radiograph and a tooth surface shape which can be obtained from three dimensional shape measurement of a dental impression. The proposed method finds an appropriate curved surface on which the dental panoramic radiograph is mapped by comparing a virtual panoramic image made from a tooth surface shape to a real panoramic radiograph. The developed pseudo three-dimensional dental images give clear impression of patient's dental condition. (author)

  10. Taxonomy for competency-based dental curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Neira, Roberto J; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this article is to propose a classification of dental competencies. Interest in dental competencies has grown consistently during the last three decades. However, the dental education literature suggests that the term "competency" is understood and used differently by dental schools around the world. The taxonomic classification of dental competencies we propose follows a systematic approach starting at the highest level of complexity, i.e., the professional profile the teaching institution envisions for its graduates, and following in a decreasing degree of complexity to competency function, task, step, movement, and moment. This taxonomy has proved to be useful for more than thirty years in the Dental School of the Peruvian University Cayetano Heredia. Graduates of this school are successful practitioners, teachers, and researchers in Peru and other countries. The classification proposed here should clarify terms, facilitate curriculum design and learning assessment, stimulate further discussion on the matter, and facilitate communication among the dental education establishment.

  11. Dental stories for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Ian W; Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; McKinney, Christy M; Scott, JoAnna M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate caregivers' preference regarding dental stories to prepare children with autism for dental visits. Caregivers of children with autism were allowed use of dental stories available via different media (paper, tablet computer, computer) and image types (comics or drawings, photographs, video). Caregivers completed pre- and postintervention surveys. Fisher's exact tests were used to determine associations between predictive factors and preferences. Forty initial and 16 follow-up surveys were completed. Subjects were primarily male (85%). Mean child age was 6.7 years. Nine (64%) caregivers found the dental story useful for themselves and their child. Two (14%) caregivers found the aid only helpful for themselves. Preferred media type was associated with language understanding (p = .038) and home media preference (p = .002). Practitioners should consider using dental stories to help prepare families and children for dental visits. Individual preferences for dental stories vary; using prior history can aid in selection. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dental Anxiety among Danish Adults—Comparison of Recent Website Data and Older Telephone Data with Government Demographic Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Bering, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background : Survey quality, in particular sampling, coverage, and issues of representativity, are important for valid and reliable conclusions from epidemiological data. Dental anxiety (DA) still challenges dental clinicians since it is synonymous with care avoidance. Accurate estimates......-3 data. Conclusion: Web survey results from this convenience sample were demographically representative for adults 20 - 80 yo and showed small changes in DA after 20 years. Future strategies regarding survey of teenagers require special attention.......Abstract Background : Survey quality, in particular sampling, coverage, and issues of representativity, are important for valid and reliable conclusions from epidemiological data. Dental anxiety (DA) still challenges dental clinicians since it is synonymous with care avoidance. Accurate estimates......); and 3) compare web results with 1993 results. Method: Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) measured DA, while other items revealed gender, age, education, dentist avoidance, and three types of negative dentist behaviors. Analyses used frequencies, Chi square, odds ratios (OR) and ANOVAs. Results: Samples from...

  13. Reliability and validity of Serbian version of children's dental fear questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalić Maja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Dental anxiety leads to avoidance of dental treatment and could lead to impaired oral health. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the Serbian version of Children’s Fear Survey Schedule Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS and the relations between dental anxiety and oral health status in a sample of Serbian schoolchildren. Methods. The CFSS-DS scale was translated into Serbian and administered to 231 (12-year old patients of the Pediatric Dental Department, Public Health Center Čukarica, Belgrade. The number of healthy, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT score in children was determined by a clinical exam. Results. The average CFSS-DS score was 26.47 ± 10.33. The girls reported higher anxiety than the boys (p < 0.05. Most common fears were drilling, choking, going to the hospital and anesthesia. Lower CFSS-DS scores were recorded in children with all healthy teeth (p < 0.05. Children with higher CFSS-DS scores mostly visit the dentist due to pain or parental insistence, and those with lower anxiety scores more often visited dentist due to regular check-ups or non-invasive treatments (p < 0.01. A high value of the Cronbach's coefficient of internal consistency (α = 0.88 was found in the entire scale. Conclusion. The Serbian version of CFSS-DS questionnaire is reliable and valid psychometric instrument for evaluation of dental fear in Serbian children. Dental anxiety negatively affects dental attendance and oral health of the examined schoolchildren.

  14. Disparities in unmet dental need and dental care received by pregnant women in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Garcia, A Isabel; Adams, Amy B; Cheng, Diana

    2014-09-01

    To examine prenatal dental care needs, utilization and oral health counseling among Maryland women who delivered a live infant during 2001-2003 and identify the factors associated with having a dental visit and having an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System is an ongoing population based surveillance system that collects information of women's attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to model dental visits and unmet dental need using predictor variables for Maryland 2001-2003 births. Less than half of all women reported having a dental visit and receiving oral health advice during pregnancy. Twenty-five percent of women reported a need for dental care, of which 33 % did not receive dental care despite their perceived need. Multivariate modeling revealed that racial minorities, women who were not married and those with annual income dental visit. Women who were not married, had low annual income, were older than 40 years of age, had an unintended pregnancy and received prenatal care later than desired were most likely to have an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Despite reported needs and existing recommendations to include oral health as a component of prenatal care, less than half of pregnant women have a dental visit during their pregnancy. One-third of women with a dental problem did not have a dental visit highlighting the unmet need for dental care during pregnancy.

  15. Assessment of anxiety related to dental treatments among patients attending dental clinics and hospitals in Ranga Reddy District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathima, Vedati; Anjum, M Shakeel; Reddy, P Parthasarathi; Jayakumar, A; Mounica, M

    2014-01-01

    To assess the levels of dental anxiety among patients anticipating dental treatments in dental clinics/hospitals of Ranga Reddy district. A cross-sectional study was conducted among a representative sample of 1200 subjects (at least 18 years old) in dental clinics/hospitals which were selected from a list obtained through systematic random sampling. The data were collected using a pre-tested and calibrated questionnaire consisting of the Modified Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) to assess anxiety levels. The majority (52.4%) of subjects showed a low level of anxiety. Females (11.44 ± 4.41) were found to have higher mean MDAS scores than males, and the highest mean MDAS scores were found among 18- to 34-year-olds (11.28 ± 4.67) (P < 0.05). Significant differences were found among subjects anticipating different treatments, with higher MDAS scores for extraction (11.25 ± 5.4), followed by examination, root canal treatment, gum surgery, scaling, restoration and others, e.g. orthodontic treatment, restoration with crowns, bridges and dentures (7.79 ± 3.80). The highest mean MDAS scores were found among subjects who were apprehensive due to 'past difficult experience in dental treatments', followed by 'drill' and 'injection', with the lowest scores among subjects indicating 'other reasons' (7.82 ± 3.84). The present data show that anxiety levels are higher in patients who have to undergo extractions than those who must be fitted with dentures. Thus, dental health care providers should pay more attention to patients' anxiety levels associated with different types of treatment.

  16. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraete Willy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3- concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-. Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO, nitrous oxide (N2O, and dinitrogen (N2 using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions.

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, D.; Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined.

  19. [Radiodiagnostic methods for dental anomalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovoĭ, S K; Serova, N S; Ivanova, D V

    2012-01-01

    To determine the capacities of radiologic studies in the examination of patients with dental anomalies. One hundred and twenty patients with dental anomalies were examined. Conventional X-ray and high-technology radiology techniques (multislice spiral computed tomography (MSSCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)) were used. Orthopantomography is the most common method for radiologic examination of patients with dental anomalies. However, X-ray procedures do not provide complete information on the position and status of an abnormal tooth, which is required to define further patient management tactics. While planning the management, MSSCT and CBCT were performed in 56 (46.7%) and 64 (53.3%) patients, respectively. In addition, 72 (60.0%) patients in whom orthodontic treatment had been recommended at the first stage underwent MSSCT or CBCT following 7 months. CBCT showed that 4 (3.3%) patients had dental ankylosis previously undiagnosed by MSSCT. The high-technology radiology techniques could assess the position of a tooth in relation to its important anatomic structures and identify the comorbidity that keeps from being treated. MSSCT and CBCT can make in full measure the topical diagnosis of abnormal teeth and hence choose an optimal algorithm for comprehensive treatment of patients.

  20. Radiation dose in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohnen, M.; Kemper, J.; Moedder, U.; Moebes, O.; Pawelzik, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology. (orig.)

  1. Dental approach to craniofacial syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2012-01-01

    is essential for insight into craniofacial syndromes. The dentition, thus, becomes central in diagnostics and evaluation of the pathogenesis. Developmental fields can explore and advance the concept of dental approaches to craniofacial syndromes. Discussion. As deviations in teeth persist and do not reorganize...

  2. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  3. Dental Hygienists Licensed in Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia. Health Manpower Project.

    Beginning with a statement on the profession of dental hygiene and the two types of professional preparation available in the field, the pilot study then presents a two-part summary of its findings and an explanation of the methodology employed. Part I of the main portion of the report concerns employment characteristics (status, age, residence,…

  4. [The future of dental amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a comment on 'The enigma of dental amalgam' by Carl Leinfelder published in 2004 in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. In that paper a warning is stated against a too abrupt change from amalgam towards resin composite, because this will bring a lot of clinical problems

  5. [Dental implant restoration abutment selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Shi; Hao, Zeng

    2017-04-01

    An increasing number of implant restoration abutment types are produced with the rapid development of dental implantology. Although various abutments can meet different clinical demands, the selection of the appropriate abutment is both difficult and confusing. This article aims to help clinicians select the appropriate abutment by describing abutment design, types, and selection criteria.

  6. Child Dental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Foods For Healthy Teeth - Amarɨñña / አማርኛ (Amharic) MP3 Office of Oral Health Maryland Department of Health ... PDF Healthy Teeth, Healthy Kids - Amarɨñña / አማርኛ (Amharic) MP3 Maryland Dental Action Coalition Arabic (العربية) Expand Section ...

  7. Room design in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achalli, Sonika

    2013-01-01

    Radiography and radiographic examination of the patient form most valuable diagnostic tool in providing comprehensive dental care. The safe and effective use of the X-ray equipment is important for the protection of the patient, other members of the public and all members of the dental team. For patients, the risk that is associated with exposure to X-rays must always be weighed against the clinical benefit of an accurate diagnosis. The risks associated with the exposure to the X-rays during the radiographic examination of the patient must be minimised by meticulously adhering to good practice and thus carefully managing the use of dental radiological procedures. The dentist or the personnel who is the license holder for the X-ray equipment is ultimately responsible for the radiation safety at the workplace. One important method in limiting the possible risk of radiation exposure at workplace is the correct design of an X-ray room. This paper is aimed at discussing the guidelines and recommendations on X-ray room designs in dental radiology in order to facilitate radiation control and safe working conditions for radiation workers as well as the public. (author)

  8. Indicators of dental anxiety in children just prior to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majstorovic, M; Morse, D E; Do, D; Lim, L l; Herman, N G; Moursi, A M

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between child dental anxiety and selected child and parental characteristics. Children and their parents were interviewed at the New York University, College of Dentistry, Pediatric Dentistry Clinic. The Children's Fear Survey Schedule - Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS) evaluated child self-reported anxiety; the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) measured self-reported parental anxiety when the parent received dental treatment. Ninety-three children and their parents completed the questionnaires. Mean CFSS-DS scores were higher for girls than boys (32.5 vs. 26.3, p=0.003) and for children whose accompanying parents had MDAS scores of 11+ vs. ≥ 11 (32.8 vs. 26.6, p=0.001). There was little difference in mean CFSS-DS scores among those aged 6-10 yrs. vs. 11-14 yrs. (30.1 vs. 29.3). Significant correlations were found between CFSS-DS and both gender (Spearman's rho, rs=0.31) and MDAS scores (rs=0.33), but not between CFSS-DS and child age (rs=-0.05). Controlling simultaneously for gender, MDAS score and child age, a high CFSS-DS score (38+ vs. ≥ 38) was positively associated with girls (ORadj=3.76, 95% CI: 1.13-12.54) and an MDAS score of ≤ 15 vs. ≥ 11 (ORadj=2.50, 0.73-8.54), but weakly and inversely associated with age (ORadj=0.80, 0.25-2.52). Child gender and parental anxiety are indicators of child dental anxiety.

  9. Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (pdecision-making.

  10. The business of dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Widyanti Sriyono

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization including General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS and Asia Fair Trade Agreement (AFTA are a new free trade system. In globalization era, there will be an intense and free competition in looking for jobs throughout the world. This new system will affect the health services system in which health services tend to follow an industrial model. Meaning that dentistry or dental health services tend to be part of a business system, and this system has caused controversy among the community and the profession itself. The results of the discussion revealed that professional and business of dentistry is compatible and complementary. The tendency of increasing number of legal form of practice (group and a professional corporation and the worldwide advertisement of these practices supported the premise that delivering dental practice tends to follow the industrial model. Dentists should not only more focus on achieving financial success in running the business of practice but profession should have the most concern for the people who seek their services. Delivering quality of dental care depends on the high skill of the dentist and on the satisfactory income for the survival of the practice in the long run, and this make the practice will be viewed by the public and profession as being appropriate and of high quality. Facing the globalization, besides possessing high clinical skill, dentists must have a firm understanding of management concepts and apply them in their practice. In conclusion: The profession and the business of dentistry are compatible and complementary. The delivery of the dental services tends to follow the industrial model, which is a current reality. Dentist should concern more on the delivering high quality of dental services, not only focus on the business of the practice, although the satisfactory income is important for the survival growth of the practice in the long run. It is suggested for dentists to follow as

  11. Impact of Self-concept on Preschoolers’ Dental Anxiety and Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Erfanparast

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Different factors affect children’s behavior during dental treatment, including psychological and behavioral characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of self-concept on child’s anxiety and be-havior during dental treatment in 4 to 6-year-old children. Materials and methods. A total of 235 preschoolers aged 4 to 6 years were included in this descriptive analytic study. Total self-concept score for each child was assessed according to Primary Self-concept Scale before dental treatment. Child’s anxiety and child’s behavior were assessed, during the restoration of mandibular primary molar, using clinical anxi-ety rating scale and Frankl Scale, respectively. Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation be-tween the total self-concept score with the results of clinical anxiety rating scale and Frankl Scale. Results. There was a moderate inverse correlation between the self-concept and clinical anxiety rating scale scores (r = −0.545, P < 0.001, and a moderate correlation between the self-concept and child’s behavior scores (r = 0.491, P < 0.001. A strong inverse relation was also found between the anxiety and behavior scores (r = −0.91, P < 0.001. Conclusion. Children with higher self-concept had lower anxiety level and better behavioral feedback during dental treat-ment.

  12. Impact of Self-concept on Preschoolers' Dental Anxiety and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanparast, Leila; Vafaei, Ali; Sohrabi, Azin; Ranjkesh, Bahram; Bahadori, Zahra; Pourkazemi, Maryam; Dadashi, Shabnam; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims . Different factors affect children's behavior during dental treatment, including psychological and behavioral characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of self-concept on child's anxiety and behavior during dental treatment in 4 to 6-year-old children. Materials and methods. A total of 235 preschoolers aged 4 to 6 years were included in this descriptive analytic study. Total self-concept score for each child was assessed according to Primary Self-concept Scale before dental treatment. Child's anxiety and child's behavior were assessed, during the restoration of mandibular primary molar, using clinical anxiety rating scale and Frankl Scale, respectively. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between the total self-concept score with the results of clinical anxiety rating scale and Frankl Scale. Results. There was a moderate inverse correlation between the self-concept and clinical anxiety rating scale scores (r = -0.545, P self-concept and child's behavior scores (r = 0.491, P self-concept had lower anxiety level and better behavioral feedback during dental treatment.

  13. Impact of Self-concept on Preschoolers’ Dental Anxiety and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanparast, Leila; Vafaei, Ali; Sohrabi, Azin; Ranjkesh, Bahram; Bahadori, Zahra; Pourkazemi, Maryam; Dadashi, Shabnam; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Different factors affect children’s behavior during dental treatment, including psychological and behavioral characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of self-concept on child’s anxiety and behavior during dental treatment in 4 to 6-year-old children. Materials and methods. A total of 235 preschoolers aged 4 to 6 years were included in this descriptive analytic study. Total self-concept score for each child was assessed according to Primary Self-concept Scale before dental treatment. Child’s anxiety and child’s behavior were assessed, during the restoration of mandibular primary molar, using clinical anxiety rating scale and Frankl Scale, respectively. Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between the total self-concept score with the results of clinical anxiety rating scale and Frankl Scale. Results. There was a moderate inverse correlation between the self-concept and clinical anxiety rating scale scores (r = -0.545, P self-concept and child’s behavior scores (r = 0.491, P self-concept had lower anxiety level and better behavioral feedback during dental treatment. PMID:26697152

  14. Salivary biomarkers for dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Jiang, Shan; Koh, David; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen

    2016-02-01

    As a highly prevalent multifactorial disease, dental caries afflicts a large proportion of the world's population. As teeth are constantly bathed in saliva, the constituents and properties of this oral fluid play an essential role in the occurrence and progression of dental caries. Various inorganic (water and electrolytes) and organic (proteins and peptides) components may protect teeth from dental caries. This occurs via several functions, such as clearance of food debris and sugar, aggregation and elimination of microorganisms, buffering actions to neutralize acid, maintaining supersaturation with respect to tooth mineral, participation in formation of the acquired pellicle and antimicrobial defense. Modest evidence is available on the associations between dental caries and several salivary parameters, including flow rate, buffering capacity and abundance of mutans streptococci. Despite some controversial findings, the main body of the literature supports an elevated caries prevalence and/or incidence among people with a pathologically low saliva flow rate, compromised buffering capacity and early colonization or high titer of mutans streptococci in saliva. The evidence remains weak and/or inconsistent on the association between dental caries and other saliva parameters, such as other possible cariogenic species (Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus sanguis group, Streptococcus salivarius, Actinomyces spp. and Candida albicans), diversity of saliva microbiomes, inorganic and organic constituents (electrolytes, immunoglobulins, other proteins and peptides) and some functional properties (sugar clearance rate, etc.). The complex interactions between salivary components and functions suggest that saliva has to be considered in its entirety to account for its total effects on teeth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Medicaid Adult Dental Benefits Increase Use Of Dental Care, But Impact Of Expansion On Dental Services Use Was Mixed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Damiano, Peter; Sabik, Lindsay

    2017-04-01

    Dental coverage for adult enrollees is an optional benefit under Medicaid. Thirty-one states and the District of Columbia have expanded eligibility for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Millions of low-income adults have gained health care coverage and, in states offering dental benefits, oral health coverage as well. Using data for 2010 and 2014 from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the impact of Medicaid adult dental coverage and eligibility expansions on low-income adults' use of dental care. We found that low-income adults in states that provided dental benefits beyond emergency-only coverage were more likely to have had a dental visit in the past year, compared to low-income adults in states without such benefits. Among states that provided dental benefits and expanded their Medicaid program, regression-based estimates suggest that childless adults had a significant increase (1.8 percentage points) in the likelihood of having had a dental visit, while parents had a significant decline (8.1 percentage points). One possible explanation for the disparity is that after expansion, newly enrolled childless adults might have exhausted the limited dental provider capacity that was available to parents before expansion. Additional policy-level efforts may be needed to expand the dental care delivery system's capacity. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  16. Psychometric properties of Spanish-language adult dental fear measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heaton Lisa J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It would be useful to have psychometrically-sound measures of dental fear for Hispanics, who comprise the largest ethnic minority in the United States. We report on the psychometric properties of Spanish-language versions of two common adult measures of dental fear (Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, MDAS; Dental Fear Survey, DFS, as well as a measure of fear of dental injections (Needle Survey, NS. Methods Spanish versions of the measures were administered to 213 adults attending Hispanic cultural festivals, 31 students (who took the questionnaire twice, for test-retest reliability, and 100 patients at a dental clinic. We also administered the questionnaire to 136 English-speaking adults at the Hispanic festivals and 58 English-speaking students at the same college where we recruited the Spanish-speaking students, to compare the performance of the English and Spanish measures in the same populations. Results The internal reliabilities of the Spanish MDAS ranged from 0.80 to 0.85. Values for the DFS ranged from 0.92 to 0.96, and values for the NS ranged from 0.92 to 0.94. The test-retest reliabilities (intra-class correlations for the three measures were 0.69, 0.86, and 0.94 for the MDAS, DFS, and NS, respectively. The three measures showed moderate correlations with one another in all three samples, providing evidence for construct validity. Patients with higher scores on the measures were rated as being more anxious during dental procedures. Similar internal reliabilities and correlations were found in the English-version analyses. The test-retest values were also similar in the English students for the DFS and NS; however, the English test-retest value for the MDAS was better than that found in the Spanish students. Conclusion We found evidence for the internal reliability, construct validity, and criterion validity for the Spanish versions of the three measures, and evidence for the test-retest reliability of the Spanish

  17. Relationship between Child and Parental Dental Anxiety with Child's Psychological Functioning and Behavior during the Administration of Local Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boka, Vasiliki; Arapostathis, Konstantinos; Kotsanos, Nikolaos; Karagiannis, Vassilis; van Loveren, Cor; Veerkamp, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine: 1) the relationship between children's psychological functioning, dental anxiety and cooperative behavior before and during local anesthesia, 2) the relationship of parental dental anxiety with all the above child characteristics. There was a convenient sample of 100 children (4-12 years). Child dental anxiety and psychological functioning were measured using the "Children's Fear Survey Schedule" (CFSS-DS) and the "Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire" (SDQ) respectively. Parental dental anxiety was measured using the "Modified Dental Anxiety Scale" (MDAS). All questionnaires were completed by parents. Before and during local anesthesia, the child behavior was scored by one experienced examiner, using the Venham scale. Non-parametric tests and correlations (Mann-Whitney, Spearman's rho) were used for the analysis. The mean SDQ score was 10±5.6 for boys (n=60) and 8.3±4.8 for girls (n=40) (p=0.038), but there was no correlation with children's age. The mean CFSS-DS score was 33.1±11.86 and there was no correlation with age or gender. Children with higher levels in the pro-social subscale of the SDQ had significantly less anxiety and better behavior before local anesthesia. Higher mean CFSS-DS scores were significantly associated with uncooperative behavior during local anesthesia (p=0.04). There was no correlation between parents' and their children's dental anxiety, psychological functioning and behavior. 46% of the children had previous dental experience in the last 6 months. As time since the last dental treatment increased, an improvement was found in children's behavior during local anesthesia. Child psychological functioning was related to dental anxiety and behavior during dental appointment involving local anesthesia.

  18. [Current status of dental English education in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Zheng, Jia-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The teaching of dental English for undergraduate students plays an important role in dental education. Most dental schools or colleges have set up the course of dental English education in China. However, this course lacks of a unified educational plans, contents and goals based on actual situation of dental students, which does not fully achieve the teaching purpose. This study was aimed to explore the developmental direction of the course of dental English education through comparison among different dental schools or colleges in China, in order to find out the teaching mode of dental English education, and promote the teaching effect and cultivation of international dental talents.

  19. Sexual Advances by Patients in Dental Practice: Implications for the Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Gary T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of Oregon dentists (n=248) and dental hygienists (n=235) investigated frequency of patient-initiated sexual advances and methods of dealing with them. Up to 44 percent experienced 1 or more patient verbal advances, and 23 percent experienced physical advances during a 5-year period. Inclusion of related issues in professional curricula is…

  20. Attitude toward Public Health Dentistry as a career among dental students in Odisha: A Cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nupur; Jain, Kittu; Kabasi, Soumik

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of dental students' expectations of their profession as well as their attitudes to study a particular specialty of dentistry is of great importance. These attitudes and expectations make studying dentistry meaningful to dental students and society and understanding these factors facilitate workforce planning in the dental sector The aim of the study was to assess the attitude of dental students towards considering Public Health Dentistry as their future career. A questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted, which included the 3 rd year, 4 th fourth year and dental interns studying in the State of Odisha. It consisted of 27 questions that were graded on 5-point Likert scale. The responses for the attitude questions toward selecting Public Health Dentistry for postgraduation were categorized into three factors, which are a negative attitude (includes score 0-21), neutral attitude (score 22-44), and positive attitude (score 45-64). Differences between groups were examined using Chi-square test for proportions. The level of statistical significance was set at P attitude toward selecting public health dentistry as their future career, and nearly two-third of them (58.23%) had neutral attitude, with very few students having a negative attitude (8.23%) toward the specialty for pursuing postgraduation. Respondents had a considerable amount of interest in pursuing postgraduation in this specialty. Efforts should be intensified, both by the dental council and by the dental colleges, to develop this specialty, keeping in mind the increasing attitude of dental undergraduates toward it.

  1. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental Service may authorize outpatient dental care which is reasonably necessary to complete treatment of a...

  2. An Overview of Dental Radiology. NCHCT Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manny, Edward F.; And Others

    This overview of dental radiology contains sections on demographics, equipment, dental radiology quality assurance, efficacy, dental radiology education curricula, professional organizations' guidelines for training and use, and state activities. In section 1 dental personnel, population of dental personnel, employment and earning prospects,…

  3. 21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral dental drill. 872.4130 Section 872.4130...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4130 Intraoral dental drill. (a) Identification. An intraoral dental drill is a rotary device intended to be attached to a dental handpiece to drill holes in...

  4. Previous toothache, dental visits and caries presence among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dental pain is an ache or soreness within or around a tooth. It has a wide range of etiology, the commonest being dental caries. Dental pain is one of the main reasons for seeking dental care. Objectives: To assess the relationship between experiences of toothache, dental visits and caries experience among ...

  5. Cameroonian Dentists' Opinion On Training And Quality Of Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chi square. P≤0.05 was considered significant. Results. The proportion of the respondents who had worked with dental auxiliaries, dental therapists, dental surgery assistants, dental technicians and dental aids was 100%,. 59.5%, 43.2%, 45.9% and 5.4% respectively (Fig. 1). More than half (51.4%) of the respondents had ...

  6. A clinical index for evaluating and monitoring dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, I B; Westergaard, J; Stoltze, K

    2000-01-01

    This study describes a new fine-scaled system for classifying initial and advanced dental erosions. The system includes the use of study casts of the teeth in an epoxy resin with an accurate surface reproduction. The severity of erosion on each tooth surface is scored according to six grades...... of severity. In addition, the presence of a Class V restoration and dental erosion on the same surface increases the erosion score, as it is assumed that the need for restorative treatment can be caused by the erosion. A high inter-examiner agreement was found when the present scoring system was used by two...... of the oral cavity and are furthermore suitable for data analysis. The system is thereby well-suited for determining etiologic factors and monitoring the progression of erosion over time....

  7. A retrospective evaluation of traumatic dental injury in children who applied to the dental hospital, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, M E; Ozmen, B; Koyuturk, A E; Tokay, U; Kasap, P; Guler, D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze traumatic dental injuries in children visiting the dental hospital emergency department in Samsun of Turkey, in the period from 2007 to 2011. Data of age, gender, causes of dental trauma, injured teeth, type of dental injuries, the application period, the dental treatments, and traumatic dental injuries according to the seasons were obtained from the records at dental hospital. Of all 320 patients with traumatic dental injury, 205 were boys and 115 were girls with a boys/girls ratio 1.78:1. Traumatic dental injury was observed more frequently in the 7-12 age groups: 52.5% in girls and 67.8% in boys. Falls are the major cause of traumatic dental injury in the age group 6-12 (51.4%). Sport activities are a common cause of traumatic dental injury in the 7-12 age group (34.2%). Patients visited a dentist within approximately 2 h (57.1%). The upper anterior teeth were subjected to trauma more frequently than the lower anterior teeth. The maxillary central incisors were the most commonly affected teeth, and the mandibular canins were the least affected teeth. In primary teeth, avulsion was the most common type of dental injury (23%); on the other hand, enamel fractures were the most common type of dental injury (30.6%) observed in permanent teeth. In the primary dentition, the most commonly performed treatments were dental examination and prescribing (70%). The most common treatment choices in permanent teeth were restoration and dental examination (49.7 and 15.8%, respectively). The results of the study show that the emergency intervention to traumatized teeth is important for good prognosis of teeth and oral tissues. Therefore, the parents should be informed about dental trauma in schools, and dental hospital physicians should be subjected to postgraduate training.

  8. Methacrylate and acrylate allergy in dental personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Alanko, Kristiina; Kuuliala, Outi; Jolanki, Riitta

    2007-11-01

    Methacrylates are important allergens in dentistry. The study aimed to analyse patch test reactivity to 36 acrylic monomers in dental personnel in relation to exposure. We reviewed the test files at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health from 1994 to 2006 for allergic reactions to acrylic monomers in dental personnel and analysed the clinical records of the sensitized patients. 32 patients had allergic reactions to acrylic monomers: 15 dental nurses, 9 dentists, and 8 dental technicians. The dentists and dental nurses were most commonly exposed to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA), triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TREGDMA), and 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (bis-GMA). 8 dentists and 12 dental nurses were allergic to 2-HEMA. The remaining dentist was positive to bis-GMA and other epoxy acrylates. The remaining 3 dental nurses reacted to diethyleneglycol diacrylate (DEGDA) or triethyleneglycol diacrylate (TREGDA), but not to monofunctional and multifunctional methacrylates. Our dental technicians were mainly exposed and sensitized to methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA). 1 technician reacted only to 2-HEMA, and another to ethyl methacrylate (EMA) and ethyl acrylate (EA). 2-HEMA was the most important allergen in dentists and dental nurses, and MMA and EGDMA in dental technicians. Reactions to bis-GMA, DEGDA, TREGDA, EMA and EA were relevant in some patients.

  9. Dental impression technique using optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Barua, Souman; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Gabor, Alin Gabriel; Zaharia, Cristian; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2018-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: The use of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a non-invasive and high precision quantitative information providing tool has been well established by researches within the last decade. The marginal discrepancy values can be scrutinized in optical biopsy made in three dimensional (3D) micro millimetre scale and reveal detailed qualitative and quantitative information of soft and hard tissues. OCT-based high resolution 3D images can provide a significant impact on finding recurrent caries, restorative failure, analysing the precision of crown preparation, and prosthetic elements marginal adaptation error with the gingiva and dental hard tissues. During the CAD/CAM process of prosthodontic restorations, the circumvent of any error is important for the practitioner and the technician to reduce waste of time and material. Additionally, OCT images help to achieve a new or semi-skilled practitioner to analyse their crown preparation works and help to develop their skills faster than in a conventional way. The aim of this study is to highlight the advantages of OCT in high precision prosthodontic restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 25 preparations of frontal and lateral teeth were performed for 7 different patients. The impressions of the prosthetic fields were obtained both using a conventional optoelectronic system (Apolo Di, Syrona) and a Spectral Domain using OCT (Dental prototype, working at 860 nm). For the conventional impression technique the preparation margins were been prelevated by gingival impregnated cords. No specific treatments were performed by the OCT impression technique. RESULTS: The scanning performed by conventional optoelectronic system proved to be quick and accurate in terms of impression technology. The results were represented by 3D virtual models obtained after the scanning procedure was completed. In order to obtain a good optical impression a gingival retraction cord was inserted between the prepared tooth and the gingival

  10. Transnational dental care among Canadian immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvasina, Paola; Muntaner, Carles; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    This study examines predictors of transnational dental care utilization, or the use of dental care across national borders, over a 4-year period among immigrants to Canada. Data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC, 2001-2005) were used. Sampling and bootstrap weights were applied to make the data nationally representative. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were applied to identify factors associated with immigrants' transnational dental care utilization. Approximately 13% of immigrants received dental care outside Canada over a period of 4 years. Immigrants lacking dental insurance (OR = 2.05; 95% CI: 1.55-2.70), those reporting dental problems (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.12-1.88), who were female (OR = 1.59; 95% CI: 1.22-2.08), aged ≥ 50 years (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.45-3.64), and who were always unemployed (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.20-2.39) were more likely to report transnational dental care utilization. History of social assistance was inversely correlated with the use of dental services outside Canada (OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.30-0.83). It is estimated that roughly 11 500 immigrants have used dental care outside Canada over a 4-year period. Although transnational dental care utilization may serve as an individual solution for immigrants' initial barriers to accessing dental care, it demonstrates weaknesses to in-country efforts at providing publicly funded dental care to socially marginalized groups. Policy reforms should be enacted to expand dental care coverage among adult immigrants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Surfing for history: dental library and dental school websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinbring, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Library and academic websites are among the most reliable Internet resources available today. Schools of all types use the Internet as a means of sharing information; and libraries provide broader access to their collections via the Web. For researchers seeking specific, authoritative resources on dental history, library and dental school websites are most helpful in identifying print and online resources, in describing manuscript collections, and in presenting a history of the host institution. A library site often can provide sufficient information online to eliminate the need for an in-person visit to the library. On the other hand, a library site may tantalize the historian with enough information on unique collections that a trip can be justified.

  12. Microbiologic aspects of dental plaque and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, P D

    1999-10-01

    Dental plaque is an example of a microbial biofilm with a diverse microbial composition; it is found naturally on teeth and confers advantages to the host, for example, by preventing colonization by exogenous, and often pathogenic, micro-organisms. In individuals with a high frequency sugar diet, or with a severely compromised saliva flow, the levels of potentially cariogenic bacteria (acid-producing and acid-tolerating species) can increase beyond those compatible with enamel health. This article discusses antimicrobial strategies to control dental caries, including; reducing plaque levels, in general or specific cariogenic bacteria in particular, by antiplaque or antimicrobial agents; reducing bacterial acid production by replacing fermentable carbohydrates in the diet with sugar substitutes, or by interfering with bacterial metabolism with fluoride or antimicrobial agents.

  13. Communication in dental medicine: importance in motivating elderly dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutariu, Mihaela Monica; Forna, Norina

    2013-01-01

    Dental services for elderly patients are characterized by a series of particularities related to the vulnerability of this age group, which is affected by various co morbidities, and the diminished physical, cognitive and financial capacities. Finding ways to keep elderly patients coming to a dental office is possible by improving the dentist-patient relationship and implicitly the quality of care by increasing the self-esteem of the elderly and their place in society, by increasing the role of oral health in the quality of life, and here we refer to the pleasure of eating, the pleasant physical aspect and normal diction. The present paper presents the psychological aspects that interfere in the communication process between the dentist and the elderly patient and the changes motivation undergoes when people are in pain. These data can sometimes change the reticent attitude of the dentist towards the elderly patient which is often considered to be a risk patient.

  14. Dental TC: evaluation of the inferior dental channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, F.; Carrascosa, P.; Urtube, S.; Carrascosa, J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the location and identification of the lower dental channel (LDC) and to show the measures, guides, and different lesions that might affect it, the authors offer a retrospective and descriptive analysis of 36 CT' exams of the jaw, as a pre-implant evaluation. A Picker PQ 500 helicoidal was used. Under the 'Dental' software program, the cross-sections were reprocessed at a Voxel Q work station. The findings were divided in 3 groups: 1) Optimal visualization of the LDC in 28 patients (78%); 2) Difficult visualization of the LDC in 6 patients (16,5%); 3) The LDC was not identified in 2 patients (5,5%). Furthermore, lesions affecting the LDC were identified in 5 patients (14%) included in group 1. (author)

  15. Examining the safety of dental treatment in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowicz, Bryan S; DiAngelis, Anthony J; Novak, M John; Buchanan, William; Papapanou, Panos N; Mitchell, Dennis A; Curran, Alice E; Lupo, Virginia R; Ferguson, James E; Bofill, James; Matseoane, Stephen; Deinard, Amos S; Rogers, Tyson B

    2008-06-01

    Although clinicians generally consider it safe to provide dental care for pregnant women, supporting clinical trial evidence is lacking. This study compares safety outcomes from a trial in which pregnant women received scaling and root planing and other dental treatments. The authors randomly assigned 823 women with periodontitis to receive scaling and root planing, either at 13 to 21 weeks' gestation or up to three months after delivery. They evaluated all subjects for essential dental treatment (EDT) needs, defined as the presence of moderate-to-severe caries or fractured or abscessed teeth; 351 women received complete EDT at 13 to 21 weeks' gestation. The authors used Fisher exact test and a propensity-score adjustment to compare rates of serious adverse events, spontaneous abortions/stillbirths, fetal/congenital anomalies and preterm deliveries ( .05) between women who received EDT and those who did not require this treatment, or between groups that received both EDT and periodontal treatment, either EDT or periodontal treatment alone, or no treatment. Use of topical or local anesthetics during root planing also was not associated with an increased risk of experiencing adverse outcomes. EDT in pregnant women at 13 to 21 weeks' gestation was not associated with an increased risk of experiencing serious medical adverse events or adverse pregnancy outcomes. Data from larger studies and from groups with other treatment needs are needed to confirm the safety of dental care in pregnant women. This study provides evidence that EDT and use of topical and local anesthetics are safe in pregnant women at 13 to 21 weeks' gestation.

  16. Does audiovisual distraction reduce dental anxiety in children under local anesthesia? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cai; Qin, Dan; Shen, Lu; Ji, Ping; Wang, Jinhua

    2018-03-02

    To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effects of audiovisual distraction on reducing dental anxiety in children during dental treatment under local anesthesia. The authors identified eligible reports published through August 2017 by searching PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Clinical trials that reported the effects of audiovisual distraction on children's physiological measures, self-reports and behavior rating scales during dental treatment met the minimum inclusion requirements. The authors extracted data and performed a meta-analysis of appropriate articles. Nine eligible trials were included and qualitatively analyzed; some of these trials were also quantitatively analyzed. Among the physiological measures, heart rate or pulse rate was significantly lower (p=0.01) in children subjected to audiovisual distraction during dental treatment under local anesthesia than in those who were not; a significant difference in oxygen saturation was not observed. The majority of the studies using self-reports and behavior rating scales suggested that audiovisual distraction was beneficial in reducing anxiety perception and improving children's cooperation during dental treatment. The audiovisual distraction approach effectively reduces dental anxiety among children. Therefore, we suggest the use of audiovisual distraction when children need dental treatment under local anesthesia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J; Cooper, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo.

  18. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Farges

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo.

  19. Proposal for internet-based Digital Dental Chart for personal dental identification in forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Yoichi; Ueno, Asao; Tsuzuki, Tamiyuki; Kajiwara, Masahiro; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2007-05-03

    A dental chart is very useful as a standard source of evidence in the personal identification of bodies. However, the kind of dental chart available will often vary as a number of types of odontogram have been developed where the visual representation of dental conditions has relied on hand-drawn representation. We propose the Digital Dental Chart (DDC) as a new style of dental chart, especially for open investigations aimed at establishing the identity of unknown bodies. Each DDC is constructed using actual oral digital images and dental data, and is easy to upload onto an Internet website. The DDC is a more useful forensic resource than the standard types of dental chart in current use as it has several advantages, among which are its ability to carry a large volume of information and reproduce dental conditions clearly and in detail on a cost-effective basis.

  20. Reliability and validity of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale for Arabic-speaking children: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Housseiny, Azza A; Alsadat, Farah A; Alamoudi, Najlaa M; El Derwi, Douaa A; Farsi, Najat M; Attar, Moaz H; Andijani, Basil M

    2016-04-14

    Early recognition of dental fear is essential for the effective delivery of dental care. This study aimed to test the reliability and validity of the Arabic version of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS). A school-based sample of 1546 children was randomly recruited. The Arabic version of the CFSS-DS was completed by children during class time. The scale was tested for internal consistency and test-retest reliability. To test criterion validity, children's behavior was assessed using the Frankl scale during dental examination, and results were compared with children's CFSS-DS scores. To test the scale's construct validity, scores on "fear of going to the dentist soon" were correlated with CFSS-DS scores. Factor analysis was also used. The Arabic version of the CFSS-DS showed high reliability regarding both test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation = 0.83, p children with negative behavior had significantly higher fear scores (t = 13.67, p fear of invasive dental procedures," "fear of less invasive dental procedures" and "fear of strangers." The Arabic version of the CFSS-DS is a reliable and valid measure of dental fear in Arabic-speaking children. Pediatric dentists and researchers may use this validated version of the CFSS-DS to measure dental fear in Arabic-speaking children.

  1. IMPACT OF DENTAL TRAUMA AND ESTHETIC IMPAIRMENT ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Bruna Miroski; Dias, Loraine Fernandes; Pereira, Carla da Silva; Ponte, Marcos Ximenes; Konrath, Andréa Cristina; Bolan, Michele da Silva; Cardoso, Mariane

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the impact of dental trauma and impaired esthetics on the quality of life (QoL) of preschool children and their relatives. Methods: Study conducted with 192 children aged 2 to 5 years in 11 preschools in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, South of Brazil. Parents/caregivers completed a questionnaire on quality of life (Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scales - B-ECOHIS), a socioeconomic survey, and then answered specific questions related to dental trauma. The subjects were examined by three accordant examiners (Kappa>0.7). Dental trauma was evaluated on the basis of indexes adopted by the World Health Organization, and esthetic impairment was then classified. Data were descriptively analyzed and put to bivariate analysis by chi-square and Fisher tests, with significance level at 5%. Results: The prevalence of dental trauma was 62.5% with 15.6% of esthetic impairment. Almost 12% of parents reported impact on the quality of life of their children. Dental trauma was not significantly associated with gender, age or QoL. Crown color change by trauma was associated with esthetic impairment. Also esthetic impairment had a negative impact on QoL (pEsthetic impairment had a negative impact on children’s quality of life, while dental trauma was not associated to it. PMID:28977132

  2. PERSONALITY TRAITS AND STRESS LEVELS AMONG SENIOR DENTAL STUDENTS: EVIDENCE FROM MALAYSIA AND SINGAPORE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Zamros Y M; Hassan, Wan Nurazreena Wan; Razak, Ishak A; Hashim, Siti Marini N; Tahir, Mohd Khairul A M; Keng, Siong Beng

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between dental students’ personality traits and stress levels in relation to dental education programs among senior dental students in University Malaya (UM) in Malaysia and National University of Singapore (NUS). A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted on UM and NUS senior dental students. The questionnaire comprised items on demographic background, the Big Five Inventory Personality Traits (BFIPT) test and a modified Dental Environment Stress (DES) scale. Rasch analysis was used to convert raw data to interval scores. Analyses were done by t-test, Pearson correlation, and Hierarchical regression statistics. The response rate was 100% (UM=132, NUS=76). Personality trait Agreeableness (mean=0.30) was significantly more prevalent among UM than NUS students (mean=0.15, p=0.016). In NUS, Neuroticism (mean=0.36) was significantly more prevalent than in UM (mean=0.14, p=0.002). The DES mean score was higher among NUS (mean=0.23) than UM students (mean=0.07). In UM, Neuroticism was significantly correlated with stress levels (r=0.338, ppersonality traits. The correlation was strongest for personality trait Neuroticism in both schools. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that gender and Neuroticism were significant predictors for students’ stress levels (ppersonality trait were significant predictors for stress levels among selected groups of dental students in Southeast Asia. Information on students’ personality may be useful in new students’ intake, stress management counseling and future program reviews.

  3. Stress predictors in two Asian dental schools with an integrated curriculum and traditional curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T T T; Seki, N; Morio, I

    2018-05-01

    This study explored stress predictors and the role of instructional methods and institutional differences in perceived stress levels amongst students at two Asian dental schools. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to undergraduate dental students at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Japan and the University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP), Hochiminh City, Vietnam in 2016. Data concerning the students' demographic information and grades, and responses to the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES) were collected. The questionnaires were prepared in English and translated into Japanese and Vietnamese following a forward-backward translation process. Altogether 684 students answered the questionnaire with a response rate of 97% for TMDU and 89% for UMP. The mean DES score of UMP students was significantly higher than TMDU (P stress scores in several areas than UMP preclinical students. Having dentistry as their first choice of educational programme was a significant stress predictor for Japanese students whilst the clinical practicum was a significant stress predictor for Vietnamese students. Previous academic performance was not a significant stress predictor for students at either dental school. Dental students of an integrated, active-learning curriculum reported lower stress levels than students of a traditional, discipline-based curriculum. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Students' perceived importance of diversity exposure and training in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Karen F; Whitehead, Albert W; Close, John M; Kaplan, Alan L

    2004-03-01

    Intercultural competence is an important component of the doctor-patient relationship in the multicultural climate evolving in the United States. We hypothesized that 1) exposure to racial and ethnic diversity in the student body, faculty, staff, and patient population in dental school and 2) a dental school curriculum that includes presentations on issues concerning racial and ethnic diversity will contribute to students' feeling more competent and confident to enter the multicultural work environment that is rapidly developing in the United States. A Likert-type scale questionnaire was administered to 627 fourth-year dental students enrolled in seven dental schools representing geographically diverse regions of the United States. Of these, 376 questionnaires were returned for a response rate of 60 percent. Results indicated that both the perception of diversity in the school environment and the presentation of diversity-specific content in the curriculum had moderately positive and significant correlations with the students' perception of their competency or ability to serve and work with diverse populations. The respective Pearson correlation coefficients for diversity in the school environment and diversity curriculum were .497 (ptraining in the dental school environment are important for dental students entering a multicultural workplace.

  5. Is income inequality related to childhood dental caries in rich countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, Eduardo; Hobdell, Martin H

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlates of income and income inequality with dental caries in a sample of all countries, as well as in rich countries alone. In this ecological study, the authors analyzed national data on income, income inequality and dental caries from 48 countries. Of them, 22 were rich countries (according to World Bank criteria). The authors determined income by gross national income (GNI) per capita (formerly known as gross national product) and income inequality by the Gini coefficient (a measure of income inequality on a scale between 0 and 1). They assessed dental caries according to the decayed, missing, filled teeth (dmft) index in 5- to 6-year-old children. The authors used Pearson and partial correlation coefficients to examine the linear associations of income and income inequality with dental caries. GNI per capita, but not the Gini coefficient, was inversely correlated with the dmft index in the 48 countries. However, the results showed an opposite pattern when analyses were restricted to rich countries (that is, the dmft index was significantly correlated with the Gini coefficient but not with GNI per capita). These findings support the income inequality hypothesis that beyond a certain level of national income, the relationship between income and the population's health is weak. Income inequality was correlated more strongly with dental caries than was income in rich countries. Among rich countries, income inequality is a stronger determinant of childhood dental caries than is absolute income.

  6. Success rates of the first inferior alveolar nerve block administered by dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriangcherdsak, Yutthasak; Raucharernporn, Somchart; Chaiyasamut, Teeranut; Wongsirichat, Natthamet

    2016-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) of the mandible is commonly used in the oral cavity as an anesthetic technique for dental procedures. This study evaluated the success rate of the first IANB administered by dental practitioners. Volunteer dental practitioners at Mahidol University who had never performed an INAB carried out 106 INAB procedures. The practitioners were divided into 12 groups with their advisors by randomized control trials. We recorded the success rate via pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores. A large percentage of the dental practitioners (85.26%) used the standard method to locate the anatomical landmarks, injecting the local anesthetic at the correct position, with the barrel of the syringe parallel to the occlusal plane of the mandibular teeth. Further, 68.42% of the dental practitioners injected the local anesthetic on the right side by using the left index finger for retraction. The onset time was approximately 0-5 mins for nearly half of the dental practitioners (47.37% for subjective onset and 43.16% for objective onset), while the duration of the IANB was approximately 240-300 minutes (36.84%) after the initiation of numbness. Moreover, the VAS pain scores were 2.5 ± 1.85 and 2.1 ± 1.8 while injecting and delivering local anesthesia, respectively. The only recorded factor that affected the success of the local anesthetic was the administering practitioner. This reinforces the notion that local anesthesia administration is a technique-sensitive procedure.

  7. Impact of Dental Disorders and its Influence on Self Esteem Levels among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Puneet; Singh, Simarpreet; Mathur, Anmol; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Batra, Manu; Sharma, Anshika; Goyal, Nikita

    2017-04-01

    Self esteem is more of a psychological concept therefore, even the common dental disorders like dental trauma, tooth loss and untreated carious lesions may affect the self esteem thus influencing the quality of life. This study aims to assess the impact of dental disorders among the adolescents on their self esteem level. The present cross-sectional study was conducted among 10 to 17 years adolescents. In order to obtain a representative sample, multistage sampling technique was used and sample was selected based on Probability Proportional to Enrolment size (PPE). Oral health assessment was carried out using WHO type III examination and self esteem was estimated using the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale score (RSES). The descriptive and inferential analysis of the data was done by using IBM SPSS software. Logistic and linear regression analysis was executed to test the individual association of different independent clinical variables with self esteem. Total sample of 1140 adolescents with mean age of 14.95 ±2.08 and RSES of 27.09 ±3.12 were considered. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was applied and best predictors in relation to RSES in the descending order were Dental Health Component (DHC), Aesthetic Component (AC), dental decay {(aesthetic zone), (masticatory zone)}, tooth loss {(aesthetic zone), (masticatory zone)} and anterior fracture of tooth. It was found that various dental disorders like malocclusion, anterior traumatic tooth, tooth loss and untreated decay causes a profound impact on aesthetics and psychosocial behaviour of adolescents, thus affecting their self esteem.

  8. Craniodentofacial characteristics, dental esthetics-related quality of life, and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavric, Anja; Mirceta, Dubravka; Jakobovic, Mario; Pavlic, Andrej; Zrinski, Magda Trinajstic; Spalj, Stjepan

    2015-06-01

    Self-esteem is a psychological trait that may develop in interaction with craniodentofacial esthetics. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship among craniodentofacial characteristics, dental esthetics-related quality of life, and self-esteem in adolescents and young adults. The study was cross-sectional; the sample included 200 pupils and university students (58% female) aged 13 to 33 years. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire were used. Craniodentofacial features were estimated by the method of Martin and Saller, the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need, and the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need. When malocclusion severity increases, dental esthetics-related quality of life decreases. The multiple linear regression showed that with the control of all other predictors in the model, the social impact of dental esthetics, borderline dental self-confidence, and facial type contribute the most to explain the variability of self-esteem, accounting for 3.2%, 1.3%, and 1.4%, respectively, of the variability values. The whole model accounts for 24.2% of the variability of self-esteem. In adolescents and young adults, self-esteem appears to be more influenced by the self-perceived psychosocial impacts of dental esthetics than the normative level of malocclusion, craniofacial typology, sex, or age. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux, dental erosion, and halitosis in epidemiological surveys: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsicano, Juliane A; de Moura-Grec, Patrícia G; Bonato, Rafaela C S; Sales-Peres, Matheus de Carvalho; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2013-02-01

    In published studies, it has been suggested that dental wear is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This systematic review was carried out to evaluate the association of GERD, dental erosion, and halitosis and to compare the indices adopted in epidemiological surveys. The Medline database (until October, 2011) was searched systematically to identify studies evaluating the prevalence of oral alterations, such as dental erosion and halitosis, in patients with GERD symptoms. Two reviewers analyzed all reports and the selected studies were evaluated according to the quality of evidence, using the validated Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Full-text copies of a total of 32 publications were obtained in duplicate. Sixteen publications were identified among the citations in the Bibliographic lists of studies that fulfilled the exclusion/inclusion criteria and quality of evidence. The relationship between dental erosion and GERD patients was significant in only seven studies. According to three studies, halitosis could be one of several extraesophageal symptoms or manifestations in GERD patients. In one study, it was found that the mucosa of GERD patients was significantly more acidic in comparison with that of the control group. This systematic review showed that there is a relationship between GERD and oral diseases (dental erosion and halitosis). The epidemiological surveys used different indices to analyze GERD and dental erosion. Further research could investigate the best method for assessing the two diseases.

  10. Tribology of dental materials: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z R; Zheng, J

    2008-01-01

    The application of tribology in dentistry is a growing and rapidly expanding field. Intensive research has been conducted to develop an understanding of dental tribology for successful design and selection of artificial dental materials. In this paper, the anatomy and function of human teeth is presented in brief, three types of current artificial dental materials are summarized, and their advantages and disadvantages, as well as typical clinical applications, are compared based on the literature. Possible tribological damage of tooth structure, which is induced by complex interfacial motion, and friction-wear test methods are reported. According to results obtained by the authors and from the literature, the main progress in the area of dental tribology on both natural teeth and artificial dental materials is reviewed. Problems and challenges are discussed and future research directions for dental tribology are recommended. (topical review)

  11. Salivary gland doses from dental radiographic exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaharu; Kato, Kazuo; Wada, Takuro; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Russell, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Salivary gland doses incurred during dental radiography were measured by phantom dosimetry, and these dose data and data obtained during a two-week survey of Hiroshima and Nagasaki dental hospitals and clinics were used to estimate the respective doses to members of the populations of the two cities. The results obtained were used to supplement previously determined doses to the thyroid gland, lens, and pituitary gland from dental radiography. No significant differences in doses were observed by age, sex or city. Doses to the salivary glands during dental radiography are probably not sufficiently large to cause bias in assessments of atomic bomb survivors for late radiation effects. However, the steadily increasing use of dental radiography underscores the need for continued monitoring of dental radiography doses in the interests of these assessments. (author)

  12. Tribology of dental materials: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z R; Zheng, J [Tribology Research Institute, Key Laboratory for Advanced Technology of Materials of Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)], E-mail: zrzhou@home.swjtu.edu.cn

    2008-06-07

    The application of tribology in dentistry is a growing and rapidly expanding field. Intensive research has been conducted to develop an understanding of dental tribology for successful design and selection of artificial dental materials. In this paper, the anatomy and function of human teeth is presented in brief, three types of current artificial dental materials are summarized, and their advantages and disadvantages, as well as typical clinical applications, are compared based on the literature. Possible tribological damage of tooth structure, which is induced by complex interfacial motion, and friction-wear test methods are reported. According to results obtained by the authors and from the literature, the main progress in the area of dental tribology on both natural teeth and artificial dental materials is reviewed. Problems and challenges are discussed and future research directions for dental tribology are recommended. (topical review)

  13. Dental Sealants: Knowledge, Value, Opinion, and Practice among Dental Professionals of Bathinda City, India

    OpenAIRE

    Asawa, Kailash; Gupta, Vivek V.; Tak, Mridula; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Chaturvedi, Pulkit; Bapat, Salil; Mishra, Prashant; Roy, Santanu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of the study was to assess the knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding use of dental sealants among private dental practitioners in Bathinda City, Punjab, India. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among all private dental practitioners in Bathinda City, Punjab. A self-administered structured questionnaire consisting of 28 items was used to assess their knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding dental sealants. One-way analysi...

  14. The importance of dental aesthetics among dental students assessment of knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Manipal, Sunayana; Mohan, C. S. Anand; Kumar, D. Lokesh; Cholan, Priyanka K.; Ahmed, Adil; Adusumilli, Preethi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the dental esthetics awareness among dental students in a private university in Chennai as none is available in Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: The dental esthetics awareness questionnaire consisting of a battery of 19 questions under five aspects that is, physical, functional, social, knowledge, and psychological aspects was administered to a sample of 100 dental college students aged between 18 and 27 years in a private college in Ch...

  15. Factors of Child Dental Fear : A Literature Review of Dental Fear in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nakata, Ayumi; Sato, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To provide an overview of the literature investigating dental fear in children during the past ten years and to review factors of child dental fear. Methods. The literature was systematically retrieved from an electronic database. The thirty four literatures which were written about the fear of dentistry, psychology and behavior during dental treatment were chosen. Results. The terms of fear being used were “Shika-kyoufu”, “Dental fear”, etc. However, the terms were not defined in...

  16. The possible usability of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography in dental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, I.; Rizal, M. F.; Kiswanjaya, B.

    2017-08-01

    The innovations and advantages of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography (3D CBCT) are continually growing for its potential use in dental research. Imaging techniques are important for planning research in dentistry. Newly improved 3D CBCT imaging systems and accessory computer programs have recently been proven effective for use in dental research. The aim of this study is to introduce 3D CBCT and open a window for future research possibilities that should be given attention in dental research.

  17. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Vdovin, Yu; Biryukova, T

    2010-01-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  18. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic dental radiography is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun having an elongated tubular target carrier extending into the patient's mouth. The carrier supports an inclined target for direction of an X-ray pattern towards a film positioned externally of the patient's mouth. Image definition is improved by a focusing anode which focuses the electron beam into a sharp spot (0.05 to 0.10 mm diameter) on the target. The potential on the focusing anode is adjustable to vary the size of the spot. An X-ray transmitting ceramic (oxides of Be, Al and Si) window is positioned adjacent to the front face of the target. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  19. Ergonomic applications to dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs," refers to musculoskeletal disorders to which the work environment contributes significantly, or to musculoskeletal disorders that are made worse or longer lasting by work conditions or workplace risk factors. In recent years, there has been an increase in reporting WMSDs for dental persons. Risk factors of WMSDs with specific reference to dentistry include - stress, poor flexibility, improper positioning, infrequent breaks, repetitive movements, weak postural muscles, prolonged awkward postures and improper adjustment of equipment. Ergonomics is the science of designing jobs, equipment and workplaces to fit workers. Proper ergonomic design is necessary to prevent repetitive strain injuries, which can develop over time and can lead to long-term disability. In this article, 20 strategies to prevent WMSDs in the dental operatory are discussed.

  20. Soft skills and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, M A G; Abu Kasim, N H; Naimie, Z

    2013-05-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses the different soft skills, how they are taught and assessed and the issues that need to be addressed in their teaching and assessment. The use of the module by the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya for development of soft skills for institutions of higher learning introduced by the Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. A Review of Medical Emergencies in Dental Practice | Uyamadu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Review of Medical Emergencies in Dental Practice. ... are those adverse medical events that may present in the course of dental treatment. ... be available in a dental clinic, outline the prevention and management of such emergencies, ...

  2. Dental pulp stone formation during orthodontic treatment: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-21

    Jun 21, 2015 ... the presence of dental pulp stone, gender, age, tooth type and arches. Results: Dental pulp ... primary and permanent dentition.[1] Dental pulp stones .... interpretation provided training to familiarize the other observer with the ...

  3. Preparedness of Government Owned Dental Clinics for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preparedness of Government Owned Dental Clinics for the Management of Medical Emergencies: A Survey of Government Dental Clinics in Lagos. ... emergencies and the availability of emergency drugs and equipment in government dental ...

  4. Retrieving chronological age from dental remains of early fossil hominins to reconstruct human growth in the past

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, M. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    A chronology of dental development in Pan troglodytes is arguably the best available model with which to compare and contrast reconstructed dental chronologies of the earliest fossil hominins. Establishing a time scale for growth is a requirement for being able to make further comparative observations about timing and rate during both dento-skeletal growth and brain growth. The absolute timing of anterior tooth crown and root formation appears not to reflect the period of somatic growth. In c...

  5. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  6. Radiation protection in the dental profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holyoak, B.; Overend, J.K.; Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A survey, conducted by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), on the standard of radiation protection in the dental profession in the United Kingdom is described. The results are compared with UK advisory standards. The preliminary survey results were reported in the professional press and each participating dental practitioner received comments and advice concerning the basic requirements for radiation protection. The method of survey has been broadened to form the basis of inspection of dental radiography by the HSE. (H.K.)

  7. Development of an interactive dental trauma guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2009-01-01

    resulting in 54 trauma scenarios of which many have specific requirements for treatment The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two dentitions have very different treatment demands. As a result it's impossible even for experienced practitioners to provide evidence-based treatment...... be available on the internet at: "www.DentalTraumaGuide.org". We hope that the Dental Trauma Guide can help improve the knowledge about dental traumatology worldwide and hereby improve the quality of treatment....

  8. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Silvestre, Francisco J.; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the ho...

  9. Prevalence of dental anomalies in Indian population

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh, Patil; Bharati, Doni; Sumita, Kaswan; Farzan, Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Developmental anomalies of the dentition are not infrequently observed by the dental practitioner. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of dental anomalies in the Indian population. Study Design: A retrospective study of 4133 panoramic radiographs of patients, who attended the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Jodhpur Dental College General Hospital between September 2008 to December 2012 was done. The ages of the patients ranged from 13 to 38 year...

  10. Dental twinning anomalies: the nomenclature enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, C M; Croll, T P

    1990-07-01

    Dental twinning results from abnormal events in the embryologic development of teeth. This paper describes the impossibility of assigning precise diagnostic terms, such as germination, fusion, macrodontia, and concrescence, to dental twinning anomalies because the entire course of odontogenesis cannot be witnessed. Traditional nomenclature is reviewed and seven cases that exemplify the principle are presented. Modification of nomenclature to describe dental twinning defects is suggested.

  11. Clinical anxiety among final year dental students: The trainers and students perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Obarisiagbon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dental clinical setting, which is a significant learning environment for undergraduate dental students, may induce anxiety, which may adversely affect the clinical performance. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the factors provoking clinical anxiety in dental students from the trainers and students perspectives. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 6 th (final year dental students of University of Benin and their clinical trainers between January and March 2012 using the 38-item modified Moss and McManus clinical anxiety questionnaire. Results: Of the 67 participants, 32 (47.8% were 6 th year dental students while 35 (52.2% were clinical trainers. According to the students, the top clinical anxiety provoking situations were inability to meet requirements before exams, inability to pass the final exams, dealing with psychiatric patients, coping with uncooperative children, getting infected by patients, fracturing a tooth during extraction, extracting the wrong tooth, discovering calculus by the supervisor after scaling, accidental pulp exposure, inadvertently hurting patients and using the high speed hand piece. There existed concordance on the top two clinical anxiety provoking situations reported by the students and their clinical trainers. However, measuring blood pressure, taking pulse, presenting in the clinic, handling a syncopal attack, and accidental pulp exposure were statistically significant contrasting clinical anxiety provoking situations from dental students and trainers perspectives. Conclusion: Data from this study revealed that clinical trainers share largely the same perspectives with the dental students on the clinical anxiety provoking situations with slight variations. Fostering a supportive learning environment conducive to dental student learning by strengthen efforts to minimize clinical anxiety is a necessity.

  12. The impact of dental appearance and anxiety on self-esteem in adult orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Maroto, M; Santos-Puerta, N; González Olmo, M J; Peñacoba-Puente, C

    2015-08-01

    To analyse the relationship between different dimensions of dental appearance impact and self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, with special attention to the possible mediating role of anxiety. A quasi-experimental design was used with a matched control group (without orthodontic treatment). In each group (experimental and control), there were 85 patients. The impact of dental appearance was measured using the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ). State anxiety was assessed with the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and self-esteem with Rosenberg's self-esteem scale. In both groups (experimental and control), self-esteem correlates negatively, ranging between 0.26 and 0.43, with all dimensions of dental appearance impact (except for the positive dental self-confidence dimension, where all correlations were positive). Anxiety correlates positively, ranges between 0.35 and 0.44, with social impact, psychological impact and aesthetic concern, although it maintains no significant correlations with dental self-confidence. Nevertheless, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, anxiety plays a mediating role between dental impact dimensions and self-esteem, whilst for the control group anxiety only plays a mediator role between psychological impact and self-esteem. Anxiety plays a fundamental role in the effect of perceived dental impact on self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. These results have important practical implications for the design of bio-psycho-social intervention programs that contemplate cognitive-affective variables as an essential part of orthodontic treatment in adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pulpa dentis D30 for acute reversible pulpitis: A prospective cohort study in routine dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Harald Johan; Mittag, Inge; Glockmann, Anja; Kiene, Helmut; Tröger, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Pulpa dentis D30 (PD: dental pulp of the calf, prepared in a homeopathic D30 potency) has been used in acute reversible pulpitis for pain relief and to avoid or postpone invasive dental treatment. To study short-term clinical outcomes of PD therapy for acute reversible pulpitis in routine dental practice. Prospective, observational, open-label, single-arm cohort study. Eleven dental primary care practices in Germany. Thirty-two patients starting monotherapy with PD for acute reversible pulpitis without visible or radiological abnormalities. PD was applied as 1-mL submucous injections into the mucobuccal fold, repeated daily as needed. Avoidance of invasive dental treatment (pulp capping, root canal therapy, tooth extraction) and remission of pain, measured on a 0-10 point scale (partial remission: reduction by > or =3 points; complete remission: reduction from > or =4 points to 0-1 points) during the 10-day follow-up period. Median pain duration was 14.0 days. The patients received a median of two PD applications (range 1-7). A total of 81% (n=26/32) of patients did not require invasive dental treatment, and 19% (n= 6) had root canal therapy. Remission status was evaluable in 24 patients. Of these, 63% (n = 15/24) achieved pain remission, 58% (n = 14) remitted without invasive dental treatment (complete remission: n=12, partial remission: n=2), and 29% (n= 7) had a close temporal relationship between PD and remission (ratio "time to remission after first PD application vs pain duration prior to first PD application" pulpitis, 58% of evaluable patients achieved pain remission without invasive dental treatment. The open-label pre-post design does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness. However, more than one-fourth of evaluable patients remitted with a close temporal relationship between the first PD application and pain remission, suggesting a causal relationship between therapy and remission.

  14. Knowledge of elementary school teachers in Tel-Aviv, Israel, regarding emergency care of dental injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fux-Noy, Avia; Sarnat, Haim; Amir, Erica

    2011-08-01

    Immediate management of traumatized teeth is often critical to the prognosis of the teeth. Most of the traumatic dental injuries occur at home, followed by school. There is a high probability that first aid would be given by lay people such as parents, teachers, or coaches. Knowledge of those people regarding emergency management of dental trauma is crucial for better prognosis. To investigate: (i) the knowledge of elementary school teachers regarding traumatic dental injuries to permanent teeth and emergency treatment, (ii) their source of information, and (iii) the demand for more education in dental trauma. A three-part questionnaire comprised of questions regarding demographic data, attitude, and knowledge about dental injuries was distributed to teachers in 12 elementary schools in the Tel-Aviv area, Israel. The average knowledge score was 4.59 (in a scale of 0-10). Three individual predictors significantly improved the respondents' knowledge: being in the 35-49-year age group (P-value = 0.042), those who had children themselves (P-value = 0.002) and those who had previous experience with trauma (P-value = 0.049). There was no correlation between the demand for further education in dental trauma and knowledge score. The knowledge regarding management of traumatic dental injuries in a group of teachers in the Tel-Aviv area is inadequate. Educational programs as well as addition to the curriculum are necessary to improve their emergency management of traumatic dental injuries and provide better protection to the students. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lars; Andreasen, Jens O; Day, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Avulsion of permanent teeth is one of the most serious dental injuries, and a prompt and correct emergency management is very important for the prognosis. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature and gr...

  16. Expanded function allied dental personnel and dental practice productivity and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazoglou, Tryfon J; Chen, Lei; Lazar, Vickie F; Brown, L Jackson; Ray, Subhash C; Heffley, Dennis R; Berg, Rob; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the impact of expanded function allied dental personnel on the productivity and efficiency of general dental practices. Detailed practice financial and clinical data were obtained from a convenience sample of 154 general dental practices in Colorado. In this state, expanded function dental assistants can provide a wide range of reversible dental services/procedures, and dental hygienists can give local anesthesia. The survey identified practices that currently use expanded function allied dental personnel and the specific services/procedures delegated. Practice productivity was measured using patient visits, gross billings, and net income. Practice efficiency was assessed using a multivariate linear program, Data Envelopment Analysis. Sixty-four percent of the practices were found to use expanded function allied dental personnel, and on average they delegated 31.4 percent of delegatable services/procedures. Practices that used expanded function allied dental personnel treated more patients and had higher gross billings and net incomes than those practices that did not; the more services they delegated, the higher was the practice's productivity and efficiency. The effective use of expanded function allied dental personnel has the potential to substantially expand the capacity of general dental practices to treat more patients and to generate higher incomes for dental practices.

  17. Dental hygiene students’ part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorterman, J.H.G.; Dikkes, B.T.; Brand, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective:  Many students have paid employment while studying. In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental hygiene students to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental hygiene students have

  18. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries. 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diangelis, A J; Andreasen, J O; Ebeleseder, K A

    2014-01-01

    Avulsion of permanent teeth is one of the most serious dental injuries, and a prompt and correct emergency management is very important for the prognosis. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature...

  19. Attitudes among dentists and dental hygienists towards extended scope and independent practice of dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim; Onclin, Pieter; van der Schans, Cees P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Attitudes of dentists and dental hygienists towards extended scope and independent dental hygiene practice are described in several studies, but the results are heterogenous. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the attitudes of dentists and dental hygienists towards extended

  20. Attitudes among dentists and dental hygienists towards extended scope and independent practice of dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Onclin, Pieter; van der Schans, Cees P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    Aims: Attitudes of dentists and dental hygienists towards extended scope and independent dental hygiene practice are described in several studies, but the results are heterogenous. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the attitudes of dentists and dental hygienists towards extended