WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental prosthesis implant-supported

  1. Stress analysis of different prosthesis materials in implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis using 3D finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Iranmanesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the present study, the finite element method (FEM was used to investigate the effects of prosthesis material types on stress distribution of the bone surrounding implants and to evaluate stress distribution in three-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP. Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional (3D finite element FDP model of the maxillary second premolar to the second molar was designed. Three load conditions were statically applied on the functional cusps in horizontal (57.0 N, vertical (200.0 N, and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120° directions. Four standard framework materials were evaluated: Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, base-metal, porcelain fused to metal, andporcelain. Results: The maximum of von Mises stress in the oblique direction was higher than the vertical and horizontal directions in all conditions. In the bone-crestal section, the maximum von Mises stress (53.78 MPa was observed in PMMA within oblique load. In FDPs, the maximum stress was generated at the connector region in all conditions. Conclusion: A noticeable difference was not observed in the bone stress distribution pattern with different prosthetic materials. Although, higher stress value could be seen in polymethyl methacrylate, all types of prosthesis yielded the same stress distribution pattern in FDP. More clinical studies are needed to evaluate the survival rate of these materials.

  2. Attachment-retained gingival prosthesis for implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis in the maxilla: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecida de Mattias Sartori, Ivete; Uhlendorf, Yuri; Padovan, Luiz Eduardo Marques; Junior, Paulo Domingos Ribeiro; Melo, Ana Cláudia Moreira; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2014-12-01

    The rehabilitation of edentulous maxillae is a complex procedure due to the involvement of esthetic and functional requirements. A trial maxillary denture can be used to identify the need for adequate upper lip support when replacing removable complete dentures by implant-fixed dental prostheses. This clinical report describes the outcome of the rehabilitation of an edentulous atrophic maxilla with unfavorable maxillomandibular relationship and deficient upper lip support. A trial denture was fabricated and used to diagnose the need for a prosthesis capable of restoring the upper lip support. The reduced upper lip support was also confirmed by a lateral cephalogram. The patient was rehabilitated by an implant-fixed dental prosthesis associated with an attachment-retained gingival prosthesis. The case presented shows that when loss of upper lip support is detected and the patient does not wish to undergo further surgical reconstruction procedure, the retention of a gingival prosthesis using a ball attachment is a satisfactory treatment option. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Complications and patient-centered outcomes with an implant-supported monolithic zirconia fixed dental prosthesis: 1 year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Bryan; Sanders, Anne E; Reside, Glenn; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-06-01

    To characterize the number and type of complications that occur with a monolithic zirconia fixed dental prosthesis (MZ-FDP) supported by four endosseous implants in the edentulous mandible over time and to quantify the impact of treatment on oral health quality of life (OHQoL). Seventeen edentulous participants were enrolled. New conventional dentures were fabricated for each participant. Four Astra Tech Osseospeed TX implants (Dentsply) were then placed in the parasymphyseal mandible, and after a period of healing, a full-arch monolithic zirconia prosthesis (Zirkonzahn) was inserted. Complication data were recorded and OHQoL was evaluated using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49), administered on four occasions: enrollment; implant surgery; and 6- and 12-month recalls. Sixty-eight implants were placed in 17 edentulous individuals aged 30 to 78 (mean 57.9 years). Implant survival was 94% from the subject perspective and 99% from the implant perspective. Prosthesis survival was 88%. Twelve complications occurred in ten participants, whereas seven participants remained complication free. Both OHIP-49 severity and extent scores decreased significantly between enrollment and 12-month recall (p < 0.001). The mean OHIP-49 severity score at baseline was 94.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 73.9, 115.8) and declined an average of 76.8 (95% CI: -91.3, -62.3) units per participant. The mean OHIP-49 extent score at baseline was 17.2 (95% CI: 10.8, 23.6) and declined 16.3 (95% CI: -20.2, -12.4) units per participant on average. Implant survival was high, and few complications related to the MZ-FDP were observed. The most common prosthetic complication was tooth chipping in the opposing maxillary denture, which accounted for 50% of all complication events. Substantial and clinically important improvements in OHQoL were achieved with both conventional dentures and the implant-supported MZ-FDP. The data of this short-term study indicate that the implant-supported MZ-FDP is a

  4. Application of digital diagnostic impression, virtual planning, and computer-guided implant surgery for a CAD/CAM-fabricated, implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Brandon M; Lin, Wei-Shao; Ntounis, Athanasios; Harris, Bryan T; Morton, Dean

    2014-09-01

    This clinical report demonstrated the use of an implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis fabricated with a contemporary digital approach. The digital diagnostic data acquisition was completed with a digital diagnostic impression with an intraoral scanner and cone-beam computed tomography with a prefabricated universal radiographic template to design a virtual prosthetically driven implant surgical plan. A surgical template fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) was used to perform computer-guided implant surgery. The definitive digital data were then used to design the definitive CAD/CAM-fabricated fixed dental prosthesis. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mastication improvement after partial implant-supported prosthesis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, T M S V; Campos, C H; Gonçalves, G M; de Moraes, M; Rodrigues Garcia, R C M

    2013-12-01

    Partially edentulous patients may be rehabilitated by the placement of removable dental prostheses, implant-supported removable dental prostheses, or partial implant fixed dental prostheses. However, it is unclear the impact of each prosthesis type over the masticatory aspects, which represents the objective of this paired clinical trial. Twelve patients sequentially received and used each of these 3 prosthesis types for 2 months, after which maximum bite force was assessed by a strain sensor and food comminution index was determined with the sieving method. Masseter and temporal muscle thicknesses during rest and maximal clenching were also evaluated by ultrasonography. Each maxillary arch received a new complete denture that was used throughout the study. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance for repeated measures, followed by the Tukey test (p mastication, and the magnitude of this effect was related to prosthesis type.

  6. A mandibular implant-supported fixed complete dental prosthesis in a patient with Sjogren syndrome: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinato, Sergio; Soardi, Carlo Maria; Zane, Anna Maria

    2010-06-01

    The article describes the treatment and 1 year follow-up of a patient with Sjogren syndrome, treated with 6 intraforaminal mandibular implants with delayed loading and an implant-retained fixed prosthesis. The maxillary arch has been treated with a complete denture. This made an enormous difference in comfort and function for the patient. Radiographic check-ups did not reveal any peri-implant bone loss after 1 year of loading.

  7. Prosthetic rehabilitation with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing dental technology for a patient with a mandibulectomy: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Han, Jung-Suk

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of dental prostheses with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing shows acceptable marginal fits and favorable treatment outcomes. This clinical report describes the management of a patient who had undergone a mandibulectomy and received an implant-supported fixed prosthesis by using additive manufacturing for the framework and subtractive manufacturing for the monolithic zirconia restorations. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Split-Framework in Mandibular Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Omar Mendoza Marin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with an implant-supported prosthesis, mandibular flexure must be considered an important biomechanical factor when planning the metal framework design, especially if implants are installed posterior to the interforaminal region. When an edentulous mandible is restored with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis connected by a fixed full-arch framework, mandibular flexure may cause needless stress in the overall restorative system and lead to screw loosening, poor fit of prosthesis, loss of the posterior implant, and patient’s discomfort due to deformation properties of the mandible during functional movements. The use of a split-framework could decrease the stress with a precise and passive fit on the implants and restore a more natural functional condition of the mandible, helping in the longevity of the prosthesis. Therefore, the present clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient by a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a split-framework to compensate for mandibular flexure. Clinical Significance. The present clinical report shows that the use of a split-framework reduced the risk of loss of the posterior implants or screws loosening with acceptable patient comfort over the period of a year. The split-framework might have compensated for the mandibular flexure during functional activities.

  9. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E.; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, and nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. Methods 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1 to 3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. Conclusion No significant relationship exists between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Clinical Significance This clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses because of the absence of a periodontal ligament. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and

  10. Maxillary Implant-Supported Fixed Prosthesis: A Survey of Reviews and Key Variables for Treatment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, German O; Avrampou, Marianna; Taylor, James C; Elpers, Julie; Thalji, Ghadeer; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2016-01-01

    This review was conducted to provide information to support the establishment of clinical guidelines for the treatment of maxillary edentulism using implant-supported fixed dental prostheses. Initial efforts were directed toward a systematic review with a defined PICO question: "For maxillary edentulous patients with dental implants treated using a fixed prosthesis, what is the impact of prosthesis design on prosthesis survival and complications?" Following a title search of more than 3,000 titles identified by electronic search of PubMed, 180 articles were identified that addressed the clinical evaluation of maxillary dental implant prostheses. The broad methodologic heterogeneity and clinical variation among reports precluded this approach for a systematic review. The information was extracted using a standardized extraction table by two pairs of investigators, and the reported outcomes were then summarized according to reported outcomes for implant prostheses supported by four, six, or eight implants using unitary or segmented prostheses. This review indicated that high prosthetic survival is observed using all approaches. The advantages of using fewer implants and a unitary prosthesis are revealed in the surgical phases, and complications commonly involve the fracture or detachment of acrylic teeth and reduced access for proper oral hygiene and related biologic complications. Using six implants typically involved grafting of posterior regions with advantages of reduced cantilevers and redundancy of implant support. Reduced prosthesis survival in these cases was associated with poor implant distribution. Segmented prostheses supported by six or more implants offered greater prosthetic survival, perhaps due to posterior implant placement. Advantages of a segmented prosthesis included pragmatic issues of accommodating divergent implants, attaining passive fit, combining prosthetic materials, and relative simplicity of repair. The existing literature demonstrated

  11. Prosthetic Consideration in Implant-supported Prosthesis: A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowd, Manga Snigdha; Shankar, Thatapudi; Ranjan, Rajeev; Singh, Arpita

    2017-06-01

    Modern dentistry has changed tremendously with implant therapy. For the successful implant therapy, making a proper treatment plan considering both surgical and prosthetic part in mind is the key of success. Often practitioners tend to create a treatment plan overlooking the basic principles of prosthetic part. This present review has discussed various prosthetic consideration of implant-supported prosthesis. A step-by-step detailed prosthetic option with their indications has been discussed to help all dental implant practitioners in making of an optimal treatment plan for each case.

  12. Implant supported prosthesis in an edentulous boy with Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia - "A happy boy"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Nyhuus, Lone; Buhl, Jytte

    2009-01-01

    region. 3. At the age of 10 years a new set of dentures were made. This time the upper denture was made as an overdenture supported and retained by 4 implants and a Dolder bar. The surgical procedure included bone grafting from the anterior ramus mandibulae. The boy's subjective judgement of his oral......Implant supported prosthesis in an edentulous boy with Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia - "A happy boy". Authors; Gjoerup,H1; Nyhuus,L2; Buhl,J3. 1) Center for Oral Health in Rare Conditions, Aarhus University Hospital 2) Prosthodontic Department, the Dental School, Aarhus University 3) Department...... by the patient and his family. Case presentation The boy was untreated until the age of 5 years. His oral functions were compromised in relation to speech and psychosocial aspects. In the following 6 years, he underwent prosthodontic treatment in three phases. 1. At the age of 5 years a set of complete dentures...

  13. Three-dimensional esthetic analysis in treatment planning for implant-supported fixed prosthesis in the edentulous maxilla: review of the esthetics literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2011-08-01

    Fixed implant-supported prosthesis for the edentulous maxilla has gained tremendous popularity over the years. Multiple prosthetic designs have been introduced in order to accommodate a gamut of clinical situations. Irrespective of the design, it is paramount that the esthetics imparted by the prosthesis be uncompromised. Though esthetics is subjective, a common ground exists where all its fundamental principles converge. This article reviews pertinent dental and facial esthetics literature for application of various esthetic concepts involved in diagnosis and treatment planning for an implant-supported fixed prosthesis in the edentulous maxilla. Three-dimensional esthetic analysis involves assessment of various esthetic parameters in superior-inferior, medial-lateral, and anterior-posterior dimensions. The impact of various esthetic parameters such as facial forms, facial profiles, maxillary teeth positions, maxillary teeth proportions, smile lines, lip support, gingival display, facial midline, dental midline, horizontal cant, and smile width are discussed in detail. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Survival of various implant-supported prosthesis designs following 36 months of clinical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A M; Orenstein, I H; Morris, H F; Ochi, S

    2000-12-01

    The use of endosseous dental implants to replace natural teeth lost to trauma, dental caries, or periodontal disease has become a predictable form of prosthetic treatment since gaining popularity in the early 1980s. While numerous clinical studies have focused on the survival of implants, few address the survival of different prosthesis designs. Beginning in 1991, 882 prostheses supported by more than 2,900 implants (687 patients) were placed by the Department of Veterans Affairs Dental Implant Clinical Research Group (DICRG). These prostheses were divided into five research strata based on arch location. The recommended design for each stratum was: bar-supported overdenture (maxillary completely edentulous); screw-retained hybrid denture (mandibular completely edentulous); screw-retained fixed partial denture (mandibular and maxillary posterior partially edentulous); and cemented single crown (maxillary anterior single tooth). Alternative overdenture designs were utilized in the edentulous arches when the recommended prosthesis could not be fabricated. Prosthesis success rates for the research strata were calculated for an observation time of up to 36 months following prosthesis placement. Success rates for the maxillary edentulous stratum ranged from 94.6% for the bar-retained overdenture supported by five to six fixtures to 81.8% for the cap-retained overdenture. The mandibular edentulous strata produced success rates of 98.1% for the fixed hybrid prosthesis to 91.7% for the cap-retained prosthesis. Success rates for maxillary and mandibular posterior fixed partial dentures were 94.3% and 92.6%, respectively, while the maxillary anterior single-tooth prosthesis yielded a success rate of 98.1% for the 36-month observation period. The recommended prosthesis designs investigated in this study proved to be reliable, with encouraging success rates for an observation period of 36 months following placement.

  15. The role of prosthetic abutment material on the stress distribution in a maxillary single implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, Hugo Eduardo; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair A.; Silva, Wander José da; Faot, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the influence of abutment's material and geometry on stress distribution in a single implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models were made based on tomographic slices of the upper middle incisor area, in which a morse taper implant was positioned and a titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrN) universal abutments was installed. The commercially available geometry of titanium (T) and zirconia (Z) abutments were used to draw two models, TM1 and ZM1 respectively, which served as control groups. These models were compared with 2 experimental groups were the mechanical properties of Z were applied to the titanium abutment (TM2) and vice versa for the zirconia abutment (ZM2). Subsequently, loading was simulated in two steps, starting with a preload phase, calculated with the respective friction coefficients of each materials, followed by a combined preload and chewing force. The maximum von Mises stress was described. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA that considered material composition, geometry and loading (p 0.05). Conclusion: The screw was the piece most intensely affected, mainly through the preload force, independent of the abutment's material. - Highlights: • The abutment's screw was the most impaired piece of the dental implant system. • The highest stress was located at first thread of the abutment's screw. • The preload is the main factor in the abutment's screw stress. • Abutment configuration and material can have a positive contribution for the stress distribution

  16. Technique for systematic bone reduction for fixed implant-supported prosthesis in the edentulous maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2015-06-01

    Bone reduction for maxillary fixed implant-supported prosthodontic treatment is often necessary to either gain prosthetic space or to conceal the prosthesis-tissue junction in patients with excessive gingival display (gummy smile). Inadequate bone reduction is often a cause of prosthetic failure due to material fractures, poor esthetics, or inability to perform oral hygiene procedures due to unfavorable ridge lap prosthetic contours. Various instruments and techniques are available for bone reduction. It would be helpful to have an accurate and efficient method for bone reduction at the time of surgery and subsequently create a smooth bony platform. This article presents a straightforward technique for systematic bone reduction by transferring the patient's maximum smile line, recorded clinically, to a clear radiographic smile guide for treatment planning using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The patient's smile line and the amount of required bone reduction are transferred clinically by marking bone with a sterile stationery graphite wood pencil at the time of surgery. This technique can help clinicians to accurately achieve the desired bone reduction during surgery, and provide confidence that the diagnostic and treatment planning goals have been achieved. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of joining the sectioned implant-supported prosthesis on the peri-implant strain generated in simulated mandibular model

    OpenAIRE

    Ipsha Singh; K Chandrasekharan Nair; Jayakar Shetty

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the strain developed in simulated mandibular model before and after the joining of an implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis by different joining techniques, namely, arc welding, laser welding, and soldering. Materials and Methods: A specimen simulating a mandibular edentulous ridge was fabricated in heat-cured acrylic resin. 4-mm holes were drilled in the following tooth positions; 36, 33, 43, 46. Implant analogs were placed in the holes. Un...

  18. Transition from failing dentition to full-arch fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a staged approach using removable partial dentures: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez; Cortes, Djalma Nogueira; No-Cortes, Juliana; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2014-06-01

    The present retrospective case series is aimed at evaluating a staged approach using a removable partial denture (RPD) as an interim prosthesis in treatment to correct a failing dentition until such time as a full-arch fixed implant-supported prosthesis may be inserted. Eight patients, who had undergone maxillary full-arch rehabilitation with dental implants due to poor prognosis of their dentitions, were analyzed. All treatment included initial periodontal therapy and a strategic order of extraction of hopeless teeth. An RPD supported by selected teeth rehabilitated the compromised arch during implant osseointegration. These remaining teeth were extracted prior to definitive prosthesis delivery. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique were also recorded for the cases presented. Among the advantages provided by the staged approach are simplicity of fabrication, low cost, and ease of insertion. Additionally, RPD tooth support prevented contact between the interim prosthesis and healing abutments, promoting implant osseointegration. The main drawbacks were interference with speech and limited esthetic results. Implant survival rate was 100% within a follow-up of at least 1 year. The use of RPDs as interim prostheses allowed for the accomplishment of the analyzed rehabilitation treatments. It is a simple treatment alternative for patients with a low smile line. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Effect of joining the sectioned implant-supported prosthesis on the peri-implant strain generated in simulated mandibular model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipsha Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the strain developed in simulated mandibular model before and after the joining of an implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis by different joining techniques, namely, arc welding, laser welding, and soldering. Materials and Methods: A specimen simulating a mandibular edentulous ridge was fabricated in heat-cured acrylic resin. 4-mm holes were drilled in the following tooth positions; 36, 33, 43, 46. Implant analogs were placed in the holes. University of California, Los Angeles, abutment was attached to the implant fixture. Eight strain gauges were attached to the acrylic resin model. Six similar models were made. Implant-supported screw-retained fixed prosthesis was fabricated in nickel-chromium alloy. A load of 400 N was applied on the prosthesis using universal testing machine. Resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. All the prostheses were sectioned at the area between 36 and 33, 33 and 43, and 43 and 46 using 35 micrometer carborundum disc, and strain was measured in each strain gauge after applying a load of 400 N on the prosthesis. Specimens were joined by arc welding, soldering, and laser welding. After joining, a load of 400 N was applied on each prosthesis and the resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. Results: Highest mean strain values were recorded before sectioning of the prostheses (889.9 microstrains. Lowest mean strain values were recorded after sectioning the prosthesis and before reuniting it (225.0 microstrains. Conclusions: Sectioning and reuniting the long-span implant prosthesis was found to be a significant factor in influencing the peri-implant strain.

  20. Effect of joining the sectioned implant-supported prosthesis on the peri-implant strain generated in simulated mandibular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ipsha; Nair, K Chandrasekharan; Shetty, Jayakar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the strain developed in simulated mandibular model before and after the joining of an implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis by different joining techniques, namely, arc welding, laser welding, and soldering. A specimen simulating a mandibular edentulous ridge was fabricated in heat-cured acrylic resin. 4-mm holes were drilled in the following tooth positions; 36, 33, 43, 46. Implant analogs were placed in the holes. University of California, Los Angeles, abutment was attached to the implant fixture. Eight strain gauges were attached to the acrylic resin model. Six similar models were made. Implant-supported screw-retained fixed prosthesis was fabricated in nickel-chromium alloy. A load of 400 N was applied on the prosthesis using universal testing machine. Resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. All the prostheses were sectioned at the area between 36 and 33, 33 and 43, and 43 and 46 using 35 micrometer carborundum disc, and strain was measured in each strain gauge after applying a load of 400 N on the prosthesis. Specimens were joined by arc welding, soldering, and laser welding. After joining, a load of 400 N was applied on each prosthesis and the resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. Highest mean strain values were recorded before sectioning of the prostheses (889.9 microstrains). Lowest mean strain values were recorded after sectioning the prosthesis and before reuniting it (225.0 microstrains). Sectioning and reuniting the long-span implant prosthesis was found to be a significant factor in influencing the peri-implant strain.

  1. Rehabilitation of an edentulous cleft lip and palate patient with a soft palate defect using a bar-retained, implant-supported speech-aid prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakan Tuna, S; Pekkan, Gurel; Buyukgural, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of an edentulous cleft lip and palate patient with a combined hard and soft palate defect is a great challenge, due to the lack of retention of the obturator prosthesis as a result of its weight and the inability to obtain a border seal. Dental implants improve the retention, stability, and occlusal function of prostheses when used in carefully selected cleft lip and palate cases. This clinical report presents an edentulous unilateral cleft lip and palate patient who has hard and soft palate defects and an atrophied maxilla, treated with an implant-supported speech-aid prosthesis.

  2. Maxillary and mandibular immediately loaded implant-supported interim complete fixed dental prostheses on immediately placed dental implants with a digital approach: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ryan C; Harris, Bryan T; Sarno, Robert; Morton, Dean; Llop, Daniel R; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2015-09-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment of maxillary and mandibular immediate implant placement and immediately loaded implant-supported interim complete fixed dental prostheses with a contemporary digital approach. The virtual diagnostic tooth arrangement eliminated the need for a customized radiographic template, and the diagnostic data collection required for computer-guided surgery (digital diagnostic impressions, digital photographs, and a cone beam-computed tomography [CBCT] scan) was completed in a single visit with improved workflow efficiency. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated surgical templates and interim prosthesis templates were made in a dental laboratory to facilitate computer-guided surgery and the immediate loading process. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of prosthetic abutment material on the stress distribution in a maxillary single implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Hugo Eduardo, E-mail: hugo.e.peixoto@hotmail.com [Implantology Team, Latin American Institute of Research and Education in Dentistry, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Bordin, Dimorvan, E-mail: dimorvan_bordin@hotmail.com [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Del Bel Cury, Altair A., E-mail: altcury@fop.unicamp.br [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Silva, Wander José da, E-mail: wanderjose@fop.unicamp.br [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Faot, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda.faot@gmail.com [Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Gonçalves Chaves, 457, 2nd floor, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul 96015-560 (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the influence of abutment's material and geometry on stress distribution in a single implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models were made based on tomographic slices of the upper middle incisor area, in which a morse taper implant was positioned and a titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrN) universal abutments was installed. The commercially available geometry of titanium (T) and zirconia (Z) abutments were used to draw two models, TM1 and ZM1 respectively, which served as control groups. These models were compared with 2 experimental groups were the mechanical properties of Z were applied to the titanium abutment (TM2) and vice versa for the zirconia abutment (ZM2). Subsequently, loading was simulated in two steps, starting with a preload phase, calculated with the respective friction coefficients of each materials, followed by a combined preload and chewing force. The maximum von Mises stress was described. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA that considered material composition, geometry and loading (p < 0.05). Results: Titanium and zirconia abutments showed similar von Mises stresses in the mechanical part of the four models. The area with the highest concentration of stress was the screw thread, following by the screw body. The highest stress levels occurred in screw thread was observed during the preloading phase in the ZM1 model (931 MPa); and during the combined loading in the TM1 model (965 MPa). Statistically significant differences were observed for loading, the material × loading interaction, and the loading × geometry interaction (p < 0.05). Preloading contributed for 77.89% of the stress (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences to the other factors (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The screw was the piece most intensely affected, mainly through the preload force, independent of the abutment's material. - Highlights: • The abutment's screw was the most impaired piece of the

  4. Prosthetic misfit of implant-supported prosthesis obtained by an alternative section method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão-Filho, Hilmo Barreto Leite; de Aguiar, Fábio Afrânio; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Adequate passive-fitting of one-piece cast 3-element implant-supported frameworks is hard to achieve. This short communication aims to present an alternative method for section of one-piece cast frameworks and for casting implant-supported frameworks. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three-unit implant-supported nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) frameworks were tested for vertical misfit (n = 6). The frameworks were cast as one-piece (Group A) and later transversally sectioned through a diagonal axis (Group B) and compared to frameworks that were cast diagonally separated (Group C). All separated frameworks were laser welded. Only one side of the frameworks was screwed. RESULTS The results on the tightened side were significantly lower in Group C (6.43 ± 3.24 µm) when compared to Groups A (16.50 ± 7.55 µm) and B (16.27 ± 1.71 µm) (Plaser welding showed significant improvement in the levels of misfit of the frameworks (Group A, 58.66±14.30 µm; Group B, 39.48±12.03 µm; Group C, 23.13±8.24 µm) (P<.05). CONCLUSION Casting diagonally sectioned frameworks lowers the misfit levels. Lower misfit levels for the frameworks can be achieved by diagonally sectioning one-piece frameworks. PMID:22737313

  5. Effect of implant number and distribution on load transfer in implant-supported partial fixed dental prostheses for the anterior maxilla: A photoelastic stress analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-In; Lee, Yoon; Kim, Yu-Lee; Cho, Hye-Won

    2016-02-01

    The 4-, 3- or even 2-implant-supported partial fixed dental prosthesis (PFDP) designs have been used to rehabilitate the anterior edentulous maxilla. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the stress distribution in the supporting tissues surrounding implants placed in the anterior maxilla with 5 PFDP designs. A photoelastic model of the human maxilla with an anterior edentulous region was made with photoelastic resin (PL-2; Vishay Micro-Measurements), and 6 straight implants (OsseoSpeed; Astra Tech AB) were placed in the 6 anterior tooth positions. The 5 design concepts based on implant location were as follows: model 6I: 6 implants; model 2C2CI: 4 implants (2 canines and 2 central incisors); model 2C2LI: 4 implants (2 canines and 2 lateral incisors); model 2C1CI: 3 implants (2 canines and 1 central incisor); and model 2C: 2 canines. A load of 127.4 N was applied on the cingulum of 3 teeth at a 30-degree angle to the long axis of the implant. Stresses that developed in the supporting structure were recorded photographically. The 6-implant-supported PFDP exhibited the most even and lowest distribution of stresses in all loading conditions. When the canine was loaded, the 2- or 3-implant-supported PFDP showed higher stresses around the implant at the canine position than did the 4- or 6-implant-supported PFDP. When the central incisor or lateral incisor was loaded, the two 4-implant-supported PFDPs exhibited similar levels of stresses around the implants and showed lower stresses than did the 2- or 3-implant-supported PFDP. Implant number and distribution influenced stress distribution around the implants in the anterior maxilla. With a decrease in implant number, the stresses around the implants increased. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabrication of a Customized Ball Abutment to Correct a Nonparallel Implant Abutment for a Mandibular Implant-Supported Removable Partial Prosthesis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Dasht; Mohammadreza Nakhaei; Nafiseh teimouri

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: While using an implant-supported removable partial prosthesis, the implant abutments should be parallel to one another along the path of insertion. If the implants and their attachments are placed vertically on a similar occlusal plane, not only is the retention improved, the prosthesis will also be maintained for a longer period. Case Report: A 65-year-old male patient referred to the School of Dentistry in Mashhad, Iran with complaints of discomfort with the removable partial ...

  7. Influence of laser-welding and electroerosion on passive fit of implant-supported prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tatiana Bernardon; De Arruda Nobilo, Mauro Antonio; Pessanha Henriques, Guilherme Elias; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Guimaraes, Magali Beck

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of laser welding and electroerosion procedure on the passive fit of interim fixed implant-supported titanium frameworks. Twenty frameworks were made from a master model, with five parallel placed implants in the inter foramen region, and cast in commercially pure titanium. The frameworks were divided into 4 groups: 10 samples were tested before (G1) and after (G2) electroerosion application; and another 10 were sectioned into five pieces and laser welded before (G3) and after (G4) electroerosion application. The passive fit between the UCLA abutment of the framework and the implant was evaluated using an optical microscope Olympus STM (Olympus Optical Co., Tokyo, Japan) with 0.0005mm of accuracy. Statistical analyses showed significant differences between G1 and G2, G1 and G3, G1 and G4, G2 and G4. However, no statistical difference was observed when comparing G2 and G3. These results indicate that frameworks may show a more precise adaptation if they are sectioned and laser welded. In the same way, electroerosion improves the precision in the framework adaptation.

  8. Randomized clinical trial of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F; Clark, Arthur E; Shuster, Jonathan J; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the survival rates over time of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic prostheses as a function of core-veneer thickness ratio, gingival connector embrasure design, and connector height. An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study involving 55 patients missing three teeth in either one or two posterior areas. These patients (34 women; 21 men; age range 52-75 years) were recruited for the study to receive a three-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Two implants were placed for each of the 72 FDPs in the study. The implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech), which were made of titanium, were grit blasted. A gold-shaded, custom-milled titanium abutment (Atlantis, Astra Tech), was secured to each implant body. Each of the 72 FDPs in 55 patients were randomly assigned based on one of the following options: (1) A. ceramic-ceramic (Yttria-stabilized zirconia core, pressable fluorapatite glass-ceramic, IPS e.max ZirCAD, and ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent) B. metal-ceramic (palladium-based noble alloy, Capricorn, Ivoclar Vivadent, with press-on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic veneer, IPS InLine POM, Ivoclar Vivadent); (2) occlusal veneer thickness (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm); (3) curvature of gingival embrasure (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mm diameter); and (4) connector height (3, 4, and 5 mm). FDPs were fabricated and cemented with dual-cure resin cement (RelyX, Universal Cement, 3M ESPE). Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. FDPs were examined for cracks, fracture, and general surface quality. Recall exams of 72 prostheses revealed 10 chipping fractures. No fractures occurred within the connector or embrasure areas. Two-sided Fisher's exact tests showed no significant correlation between fractures and type of material system (p = 0.51), veneer thickness (p = 0.75), radius of curvature of gingival embrasure (p = 0.68), and connector height (p = 0

  9. Tracheobronchial Foreign Body Aspiration: Dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataman Köse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to extract foreign bodies for avoiding life-threatening complications. They can lead to death if they are not treated. Different signs and symptoms could occur according to the complete or partial airway obstruction. Foreign body aspiration is a rare incident in adults. The organic foreign materials such as foods are found to be aspirated more commonly and are usually settled in the right bronchial system. However, dental prosthesis and teeth aspirations are rare in literature. In our study, a 52-year-old male patient who had aspirated the front part of his lower dental prosthesis accidentally is presented and the foreign body is extracted by using rigid bronchoscopy. There are many causes of aspiration but dental prosthetic aspirations should be kept in mind during sleep. For this reason, dental apparatus must be taken out while asleep.

  10. Replacement of missing tooth in esthetic zone with implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the anterior region, the common reason for tooth loss is due to traumatic injury or congenital anomaly. Loss of a single tooth may cause functional and esthetic deficits to the patient. There are different treatment options available for replacing a missing incisor. Implant dentistry should be considered as first treatment alternative for replace a missing tooth. This case report presents the replacement of a missing maxillary left central incisor in a compromised site with dental implants along with bone graft followed by frenectomy to obtain a good clinical result and for better function and esthetics of the patient.

  11. Fabrication of a Customized Ball Abutment to Correct a Nonparallel Implant Abutment for a Mandibular Implant-Supported Removable Partial Prosthesis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dasht

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While using an implant-supported removable partial prosthesis, the implant abutments should be parallel to one another along the path of insertion. If the implants and their attachments are placed vertically on a similar occlusal plane, not only is the retention improved, the prosthesis will also be maintained for a longer period. Case Report: A 65-year-old male patient referred to the School of Dentistry in Mashhad, Iran with complaints of discomfort with the removable partial dentures for his lower mandible. Due to the lack of parallelism in the supporting implants, prefabricated ball abutment could not be used. As a result, a customized ball abutment was fabricated in order to correct the non-parallelism of the implants. Conclusion: Using UCLA abutments could be a cost-efficient approach for the correction of misaligned implant abutments in implant-supported overdentures.

  12. Outcomes Assessment of Treating Completely Edentulous Patients with a Fixed Implant-Supported Profile Prosthesis Utilizing a Graftless Approach. Part 1: Clinically Related Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Fawaz; Bedrossian, Edmond; Wong, Allen; Farrell, Douglas; Park, Chan; Indresano, Thomas

    To assess outcomes of treating completely edentulous patients with a fixed implant-supported profile prosthesis utilizing a graftless approach for the maxilla and for the mandible, with emphasis on clinically related outcomes, specifically implant and prosthesis survival. This was a retrospective study with the following inclusion criteria: completely edentulous patients rehabilitated with a fixed implant-supported profile denture utilizing a graftless approach. Patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were asked to participate in the study during their follow-up visits, and hence a consecutive sampling strategy was used. Data regarding implant and prosthesis cumulative survival rates (CSRs) were gathered and calculated. Thirty-four patients were identified with a total of 220 implants placed. An overall CSR of 98.2% was recorded with an observation of up to 10 years. For tilted, axial, and zygomatic implants, CSRs of 96.9%, 98.0%, and 100%, respectively, were observed for up to 10 years. For provisional prostheses, CSRs of 92.3% at 1 year, and 84.6% at 2 years were observed. For final prostheses, a CSR of 93.8% was observed at 10 years. The results suggest that treating completely edentulous patients with a fixed profile prosthesis utilizing a graftless approach in the maxilla and the mandible can be a reliable treatment option.

  13. Control of dental prosthesis system with microcontroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapidere, M; Müldür, S; Güler, I

    2000-04-01

    In this study, a microcontroller-based electronic circuit was designed and implemented for dental prosthesis curing system. Heater, compressor and valve were controlled by 8-bit PIC16C64 microcontroller which is programmed using MPASM package. The temperature and time were controlled automatically by preset values which were inputted from keyboard while the pressure was kept constant. Calibration was controlled and the working range was tested. The test results showed that the system provided a good performance.

  14. Teaching mandibular implant-Supported overdentures in dental schools in North America - a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Gal, G; Ziv, Y; Weiss, E I; Zabrovsky, A

    2017-05-01

    Mandibular two-implant overdentures are considered the minimum standard of care for edentulous patients and provide an excellent performance, as well as satisfaction to the patients. Dental schools are required to promote the teaching of current treatment options in order to enable students to master state-of-the-art procedures. The purpose of this study was to examine how the theoretical and practical aspects of mandibular two-implant overdentures are taught in dental schools in North America. Data were collected via an online questionnaire that included questions regarding the theoretical and clinical courses, surgical procedure and imaging method. Of 75 schools, 36 responded to the survey. Almost all the schools teach the subject theoretically, but it is not mandatory for students to perform in most of the schools. Only a minority (23%) of the mandibular dentures made by students are implant-supported. Almost all of the schools (94%) use two implants to support overdentures, and Locator abutment is used almost exclusively. The prevalent imaging for the surgical procedure is CT scans, although 30% of the schools use panoramic radiograph. None of the schools loads the implants immediately after surgery. Some clear trends are apparent in the current survey: the use of two implants, no use of bar connectors and delayed loading of the implants. It is likely that graduates will not have sufficient clinical skills and will need continuing education to be familiar with the required procedures, both surgical and prosthetic. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of the influence exerted by different dental specialty backgrounds and measuring instrument reproducibility on esthetic aspects of maxillary implant-supported single crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Samriddhi; Ho, Yu Lau Elaine; Hao, Jie; Lang, Niklaus P; Mattheos, Nikos

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the influence exerted by different dental specialty backgrounds as well as the validity and reproducibility of the Pink Esthetic Score/White Esthetic Score (PES/WES) and the modified Implant Crown Aesthetic Index (mod-ICAI) on the assessment of esthetic aspects of maxillary implants supported single-tooth prosthesis. A total of fourteen examiners (Two orthodontists, two prosthodontists, two oral surgeons, two periodontists, two dental technicians, two dental assistants, and two postgraduate students in Implant Dentistry evaluated 20 photographs of single-implant-supported crowns and five photographs of unrestored teeth of esthetic zone in a two part study. The examiners assessed the photographs with each index (Pink Esthetic Score/White Esthetic Score and modified Implant Crown Aesthetic Index), twice with a week's interval. Orders of photographs were rearranged in the second assessment. Kruskal-Wallis test results showed significant differences among all the six specialties (P ≤ 0.001). DAs and periodontists had significantly better ratings than other specialties with both indices. Prosthodontists had the lowest mean rank scores regardless of the index. Interobserver agreement was also lowest between the two prosthodontists (4-28%), rest of the groups had low-to-moderate agreement (20-80%) when limited allowance was accepted. With mod-ICAI, more interobserver agreement was noted within the specialty group than with PES/WES. The PES/WES and the modified ICAI can be reliable estimates of esthetic outcomes. The assessor degree of specialization affected the esthetic evaluation with both the PES/WES and the modified ICAI. DAs and periodontists were identified to provide more favorable ratings than other specialties while prosthodontists were most critical in this study. With modified ICAI, more interobserver agreement within specialty resulted. The interexaminer agreement may be increased if more tolerance of 1-2 points is considered. © 2014 John Wiley

  16. 3D Metal Printing - Additive Manufacturing Technologies for Frameworks of Implant-Borne Fixed Dental Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla León, M; Klemm, I M; García-Arranz, J; Özcan, M

    2017-09-01

    An edentulous patient was rehabilitated with maxillary metal-ceramic and mandibular metal-resin implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Metal frameworks of the FDPs were fabricated using 3D additive manufacturing technologies utilizing selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) processes. Both SLM and EBM technologies were employed in combination with computer numerical control (CNC) post-machining at the implant interface. This report highlights the technical and clinical protocol for fabrication of FDPs using SLM and EBM additive technologies. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  17. Difficult factors in Management of Impacted Dental Prosthesis in Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efiaty A. Soepardi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A dental prosthesis which ingested and impacted in esophagus, is an emergency case and life threatening, so require immediate esophagoscopy intervention for removing. The objective of this study is to assess some factors can caused dtfficulties in diagnosing and treating the ingested and impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus and their complications. This retrospective study analyzed patient’s chart whose underwent esophagoscopy for removing the impacted dental prosthesis in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia during a period between January 1997 and December 2003. Neck-chest X-ray and esophagoscopy were performed in all patients to identify the existence of the dental prosthesis as a diagnostic and treatment procedure. The length of time for removing the dental prosthesis was recorded and stated as a less difficult esophagoscopy when it takes time less than 60 minutes and as a difficult  esophagoscopy takes 60 minutes or longer. Some risk difficulties factors were statistically analyzed. There were 53 patients of ingested dental prosthesis in esophagus. Only 51 cases were analyzed According to the length of time for removing the dental prosthesis by esophagoscopy, 22 patients were recorded as less difficult cases and 29 patients as difficult cases. Two cases among the cases needed cervicotomy after unsuccessful esophagoscopy removal. The difficulties to diagnose an impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus caused by unreliable clinical history, unclear signs and symptoms, unable to be detected by X-ray and was not found during esophagoscopy. The difficulties in treating due to mucosal laceration, edema, bleeding, failure of the first extraction and conformity with the size and shape, the wire outside the dental prosthesis and the length of time stayed in the esophagus. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 33-6Keywords: ingested dental prosthesis, radioluscent foreign body, length of time of esophagoscopy

  18. Removable dental prosthesis as periodontal treatment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilia Adenan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of prostheses are to restore mastication force, improve esthetics and maintain gingival health. The construction and function of prosthesis restoration are mutually interdependent with condition of periodontal tissues. A properly constructed prosthesis is an integral phase of complete treatment of periodontal disease in order to maintain periodontal tissues health. This paper reports case of a man aged 47 years who came to Dental Specialist Clinic in Oral and Dental Hospital Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran with chief complaint of mobility in almost all his teeth and they seems to look longer. The patient has no systemic disease and did not want his teeth to be extracted. Clinical and panoramic radiographic and laboratoris examinations has been done. During treatment, oclusal adjustment and splinting had been done on tooth 33,34,35 and tooth 44,43 also tooth 43,42 splinting with composite. The following treatment was the acrylic removable partial denture for upper jaw while mandible was fitted a frame denture which functioned as a semi permanent splint. One month post treatment, patien felt comfort and the denture was well functioning.

  19. Full Mouth Oral Rehabilitation by Maxillary Implant Supported Hybrid Denture Employing a Fiber Reinforced Material Instead of Conventional PMMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamheya, Ala Hassan A; Yeniyol, Sinem; Arısan, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Many people have life-long problems with their dentures, such as difficulties with speaking and eating, loose denture, and sore mouth syndrome. The evolution of dental implant supported prosthesis gives these patients normal healthy life for their functional and esthetic advantages. This case report presents the fabrication of maxillary implant supported hybrid prosthesis by using Nanofilled Composite (NFC) material in teeth construction to rehabilitate a complete denture wearer patient.

  20. Full Mouth Oral Rehabilitation by Maxillary Implant Supported Hybrid Denture Employing a Fiber Reinforced Material Instead of Conventional PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Hassan A. Qamheya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people have life-long problems with their dentures, such as difficulties with speaking and eating, loose denture, and sore mouth syndrome. The evolution of dental implant supported prosthesis gives these patients normal healthy life for their functional and esthetic advantages. This case report presents the fabrication of maxillary implant supported hybrid prosthesis by using Nanofilled Composite (NFC material in teeth construction to rehabilitate a complete denture wearer patient.

  1. An alternative section method for casting and posterior laser welding of metallic frameworks for an implant-supported prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Fábio Afrânio; Tiossi, Rodrigo; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Mattos, Maria de Gloria Chiarello; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of fit of three types of implant-supported frameworks cast in Ni-Cr alloy: specifically, a framework cast as one piece compared to frameworks cast separately in sections to the transverse or the diagonal axis, and later laser welded. Three sets of similar implant-supported frameworks were constructed. The first group of six 3-unit implant-supported frameworks were cast as one piece, the second group of six were sectioned in the transverse axis of the pontic region prior to casting, and the last group of six were sectioned in the diagonal axis of the pontic region prior to casting. The sectioned frameworks were positioned in the matrix (10 N.cm torque) and laser welded. To evaluate passive fit, readings were made with an optical microscope with both screws tightened and with only one-screw tightened. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer's test (p screws were tightened, no differences were found between the three groups (p > 0.05). In the single-screw-tightened test, with readings made opposite to the tightened side, the group cast as one piece (57.02 +/- 33.48 mum) was significantly different (p 0.05) from the group transversally sectioned (31.42 +/- 20.68 microm). On the tightened side, no significant differences were found between the groups (p > 0.05). Results of this study showed that casting diagonally sectioned frameworks lowers misfit levels of prosthetic implant-supported frameworks and also improves the levels of passivity to the same frameworks when compared to structures cast as one piece.

  2. A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanoue, Naomi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis, with a composite resin denture tooth as a pontic, a tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin, and screw posts for reinforcement, was still functioning after an observation period of 20 years. The prosthesis was found to be reliable for long-term clinical use when chemically and mechanically reinforced.

  3. Availability of Dental Prosthesis Procedures in Brazilian Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Gonçalves Melo Cunha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To describe dental prosthesis provision in the Brazilian public health service and report the performance of dental prosthesis procedures according to the Brazilian macroregions. Methods. A structured interview was conducted with senior-level health professionals from each of the 18,114 oral health teams (OHT. The dependent variables were performance of removable prostheses and prosthesis procedures, including provision of fixed prostheses by OHT. Descriptive statistics were produced together with performing a cluster analysis using SPSS version 19.0. Results. The manufacture of any type of prosthesis was done by a minority of OHT (43%. The most commonly provided types of dental prosthesis were removable full and partial dentures. Cluster 1 (teams that performed prosthesis procedures the most was composed of a smaller number of teams (n = 5,531, and Cluster 2 (composed of teams that do not perform prosthetics or that perform them in small amounts consisted of 12,583 teams. The geographic distribution of clusters reveals that the largest proportion of Cluster 1 teams is located in the Northeast (33.9% and Southeast (33.6%. Conclusions. A minority of OHT produce dental prostheses. There is an unequal geographical distribution of clusters.

  4. Osseointegrated silicone finger prosthesis using dental implants: a renovated technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Sankar, V Vijay; Chirumamilla, Naveen; Reddy, V Vamsikrishna

    2014-11-01

    In clinical practice, we come across patients with traumatically amputated or congenitally missing partial or complete fingers that can be restored using microsurgical replantation or transplantation procedures. However, in some cases this might not be possible due to systemic or local factors and the lost or missing part has to be replaced prosthetically to offer psychological and functional wellbeing. These prostheses can be constructed with various materials like acrylics or silicone retained with the help of auxiliary aids. However, these prostheses cause some hindrance in performing functions like writing, typing, etc. The aim of the present trial was to ameliorate the existing design of implant supported finger prosthesis. Distal phalange of middle finger replaced with implant supported silicone finger prosthesis is modified by utilizing a metal framework to support silicone material to improve rigidity while working. We could achieve a good function, esthetics and tactile sensibility with this modified design. Whenever, feasible this design can improve the performance and patients feel a deep sense of satisfaction and improved self-esteem with this modified prosthesis.

  5. Esthetic Outcome of Implant Supported Crowns With and Without Peri-Implant Conditioning Using Provisional Fixed Prosthesis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furze, David; Byrne, Ashley; Alam, Sonia; Wittneben, Julia-Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Achieving an optimal esthetic result using dental implants is challenging. Fixed implant-supported provisional crowns are often used to customize the emergence profile and to individualize the surrounding peri-implant soft tissue. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether the use of a provisional implant-supported crown leads to an esthetic benefit on implants that are placed in the esthetic zone. The null hypothesis is that there is no-difference between the two study groups. Twenty single implants (Bone Level, Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) were inserted in consecutive patients. After reopening, a randomization process assigned them to either cohort group 1: a provisional phase with soft tissue conditioning using the "dynamic compression technique" or cohort group 2: without a provisional. Implants were finally restored with an all-ceramic crown. Follow-up examinations were performed at 3 and 12 months including implant success and survival, clinical, and radiographic parameters. After 1 year all implants successfully integrated, mean values of combined modPES and WES were 16.7 for group 1 and 10.5 for Group 2. This was statistically significant. Mean bone loss after 1 year was -0.09 and -0.08 for groups 1 and 2, respectively, without being statistically significant. A provisional phase with soft tissue conditioning does improve the final esthetic result. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Establishing the maxillary occlusal plane as a requisite for placement of an immediate implant-supported fixed prosthesis in the mandible: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Edson Miranda

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In patients with Bruxism, the attrition can result in excessive occlusal wear that exceeds the compensatory mechanism and loss of occlusion vertical dimension occurs. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to show the importance of re-establishing an adequate occlusal plane for the non treated arch by means of a fixed acrylic overlay, compatible with the prosthetic treatment of the arch to be rehabilitated. An upper maxillary fixed acrylic overlay restored the patient’s occlusal plane in an appropriate vertical dimension of occlusion together with a fixed prosthesis in the mandible, supported by five dental implants. CONCLUSION: When there is severe wear due to dental attrition in one of the arches, it is important to re-establish the occlusal plane and compensation curves in conjunction with the prosthetic treatment of the arch to be rehabilitated.

  7. Implant-supported auricular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Nanda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the balance of shape, size, and position of body organs are immediately perceived as "looking wrong" and this perception can subject the individual to significant peer ridicule and social ostracism, often expressing as intense shame and anguish in the attitude of the afflicted. Rehabilitation of such patients can be remarkably beneficial on the individual′s self-esteem and body image. The onus of the deed lies in the hands of a team that combines artistic excellence with surgical expertise, by combining the skills of anaplastologists, surgeons, and prosthodontists. This is a review of a few surgical and prosthetic considerations in the management of auricular defect and a case description of management of a patient of microtia following similar guidelines in fabrication of the epithesis.

  8. Comparative Evaluation of a Four-Implant-Supported Polyetherketoneketone Framework Prosthesis: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Computer-Aided Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Sun; Shin, Sang-Wan; Lee, Sang-Pyo; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Yol

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate and compare polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) with different framework materials for implant-supported prostheses by means of a three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA) based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computer-aided design (CAD) data. A geometric model that consisted of four maxillary implants supporting a prosthesis framework was constructed from CBCT and CAD data of a treated patient. Three different materials (zirconia, titanium, and PEKK) were selected, and their material properties were simulated using FEA software in the generated geometric model. In the PEKK framework (ie, low elastic modulus) group, the stress transferred to the implant and simulated adjacent tissue was reduced when compressive stress was dominant, but increased when tensile stress was dominant. This study suggests that the shock-absorbing effects of a resilient implant-supported framework are limited in some areas and that rigid framework material shows a favorable stress distribution and safety of overall components of the prosthesis.

  9. Effect of tightening torque on the marginal adaptation of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Jalil; Dashti, Hossin; Karamad, Reza; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    The final position of the abutment changes with the amount of tightening torque. This could eventually lead to loss of passivity and marginal misfit of prostheses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different tightening torques on the marginal adaptation of 3-unit cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Two implants (Straumann) were inserted in an acrylic block so that one of the implants was placed vertically and the other at a 15° vertical angle. A straight abutment and a 15° angulated abutment were connected to the vertically and obliquely installed implants, respectively, so that the two abutments were parallel. Then, 10 cement-retained FDPs were waxed and cast. Abutments were tightened with 10, 20, and 35 Ncm torques, respectively. Following each tightening torque, FDPs were luted on respective abutments with temporary cement. The marginal adaptation of the retainers was evaluated using stereomicroscope. FDPs were then removed from the abutments and were sectioned at the connector sites. The retainers were luted again on their respective abutments. Luting procedures and marginal adaptation measurement were repeated. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and least significant difference tests (α = 0.05). After cutting the FDP connectors, the independent samples t-test was used to compare misfit values (α = 0.05). Following 10, 20, and 35 Ncm tightening torques, the marginal discrepancy of the retainers of FDPs significantly increased (P marginal discrepancies of these two retainers (P > 0.05). The marginal gap values of angulated abutment retainers (ANRs) were significantly higher than those of the straight abutment after cutting the connectors (P = 0.026). Within the limitations of this study, the marginal misfit of cement-retained FDPs increased continuously when the tightening torque increased. After cutting the connectors, the marginal misfit of the ANRs was higher than those of the straight abutment retainers.

  10. Reliability and failure modes of implant-supported zirconium-oxide fixed dental prostheses related to veneering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarri, Marta; Zhang, Yu; Thompson, Van P.; Rekow, Elizabeth D.; Stappert, Christian F. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objectives To compare fatigue failure modes and reliability of hand-veneered and over-pressed implant-supported three-unit zirconium-oxide fixed-dental-prostheses(FDPs). Methods Sixty-four custom-made zirconium-oxide abutments (n=32/group) and thirty-two zirconium-oxide FDP-frameworks were CAD/CAM manufactured. Frameworks were veneered with hand-built up or over-pressed porcelain (n=16/group). Step-stress-accelerated-life-testing (SSALT) was performed in water applying a distributed contact load at the buccal cusp-pontic-area. Post failure examinations were carried out using optical (polarized-reflected-light) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize crack propagation and failure modes. Reliability was compared using cumulative-damage step-stress analysis (Alta-7-Pro, Reliasoft). Results Crack propagation was observed in the veneering porcelain during fatigue. The majority of zirconium-oxide FDPs demonstrated porcelain chipping as the dominant failure mode. Nevertheless, fracture of the zirconium-oxide frameworks was also observed. Over-pressed FDPs failed earlier at a mean failure load of 696 ± 149 N relative to hand-veneered at 882 ± 61 N (profile I). Weibull-stress-number of cycles-unreliability-curves were generated. The reliability (2-sided at 90% confidence bounds) for a 400N load at 100K cycles indicated values of 0.84 (0.98-0.24) for the hand-veneered FDPs and 0.50 (0.82-0.09) for their over-pressed counterparts. Conclusions Both zirconium-oxide FDP systems were resistant under accelerated-life-time-testing. Over-pressed specimens were more susceptible to fatigue loading with earlier veneer chipping. PMID:21557985

  11. Effect of different types of prosthetic platforms on stress-distribution in dental implant-supported prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minatel, Lurian [Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa e Pós-graduação (PRPPG), Universidade do Sagrado Coração, USC, 10–50 Irmã Armindal, Jardim Brasil, Bauru, 17011–160, SP (Brazil); Verri, Fellippo Ramos [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Araçatuba Dental School, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, 1193 José Bonifácio Street, Vila Mendonça, Araçatuba 16015–050 (Brazil); Kudo, Guilherme Abu Halawa [Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa e Pós-graduação (PRPPG), Universidade do Sagrado Coração, USC, 10–50 Irmã Armindal, Jardim Brasil, Bauru, 17011–160, SP (Brazil); Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto de; Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo de; Aparecido Araujo Lemos, Cleidiel; Piza Pellizzer, Eduardo [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Araçatuba Dental School, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, 1193 José Bonifácio Street, Vila Mendonça, Araçatuba 16015–050 (Brazil); and others

    2017-02-01

    A biomechanical analysis of different types of implant connections is relevant to clinical practice because it may impact the longevity of the rehabilitation treatment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the Morse taper connections and the stress distribution of structures associated with the platform switching (PSW) concept. It will do this by obtaining data on the biomechanical behavior of the main structure in relation to the dental implant using the 3-dimensional finite element methodology. Four models were simulated (with each containing a single prosthesis over the implant) in the molar region, with the following specifications: M1 and M2 is an external hexagonal implant on a regular platform; M3 is an external hexagonal implant using PSW concept; and M4 is a Morse taper implant. The modeling process involved the use of images from InVesalius CT (computed tomography) processing software, which were refined using Rhinoceros 4.0 and SolidWorks 2011 CAD software. The models were then exported into the finite element program (FEMAP 11.0) to configure the meshes. The models were processed using NeiNastram software. The main results are that M1 (regular diameter 4 mm) had the highest stress concentration area and highest microstrain concentration for bone tissue, dental implants, and the retaining screw (P < 0.05). Using the PSW concept increases the area of the stress concentrations in the retaining screw (P < 0.05) more than in the regular platform implant. It was concluded that the increase in diameter is beneficial for stress distribution and that the PSW concept had higher stress concentrations in the retaining screw and the crown compared to the regular platform implant. - Highlights: • The external hexagon implants was unfavorable biomechanical. • The Morse taper implant presented the best biomechanical result. • Platform switching concept increased stress in screw-retained prostheses.

  12. Effect of different types of prosthetic platforms on stress-distribution in dental implant-supported prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatel, Lurian; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Kudo, Guilherme Abu Halawa; Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto de; Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo de; Aparecido Araujo Lemos, Cleidiel; Piza Pellizzer, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    A biomechanical analysis of different types of implant connections is relevant to clinical practice because it may impact the longevity of the rehabilitation treatment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the Morse taper connections and the stress distribution of structures associated with the platform switching (PSW) concept. It will do this by obtaining data on the biomechanical behavior of the main structure in relation to the dental implant using the 3-dimensional finite element methodology. Four models were simulated (with each containing a single prosthesis over the implant) in the molar region, with the following specifications: M1 and M2 is an external hexagonal implant on a regular platform; M3 is an external hexagonal implant using PSW concept; and M4 is a Morse taper implant. The modeling process involved the use of images from InVesalius CT (computed tomography) processing software, which were refined using Rhinoceros 4.0 and SolidWorks 2011 CAD software. The models were then exported into the finite element program (FEMAP 11.0) to configure the meshes. The models were processed using NeiNastram software. The main results are that M1 (regular diameter 4 mm) had the highest stress concentration area and highest microstrain concentration for bone tissue, dental implants, and the retaining screw (P < 0.05). Using the PSW concept increases the area of the stress concentrations in the retaining screw (P < 0.05) more than in the regular platform implant. It was concluded that the increase in diameter is beneficial for stress distribution and that the PSW concept had higher stress concentrations in the retaining screw and the crown compared to the regular platform implant. - Highlights: • The external hexagon implants was unfavorable biomechanical. • The Morse taper implant presented the best biomechanical result. • Platform switching concept increased stress in screw-retained prostheses.

  13. Dual jaw treatment of edentulism using implant-supported monolithic zirconia fixed prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Sandra; Limmer, Bryan; Reside, Glenn J; Cooper, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes restoration of the edentulous maxilla and mandible with implant supported fixed prostheses using monolithic zirconia, where the incisal edges and occluding surfaces were made of monolithic zirconia. Edentulism is a debilitating condition that can be treated with either a removable or fixed dental prosthesis. The most common type of implant-supported fixed prosthesis is the metal acrylic (hybrid), with ceramo-metal prostheses being used less commonly in complete edentulism. However, both of these prostheses designs are associated with reported complications of screw loosening or fracture and chipping of acrylic resin and porcelain. Monolithic zirconia implant-supported fixed prostheses have the potential for reduction of such complications. In this case, the CAD/CAM concept was utilized in fabrication of maxillary and mandibular screw-retained implant-supported fixed prostheses using monolithic zirconia. Proper treatment planning and execution coupled with utilizing advanced technologies contributes to highly esthetic results. However, long-term studies are required to guarantee a satisfactory long-term outcome of this modality of treatment. This case report describes the clinical and technical procedures involved in fabrication of maxillary and mandibular implant-supported fixed prostheses using monolithic zirconia as a treatment of edentulism, and proposes the possible advantages associated with using monolithic zirconia in eliminating dissimilar interfaces in such prostheses that are accountable for the most commonly occurring technical complication for these prostheses being chipping and fracture of the veneering material. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Prosthetically guided bone sculpturing for a maxillary complete-arch implant-supported monolithic zirconia fixed prosthesis based on a digital smile design: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Vizcaya, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    A digital smile design was used to create an average smile and to develop a removable interim restoration for an edentulous patient with a high smile line and different bone levels in the maxilla. The interim restoration was used as a guide to perform bone sculpturing to create space for the biological width and to restore a monolithic zirconia implant-supported fixed restoration. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 78 FR 9010 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    .... FDA-2012-N-1239] Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis AGENCY... condyle prostheses into class III, based on the recommendation of a Dental Products Panel (the Panel... Administration, Dental Products Advisory Panel Meeting Transcript, February 12, 1997; http://www.accessdata.fda...

  16. The method of manufacture of nylon dental partially removable prosthesis using additive technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashapov, R. N.; Korobkina, A. I.; Platonov, E. V.; Saleeva, G. T.

    2014-12-01

    The article is devoted to the topic of creating new methods of dental prosthesis. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of using additive technology to create nylon prosthesis. As a result of experimental studies, was made a sample of nylon partially removable prosthesis using 3D printing has allowed to simplify, accelerate and reduce the coat of manufacturing high-precision nylon dentures.

  17. Microbial contamination of removable dental prosthesis at different interval of usage: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijita Vijay Nair

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There is a linear increase in microbial contamination of removable dental prosthesis as the duration of usage increases and might increase the susceptibility of individuals' to many diseases.

  18. Unidirectional infiltration method to produce crown for dental prosthesis application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontes, F.H.D.; Taguchi, S.P.; Machado, J.P.B.; Santos, C.

    2009-01-01

    Alumina ceramics have been used in dental prosthesis because it is inert, presents higher corrosion and shear resistance when compared to metals, excellent aesthetic, and mechanical resistance. In this work it was produced an infrastructure material for applications in dental crowns, obtained by glass infiltration in alumina preform. Various oxides, among that, rare-earth oxide produced by Xenotime, were melted at 1450 deg C and heat treatment at 700 deg C to obtain the glass (REglass). The alumina was pre-sintered at 1100 deg C cut and machined to predetermine format (unidirectional indirect infiltration) and finally conducted to infiltration test. The alumina was characterized by porosity (Hg-porosity and density) and microstructure (SEM). The glass wettability in alumina was determined as function of temperature, and the contact angle presented a low value (θ<90 deg), showing that glass can be infiltrated spontaneously in alumina. The infiltration test was conducted at glass melting temperature, during 30, 60, 180, 360 minutes. After infiltration, the samples were cut in longitudinal section, ground and polished, and analyzed by XRD (crystalline phases), SEM (microstructure) and EDS (composition).The REglass presents higher infiltration height when compared to current processes (direct infiltration), and homogeneous microstructure, showing that it is a promising method used by prosthetics and dentists. (author)

  19. Unidirectional infiltration method to produce crown for dental prosthesis application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontes, F.H.D.; Taguchi, S.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/DEMAR/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Borges Junior, L.A. [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Machado, J.P.B. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Santos, C. [ProtMat Materiais Avancados, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Alumina ceramics have been used in dental prosthesis because it is inert, presents higher corrosion and shear resistance when compared to metals, excellent aesthetic, and mechanical resistance. In this work it was produced an infrastructure material for applications in dental crowns, obtained by glass infiltration in alumina preform. Various oxides, among that, rare-earth oxide produced by Xenotime, were melted at 1450 deg C and heat treatment at 700 deg C to obtain the glass (REglass). The alumina was pre-sintered at 1100 deg C cut and machined to predetermine format (unidirectional indirect infiltration) and finally conducted to infiltration test. The alumina was characterized by porosity (Hg-porosity and density) and microstructure (SEM). The glass wettability in alumina was determined as function of temperature, and the contact angle presented a low value (θ<90 deg), showing that glass can be infiltrated spontaneously in alumina. The infiltration test was conducted at glass melting temperature, during 30, 60, 180, 360 minutes. After infiltration, the samples were cut in longitudinal section, ground and polished, and analyzed by XRD (crystalline phases), SEM (microstructure) and EDS (composition).The REglass presents higher infiltration height when compared to current processes (direct infiltration), and homogeneous microstructure, showing that it is a promising method used by prosthetics and dentists. (author)

  20. Dental laboratory communication regarding removable dental prosthesis design in the UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Ali, Reem; Al Quran, Firas; Adel, Omar

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the methods dental practitioners in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) use to communicate cast removable dental prosthesis (RDP) design to dental laboratories; identify common practices taken by dentists/dental technicians prior to fabrication of RDP framework; and seek out dental technicians' attitudes toward their role in RDP design decisions. All dental laboratories (n = 28) listed in a local telephone directory were invited to complete a questionnaire through a face-to-face interview. They were also requested to examine RDP cases fabricated in the past 2 months and identify steps taken by dentists/dental technicians prior to fabrication of the framework. Descriptive statistics were used to report frequencies and percentages. Twenty-one (75%) dental laboratories agreed to participate, out of which 19 had the facilities to fabricate chrome-cobalt RDPs. Cast RDPs comprised approximately 4.04% (±2.67) of services provided. A reported 84.2% of dentists frequently communicate through generic lab script, with 89.5% rarely/never giving details regarding RDP design. While 52.6% of labs agree/strongly agree that it is the dentist's responsibility to decide the final RDP design, 94.7% agree/strongly agree that dentists should depend on dental technicians for design-making decisions. A total of 19 RDP cases were reviewed. All 19 were surveyed and designed by dental technicians but received dentist approval of design prior to fabrication. Thirteen (68.4%) had rest-seat preparations done by dentists after approval, and new impressions sent to the lab. No other tooth modifications were noted. The responsibility of RDP design appeared to be largely delegated to dental technicians. Importance of tooth modifications seemed to be undervalued and not completed prior to framework fabrication. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Masticatory function with implant-supported overdentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, FMC; van der Bilt, A; Cune, MS; Fontijn-Tekamp, FA; Bosman, F

    The type of attachment that is used in implant-supported mandibular overdentures may influence the retention and stability of the prosthesis and, thus, masticatory function. In this within- subject cross- over clinical trial, we examined the hypothesis that greater retention and stability of the

  2. Relation between bruxism and dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    TORCATO,Leonardo Bueno; ZUIM,Paulo Renato Junqueira; BRANDINI,Daniela Atili; FALCÓN-ANTENUCCI,Rosse Mary

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to gather information and discuss the predictability of implant-supported prostheses in patients with bruxism by performing a literature review.METHODS: In order to select the studies included in this review, a detailed search was performed in PubMed and Medlinedatabases, using the following key words: bruxism, dental implants, implant supported prosthesis, and dental restoration failure. Items that were included are: case reports, randomized controlled tr...

  3. Fractography of clinically fractured, implant-supported dental computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing crowns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Belli, Renan; Cune, Marco S; Schepke, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Today, a substantial part of the dental crown production uses computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. A recent step in restorative dentistry is the replacement of natural tooth structure with pre-polymerized and machined resin-based methacrylic polymers.

  4. Cross-pinning: the philosophy of retrievability applied practically to fixed, implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, M J; Hatzipanagiotis, P; Wilson, P R

    2008-03-01

    Biologic and technical complications are widely reported in the dental literature and often compromise the functional and/or aesthetic features of fixed, implant-supported prostheses. Managing complications without damaging or destroying a restoration is an obvious advantage of implant-based dentistry where the option of prosthetic retrievability is almost always available. The technique of cross-pinning uses a transverse screw to secure a prosthesis to a milled implant abutment, allowing prosthetic retrievability irrespective of dental implant alignment. This study presents guidelines for cross-pinning implant-supported prostheses based on resistance form, screw mechanics and natural tooth contours. The technical aspects of cross-pinning are also discussed using examples from four implant systems.

  5. 78 FR 79308 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 872 [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1239] Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis AGENCY... delegated to the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, 21 CFR part 872 is amended as follows: PART 872--DENTAL...

  6. Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans colonization in patients wearing dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Monroy, Tania; Moreno-Maldonado, Víctor; Franco-Martínez, Fernando; Aldape-Barrios, Beatriz; Quindós, Guillermo; Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio

    2005-04-01

    Denture stomatitis is associated to Candida albicans, different bacteria and other co-factors such as an acid pH, a carbohydrate ingestion increase, different systemic illnesses and pharmacological treatments. The aim of this study was to determine Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans prevalence in the mucous membrane and prosthesis of patients with and without atrophic denture stomatitis and its relationship with other potential clinical co-factors. Saliva was collected from 105 patients (62 female and 43 male) wearing dental prosthesis in order to measure their pH. Oral samples of the mucous membrane and the internal surface of dental prosthesis were taken with sterile cotton to proceed with the microbiological study. The identification of the isolated microorganisms was performed using conventional microbiological methods. Diabetes and Hypertension were the most frequent systemic illnesses. High carbohydrate ingestion was observed in numerous patients. Atrophic denture stomatitis was reported in 50 patients and the pH average in saliva was of 5.2. The presence of C albicans, S. aureus and S. mutans in the mucous membrane and prosthesis was of 51.4%, 52.4% and 67.6%, respectively. C. albicans was isolated in 66.7% from the prosthesis, whereas S. aureus and S. mutans were isolated in 49.5% of those same prosthesis. C. albicans was isolated in 86% of the patients with atrophic denture stomatitis and S. aureus was isolated in a similar percentage (84% of patients). The isolation of S. mutans was less frequent, and it was observed in 16% of the oral samples of these patients. C. albicans, S. aureus and S. mutans frequently colonize the oral mucous of patients wearing dental prosthesis. This illness-bearing condition is more frequent in patients with denture stomatitis, even though dental prosthesis colonization is lower than in the oral mucous.

  7. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient with Mandibular Resection Prosthesis Using Mini Dental Implants (MDIs) – Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Vojvodić, Denis; Čelebić, Asja; Mehulić, Ketij; Žabarović, Domagoj

    2012-01-01

    Physical disfigurement and functional impairments associated with facial trauma are a challenge to a prosthodontist, because even novel sophisticated surgical reconstructive techniques fail to provide adequate support for dental resection prosthesis. Therefore, different endosseous implants are often used as prosthesis-supporting elements. Manufacturers of dental implants have recently presented mini dental implants (MDIs) with diameter of only 1.8–2.4 mm. These implants allow very suitable p...

  8. Zinc phosphate as a definitive cement for implant-supported crowns and fixed dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flanagan D

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dennis Flanagan Private Practice, Willimantic, CT, USA Abstract: Implant-supported dental prostheses can be retained by a screw or cement. Implant-supported fixed partial dentures have a passive fit. A passive fit means there is an internal gap between the abutment surface and the intaglio of the retainer to insure that there is no lateral pressure on the supporting implants or friction upon seating of the prosthesis. This gap is filled with cement for retention of the prosthesis. Any lateral pressure may cause marginal bone loss or periimplantitis. Also, there is usually a microscopic gap at the margin of a crown retainer that exposes the cement to oral fluids. The solubility of zinc phosphate (ZOP cement is a definite liability due to the risk for cement dissolution. In fixed prostheses, the dissolution of the cement of one or more retainers would cause a transfer of the occlusal load to the retained unit(s. The resulting rotation and lifting of the cement-retained implants from occlusal and parafunctional loads could cause loss of osseointegration of the abutment-retained implant(s. ZOP cement may not be indicated for implant-supported fixed partial dentures or splints. Cement dissolution in single unit probably only involves re-cementation, if the patient does not swallow or aspirate the crown. Keywords: passive fit, retention, film thickness, fixed, marginal gap 

  9. Ten-year survival and complication rates of lithium-disilicate (Empress 2) tooth-supported crowns, implant-supported crowns, and fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Maren; Göckler, Fabian; Weber, Volker; Yildirim, Murat; Wolfart, Stefan; Edelhoff, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the clinical long-term outcome of tooth-supported crowns (SCs), implant-supported crowns (ISCs), and fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic framework material (IPS Empress 2). Between 1997 and 1999, a total of 184 restorations (106 SCs, 32 ISCs, 33 FDPs, and 13 diverse restorations) were placed in 73 patients. Kaplan-Meier estimation was applied for survival and chipping-free rates. Inter-group comparison of both rates was realized by a log rank test and a 2×2 contingency table. Also, SCs and FDPs were compared regarding adhesive vs. conventional cementation, and anterior vs. posterior positioning, for impact on survival. Due to 14 dropouts (34 restorations) and reasonable exclusion of 19 other restorations, the final dataset included: i) 87 SCs [37 patients, mean observation time 11.4 (±3.8)years]; ii) 17 ISCs [12 patients, mean observation time 13.3 (±2.3)years; and iii) 27 FDPs [19 patients, mean observation time 8.9 (±5.4)years]. The 10-year survival rate/chipping-free rate for SCs were 86.1%/83.4%, for ISCs 93.8%/94.1%, and for FDPs were 51.9%/90.8%. Both ISCs and SCs had a significantly higher survival than FDPs (ISCs vs. FDPs: both tests p=0.001; SCs vs. FDPs: p=0.001 and p=0.005). Differences in the chipping-free rates did not reach significance. Also, neither the cementation mode nor positioning of the restoration had an impact on survival. SCs had a slightly lower outcome than can generally be expected from single crowns. In contrast, ICSs had a favorable outcome and the FDPs predominantly failed. The practitioner's choice of dental materials is based (at best) on long-term experience. The present 10-year results are based on comprehensive data analyses and show the high potential of lithium-disilicate as a reliable material, especially for single-unit restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress distribution in dental prosthesis under an occlusal combined dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merdji, A.; Bachir Bouiadjra, B.; Ould Chikh, B.; Mootanah, R.; Aminallah, L.; Serier, B.; Muslih, I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The mechanical stress reaches the highest in areas of cortical bones. ► The mechanical stress in the cancellous bone reaches greatest in the bottom of the dental implant. ► Implant with low-volume bone might cause increased stress concentration in the cortical bone. -- Abstract: The biomechanical behavior of osseointegrated dental prostheses systems plays an important role in its functional longevity inside the bone. Simulation of these systems requires an accurate modeling of the prosthesis components, the jaw bone, the implant–bone interface, and the response of the system to different types of applied forces. The purpose of this study was to develop a new three-dimensional model of an osseointegrated molar dental prosthesis and to carry out finite element analysis to evaluate stress distributions in the bone and the dental prosthesis compounds under an occlusal combined dynamic load was applied to the top of the occlusale face of the prosthesis crown. The jaw bone model containing cortical bone and cancellous bone was constructed by using computer tomography scan pictures and Computer Aided Design tools. The dental prosthesis compounds were constructed, simulating the commercially available cylindrical implant of 4.8 mm diameter and 10 mm length. Both finite element models were created in Abaqus finite element software. All materials used in the models were considered to be isotropic, homogeneous and linearly elastic. The elastic properties, loads and constraints used in the model were taken from published data. Results of our finite element analyses, indicated that the maximum stresses were located around the mesial neck of the implant, in the marginal bone. Thus, this area should be preserved clinically in order to maintain the bone–implant interface structurally and functionally.

  11. Fabricating a Mandibular Implant Supported Overdenture with a Suspended Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Swati; Jain, Vinay; Cagna, David; Wicks, Russell

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of implant-supported overdentures as a clinical alternative has improved the quality of life of the edentulous population. Implant-supported overdentures have diminished many of the problems associated with conventional dentures by providing improved retention, stability, function, esthetics and physical and emotional health. Greater support and stability of the implant borne prosthesis is associated with improved bite force and oral function for overdentures when compared to...

  12. Precision Fit of Screw-Retained Implant-Supported Fixed Dental Prostheses Fabricated by CAD/CAM, Copy-Milling, and Conventional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Danilo Gonzaga; Morais, Maria Helena; das Neves, Flávio D; Carreiro, Adriana Fonte; Barbosa, Gustavo As

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fabrication methods (computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture [CAD/CAM], copy-milling, and conventional casting) in the fit accuracy of three-unit, screw-retained fixed dental prostheses. Sixteen three-unit implant-supported screw-retained frameworks were fabricated to fit an in vitro model. Eight frameworks were fabricated using the CAD/CAM system, four in zirconia and four in cobalt-chromium. Four zirconia frameworks were fabricated using the copy-milled system, and four were cast in cobalt-chromium using conventional casting with premachined abutments. The vertical and horizontal misfit at the implant-framework interface was measured using scanning electron microscopy at ×250. The results for vertical misfit were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. The horizontal misfits were categorized as underextended, equally extended, or overextended. Statistical analysis established differences between groups according to the chi-square test (α = .05). The mean vertical misfit was 5.9 ± 3.6 μm for CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia, 1.2 ± 2.2 μm for CAD/CAM-fabricated cobalt-chromium frameworks, 7.6 ± 9.2 μm for copy-milling-fabricated zirconia frameworks, and 11.8 (9.8) μm for conventionally fabricated frameworks. The Mann-Whitney test revealed significant differences between all but the zirconia-fabricated frameworks. A significant association was observed between the horizontal misfits and the fabrication method. The percentage of horizontal misfits that were underextended and overextended was higher in milled zirconia (83.3%), CAD/CAM cobaltchromium (66.7%), cast cobalt-chromium (58.3%), and CAD/CAM zirconia (33.3%) frameworks. CAD/CAM-fabricated frameworks exhibit better vertical misfit and low variability compared with copy-milled and conventionally fabricated frameworks. The percentage of interfaces equally extended was higher when CAD/CAM and zirconia were used.

  13. Implant supported overdentures--the Copenhagen experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional and biological effect of implant-supported overdenture treatment in the lower jaw. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Thirty-two patients were consecutively treated with Astra Tech implants in the lower jaw for retaining overdentures. All implants had a diameter of 3.5 mm...... and all but two of the implants were longer than 10 mm. For the implant supported overdentures two methods of attachment were used, a bar or a ball. RESULTS: One of 69 fixtures was lost during the 4-5 year observation period. The mean bone loss for all fixtures was less than 0.2 mm per year. Complications...... quality and quantity is sufficient, two implants can support an overdenture in the lower jaw, providing prosthesis which functions well....

  14. Inlay-Retained Fixed Dental Prosthesis: A Clinical Option Using Monolithic Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Augusti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different indirect restorations to replace a single missing tooth in the posterior region are available in dentistry: traditional full-coverage fixed dental prostheses (FDPs, implant-supported crowns (ISC, and inlay-retained FDPs (IRFDP. Resin bonded FDPs represent a minimally invasive procedure; preexisting fillings can minimize tooth structure removal and give retention to the IRFDP, transforming it into an ultraconservative option. New high strength zirconia ceramics, with their stiffness and high mechanical properties, could be considered a right choice for an IRFDP rehabilitation. The case report presented describes an IRFDP treatment using a CAD/CAM monolithic zirconia IRFDP; clinical and laboratory steps are illustrated, according to the most recent scientific protocols. Adhesive procedures are focused on the Y-TZP and tooth substrate conditioning methods. Nice esthetic and functional integration of indirect restoration at two-year follow-up confirmed the success of this conservative approach.

  15. Immediately loaded implants supporting fixed prostheses in the edentulous maxilla: a preliminary clinical and radiologic report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergkvist, Göran; Sahlholm, Sten; Karlsson, Ulf; Nilner, Krister; Lindh, Christina

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the survival rate of immediately loaded ITI sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) solid-screw dental implants in the edentulous maxilla after 8 months of loading. Twenty-eight patients (mean age 63 years) with edentulous maxillae each received 6 implants and 1 implant-supported fixed provisional prosthesis within 24 hours after surgery. After a mean healing time of 15 weeks, the patient received a definitive, screw-retained, implant-supported fixed prosthesis. A total of 168 implants were placed. Clinical parameters were registered after 1 month of loading with the implant-supported fixed prostheses as well as 8 months after implant placement. Radiologic examinations and assessments were made at implant placement and after 8 months. The mean marginal bone level at implant placement was 1.6 mm (range 0 to 5.1; SD 1.1) apical of the reference point (the implant shoulder). The mean marginal bone level at the 8-month follow-up was 3.2 mm (range 0.4 to 5.9; SD 1.1) apical of the reference point. Three implants failed during the healing period. The improved results in the present study might be a result of the positive effect of splinting the implants immediately after placement. ITI SLA solid-screw implants immediately loaded (ie, loaded within 24 hours of placement) and supporting fixed prostheses had successful survival rates after 8 months. The present results constitute a solid baseline for future follow-up studies.

  16. Association between Dental Prosthesis and Periodontal Disease among Patients Visiting a Tertiary Dental Care Centre in Eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuri, M; Shrestha, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental caries and Periodontal diseases are the most prevalent oral health problems present globally. The distribution and severity of such oral health problems varies in different parts of the world and even in different regions of the same country. Nepal is one of the country with higher prevalence rate of these problems. These problems arise in association with multiple factors. Objective This study was carried out to describe the periodontal status and to analyse the association of periodontal disease with the wearing of fixed or removable partial dentures in a Nepalese population reporting to the College of Dental Surgery, B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. Method This study comprised of a sample of 200 adult individuals. All data were collected by performing clinical examinations in accordance with the World Health Organization Oral Health Surveys Basic Methods Criteria. It included the Community Periodontal Index and dental prosthesis examination. Result A descriptive analysis was performed and odds ratio (1.048) and 95% confidence interval (1.001; 1.096) was found out. The mean age of the population participated in the study was 41.82 ± 14.80 years. A total of 93 (46.5%) males and 107 (53.5%) females participated in the study. Among these subjects, 100% presented some periodontal problems. The statistical analysis indicated that the probability of periodontal disease with regards to wearing partial dentures was not significant as suggested by the odds ratio (1.048). Conclusion There is no association of the wearing of dental prosthesis (RPD and/or FPD) with the periodontal disease and suggests a need for populations based oral health education programs, plaque control programs to reduce the incidence of periodontal disease.

  17. Tardive Dyskinesia, Oral Parafunction, and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumetti, S; Ghiacci, G; Macaluso, G M; Amore, M; Galli, C; Calciolari, E; Manfredi, E

    2016-01-01

    Oral movement disorders may lead to prosthesis and implant failure due to excessive loading. We report on an edentulous patient suffering from drug-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD) and oral parafunction (OP) rehabilitated with implant-supported screw-retained prostheses. The frequency and intensity of the movements were high, and no pharmacological intervention was possible. Moreover, the patient refused night-time splint therapy. A series of implant and prosthetic failures were experienced. Implant failures were all in the maxilla and stopped when a rigid titanium structure was placed to connect implants. Ad hoc designed studies are desirable to elucidate the mutual influence between oral movement disorders and implant-supported rehabilitation.

  18. An Adult Patient with Pneumonia Due to Aspiration of Dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samil Gunay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients with a new and suddenly beginning of bronchial asthma and repetitive respiratory infection, one should consider the possibility of obstruction by a foreign body. In this case we present a male patient with pneumonia due to aspiration of dental prosthesis. A 32-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of dyspnea, chest pain and new    compliants of diaphoresis and fever persistend despite of antibiotic treatment. Then the patient consultated to our chest surgery department. After the physical examination of patient we made the fiberoptic  flexible bronchoscopy according to the uncertain opasity seen in the chest radiography. Later in the operating room, with the patient under general anesthesia, we extracted the aspirated foreign body, dental prosthesis, by rigid bronchoscopy. We should think about the possibility of foreign body aspiration for the patients with suddenly beginning of the complaints such as, bronchial asthma, repetitive respiratory infection, diaphoresis, chest pain and fever. Sometimes people hides the true anamnesis because of be ashamed or amnesia.

  19. Treatment planning: implant-supported partial overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Winston W L

    2005-04-01

    When multiple anterior teeth are missing, many options of replacement are available. Traditionally, the choice was between a fixed or removable prostheses. Today, with the predictability of dental implants, the options of tooth replacement range from removable partial dentures to implant-supported fixed prostheses. The choice of which restoration that will best provide occlusion and esthetics depends on multiple factors including the number and location of missing teeth, the residual ridge form in relation to the replacement teeth, the relationship of the maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth, the condition of teeth adjacent to the edentulous span, the amount of bone available for implant placement, the patients "smile line" and display of teeth, lip support, and financial constraints. When there is minimal loss of the ridge contour, restorations that emerge from the ridge are the most functional and esthetic restorations, adhesive-type fixed partial dentures, conventional fixed partial dentures, and implant-supported restorations can be indicated with the choice of restoration dependent on a risk benefit and cost benefit analysis. When there is a loss of ridge contour due to residual ridge resorption or trauma, the decision becomes more complex as not only does the tooth structure need to be replaced, the ridge form also has to be replaced. (Figures 1 and 2). This can be assessed clinically as illustrated by Figures 1 and 2 where a dis crepancy in arch form and ridge form in relation to the adjacent teeth and/or opposing arch can be observed. Other considerations are lip support and display of the teeth when smiling. This article presents a case and rationale for implant-supported par tial overdentures. Many authors have written on the merits of com plete overdentures. The complete overdenture has proven to be an improvement over conventional complete prostheses with respect to chewing efficiency, patient comfort and satisfaction. In partial edentulism, the

  20. Polygonal Area of Prosthesis Support with Straight and Tilted Dental Implants in Edentulous Maxillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentaschek, Stefan; Lehmann, Karl Martin; Scheller, Herbert; Weibrich, Gernot; Behneke, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the increase in the polygonal area of implant-retained prosthesis supports in edentulous maxillae with the use of tilted distal implants compared with the use of straight distal implants, using a variety of implant lengths. A total of 25 DICOM datasets of atrophic edentulous maxillae were provided. Bone augmentations in the molar region had to be avoided. Two straight reference implants were virtually inserted in the anterior region. Two additional implants were placed far distally on both sides (4 groups: [1] straight, 12-mm length; [2] straight, 10 mm; [3] straight, 8 mm; [4] tilted, 12-16 mm). The resulting implant-supported polygon was measured for each of the 4 groups using three-dimensional planning software. The mean sagittal depth of the supported polygon in Group 1 was 9.9 mm (standard deviation [SD] 4.4) on the right and 10.2 mm (SD 4.4) on the left, and it was 33.7 mm (SD 5.8) in width. For Group 2, the mean sagittal depth was 11.5 mm (SD 5.0) on the right and 11.9 mm (SD 4.7) on the left, and the width was 35.2 mm (SD 5.6). The measurements for Group 3 were 13.8 mm (SD 4.9) deep on the right, 13.8 mm (SD 5.1) deep on the left, and 37.0 mm (SD 5.4) in width. For Group 4, the depth was 15.8 mm (SD 4.9) on the right and 16.4 mm (SD 5.8) on the left, and the width was 39.0 mm (SD 5.1). The area of implant-retained prosthesis support can be enlarged by the use of tilted implants (12 to 16 mm in length, 42 to 45 degrees) compared to the use of straight 8-mm implants (resulting increase: about 15%).

  1. Fabrication of an interim complete removable dental prosthesis with an in-office digital light processing three-dimensional printer: A proof-of-concept technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Pellerito, John; Morton, Dean

    2018-04-30

    This report describes a proof of concept for fabricating an interim complete removable dental prosthesis with a digital light processing 3-dimensional (3D) printer. Although an in-office 3D printer can reduce the overall production cost for an interim complete removable dental prosthesis, the process has not been validated with clinical studies. This report provided a preliminary proof of concept in developing a digital workflow for the in-office additively manufactured interim complete removable dental prosthesis. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Stress Distribution of Mini Dental Implant-Supported Overdentures in Complete Cleft Palate Models: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soğancı, Gökçe; Yazıcıoğlu, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Mini dental implants could be an alternative treatment method for prosthetic treatment of edentulous cleft palate. The aim of this study was to analyze stress distribution around the cortical bone and different plans using a varied number of mini dental implants in edentulous unilateral complete cleft palates. Three edentulous maxillary models were modified to create unilateral complete cleft palates. Mini dental implants (2.4 × 15 mm) were located as two mini implants at the premolar region, four mini implants at the premolar and molar region, and six mini implants at the first premolar, second premolar, and first molar regions in the models, respectively. Mucosa, o-ring/ball attachments, and overdentures were simulated. Vertical and horizontal loads of 100 N were applied on both the right and left molar teeth of the overdenture for each model. Maximum and minimum principal stress values and the distribution at cortical bone around the implants and cleft palates were evaluated by finite element analysis. Stress values under vertical loads were lower than values under horizontal loadings for all models. Stress values were found to be lower in the first model than in the second and third models. The highest stress values were found around implants in the second model. The unilateral feature of a complete cleft pattern affected the stress distribution. Stresses occured mostly around implants when the overdenture was supported by six implants; however, the stress distribution around implants was low with two implants because of tissue support.

  3. The analysis of cost-effectiveness of implant and conventional fixed dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, June Sang; Har, Alix; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Lim, Hoi-Jeong

    2016-02-01

    This study conducted an analysis of cost-effectiveness of the implant and conventional fixed dental prosthesis (CFDP) from a single treatment perspective. The Markov model for cost-effectiveness analysis of the implant and CFDP was carried out over maximum 50 years. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed by the 10,000 Monte-Carlo simulations, and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEAC) were also presented. The results from meta-analysis studies were used to determine the survival rates and complication rates of the implant and CFDP. Data regarding the cost of each treatment method were collected from University Dental Hospital and Statistics Korea for 2013. Using the results of the patient satisfaction survey study, quality-adjusted prosthesis year (QAPY) of the implant and CFDP strategy was evaluated with annual discount rate. When only the direct cost was considered, implants were more cost-effective when the willingness to pay (WTP) was more than 10,000 won at 10(th) year after the treatment, and more cost-effective regardless of the WTP from 20(th) year after the prosthodontic treatment. When the indirect cost was added to the direct cost, implants were more cost-effective only when the WTP was more than 75,000 won at the 10(th) year after the prosthodontic treatment, more than 35,000 won at the 20(th) year after prosthodontic treatment. The CFDP was more cost-effective unless the WTP was more than 75,000 won at the 10(th) year after prosthodontic treatment. But the cost-effectivenss tendency changed from CFDP to implant as time passed.

  4. A novel laser-based method for controlled crystallization in dental prosthesis materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Peter; Neuenschwander, Beat; Schwaller, Patrick; Köhli, Benjamin; Lüscher, Beat; Senn, Florian; Kounga, Alain; Appert, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Glass-ceramic materials are increasingly becoming the material of choice in the field of dental prosthetics, as they can feature both high strength and very good aesthetics. It is believed that their color, microstructure and mechanical properties can be tuned such as to achieve an optimal lifelike performance. In order to reach that ultimate perfection a controlled arrangement of amorphous and crystalline phases in the material is required. A phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline is achieved by a heat treatment at defined temperature levels. The traditional approach is to perform the heat treatment in a furnace. This, however, only allows a homogeneous degree of crystallization over the whole volume of the parent glass material. Here a novel approach using a local heat treatment by laser irradiation is presented. To investigate the potential of this approach the crystallization process of SiO2-Li2O-Al2O3-based glass has been studied with laser systems (pulsed and continuous wave) operating at different wavelengths. Our results show the feasibility of gradual and partial crystallization of the base material using continuous laser irradiation. A dental prosthesis machined from an amorphous glassy state can be effectively treated with laser irradiation and crystallized within a confined region of a few millimeters starting from the body surface. Very good aesthetics have been achieved. Preliminary investigation with pulsed nanosecond lasers of a few hundreds nanoseconds pulse width has enabled more refinement of crystallization and possibility to place start of phase change within the material bulk.

  5. Dental status, oral prosthesis and chewing ability in an adult and elderly population in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Alexandre; Schmidt, Jeanne Gabriele; Rech, Rafaela Soares; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot; Goulart, Bárbara Niegia Garcia de

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the factors associated with inadequate chewing in an adult and elderly population of a city in the southern region of Brazil. This was a cross-sectional study based on a population home-based inquiry (DCH-POP) in southern Brazil. Individuals were interviewed by trained interviewers to create a standardized procedure. In a pilot study, the Questionnaire of Human Communication Disorders (DCH-POP) was created and validated to identify self-reported speech and language, swallowing and hearing disorders. The outcome was dichotomized into either having adequate chewing or not, as assessed by a series of questions about chewing ability. Analyses of absolute and relative frequencies were measured according to the studied variables. A Poisson regression was applied at a significance level of 5%. A total of 1,246 people were interviewed. Inadequate chewing was found in 52 (5.6%) individuals, with a higher prevalence in the elderly (11.8%) than in adults (5.2%). In the final model, the following factors were associated with inadequate chewing: being 61 years of age or older (prevalence ratio or PR=9.03; 95% CI: 1.20-67.91), loss of teeth and use of unadjusted prosthesis (PR=3.50; 95% CI: 1.54-7.95), preference for foods of soft consistency (PR=9.34; 95% CI:4.66-8.70) and difficulty in nasal breathing (PR=2.82; 95% CI: 1.31-6.06). Age, oral health status through dental prosthesis, preference for foods of soft consistency and difficulty breathing through the nose were factors associated with chewing inability in adults and the elderly.

  6. Fracture Strength and Failure Mode of Maxillary Implant-Supported Provisional Single Crowns : A Comparison of Composite Resin Crowns Fabricated Directly Over PEEK Abutments and Solid Titanium Abutments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santing, H.J.; Meijer, Henny J.A.; Raghoebar, G.M.; Ozcan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. Purpose: The objectives of this

  7. Association between dental prosthesis need, nutritional status and quality of life of elderly subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Rajath; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Jain, Veena

    2015-01-01

    clinic were recruited in the study. Mini-nutritional assessment (MNA), geriatric oral health assessment (GOHAI) indices, prosthesis need according to WHO criteria, and prosthesis want was recorded along with age, gender, socioeconomic status and posterior occluding pair. RESULTS: Significant associations......To determine the effect of prosthesis need on nutritional status and oral health-related quality of life (OHrQoL) in elderly and to check the disparity between prosthesis need and prosthesis want in the Indian elderly. METHODS: A total of 946 geriatric participants reporting to a geriatric medicine...

  8. Distortion of CAD-CAM-fabricated implant-fixed titanium and zirconia complete dental prosthesis frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Meraikhi, Hadi; Yilmaz, Burak; McGlumphy, Edwin; Brantley, William A; Johnston, William M

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM)-fabricated titanium and zirconia implant-supported fixed dental prostheses have become increasingly popular for restoring patients with complete edentulism. However, the distortion level of these frameworks is not well known. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the 3-dimensional (3D) distortion of CAD-CAM zirconia and titanium implant-fixed screw-retained complete dental prostheses. A master edentulous model with 4 implants at the positions of the maxillary first molars and canines was used. Multiunit abutments (Nobel Biocare) secured to the model were digitally scanned using scan bodies and a laboratory scanner (S600 ARTI; Zirkonzahn). Titanium (n=5) and zirconia (n=5) frameworks were milled using a CAD-CAM system (Zirkonzahn M1; Zirkonzahn). All frameworks were scanned using an industrial computed tomography (CT) scanner (Nikon/X-Tek XT H 225kV MCT Micro-Focus). The direct CT scans were reconstructed to generate standard tessellation language (STL) files. To calculate the 3D distortion of the frameworks, STL files of the CT scans were aligned to the CAD model using a sum of the least squares best-fit algorithm. Surface comparison points were placed on the CAD model on the midfacial aspect of all teeth. The 3D distortion of each direct scan to the CAD model was calculated. In addition, color maps of the scan-to-CAD comparison were constructed using a ±0.500 mm color scale range. Both materials exhibited distortion; however, no significant difference was found in the amount of distortion from the CAD model between the materials (P=.747). Absolute values of deviations from the CAD model were evident in the x and y plane and less so in the z direction. Zirconia and titanium frameworks showed similar 3D distortion compared with the CAD model for the tested CAD-CAM and implant systems. The distortion was more pronounced in the horizontal and sagittal plane than in the vertical plane

  9. Fabrication of titanium removable dental prosthesis frameworks with a 2-step investment coating method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Mari; Hummel, Susan K; Ball, John D; Okabe, Toru

    2012-06-01

    Although pure titanium is known to have good biocompatibility, a titanium alloy with better strength is needed for fabricating clinically acceptable, partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP) frameworks. The mechanical properties of an experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy cast with a 2-step investment technique were examined for RDP framework applications. Patterns for tests for various properties and denture frameworks for a preliminary trial casting were invested with a 2-step coating method using 2 types of mold materials: a less reactive spinel compound (Al(2)O(3)·MgO) and a less expensive SiO(2)-based material. The yield and tensile strength (n=5), modulus of elasticity (n=5), elongation (n=5), and hardness (n=8) of the cast Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy were determined. The external appearance and internal porosities of the preliminary trial castings of denture frameworks (n=2) were examined with a conventional dental radiographic unit. Cast Ti-6Al-4V alloy and commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) were used as controls. The data for the mechanical properties were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA (α=.05). The yield strength of the cast Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy was 851 MPa and the hardness was 356 HV. These properties were comparable to those of the cast Ti-6Al-4V and were higher than those of CP Ti (PAl-5Cu frameworks was found to have been incompletely cast. The cast biocompatible experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy exhibited high strength when cast with a 2-step coating method. With a dedicated study to determine the effect of sprue design on the quality of castings, biocompatible Ti-5Al-5Cu RDP frameworks for a clinical trial can be produced. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Masseter muscle fatigue during sustained clenching in subjects with complete dentures, implant-supported prostheses, and natural teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, R; van Steenberghe, D

    1993-03-01

    A sustained submaximal (50%) clenching effort was performed in four patient groups to establish whether implant-supported prosthetic reconstructions influence myoelectrical signal parameters. The first group consisted of patients with natural teeth in both jaws. The other three groups consisted of patients who were edentulous in both jaws: one group had complete dentures; one had an overdenture in the mandible on two implants connected by a bar; and the third had an implant-supported fixed prosthesis in either the maxilla or the mandible. Surface electromyography indicated an increased myoelectrical output level that paralleled a higher bite force level for implant-supported reconstructions compared with complete dentures. Power spectrum analysis revealed a downward shift of the mean power frequency during sustained clenching in all groups except the implant-supported fixed prosthesis. The absence of a spectral shift in the latter group probably reflected a fear of biting too hard and fracturing the prosthesis.

  11. Tardive Dyskinesia, Oral Parafunction, and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lumetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral movement disorders may lead to prosthesis and implant failure due to excessive loading. We report on an edentulous patient suffering from drug-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD and oral parafunction (OP rehabilitated with implant-supported screw-retained prostheses. The frequency and intensity of the movements were high, and no pharmacological intervention was possible. Moreover, the patient refused night-time splint therapy. A series of implant and prosthetic failures were experienced. Implant failures were all in the maxilla and stopped when a rigid titanium structure was placed to connect implants. Ad hoc designed studies are desirable to elucidate the mutual influence between oral movement disorders and implant-supported rehabilitation.

  12. Maxillary arch rehabilitation using implant-supported computer-assisted design-computer-assisted manufacturing-milled titanium framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika S Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetic and functional rehabilitation of completely edentulous maxillary arch with fixed implant supported prosthesis is a challenging task. Newer technologies such as computer assisted design computer assisted manufacturing (CAD CAM and cone beam conventional tomography play an important role in achieving predictable results. Full mouth porcelain fused to metal (PFM individual crowns on CAD CAM milled titanium framework provides positive esthetic and functional outcome. This is a case report of rehabilitation of partially edentulous maxillary arch patient. Staged rehabilitation of this patient was planned. In the first stage, root canal treatment of key abutment teeth was done, nonsalvageable teeth were removed, and immediate interim overdenture was provided. In the second stage, five Nobel Biocare dental implants were placed. After integration impressions were made, CAD CAM milled titanium bar was fabricated. Individual PFM crowns were made and cemented. This method gives better esthetic compared to acrylic fused to metal hybrid prosthesis with the advantage of retrievability just like screw retained prosthesis. Hence, this technique is good for rehabilitation of patients with high esthetic demands.

  13. Clinical follow-up of unilateral, fixed dental prosthesis on maxillary implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlström, Monica; Sagulin, Gun-Britt; Jansson, Leif E

    2010-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate (1) the success rate of unilateral maxillary fixed dental prosthesis (FDPs) on implants in patients at a periodontal clinic referred for periodontal treatment, (2) the prevalence of varying mechanical and biological complications and (3) effects of potential risk factors on the success rate. Fifty consecutive patients were invited to participate in a follow-up. The patients had received FDPs on implants between November 2000 and December 2003 after treatment to achieve optimal peridontal health, and the FDPs had been in function for at least 3 years. A questionnaire was sent to the patients before the follow-up examination. Forty-six patients with 116 implants were examined. The follow-up comprised clinical and radiographic examinations and evaluations of treatment outcome. Before implant treatment, 13% of the teeth were extracted; of these, 80% were extracted due to periodontal disease. No implants had been lost before implant loading. One implant in one patient fractured after 3 years of functional loading and three implants in another patient after 6.5 years. The most frequent mechanical complications were veneer fractures and loose bridge screws. Patients with peri-implant mucositis had significantly more bleeding on probing around teeth and implants. Patients with peri-implantitis at the follow-up had more deep periodontal pockets around their remaining teeth compared with individuals without peri-implantitis, but these differences were not significant. Smokers had significantly fewer teeth, more periodontal pockets ≥ 4mm and a tendency towards greater marginal bone loss at the follow-up, compared with non-smokers. In the short term, overloading and bruxism seem more hazardous for implant treatment, compared with a history of periodontitis.

  14. Implant Supported Prosthesıs in a Patıent wıth Progerıa: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözlem Ceylan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Prosthodontic rehabilitation can be accomplished with fixed, overdenture, complete, or implant-retained prostheses. Dental treatment overcomes the patient’s functional, psychological, esthetic and phonation problems. Remaining healthy teeth may allow the dentist to fabrícate a removable partial overdenture, fixed partial prosthesis or implant - supported prosthesis. The retention of a number of abutments helps maintain a positive ridge form with greater height and volume of the alveolar bone, improving masticatory performance, as well as providing a more stable prostheses. Dental patients who have medical problems need many treatment procedures. Multidisciplinary treatment planning is invaluable for patient’s dental health. Progeria is a rare genetic condition where symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. characteristic clinical findings of Progeria disease include abnormalities of the skin and hair in conjunction with char-acteristic facial features and skeletal abnormalities. The characteristic facies show protruding ears, beaked nose, thin lips with centrofacial cyanosis, prominent eyes, frontal and parietal bossing with pseudohydrocephaly, midface hypoplasia with micrognathia and large anterior fontanel. The other reported anomalies are dystrophic nails, hypertrophic scars and hypoplastic nipples. The findings that are nearly interested in dentistry are delayed dentition, anodontia, hypodontia, or crowding of teeth. This article presents the multidisciplinary dental treatment planning includes surgical, endodontic and prosthetic treatment of a patient with a history of progeria. In this case complete-arch fixed prostheses in both maxilla and mandible, supported by a combination of im-plants and teeth are reported.

  15. Rapid proto typing of dental prosthesis by means of a feldspathic glass composite mixed with muscovite mica via CAD/CAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Junior, E.S.; Gomes Junior, G.G.; Fonseca, M.D.; Moraes, E.E.S.; Ogasawara, T.

    2010-01-01

    The work consists in the use and integration of CAD/CAM tools as a process of design and manufacture of a rapid prototyping of dental prosthesis by machining using a CNC milling machine. The material machined to obtain the dental prosthesis were cylindrical blocks of a Feldspathic glass composite mixed with muscovite mica in various percentages (15%, 40% and 80%), which was resigned under biaxial pressing and sintered in vacuum at temperatures from 800 to 1100 deg C. The composite was characterized by XRD and SEM. The results show that increasing the crystallization of leucite is consequent to the temperature increase, and that the use of CAD/CAM system using a CNC milling machine is feasible to obtain dental prosthesis. (author)

  16. Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargari, M; Prete, V; Pujia, M; Ceruso, F M

    2012-10-01

    Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year. The aim of this study is to compare functional efficiency and patients satisfaction between tooth-supported and implant-supported overdenture through a questionnaire that accurately reflects the real concerns of patients with dental prosthesis. Forty-three patients were selected from the out patient clinic, Department of Dentistry "Fra G.B. Orsenigo Ospedale San Pietro F.B.F.", Rome, Italy. Their age were ranging from 61 to 83 years. Eighteen patients were rehabilitated with overdentures supported by natural teeth and twenty-five with overdentures implant-supported. DISCUSSION AND RESULT: The questionnaire proposed one year after the insertion of the prosthetis has showed that there isn't difference statistically significant in terms of function, phonetics and aesthetics between overdenture implant-supported and tooth-supported. The results of the questionnaire showed that the patients generally had a high level of satisfaction concern to the masticatory function, esthetics and phonetics. In addition, on average, they haven't difficulty in removal and insertion of the denture and in oral hygiene. They haven't in both groups problems related to fractures.

  17. New 3D technologies applied to assess the long-term clinical effects of misfit of the full jaw fixed prosthesis on dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, Asbjørn; Shokati, Babak

    2015-10-01

    To assess implant:suprastructure misfit in patients with an edentulous jaw restored by an implant-retained fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) and its association with biologic and mechanical adverse events over an extensive period. Thirty patients with an edentulous mandible treated with implant-supported prosthetics before 2000 were examined clinically in 2012. Each patient had received 4 to 6 implants to retain a FDP made from acrylic and three different metal alloys, that is, Ag-Pd, Pd-Ag, and Au type IV. The implant intra-oral locations were recorded digitally by use of an intra-oral scanner, and the intaglio surface of the detached FDP was recorded using a desktop scanner. The fit was estimated by digital matching of the STL files using industrial metrological software. The average misfit was correlated with the average marginal bone loss and the prevalence of screw loosening or fractures, using the patient as the statistical unit. Over an average of 19 years (range 12 to 32), 5 implants had been lost in 4 participants (96.7% implant survival) and 8 eight prostheses (26.7%) had been remade. Anaverage misfit was 150 μm (SD 35, range 95-232, CI 138-163). An average marginal bone loss of 2.2 mm (SD = 0.7) had occurred (range 0.6 to 5.8 mm) for individual implants. The correlation between framework misfit and marginal bone loss was weak (R² = 0.04) (P = 0.29). The prostheses with a history of screw-related adverse events showed average misfit of 169 μm (SD = 32) vs. those with no history of screw-related adverse events, that is, 134 μm (SD = 30) (P = 0.005, Student's t-test). Fourteen of the 30 participants had experienced at least one incidence of screw loosening or fracture of prosthetic or abutment screw(s) over the period of follow-up. The occurrence among the frameworks fabricated with different metal alloys did not differ (P > 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Combining STL files with best-fit algorithms to appraise misfit is feasible using

  18. An investigation on the frequency of partial prosthesis classification in dental faculty, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zand S

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Tooth loss is a kind of handicap and losing a number of teeth makes an individual susceptible to this disability. Having knowledge about the prevalence of partial tooth loss, provides us with a better understanding of social hygiene. On the other hand, having access to such an information, students can be led properly to treat more prevalent cases. The goal of this retrospective study is to investigate the frequency of partial prosthesis classifications, among patients, referred to Shiraz dental faculty. Sexuality, tooth loss classification and its reason and the presence of additional space were studied about all patients (371 females, 205 males from (97-98 to the end of (99-2000. The results showed that females were more than males (64.4%, the lower jaw was treated more than the upper jaw (67.9%, dental caries were the most important reason for extraction (55.5%, class I among females (28.79% and class II mod I among males (29.73% had the most frequency, meaning that the most cases were free end, so more attention should be paid for the education of free end partial prosthesis, however, preventive steps should be taken to retain abutment teeth.

  19. Management of aggressive periodontitis patient with implant supported prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive periodontitis (AgP comprises a group of rare, often severe, rapidly progressive forms of periodontitis which is characterized by an early age of clinical manifestations. It usually affects people under 30 years of age, but patients may be older. Microbiota associated are Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The presence of highly pathogenic bacteria, severe periodontal bone destruction and the refractory nature of this disease tends to deter the clinician from placing implants in these patients. This case report demonstrates the placement of implants in a patient with AgP with successful 18 months follow-up.

  20. Neuromuscular coordination of masticatory muscles in subjects with two types of implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Maglione, Michele; Simion, Massimo; Sforza, Chiarella

    2004-04-01

    To compare the electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of masticatory muscles in patients with fixed implant-supported prostheses and implant overdentures. Nineteen subjects aged 45-79 years were examined. Fourteen were edentulous and had been successfully rehabilitated with (a) maxillary and mandibular implant-supported fixed prostheses (seven patients); (b) mandibular implant overdentures and maxillary complete dentures (seven patients). Five control subjects had natural dentition or single/partial (no more than two teeth) tooth or implant fixed dentures. Surface EMG of the masseter and temporal muscles was performed during unilateral gum chewing and during maximum teeth clenching. To reduce biological and instrumental noise, all values were standardized as percentage of a maximum clenching on cotton rolls. During clenching, temporal muscle symmetry was larger in control subjects and fixed implant-supported prosthesis patients than in overdenture patients (analysis of variance, P=0.005). No differences were found in masseter muscle symmetry or in muscular torque. Muscle activities (integrated areas of the EMG potentials over time) were significantly larger in control subjects than in implant-supported prosthesis patients (P=0.014). In both patient groups, a poor neuromuscular coordination during chewing, with altered muscular patterns, and a smaller left-right symmetry than in control subjects were found (P=0.05). No differences in masticatory frequency were found. Surface EMG analysis of clenching and chewing showed that fixed implant-supported prostheses and implant overdentures were functionally equivalent. Neuromuscular coordination during chewing was inferior to that found in subjects with natural dentition.

  1. Zygoma Implant-Supported Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient After Bilateral Maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celakil, Tamer; Ayvalioglu, Demet Cagil; Sancakli, Erkan; Atalay, Belir; Doganay, Ozge; Kayhan, Kivanc Bektas

    2015-10-01

    Maxillectomy defects may vary from localized to extensive soft and hard tissue loss. In addition to physical and psychologic damages, functional and aesthetic aspects must be restored. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a zygoma implant-supported obturator prosthesis caused by a subtotal bilateral maxillectomy due to a squamous oral cell carcinoma. Prosthetic rehabilitation of this patient was performed after zygoma implant surgery. A maxillary obturator prosthesis supported by 2 osseointegrated zygoma implants was fabricated. Despite limited mouth opening and anatomic deficiencies, the patient's aesthetic and functional demands were fulfilled.

  2. Mandibular implant-supported overdentures: Prosthetic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad A Al-Harbi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-supported overdentures are becoming the treatment of choice for the completely edentulous mandible. They significantly improve the quality of life in edentulous patients. For this review article, the literature was searched to identify pertinent studies. No meta-analysis was conducted because of high heterogeneity within the literature. Accordingly, in this review article, the author provides an update on implant-supported mandible overdentures with regard to the number of implants, type of loading, stress–strain distribution, mode of implant-to-denture attachment, occlusal considerations and complications.

  3. Focal epithelial hyperplasia arising after delivery of metal-ceramic fixed dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Woo; Cho, Young-Ah; Kim, Soung-Min; Myoung, Hoon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Suk-Keun

    2014-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced alteration of the oral mucosa that presents with a clinically distinct appearance. While other HPV-infected lesions such as squamous papilloma, verruca vulgaris, and condyloma acuminatum involve the skin, oral mucosa, and genital mucosa, FEH occurs only in the oral mucosa. The affected oral mucosa exhibits multiple papules and nodules with each papule/nodule being flat-topped or sessile. The affected region resembles the normal color of oral mucosa rather than appearing as a white color since the epithelial surface is not hyperkeratinized. Almost all cases present with multiple sites of occurrence. This rare, benign epithelial proliferation is related to low-risk HPV, especially HPV-13 and -32, and is not transformed into carcinoma. We report a case of FEH that arose on the attached gingiva of an East Asian male adult related to prosthesis without detection of any HPV subtype in HPV DNA chip and sequencing.

  4. A finite element evaluation of mechanical function for 3 distal extension partial dental prosthesis designs with a 3-dimensional nonlinear method for modeling soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshinori; Kanbara, Ryo; Ochiai, Kent T; Tanaka, Yoshinobu

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical evaluation of the function of partial removable dental prostheses with 3-dimensional finite element modeling requires the accurate assessment and incorporation of soft tissue behavior. The differential behaviors of the residual ridge mucosa and periodontal ligament tissues have been shown to exhibit nonlinear displacement. The mathematic incorporation of known values simulating nonlinear soft tissue behavior has not been investigated previously via 3-dimensional finite element modeling evaluation to demonstrate the effect of prosthesis design on the supporting tissues. The purpose of this comparative study was to evaluate the functional differences of 3 different partial removable dental prosthesis designs with 3-dimensional finite element analysis modeling and a simulated patient model incorporating known viscoelastic, nonlinear soft tissue properties. Three different designs of distal extension removable partial dental prostheses were analyzed. The stress distributions to the supporting abutments and soft tissue displacements of the designs tested were calculated and mechanically compared. Among the 3 dental designs evaluated, the RPI prosthesis demonstrated the lowest stress concentrations on the tissue supporting the tooth abutment and also provided wide mucosa-borne areas of support, thereby demonstrating a mechanical advantage and efficacy over the other designs evaluated. The data and results obtained from this study confirmed that the functional behavior of partial dental prostheses with supporting abutments and soft tissues are consistent with the conventional theories of design and clinical experience. The validity and usefulness of this testing method for future applications and testing protocols are shown. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevention and treatment of chronic catarrhal gingivitis and gingival recession in patients with non-removable dental prosthesis designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анатолій Михайлович Петрушанко

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Schemes of prevention and treatment of chronic catarrhal gingivitis and gingival recession in patients with non-removable dental prosthesis designs. It is proved their clinical effectiveness and evaluation criteria of developed gum recession land. After application of preventive and therapeutic complexes, which observed in patients, improve the hygienic condition of the mouth, confirming the feasibility of their application.Methods. It is included 153 patients with various defects of individual teeth and dentition, including 85 women (55.6% and 68 men (44.4% aged from 25 to 55 years. The control group consisted of 35 healthy individuals of the same age without metallic inclusions in the mouth.Results. In analyzing the evaluation index hygienic condition of the oral cavity in patients 25-34 years of gingivitis against the backdrop of orthopedic treatment non-removable denture constructions the indices Green-Vermillion and Silness-Loe following data were obtained: patients of the main group before treatment, the rate Green Vermillion index was an average of 1,70 ± 0,07 points to 1,75 ± 0,08 points, indicating a satisfactory level of oral hygiene. After application of preventive and therapeutic complexes improve the hygienic condition of the oral cavity, which marked the studied index indicators hygiene.Analyzing the data should be noted that positive changes of hygienic condition of the oral cavity were observed throughout the study period in all age groups of patients in both subgroups of observation and comparison.Conclusions. We offer health care systems for the prevention and treatment of gum recession and chronic catarrhal gingivitis in patients after dental prosthetics of non-replaceable constructs allowed to suspend pathological processes in the gums and improve oral hygiene

  6. Elements of implant-supported rehabilitation planning in patients with bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Faot, Fernanda

    2012-11-01

    The rehabilitation of partial or completely edentulous patients with implant-supported prostheses has been widely used, achieving high success rates. However, many studies consider the presence of bruxism as a contraindication for this treatment modality. The purpose of this study was to revise the literature and identify risk factors in implant-supported rehabilitation planning in subjects with bruxism. Available literature was searched through Medline, with no time limit, including only studies in English. Topics discussed were etiology of bruxism and its implications on dental implants, biomechanical considerations regarding the overload on dental implants, and methods to prevent the occurrence of overloads in implant-supported prostheses. The rehabilitation of bruxers using implant-supported prostheses, using implants with adequate length and diameter, as well as proper positioning seems to be a reliable treatment, with reduced risks of failure. Bruxism control through the use of a nightguard by rigid occlusal stabilization appliance relieved in the region of implants is highly indicated. Although it is clear that implant-supported rehabilitation of patients with bruxism requires adequate planning and follow-up, well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to provide reliable evidence on the long-term success of this treatment modality.

  7. [Foreign dentures and dental tourism--willingness-to-pay and factors influencing the demand for foreign dental prosthesis in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köberlein, J; Klingenberger, D

    2011-07-01

    With the progressive realisation of the single European market, public interest has been directed towards cross-border healthcare services to an increasing extent. More and more dentures are being imported into Germany from foreign countries. Furthermore, patients are becoming ever more mobile, travelling to other countries to receive prosthetic treatment from dentists. The objective of this evaluation was to determine by means of a dedicated questionnaire the patients' individual preferences for foreign dentures and the potential savings. 1 368 individuals between the ages of 30 and 75 years were interviewed within a representative omnibus survey. The evaluation of the individual willingness-to-pay included 4 treatment scenarios, which were assessed by the participants in a "bidding game". Participants could choose between a "crown scenario" and an "implant scenario", both with the subcategories "foreign dentures" and "dental tourism". The direct comparison revealed a preference for the "foreign dentures" option over "dental tourism". Average willingness-to-pay for the dental tourism option in the crown scenario was calculated as 80 Euro, and in the implant scenario as 280 Euro less in comparison with the willingness-to-pay for the foreign dentures option. The willingness to switch to a less expensive dentist was one of the main determinants in the causal explanation for the variance in willingness-to-pay. Quality proved to be the decisive criterion and was indicated by 92.4% participants. A lower price for dentures played a subordinate role and was only stated as the decisive factor by 31.1% participants. In conclusion, the results clearly indicate that the decision for or against foreign dentures and the extent of willingness-to-pay depends on a range of criteria, of which "price" is only one and not the decisive factor. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Bar versus ball attachments for implant-supported overdentures in complete edentulism: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas El-Wegoud, Marwah; Fayyad, Ahmed; Kaddah, Amal; Nabhan, Ashraf

    2018-04-01

    Implant-supported overdenture is one of the most predictable treatment options used in complete edentulism. However, differences have been reported between bar and ball attachments used to retain overdentures in terms of patient satisfaction and prosthesis retention. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of bar and ball attachments for conventionally loaded implant-supported overdentures in completely edentulous patients to improve patient satisfaction and prosthesis retention. We conducted the review according to the Cochrane methods and following MECIR standards. We searched Cochrane Oral Health Group Trial register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and the WHO ICTRP (March 31, 2017). Two review authors assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data, and checked for accuracy. We have expressed results as risk ratio or mean differences, together with their 95% confidence intervals. We included 10 trials (465 participants). After 5 y, one trial reported higher patient satisfaction when bar attachment was used (MD 1.30, 95% CI 0.20-2.40), and reported no difference between both systems in prosthesis retention (MD -0.90, 95% CI -1.90 to 0.10). Two trials reported no implant failures after 1 and 5 y in both attachments. Downgrading of evidence was based on the unclear risk of bias of included studies and the wide CI crossing the line of no effect. There is insufficient evidence to support bar or ball attachment to be used with implant-supported overdentures in completely edentulous patients to improve patient satisfaction and prosthesis retention (PROSPERO 2014:CRD42014014594). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The impact on bone tissues of immediate implant-supported mandibular overdentures with cusped and cuspless teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid A. Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effects on bone tissues of immediate implant-supported mandibular overdentures with cusped or cuspless teeth. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Dental Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Al-Azhar University, Assiut Branch, Egypt, over a 12-month period from September 2013 to September 2014. Twenty patients were treated with immediate implant-supported overdentures: one group received overdentures with cusped teeth, and the other group receive...

  10. Translucence in dental prosthesis based on zirconia ceramics: effect of the sintering parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this work the translucence of Zirconia dental ceramics was evaluated as function of sintering conditions (temperature and isothermal holding time). Samples with 15x15x1mm, were sintered at 1450 to 1600 deg C, with holding of 2h or 4h. Sintered samples were characterized by relative density, crystalline phases and microstructural aspects. Full density was obtained in samples sintered at 1530 and 1600 deg C, which presented higher grain sizes. Na increasing of translucence was observed in samples sintered at 1530 and 1600, correlating these properties with increasing of density and grain size of the samples. (author)

  11. Influence of Abutment Angle on Implant Strain When Supporting a Distal Extension Removable Partial Dental Prosthesis: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Toshihito; Tomita, Akiko; Gonda, Tomoya; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    This study evaluated the impact of angled abutments on strain in implants supporting a distal extension removable partial denture. An in vitro model of an implant supporting a distal extension removable partial denture was developed. The implant was positioned with a 17- or 30-degree mesial inclination, with either a healing abutment or a corrective multiunit abutment. Levels of strain under load were compared, and the results were compared using t test (P = .05). Correcting angulation with a multiunit angled abutment significantly decreased strain (P abutment. An angled abutment decreased the strain on an inclined implant significantly more than a healing abutment when loaded under a distal extension removable partial denture.

  12. Clinical acceptability of metal-ceramic fixed partial dental prosthesis fabricated with direct metal laser sintering technique-5 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Radhakrishnan; Prabhu, Geetha; Baskaran, Eswaran; Arumugam, Eswaran M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, direct metal laser sintered (DMLS) metal-ceramic-based fixed partial denture prostheses have been used as an alternative to conventional metal-ceramic fixed partial denture prostheses. However, clinical studies for evaluating their long-term clinical survivability and acceptability are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of metal-ceramic fixed dental prosthesis fabricated with DMLS technique, and its clinical acceptance on long-term clinical use. The study group consisted of 45 patients who were restored with posterior three-unit fixed partial denture prosthesis made using direct laser sintered metal-ceramic restorations. Patient recall and clinical examination of the restorations were done after 6months and every 12 months thereafter for the period of 60 months. Clinical examination for evaluation of longevity of restorations was done using modified Ryge criteria which included chipping of the veneered ceramic, connector failure occurring in the fixed partial denture prosthesis, discoloration at the marginal areas of the veneered ceramic, and marginal adaptation of the metal and ceramic of the fixed denture prosthesis. Periapical status was assessed using periodical radiographs during the study period. Survival analysis was made using the Kaplan-Meier method. None of the patients had failure of the connector of the fixed partial denture prostheses during the study period. Two exhibited biological changes which included periapical changes and proximal caries adjacent to the abutments. DMLS metal-ceramic fixed partial denture prosthesis had a survival rate of 95.5% and yielded promising results during the 5-year clinical study.

  13. Dental onlay bridge-like prosthesis in three koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): the use of Premise trimodal composite to prevent interproximal Eucalyptus spp. retention and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sean M; Pye, Geoffrey W; Fagan, David A

    2014-06-01

    Three koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) presented with moderate to severe interproximal space accumulation with Eucalyptus spp. at the San Diego Zoo. Premise trimodal composite was used to create dental onlay bridge-like prostheses to eliminate open, enlarged interproximal spaces. The prostheses prevented further leaf material accumulation within the interproximal spaces and consequently reduced periodontal disease. Aesthetically, the prosthesis replicates normal tooth coloration and appearance and wears at a similar rate to surrounding teeth. Prosthetic repair or replacement may be required, so periodic examination every 3-6 mo is recommended.

  14. Impact of implant-supported prostheses on nutritional status and oral health perception in edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Osta, Nada; El Osta, Lana; Moukaddem, Farah; Papazian, Tatiana; Saad, Robert; Hennequin, Martine; Rabbaa Khabbaz, Lydia

    2017-04-01

    Improvement of nutritional status and perception of oral health are supposed to be different with complete conventional denture or implant-supported fixed or removable prostheses. Since no study has been conducted in Lebanon, the aim of our study was to assess the nutritional status and oral heath related quality of life (OHRQoL) in totally edentulous patients after treatment with complete denture or implant supported-prostheses. This was an observational clinical prospective study. A convenient sample of Lebanese people aged 60 years or more was selected between September 2013 and July 2015 from the Departments of removable and fixed prosthesis at Saint-Joseph University of Beirut. The treatment options included complete denture, implant-supported complete denture and implant-supported fixed prostheses. Nutritional status and OHRQoL were assessed with the Mini-Nutritional Assessment Index (MNA) and the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) respectively at Baseline (first visit before treatment), 2-3 weeks after treatment (t1), 3 months (t2) and 6 months (t3) after treatment. Fifty-one participants (mean age: 69.39 ± 7.164 years) were included. The results have shown an improvement over time in nutritional status and OHRQoL for all treatment groups. However, 2-3 weeks after treatment the number of participants at risk of malnutrition was higher with complete removable denture, intermediate with implant-supported complete denture and lower with implant-supported fixed prostheses (p-value = 0.049). Moreover, the mean GOHAI score was significantly lower over time with complete removable denture compared to implant-supported prostheses (p-value nutritional status for implant supported-prostheses compared to conventional removable dentures. Therefore, it is fundamental that dentists communicate with their patients about implant treatment to understand their expectations, to explain the outcomes and achieve the desired clinical result. Copyright © 2017

  15. A Sequential Approach to Implant-Supported Overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Fabrication of implant-supported maxillary or mandibular overdentures can seem to be difficult procedures. Many things could go wrong and/or unnoticed until the fabrication has been completed. Implants must be correctly surgically placed in viable bone at the proper angulation and spacing within an arch. The type of attachment must be considered and future treatment of the appliance should be simple and efficient. The appliance must function not only initially but also for many years to come. The author has found the use of the GPS attachment to be an ideal tool to achieve the goals of retention and stability. Careful planning is the most important part of this process, and understanding the benefits and risks of creating overdentures should be well understood by the dentists. By sequentially planning and treating these types of cases, the patient is able to function reasonably during the stages of implant healing. The final prosthesis is created and remaining teeth that held the transitional appliance in place are remove on the day of final seating. This is an excellent simplified retentive system option for those patients who are anxious about losing their teeth, even those teeth that are diseased and ugly.

  16. Implant support for removable partial overdentures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halterman, S M; Rivers, J A; Keith, J D; Nelson, D R

    1999-01-01

    Functional stability and the preservation of remaining alveolar bone are primary, and often elusive, goals when restoring the partially edentulous arch. The incorporation of dental implants for the partial support of removable prostheses offers a practical adjunct in the fulfillment of these objectives. Planning for complex courses of treatment that include dental implants requires close coordination between the surgeon and the restorative dentist. Decisions that deal with type, location, size, number of implant fixtures, and design of the prosthesis are critical. All of these areas must be discussed and established as acceptable to the patient and each clinician before the initiation of treatment. In this report, we present a course of patient treatment in which a removable partial denture is supported by natural remaining teeth in conjunction with osseointegrated implants.

  17. Implant supported overdentures--the Copenhagen experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K

    1997-01-01

    included 15 fractures of the ball attachment and 26 episodes of looseness of the matrices holding the screw in place. Patient satisfaction with the treatment of the lower jaw was high although 7 patients found that control of the upper denture was poor following treatment. CONCLUSIONS: When the bone...... and all but two of the implants were longer than 10 mm. For the implant supported overdentures two methods of attachment were used, a bar or a ball. RESULTS: One of 69 fixtures was lost during the 4-5 year observation period. The mean bone loss for all fixtures was less than 0.2 mm per year. Complications...

  18. Full mouth rehabilitation with retrievable metal-ceramic implant-supported fixed prostheses for a young patient with atrophic jaws: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Narges; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Rezayani, Vida

    2017-09-01

    Treatment of atrophic edentulous jaws with implant-supported fixed prostheses is one of the most complicated challenges in dentistry. This clinical report describes the prosthesis which consists of screw retained frameworks with individual cement retained crowns which combines the advantages of the screw retained restoration with the advantage of cement retained.

  19. Electromyographic evaluation of implant-supported prostheses in hemimandibulectomy-reconstructed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellavia, Claudia; Romeo, Eugenio; Ghisolfi, Marco; Chiapasco, Matteo; Sforza, Chiarella; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2007-06-01

    To assess the clinical conditions, patient's satisfaction and functional outcomes in oral neoplasia patients with hemimandibulectomy, bone reconstruction and implant-supported prosthesis. Twelve patients after mandibular resection (with and without condyle), reconstruction and successful fixed implant-supported prosthesis rehabilitation were examined. Patients underwent clinical evaluation and filled in a questionnaire about their satisfaction toward oral functions. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the masticatory muscles was performed during a 15-s unilateral gum chewing test. EMG potentials were standardized as percentage of a maximum clench on cotton rolls and compared with reference data obtained from 20 healthy subjects. Excellent clinical and radiological parameters were found. Patients stated a decreased post-rehabilitation satisfaction toward mastication and phonetics, but an increased attention to oral care. Only patients with condylar resection reported augmented esthetic scores. In both the resected and the remaining sides, chewing frequency was higher in the patients than in the reference group (Wilcoxon's rank-sum test, Pchewing were more variable in the reconstructed patients than in control subjects; the difference was significant only in the non-operated side (P<0.01). Post-rehabilitation median scores of the questionnaire indicated a positive judgment of the treatment. EMG analysis showed that functional recovery in hemimandibulectomy patients was satisfactory, although some alterations were observed in the non-operated side of mastication.

  20. Long-term survival rate of implant-supported overdentures with various attachment systems: A 20-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Sheng Chang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The overall survival rate of dental implants with overdenture rehabilitation was 95.3% (91.3% in maxillae vs. 96.4% in mandibles within the past 20 years. With careful treatment planning, implant-supported overdenture is an interesting treatment alternative with better esthetic, retention, stability, and good hygienic maintenance for patients with severe ridge resorption.

  1. Replacement of a hopeless maxillary central incisor: a technique for the fabrication of an immediate implant-supported interim restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graiff, Lorenzo; Vigolo, Paolo

    2012-04-01

    Placement of a dental implant and an interim restoration in the esthetic zone immediately following tooth extraction is now a common procedure. However, in such clinical situations, the fabrication of an appropriate interim restoration may be challenging. The aim of this article is to present a technique for modifying the extracted tooth so it can be used as an implant-supported interim restoration.

  2. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the temporomandibular...

  3. Biomechanical comparison of two different collar structured implants supporting 3-unit fixed partial denture: a 3-D FEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriç, Gökçe; Erkmen, Erkan; Kurt, Ahmet; Eser, Atilim; Ozden, Ahmet Utku

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of two distinct collar geometries of implants on stress distribution in the bone as well as in the fixture-abutment complex, in the framework and in the veneering material of 3-unit fixed partial denture (FPD). The 3-dimensional finite element analysis method was selected to evaluate the stress distribution in the system composed of 3-unit FPD supported by two different dental implant systems with two distinct collar geometries; microthread collar structure (MCS) and non-microthread collar structure (NMCS). In separate load cases, 300 N vertical, 150 N oblique and 60 N horizontal, forces were utilized to simulate the multidirectional chewing forces. Tensile and compressive stress values in the cortical and cancellous bone and von Mises stresses in the fixture-abutment complex, in the framework and veneering material, were simulated as a body and investigated separately. In the cortical bone lower stress values were found in the MCS model, when compared with NMCS. In the cancellous bone, lower stress values were observed in the NMCS model when compared with MCS. In the implant-abutment complex, highest von Mises stress values were noted in the NMCS model; however, in the framework and veneering material, highest stress values were calculated in MCS model. MCS implants when compared with NMCS implants supporting 3-unit FPDs decrease the stress values in the cortical bone and implant-abutment complex. The results of the present study will be evaluated as a base for our ongoing FEA studies focused on stress distribution around the microthread and non-microthread collar geometries with various prosthesis design.

  4. The total occlusal convergence of the abutment of a partial fixed dental prosthesis: A definition and a clinical technique for its assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoun, John S.

    2013-01-01

    The abutment(s) of a partial fixed dental prosthesis (PFDP) should have a minimal total occlusal convergence (TOC), also called a taper, in order to ensure adequate retention of a PFDP that will be made for the abutment(s), given the height of the abutment(s). This article reviews the concept of PFDP abutment TOC and presents an alternative definition of what TOC is, defining it as the extent to which the shape of an abutment differs from an ideal cylinder shape of an abutment. This article also reviews experimental results concerning what is the ideal TOC in degrees and explores clinical techniques of estimating the TOC of a crown abutment. The author suggests that Dentists use high magnification loupes (×6-8 magnification or greater) or a surgical operating microscope when preparing crown abutments, to facilitate creating a minimum abutment TOC. PMID:24932130

  5. Prognosis of Combining Remaining Teeth and Implants in Double-Crown-Retained Removable Dental Prostheses: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Meifei; Zhao, Kai; Feng, Yunzhi; Yao, Qian

    The reliability of combining natural teeth and implants in one removable prosthesis is controversial. This systematic review was conducted to evaluate the prognosis of combined tooth/implant-supported double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses (DCR-RDPs) and to compare them with solely implant-supported prostheses with a minimum observation period of 3 years. Electronic database (PubMed, Embase, Central, and SCI) and manual searches up to August 2016 were conducted to identify human clinical studies on tooth/implant-supported DCR-RDPs. Literature selection and data extraction were accomplished by two independent reviewers. Meta-analyses of survival and complication rates were performed separately for combined tooth/implant-supported and solely implant-supported DCRRDPs. Among the initially identified 366 articles, 17 were included in a quantitative analysis. The estimated overall cumulative survival rate (CSR) for implants in combined tooth/implant-supported DCRRDPs was 98.72% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 96.98% to 99.82%), and that for implants in solely implant-supported DCR-RDPs was 98.83% (95% CI: 97.45% to 99.75%). The summary CSR for abutment teeth was 92.96% (95% CI: 85.38% to 98.12%). Double-crown-retained dentures with both abutment types showed high CSRs, most of which were approximately 100%. Regarding prosthetic maintenance treatment, the estimated incidence for patients treated with combined tooth/implant-supported RDPs was 0.164 (95% CI: 0.089 to 0.305) per patient per year (T/P/Y) and that for patients restored with solely implant-supported RDPs was 0.260 (95% CI: 0.149 to 0.454) T/P/Y. Based on four studies with combined tooth/implant-supported DCR-RDPs, no intrusion phenomena were encountered. Subject to the limitations of the present review, combining remaining teeth and implants in DCR-RDPs is a reliable and predictable treatment modality for partially edentulous patients. Comparable high survival rates and minor biologic or

  6. Removal of a Dental Implant Displaced into the Maxillary Sinus by Means of the Bone Lid Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Fusari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rehabilitation of edentulous jaws with implant-supported prosthesis has become a common practice among oral surgeons in the last three decades. This therapy presents a very low incidence of complications. One of them is the displacement of dental implants into the maxillary sinus. Dental implants, such as any other foreign body into the maxillary sinus, should be removed in order to prevent sinusitis. Methods. In this paper, we report a case of dental implant migrated in the maxillary sinus and removed by means of the bone lid technique. Results and Conclusion. The migration of dental implants into the maxillary sinus is rarely reported. Migrated implants should be considered for removal in order to prevent possible sinusal diseases. The implant has been removed without any complications, confirming the bone lid technique to be safe and reliable.

  7. Mandibular implant-supported overdentures: attachment systems, and number and locations of implants--Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warreth, Abdulhadi; Alkadhimi, Aslam Fadel; Sultan, Ahmed; Byrne, Caroline; Woods, Edel

    2015-01-01

    The use of dental implants in replacing missing teeth is an integral part of restorative dental treatment. Use of conventional complete dentures is associated with several problems such as lack of denture stability, support and retention. However, when mandibular complete dentures were used with two or more implants, an improvement in the patients' psychological and social well-being could be seen. There is general consensus that removable implant-supported overdentures (RISOs) with two implants should be considered as the first-choice standard of care for an edentulous mandible. This treatment option necessitates the use of attachment systems that connect the complete denture to the implant. Nevertheless, each attachment system has its inherent advantages and disadvantages, which should be considered when choosing a system. The first part of this article provides an overview on options available to restore the mandibular edentulous arch with dental implants. Different types of attachment systems, their features and drawbacks are also reviewed.

  8. Electromyographic evaluation of mastication and swallowing in elderly individuals with mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giédre Berretin-Felix

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of implant-supported oral rehabilitation in the mandible on the electromyographic activity during mastication and swallowing in edentulous elderly individuals. Fifteen patients aged more than 60 years were evaluated, being 10 females and 5 males. All patients were edentulous, wore removable complete dentures on both dental arches, and had the mandibular dentures replaced by implant-supported prostheses. All patients were submitted to electromyographic evaluation of the masseter, superior orbicularis oris muscles, and the submental muscles, before surgery and 3, 6 and 18 months postoperatively, using foods of different textures. The results obtained at the different periods were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. Statistical analysis showed that only the masseter muscle had a significant loss in electromyographic activity (p<0.001, with a tendency of similar response for the submental muscles. Moreover, there was an increase in the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during rubber chewing after treatment, yet without statistically significant difference. Mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses in elderly individuals revealed a decrease in electromyographic amplitude for the masseter muscles during swallowing, which may indicate adaptation to new conditions of stability provided by fixation of the complete denture in the mandibular arch.

  9. Implant-supported Oral Rehabilitation in Child with Ectodermal Dysplasia - 4-year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezária Triches, Thaisa; Ximenes, Marcos; Oliveira de Souza, João Gustavo; Rodrigues Lopes Pereira Neto, Armando; Cardoso, Antônio Carlos; Bolan, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is an anomaly determined by genetic factors that alter ectodermal structures such as skin, hair, nails, glands, and teeth. Children affected by this condition require extensive, comprehensive, and multidisciplinary treatment. An 8-year-old female patient visited the Dentistry Clinic of the Federal University of Santa Catarina with the chief complaint of multiple missing teeth. The mother reported that the patient had ED. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed the congenital absence of several primary and permanent teeth and tooth germs. Subsequent oral rehabilitation comprised the application of a maxillary denture and mandibular implant-supported fixed prosthesis. The child was also supplied with a wig for further enhancement of esthetics aimed at improving her emotional wellbeing. Psychological follow-up and speech therapy were also provided. After 4 years of follow-up, implant-supported oral rehabilitation has proved to be a satisfactory treatment option, allowing restoration of masticatory, phonetic, and esthetic function, as well as an improvement in the patient's self-esteem and social wellbeing.

  10. Various Techniques to Increase Keratinized Tissue for Implant Supported Overdentures: Retrospective Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elkhaweldi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this retrospective case series is to describe and compare different surgical techniques that can be utilized to augment the keratinized soft tissue around implant-supported overdentures. Materials and Methods. The data set was extracted as deidentified information from the routine treatment of patients at the Ashman Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry at New York University College of Dentistry. Eight edentulous patients were selected to be included in this study. Patients were treated for lack of keratinized tissue prior to implant placement, during the second stage surgery, and after delivery of the final prosthesis. Results. All 8 patients in this study were wearing a complete maxillary and/or mandibular denture for at least a year before the time of the surgery. One of the following surgical techniques was utilized to increase the amount of keratinized tissue: apically positioned flap (APF, pedicle graft (PG, connective tissue graft (CTG, or free gingival graft (FGG. Conclusions. The amount of keratinized tissue should be taken into consideration when planning for implant-supported overdentures. The apical repositioning flap is an effective approach to increase the width of keratinized tissue prior to the implant placement.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to... requirement for premarket approval for any mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the human...

  12. Fit accuracy of metal partial removable dental prosthesis frameworks fabricated by traditional or light curing modeling material technique: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan, Mohammad Tarek M.; Al-Saadi, Mohannad H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the fit accuracies of metal partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) frameworks fabricated by the traditional technique (TT) or the light-curing modeling material technique (LCMT). Materials and methods A metal model of a Kennedy class III modification 1 mandibular dental arch with two edentulous spaces of different spans, short and long, was used for the study. Thirty identical working casts were used to produce 15 PRDP frameworks each by TT and by LCMT. Every framework was transferred to a metal master cast to measure the gap between the metal base of the framework and the crest of the alveolar ridge of the cast. Gaps were measured at three points on each side by a USB digital intraoral camera at ×16.5 magnification. Images were transferred to a graphics editing program. A single examiner performed all measurements. The two-tailed t-test was performed at the 5% significance level. Results The mean gap value was significantly smaller in the LCMT group compared to the TT group. The mean value of the short edentulous span was significantly smaller than that of the long edentulous span in the LCMT group, whereas the opposite result was obtained in the TT group. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the fit of the LCMT-fabricated frameworks was better than the fit of the TT-fabricated frameworks. The framework fit can differ according to the span of the edentate ridge and the fabrication technique for the metal framework. PMID:26236129

  13. Team-based learning in a preclinical removable denture prosthesis module in a United Arab Emirates dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Ali, Reem; Al Quran, Firas

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of a team-based learning (TBL) approach in a removable denture prosthesis (RDP) module and present the results of students' performance in individual and group TBL activities and exam scores, students' experience with TBL and end of course evaluations, and faculty feedback. Course material at the College of Dentistry, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, was transformed into seven conventional lectures and seven TBL sessions. Each TBL session consisted of pre-assigned reading (self-directed learning), in-class individual and group readiness tests (accountability), team problem-solving of patient RDP cases, and faculty-led class discussion (knowledge application). The course was assessed through scores from TBL session activities and course examinations, student satisfaction survey, and faculty feedback. Course grades were found to be higher using the TBL method then the traditional lecture-based method. Student evaluation data and faculty response indicated strong support for TBL as it was implemented in the course. The faculty noted a higher level of student engagement with team learning than in conventional class lecturing. TBL is an active-learning instructional strategy for courses with high student-to-faculty ratios. This approach provides regular feedback and the opportunity for students to develop higher reasoning skills.

  14. Manufacturing Implant Supported Auricular Prostheses by Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Cifter, Ebru Demet; Ozenen, Didem Ozdemir; Balik, Ali; Tuncer, Erman Bulent

    2011-01-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses are usually fabricated on the models obtained following the impression procedures. Disadvantages of conventional impression techniques used in production of facial prosthesis are deformation of soft tissues caused by impression material and disturbance of the patient due to. Additionally production of prosthesis by conventional methods takes longer time. Recently, rapid prototyping techniques have been developed for extraoral prosthesis in order to reduce these disadv...

  15. An in vitro investigation into retention strength and fatigue resistance of various designs of tooth/implant supported overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatalla, Abdalbseet A; Song, Ke; Du, Tianfeng; Cao, Yingguang

    2012-02-01

    Previously, the choice of prosthetic implant-retained overdentures has depended on data from previous studies about the retention-fatigue strength of the attachment system selected. Little or no data have been available on the correlation between the attachment system selected and the overdenture support configuration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the retention force and fatigue resistance of three attachment systems and four support designs of overdenture prosthesis. Four lower edentulous acrylic models were prepared and eight combinations of attachments groups were investigated in the study. These included: O-Rings with mini-dental implants (MDIs), Dalbo elliptic with Dalbo Rotex and fabricated flexible acrylic attachments with both MDI and Dalbo Rotex. The study was divided into four test groups: groups A and B, controls, and groups C and D, experimental groups. Control group A contained three overdenture supports: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with Dalbo Rotex screwed in. Control group B contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with Dalbo Rotex screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Experimental group C contained three overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with MDI screwed in. Experimental group D contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with MDIs screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Each group was further divided into two subgroups according to attachment type used. Five samples were prepared for each group. Retention force (N) values were recorded initially (0 cycles) and after 360, 720, 1440

  16. [A phd completed 10. Implant-supported removable partial -dentures in a Kennedy Class I-situation in the mandible].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Louwerse, C

    2017-06-01

    Implant-supported removable partial dentures in the mandible often cause problems, which means that patients wear their dentures seldom if at all. A solution is to place implants that the dentures can be snapped onto. There is, however, no consensus about the best position of the implants in the mandible yet. In addition, it is worthwhile to balance the cost of treatment with its effectiveness. In a randomised cross-over clinical trial involving 30 patients with a shortened dental arch, the implant-supported removable partial denture in the mandible was evaluated based on the experience of the patient, mean time of wearing, chewing ability and the clinical and radiographic parameters in relation to 2 different implant positions: 2 in the pre-molar region or 2 in the molar region. The cost-effectiveness of both treatments was also evaluated. From the patient's point of view, the implant-supported removable partial dentures are best supported by implants placed in the molar region. The research also revealed, however, that significantly more bleeding occurred around implants placed in the molar region and from a clinical perspective placement in the pre-molar region would have preference. The cost-effectiveness of the treatment with an implant-supported removable partial denture depends on the choice of outcome measurement and monetary threshold.

  17. REHABILITATION OF COMPLETELY EDENTULOUS MANDIBULAR ARCH USING IMPLANT SUPPORTED FIXED PROSTHESIS - A CASE REPORT.

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran Kaushik; Pankaj Dhawan; Pankaj Madhukar; Piyush Tandan; Prateek Agarwal.

    2018-01-01

    Teeth are important structures in the oral cavity with many associated functions. Loss of teeth may be inevitable due to several reasons. Replacement of teeth should be done to restore the functions like mastication, phonetics, and esthetics. Modern dentistry aims to return patients to normal oral health and function in a predictable fashion. Satisfying a completely edentulous patient is always considered as a difficult task. Various treatment options for completely edentulous patients are av...

  18. Validation of an experimental polyurethane model for biomechanical studies on implant supported prosthesis - tension tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Miyashiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The complexity and heterogeneity of human bone, as well as ethical issues, frequently hinder the development of clinical trials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the modulus of elasticity of a polyurethane isotropic experimental model via tension tests, comparing the results to those reported in the literature for mandibular bone, in order to validate the use of such a model in lieu of mandibular bone in biomechanical studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five polyurethane test specimens were divided into 3 groups of 15 specimens each, according to the ratio (A/B of polyurethane reagents (PU-1: 1/0.5, PU-2: 1/1, PU-3: 1/1.5. RESULTS: Tension tests were performed in each experimental group and the modulus of elasticity values found were 192.98 MPa (SD=57.20 for PU-1, 347.90 MPa (SD=109.54 for PU-2 and 304.64 MPa (SD=25.48 for PU-3. CONCLUSION: The concentration of choice for building the experimental model was 1/1.

  19. Photoelastic Stress Analysis Surrounding Implant-Supported Prosthesis and Alveolar Ridge on Mandibular Overdentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorival Pedroso da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to evaluate the maximum stress around osseointegrated implants and alveolar ridge, in a mandible with left partial resection through a photoelastic mandibular model. The first group consisted of two implants: traditional model (T, implants placed in the position of both canines; fulcrum model (F, implants placed in the position of left canine CL and right lateral incisor LiR. Both models linked through a bar and clips. The second group was consisted of three implants, with implants placed in the position of both canines (CR and CL and the right lateral incisor (LiR, which composed four groups: (1 model with 3 “O” rings, (2 model 2 ERAs, bar with clips, (3 model 2 ERAs bar without clips; (4 model “O” ring bar and ERA. An axial and an oblique load of 6.8 kgf was applied on a overdenture at the 1st Pm, 2nd Pm, and 1st M. Results showed that the area around the left canine (CL was practically free of stress; the left lateral incisor (LiL developed only small tensions, and low stress in all the other cases; the right canine tooth suffered the largest concentrations of stress, mainly with the ERA retention mechanism.

  20. Occlusal wear of provisional implant-supported restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santing, Hendrik J.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Werner, Arie; Feilzer, Albert J.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    BACKGROUND: Implant-supported provisional restorations should be resistant to occlusal wear. PURPOSE: The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate three-body wear of three indirect laboratory composite resins, five chair side bis-acryl resin-based materials, and two chair side

  1. Rapid proto typing of dental prosthesis by means of a feldspathic glass composite mixed with muscovite mica via CAD/CAM; Prototipagem rapida de proteses dentarias por meio de um composito de vidro feldspatico misturado com mica moscovita via CAD/CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Junior, E.S.; Gomes Junior, G.G.; Fonseca, M.D.; Moraes, E.E.S.; Ogasawara, T., E-mail: edil@metalmat.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais

    2010-07-01

    The work consists in the use and integration of CAD/CAM tools as a process of design and manufacture of a rapid prototyping of dental prosthesis by machining using a CNC milling machine. The material machined to obtain the dental prosthesis were cylindrical blocks of a Feldspathic glass composite mixed with muscovite mica in various percentages (15%, 40% and 80%), which was resigned under biaxial pressing and sintered in vacuum at temperatures from 800 to 1100 deg C. The composite was characterized by XRD and SEM. The results show that increasing the crystallization of leucite is consequent to the temperature increase, and that the use of CAD/CAM system using a CNC milling machine is feasible to obtain dental prosthesis. (author)

  2. Occlusal wear of provisional implant-supported restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santing, Hendrik J; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Werner, Arie; Feilzer, Albert J; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A

    2015-02-01

    Implant-supported provisional restorations should be resistant to occlusal wear. The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate three-body wear of three indirect laboratory composite resins, five chair side bis-acryl resin-based materials, and two chair side methacrylate-based materials used to fabricate provisional implant-supported restorations. The materials were handled and cured according to the manufacturers' instructions. The three-body wear was measured 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after curing using the ACTA wear device. Wear rate decreased significantly after 8 weeks compared with the first day for all tested materials, except for Estenia C&B. The three-body wear of two indirect laboratory composite resins, that is, Estenia C&B and Solidex, was significantly less compared with all other tested materials used for fabricating provisional implant-supported restorations. Of the chair side materials, the wear rate of Protemp Crown Paste was significantly less compared with the others materials used to fabricate chair side provisional implant-supported restorations. The methacrylate-based materials, Temdent Classic and Trim, showed extreme high wear rates. Based on the results of this laboratory study on long-term wear, the use of indirect composite resin is preferred over chair side methacrylate-based materials when the provisional implant-supported restoration has to be in service for a long period of time. Of the investigated materials, only Estenia C&B and Solidex showed wear rate comparable with posterior resin composites. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of Satisfaction Level in Patients With Mandibular Implant Supported Overdentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh khoshhal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Implant-supported overdentures could have many benefits for patients, especially in the lower jaws. As a matter of fact, the most common reason for prescribing mandibular overdenture is dissatisfaction of patients with mandibular dentures usually because of a lack of retention, stability and function and speech difficulties. On the other hand, patients' expectations of overdenture treatments are their main disadvantage. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of patients who had received mandibular implant supported overdenture treatment with different number of implants. Patients and Methods This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with a mean age of 62.7 years who had received mandibular implant supported overdenture treatment at the dental school of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences were enrolled. Among these patients, six had overdentures supported by one implant, nine had overdentures supported by two implants, two had overdentures supported by three implants, five had overdentures supported by four implants and three had overdentures supported by five implants. The visual analogue scale (VAS questionnaire was used to evaluate the general satisfaction, comfort, esthetic, fitness, satisfaction of chewing and social communication, and the data was analyzed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA test. Results All patients in all five groups were satisfied with their overdentures; however there was no significant relationship between the number of implants and fitness (P = 0.446, esthetic (P = 0.843, comfort (P = 0.805, satisfaction of chewing (P = 0.133, social communication (P = 0.322 and general satisfaction (P = 0.493. Conclusions There was no difference in satisfaction level of patients who had received mandibular overdentures with different number of implants.

  4. A feasible, aesthetic quality evaluation of implant-supported single crowns: an analysis of validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the reliability and validity of six aesthetic parameters and to compare the professional- and patient-reported aesthetic outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-four patients with 66 implant-supported premolar crowns were included. Two prosthodontists and 11 dental students......,24) were found between patient and professional evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: The feasibility, reliability and validity of the CIS make the parameters useful for quality control of implant-supported restorations. The professional- and patient-reported aesthetic outcomes had no significant correlation....... and the internal consistency were analysed by Cohen's ¿ and Cronbach's a, respectively. The validity of CIS parameters was tested against the corresponding Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) scores. The Spearman correlation coefficients were used. Six aesthetic Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) questions were correlated...

  5. Telescopic crowns as attachments for implant supported restorations: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Oliver; Beaumont, Christian; Tatakis, Dimitris N; Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George

    2006-01-01

    The use of dental implants to support mandibular or maxillary overdentures is a widely used treatment modality. Advantages are an increase in retention, an increase in chewing ability, and easy access for oral hygiene procedures. While telescopic and conical crowns have been used for decades to connect natural teeth to overdentures, not many cases have been reported in the literature of telescopic crowns placed on implants to support overdentures. This article describes 7 patients with overdentures supported by telescopic crowns who received 65 implants (ITI Straumann). The cases presented in this report have been in function for up to 4.5 years. During that time no adverse events were reported. The use of telescopic crowns as attachments for implant-supported overdentures may be a viable treatment option.

  6. Zirconia- versus metal-based, implant-supported abutments and crowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana

    , the selection of restoration materials should be based on proper optical characteristics in addition to biocompatibility and sufficient strength of materials. Abutments and crowns based on zirconia are one of the most recent alternatives to metal abutments and metal-ceramic crowns. To date, only few comparative...... and to estimate long-term biomechanical results of zirconia-based versus metal-based restorations. The aim of study I was to analyse the mode of fracture and number of cyclic loadings until veneering fracture of zirconia-based all-ceramic restorations compared to metal-ceramic restorations. The aim of study II...... was to test the reliability and validity of six aesthetic parameters used at the Copenhagen Dental School to assess the aesthetic outcome of implant-supported restorations. The aims of study III and IV were to compare the influence of different abutment and crown materials on biological, biomechanical...

  7. Immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable plastic skull model and laser welding. A technical note on the screw-retained type: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ishida, Osamu; Kanitani, Hideo; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a new procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus. Preoperatively, the framework was fabricated on a photocurable resin skull model produced from a CT scan and individually designed guide template. The implants were immediately placed using the guide template; laser welding connected the components of framework. Despite the custom-made prosthesis, the total treatment from implant placement to superstructure placement can be completed within only 1 day. This procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus may be useful for any implant system and patient.

  8. The stereognostic ability of natural dentitions versus implant-supported fixed prostheses or overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, R; Bou Serhal, C; van Steenberghe, D

    1997-06-01

    A stereognostic ability test was performed in 60 patients. Forty patients were rehabilitated by means of osseointegrated implants. One group consisted of 20 patients with fixed prostheses on implants in both the upper and lower jaws. The other 20 patients had a maxillary denture while in the mandible an overdenture was retained by means of two implants connected by a bar. They were compared to a group of 20 subjects (controls) with a non-restored natural dentition. For the stereognostic ability test, subjects had to recognise ten different test pieces by manipulating them with two antagonistic incisor teeth, avoiding any contact with other oral structures. Both response time and percentage accuracy of recognition were evaluated. The present findings indicated that subjects with an overdenture on implants did not score significantly different from those with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis. In contrast, subjects with teeth had a significantly better stereognostic ability. The percentage of correct responses was 52% for overdentures, 56% for fixed prostheses on implants and 75% for natural dentitions. From these results, it could be concluded that the stereognostic ability is impaired in subjects rehabilitated with osseointegrated implants by about one-third to one-quarter compared to subjects with natural teeth.

  9. All on Four® fixed implant support rehabilitation: a masticatory function study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rossi, Moara; Santos, Carla Moreto; Migliorança, Reginaldo; Regalo, Simone Cecílio Hallak

    2014-08-01

    Fixed implant-supported prostheses according to All-on-Four® (Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden) principles have become an accepted treatment modality in totally edentulous patients, whereas the functional effect of this therapy is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the muscular function of patients totally rehabilitated with All-on-Four. This study evaluated 63 patients. Twenty-one patients were successfully rehabilitated with maxillary and mandibular All-on-Four (no dropout implants, satisfactory aesthetic and function demands prosthesis), 21 patients were dentate, and 21 were rehabilitated with double complete dentures. Electromyography was carried out during clenching, nonhabitual and habitual chewing, and rest. All values were standardized as percentage of a maximum voluntary contraction. Data were analyzed by ANOVA to compare groups and paired t-test was used for comparison between sides within each group. All groups presented symmetric muscular activity. The All-on-Four and dentate groups had a similar muscles surface electromyography (sEMG) contraction pattern, that is, a higher sEMG activity of masseter than temporalis muscles, differing (p ≤ .05) from those of denture group. Not one statistical difference was found between All-on-Four and dentate groups. The muscular function similarity of All-on-Four and dentate patients shows that this treatment concept may be considered as a good option for oral rehabilitation in edentulous patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Fracture Strength of Three-Unit Implant Supported Fixed Partial Dentures with Excessive Crown Height Fabricated from Different Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Nazari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fracture strength is an important factor influencing the clinical long-term success of implant-supported prostheses especially in high stress situations like excessive crown height space (CHS. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strength of implant-supported fixed partial dentures (FPDs with excessive crown height, fabricated from three different materials.Materials and Methods: Two implants with corresponding abutments were mounted in a metal model that simulated mandibular second premolar and second molar. Thirty 3-unit frameworks with supportive anatomical design were fabricated using zirconia, nickel-chromium alloy (Ni-Cr, and polyetheretherketone (PEEK (n=10. After veneering, the CHS was equal to 15mm. Then; samples were axially loaded on the center of pontics until fracture in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The failure load data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Games-Howell tests at significance level of 0.05.Results: The mean failure loads for zirconia, Ni-Cr and PEEK restorations were 2086±362N, 5591±1200N and 1430±262N, respectively. There were significant differences in the mean failure loads of the three groups (P<0.001. The fracture modes in zirconia, metal ceramic and PEEK restorations were cohesive, mixed and adhesive type, respectively.Conclusions: According to the findings of this study, all implant supported three-unit FPDs fabricated of zirconia, metal ceramic and PEEK materials are capable to withstand bite force (even para-functions in the molar region with excessive CHS.Keywords: Dental Implants; Polyetheretherketone; Zirconium oxide; Dental Restoration Failure; Dental Porcelain

  11. Manufacturing implant supported auricular prostheses by rapid prototyping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Cifter, Ebru Demet; Ozenen, Didem Ozdemir; Balik, Ali; Tuncer, Erman Bulent

    2011-08-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses are usually fabricated on the models obtained following the impression procedures. Disadvantages of conventional impression techniques used in production of facial prosthesis are deformation of soft tissues caused by impression material and disturbance of the patient due to. Additionally production of prosthesis by conventional methods takes longer time. Recently, rapid prototyping techniques have been developed for extraoral prosthesis in order to reduce these disadvantages of conventional methods. Rapid prototyping technique has the potential to simplify the procedure and decrease the laboratory work required. It eliminates the need for measurement impression procedures and preparation of wax model to be performed by prosthodontists themselves In the near future this technology will become a standard for fabricating maxillofacial prostheses.

  12. Implant-supported rehabilitation after treatment of atrophic mandibular fractures: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leandro Benetti de; Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida Cabrini; Gabrielli, Mario Francisco Real; Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio Pereira

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to present options of rehabilitation with dental implants in two cases of severely atrophic mandibles (fractures. Two patients who sustained fractures in severely atrophic mandibles with less than 10 mm of bone height were treated by open reduction and internal fixation through a transcervical access. Internal fixation was obtained with 2.4-mm locking reconstruction plates. The first patient presented satisfactory bone height at the area between the mental foramens and after 2 years, received flapless guided implants in the anterior mandible and an immediate protocol prosthesis. The second patient received a tent pole iliac crest autogenous graft after 2 years of fracture treatment and immediate implants. After 5 months, a protocol prosthesis was installed in the second patient. In both cases, the internal fixation followed AO principles for load-bearing osteosynthesis. Both prosthetic devices were Branemark protocol prosthesis. The mandibular reconstruction plates were not removed. Both patients are rehabilitated without complications and satisfied with esthetic and functional results. With the current techniques of internal fixation, grafting, and guided implants, the treatment of atrophic mandible fractures can achieve very good results, which were previously not possible.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... implant). 872.3970 Section 872.3970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3970 Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis...

  14. Maxillary palatal ramp prosthesis: A prosthodontic solution to manage mandibular deviation following surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampa Ray (Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular resection following surgical treatment for neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity leads to numerous complications including altered mandibular movements, disfigurement, difficult in swallowing, impaired speech and articulation, and deviation of the mandible towards the resected site. Various prosthetic methods are employed to reduce or minimize mandibular deviation and improve and restore the lost functions and esthetic, like maxillomandibular fixation, implant supported prosthesis, removable mandibular guide flange prosthesis, and palatal based guidance restoration. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient following segmental mandibulectomy using palatal ramp prosthesis.

  15. The effect of varying implant position in immediately loaded implant-supported mandibular overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaarawy, Mohammed A; Aboelross, Ehab M

    2013-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of varying implant position in immediately loaded implant-supported mandibular overdentures on peri-implant bone density, muscle activity, and patient satisfaction. Fourteen completely edentulous patients were selected for the study. After complete denture construction, patients were divided into 2 equal groups. Four dental implants were installed bilaterally in the interforaminal region in the first group, while in the second group, 4 dental implants were inserted bilaterally: 2 in the interforaminal region and 2 in the first molar area. Immediately after suturing, telescopic abutments were screwed to the implants, and the retaining caps were picked up into the fitting surface of the lower denture, which was delivered to the patient. Patients were recalled for radiographic bone density evaluation just after denture delivery and then at 3, 6, and 12 months thereafter. Muscle activities of masseter and temporalis muscles as well as patient satisfaction were also evaluated. The results of the study showed a high success rate approximating 98.2% of the immediately loaded implants. The electromyographic (EMG) records of both muscles in group 1 were significantly higher during chewing hard food after 3 months compared with group 2 (P overdentures through posterior placement beyond the interforaminal area results in a favorable response in terms of increased peri-implant bone density as well as decreased EMG activity of masseter and temporalis muscles.

  16. Deposition of SiOx thin films on Y-TZP by reactive magnetron sputtering: influence of plasma parameters on the adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement for application in dental prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Renato Calvacanti de Queiroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper SiOx thin films were deposited on Y-TZP ceramics by reactive magnetron sputtering technique in order to improve the adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement for applications in dental prosthesis. For fixed cathode voltage, target current, working pressure and target-to-substrate distance, SiOx thin films were deposited at different oxygen concentrations in the Ar+O2 plasma forming gas. After deposition processes, SiOx thin films were characterized by profilometry, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement were evaluated by shear testing. Results indicate that films deposited at 20%O2 increased the bond strength to (32.8 ± 5.4 MPa. This value has not been achieved by traditional methods.

  17. Implant-Supported PMMA Monolithic Full-Arch Rehabilitation with Surgical Computer-Planned Guide and Immediate Provisional: A Case Report with One Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Luca Zizzari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case report is to describe the surgical and prosthetic procedures to achieve maxillary and mandibular implant-supported PMMA monolithic full-arch rehabilitation (PMFR with surgical computer-planned guide and immediate provisional. In such cases, the correct planning of dental implants’ position, length, and diameter and the prosthetic phases via computer-aided design are very important to achieve good aesthetic and functional long-lasting results.

  18. Implant-Supported PMMA Monolithic Full-Arch Rehabilitation with Surgical Computer-Planned Guide and Immediate Provisional: A Case Report with One Year Follow-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Tacconelli, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the surgical and prosthetic procedures to achieve maxillary and mandibular implant-supported PMMA monolithic full-arch rehabilitation (PMFR) with surgical computer-planned guide and immediate provisional. In such cases, the correct planning of dental implants’ position, length, and diameter and the prosthetic phases via computer-aided design are very important to achieve good aesthetic and functional long-lasting results.

  19. Multidisciplinary approach of ectodermal dysplasia with implant retained fixed prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Priya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasia represents a group of rare inherited conditions in which two or more ectodermally derived anatomical structures fail to develop. Early dental intervention can improve patient′s appearance, thereby minimizing associated emotional and psychological problems in these patients. Treatment requires a teamwork by medical personnel along with dental professionals of various specialties. Here, a rare case of a young female patient is presented with prosthetic management with implant supported fixed partial denture.

  20. Free vascularized flaps for reconstruction of the mandible: complications, success, and dental rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Johannes T M; van Es, Robert J J; Rosenberg, Antoine J W P; van der Bilt, Andries; Koole, Ron; Van Cann, Ellen M

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate complications and success of mandibular reconstruction with free fibula flaps, iliac crest flaps, and forearm flaps with reconstruction plates and to evaluate dental rehabilitation after these reconstructions. Eighty-three patients with segmental mandibular defects were included. Correlation analyses were used to determine the relationship between reconstruction type and clinical parameters with recipient-site complications and success. The dental rehabilitation was evaluated in successfully reconstructed survivors. Multivariate analyses showed significant correlations between flap type and success (P < .0001). Of the patients, 51 (61%) were alive 2 years after the reconstruction. Mandibular reconstruction with a free forearm flap and reconstruction plate was associated with higher complication rates at the recipient site and higher failure rates compared with reconstruction with free vascularized bone flaps. Of the 32 successfully reconstructed survivors, 14 (44%) had a complete dental rehabilitation, of which 10 had dental implants and 4 did not. Only 6 (29%) of the edentulous survivors ultimately had an implant-supported prosthesis. Reconstruction of the mandible with a free vascularized bone flap is superior to reconstruction with a free forearm flap with a reconstruction plate. Complete dental rehabilitation was reached in fewer than half of the surviving patients. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of prosthesis type and material on the stress distribution in bone around implants: A 3-dimensional finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçe Meriç

    2011-03-01

    Conclusions: Prosthesis design and materials affect the load-transmission mechanism. Although additional experimental and clinical studies are needed, FRC FPDs can be considered a suitable alternative treatment choice for implant-supported prostheses. Within the limitations of the study, the 3-unit FPD supported by 2 implants with a cantilevered extension revealed acceptable stress distributions.

  2. Oral rehabilitation with implant supported overdentures in patients with non-reconstructed segmental mandibulectomy: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Zupančič

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Segmental mandibulectomy is most often performed as part of resection of advanced squamous cell carcinoma, which involves the mandible by extension from intraoral tissues and is usually followed by reconstruction of the mandible. However, not all mandibular defects can be surgically reconstructed, due to local or systemic factors. Oral rehabilitation with conventional removable dentures is often insufficient. In order to provide predictable support and denture retention, especially in the non-reconstructed cases of segmental mandibulectomy, dental implants are indicated.Case report: The authors describe oral rehabilitation with implant-supported overdenture in two non-reconstructed patients with similar mandibular defect, but different etiology, as well as different denture design and different outcome in terms of success and patient satisfaction. In the first case, the defect was caused by surgical treatment of cancer, which was followed by radiotherapy and prosthodontic treatment with an implant-supported mandibular overdenture anchored with a bar. In another case, the damage was due to a suicide attempt. This was initially followed by the surgical treatment of the injury. Afterwards, the prosthodontic treatment with an implant-supported and conical–crown-anchored mandibular overdenture was performed.Conclusions: The success of the prosthodontic oral rehabilitation of patients with segmental mandibulectomy depends on many factors. The size of the defect and the condition of the remaining hard and soft tissues, which are affected by radiotherapy, are crucial. The etiology of the defect, the opposing jaw status, maxillomandibular relationships, the consistency of mandibular movement and the denture design play an important role as well.

  3. Refusal of implant supported mandibular overdentures by elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Janice S; Levine, Alissa; Bedos, Christophe; Mojon, Phillippe; Rosberger, Zeer; Feine, Jocelyne; Thomason, J Mark

    2011-03-01

      The aim of this study was to gain greater in-depth understanding of why elderly patients who are currently dissatisfied with conventional dentures decline implant treatment.   There is strong evidence from high-quality randomised controlled trials to support the use of implant-supported overdentures for the restoration of the edentulous mandible. However, whilst recruiting for randomised clinical trials, researchers have found that a high proportion of potential subjects decline participation, despite the removal of financial constraints.   The study adopted a qualitative approach to provide a rich and deep understanding of people's reasons for refusal. Data were collected through focus group interviews in a two-centre study based in Montreal, Canada and Newcastle, UK. A semi-structured interview schedule was used and iteratively developed as analysis identified themes from previous focus groups. Transcripts of focus groups were coded and emergent themes determined.   Two main themes emerged; patients' fear and anxiety (relating to the pain of surgery, complications of the procedure and immediate post-surgical denture use), and the appropriateness of the procedure in an elderly person.   Fears of pain, complications and social embarrassment, exacerbated by age, are important factors that help explain refusal of implants by elderly patients. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. The impact on bone tissues of immediate implant-supported mandibular overdentures with cusped and cuspless teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the effects on bone tissues of immediate implant-supported mandibular overdentures with cusped or cuspless teeth. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Dental Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Al-Azhar University, Assiut Branch, Egypt, over a 12-month period from September 2013 to September 2014. Twenty patients were treated with immediate implant-supported overdentures: one group received overdentures with cusped teeth, and the other group received overdentures with cuspless teeth. The rate of implant success was assessed clinically and radiographically at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The data were collected by a questionnaire, an observation checklist, and radiography. The data were then analyzed using computerized methods. Results: Overdentures with cusped teeth showed a significant improvement in the clinical criteria, including the absence of clinical implant mobility, pain, and bone resorption, while the clinical criteria for the absence of peri-implant radiolucency were insignificantly different between the 2 groups (p>0.05. There were no significant differences in the clinical evaluations for bone levels at the time of insertion or 3 months after insertions, while significant differences were found at 6, 9, and 12 months after insertion. Conclusion: Overdentures with cusped teeth supported by immediate implants were found superior regarding many clinical criteria than those cuspless counterparts.

  5. The impact on bone tissues of immediate implant-supported mandibular overdentures with cusped and cuspless teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Khalid A

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects on bone tissues of immediate implant-supported mandibular overdentures with cusped or cuspless teeth. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Dental Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Al-Azhar University, Assiut Branch, Egypt, over a 12-month period from September 2013 to September 2014. Twenty patients were treated with immediate implant-supported overdentures: one group received overdentures with cusped teeth, and the other group received overdentures with cuspless teeth. The rate of implant success was assessed clinically and radiographically at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The data were collected by a questionnaire, an observation checklist, and radiography. The data were then analyzed using computerized methods.  Overdentures with cusped teeth showed a significant improvement in the clinical criteria, including the absence of clinical implant mobility, pain, and bone resorption, while the clinical criteria for the absence of peri-implant radiolucency were insignificantly different between the 2 groups (p more than 0.05). There were no significant differences in the clinical evaluations for bone levels at the time of insertion or 3 months after insertions, while significant differences were found at 6, 9, and 12 months after insertion. Overdentures with cusped teeth supported by immediate implants were found superior regarding many clinical criteria than those cuspless counterparts.

  6. SU-G-IeP2-03: Comparison of Dose Calculation On MAR (metal Artifact Reduction) and Non-MAR Datasets for Pelvic Patients with Hip Prosthesis and Head and Neck Patients with Dental Filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, V; Kohli, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) software in computed tomography (CT) was previously evaluated with phantoms demonstrating the algorithm is capable of reducing metal artifacts without affecting the overall image quality. The goal of this study is to determine the dosimetric impact when calculating with CT datasets reconstructed with and without MAR software. Methods: Twelve head and neck cancer patients with dental fillings and four pelvic cancer patients with hip prosthesis were scanned with a GE Optima RT 580 CT scanner. Images were reconstructed with and without the MAR software. 6MV IMRT and VMAT plans were calculated with AAA on the MAR dataset until all constraints met our clinic’s guidelines. Contours from the MAR dataset were copied to the non-MAR dataset. Next, dose calculation on the non-MAR dataset was performed using the same field arrangements and fluence as the MAR plan. Conformality index, D99% and V100% to PTV were compared between MAR and non-MAR plans. Results: Differences between MAR and non-MAR plans were evaluated. For head and neck plans, the largest variations in conformality index, D99% and V100% were −3.8%, −0.9% and −2.1% respectively whereas for pelvic plans, the biggest discrepancies were −32.7%, −0.4% and -33.5% respectively. The dosimetric impact from hip prosthesis is greater because it produces more artifacts compared to dental fillings. Coverage to PTV can increase or decrease depending on the artifacts since dark streaks reduce the HU whereas bright streaks increase the HU. In the majority of the cases, PTV dose in the non-MAR plans is higher than MAR plans. Conclusion: With the presence of metals, MAR algorithm can allow more accurate delineation of targets and OARs. Dose difference between MAR and non-MAR plans depends on the proximity of the organ to the high density material, the streaking artifacts and the beam arrangements of the plan.

  7. SU-G-IeP2-03: Comparison of Dose Calculation On MAR (metal Artifact Reduction) and Non-MAR Datasets for Pelvic Patients with Hip Prosthesis and Head and Neck Patients with Dental Filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, V; Kohli, K [BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, BC (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) software in computed tomography (CT) was previously evaluated with phantoms demonstrating the algorithm is capable of reducing metal artifacts without affecting the overall image quality. The goal of this study is to determine the dosimetric impact when calculating with CT datasets reconstructed with and without MAR software. Methods: Twelve head and neck cancer patients with dental fillings and four pelvic cancer patients with hip prosthesis were scanned with a GE Optima RT 580 CT scanner. Images were reconstructed with and without the MAR software. 6MV IMRT and VMAT plans were calculated with AAA on the MAR dataset until all constraints met our clinic’s guidelines. Contours from the MAR dataset were copied to the non-MAR dataset. Next, dose calculation on the non-MAR dataset was performed using the same field arrangements and fluence as the MAR plan. Conformality index, D99% and V100% to PTV were compared between MAR and non-MAR plans. Results: Differences between MAR and non-MAR plans were evaluated. For head and neck plans, the largest variations in conformality index, D99% and V100% were −3.8%, −0.9% and −2.1% respectively whereas for pelvic plans, the biggest discrepancies were −32.7%, −0.4% and -33.5% respectively. The dosimetric impact from hip prosthesis is greater because it produces more artifacts compared to dental fillings. Coverage to PTV can increase or decrease depending on the artifacts since dark streaks reduce the HU whereas bright streaks increase the HU. In the majority of the cases, PTV dose in the non-MAR plans is higher than MAR plans. Conclusion: With the presence of metals, MAR algorithm can allow more accurate delineation of targets and OARs. Dose difference between MAR and non-MAR plans depends on the proximity of the organ to the high density material, the streaking artifacts and the beam arrangements of the plan.

  8. Analysis of the causes of dental implant fracture: A retrospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoichkov, Biser; Kirov, Dimitar

    2018-01-01

    Fracture of osseointegrated dental implants is the most severe mechanical complication. The aim of the present study was to analyze possible causative factors for implant body fracture. One hundred and one patients with 218 fitted implants and a follow-up period of 3 to 10 years were studied. Factors associated with biomechanical and physiologic overloading such as parafunctional activity (eg, bruxism), occlusion, and cantilevers, and factors related to the planning of the dental prosthesis, available bone volume, implant area, implant diameter, number of implants, and their inclination were tracked. The impact of their effect was analyzed using the Bonferroni-corrected post-hoc Mann-Whitney test for each group. The incidence of dental implant fracture was 2.3% in the investigated cases. Improper treatment planning, bruxism, and time of the complication setting in were the main factors leading to this complication. Typical size effect was established only for available bruxism, occlusal errors, and their activity duration. These complications were observed most often with single crown prostheses, and in combination with parafunctional activities such as bruxism and lack of implant-protected occlusion. Occlusal overload due to bruxism or inappropriate or inadequate occlusion as a single factor or a combination of these factors during the first years after the functional load can cause implant fracture. Fracture of the implant body more frequently occurred with single crowns than with other implant-supported fixed dental prostheses.

  9. The zygomatic implant perforated (ZIP) flap: a new technique for combined surgical reconstruction and rapid fixed dental rehabilitation following low-level maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, C J; Rogers, S N

    2017-12-01

    This aim of this report is to describe the development and evolution of a new surgical technique for the immediate surgical reconstruction and rapid post-operative prosthodontic rehabilitation with a fixed dental prosthesis following low-level maxillectomy for malignant disease.The technique involves the use of a zygomatic oncology implant perforated micro-vascular soft tissue flap (ZIP flap) for the primary management of maxillary malignancy with surgical closure of the resultant maxillary defect and the installation of osseointegrated support for a zygomatic implant-supported maxillary fixed dental prosthesis.The use of this technique facilitates extremely rapid oral and dental rehabilitation within a few weeks of resective surgery, providing rapid return to function and restoring appearance following low-level maxillary resection, even in cases where radiotherapy is required as an adjuvant treatment post-operatively. The ZIP flap technique has been adopted as a standard procedure in the unit for the management of low-level maxillary malignancy, and this report provides a detailed step-by-step approach to treatment and discusses modifications developed over the treatment of an initial cohort of patients.

  10. Oral health-related quality of life in patients treated by implant-supported fixed dentures and removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuyama, Chisako; Takaba, Masayuki; Inukai, Mika; Mulligan, Roseann; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the association between denture status [implant-supported fixed dentures (IDs) and removable partial dentures (RPDs)] and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Consecutive patients with IDs and RPDs were recruited from the Prosthodontics Departments at Showa University and Tokyo Medical and Dental University. The Japanese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-J-49) was administered to each subject. For each OHIP-J-49 question, the subjects were asked to indicate the frequency with which they had experienced a dental problem during the last month. Responses were recorded on a 5 point Likert rating scale, with 0 being never and 4, very often. Summary scores were calculated and regression analyses conducted to investigate the association between denture status and OHIP-J-49 summary score. In total 79 ID subjects (mean age±SD of 51.7±12.4 years, 44.3% men) and 109 RPD subjects (mean age of 66.5±8.6 years, 30% men) participated after giving informed consent. The regression analysis between the type of treatment and the OHIP-J-49 summary score revealed a significant association with a coefficient of 17.0 (Confidence interval, CI: 10.9-23.1). When age and duration of denture usage, which had significant associations with OHIP-J-49, were included in this model, the regression coefficient remained virtually unchanged at 17.4 (CI: 9.75-25.0), thus indicating little potential confounding by them. OHRQoL in patients with implant-supported fixed dentures is generally less impaired than it is in those patients with RPDs. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. A comparative transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and spatially resolved micropillar compression study of the yttria partially stabilised zirconia - porcelain interface in dental prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunt, Alexander J.G., E-mail: alexander.lunt@chch.ox.ac.uk [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Mohanty, Gaurav, E-mail: gaurav.mohanty@empa.ch [EMPA Materials Science & Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Ying, Siqi, E-mail: siqi.ying@eng.ox.ac.uk [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Dluhoš, Jiří, E-mail: jiri.dluhos@tescan.cz [TESCAN Brno, s.r.o., Libušina tř. 1, 623 00 Brno-Kohoutovice (Czech Republic); Sui, Tan, E-mail: tan.sui@eng.ox.ac.uk [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Neo, Tee K., E-mail: neophyte@singnet.com.sg [Specialist Dental Group, Mount Elizabeth Orchard, 3 Mount Elizabeth, #08-03/08-08/08-10, 228510 (Singapore); Michler, Johann, E-mail: johann.michler@empa.ch [EMPA Materials Science & Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Korsunsky, Alexander M., E-mail: alexander.korsunsky@eng.ox.ac.uk [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies into the origins of failure of yttria partially stabilised zirconia–porcelain veneered prosthesis have revealed the importance of micro-to-nano scale characterisation of this interface zone. Current understanding suggests that the heat treatment, residual stresses and varying microstructure at this location may contribute to near-interface porcelain chipping. In this study the chemical, microstructural and mechanical property variation across the interfacial zone has been characterised at two differing length scales and using three independent techniques; energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and micropillar compression. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping of the near-interface region revealed, for the first time, that the diffusional lengths of twelve principal elements are limited to within 2–6 μm of the interface. This study also revealed that 0.2–2 μm diameter zirconia grains had become detached from the bulk and were embedded in the near-interface porcelain. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated the presence of nanoscale spherical features, indicative of tensile creep induced voiding, within the first 0.4–1.5 μm from the interface. Within zirconia, variations in grain size and atomistic structure were also observed within the 3 μm closest to the interface. Micropillar compression was performed over a 100 μm range on either side of the interface at the spatial resolution of 5 μm. This revealed an increase in zirconia and porcelain loading modulus at close proximities (< 5 μm) to the interface and a decrease in zirconia modulus at distances between 6 and 41 μm from this location. The combination of the three experimental techniques has revealed intricate details of the microstructural, chemical and consequently mechanical heterogeneities in the YPSZ–porcelain interface, and demonstrated that the length scales typically associated with this behaviour are approximately ± 5

  12. Comparative three-dimensional finite element analysis of implant-supported fixed complete arch mandibular prostheses in two materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribst, João Paulo Mendes; de Morais, Dayana Campanelli; Alonso, Alexandre Abhdala; Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira Dal; Borges, Alexandre Luis Souto

    2017-01-01

    The increase of requests for implant-supported prosthesis (ISP) with zirconia as infrastructure has attracted a lot of attention due to its esthetics, biocompatibility, and survival rate similar to metallic infrastructure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two different framework materials on stress distribution over a bone tissue-simulating material. Two ISP were modeled and divided into two infrastructure materials: titanium (Ti) and zirconia. Then, these bars were attached to a modeled jaw with polyurethane properties to simulate bone tissue. An axial load of 200 N was applied on a standardized area for both systems. Maximum principal stress (MPS) on solids and microstrain (MS) generated through the jaw were analyzed by finite element analysis. According to MS, both models showed strains on peri-implant region of the penultimate (same side of the load application) and central implants. For MPS, more stress concentration was slightly higher in the left posterior region for Ti's bar. In prosthetic fixation screws, the MPS prevailed strongly in Ti protocol, while for zirconia's bar, the cervical of the penultimate implant was the one that highlighted larger areas of possible damages. The stress generated in all constituents of the system was not significantly influenced by the framework's material. This allows suggesting that in cases without components, the use of a framework in zirconia has biomechanical behavior similar to that of a Ti bar.

  13. Influence of Manufacturing Methods of Implant-Supported Crowns on External and Internal Marginal Fit: A Micro-CT Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moris, Izabela C M; Monteiro, Silas Borges; Martins, Raíssa; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Gomes, Erica A

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of different manufacturing methods of single implant-supported metallic crowns on the internal and external marginal fit through computed microtomography. Forty external hexagon implants were divided into 4 groups ( n = 8), according to the manufacturing method: GC, conventional casting; GI, induction casting; GP, plasma casting; and GCAD, CAD/CAM machining. The crowns were attached to the implants with insertion torque of 30 N·cm. The external (vertical and horizontal) marginal fit and internal fit were assessed through computed microtomography. Internal and external marginal fit data ( μ m) were submitted to a one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test ( α = .05). Qualitative evaluation of the images was conducted by using micro-CT. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the groups for vertical misfit ( P = 0.721). There was no significant difference ( P > 0.05) for the internal and horizontal marginal misfit in the groups GC, GI, and GP, but it was found for the group GCAD ( P ≤ 0.05). Qualitative analysis revealed that most of the samples of cast groups exhibited crowns underextension while the group GCAD showed overextension. The manufacturing method of the crowns influenced the accuracy of marginal fit between the prosthesis and implant. The best results were found for the crowns fabricated through CAD/CAM machining.

  14. Influence of Manufacturing Methods of Implant-Supported Crowns on External and Internal Marginal Fit: A Micro-CT Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela C. M. Moris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the influence of different manufacturing methods of single implant-supported metallic crowns on the internal and external marginal fit through computed microtomography. Methods. Forty external hexagon implants were divided into 4 groups (n=8, according to the manufacturing method: GC, conventional casting; GI, induction casting; GP, plasma casting; and GCAD, CAD/CAM machining. The crowns were attached to the implants with insertion torque of 30 N·cm. The external (vertical and horizontal marginal fit and internal fit were assessed through computed microtomography. Internal and external marginal fit data (μm were submitted to a one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=.05. Qualitative evaluation of the images was conducted by using micro-CT. Results. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the groups for vertical misfit (P=0.721. There was no significant difference (P>0.05 for the internal and horizontal marginal misfit in the groups GC, GI, and GP, but it was found for the group GCAD (P≤0.05. Qualitative analysis revealed that most of the samples of cast groups exhibited crowns underextension while the group GCAD showed overextension. Conclusions. The manufacturing method of the crowns influenced the accuracy of marginal fit between the prosthesis and implant. The best results were found for the crowns fabricated through CAD/CAM machining.

  15. Staged Hard and Soft Tissue Reconstruction Followed by Implant Supported Restoration in the Aesthetic Zone: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Harinath; Ramachandran, Lakshmi; Tadepalli, Anupama; Ponnaiyan, Deepa

    2017-04-01

    Alveolar ridge deficiency is a common clinical consequence following tooth loss due to chronic periodontitis complicating ideal implant placement. Advanced hard and soft tissue augmentation procedures have been developed in the recent past with predictable clinical outcomes. A male patient presented with a Grade III mobile upper right central incisor associated with advanced bone loss and soft tissue deficit. Following extraction of tooth #11, socket augmentation was done using an autogenous cortico-cancellous block graft and subsequent soft tissue augmentation was done with palatal connective tissue graft. At the end of six months, a tapered self tapping implant fixture was placed with adequate primary stability and after eight weeks, second stage implant surgery was done with the Misch technique in order to recreate papillae and the implant was prosthetically restored. The alveolar ridge was adequately recontoured following the staged surgical protocol. The implant was well integrated at the end of 15 months. Execution of sequential surgical procedures in a highly deficient edentulous site made it possible to achieve of optimal pink and white aesthetics with stable implant supported fixed prosthesis.

  16. The effect of implant-supported removable partial dentures on oral health quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, W Day; Cooper, Lyndon F; Sanders, Anne E; Reside, Glenn J; De Kok, Ingeborg J

    2014-02-01

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) represent standard treatment for partial edentulism despite major shortcomings. To alleviate these shortcomings, endosseous implants provide support and stability as well as contribute to maintenance of alveolar bone. This prospective, within subject, time series study evaluated patient-based outcomes of RPDs compared to implant-supported removable partial dentures (ISRPDs). The study hypothesis was that the ISRPD would substantially improve oral health quality of life for patients. Seventeen patients requesting new mandibular Kennedy I or II RPDs received one 6-mm dental implant in one or both of the posterior edentulous areas. After healing, conventional RPDs were fabricated and delivered. Twelve weeks later, second-stage surgery was performed, and ball abutments with Clix attachments were inserted, thereby converting the prostheses to ISRPDs. Oral health quality of life was evaluated using the 49-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49) questionnaire. The OHIP-49 was administered prior to treatment (baseline), at 6 and 12 weeks following RPD delivery and at 6 and 12 weeks following ISRPD conversion. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 6 and 12 weeks following ISRPD conversion. In statistical analysis, a fixed-slope random intercept variance components model took account of the multiple observations per person over time. In 17 subjects, 29 of 30 implants survived. The failed implant was replaced without complications. Abutment complications were limited to one abutment loosening and one attachment replacement. Minor prosthodontic complications were recorded. The OHIP-49 score reduced by 11.8 points, on average, at 12 weeks following ISRPD conversion (P = 0.011). Patients reported improved oral health following conversion to an ISRPD from RPD. The ISRPD involving short implants is one treatment option that should be considered when treatment planning Kennedy Class I and II patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. A 2D panoramic surgical stent imaging: Complete arch mandibular implant fixed prosthesis along with bar supported maxillary over denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Singhal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful rehabilitation of a patient should restore function, esthetic, and speech by prosthesis. Treatment modalities vary from patient to patient. Semi-precision attachments and implants offer several advantages over the traditional approach. The aim and objective of this report was to assess a case of a 55-year-old female patient who had lost all her teeth, except maxillary canines #13 and #23 and with severe bone loss in the mandible. Tooth-supported bar attachment was planned for maxilla, and a total of five dental implants were placed in the mandible using a flapless approach aided by radiographic gutta-percha surgical stents over panoramic two-dimensional imaging. Customized, radiographic stents help for the placement of implant in the view of paralleling and flapless surgery, completely. An immediate loading protocol is adopted as from day of the surgery to 6 weeks along with implant supported full arch fixed dentures after 4 months. The outcome of the treatment was impressive, and the patient gave a positive response with superb esthetics and functions.

  18. Investigation of the implant-supported overdentures in completely edentulous mandibles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hwa Pan

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that implant-supported overdentures provide a reliable and effective alternative to conventional complete mandibular dentures. Overdentures with Hader bars and bilateral, cast ERA attachments resulted in fewer prosthetic complications.

  19. Fracture strength and failure mode of maxillary implant-supported provisional single crowns: a comparison of composite resin crowns fabricated directly over PEEK abutments and solid titanium abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santing, Hendrik Jacob; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the fracture strength of implant-supported composite resin crowns on PEEK and solid titanium temporary abutments, and to analyze the failure types. Three types of provisional abutments, RN synOcta Temporary Meso Abutment (PEEK; Straumann), RN synOcta Titanium Post for Temporary Restorations (Straumann), and Temporary Abutment Engaging NobRplRP (Nobel Biocare) were used, and provisional screw-retained crowns using composite resin (Solidex) were fabricated for four different locations in the maxilla. The specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until fracture occurred. The failure types were analyzed and further categorized as irreparable (Type 1) or reparable (Type 2). No significant difference was found between different abutment types. Only for the position of the maxillary central incisor, composite resin crowns on PEEK temporary abutments showed significantly lower (p Provisional crowns on PEEK abutments showed similar fracture strength as titanium temporary abutments except for central incisors. Maxillary right central incisor composite resin crowns on PEEK temporary abutments fractured below the mean anterior masticatory loading forces reported to be approximately 206 N. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Economic Evaluation of Implant-Supported Overdentures in Edentulous Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Jin, Xin; Yu, Mengliu; Ou, Guoming; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Liang, Xing; Sasaki, Keiichi

    Edentulous patients benefit significantly from implant-supported overdenture prostheses. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of implant-supported overdentures (IODs) for edentulous patients. The search was limited to studies written in English and included an electronic and manual search through MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to November 2015), Embase (Ovid, 1966 to November 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (to November 2015), and PubMed (to November 2015). Two investigators extracted the data and assessed the studies independently. No meta-analysis was conducted due to the high heterogeneity within the literature. Of the initial 583 selected articles, 10 studies involving 802 participants were included. Of these, 6 studies had a high risk of bias and the rest had an unclear risk of bias. Implant-supported prostheses were more cost-effective when compared to conventional dentures and fixed implant-supported prostheses. Overdentures supported by two implants and magnet attachment were reported as cost-effective. Implant-supported overdentures are a cost-effective treatment for edentulous patients. More clinical studies with appropriate scientific vigor are required to further assess the cost-effectiveness of implant-supported overdentures.

  1. Using individual two-posterior short implants with two-anterior standard implants in mandibular implant-supported-overdenture to enhance the patient satisfaction: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Bahrami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many clinical cases and the literature review have revealed implant-supported-overdentures’ (ISOs treatment success and predictability in elderly patients. According to the previous studies, all the mandibular ISOs used 2–4 implants anterior to mental foramen to retain the denture. Case Report: In this clinical report, two individual anterior standard implants and two individual posterior short implants were used to support the mandibular ISO, as well as to prevent further posterior bone resorption. This treatment option permits the patient to insert more implants in the future, and could be upgraded to implant-supported-fixed prosthesis. Discussion: The patient was completely satisfied about the final result, especially for upgrading the mastication efficiency. The patient was followed-up for more than 2 years without complication. The panoramic X-ray showed the preserved bone in the posterior region. This technique could be considered to be innovative, and more clinical cases are required to be documented as a predictable modality.

  2. Comparison of three-implant-supported fixed dentures and two-implant-retained overdentures in the edentulous mandible: a pilot study of treatment efficacy and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kok, Ingeborg J; Chang, Kuang-Han; Lu, Tsui-Shan; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2011-01-01

    The mandibular two-implant overdenture has been shown to be a highly successful treatment. However, overdenture patients who desire a fixed prosthesis may not be satisfied with a removable overdenture. This prospective study sought to compare prosthetic outcomes, patient satisfaction, and survival rates of implants between two-implant-supported overdentures (IODs) and three-implant-supported fixed dentures (ISFDs). Twenty completely edentulous patients were randomly and equally assigned to two groups. New conventional complete dentures were made, and the mandibular denture was used as a surgical guide during implant placement. Implants were placed in one stage, followed by a mandibular denture soft reline (provisional loading). Ball attachments were inserted at 8 weeks, and ISFDs were delivered at 16 weeks. IODs were connected to the attachments at 8 weeks, using each patients's existing denture. The definitive ISFDs were fabricated using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture milled titanium frameworks and acrylic resin base and teeth. Patient satisfaction and panoramic radiographs were investigated at 6 and 12 months. Both treatments had significant and positive effects on patient satisfaction and quality of life. None of the 50 implants placed had failed at 12 months of follow-up; therefore, the implant survival rate was 100%. Prosthetic complications were generally rare and easily manageable. Both the treatment modalities-the ISFD supported by three implants and the IOD supported by two implants-significantly and similarly improved patient satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life, and prosthetic complications were relatively rare for both treatments. Three implants can be used to support a mandibular fixed prosthesis; however, a longer observation period is needed to validate this treatment modality.

  3. Compendium of Dental Residents’ Research Project and Literature Reviews - 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    composite resin to dentin that had four different treat- ments applied. A flat dentin surface on 80 extracted human third molars was obtained and the teeth ...sizes. In the study, 150 single-canal roots from extracted human teeth were divided into three groups of 50 roots with patent apical openings of 0.10...are indicated for rehabilitation, but a total implant supported prosthesis may not always be possible. The implant supported overdenture is an

  4. Effects of framework design and layering material on fracture strength of implant-supported zirconia-based molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamio, Shingo; Komine, Futoshi; Taguchi, Kohei; Iwasaki, Taro; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of framework design and layering material on the fracture strength of implant-supported zirconia-based molar crowns. Sixty-six titanium abutments (GingiHue Post) were tightened onto dental implants (Implant Lab Analog). These abutment-implant complexes were randomly divided into three groups (n = 22) according to the design of the zirconia framework (Katana), namely, uniform-thickness (UNI), anatomic (ANA), and supported anatomic (SUP) designs. The specimens in each design group were further divided into two subgroups (n = 11): zirconia-based all-ceramic restorations (ZAC group) and zirconia-based restorations with an indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) layered onto the zirconia framework (ZIC group). All crowns were cemented on implant abutments, after which the specimens were tested for fracture resistance. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney U-test with the Bonferroni correction (α = 0.05). The following mean fracture strength values (kN) were obtained in UNI design, ANA design, and SUP design, respectively: Group ZAC, 3.78, 6.01, 6.50 and Group ZIC, 3.15, 5.65, 5.83. In both the ZAC and ZIC groups, fracture strength was significantly lower for the UNI design than the other two framework designs (P = 0.001). Fracture strength did not significantly differ (P > 0.420) between identical framework designs in the ZAC and ZIC groups. A framework design with standardized layer thickness and adequate support of veneer by zirconia frameworks, as in the ANA and SUP designs, increases fracture resistance in implant-supported zirconia-based restorations under conditions of chewing attrition. Indirect composite material and porcelain perform similarly as layering materials on zirconia frameworks. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Fracture Resistance and Mode of Failure of Ceramic versus Titanium Implant Abutments and Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaireen, Mohd G

    2015-06-01

    The material of choice for implant-supported restorations is affected by esthetic requirements and type of abutment. This study compares the fracture resistance of different types of implant abutments and implant-supported restorations and their mode of failure. Forty-five Oraltronics Pitt-Easy implants (Oraltronics Dental Implant Technology GmbH, Bremen, Germany) (4 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were embedded in clear autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The implants were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, of 15 implants each. In group A, titanium abutments and metal-ceramic crowns were used. In group B, zirconia ceramic abutments and In-Ceram Alumina crowns were used. In group C, zirconia ceramic abutments and IPS Empress Esthetic crowns were used. Specimens were tested to failure by applying load at 130° from horizontal plane using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Subsequently, the mode of failure of each specimen was identified. Fracture resistance was significantly different between groups (p Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments had the lowest fracture loads (p = .000). Fracture modes of metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments included screw fracture and screw bending. Fracture of both crown and abutment was the dominant mode of failure of In-Ceram/IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. Metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments were more resistant to fracture than In-Ceram crowns supported by zirconia abutments, which in turn were more resistant to fracture than IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. In addition, failure modes of restorations supported by zirconia abutments were more catastrophic than those for restorations supported by titanium abutments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Implant-supported prostheses versus conventional permanent and removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszuta Agnieszka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Social, economic and technological progress results in an increasing range of treatment and rehabilitation methods for patients with partial or complete edentulism. The role of the dentist is to inform the patient about the full range of available missing teeth treatment options leading to complete rehabilitation of the masticatory organ in agreement with the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations. The aim of the paper was to identify the type of prostheses used by patients before opting for implantsupported teeth replacements, according to the patients’ age, sex, marital status, place of residence and education. The study covered 464 patients, women and men, aged 20-74, treated with dental implants. The patients answered questions in an anonymous questionnaire. The influence of the prosthetic replacement type according to age and marital status was highly statistically significant, whereas it was statistically significant according to sex, place of residence and education. The female respondents who previously used tissue-borne complete or partial dentures opted for implant treatment more frequently. The respondents younger than 40 and between 40-60 years of age who did not previously used any prosthetic replacements opted for implant treatment more frequently. The respondents who did not use any prosthetic replacements decided to undergo implant treatment most frequently, regardless of their marital status, education and place of residence. The patients opted for implant treatment to improve their quality of life, despite the high cost of such therapy.

  7. Marginal tissue response adjacent to Astra Dental Implants supporting overdentures in the mandible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Holm, B; Sewerin, I

    1993-01-01

    and by a bar attachment in 9 patients. Periodontal registrations were recorded 0 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months after the overdentures were inserted. One of the 40 fixtures was lost at the stage of abutment connection. No fixtures were lost during the 2- to 4-year observation period and no fixtures...

  8. The Angelchik prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fargnoli, R.; Bozza, A.; Magnoli, A.; Villari, N.; Pernice, L.M.; Andreoli, F.; Lombardi, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Angelchik prosthesis is used in the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux. Operated patients are preliminary examined with imaging techniques, but manometric and acidometric techniques are also used. Although the conventional esophagogram still maintains its diagnostic significance, Computed Tomography (CT) has become the first-choice imaging modality. CT allows the correct evaluation of both the state of the prosthesis and its relationship to the esophagus and gastric fundus. The possible postoperative complications following an incorrect placement of the prosthesis can be accurately diagnosed too. The authors report their experience in the study of 5 patients examined with both conventional radiology and CT

  9. Evaluation of the success rate of cone beam computed tomography in determining the location and direction of screw access holes in cement-retained implant-supported prostheses: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshandar Asli, Hamid; Dalili Kajan, Zahra; Gholizade, Fatemeh

    2018-02-21

    Cement-retained implant-supported restorations have advantages over screw-retained restorations but are difficult to retrieve. Identifying the approximate location of the screw access hole (SAH) may reduce damage to the prosthesis. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging to determine the location and direction of SAHs in cement-retained implant prostheses. Five clear acrylic resin casts were made based on a mandibular model. Several implant osteotomies (n=30) were created on the models with surgical burs, and crowns were made using the standard laboratory method with a transfer coping and the closed tray impression technique. CBCT images from the acrylic resin casts were evaluated by a maxillofacial radiologist who was blind to the locations and angles of the osteotomies. The locations of the access holes were determined on multiplanar reconstruction images and transferred to the clinical crown surface as defined points. Based on cross-sectional images, the predicted angle of the access hole was provided to a prosthodontist who was requested to pierce the crown at the proposed location in the specified direction. If the location and/or direction of the access hole were found, the process was considered successful, as the crown could then be removed from the implant abutment through the SAH. The success rate in the detection of the location and direction of the SAH was calculated, and chi-square and Fisher exact tests were applied for data analysis (α=.05). According to the results of this study, the success rate of CBCT to define the location of SAHs was 83.3% and 80% to determine the direction. No significant differences were found among the different dental groups in determination of the location (P=.79) or the direction (P=.53) of the SAHs. Most of the failures in determining the location and direction of the access hole in the buccolingual and mesiodistal directions were in the buccal and

  10. The effect of flexible acrylic resin on masticatory muscle activity in implant-supported mandibular overdentures: a controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Background It is not yet clear from the current literature to what extent masticatory muscle activity is affected by the use of flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures. Objective To compare masticatory muscle activity between patients who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin and those who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from heat-cured conven...

  11. Full Contoured Tooth-Implant Supported 3-Pointic All-Ceramic Denture During Occlusal Load Transfer in Lateral Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żmudzki J.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Implant and a tooth supported dentures are avoided by dentists because of uneven distribution of occlusal loads between a stiffer implant and a more pliable tooth. The hypothesis was that a 3-point all-ceramic bridge supported on a natural second premolar tooth and a two-pieces typical implant bears safely mastication loads. The finite element analysis showed that the implant splinted by all-ceramic zirconium bridge with the second premolar was safe under lateral mastication load, but there was found an overload at wide zone of bone tissue around the implant under the load of 800 N. The patients can safely masticate, but comminution of hard food should be avoided and they should be instructed that after such an indiscretion they need to contact a dental professional, because, in spite of integrity of the prosthesis, the bone tissue around the implant may fail and there is a hazard of intrusion of the tooth.

  12. Treatment Outcome and Patient Satisfaction with Two Adjacent Implant-Supported Restorations in the Esthetic Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tymstra, Nynke; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Stellingsma, Kees; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic parameters as well as the esthetic outcome of two adjacent implant-supported restorations and the surrounding peri-implant mucosa in the maxillary esthetic zone. Ten patients were treated with two adjacent implants in the

  13. Implant-supported removable partial dentures in the mandible : A 3-16 year retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Kerdijk, Wouter; Cune, Marco S

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess performance, together with biological and technical complications, of implant-supported removable partial dentures (ISRPD) in mandibular Kennedy class I situations with implants placed in the anterior or posterior position. METHODS: 23

  14. Cost-effectiveness of implant-supported mandibular removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Ross, Jamila; Feenstra, Talitha L; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Speksnijder, Caroline; Meijer, Henny J A; Cune, Marco S

    ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing conventional removable partial dentures (RPDs) and implant-supported RPDs (ISRPDs) treatment in patients with an edentulous maxilla and a bilateral free-ending situation in the mandible. Material and methodsThirty

  15. Implant-supported removable partial dentures in the mandible : A 3-16 year retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Cune, Marco S.

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess performance, together with biological and technical complications, of implant-supported removable partial dentures (ISRPD) in mandibular Kennedy class I situations with implants placed in the anterior or posterior position. Methods: 23

  16. Should edentulous patients be constrained to removable complete dentures? The use of dental implants to improve the quality of life for edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Company, Andrea M; McGlumphy, Edwin A

    2010-03-01

    Nowadays, there is some speculation among dental educators that the need for complete dentures will significantly decrease in the future and that training in their provision should be removed from the dental curriculum. To sensitise the reader to the functional shortcomings of complete denture therapy in the edentulous patient and present restorative options including implants to improve edentulous quality of life in these patients. Information retrieval followed a systematic approach using PubMed. English articles published from 1964 to 2008, in which the masticatory performance of patients with implant-supported dentures was assessed by objective methods and compared with performance with conventional dentures, were included. National epidemiological survey data suggested that the adult population in need of one or two complete dentures will increase from 35.4 million adults in 2000 to 37.9 million adults in 2020. Clinical studies have showed that the ratings of general satisfaction were significantly better in the patients treated with implant overdentures post-delivery compared with the complete denture users. In addition, the implant group gave significantly higher ratings on comfort, stability and ability to chew. Furthermore, patients who received mandibular implant overdentures had significantly fewer oral health-related quality of life problems than did the conventional group. Implant-supported dentures including either complete overdentures or a hybrid prosthesis significantly improve the quality of life for edentulous patients compared with conventional removable complete dentures. Therefore, the contemporary dental practitioner should consider other options as well as conventional removable complete dentures to restore edentulous patients.

  17. Voxel-based registration of simulated and real patient CBCT data for accurate dental implant pose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, António H. J.; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Correia, André Ricardo; Fernandes, Valter; Pinho, A. C. M.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    The success of dental implant-supported prosthesis is directly linked to the accuracy obtained during implant's pose estimation (position and orientation). Although traditional impression techniques and recent digital acquisition methods are acceptably accurate, a simultaneously fast, accurate and operator-independent methodology is still lacking. Hereto, an image-based framework is proposed to estimate the patient-specific implant's pose using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and prior knowledge of implanted model. The pose estimation is accomplished in a threestep approach: (1) a region-of-interest is extracted from the CBCT data using 2 operator-defined points at the implant's main axis; (2) a simulated CBCT volume of the known implanted model is generated through Feldkamp-Davis-Kress reconstruction and coarsely aligned to the defined axis; and (3) a voxel-based rigid registration is performed to optimally align both patient and simulated CBCT data, extracting the implant's pose from the optimal transformation. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the framework: (1) an in silico study using 48 implants distributed through 12 tridimensional synthetic mandibular models; (2) an in vitro study using an artificial mandible with 2 dental implants acquired with an i-CAT system; and (3) two clinical case studies. The results shown positional errors of 67+/-34μm and 108μm, and angular misfits of 0.15+/-0.08° and 1.4°, for experiment 1 and 2, respectively. Moreover, in experiment 3, visual assessment of clinical data results shown a coherent alignment of the reference implant. Overall, a novel image-based framework for implants' pose estimation from CBCT data was proposed, showing accurate results in agreement with dental prosthesis modelling requirements.

  18. Maxillary complete denture outcome with two-implant supported mandibular overdentures. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Bendinskaite, Ruta; Linkevicius, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Research data regarding maxillary complete denture outcome with two-implant supported mandibular overdentures are not consistent. Considering multiple publications on implant supported mandibular overdentures, it was decided to summarize currently present evidence on the maxillary complete dentures opposed by implant-supported mandibular overdentures, and analyze factors that could potentially influence the outcomes. The articles from 1985 to 2007 related to the topic were identified in the online MEDLINE/Pubmed and other databases and manually. Primary articles were scanned, and irrelevant studies were excluded from the further review process. Potentially relevant titles and abstracts were provisionally included for consideration on the basis of full text articles. Full text articles were obtained from on-line and printed sources. The data from the studies were extracted and reviewed. The study has failed to identify any prospective satisfying inclusion/exclusion criteria RCT reporting on maxillary bone resorption. The number of maxillary complete denture relining incidences per patient was constantly increasing during the 10-year period. Maxillary complete denture remake incidences comprised 16-33 % of the number of patients followed during the 10-year period. Comparing patient satisfaction with upper dentures at the baseline and after two years, no decrease in satisfaction was noticed. There is no evidence that maxillary ridge resorption is accelerated with certain types of two-implant supported mandibular overdenture attachments. Most common complication for the maxilla - prosthetic maintenance. There is a risk of decreased patient satisfaction with bar-supported mandibular overdenture. Further studies are needed to provide evidence for the maxillary complete denture outcome with two-implant supported mandibular overdentures.

  19. The influence of professional competence on the inter- and intra-individual esthetic evaluation of implant-supported crowns in the anterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsos, Hari; Trimpou, Georgia; Eickholz, Peter; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Weigl, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Evaluation of the influence of professional competence on esthetic predictability of implant-supported crowns in the anterior maxilla and identification of objective factors allowing predictable planning for esthetic results. Sixty patients with 82 implants in the esthetic zone were included in this study. Width of keratinized mucosa, biotype, recessions, and papilla index according to Jemt as well as radiological bone loss were assessed. Study casts and photographs were obtained. Each patient as well as people with different level of expertise (laypersons, students and dentists) rated the esthetic satisfaction after final restoration on a scale (1-10). Correlations between esthetic assessments and previously documented clinical parameters were tested. The study failed to show a significant relationship between the raters' level of dental expertise and their subjective esthetic evaluation. However, patients rated themselves much more favorable than the three evaluator groups did. A comparison of the clinical parameters with the esthetic evaluation revealed significantly more favorable ratings by the lay group in the presence of a wide attached gingiva (P = 0.021) than by the other groups and by the laypersons (P = 0.002), the dentists (P = 0.003), and students (P = 0.009) in the absence of recessions. The ratio of the implant crown length to the length of the contralateral crown had a negative effect on ratings for all three groups ([laypersons P esthetic predictability of implant-supported crowns in the anterior maxilla in laypersons' ratings. Furthermore, there is an association between the discrepancy of lengths of implant-supported single crowns to their contralateral natural teeth and esthetic satisfaction for all expertise levels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. In vitro comparative analysis of the fit of gold alloy or commercially pure titanium implant-supported prostheses before and after electroerosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Ivete Aparecida de Mattias; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2004-08-01

    For implant-supported prostheses, passive fit is critical for the success of rehabilitation, especially when alternative materials are used. The purpose of this study was to compare interfacial fit of implant-supported prostheses cast in titanium to those cast in gold alloy. Five 3-unit fixed partial dentures were fabricated in gold alloy (Degudent U) as 1-piece castings, and 5 others were similarly cast in commercially pure titanium (Grade 1). The interfacial gaps between the prostheses and the abutments were evaluated with an optical microscope, before and after electroerosion. Readings were made with both screws tightened (10 N.cm torque), and with only 1 side tightened, so as to also evaluate the passive fit of the prostheses. Data were compared statistically by 2-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey multiple range test (alpha=.05). Before electroerosion, the interfacial gaps for the 1-piece prostheses were significantly smaller (Pelectroerosion procedure significantly (Pelectroerosion did not present significant differences when the side opposite the tightened side was analyzed, but the gold alloy group showed better fit when the tightened side was analyzed (12.8 +/- 1.4 microm for gold alloy; 29.6 +/- 4.4 microm for titanium) and when both screws were tightened (5.4 +/- 2.3 microm for gold alloy; 16.1 +/- 5.5 microm for titanium). Cast titanium prostheses, despite showing larger interfacial gaps between the prosthesis and abutment than those obtained with gold alloy, had improved fit after being subjected to electroerosion.

  1. Influence of restorative materials on color of implant-supported single crowns in esthetic zone: A spectrophotometric evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M., Peng; W.-J., Zhao; M., Hosseini

    2017-01-01

    of the esthetic outcome of soft tissue around implant-supported single crowns in the anterior zone, and the crown color match score was used for subjective evaluation of the esthetic outcome of implant-supported restoration. ANOVA analysis was used to compare the differences among groups and Spearman correlation...

  2. Comparison of fixed implant-supported prostheses, removable implant-supported prostheses, and complete dentures: patient satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung-Hee; Kim, Younhee; Park, Joo-Yeon; Jung, Yea Ji; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Park, Sun-Young

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among fully edentulous patients treated with either fixed implant-supported prostheses (FP), removable implant-supported prostheses (RP), or complete dentures (CD). Eighty-six patients - 29 FP, 27 RP, and 30 CD patients - participated in this study. The survey was conducted using face-to-face interviews with a questionnaire that included a patient satisfaction scale and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). We measured patient satisfaction after prosthetic treatments and OHRQoL before and after the treatments. After prosthetic treatments, OHRQoL increased in all three groups (P patient satisfaction and OHRQoL, and both groups showed greater improvement compared with the CD group. Specifically, the OHRQoL dimensions of functional limitation, physical pain, psychological discomfort, and psychological disability in the FP group, and functional limitation in the RP group, improved greatly in comparison with the CD group (P patient satisfaction than the CD treatment. Reliable information of OHRQoL and patient satisfaction helps experts and patients choose the best prosthetic treatment option. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effect of mini-implant-supported mandibular overdentures on electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle during chewing of hard and soft food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmawy, Tarek Mohy; El Talawy, Dina Bahgat; Shaheen, Nasser Hussein

    2014-09-01

    To objectively evaluate the effect of mini-implant- supported mandibular overdentures on electromyographic activity (EMG) of the masseter muscle during chewing of hard and soft foods. Twelve completely edentulous patients (4 females and 8 males) with maladaptive experience of wearing mandibular dentures received new maxillary and mandibular dentures. After 3 months of adaptation, four mini dental implants (MDIs) were inserted in the interforaminal region of the mandible, and the new mandibular dentures were connected to the implants immediately with O/ring attachments. The activity of masseter muscle (EMG) and the duration of chewing cycle were measured during chewing hard (carrot) and soft (gum) foods. The measurements were made 3 months after wearing each of the following prostheses: the new conventional dentures; and the MDI-retained mandibular overdentures. The EMG of masseter muscle increased and the DC decreased with MDI-retained mandibular overdentures when compared to conventional dentures. Hard food (carrot) was associated with increased EMG and decreased DC when compared to soft food (gum) for both conventional dentures and MDI-retained mandibular overdentures. Mini-implant-supported mandibular overdentures are associated with increased activity of masseter muscle and decreased duration of chewing cycle for both hard and soft foods when compared to conventional dentures.

  4. Implant-Supported Telescopic Crown-Retained Overdentures for Oral Rehabilitation of Patients with Severe Bony Defects: A 5-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Duohong; Wang, Feng; Wu, Yiqun; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Chenping; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of dental implant-supported telescopic crown (TC)-retained overdentures to restore the oral function of patients who have insufficient jawbone volume resulting from tumor resection or trauma. From January 2004 to December 2008, implant-supported TC-retained overdentures were used to restore the oral function of patients with severe bony defects resulting from tumor resection or trauma. Clinical data, including implant success and survival rates, biologic and mechanical complications, prosthodontic maintenance efforts, and patient satisfaction, were analyzed annually after delivery of the final prostheses. Twenty-four patients were treated, and a total of 88 implants were inserted to support TC-retained overdentures. The mean modified plaque index of implants remained low (76.3%) in the study showed the absence of bleeding on probing at follow-up visits. Peri-implant marginal bone loss (MBL) ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 mm. There was no statistically significant difference in the MBL between maxillary and mandibular implants (P = .43). The implant success rate was 100% after 5 years, and the prosthodontic maintenance and complication rate was 0.22 times per year. More than 90% of patients were satisfied with the restoration of their oral function using TCs. Based on our study of 24 patients treated with TC-retained overdentures, it appears that this treatment may be a viable option for patients with insufficient jawbone volume.

  5. Short dental implants: A scoping review of the literature for patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edher, Faraj; Nguyen, Caroline T

    2017-09-16

    Dental implants can be essential in the rehabilitation of various cancer defects, but their ideal placement can be complicated by the limited dimensions of the available host bone. Surgical interventions developed to increase the amount of bone are not all predictable or successful and can sometimes be contraindicated. Short dental implants have been suggested as an alternative option in sites where longer implants are not possible. Whether they provide a successful treatment option is unclear. The purpose of this study was to review the literature on short dental implants and assess whether they are a viable definitive treatment option for rehabilitating cancer patients with deficient bone. A scoping review of the literature was performed, including a search of established periodontal textbooks for articles on short dental implants combined with a search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. A search for all literature published before June 2016 was based on the following keywords: ['dental implants' OR 'dental implantation, endosseous' OR 'dental prosthesis, implant supported'] AND [short]. The minimum acceptable implant length has been considered to be 6 mm. The survival rates of short implants varied between 74% and 96% at 5 years, depending on factors such as the quality of the patient's bone, primary stability of the implant, clinician's learning curve, and implant surface. Short implants can achieve results similar to those of longer implants in augmented bone and offer a treatment alternative that could reduce the need for invasive surgery and associated morbidity and be safer and more economical. Short dental implants (6 mm to 8 mm) can be used successfully to support single or multiple fixed reconstructions or overdentures in atrophic maxillae and mandibles. The use of short dental implants lessens the need for advanced and complicated surgical bone augmentation procedures, which reduces complications

  6. Fit Analysis of Different Framework Fabrication Techniques for Implant-Supported Partial Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, Aloísio Oro; Bacchi, Atais; Trevisani, Alexandre; Farina, Ana Paula; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the vertical misfit of implant-supported frameworks made using different techniques to obtain passive fit. Thirty three-unit fixed partial dentures were fabricated in cobalt-chromium alloy (n = 10) using three fabrication methods: one-piece casting, framework cemented on prepared abutments, and laser welding. The vertical misfit between the frameworks and the abutments was evaluated with an optical microscope using the single-screw test. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = .05). The one-piece casted frameworks presented significantly higher vertical misfit values than those found for framework cemented on prepared abutments and laser welding techniques (P Laser welding and framework cemented on prepared abutments are effective techniques to improve the adaptation of three-unit implant-supported prostheses. These techniques presented similar fit.

  7. Progressive recovery of osseoperception as a function of the combination of implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Mauro; Bonachela, Wellington; Soares, Janir

    2008-06-01

    The extraction of teeth involves the elimination of extremely sensitive periodontal mechanoreceptors, which play an important role in oral sensory perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recovery of interocclusal sensory perception for micro-thickness in individuals with different types of implant-supported prostheses. Wearers of complete dentures (CDs) comprised the negative control group (group A, n=17). The experimental group consisted of wearers of prostheses supported by osseointegrated implants (Group B, n=29), which was subsequently divided into 4 subgroups: B(1) (n=5)--implant supported overdentures (ISO) occluding with CD; B(2) (n=6)--implant-supported fixed prostheses (ISFP) occluding with CD; B(3) (n=8)--wearers of maxillary and mandibular ISFP, and B(4) (n=10)--ISFP occluding with natural dentition (ND). Individuals with ND represented the positive control group (Group C, n=24). Aluminum foils measuring 10 microm, 24 microm, 30 microm, 50 microm, 80 microm, and 104 microm thickness were placed within the premolar area, adding up to 120 tests for each individual. The mean tactile thresholds of groups A, B1, B2, B3, B4, and C were 92 microm, 27 microm, 27 microm, 14 microm, 10 microm, and 10 microm, respectively. [Correction added after publication online 18 April 2008: in the preceding sentence 92 microm, 27 microm, 14 microm, 10 microm and 10 microm, was corrected to 92 microm, 27 microm, 27 microm, 14 microm, 10 microm and 10 microm]. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed significant difference among groups (P<0.05). The Dunn test revealed that group A was statistically different from groups C, B(3), and B(4), and that B(1) and B(2) were statistically different from group C. Progressive recovery of osseoperception as a function of the combination of implant-supported prostheses could be observed. Moreover, ISO and/or ISFP combinations may similarly maximize the recovery of osseoperception.

  8. Rehabilitation with implant-supported overdentures in total edentulous patients: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez–Lage-Azorín, Juan F.; Segura-Andrés, Gustavo; Faus-López, Joan; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The main aim of this review article is to discuss implant-supported overdentures (ISOs) as treatment in edentulous patients. Besides, we will try to discuss among the different treatment options in such patients and to analyze their validity when ISOs are compared with other clinical modalities. At the same time, we will try to suggest clinical guidelines supported by current clinical studies. Material and methods: We performed a Medline search and review of pertinent articles on ...

  9. Clinical Evaluation of Implant-Supported Removable Partial Dentures With a Stress-Breaking Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Kono, Kentaro; Shimpo, Hidemasa; Sato, Yohei; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2017-08-01

    The stress-breaking ball (SBB) attachment can distribute the occlusal force equally between the alveolar ridge and the implants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implant-supported distal extension removable partial dentures (RPDs) with SBB attachment in 10 patients who were partially edentulous. This randomized crossover study was designed to compare the function of RPDs with and without healing abutments and SBB attachments to support the posterior aspects of the RPDs. Mandibular jaw movements during mastication and the occlusal force and contact area were measured with a commercially available tracking device and pressure-sensitive sheets. Using a visual analog scale, 4 criteria-chewing, retention, stability, and comfort-were evaluated. All of the data obtained were analyzed using a 1-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05). There were no significant differences in either the mean time or the coefficient of variation among the SBB attachments and healing abutments of implant-supported removable partial dentures (ISRPDs) and conventional removable partial dentures (CRPDs). SBB attachments and healing abutments of ISRPDs had greater forces and contact areas than those of CRPDs with significant differences. For all criteria, patients preferred SBB attachments to healing abutments and CRPDs. The implant-supported distal extension RPDs with SBB attachment improved denture stability and patients' satisfaction.

  10. Implant-supported titanium prostheses following augmentation procedures: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, C; Hoffmeister, B

    2003-03-01

    This report describes a novel technique for fabricating retrievable implant-supported titanium (Ti) prostheses in patients requiring a comprehensive treatment plan involving the combined efforts of maxillofacial surgery and implant prosthodontics. Following bone graft reconstructive surgery and implant placement prosthetic treatment was initiated by inserting ITI-Octa abutments. An impression was made, and a framework was fabricated by fusing Ti-cast frameworks to prefabricated titanium copings by laser-welding. This was followed by veneering or fabrication of a removable denture with Ti metal re-enforcement. Favourable clinical results have been achieved using these screw-retained Ti implant-supported restorations for patients treated with reconstructive bone graft-surgery, with clinical observation periods ranging from three to four years. The present observations suggest that these screw-retained implant-supported Ti prostheses may be a meaningful contribution to implant prosthodontics, facilitating retrievable restorations of optimum biocompatibility, good marginal precision and with a good esthetic result. However, controlled clinical studies are needed to establish the long-term serviceability of these Ti restorations.

  11. Biting Force and Muscle Activity in Implant-Supported Single Mandibular Overdentures Opposing Fixed Maxillary Dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Magaleh, Wafaʼa R; Abbas, Nadia A; Amer, Ashraf A; Abdelkader, Ann A; Bahgat, Basma

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relation between biting force and masticatory muscle activity in patients treated by 3 modalities of single mandibular dentures. Forty implants were placed in 10 patients with completely edentulous mandibles. The study was divided into 3 treatment stages. Initially, each patient received a conventional mandibular complete denture. At the second stage, 4 mandibular implants were placed and the denture was refitted to their abutments. Third stage comprised connecting the denture to the implants through ball attachments. During each treatment stage, maximum biting force and muscle activity were measured during maximum clenching and chewing of soft and hard food. Biting force demonstrated a statistically significant increase by time for the 3 treatment stages. The highest muscle activity was recorded for the conventional denture followed by the implant-supported overdenture without attachment, whereas the lowest values were recorded for the implant-supported overdenture with attachment. Biting force was related mainly to the quality of denture support. Muscle activity was higher in patients with conventional denture than with implant-supported prostheses (with or without attachments).

  12. Within-Subject Comparison of Maxillary Implant-Supported Overdentures with and without Palatal Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembic, Anja; Tahmaseb, Ali; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient-reported outcomes for maxillary implant-supported overdentures with and without palatal coverage. Twenty-one maxillary edentulous patients (six women, 15 men) were included. In total, 42 implants were inserted in the anterior maxilla. All patients received implant-supported overdentures on two retentive anchors with palatal coverage for 2 months. Thereafter, patient satisfaction was assessed by means of questionnaires capturing the oral health impact profile (OHIP) on functional limitation, physical pain, psychological discomfort, physical, psychological and social disability, and handicap. Additionally, cleaning ability, general satisfaction, speech, comfort, esthetics, stability, and chewing ability were rated. Subsequently, palatal coverage was reduced, and the patients wore the overdentures for another 2 months. Patient satisfaction was obtained in the same way as above, and the evaluated parameters were compared for the two overdenture designs. There were no significant differences between implant-supported overdentures with and without palatal coverage for any of the OHIP domains. The evaluation of additional parameters revealed significantly higher patient satisfaction for esthetics (mean difference 8.8 mm ± 24.6) and taste (mean difference 28.4 mm ± 29.9) without palatal coverage, p overdentures supported by two implants were equally satisfactory with and without palatal coverage. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  14. Photoelastic analysis of mandibular full-arch implant-supported fixed dentures made with different bar materials and manufacturing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaparolli, Danilo; Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; Pupim, Denise; Macedo, Ana Paula; Toniollo, Marcelo Bighetti; Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello de

    2017-12-01

    To compare the stress distribution of mandibular full dentures supported with implants according to the bar materials and manufacturing techniques using a qualitative photoelastic analysis. An acrylic master model simulating the mandibular arch was fabricated with four Morse taper implant analogs of 4.5×6mm. Four different bars were manufactured according to different material and techniques: fiber-reinforced resin (G1, Trinia, CAD/CAM), commercially pure titanium (G2, cpTi, CAD/CAM), cobalt‑chromium (G3, Co-Cr, CAD/CAM) and cobalt‑chromium (G4, Co-Cr, conventional cast). Standard clinical and laboratory procedures were used by an experienced dental technician to fabricate 4 mandibular implant-supported dentures. The photoelastic model was created based on the acrylic master model. A load simulation (150N) was performed in total occlusion against the antagonist. Dentures with fiber-reinforced resin bar (G1) exhibited better stress distribution. Dentures with machined Co-Cr bar (G3) exhibited the worst standard of stress distribution, with an overload on the distal part of the posteriors implants, followed by dentures with cast Co-Cr bar (G4) and machined cpTi bar (G2). The fiber-reinforced resin bar exhibited an adequate stress distribution and can serve as a viable alternative for oral rehabilitation with mandibular full dentures supported with implants. Moreover, the use of the G1 group offered advantages including reduced weight and less possible overload to the implants components, leading to the preservation of the support structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Implant-supported mandibular removable partial dentures; patient-based outcome measures in relation to implant position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Kerdijk, Wouter; Meijer, Henny J A; Cune, Marco S

    2016-12-01

    To assess the benefits of implant support to Removable Partial Dentures (RPD) in patients with a bilateral free-ending situation in the mandible and to determine the most favorable implant position: the premolar (PM) or the molar (M) region. Thirty subjects with a bilateral unbounded posterior saddle received 2 PM and 2M implants. A new RPD was placed. Implant support was provided 3 months later. Two PM implants supported the RPD. After 3 months the 2M implants were used or vice versa. Outcome measures included oral health related quality of life (OHIP-NL49), general health status (SF-36), contentment assessed on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the number of hours that the RPD was worn. Data were collected prior to treatment, 3 months after having functioned with a new RPD and after 3 and 6 months with implant support. Finally, patients expressed their preferred implant position. The general health status (SF-36) was not influenced. OHIP-NL49 values and mean wearing-time were statistical significantly more favorable for ISRPD's, regardless of the implant position. Per day, the ISRPD's were worn 2-3h more than the unsupported new RPD. Patients' expectations were met as the VAS-scores of anticipated and realized contentment did not reach a statistical significant level (p>0.05). VAS scores for ISRPD's with M implant support were higher than for PM implant support. Finally, 56.7% of subjects preferred the M implant support, 13.3% expressed no preference and 30% opted for PM implant support. Mandibular implant support favorably influences oral health related patient-based outcome measures in patients with a bilateral free-ending situation. The majority of patients prefer the implant support to be in the molar region. Patients with a bilateral free-ending situation in the mandible opposed by a maxillary denture benefit from implant support to their mandibular removable partial denture. Most patients prefer this support to be in the molar region. Copyright © 2016

  16. [Loading and strength of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses 2. Strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Meijers, C.C.A.J.; Vergoossen, E.L.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate strength of a dental prosthesis is defined as the strongest loading force applied to the prosthesis until afracture failure occurs. Important key terms are strength, hardness, toughness and fatigue. Relatively prevalent complications of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses are

  17. A systematic review of functional outcome and quality of life following reconstruction of maxillofacial defects using vascularized free fibula flaps and dental rehabilitation reveals poor data quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijbenga, Johan G.; Schepers, Rutger H.; Werker, Paul M. N.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    Background: Reconstruction and oral rehabilitation of segmental maxillofacial defects resulting from ablative surgery is commonly achieved by osteocutaneous vascularized free fibula (VFFF) transplantation combined with implant-supported dental prostheses. We systematically reviewed the literature

  18. Magnet-retained implant-supported overdentures: review and 1-year clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Paola; Bryant, S Ross; Lee, Jun-Ho; MacEntee, Michael I

    2010-01-01

    Open-field aluminum-nickle-cobalt magnets have been used in prosthodontics for many years, but success has been limited because these magnets are susceptible to corrosion by the saliva and because their retentive force is weak relative to the initial retention offered by mechanical attachments. More recently, magnets have been made from alloys of the rare earth elements samarium and neodymium, which provide stronger magnetic force per unit size. In addition, a new generation of laser-welded containers has improved protection from salivary corrosion. The current resurgence of interest in this type of attachment appears justified because, unlike mechanical attachments, magnets have potential for unlimited durability and might therefore be superior to mechanical ball or bar attachments for the retention of removable prostheses on implants. To date, no long-term prospective trials have been conducted to confirm the clinical durability of this new generation of magnets for retaining dentures on either teeth or implants. The aim of this study was to document initial clinical experiences and levels of satisfaction among edentulous patients treated with mandibular implant-supported overdentures retained using a new generation of rare-earth magnetic attachments. At the outset, all but one of the 17 patients had had several years of experience with implant-supported overdentures. During the first year, the mean overall satisfaction among these 17 patients increased from less than 70 to over 90 out of 100 (standardized visual analogue scale). No unusual difficulties were encountered in rendering the treatment or maintaining the attachments. This report offers preliminary evidence of the excellent potential of these magnets for retaining mandibular implant-supported overdentures.

  19. Retention system for implant-supported dentures used by brazilian dentists who work in implant dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Saturnino Aparecido Ramalho; Fábio Pontes Dantas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide the dentists with support in the choice of the cement or screw type of retention for implant-supported dentures, according to the patient’s problem. Methods: An opinion questionnaire was applied to a sample of 468 participants, all dentists working in the field of Implant Dentistry, of whom 272 (58.1%) participated in the 4th International Congress of Osseointegration of APCD, held in São Paulo (SP) from 6 to 9 May 2004, 119 (25.4%) participated in the 2nd International ...

  20. Evaluation of stress distribution characteristics on various bar designs of three-implant-supported mandibular overdentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Tokar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Implant-supported-overdentures, instead of conventional complete dentures, are frequently recommended to rehabilitate patients having edentulous mandible. The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution characteristics of mandibular implant-supported overdentures with four different bar attachment designs. Materials and Method: A photoelastic mandibular model with three implants (3.75 mm - 13 mm placed at the interforaminal region was generated from a cast of an edentulous mandible. Four mandibular bar overdenture designs were fabricated: bar-clip, bar-galvano, bar-locator, and bar-ceka. Axial vertical loads (135 N were applied to the central fossa of the right first molar area for each overdenture design. Stress concentrations were recorded photographically and analyzed visually. Results: The tested bar attachment designs revealed low and moderate stress levels. The lowest stress was observed with the bar-clip design, followed by bar-locator, bar-ceka, and bar-galvano designs. Conclusion: The loads were distributed to all of the implants. Studied designs experienced moderate stress levels around the loaded side implant. Bars with distally placed stud attachments and surface treatment with electroforming seems to increase stress levels around the implants.

  1. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  2. Prosthetic Complications and Maintenance Requirements in Locator-attached Implant-Supported Overdentures: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Frank; Zeman, Florian; Behr, Michael; Hahmel, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Retrospective data of 32 patients supplied with implant-supported and Locator-attached overdentures were screened for prosthetic complications and maintenance requirements, which were recorded and statistically analyzed. Mean observation time was 4.78 ± 1.72) years. Loss of retention was the most frequently observed event (n = 22). Damage and exchange of the insert holders (n = 4) and loosening of locator attachments (n = 2) and fracture of the insert holder (n = 2) were uncommon events; no loss of locator attachments was observed. Loss of retention in Locator-attached overdentures is frequent; correlating patient-specific parameters with prosthetic complications is necessary to define recommendations for the use of Locator attachments.

  3. The role of welding techniques in the biomechanical behavior of implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sabrina Alessandra; Presotto, Anna Gabriella Camacho; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio Arruda; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2017-09-01

    This in vitro study investigated the role of welding techniques of implant-supported prostheses in the 2D and 3D marginal misfits of prosthetic frameworks, strain induced on the mini abutment, and detorque of prosthetic screws. The correlations between the analyzed variables were also investigated. Frameworks were cast in commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti). A marginal misfit of 200μm was simulated in the working models (control group) (n=20). The 2D marginal misfit was analyzed according to the single-screw test protocol using a precision optical microscope. The 3D marginal misfit was performed by X-ray microtomography. Strain gauge analysis was performed to investigate the strain induced on the mini abutment. A digital torque meter was used for analysis of the detorque and the mean value was calculated for each framework. Afterwards, the frameworks were divided into two experimental groups (n=10): Laser (L) and TIG (T). The welding techniques were performed according to the following parameters: L (390V/9ms); T (36A/60ms). The L and T groups were reevaluated according to the marginal misfit, strain, and detorque. The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test and Person correlation analysis (α=0.05). Welding techniques statistically reduced the 2D and 3D marginal misfits of prosthetic frameworks (p0.05). Positive correlations were observed between 2D and 3D marginal misfit reading methods (r=0.943, pwelding techniques improved the biomechanical behavior of the implant-supported system. TIG can be an acceptable and affordable technique to reduce the misfit of 3-unit Ti frameworks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of implant-supported mandibular removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Ross, Jamila; Feenstra, Talitha L; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Speksnijder, Caroline; Meijer, Henny J A; Cune, Marco S

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing conventional removable partial dentures (RPDs) and implant-supported RPDs (ISRPDs) treatment in patients with an edentulous maxilla and a bilateral free-ending situation in the mandible. Thirty subjects were included. A new RPD was made and implant support was provided 3 months later. Treatment costs (opportunity costs and costs based on tariffs) were calculated. Treatment effect was expressed by means of the Dutch Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-NL49), a chewing ability test (Mixing Ability Index, MAI) and a short-form health survey measuring perceived general health (SF-36), which was subsequently converted into quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was the primary outcome measure of cost-effectiveness, comparing both treatment strategies. The mean total opportunity costs were €981 (95% CI €971-€991) for the RPD treatment and €2.480 (95% CI €2.461-€2.500) for the ISRPD treatment. The total costs derived from the national tariff structure were €850 for the RPD treatment and €2.610 for the ISRPD treatment. The ICER for OHIP-NL49 and MAI using the opportunity costs was €80 and €786, respectively. When using the tariff structure, corresponding ICERs were €94 and €921. The effect of supporting an RPD with implants when expressed in QALYs was negligible; hence an ICER was not determined. It is concluded that depending on the choice of outcome measure and monetary threshold, supporting an RPD with implants is cost-effective when payers are willing to pay more than €80 per OHIP point gained. Per MAI point gained, an additional €786 has to be invested. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Fatigue Fracture Strength of Implant-Supported Full Contour Zirconia and Metal Ceramic Fixed Partial Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Vafaee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Zirconia restorations have been suggested as a more durable and more appealing alternative to metal restorations. However, their mechanical properties may be negatively affected by fatigue due to superficial stresses or low temperature degradation. This study aimed to assess the fatigue fracture strength of three-unit implant-supported full contour zirconia and pre-sintered cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr alloy posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs.Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro experimental study, 28 posterior three-unit implant-supported FPDs were fabricated of full contour zirconia and pre-sintered Co-Cr alloy, and were cemented on implant abutments. To simulate the oral environment, FPDs were subjected to 10,000 thermal cycles between 5-55°C for 30 seconds, and were then transferred to a chewing simulator (100,000 cycles, 50 N, 0.5 Hz. Afterwards, fatigue fracture strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test.Results: The mean and standard deviation of fracture strength were 2108.6±440.1 N in full contour zirconia, and 3499.9±1106.5 N in pre-sintered Co-Cr alloy. According to Mann- Whitney U test, the difference in this respect was statistically significant between the two groups (P=0.007.Conclusions: Since the fracture strength values obtained in the two groups were significantly higher than the maximum mean masticatory load in the oral environment, both materials can be used for fabrication of posterior three-unit FPDs, depending on the esthetic demands of patients.

  6. Retentiveness of implant-supported metal copings using different luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Nejatidanesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With regard to potential retrievability of cement-retained implant restorations, the retentive strength of the luting agents is critical. The aim of this study was to evaluate the retention values of implant-supported metal copings using different luting agents. Materials and Methods: Twenty ITI implant analogs and solid abutments of 5.5-mm height were embedded vertically in autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Metal copings with a loop on the occlusal surface were fabricated using base metal alloy (Rexillium III. The copings were luted using eight cements with different retention mechanisms (Panavia F2.0, Fuji Plus, Fleck′s, Poly F, Fuji I, Temp Bond, GC-free eugenol, and TempSpan under static load of 5 kg (n=10. All specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours, conditioned in artificial saliva for 7 days and thermocycled for 5000 cycles (5-55°C. The dislodging force was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Statistical analyses were performed using Kruskal-Wallis (α=0.05 and Mann-Whitney tests with Bonferroni correction (α=0.001. Results: Fuji Plus and TempSpan had the highest and the least mean retentive strength, respectively (320.97±161.47, 3.39±2.33. There was no significant difference between Fuji Plus, Fleck′s, Ploy F, and Panavia F2.0. These cements were superior to provisional cements and Fuji I (P<0.001 which showed statistically same retentive strength. Conclusion: Within the conditions of this study, the resin modified glass ionomer, zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate, and Panavia F2.0 had statistically the same retentive quality and are recommended for definitive cementation of single implant-supported restorations. The provisional cements and glass ionomer may allow retrievability of these restorations.

  7. Prosthesis-patient mismatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Pibarot

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM is present when the effective orifice area of the inserted prosthetic valve is too small in relation to body size. Its main hemodynamic consequence is to generate higher than expected gradients through normally functioning prosthetic valves. The purpose of this review is to present an update on the present state of knowledge with regards to diagnosis, prognosis and prevention of PPM. PPM is a frequent occurrence (20%–70% of aortic valve replacements that has been shown to be associated with worse hemodynamics, less regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, more cardiac events, and lower survival. Moreover, as opposed to most other risk factors, PPM can largely be prevented by using a prospective strategy at the time of operation.

  8. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  9. Immediate occluding definitive partial fixed prosthesis versus non-occluding provisional restorations - 4-month post-loading results from a pragmatic multicenter randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Friedhelm; Grufferty, Brendan; Papavasiliou, George; Dominiak, Marzena; García, Jaime Jiménez; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    2016-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcome of dental implants restored with definitive occluding partial fixed prostheses within 1 week, after implant placement with immediate non-occluding provisional restorations, which were to be replaced by definitive prostheses after 4 months. Fifty partially edentulous patients treated with one to three dental implants, at least 8.5 mm long and 4.0 mm wide inserted with a torque of at least 35 Ncm, were randomised in two groups of 25 patients each, to be immediately loaded with partial fixed prostheses. Patients of one group received one definitive screw-retained metal-ceramic prosthesis in occlusion within 1 week after placement. Patients of the other group received one non-occluding provisional acrylic reinforced prosthesis within 24 h after implant placement. Provisional prostheses were replaced after 4 months by definitive ones. The follow-up for all patients was 4-months post-loading. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant failures, any complications, peri-implant marginal bone level changes, aesthetic evaluation by a clinician, patient satisfaction, chair time and number of visits at the dental office from implant placement to delivery of definitive restorations. No patient dropped out. Two immediately occlusally loaded implants with their related definitive prostheses (8%) failed early (difference in proportions = 0.08; 95% CI: -0.03 to 0.19; P = 0.490). Four complications occurred in the occlusal group versus one in the non-occlusal group; (difference in proportions = 0.12; 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.28; P = 0.349). Four months after loading, patients subjected to non-occlusal loading lost an average of 0.72 mm of peri-implant bone versus 0.99 mm of patients restored with occluding definitive partial fixed prostheses. There were no statistically significant differences for marginal bone level changes between the two groups (mean difference = -0.27 mm; 95% CI: -0.84 to 0.30; P = 0.349). The differences for aesthetic scores showed

  10. Retention Strength of Conical Welding Caps for Fixed Implant-Supported Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Diego; Degidi, Marco; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Tebbel, Florian; Marchetti, Claudio

    This study evaluated the retention strength of welding caps for Ankylos standard abutments using a pull-out test. Each sample consisted of an implant abutment and its welding cap. The tests were performed with a Zwick Roell testing machine with a 1-kN load cell. The retention strength of the welding caps increased with higher abutment diameters and higher head heights and was comparable or superior to the values reported in the literature for the temporary cements used in implant dentistry. Welding caps provide a reliable connection between an abutment and a fixed prosthesis without the use of cement.

  11. Effect of tightening torque on the marginal adaptation of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ghanbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the marginal misfit of cement-retained FDPs increased continuously when the tightening torque increased. After cutting the connectors, the marginal misfit of the ANRs was higher than those of the straight abutment retainers.

  12. Trauma to an implant-supported crown that was saved by the fixation screw : A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Stellingsma, Kees; Santing, Hendrik J.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    A traumatic impact to an implant-supported crown might damage the implant, restoration and peri-implant tissues. Ideally, only a small prosthetic retreatment is needed for restoration, as complicated prosthetic retreatments or surgical retreatments in particular, could be very inconvenient for the

  13. Implant-supported mandibular removable partial dentures: Functional, clinical and radiographical parameters in relation to implant position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Speksnijder, Caroline M; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Kerdijk, Wouter; Meijer, Henny J A; Cune, Marco S

    2017-06-01

    Patients with a Kennedy class I situation often encounter problems with their removable partial denture (RPD). To assess the functional benefits of implant support to RPDs, the clinical performance of the implants and teeth and to determine the most favorable implant position: the premolar (PM) or molar (M) region. Thirty subjects received 2 PM and 2 M implants. A new RPD was made. Implant support was provided 3 months later. In a cross-over model, randomly, 2 implants (PM or M) supported the RPD during 3 months. Masticatory performance was assessed using the mixing ability index (MAI). Clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. Non-parametric statistical analysis for related samples and post hoc comparisons were performed. Masticatory performance differed significantly between the stages of treatment (P < .001). MAI-scores improved with implant support although the implant position had no significant effect. No complications to the implants or RPD were observed and clinical and radiographical parameters for both implants and teeth were favorable. Higher scores for bleeding on probing were seen for molar implants. Implant support to a Kennedy class I RPD significantly improves masticatory function, regardless of implant position. No major clinical problems were observed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Implant-supported mandibular removable partial dentures; patient-based outcome measures in relation to implant position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Cune, Marco S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the benefits of implant support to Removable Partial Dentures (RPD) in patients with a bilateral free-ending situation in the mandible and to determine the most favorable implant position: the premolar (PM) or the molar (M) region. Methods: Thirty subjects with a bilateral

  15. Implant-supported mandibular removable partial dentures : Functional, clinical and radiographical parameters in relation to implant position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Speksnijder, Caroline M.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Meijer, Henny J A; Cune, Marco S.

    Background: Patients with a Kennedy class I situation often encounter problems with their removable partial denture (RPD). Purpose: To assess the functional benefits of implant support to RPDs, the clinical performance of the implants and teeth and to determine the most favorable implant position:

  16. Implant-supported overdentures, a prevention of bone loss in edentulous mandibles? A 5-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wowern, N; Gotfredsen, K

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study were to analyse 1) the changes in the bone mineral content (BMC) in mandibles with implant-supported overdentures when compared with the physiologic age-related mandibular BMC loss, 2) whether the BMC changes were different in groups without or with a bar connecting...

  17. Passividade da estrutura metálica para próteses fixas implanto-suportadas = Passivity of metallic framework for implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stüker, Rafael Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Em virtude da freqüência cada vez maior de reabilitações implanto-suportadas, e de que esta modalidade de tratamento vem se mostrando extremamente eficaz na resolução de várias situações clínicas, foi realizada esta revisão literária com o objetivo de ressaltar questões relacionadas à passividade da estrutura metálica em próteses fixas sobre implantes. São descritos aspectos e alternativas relacionadas a alterações ósseas, assim como procedimentos clínicos e laboratoriais que podem influenciar na passividade de estruturas metálicas, esta que talvez seja o fator mais importante na determinação da longevidade tanto da restauração protética quanto dos implantes

  18. Retrospective comparative ten-year study of cumulative survival rates of remaining teeth in large edentulism treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures or removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Seiya; Arakawa, Hikaru; Maekawa, Kenji; Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Noda, Kinji; Minakuchi, Hajime; Sonoyama, Wataru; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Kuboki, Takuo

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the survival rates of remaining teeth between implant-supported fixed dentures (IFDs) and removable partial dentures (RPDs) in patients with large edentulous cases. The second goal was to assess the risk factors for remaining tooth loss. The study subjects were selected among those who received prosthodontic treatment at Okayama University Dental Hospital for their edentulous space exceeding at least four continuous missing teeth. Twenty-one patients were included in the IFD group and 82 patients were included in the RPD group. Survival rates of remaining teeth were calculated in three subcategories: (1) whole remaining teeth, (2) adjacent teeth to intended edentulous space, and (3) opposing teeth to intended edentulous space. The ten-year cumulative survival rate of the whole remaining teeth was significantly higher in the IFD group (40.0%) than in the RPD group (24.4%). On the other hand, there was no significant difference between two groups in the survival rate of teeth adjacent or opposing to intended edentulous space. A Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that RPD restoration and gender (male) were the significant risk factors for remaining tooth loss (whole remaining teeth). These results suggest that IFD treatment can reduce the incidence of remaining tooth loss in large edentulous cases. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Retention of implant-supported zirconium oxide ceramic restorations using different luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Savabi, Omid; Shahtoosi, Mojtaba

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the retention value of implant-supported zirconium oxide ceramic copings using different luting agents. Twenty ITI solid abutments of 5.5 mm height and ITI implant analogs were mounted vertically into autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Ninety zirconium oxide copings (Cercon, Degudent) with a loop on the occlusal portion were made. All samples were airborne particle abraded with 110 μm Al₂O₃ and luted using different types of luting agents: resin cements (Clearfil SA, Panavia F2.0, Fuji Plus), conventional cements (Fleck's, Poly F, Fuji I), and temporary cements (Temp Bond, GC free eugenol, TempSpan) with a load of 5 Kg. (N = 10) All copings were incubated at 37°C for 24 h and conditioned in artificial saliva for 1 week, and thermal cycled for 5000 cycles 5-55°C with a 30-s dwell time. The dislodging force of the copings along the long axis of the implant-abutment complex was recorded using universal testing machine with 5 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis (α = 0.05) and Mann-Whitney tests with Bonferroni step down correction (α = 0.001). There was significant difference between the mean rank retention values of different luting agents (P zirconium oxide restorations. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Retention system for implant-supported dentures used by brazilian dentists who work in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturnino Aparecido Ramalho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide the dentists with support in the choice of the cement or screw type of retention for implant-supported dentures, according to the patient’s problem. Methods: An opinion questionnaire was applied to a sample of 468 participants, all dentists working in the field of Implant Dentistry, of whom 272 (58.1% participated in the 4th International Congress of Osseointegration of APCD, held in São Paulo (SP from 6 to 9 May 2004, 119 (25.4% participated in the 2nd International Congress of Implant Dentistry of Minas Gerais, between 10 and 12 June 2004 and 77 (16.5% were professors and specialization and master students from São Leopoldo Mandic. Results: The results showed that 254 participants opted for the screw-retained system while 214 opted for the cement-retained system. Conclusion: There was a preference for the use of the screw-retained system, and that both cemented and screw-retained systems have advantages and disadvantages, so that the dentist is left to decide and evaluate them in order to indicate and use them with confidence in different clinical cases.

  1. A new classification of peri-implant bone morphology: a radiographic study of patients with lower implant-supported mandibular overdentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Geraets, W.; Zhou, Y.; Wu, W.; Wismeijer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to classify peri-implant bone defects (PIBDs) on the basis of their radiographic appearance in a cohort of patients with lower implant-supported overdentures. Materials and methods Eighty-three patients with lower implant-supported overdentures were recruited to

  2. Permanent Quadriplegia Following Replacement of Voice Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Kayhan; Erdur, Omer; Kibar, Ertugrul

    2016-11-01

    The authors presented a patient with quadriplegia caused by cervical spine abscess following voice prosthesis replacement. The authors present the first reported permanent quadriplegia patient caused by voice prosthesis replacement. The authors wanted to emphasize that life-threatening complications may be faced during the replacement of voice prosthesis. Care should be taken during the replacement of voice prosthesis and if some problems have been faced during the procedure patients must be followed closely.

  3. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel speech prosthesis for mandibular guidance therapy in hemimandibulectomy patient: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Adaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treating diverse maxillofacial patients poses a challenge to the maxillofacial prosthodontist. Rehabilitation of hemimandibulectomy patients must aim at restoring mastication and other functions such as intelligible speech, swallowing, and esthetics. Prosthetic methods such as palatal ramp and mandibular guiding flange reposition the deviated mandible. Such prosthesis can also be used to restore speech in case of patients with debilitating speech following surgical resection. This clinical report gives detail of a hemimandibulectomy patient provided with an interim removable dental speech prosthesis with composite resin flange for mandibular guidance therapy.

  5. Crown color match of implant-supported zirconia and Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal restorations:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Min; Fei, Wei; Hosseini, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    ShadeTM, Micro Dental) in CIEL¿a¿b¿ coordinates. Subjective crown color match scores were evaluated. Independent sample t test of SPSS17.0 was used to compare the difference between zirconia restoration and PFM restoration. Spearman correlation was used to analyze the relationship between the spectrophotometric...

  6. Pressure distribution of implant-supported removable partial dentures with stress-breaking attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Kentaro; Kurihara, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yasunori; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2014-04-01

    This in vitro study investigated the pressure distribution of the implant-supported removable partial dentures (RPDs) with the stress-breaking attachments under the occlusal force. The experimental model of bilateral missing premolars and molars was modified from a commercial simulation model. Five pressure sensors were embedded near the bilateral first molars, first premolars, and medio-lingual alveolar crest. Two implants were placed near the second molars, and they were connected to the denture base using the following conditions: complete separation between the denture base and implant with cover screws (CRPD), flexible connection with a stress-breaking ball (SBB) attachment, and rigid connection without stress breaking with healing caps (HC). The pressure at five different areas of the soft tissue and the displacement of the RPDs were simultaneously measured, loading up to 50 N. The coefficient of variation (CV) for each connection was calculated from all data of the pressure at five areas to evaluate the pressure distribution. The pressure on medio-lingual alveolar crest and molars of the HC was less than SBB and CRPD. In contrast, the pressure on premolars of SBB was greater than for the HC and CRPD. The CV of SBB was less than that of HC and CRPD. Denture displacement of HC and SBB was less than for CRPD. Within the in vitro limitations, precise denture settlements and pressure distribution under the denture base could be controlled using an SBB attachment. An SBB attachment might be able to protect the implant from harmful force. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Implant-supported removable partial dentures in the mandible: A 3-16 year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Kerdijk, Wouter; Cune, Marco S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess performance, together with biological and technical complications, of implant-supported removable partial dentures (ISRPD) in mandibular Kennedy class I situations with implants placed in the anterior or posterior position. 23 subjects with two endosseous implants to support a bilateral-free-ending mandibular removable denture were examined. Eight subjects had implants in the premolar (anterior) region and 15 subjects implants in the molar (posterior) region. Biological and technical complications were recorded from the patients' medical record. Patients filled out a validated questionnaire regarding their appreciation of oral health related quality of life (OHIP-NL49) and a VAS score on overall satisfaction. Over a mean follow-up period of 8 years (median 8 years, range 3-16 years) the cumulative implant survival rate was 91.7% (SE 0.05). Mean peri-implant bone loss was 0.9mm (SD 1.0mm). Scores for bleeding on probing, plaque and mucosal health were generally low, but significantly worse for posteriorly placed implants. Significantly more biological complications occurred in the posterior group (X 2 (1)=3.9; p=0.048). In 65% of the cases no technical complications were registered. Mean overall OHIP score was 16.1 (SD 18.4) and patients were highly satisfied (VAS: 8.4; SD 2.1). Within the limitations of this retrospective study, in case of a Kennedy class I situation in the mandible, an ISRPD is a viable treatment option with a high implant survival rate and satisfied patients after a maximum of 16 years. Technical and biological complications should be anticipated. Anteriorly placed implants performed slightly better. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro investigation of marginal accuracy of implant-supported screw-retained partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koke, U; Wolf, A; Lenz, P; Gilde, H

    2004-05-01

    Mismatch occurring during the fabrication of implant-supported dentures may induce stress to the peri-implant bone. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of two different alloys and the fabrication method on the marginal accuracy of cast partial dentures. Two laboratory implants were bonded into an aluminium block so that the distance between their longitudinal axes was 21 mm. Frameworks designed for screw-retained partial dentures were cast either with pure titanium (rematitan) or with a CoCr-alloy (remanium CD). Two groups of 10 frameworks were cast in a single piece. The first group was made of pure titanium, and the second group of a CoCr-alloy (remanium CD). A third group of 10 was cast in two pieces and then laser-welded onto a soldering model. This latter group was also made of the CoCr-alloy. All the frameworks were screwed to the original model with defined torque. Using light microscopy, marginal accuracy was determined by measuring vertical gaps at eight defined points around each implant. Titanium frameworks cast in a single piece demonstrated mean vertical gaps of 40 microm (s.d. = 11 microm) compared with 72 microm (s.d. = 40 microm) for CoCr-frameworks. These differences were not significant (U-test, P = 0.124) because of a considerable variation of the values for CoCr-frameworks (minimum: 8 microm and maximum: 216 microm). However, frameworks cast in two pieces and mated with a laser showed significantly better accuracy in comparison with the other experimental groups (mean: 17 microm +/- 6; P laser welding. Manufacturing the framework pieces separately and then welding them together provides the best marginal fit.

  9. Functional adaptation of the masticatory system to implant-supported mandibular overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Corteville, Frédéric; Kappel, Stefanie; Rammelsberg, Peter; Schindler, Hans Jürgen; Eberhard, Lydia

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the adaptation behavior of the stomatognathic system after immediate loading (24 to 72 h after surgery) of two implants supporting mandibular overdentures, assessed on insertion and three months later. The study hypothesis was that insertion of the overdentures would significantly change masticatory performance and muscle activity at both times. Thirty subjects (nine female, mean age 69.64 ± 11.81 years; 21 male, mean age 68.67 ± 7.41 years) who participated in a randomized clinical trial were included in the study. Each patient was examined three times: (i) at baseline, after already having worn new dentures for three months (T1); (ii) immediately after insertion of the overdentures on the implants (T2); and (iii) after an adaptation period of three months (T3). Examination comprised assessment of masticatory performance with artificial test food (Optocal), and simultaneous bilateral surface EMG recording of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. Particle-size distribution (representative value X 50 ), maximum muscle contraction (MVC), and total muscle work (TMW; area under the curve) were compared by use of repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). At T3, all measured variables (i.e., masticatory performance and muscle activity) were significantly different from those at T1. At T2, no significant changes were observed. The study hypothesis had to be rejected for T2 but accepted for T3. Functional rehabilitation (in terms of masticatory performance and masticatory muscle activity) does not occur immediately after immediate loading of two implants with mandibular overdentures, but requires a significant time for functional improvement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. From Guided Surgery to Final Prosthesis with a Fully Digital Procedure: A Prospective Clinical Study on 15 Partially Edentulous Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Andrea Dolcini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scope. To demonstrate guided implant placement and the application of fixed, implant-supported prosthetic restorations with a fully digital workflow. Methods. Over a 2-year period, all patients with partial edentulism of the posterior maxilla, in need of fixed implant-supported prostheses, were considered for inclusion in this study. The protocol required intraoral scanning and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, the superimposition of dental-gingival information on bone anatomy, surgical planning, 3D-printed teeth-supported surgical templates, and modelling and milling of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA temporaries for immediate loading. After 3 months, final optical impression was taken and milled zirconia frameworks and 3D-printed models were fabricated. The frameworks were veneered with ceramic and delivered to the patients. Results. Fifteen patients were selected for this study. The surgical templates were stable. Thirty implants were placed (BTK Safe®, BTK, Vicenza, Italy and immediately loaded with PMMA temporaries. After 3 months, the temporaries were replaced by the final restorations in zirconia-ceramic, fabricated with a fully digital process. At 6 months, none of the patients reported any biological or functional problems with the implant-supported prostheses. Conclusions. The present procedure for fully digital planning of implants and short-span fixed implant-supported restorations has been shown to be reliable. Further studies are needed to validate these results.

  11. Verificação e análise morfofuncional das características da mastigação em usuários de prótese dentária removível Verification and morfofunctional analysis of mastication characteristics in individuals using removable dental prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Veiga Andersen Cavalcanti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar as características da mastigação em indivíduos usuários de prótese dentária removível parcial e total, analisando prováveis fatores interferentes associados à função mastigatória. MÉTODOS: participaram 53 indivíduos, ambos os sexos, entre 42 anos e 67 anos, divididos em dois grupos: 32 indivíduos usuários de prótese dentária total e/ou parcial removível estável (G1 e 21 indivíduos com dentição natural (G2. Foram critérios de exclusão: deficiência neurológica ou cognitiva, deformidades dentofaciais, disfunção temporomandibular e qualquer lesão bucal que pudesse interferir na mastigação. A avaliação foi realizada com pão de sal, solicitando-se mastigação habitual. Foram analisados: características das estruturas e da musculatura, tipo de corte, manutenção de vedamento labial, tempo de mastigação, número de ciclos mastigatórios, e tipo de mastigação: se uni ou bilateral, considerando-se predomínio unilateral em mais de 66% dos ciclos mastigatórios em um único lado. RESULTADOS: foram verificadas alterações quanto à característica do músculo masseter e ao tipo de corte para G1 com diferenças estatisticamente significantes, quando comparado à G2. As demais estruturas orofaciais, lábios, língua, bochechas, mentual, e postura de lábios durante a mastigação apresentaram-se normais para ambos os grupos. Não houve diferença significante entre os grupos quanto aos movimentos mandibulares, ao tipo, tempo e número de ciclos mastigatórios e caracterização da deglutição. CONCLUSÃO: a mastigação em usuários de prótese dentária removível caracteriza-se por alterações no corte do alimento, indefinição de tipo mastigatório, vedamento labial satisfatório, média do tempo e de ciclos mastigatórios semelhantes àqueles obtidos para indivíduos com dentição natural.PURPOSE: to check mastication characteristics in individuals using removable dental prosthesis

  12. A simple procedure for retrieval of a cement-retained implant-supported crown: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed Mahmoud; Mahmood, Wan Adida; Yunus, Norsiah Binti

    2014-02-01

    Retrieval of cement-retained implant prostheses can be more demanding than retrieval of screw-retained prostheses. This case report describes a simple and predictable procedure to locate the abutment screw access openings of cementretained implant-supported crowns in cases of fractured ceramic veneer. A conventional periapical radiography image was captured using a digital camera, transferred to a computer, and manipulated using Microsoft Word document software to estimate the location of the abutment screw access.

  13. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-09

    Jun 9, 2013 ... Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention.

  14. Elektra prosthesis for trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klahn, A; Nygaard, Mads; Gvozdenovic, R

    2012-01-01

    We present a prospective follow-up of 39 Elektra prostheses in 37 patients (32 women and five men), with a mean age of 56.5 (range 46-71) years; 34 patients had osteoarthritis and three had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were followed using clinical examination, including measurement of pain...... be the key problem in treating trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis using a total prosthesis....

  15. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  16. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  17. Effect of Diamondlike Carbon Coating on Reliability of Implant-Supported Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Ronaldo; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Bonfante, Estevam A; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Imazato, Satoshi; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of diamondlike carbon (DLC) coating on abutments and/or abutment screws on the reliability, characteristic strength, and Weibull modulus of implant-supported single crowns. Seventy-two external hexagon implants (Emfills Implant 4 mm diameter, 10 mm length, Emfills) were divided into four groups (n = 18 each), according to the presence or not of a DLC coating in the abutment and/or abutment screw, as follows: abutment without coating, screw without coating (AwcSwc); abutment without coating with coated screw (AwcSC); abutment coated with noncoated screw (ACSwc), and coated abutment with coated screw (ACSC). Abutments and screws were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. The specimens were subjected to step-stress accelerated life testing in water. Use-level probability Weibull curves and reliability for a mission of 100,000 cycles at 150 N (90% two-sided confidence intervals) were calculated. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopes were used for fractographic analysis. For a mission of 100,000 cycles at 150 N, reliability was 0.45 (0.20 to 0.67), 0.12 (0.00 to 0.47), 0.56 (0.17 to 0.82), and 0.44 (0.07 to 0.77) for AwcSwc, AwcSC, ACSwc, and ACSC, respectively. The probability Weibull calculation showed a Weibull modulus (m) of m = 5.50, m = 11.64, m = 16.96, and m = 15.08 and the characteristic strengths (η, which indicates the load at which 63.2% of the specimens of each group fail) of η = 202.67 N, ŋ = 206.64 N, ŋ = 192.54 N, and ŋ = 203.59 N for AwcSwc, AwcSC, ACSwc, and ACSC, respectively. Abutment screw fracture was the chief failure outcome in all groups. Characteristic strength values were not different among groups; neither was reliability. However, an increase in Weibull modulus (indicating low variability of the results) was observed with DLC coating of abutment or screw or both.

  18. Prosthetic rehabilitation of mandibular defects with fixed-removable partial denture prosthesis using precision attachment: A twin case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimal Kantilal Munot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The restoration of normal function and esthetic appearance with a dental prosthesis is a major challenge in the rehabilitation of patients who have lost their teeth and surrounding bone because of surgery for oral cyst or tumor. Rehabilitation with fixed or removable prosthesis is even more challenging when the edentulous span is long and the ridge is defective. Anatomic deformities and unfavorable biomechanics encountered in the region of resection add to the misery. In such situation, a fixed-removable prosthesis allows favorable biomechanical stress distribution along with restoration of esthetics, phonetics, comfort, hygiene, and better postoperative care and maintenance. This article describes rehabilitation of two cases with mandibular defects with an attachment-retained fixed-removable hybrid prosthesis.

  19. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Mandibular Defects with Fixed-removable Partial Denture Prosthesis Using Precision Attachment: A Twin Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munot, Vimal Kantilal; Nayakar, Ramesh P; Patil, Raghunath

    2017-01-01

    The restoration of normal function and esthetic appearance with a dental prosthesis is a major challenge in the rehabilitation of patients who have lost their teeth and surrounding bone because of surgery for oral cyst or tumor. Rehabilitation with fixed or removable prosthesis is even more challenging when the edentulous span is long and the ridge is defective. Anatomic deformities and unfavorable biomechanics encountered in the region of resection add to the misery. In such situation, a fixed-removable prosthesis allows favorable biomechanical stress distribution along with restoration of esthetics, phonetics, comfort, hygiene, and better postoperative care and maintenance. This article describes rehabilitation of two cases with mandibular defects with an attachment-retained fixed-removable hybrid prosthesis.

  20. A simplified method to reduce prosthetic misfit for a screw-retained, implant-supported complete denture using a luting technique and laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Salvatore; Sartori, Matteo; Davide, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    An important aim of implant-supported prostheses is to achieve a passive fit of the framework with the abutments to limit the amount of stress transfer to the bone-implant interface. An efficient and standardized technique is proposed. A definitive screw-retained, implant-supported complete denture was fabricated for an immediately loaded provisional screw-retained implant-supported complete denture. Precise fit was achieved by the use of industrial titanium components and the passivity, by an intraoral luting sequence and laser welding.

  1. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of different implant configurations for a mandibular fixed prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Giovanni; Tellini, Simone; Vangi, Dario; Branchi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of stresses in bone, implants, and prosthesis were analyzed via three-dimensional finite element modeling in different implant configurations for a fixed implant-supported prosthesis in an edentulous mandible. A finite element model was created with data obtained from computed tomographic scans of a human mandible. Anisotropic characteristics for cortical and cancellous bone were incorporated into the model. Six different configurations of intraforaminal implants were tested, with the number of implants varying from three to five and the distal implants inserted either parallel to the other implants or tilted distally by 17 or 34 degrees. A prosthetic structure connecting the implants was designed, with 20-mm posterior cantilevers for the parallel implant configurations, and a load of 200 N was applied to the distal portion of the cantilevers. Stresses were measured at the level of the implant, the prosthetic structure, and the bone. Bone-level stresses were analyzed at the implant-bone interface, at the external cortical bone surface, distal to the terminal implant, and in the cancellous bone along the implant body. A three-parallel-implant configuration resulted in higher stress in the implant and bone than configurations with four or five parallel implants. Configurations with the distal implants tilted resulted in a more favorable stress distribution at all levels. In parallel-implant configurations for fixed implant-supported mandibular prostheses, four and five implants resulted in similar stress distribution in the bone, framework, and implants. A distribution of four implants with the distal implants tilted 34 degrees (ie, the "All-on-Four" configuration) resulted in a favorable reduction of stresses in the bone, framework, and implants.

  2. Oral health related quality-of-life outcomes of partially edentulous patients treated with implant-supported single crowns or fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZarea, Bader K

    2017-05-01

    Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) is afflicted by different variables. Limited information is available regarding the impact of different phases of implant therapy on OHRQoL of edentulous patients. This study was carried out to assess the OHRQoL of patients treated with implant-supported single crowns or fixed partial dentures. A total of 79 healthy partially edentulous subjects needing implant therapy were incorporated in this study. Before placement of the implants, the subjects were instructed to fill the original version of OHIP questionnaire. Subsequently patients received titanium oral implants of the ITI® Dental Implant System. After 1st, 2nd and 3rd year of implant placement, patients filled the same OHIP-49 questionnaire. In this manner the impact of implant therapy on OHRQoL by putting in comparison pre- and post-treatment OHIP-49 scores was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using Statistical Package for the Social Science software (SPSS, version 22, Chicago, IL, USA). Paired t test and Unpaired t test were performed and a statistical significance was set at 5% level of significance ( p disability, psychological disability, social disability were significantly decreased from baseline to 1st year ( p 0.05). All variables were also significantly decreased from baseline to 2nd year and 3rd year ( p 0.05). Patients aged less than 60 years and more than 60 years of age groups differed significantly with respect to OHIP scores measured at 1st year, 2nd year and at 3rd year of implant placement ( p Oral health-related quality-of-life.

  3. Is bruxism a risk factor for dental implants? A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manfredini, D.; Poggio, C.E.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review the literature on the role of bruxism as a risk factor for the different complications on dental implant-supported rehabilitations. Material and Methods A systematic search in the National Library of Medicine's Medline Database was performed to identify all

  4. The Amount of Wear in Attachment of Implant-Supported Overdentures in Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Vafaee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: One of the simplest and cheapest attachments for overdentures, is the ball-type attachment, however, keeping it during the first year of prosthesis delivery and after that is one of the main concerns of dentists. The present study aimed to assess the wear of matrix in overdentures attachment supported by one, two and three implants in the mandible. Materials and methods: Thirty edentulous patients were randomly divided into three groups: the first group received a single implant in the midline of the lower mandible, the second group two implants in areas B and D, and the third group three implants in areas B, C, and D. The attachment used in patients’ prosthetic with single and two implants was O-ball/ring attachment and for patients with three implants, the treatment plan was ball bar-supported attachments. After placing the new matrix implant for each patient and obtaining their consent, the matrix wear was measured with CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine device. To compare matrix wear after six months and one year, measurements were repeated. Data analysis, using ANOVA and multiple comparisons was down by Tukey Test. variance with repeated measures and Tukey test were used to compare the groups two-by-two. P.value less than 0.05 was set statistical significant. SPSS 16 software was used for data analysis. Results: The data obtained from the CMM device showed that the lowest mean matrix wear in the maximum single implant and maximum mean were in group two. Conclusion: Both time and the number of implants had a significant effect on the wear of the O-ring.

  5. Dosimetry of a silicone breast prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Powell, W.R.; Bostwick, J.

    1980-01-01

    Dose measurements were conducted in a phantom which simulates breast tissue and in another phantom which simulates a breast containing a silicone prosthesis. No detectable difference was found when the irradiations were carried out with tangential beams of 60 Co radiation. The degree of backscatter and absorption of radiation by the prosthesis and phantom were also similar. A slight decrease in dose of approximately 8% was found at the interface between the prosthesis and muscle-equivalent material

  6. Malrotation of the McGhan Style 510 prosthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schots, J.M.; Fechner, M.R.; Hoogbergen, M.M.; Tits, H.W.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anatomically shaped cohesive silicone breast implants are frequently used in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery. After successful results with the Style 410 prosthesis, McGhan (Natrelle, Allergan) introduced the Style 510 prosthesis. After using this novel prosthesis, the authors

  7. Evaluation of marginal fit of single implant-supported metal-ceramic crowns prepared by using presintered metal blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasali, Baris; Sarac, Duygu; Kaleli, Necati; Sarac, Yakup Sinasi

    2018-02-01

    Recently, presintered metal blocks for nonprecious and precious metal implant-supported restorations have gained popularity in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) systems. However, few studies have evaluated the marginal discrepancy of implant-supported restorations made with these new alloy systems. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the milling-sintering method with the lost-wax and milling methods in terms of the marginal fit of implant-supported metal-ceramic restorations. Thirty implant abutments screwed to implant analogs were embedded into acrylic resin to investigate marginal fit and then divided according to fabrication methods into the following 3 groups (n=10): lost-wax (LW; control group), milling (M), and milling-sintering (MS). Porcelain material was applied to all specimens after completion of the fabrication process. Subsequently, all specimens were cemented to implant abutments for the measurement of marginal discrepancies. Twelve marginal discrepancy measurements were recorded on each implant abutment by using a stereomicroscope. The arithmetic mean of these 12 measurements was considered the mean marginal discrepancy value of each abutment. Data were statistically analyzed by using 1-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significant difference tests (α=.05). The lowest mean marginal discrepancy values (81 ±2 μm) were observed in the M group, which was significantly different (Pmarginal discrepancy values (99 ±2 μm) were observed in the MS group. The results revealed that restorations prepared by the milling-sintering method provided clinically acceptable results (marginal fit. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nasal prosthesis rehabilitation: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Sumeet; Maru, Kavita; Shukla, Jyotsana

    2011-01-01

    Facial defects resulting from neoplasm, congenital malformation or trauma can be restored with facial prosthesis using different materials and retention methods to achieve life-like look and function. A nasal prosthesis can re-establish esthetic form and anatomic contours for mid-facial defects...... the non-surgical rehabilitation, with polymethyl meth-acrylate resin, nasal prosthesis for a patient who received partial rhinectomy as a result of squamous cell carcinoma of the nose. The prosthesis was made to restore the esthetic appearance of the patient with a mechanical retained design using...

  9. Clinical research in implant dentistry: evaluation of implant-supported restorations, aesthetic and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Niklaus P; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2012-02-01

    The articles discussed in working group 3 dealt with specific aspects of clinical research. In this context, the literature reporting on survival and complication rates of implant-supported or implant-tooth supported restorations in longitudinal studies of at least 5 years were discussed. The second aspect dealt with the evaluation of aesthetic outcomes in clinical studies and the related index systems available. Finally, the third aspect discussed dealt with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). A detailed appraisal of the available methodology was presented. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Implant-supported mandibular overdentures retained with ball or bar attachments: a randomized prospective 5-year study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Holm, B

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the periimplant conditions and the maintenance requirements for implant-supported overdentures in the mandible retained with ball or bar attachments during a 5-year period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-six completely edentulous patients had two...... differences were registered. The mean frequency of complications/repairs per patient per year was 1.0 in the bar group and 0.6 in the ball group during the 5-year observation period. CONCLUSION: Two implants with ball or bar attachment supported an overdenture in the mandible for 5 years with a 100% survival...

  11. Evaluation of patients with oral lichenoid lesions by dental patch testing and results of removal of the dental restoration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Buket Şahin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Oral lichenoid lesions (OLL are contact stomatitis characterized by white reticular or erosive patches, plaque-like lesions that are clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from oral lichen planus (OLP. Amalgam dental fillings and dental restoration materials are among the etiologic agents. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the standard and dental series patch tests in patients with OLL in comparison to a control group and evaluate our results. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with OLL or OLP and 30 healthy control subjects, who had at least one dental restoration material and/or dental filling, were included in the study. Both groups received standard series and dental patch test and the results were evaluated simultaneously. Results: The most frequent allergens in the dental series patch test in the patient group were palladium chloride (n=4; 12.12% and benzoyl peroxide (n=2, 6.06%. Of the 33 patients with OLL; 8 had positive reaction to allergents in the standard patch test series and 8 had positive reaction in the dental patch test series. There was no significant difference in the rate of patch test reaction to the dental and standard series between the groups. Ten patients were advised to have the dental restoration material removed according to the results of the patch tests. The lesions improved in three patients [removal of all amalgam dental fillings (n=1, replacement of all amalgam dental fillings with an alternative filling material (n=1 and replacement of the dental prosthesis (n=1] following the removal or replacement of the dental restoration material. Conclusion: Dental patch test should be performed in patients with OLL and dental restoration material. Dental filling and/or prosthesis should be removed/replaced if there is a reaction against a dental restoration material-related allergen.

  12. Bilateral implant-retained auricular prosthesis for a patient with congenitally missing ears. A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Preeti Satheesh; Satheesh Kumar, K S; Savadi, Ravindra C

    2012-06-01

    Microtia is a major congenital anomaly of the external ear. It includes a spectrum of deformities from a grossly normal but small ear to the absence of the entire external ear. These deformities account for three in every 10,000 births, with bilaterally missing ears seen in fewer than 10% of all cases. Congenital abnormalities of the ear are unlikely to result in the complete absence of the ears, but the patient presented in this article had bilateral congenitally missing ears. There was loss of anatomic landmarks and alteration of normal bony architecture. Minimal tissue was available for retention; therefore, conventional techniques could not be used for achieving retention. A two-implant-supported auricular prosthesis was planned, but the patient was found to have deficient bone in the implant site. Hence the implants were placed posterior to these sites, and the superstructure was modified to accommodate for this change in position of the implant to ensure the esthetic positioning of the prosthesis. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Accuracy of digital impression in dental implants: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Sudabe Kulivand; Maryam Moslemion

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of dental implants remains one of the most challenging aspects of implant dentistry. Although it is not clear whether prosthetic misfit could affect osseointegration, mechanical complications of implant-supported prostheses can be avoided by achieving a good passive fit between the framework and the implants. Passive fit is a difficult concept to define. Obtaining absolute passive fit of the prosthetic framework on implants has been reported to be nearly impossible. Because of ...

  14. Effect of implant support on mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures: relationship between denture supporting area and stress distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Suzuki, Yasunori; Kurihara, Daisuke; Shimpo, Hidemasa; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-04-01

    This study explored the relationship between implant support and the denture-supporting area by comparing the stability of an implant-supported distal extension removable partial denture and a conventional distal extension removable partial denture. A model simulating a mandibular bilateral distal extension missing (#34-37 and #44-47) was fabricated using silicone impression material as soft tissue (2 mm thick) on an epoxy resin bone model. The denture base was reduced by 5 mm cutting part of both the retromolar pad and the lingual border. Loads of up to 5 kg were applied, and the pressure and displacement of the RPDs were simultaneously measured and analyzed using the Wilcoxon test (αremovable partial denture (ISRPD) was significantly less than on the conventional RPD (CRPD). As the supporting area of the denture base decreased, the pressure and the denture displacement of the CRPD were greater than for the ISRPD. This study indicated that implant placement at the distal edentulous ridge can prevent denture displacement of the distal extension bases, regardless of the supporting area of the denture base. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Strain gauge analysis of the effect of porcelain firing simulation on the prosthetic misfit of implant-supported frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vasconcellos, Diego Klee; Özcan, Mutlu; Maziero Volpato, Cláudia Ângela; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Yener, Esra Salihoğlu

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of porcelain firing on the misfit of implant-supported frameworks and analyzed the influence of preheat treatment on the dimensional alterations. Four external-hex cylindrical implants were placed in polyurethane block. Ten frameworks of screw-retained implant-supported prostheses were cast in Pd-Ag using 2 procedures: (1) control group (CG, n = 5): cast in segments and laser welded; and test group (TG, n = 5): cast in segments, preheated, and laser welded. All samples were subjected to firing to simulate porcelain veneering firing. Strain gauges were bonded around the implants, and microstrain values (με = 10⁻⁶ε) were recorded after welding (M1), oxidation cycle (M2), and glaze firing (M3). Data were statistically analyzed (2-way analysis of variance, Bonferroni, α = 0.05). The microstrain value in the CG at M3 (475.2 με) was significantly different from the values observed at M1 (355.6 με) and M2 (413.9 με). The values at M2 and M3 in the CG were not statistically different. Microstrain values recorded at different moments (M1: 361.6 με/M2: 335.3 με/M3: 307.2 με) did not show significant difference. The framework misfit deteriorates during firing cycles of porcelain veneering. Metal distortion after porcelain veneering could be controlled by preheat treatment.

  16. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore...

  17. Femoral Prosthesis Infection by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Sozio, Federica; Catavitello, Chiara; Talia, Marzia; Manna, Assunta; Febbo, Fabio; Balbinot, Andrea; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Piccolomini, Raffaele; Parruti, Giustino; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    This case report is a case history of a femoral prosthesis infection caused by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in a human immunodeficiency virus patient. Though the pathogenicity of this organism for bone tissue has been previously reported, this is the first reported case of an orthopedic prosthesis infection by this species of the genus Rhodotorula. PMID:18753353

  18. Smartphone supported upper limb prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepp D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available State of the art upper limb prostheses offer up to six active DoFs (degrees of freedom and are controlled using different grip patterns. This low number of DoFs combined with a machine-human-interface which does not provide control over all DoFs separately result in a lack of usability for the patient. The aim of this novel upper limb prosthesis is both offering simplified control possibilities for changing grip patterns depending on the patients’ priorities and the improvement of grasp capability. Design development followed the design process requirements given by the European Medical Device Directive 93/42 ECC and was structured into the topics mechanics, software and drive technology. First user needs were identified by literature research and by patient feedback. Consequently, concepts were evaluated against technical and usability requirements. A first evaluation prototype with one active DoF per finger was manufactured. In a second step a test setup with two active DoF per finger was designed. The prototype is connected to an Android based smartphone application. Two main grip patterns can be preselected in the software application and afterwards changed and used by the EMG signal. Three different control algorithms can be selected: “all-day”, “fine” and “tired muscle”. Further parameters can be adjusted to customize the prosthesis to the patients’ needs. First patient feedback certified the prosthesis an improved level of handling compared to the existing devices. Using the two DoF test setup, the possibilities of finger control with a neural network are evaluated at the moment. In a first user feedback test, the smartphone based software application increased the device usability, e.g. the change within preselected grip patterns and the “tired muscle” algorithm. Although the overall software application was positively rated, the handling of the prosthesis itself needs to be proven within a patient study to be

  19. Quality of Life of Patients Treated With Implant-Supported Mandibular Overdentures Evaluated With the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14: a Survey of 58 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Kuoppala

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oral health-related quality of life of patients treated with implant-supported mandibular overdentures and to compare the attachment systems used.Material and Methods: Altogether 112 patients treated with implant-supported mandibular overdentures in 1985 - 2004 were invited to the follow-up; 58 of them attended and replied to the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14 -questionnaire. There were 48 overdentures with a bar connection and 10 with a ball connection, the total number of implants installed and still in use was 197. The mean follow-up time was 13.7 years. The associations between the OHIP-14 variables and the patient’s age, gender as well as the number of implants supporting the overdenture and the type of attachment used were assessed.Results: The results showed that patients with implant-supported mandibular overdentures were satisfied with their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL. Older patients were more satisfied than younger ones in both genders. Neither the implant connection type nor the number of supporting implants seemed to have a significant influence on the OHRQoL.Conclusions: Especially older patients with mandibular implant-supported overdentures were satisfied with their oral health-related quality of life. Attachment type or the number of supporting implants did not have a significant influence on the oral health-related quality of life.

  20. Psychosocial impact on anophthalmic patients wearing ocular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, M C; dos Santos, D M; Bannwart, L C; Moreno, A; Pesqueira, A A; Haddad, M F; dos Santos, E G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the improvement in psychosocial awareness of anophthalmic patients wearing ocular prostheses and its relationship with demographic characteristics, factors of loss/treatment, social activity, and relationship between professional and patient. Surveys including a form for evaluation of psychosocial pattern were conducted with 40 anophthalmic patients rehabilitated with ocular prosthesis at the Center of Oral Oncology in the authors' dental school from January 1998 to November 2010. The improvement in psychosocial awareness was assessed by comparing the perception of some feelings reported in the period of eye loss and currently. Wilcoxon tests were applied for comparison of patients' perception between the periods. χ(2) tests were used to assess the relationship between the improvement in psychosocial awareness and the variables of the study. In addition, the logistic regression model measured this relationship with the measure of odds ratio. The feelings of shame, shyness, preoccupation with hiding it, sadness, insecurity and fear were significant for improvement in psychosocial awareness. It was concluded that the anophthalmic patients wearing an ocular prosthesis has significant improvement in psychosocial awareness after rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Motor behavior during the first chewing cycle in subjects with fixed tooth- or implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriadis, Joannis; Trulsson, Mats; Svensson, Krister G

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate sensory information from periodontal mechanoreceptors (PMRs) is important for optimizing the positioning of food and adjustment of force vectors during precision biting. This study was designed to describe motor behavior during the first cycle of a natural chewing task and to evaluate the role of such sensory input in this behavior. While 10 subjects with natural dentition, 11 with bimaxillary fixed tooth-supported prostheses (TSP) and 10 with bimaxillary fixed implant-supported prostheses (ISP) (mean age 69 [range 61-83]) chewed a total of five hazelnuts, their vertical and lateral jaw movements were recorded. Data obtained during the first chewing cycle of each hazelnut were analyzed. The amplitude of vertical and lateral mandibular movement and duration of jaw opening did not differ between the groups, indicating similar behavior during this part of the chewing cycle. However, only 30% of the subjects in the natural dentate group, but 82% of those in the TSP and 70% in the ISP group exhibited slippage of the hazelnut during jaw closure in at least one of five trials. The TSP and ISP groups also exhibited more irregular and narrower patterns of motion (total lateral/vertical movement = 0.15 and 0.19, respectively, compared to 0.27 for the natural group). Subjects with fixed tooth- or implant-supported prostheses in both jaws show altered behavior, including inadequate control of the hazelnut, during the first chewing cycle. We propose that these differences are due to impairment or absence of sensory signaling from PMRs in these individuals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Influence of Abutment Design on Stiffness, Strength, and Failure of Implant-Supported Monolithic Resin Nano Ceramic (RNC) Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joda, Tim; Huber, Samuel; Bürki, Alexander; Zysset, Philippe; Brägger, Urs

    2015-12-01

    Recent technical development allows the digital manufacturing of monolithic reconstructions with high-performance materials. For implant-supported crowns, the fixation requires an abutment design onto which the reconstruction can be bonded. The aim of this laboratory investigation was to analyze stiffness, strength, and failure modes of implant-supported, computer-assisted design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-generated resin nano ceramic (RNC) crowns bonded to three different titanium abutments. Eighteen monolithic RNC crowns were produced and loaded in a universal testing machine under quasi-static condition according to DIN ISO 14801. With regard to the type of titanium abutment, three groups were defined: (1) prefabricated cementable standard; (2) CAD/CAM-constructed individualized; and (3) novel prefabricated bonding base. Stiffness and strength were measured and analyzed statistically with Wilcoxon rank sum test. Sections of the specimens were examined microscopically. Stiffness demonstrated high stability for all specimens loaded in the physiological loading range with means and standard deviations of 1,579 ± 120 N/mm (group A), 1,733 ± 89 N/mm (group B), and 1,704 ± 162 N/mm (group C). Mean strength of the novel prefabricated bonding base (group C) was 17% lower than of the two other groups. Plastic deformations were detectable for all implant-abutment crown connections. Monolithic implant crowns made of RNC seem to represent a feasible and stable prosthetic construction under laboratory testing conditions with strength higher than the average occlusal force, independent of the different abutment designs used in this investigation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, K.M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2000-01-01

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  4. Stretch due to Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baten

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year old patient presented to the emergency department with stretch, due to impossible deflation of the penile prosthesis, 4 years after successful implant. A CT-scan showed migration of the reservoir to the left rectus abdominis muscle. Refilling of the reservoir was inhibited by muscular compression, causing stretch. Removal and replacement of the reservoir was performed, after which the prosthesis was well-functioning again. Migration of the penile prosthesis reservoir is extremely rare but can cause several complications, such as stretch.

  5. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. The tracheal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device made of a silicone... of the trachea or trachealbronchial tree. It may be unbranched or contain one or two branches. The...

  6. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-08-29

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis.

  7. Classification system on the selection of number of implants and superstructure design on the basis available vertical restorative space and interforaminal distance for implant supported mandibular overdenture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Bhargava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The rehabilitation of the edentulous mandible is a challenge due to various limiting factors, of which the available vertical restorative space (AVRS has been well understood in the literature. However, other anatomic variations such as arch form, arch size, and also the interforaminal distance (IFD (due to the presence of mandibular nerve are influential in the selection of size and position of implants, and thereby the prosthetic design. Materials and Method: In the present study, 30 edentulous patients from a group of 300 edentulous patients, representing all the three jaw relations (Class I, II, and III were evaluated for designing a classification that could help in a comprehensive treatment plan for the edentulous mandible. Dental panoramic radiographs of each individual with a trial or final prosthesis were made. The horizontal IFD and AVRS values were calculated. Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by post-hoc test (multiple comparison and Bonferroni method having P < 0.05 as significant value showed an overall mean of 38.9 mm for horizontal distance and 13.69 mm for the AVRS in 30 edentulous patients. Conclusion: The results showed that in the majority of cases (90% there is insufficient space to place a bar attachment supported by five implants for mandibular overdentures. This suggests that a universal treatment plan cannot be followed due to varying anatomic factors. Hence, it becomes imperative to have a set of clinical guidelines based on the AVRS and IFD, for the selection of implant number and type of attachment. The article proposes a simple classification system based on the AVRS and IFD for establishing guidelines in the treatment planning of the edentulous mandible, to aid in selection of implant size, number, and position along with the associated prosthetic design.

  8. Osseoperception in Dental Implants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Brånemark, Per-Ingvar

    2016-04-01

    Replacement of lost teeth has significant functional and psychosocial effects. The capability of osseointegrated dental implants to transmit a certain amount of sensibility is still unclear. The phenomenon of developing a certain amount of tactile sensibility through osseointegrated dental implants is called osseoperception. The aim of this article is to evaluate the available literature to find osseoperception associated with dental implants. To identify suitable literature, an electronic search was performed using Medline and PubMed database. Articles published in English and articles whose abstract is available in English were included. The articles included in the review were based on osseoperception, tactile sensation, and neurophysiological mechanoreceptors in relation to dental implants. Articles on peri-implantitis and infection-related sensitivity were not included. Review articles without the original data were excluded, although references to potentially pertinent articles were noted for further follow-up. The phenomenon of osseoperception remains a matter of debate, so the search strategy mainly focused on articles on osseoperception and tactile sensibility of dental implants. This review presents the histological, neurophysiological, and psychophysical evidence of osseoperception and also the role of mechanoreceptors in osseoperception. The literature on osseoperception in dental implants is very scarce. The initial literature search resulted in 90 articles, of which 81 articles that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this systematic review. Patients restored with implant-supported prostheses reported improved tactile and motor function when compared with patients wearing complete dentures. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Communication Protocol for Advanced Prosthesis Components

    OpenAIRE

    Karnå, David

    2007-01-01

    It would be of great value for the prosthesis industry to achieve an open standard for communication in upper limb prostheses. Cooperation between NTNU and the University of New Brunswick has resulted in a functional requirements specification for such a standard, SCIP(Standardised Communication Interface in Prostheses). The special challenges for communication in a prosthesis system are possible noisy environments, high demands for light weight, safety for the user and the fact that devices ...

  10. Does pneumoconiosis of dental technician cause to calcific pleural lesions? (Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman ŞENYİĞİT

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The articles about various pneumoconiosis in dental technicians who work in inconvenient conditions have been increasing in recent years. Exposure to dust and fume that occur during the dental procedure may play role in pneumoconiosis of dental technicians.A 53 years old male patient conveyed that he has worked in dental prosthesis procedures for 22 years (1968-1990.Environmental asbestosis was not established in the history of the case but there were calcified pleural plaques in the chest x-ray graphy.There were appearance of calcific asbest plaques in many section of thorax CT.A case of pneumoconiosis in dental technician who work in unadequate preventive conditions was reported in this paper. Probably ,exposure to the asbest fibers that occurs during the procedure of dental prosthesis were the main reason for developing calcific pleural lesions.

  11. [Attaching single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreulen, C.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A single- or multi-unit fixed dental prosthesis can be attached to the abutment teeth through mechanical retention and gap sealing or by adhesion. For sealing the gap, water-soluble cements are appropriate, such as zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, and (resin-modified) glasionomer cement. Attachment

  12. Treatment Outcome of Two Adjacent Implant-Supported Restorations with Different Implant Platform Designs in the Esthetic Region : A Five-Year Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nimwegen, Wouter G.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Stellingsma, Kees; Tymstra, Nynke; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the peri-implant soft and hard tissues and satisfaction in patients with two adjacent implant-supported restorations in the esthetic region, treated with two adjacent implants with a scalloped or flat platform. Materials and Methods: The randomized

  13. Evaluation of aesthetics of implant-supported single-tooth replacements using different bone augmentation procedures : A prospective randomized clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijndert, Leo; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Stellingsma, Kees; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the aesthetics of implant-supported single-tooth replacements using different augmentation procedures in a prospective study with the use of an objective rating index and with a subjective patient questionnaire, and to compare the results with each

  14. The Use of CAD/CAM Trial Pattern for Facial Prosthesis Fabrication of a Maxillofacial Patient with Large Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ariani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of maxillofacial patients needs a multidisciplinary approach of several expertise based on the complexityof the case. Prosthodontists often work together with e.g. ENT, oral or plastic surgeons to provide patient with betterprosthesis and optimum treatment. Case report: A 55 years old male was referred to Dental Teaching Hospital ofUniversitas Indonesia for facial prosthesis fabrication. Patient had undergone squamous cell carcinoma ablationsurgery that encompassed nose, cheek, sinuses, upper lip and most of the hard palate. Due to the extensive natureof the defect, Department of Prosthodontics collaborated with Department of Biomedical Engineering to employ3D printing technique using general purpose machine for fabricating the trial pattern for the prosthesis, withattention given especially to margin areas and facial contours. This technique helps for prosthesis fabrication ofthis patient because manual wax carving is no longer necessary. Wax carving usually is a labor/skill intensive stepand takes longer time. Conclusion: 3D printing of the trial pattern for the prosthesis help minimizes the labor/skill intensive part of facial prosthesis fabrication.

  15. [Osteo-odonto-kerato-prosthesis. Radiographic, CT and MR features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellelli, A; Avitto, A; Liberali, M; Iannetti, F; Iannetti, L; David, V

    2001-09-01

    Osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis, a complex eye surgery technique devised by Strampelli, provides a valuable opportunity to restore vision in patients with severe corneal opacification (chemical or thermal burns, bullous keratopathy, severe keratitis, consequences of perforating injuries) in whom corneal transplant or the insertion of synthetic prostheses is contraindicated because of the high risk of rejection. Successful implantation of corneal prostheses in these patients was clearly dependent on the use of perfectly biocompatible materials to support the optic. Strampelli demonstrated that thin autologous tooth sections, complete with alveolar-dental ligament fulfilled these requirements, and integrated perfectly with the eye tissues without any risk of rejection. This study aims to present the radiological aspects and postoperative outcome of 13 patients who received osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (bilateral in 11 cases and monolateral in 2) evaluated by plain radiography, CT and MRI. Between 1993 and 2001 we evaluated 13 patients who had undergone Strampelli's osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis, using CT, plain radiography and MRI. All patients were examined by plain radiography; 11 patients were also examined by CT and 8 also by MRI. The time interval between surgery and the radiological evaluation ranged from 3 to 13 years with a mean follow-up of 5 years and 9 months. All patients underwent periodic clinical and imaging examinations in the post-operative period to evaluate the osteo-dental implant and to study trophism of the transplant. No post-operative complications, either cicatricial, inflammatory or of any other nature, were clinically suspected. Only two patients showed partial reabsorption of the osteo-dental lamina - evident both on plain film and CT - 10 and 12 years after surgery. Vision was restored in all the patients, with visual acuity of 10/10 in 7 cases. Plain radiography allows to correctly evaluate the position of the prosthesis and detect

  16. Functional evaluation of a CAD/CAM prosthesis for immediate defect repair after total maxillectomy: a case series of 18 patients with maxillary sinus cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei-Fei; Hou, Yan; Lu, Li; Ding, Xiao-Xu; Li, Wei; Yan, Ai-Hui

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the facial profiles and functional recovery of 18 patients treated by a computer-aided designed/manufactured hollow obturator prosthesis (CAD/CAM prosthesis) after total maxillectomy for malignant maxillary sinus tumor. A retrospective observational study was performed to evaluate the facial profiles and functional recovery of 18 patients with T3-4a N0 M0 maxillary sinus cancer, who were treated by total maxillectomy and simultaneous implantation of a computer-aided designed/manufactured hollow obturator prosthesis (CAD/CAM prosthesis). Follow-ups were performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Facial measurements, speech intelligibility, and chewing and swallowing functions were examined. Thirteen patients converted to a permanent prosthesis 6 months after surgery. Comparisons were made between patients with and without the CAD/CAM or permanent prosthesis at various times using SPSS13.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Speech intelligibility, facial depression, and eyeball prolapse results showed improvements with prosthesis use at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery (p maxillectomy. This surgical treatment of maxillary sinus cancer is applied rarely in China, but it has a good effect based on our observation. Simultaneous CAD/CAM prosthesis implantation after total maxillectomy can recover the facial profile, enhance the speaking, swallowing, and chewing functions, and improve the quality of life of patients. Tumor recurrence can be detected by direct observation of the postoperative maxillary cavity. This technique avoids the need for dental implants because the bottom part of the prosthesis contains a palatal plate with dentures. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Technical complications rates and plaque control of fixed dental prostheses in patients treated for periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yesi; Meng, Huanxin; Han, Jie; Pan, Shaoxia; Zhang, Li; Shi, Dong

    2016-02-01

    To compare the incidence of technical complications of implant-supported fixed dental prostheses in Chinese patients with a history of moderate or severe periodontitis and periodontally healthy patients(PHP) and analyze the effects of interproximal papillae patterns on food impaction and efficacy of plaque control. A total of 103 partially edentulous patients treated with implant-supported fixed dental prostheses between December 2009 and December 2012 for a minimum 1-year follow-up period were recruited from Department of Periodontology, Peking University, School and Hospital of Stomatology. Based on the initial periodontal examination, the participants were divided into three groups: 30 PHP, 36 moderate periodontally compromised patients(mPCP) and 37 severe periodontally compromised patients(sPCP). Implant survival/loss, technical complications, plaque index, papilla index, food impaction and degree of proximal contact tightness of each patient were assessed around the implants at follow-up. According to the implant papilla index, the implants were divided into two groups: the "filling" group with the mesial and distal aspects with papilla index=3 and the "no filling" group with at least one aspect with papilla indextechnical complications were analyzed. Comparisons of the incidence of technical complications were performed between the patients with different periodontal conditions with chi-square or Fisher's exact test. The influences of the interproximal papillae loss on food impaction and efficacy of plaque control were estimated with chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. The total implant survival rate was 100%(162/162) for all three groups. Technical complications were as following: veneer fractures(1.9%, 3/162), abutment screw loosening(1.9%, 3/162), prosthetic screw loosening(3.1%, 5/162) and decementation(3.1%, 5/162) in all subjects. No implant/screw fracture was noted. The incidence of technical complications in sPCP, mPCP and PHP did not yield

  18. Different techniques in fabrication of ocular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Pinar; Dilber, Erhan; Eraslan, Oguz

    2012-11-01

    Loss of an eye caused by cancer, trauma, or congenital defect creates a deep psychological impact on an individual's life especially social and professional life. Custom-made prosthesis, compared to stock prosthesis, provides a better fit to the eye socket, better cosmetic results, and less discomfort to the patient in the long term. The main objective of this article was to describe 3 different alternative and practical techniques of fabricating custom-made ocular prosthesis. An impression of anophthalmic socket was made with the addition of cured silicone-based precision impression material in all techniques. A master cast was prepared and duplicated with condensation silicone. A self-cure acrylic resin was polymerized in the silicone model and was fitted into the patient's eye socket. A digital photograph of the patient's iris was made using a digital camera and printed on good-quality photo paper in various shades and sizes in the first and the second techniques. Then the photo paper was coated with PVC so as not to allow any color flowing. The proper iris was then inserted to the acrylic base. The prosthesis was final processed using orthodontic heat polymerizing clear acrylic resin.In the other technique, after the trying-in process with wax pattern, an acrylic base was fabricated using heat polymerizing scleral acrylic resin. The prosthetic iris was fabricated from a transparent contact lens by painting the lens with watercolor paints and attaching it to an acrylic resin with tissue conditioner. The final process was made with heat polymerizing transparent acrylic resin. Custom-made prosthesis allows better esthetic and functional results to the patient in comparison to stock prosthesis. Further follow-up is necessary to check the condition and fit of the ocular prosthesis in such patients.

  19. Stress analysis on the free-end distal extension of an implant-supported mandibular complete denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Diniz Greco

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative and qualitative analysis of the tensions generated in the cantilever region of an implant-supported mandibular complete denture was conducted using the three-dimensional finite element method. The mechanical properties of the components were input in the model and a load of 15 N was applied in pre-determined points. In the first simulation, the load was applied on the occlusal surface of the first premolar. In the second simulation, it was applied on the first and second premolars. In the third simulation, it was applied on the first and second premolars and on the first molar. The different occlusion patterns produced similar tension distributions in the cantilever region, which followed a similar pattern in the three simulations. In all of the cases, the highest levels of tension were located in the region of the first implant. However, as the loads were dislocated distally, the tensions increased considerably. The more extensive the cantilever, the more compromised will be the infrastructure, the prosthetic components and the implants. Regardless of the length of the cantilever, the highest tensions will always be located in the region of the implant next to the load application point.

  20. The Effect of Abutment Surface Roughness on the Retention of Implant-Supported Crowns Cemented with Provisional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mohammad Abrisham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness can increase the retention of castings by ridges and grooves that are microretentive. This study compared the retention of implant-supported crowns when used with 3 different surface roughness abutments and one temporary cement. Methods: Thirty solid abutments (ITI, 4 mm high, were divided into three groups randomly. In the first group, 10 abutments were roughened with sandblast (50-µm aluminum oxide and in the second group, 10 abutments were roughened with diamond bur. The third group had no surface treatment. Then, thirty implant fixture analogs (ITI were placed in the center of acrylic cylinders. After that a solid abutment was tightened on the each fixture analog with 35 N/cm force. Thirty base metal crowns were made on the 4 mm ITI abutment analogs using plastic coping. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by TempBond temporary cement and finally, crowns were pulled from the abutment in a universal test machine at a cross speed of 0.5cm/min. Results: The mean tensile strength in sandblasted, bur treated, and control group were 64.38±8, 91.37±7.19, and 58.61±1.93, respectively. Bur treated group showed higher tensile strength in comparison with two other groups. Conclusion: Surface modification of implant abutment by diamond bur may be an effective method to increase retention of crown when TempBond is used.

  1. The Effect of Abutment Surface Roughness on the Retention of Implant-Supported Crowns Cemented with Provisional Luting Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ganbarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness can increase the retention of castings by ridges and grooves that are microretentive. This study compared the retention of implant-supported crowns when used with 3 different surface roughness abutments and one temporary cement. Methods: Thirty solid abutments (ITI, 4 mm high, were divided into three groups randomly. In the first group, 10 abutments were roughened with sandblast (50-µm aluminum oxide and in the second group, 10 abutments were roughened with diamond bur. The third group had no surface treatment. Then, thirty implant fixture analogs (ITI were placed in the center of acrylic cylinders. After that a solid abutment was tightened on the each fixture analog with 35 N/cm force. Thirty base metal crowns were made on the 4 mm ITI abutment analogs using plastic coping. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by TempBond temporary cement and finally, crowns were pulled from the abutment in a universal test machine at a cross speed of 0.5cm/min. Results: The mean tensile strength in sandblasted, bur treated, and control group were 64.38±8, 91.37±7.19, and 58.61±1.93, respectively. Bur treated group showed higher tensile strength in comparison with two other groups. Conclusion: Surface modification of implant abutment by diamond bur may be an effective method to increase retention of crown when TempBond is used.

  2. Stress distribution patterns of implant supported overdentures-analog versus finite element analysis: A comparative in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumyadev Satpathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to asses & compare the load transfer characteristics of Ball/O-ring and Bar/Clip attachment systems in implant supported overdentures using analog and finite element analysis models. Methodology: For the analog part of the study, castable bar was used for the bar and clip attachment and a metallic housing with a rubber O-ring component was used for the ball/O-ring attachment. The stress on the implant surface was measured using the strain-gauge technique. For the finite element analysis, the model were fabricated and load applications were done in a similar manner as in analog study. Results: The difference between both the attachment systems was found to be statistically significant (P<0.001. Conclusion: Ball/O-ring attachment system transmitted lesser amount of stresses to the implants on the non-loading side, as compared to the Bar-Clip attachment system. When overall stress distribution is compared, the Bar-Clip attachment seems to perform better than the Ball/O-ring attachment, because the force was distributed better.

  3. Osseointegrated Supported Prosthesis and Interdisciplinary Approach for Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of a Young Patient with Ectodermal Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik M. Sadashiva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a triad of hypodontia or anodontia, hypotrichosis, and hypohydrosis, associated with other problems that result from the defective development of structures of ectodermal origin (Freire-Maia, Pinheiro (1988. Early and extensive dental treatment is needed keeping in mind the effect on the craniofacial growth. Due to rapid growth of the jaws, the patients are rehabilitated using removable prostheses (Tarjan et al. (2005. Hence for a young patient in this case report, the placement of endosseous osseointegrated implants was delayed till adulthood. Finally a definitive fixed tooth-supported and osseointegrated implant supported fixed partial denture therapy was used to rehabilitate the patient satisfactorily after she had completed her growth (Sweeney et al. (2005. A review of the current literature relevant to several aspects of syndromic hypodontia, patient selection, and implant planning is discussed.

  4. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2015-07-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  5. R&D on dental implants breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Sorin Mihai; Popovici, Ion Alexandru

    2017-09-01

    Most used dental implants for human dental prostheses are of two steps type: first step means implantation and, after several months healing and osseointegration, second step is prosthesis fixture. For sure, dental implants and prostheses are meant to last for a lifetime. Still, there are unfortunate cases when dental implants break. This paper studies two steps dental implants breakage and proposes a set of instruments for replacement and restoration of the broken implant. First part of the paper sets the input data of the study: structure of the studied two steps dental implants based on two Romanian patents and values of the loading forces found in practice and specialty papers. In the second part of the paper, using DEFORM 2D™ FEM simulation software, worst case scenarios of loading dental implants are studied in order to determine which zones and components of the dental implant set are affected (broken). Last part of the paper is dedicated to design and presentation of a set for extracting and cutting tools used to restore the broken implant set.

  6. Robotic lower limb prosthesis design through simultaneous computer optimizations of human and prosthesis costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Matthew L.; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2016-02-01

    Robotic lower limb prostheses can improve the quality of life for amputees. Development of such devices, currently dominated by long prototyping periods, could be sped up by predictive simulations. In contrast to some amputee simulations which track experimentally determined non-amputee walking kinematics, here, we explicitly model the human-prosthesis interaction to produce a prediction of the user’s walking kinematics. We obtain simulations of an amputee using an ankle-foot prosthesis by simultaneously optimizing human movements and prosthesis actuation, minimizing a weighted sum of human metabolic and prosthesis costs. The resulting Pareto optimal solutions predict that increasing prosthesis energy cost, decreasing prosthesis mass, and allowing asymmetric gaits all decrease human metabolic rate for a given speed and alter human kinematics. The metabolic rates increase monotonically with speed. Remarkably, by performing an analogous optimization for a non-amputee human, we predict that an amputee walking with an appropriately optimized robotic prosthesis can have a lower metabolic cost - even lower than assuming that the non-amputee’s ankle torques are cost-free.

  7. Implant-Retained Auricular Prosthesis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturk, A. Nilgun; Usumez, Aslihan; Tosun, Zekeriya

    2010-01-01

    Extraoral implant retained prosthesis have been proven to be a predictable treatment option for maxillofacial rehabilitation. This case report describes the clinical and laboratory procedures for fabricating an auricular prosthesis. In this case report, an auricular prosthesis was fabricated for a patient who lost the left and right external ear in an electrical burn. Extraoral implants and bar-and-clip retention for the proper connection of the auricular prosthesis to implant were used. This...

  8. Body image and prosthesis satisfaction in the lower limb amputee.

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Craig; Fox, Jezz

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the relationship between prosthesis satisfaction and body image in lower limb prosthesis users, and the gendered variations within these relationships. Method: A total of 44 valid responses were obtained to an Internet survey regarding prosthesis satisfaction, body image, and phantom pain. Spearman Rho correlations were calculated for these three domains. Results: Moderate to high negative correlations were observed between Body Image Disturbance and Prosthesis Sa...

  9. Maxillary implant-supported overdentures opposed by (partial) natural dentitions : A 5-year prospective case series study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, G. C.; Slot, J. W. A.; Raghoebar, G. M.; Vissink, A.; Meijer, H. J. A.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year treatment outcome of maxillary implant-retained overdentures opposed by natural antagonistic teeth. Fifty consecutive patients received maxillary overdentures supported by six dental implants. Implants were placed in the anterior region, if enough bone

  10. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration prosthesis... (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part...

  11. Fabrication of temporary speech bulb prosthesis: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Kasim Mohamed, K.; Anand Kumar, V.; Devi, N.; Padmanaban, T. V.

    2010-01-01

    Maxillofacial prosthesis is an art and science which not only replaces the lost structure sometimes it restores the functions also. Pharyngeal obturator is a prosthesis which closes the palatal and pharyngeal defects and improving the speech and other function. The following case report discusses palatopharyngeal insufficiency, impression procedures, fabrication of prosthesis and improvements in speech.

  12. Comparison of Treatment Outcomes in Partially Edentulous Patients with Implant-Supported Fixed Prostheses and Removable Partial Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Toshifumi; Takayama, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Keita; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    The aim of this study was to compare masticatory performance, occlusal force, and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients with mandibular distal-extension edentulism between those with implant-supported fixed prostheses (ISFPs) and those with removable partial dentures (RPDs), and to evaluate relationships among them. Subjects were recruited from patients using ISFPs or RPDs for mandibular distal-extension edentulism. Masticatory performance was evaluated based on the glucose extracted from chewed gummy jelly. Occlusal force was measured with a pressure-sensitive sheet, and data were subjected to computer analysis. The Japanese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-J) was used to evaluate OHRQoL. The masticatory performance, occlusal force, and OHIP-J scores of the ISFP and RPD groups were compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The relationships among the variables were analyzed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was employed with the OHIP-J score as a dependent variable. Nineteen patients with ISFPs and 25 patients with RPDs participated in this study. No significant difference was observed between the two groups with regard to masticatory performance and occlusal force. The OHIP-J score was significantly lower in the ISFP group than in the RPD group. The OHIP-J score had no significant correlation with masticatory performance, but was significantly correlated with occlusal force and the prosthetic method. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that younger age, RPDs, and lower occlusal force were significantly associated with a higher OHIP-J summary score. The present results suggest that the difference in masticatory performance and occlusal force between ISFPs and RPDs is small, but ISFPs are superior to RPDs with regard to OHRQoL in patients with mandibular distal-extension edentulism. In addition, there appears to be a slight correlation between the OHIP

  13. Analysis of load distribution in tooth-implant supported fixed partial dentures by the use of resilient abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisić, Mirko; Stamenković, Dragoslav; Grbović, Aleksandar; Todorović, Aleksandar; Marković, Aleksa; Trifković, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Differences between the tooth and implant response to load can lead to many biological and technical implications in the conditions of occlusal forces. The objective of this study was to analyze load distribution in tooth/implant-supported fixed partial dentures with the use of resilient TSA (Titan Shock Absorber, BoneCare GmbH, Augsburg, Germany) abutment and conventional non-resilient abutment using finite element method. This study presents two basic 3D models. For one model a standard non-resilient abutment is used, and on the implant of the second model a resilient TSA abutment is applied. The virtual model contains drawn contours of tooth, mucous membranes, implant, cortical bones and spongiosa, abutment and suprastructure. The experiment used 500 N of vertical force, applied in three different cases of axial load. Calculations of von Mises equivalent stresses of the tooth root and periodontium, implants and peri-implant tissue were made. For the model to which a non-resilient abutment is applied, maximum stress values in all three cases are observed in the cortical part of the bone (maximum stress value of 49.7 MPa). Measurements of stress and deformation in the bone tissue in the model with application of the resilientTSA abutment demonstrated similar distribution; however, these values are many times lower than in the model with non-resilient TSA abutment (maximum stress value of 28.9 MPa). Application of the resilient TSA abutment results in more equal distribution of stress and deformations in the bone tissue under vertical forces. These values are many times lower than in the model with the non-resilient abutment.

  14. A study of the bending resistance of implant-supported reinforced alumina and machined zirconia abutments and copies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundh, Anders; Sjögren, Göran

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the bending resistance of implant-supported CAD/CAM-processed restorations made out of zirconia or manually shaped made out of reinforced alumina. Units of abutments and copies made of (i) a prefabricated hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) yttrium oxide partially-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) (Denzir), (ii) a prefabricated densely-sintered magnesia partially stabilized zirconia (Mg-PSZ) (Denzir-M) or, copies made of (iii) a prefabricated partially-sintered, porous reinforced alumina ceramic (RN synOcta-In-Ceram) were subjected to static loading perpendicularly at the long axis. The abutments were attached to either stainless steel analogs or titanium implant fixtures. The Y-TZP and Mg-PSZ copies were bonded onto the ceramic abutments with a dual-cured resin composite (Rely-X Unicem). Units of titanium abutment attached to a titanium implant fixtures were used as reference. The units comprising Denzir abutments as delivered (pstainless steel analogs exhibited significantly higher bending resistance than the control. The heat-treated Denzir copies bonded to the heat-treated Denzir M abutments attached to titanium implant fixtures and the In-Ceram specimens attached to stainless steel analogs showed significantly (pstainless steel analogs. No statistically significant (p>0.05) differences were seen among the other groups studied. All the ceramic abutments and copies exhibited values that were equal or superior to that of the control and exceeded the reported value, up to 300 N, for maximum incisal bite forces. To assess the clinical behavior long-term clinical studies should be conducted.

  15. Patient preference and satisfaction with implant-supported mandibular overdentures retained with ball or locator attachments: a crossover clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krennmair, Gerald; Seemann, Rudolf; Fazekas, Andres; Ewers, Rolf; Piehslinger, Eva

    2012-01-01

    To determine patient satisfaction and preference for implant-supported mandibular overdentures (IOD) retained with ball or Locator attachments. In addition, peri-implant conditions and prosthodontic maintenance efforts for the final attachments were evaluated after 1 year of function. In this crossover clinical trial, 20 edentulous patients were recruited to receive two mandibular implants in the canine region and were provided with implant-retained mandibular overdentures and new complete maxillary dentures. Implant-retained mandibular overdentures were stabilized with either ball attachments or Locator attachments, in random order. After 3 months of function, the attachments in the existing denture were changed. Questionnaires on satisfaction/complaints with the prostheses were administered at baseline (with the old dentures) and after 3 months of function with each attachment, thus providing for an intraindividual comparison. The decision for the final attachment chosen was based on the patient's preference. For the definitive attachment, peri-implant conditions (peri-implant marginal bone resorption, pocket depth, and Plaque Index, Gingival Index, and Bleeding Index) as well as prosthodontic maintenance efforts and satisfaction score were evaluated after an insertion period of 1 year. Nineteen (95%) patients completed the study (1 dropout). Patient satisfaction improved significantly (P<.05) from baseline (old dentures) to the new prostheses retained with each of the two attachment types for all domains of satisfaction. However, there were no differences between ball or Locator attachment for any items of satisfaction evaluated and neither attachment had a significant patient preference. No differences for peri-implant parameters or for patient satisfaction were noted between the definitive attachments (ball, n=10; Locator, n=9) after 1 year. Although the overall incidence rate of prosthodontic maintenance did not significantly differ between both retention

  16. Two-Implant-Supported Mandibular Overdentures: Do Clinical Denture Quality and Inter-Implant Distance Affect Patient Satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadda, Sara A; Al Amri, Mohammad D; Al-Ohali, Amal; Al-Hakami, Arwa; Al-Madhi, Noura

    To investigate the following three null hypotheses in patients rehabilitated with a mandibular overdenture supported by two unsplinted implants: (1) patient satisfaction is not related to the clinical quality of the dentures; (2) inter-implant distance (IID) has no effect on the clinical quality of the dentures; and (3) IID does not influence patient satisfaction. Forty edentulous patients who were rehabilitated with a two-implant-supported mandibular overdenture participated in the study. Independent investigators evaluated the dentures on the basis of five clinical criteria using the validated Denture Quality Evaluation Form, and the patients completed the validated Denture Satisfaction Scale. Irreversible hydrocolloid impressions of the mandible were made and poured immediately in die stone. The IID was measured by adapting an orthodontic wire to the mandibular alveolar ridge crest, extending from the center of one implant to the center of the other. Spearman correlation analyses were used to identify possible correlations, with a significance level set at P overdenture and of the maxillary conventional complete denture was significantly related to satisfaction (r = 0.389 and r = 0.44, respectively). Significant associations were found between the mandibular stability items and satisfaction with both maxillary and mandibular dentures. The stability of the maxillary denture was significantly associated with patient satisfaction with mandibular denture retention, stability, and comfort. None of the 12 denture satisfaction items were significantly associated with IID. Similarly, IID did not have an effect on the quality of either denture in terms of retention, stability, or occlusion. Denture stability was the feature that had the most influence on patient satisfaction with the mandibular overdenture and with the maxillary conventional denture. IID had no effect on the clinical quality of either denture and did not influence patient satisfaction.

  17. Effect of geometry on deformation of anterior implant-supported zirconia frameworks: An in vitro study using digital image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calha, Nuno; Messias, Ana; Guerra, Fernando; Martinho, Beatriz; Neto, Maria Augusta; Nicolau, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of geometry on the displacement and the strain distribution of anterior implant-supported zirconia frameworks under static load using the 3D digital image correlation method. Two groups (n=5) of 4-unit zirconia frameworks were produced by CAD/CAM for the implant-abutment assembly. Group 1 comprised five straight configuration frameworks and group 2 consisted of five curved configuration frameworks. Specimens were cemented and submitted to static load up to 200N. Displacements were captured with two high-speed photographic cameras and analyzed with video correlation system in three spacial axes U, V, W. Statistical analysis was made using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Up to 150N loads, the vertical displacements (V axis) were statistically higher for curved frameworks (-267.83±23.76μm), when compared to the straight frameworks (-120.73±36.17μm) (p=0.008), as well as anterior displacements in the W transformed axis (589.55±64.51μm vs 224.29±50.38μm for the curved and straight frameworks), respectively (p=0.008). The mean von Mises strains over the surface frameworks were statistically higher for the curved frameworks under any load. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it is possible to conclude that the geometric configuration influences the deformation of 4-unit anterior frameworks under static load. The higher strain distribution and micro-movements of the curved frameworks reflect less rigidity and increased risk of fractures associated to FPDs. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Smart image processing system for retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D; Parikh, Neha; Pradeep, Vivek; Medioni, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses for the blind have demonstrated the ability to provide the sensation of light in otherwise blind individuals. However, visual task performance in these patients remains poor relative to someone with normal vision. Computer vision algorithms for navigation and object detection were evaluated for their ability to improve task performance. Blind subjects navigating a mobility course had fewer collisions when using a wearable camera system that guided them on a safe path. Subjects using a retinal prosthesis simulator could locate objects more quickly when an object detection algorithm assisted them. Computer vision algorithms can assist retinal prosthesis patients and low-vision patients in general.

  19. [Lessons from a heart valve prosthesis controversy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, J P; Grobbee, D E

    1998-07-18

    Two lessons are to be learnt from the Björk-Shiley heart valve prosthesis tragedy. In the first place pharmacoepidemiologic studies are seriously hampered by recent privacy legislation. Individual patients carrying such a prosthesis cannot be traced and advised as to their health risks any more, because their legal autonomy has to be respected. This is clearly not to their advantage. In the second place the atmosphere of marketing and litigation and the increasing dependency of researchers on money from sources with conflicting interests is not conducive to a well-informed and balanced judgement of the epidemiological evidence of safety and efficacy of medical treatments.

  20. [Systematic review and meta-analysis on the effect of implant supported overdentures on the oral health related quality of life of edentulous patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S S; Zhang, Y; Di, P; Lin, Y

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of implant related treatment on the oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) of edentulous patients. Methods: The CNKI, Wanfang database and Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library databases that include randomized clinical trials comparing implant supported overdentures with conventional complete denture for edentulous patients were retrived. Nine studies involving 769 cases were included and meta-analysis was conducted. Results: The standardized mean difference (SMD) of oral health impact profile (OHIP) score was 1.63 (95% CI: 1.25-2.02) and improved after implant related treatment, which was significantly better than the conventional complete denture (0.87, 95% CI: 0.54-1.20). Conclusions: Implant supported overdentures improved patient's OHRQoL and showed better performance compared to the overdentures complete dentures.

  1. Fracture load of complete-arch implant-supported prostheses reinforced with nylon-silica mesh: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Fernanda de Cássia Papaiz; Amaral, Marina; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Gonçalves, Luiz Fernando Martins; Paes-Junior, Tarcisio José de Arruda

    2018-04-01

    Complete-arch implant-supported prostheses without a framework have a high risk of failure: a straightforward and inexpensive reinforcement material, such as nylon mesh, could improve their longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate a nylon-silica mesh compound on the fracture strength of acrylic resin and the fracture load of complete-arch implant-supported prostheses. Twenty-four complete mandibular arch implant-supported prostheses were divided into 2 groups according to cantilever length (molar and premolar) and subdivided into another 2 subgroups according to the presence or absence of reinforcing mesh. The specimens were submitted to a maximum load-to-fracture test in a universal testing machine, with a 100-N load cell, a 2 mm/min crosshead speed, and a spherical metal tip diameter of 4 mm at different points (molar and premolar). These were submitted to 1-way analysis of variance for repeated measurement and the post hoc Tukey multiple comparison test (α=.05). The mean maximum load ±standard deviation for the molar group was 393.4 ±95.0 N with reinforcement and 305.4 ±76.3 N without reinforcement (P=.02); and for the premolar group was 1083.3 ±283.7 N with reinforcement and 605.3 ±90.5 N without reinforcement (P=.001). Reinforcement with nylon mesh increased the mean maximum load of implant-supported complete-arch prostheses at both cantilever lengths. The cantilever to the premolar (5 mm) presented the highest maximum load values to fracture. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of screw access hole preparation on fracture load of implant-supported zirconia-based crowns: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Mokhtarpour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fracture load of implant-supported restorations is an important factor in clinical success. This study evaluated the effect of two techniques for screw access hole preparation on the fracture load of cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based crowns. Methods. Thirty similar cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based maxillary central incisor crowns were evaluated in three groups of 10. Group NH: with no screw access holes for the control; Group HBS: with screw access holes prepared with a machine before zirconia sintering; Group HAS: with screw access holes prepared manually after zirconia sintering. In group HBS, the access holes were virtually designed and prepared by a computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing system. In group HAS, the access holes were manually prepared after zirconia sintering using a diamond bur. The dimensions of the screw access holes were equal in both groups. The crowns were cemented onto same-size abutments and were then subjected to thermocycling. The fracture load values of the crowns were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05. Results. The mean fracture load value for the group NH was 888.37 ± 228.92 N, which was the highest among the groups, with a significant difference (P < 0.0001. The fracture load values were 610.48 ± 125.02 N and 496.74 ± 104.10 Nin the HBS and HAS groups, respectively, with no significant differences (P = 0.44. Conclusion. Both techniques used for preparation of screw access holes in implant-supported zirconia-based crowns de-creased the fracture load.

  3. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  4. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  5. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  6. Prosthetic outcome, patient complaints, and nutritional effects on elderly patients with magnet-retained, implant-supported overdentures--a 1-year report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Huan Ding; Chai, John; Chow, Tak Wah

    2013-01-01

    To study the changes in treatment outcomes of complete dentures and magnet-retained, implant-supported overdentures in a group of elderly patients. In this nonrandomized trial, 43 edentulous patients (14 men and 29 women) were fitted with complete dentures followed by implant-supported mandibular overdenture in a sequential model. Treatment outcomes used for analysis included objective assessment of denture quality (Woelfel's index), patient satisfaction, nutritional status, body mass index (BMI), and serum albumin level. The McNemar test was used to determine if significant differences in the Woelfel's index and nutritional status existed at different treatment phases. Repeated measures ANOVA and multiple pairwise comparison tests were used to analyze patient satisfaction. BMI status and serum albumin level at different treatment phases were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. At the 1-year follow-up, significant improvements were recorded for the objective assessment of denture quality and patient complaints (P .05) CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrated that in elderly patients with stable health and nutritional status, complete dentures made in a university clinic brought about overall improvement in denture quality and reduction in denture complaint score. Insertion of mandibular implant-supported overdentures further improved the mandibular denture quality and reduced the mandibular denture complaint score. In this group of patients, no improvement in BMI, serum albumin value, and nutritional status were documented.

  7. A 5- to 8-year retrospective study comparing the clinical results of implant-supported telescopic crown versus bar overdentures in patients with edentulous maxillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Duohong; Wu, Yiqun; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare implant survival and success rates, peri-implant parameters, and prosthodontic maintenance efforts for implant-supported telescopic crown overdentures and bar overdentures to restore maxillary edentulism. This retrospective clinical study involved patients with maxillary edentulism who were fitted with implant-supported overdentures from January 2004 to June 2007. During a 5- to 8-year follow-up period, the implant survival and success rates, biologic and mechanical complications, prosthodontic maintenance, and patient satisfaction were retrospectively analyzed. The data were evaluated statistically and P overdentures. Twenty-one patients chose telescopic crown overdentures and 23 patients chose bar overdentures. A total of 41 patients and 201 implants were available for follow-up. The implant survival and success rates, average bone resorption, and subjective patient satisfaction scores showed no difference between the telescopic crown and the bar overdenture group at follow-up. However, there were higher values for Plaque and Calculus Indexes in the bar group compared with the telescopic crown group, and these values showed a statistically significant difference annually from the 3-year follow-up (P overdentures provided a healthy peri-implant structure for implants in both groups. Implant-supported telescopic crown or bar overdentures can provide a good treatment option for patients with edentulous maxillae.

  8. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brajkovic, Denis; Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Kisic, Danilo; Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija; Rakocevic, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation and presumably prevent periimplant infection

  9. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation and presumably prevent periimplant infection.

  10. Horizontal alveolar ridge expansion followed by immediate placement of implants and rehabilitation with zirconia prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Miranda Deliberador

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been a growing number of procedures involving dental implants. Most cases, though, are characterized by bone atrophy, especially horizontal atrophy. This clinical case aims to report a technique for the expansion of the horizontal alveolar ridge. A longitudinal fracture was created in the alveolar ridge to expand the bone, followed by immediate insertion of dental implants along with a particulate allogeneic bone graft. Eight implants were placed in the maxilla, and after 12 months, a surgical reopening was performed, along with rehabilitation with a protocol-type prosthesis, for which a zirconia infrastructure was made. The patient was observed during a 10-month follow-up period in which an effective osseointegration of all implants was achieved as a result of such a technique. The split-crest technique followed by the immediate placement of implants and a particulate allogeneic bone graft proved to be effective, with a predictable osseointegration.

  11. Dental negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C S

    2000-02-01

    Medical and dental errors and negligence are again in the spotlight in recent news report. Dead because of doctor's bad handwriting Prescribing drug overdoses Germ-infested soap pumps--infections in hospitals This articles explains dental negligence including dental duty of care and the standard of care expected of dentists in relation to the Bolam principle.

  12. Clinical Outcomes of Penile Prosthesis Implantation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Dede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to evaluating the outcomes of in­flatable penile prosthesis implantations and partner sat­isfaction. Methods: Data of 52 patients who underwent penile prosthesis implantation in single center between May 2010 and December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Types of prosthesis, complication and satisfaction rates of patients were recorded by EDITS (Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction questionnaire was used. Results: The mean age was 49.2±14.7 years for patients. The mean follow-up durations for 34.3±12.5 months. The mean hospital stay was 3.84±1.52 days. Evaluating of the couples satisfaction revealed that 44 (84% of the patient were very satisfied. There was not any complication and no patient need to underwent revision surgery. Conclusion: Inflatable penile prosthesis implants, with high levels of treatment success, patient and partner sat­isfaction, are effective and safe options for treatment of organic erectile dysfunction with acceptable complication and revision rates.

  13. Case Report: Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention. Key words: Magnet ...

  14. Fusion around cervical disc prosthesis: case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Donk, R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Cervical arthroplasty is a relatively new method to maintain motion after cervical anterior discectomy. Two cases are presented in which bony fusion occurred around a cervical disc prosthesis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 30-year-old man and a 49-year-old woman underwent a

  15. Clinical and Radiographic Assessment of Reasons for Replacement of Metal- Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses in Patients Referring to Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Refai, Roa'a; Saker, Samah

    2018-01-01

    The expected length of service and reasons for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) replacement are a frequent inquiry by patients while the answers were mainly based on studies reports that was conducted outside the middle east region. This clinical and radiographic survey was constructed to assess and survey clinically and radiographically the reasons of replacement of metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, amongst patients reporting at dental school in Taibah University. Between January and May 2016, 151 patients were recruited for this study. Interview (include questions pertained to the length of service of the prosthesis, the nature of complaint as told by patient in her own words), clinical examination, intra-oral photographs, and periapical radiographs, were done by the researchers. The parameters assessed were secondary caries, open margins, loss of retention, failure of endodontic treatment of the abutment and periodontal diseases. A total number of 249 failed fixed dental prostheses were evaluated. Of which 180 (39.7%) were single crowns, 159 (35.0%) were retainers and 117 (25.8%) were pontics in 69 fixed partial denture. The most common reason for replacement of fixed restorations was periodontal diseases affecting 92.8% of all types' restorations, followed by defective margin in 90.4% of examined restoration, poor aesthetic in 88% of restorations, while periapical involvement was found in 85.5% of fixed dental prosthesis. The survival rates of fixed prostheses were not predictable, and no association was found between number of years in service and the number of restorations. The most common reasons for replacing single unit fixed dental prostheses are periodontal diseases and periapical involvement, while defective margins and poor aesthetic mainly associated with multi-unit fixed dental prostheses. Key words: Failure, Fixed dental prosthesis, Survival, Replacement.

  16. Comparison of Range of Motion After Total Knee Prosthesis According to Different Type of Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Seyfettinoglu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and range of motion of different type of knee prosthesis. Material and Method: This study includes 180 of 225 patients (139 F, 41 M, average age: 65, range of age: 51-82 between April 2005 and September 2007 with the diagnosis of gonarthrosis. All patients underwent to primary total knee arthroplasty. Primary osteoartrhritis is the reason of gonarthrosis. The patients with secondary osteoartrhritis were excluded from the study. All the patients were operated by the same surgical team and rehabilitated after surgery. Patella didnt change any patient. PCL was protected in some of the patients and cut some of patients. Totally seven type prosthesis in 16 subgroup were applied to the patients. All measurement were done by the same surgeon. Average follow up period was 31 months (24-49 months. Results: Patients without subgrouping were tested according to the range of motion before and after surgery to the type of the prosthesis trademark. Range of motion was decreased with the usage of Rotaglide and LCS® type of prosthesis. Range of motion didnt change with the usage of Maxim and Kinemax type. The range of motion increased in the other trademark of prosthesis. Flexion angle was increased statistically significant with nexgen® and scorpio® prosthesis (p

  17. Hearing results using the SMart piston prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Jose N; Semaan, Maroun T; Meier, Josh C; House, John W

    2009-12-01

    SMart, a newly introduced piston prosthesis for stapedotomy, is a nitinol-based, heat-activated, self-crimping prosthesis. We review our hearing results and postoperative complications using this self-crimped piston prosthesis and compare them with those obtained using stainless steel or platinum piston prostheses. Audiometric results using the SMart piston are identical to those obtained using a conventional piston prosthesis. Retrospective chart review. Private neurotologic tertiary referral center. The 416 ears reviewed included 306 with a SMart prosthesis and 110 conventional prostheses. 61% were women. Mean follow-up time was 5.6 (standard deviation [SD], 6.3 mo) and 6.9 months (SD, 7.0 mo) for the 2 groups, respectively. Stapedotomy using the SMart or a conventional (non-SMart) prosthesis. Audiometric hearing results, including pure-tone average (PTA) and air-bone gap (ABG), and prevalence of postoperative complications. Mean postoperative PTA was 32.6 (SD, 16.8) dB for the SMart group and 29.4 (SD, 13.5) dB for the non-SMart group, with ABGs of 7.6 (SD, 8.9) and 6.0 (SD, 5.2) dB, respectively. Mean change (decrease) in ABG was 18.7 (SD, 13.1) dB for the SMart group and 19.9 (SD, 10.3) dB for the non-SMart group. High-frequency bone PTAs showed overclosure of 2.0 (SD, 7.9) dB for the SMart group and 3.6 (SD, 8.6) dB for the non-SMart group. Postoperative vertigo and tinnitus were infrequent. No significant differences in these audiometric outcomes or complication rates were noted between groups. There was no significant difference in rate of gap closure to within 10 dB (78.3 versus 84.2%, SMart and non-SMart, respectively) or 20 dB (94.2 and 98.0%). Compared with conventional stapes prostheses, the nitinol-based SMart is a safe and reliable stapes prosthesis that eliminates manual crimping without significantly altering the audiometric outcome. Complications are rare, but longer follow-up is needed before establishing long-term stability.

  18. Reading visual braille with a retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Thomas Z; Harris, Jordan; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, Jose A; Dorn, Jessy D; McClure, Kelly; Greenberg, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 × 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 × 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera) to create visual percepts of individual braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time) in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  19. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Nagarajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy.

  20. Oral rehabilitation of segmental mandibulectomy patient with osseointegrated dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical management of oral cancer lesions results in explicit aesthetic and functional disfigurement, including facial deformity, loss of hard and soft tissue, impaired speech, swallowing and mastication, which modify the patient′s self-image and quality-of-life. Recent advances in head and neck reconstruction techniques and dental implant based prosthetic rehabilitation may significantly improve the quality-of-life and self-esteem for such post-surgery patients. This clinical report describes rehabilitation of oral cancer patient having segmental mandibulectomy with implant-supported fixed partial denture.

  1. Relationship between removable prosthesis and some systemics disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Le Bars

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the dental literature concerning the potential impact of the removable prosthesis (RP on the health status of patients with certain systemic diseases. Literature was surveyed using Medline/PubMed database resources, as well as a manual search, up to 2015 to identify appropriate articles that addressed the aim of this review. The research used keywords about associations between RP and six pathologies: Human immunodeficiency virus infection, diabetes mellitus, pulmonary diseases, gastric-Helicobacter pylori, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Analysis of literature showed that in patients with dentures having one or more of the six general conditions listed, Candida albicans organism is more frequently found in the oral flora compared to healthy denture wearer. Although causality has not been established and pending further research on this topic, the hygienic practices necessary to minimize the risk of numerous pathologies should be strengthened in the case of these patients, all the more in the presence of physical or psychological disability. The relationship between the general diseases and increasing of oral candidiasis denture patients is not explained. Therefore, attention to oral hygiene and professional care for removing C. albicans may be beneficial in these medically compromised patients.

  2. Relationship between removable prosthesis and some systemics disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, Pierre; Kouadio, Alain Ayepa; N'goran, Justin Koffi; Badran, Zahi; Soueidan, Assem

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the dental literature concerning the potential impact of the removable prosthesis (RP) on the health status of patients with certain systemic diseases. Literature was surveyed using Medline/PubMed database resources, as well as a manual search, up to 2015 to identify appropriate articles that addressed the aim of this review. The research used keywords about associations between RP and six pathologies: Human immunodeficiency virus infection, diabetes mellitus, pulmonary diseases, gastric-Helicobacter pylori, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Analysis of literature showed that in patients with dentures having one or more of the six general conditions listed, Candida albicans organism is more frequently found in the oral flora compared to healthy denture wearer. Although causality has not been established and pending further research on this topic, the hygienic practices necessary to minimize the risk of numerous pathologies should be strengthened in the case of these patients, all the more in the presence of physical or psychological disability. The relationship between the general diseases and increasing of oral candidiasis denture patients is not explained. Therefore, attention to oral hygiene and professional care for removing C. albicans may be beneficial in these medically compromised patients.

  3. The Key Points of Maintenance Therapy for Dental Implants: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirc, Miha; Dragan, Irina F

    2017-04-01

    Dental implants require lifelong maintenance and care. Success is defined by biologic factors (presence of inflamed soft tissues surrounding dental implants and radiographic changes in the crestal bone levels) and mechanical factors (stability of the implant fixture and implant supported restoration, etc). Most implant failures are initiated by incipient stages of inflammatory processes, which lead to peri-mucositis and peri-implantitis. The evidence regarding the value of maintenance protocol regarding implants is sparse compared with the one for teeth. This article addresses the existing literature on processes for oral hygiene for implant care.

  4. Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year

    OpenAIRE

    GARGARI, M.; PRETE, V.; PUJIA, M.; CERUSO, F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year.

  5. Telescopic overdenture for oral rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patient

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Charu; Verma, Mahesh; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra

    2015-01-01

    Reduced number of teeth with underdeveloped alveolar ridges poses a greatest prosthetic challenge in rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patients (ED). Furthermore, surgical risks and financial constraints may preclude the implant supported prosthesis, the most desirable treatment option in an adult ED patient. Long edentulous span does not permit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) as well. Telescopic denture by incorporating the best of both fixed and removable prosthesis can be a viable treat...

  6. Influence of different catilever extensions and glass or polyamaramid reinforcement fibers on fracture strength of implant-supported temporary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Colán Guzmán

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In long-term oral rehabilitation treatments, resistance of provisional crowns is a very important factor, especially in cases of an extensive edentulous distal space. The aim of this laboratorial study was to evaluate an acrylic resin cantilever-type prosthesis regarding the flexural strength of its in-balance portion as a function of its extension variation and reinforcement by two types of fibers (glass and polyaramid, considering that literature is not conclusive on this subject. Each specimen was composed by 3 total crowns at its mesial portion, each one attached to an implant component (abutment, while the distal portion (cantilever had two crowns. Each specimen was constructed by injecting acrylic resin into a two-part silicone matrix placed on a metallic base. In each specimen, the crowns were fabricated with either acrylic resin (control group or acrylic resin reinforced by glass (Fibrante, Angelus or polyaramide (Kevlar 49, Du Pont fibers. Compression load was applied on the cantilever, in a point located 7, 14 or 21 mm from the distal surface of the nearest crown with abutment, to simulate different extensions. The specimen was fixed on the metallic base and the force was applied until fracture in a universal test machine. Each one of the 9 sub-groups was composed by 10 specimens. Flexural strength means (in kgf for the distances of 7, 14 and 21 mm were, respectively, 28.07, 8.27 and 6.39 for control group, 31.89, 9.18 and 5.16 for Kevlar 49 and 30.90, 9.31 and 6.86 for Fibrante. Data analysis ANOVA showed statistically significant difference (p<0.05 only regarding cantilever extension. Tukey's test detected significantly higher flexural strength for the 7 mm-distance, followed by 14 and 21 mm. Fracture was complete only on specimens of non-reinforced groups.

  7. Maxillary implant-supported overdentures opposed by (partial) natural dentitions: a 5-year prospective case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boven, G C; Slot, J W A; Raghoebar, G M; Vissink, A; Meijer, H J A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year treatment outcome of maxillary implant-retained overdentures opposed by natural antagonistic teeth. Fifty consecutive patients received maxillary overdentures supported by six dental implants. Implants were placed in the anterior region, if enough bone was present (n = 25 patients) Implant were placed in the posterior region if implant placement in the anterior region was not possible (n = 25 patients). Variables assessed included survival of implants, condition of hard and soft peri-implant tissues and patients' satisfaction. The five-year implant survival rate was 97·0% and 99·3%, and mean radiographic bone loss was 0·23 and 0·69 mm in the anterior and posterior group, respectively. Median scores for plaque, calculus, gingiva, bleeding and mean scores for pocket probing depth were low and stayed low. Patients' satisfaction after treatment was high in both groups. Within the limits of this 5-year study, it is concluded that six dental implants (placed in the anterior or posterior region) connected with a bar and opposed to natural antagonistic teeth result in acceptable results for clinical parameters and good outcomes for marginal bone level changes and patient satisfaction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The psychosocial impacts of implantation on the dental aesthetics of missing anterior teeth patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P; Yu, S; Zhu, G

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics among patients who received anterior implant-supported prostheses. The current study is a cross-sectional evaluation involving 115 individuals who had gone through treatment at the dental clinics of general hospitals. Participants completed the Chinese version of the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics questionnaire (PIDAQ) before implantation and six months after crown restoration. Basic demographic information was recorded. Six months after implant crown restoration, participants were asked to self-assess their own oral aesthetics compared to before implantation. A total of 106 patients completed the study. PIDAQ scores correlated significantly with the self-assessment of the degree of oral aesthetics. Six months after crown restoration, the two factors (social impact and aesthetic attitude) decreased and the dental self-confidence score increased significantly compared to pre-implantation scores. Gender and education level significantly affected PIDAQ. Anterior implant-supported prostheses significantly affected the patients' psychosocial perception. Implantation of missing anterior teeth can significantly improve patients' negative psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics. Gender and education level are correlated with the degree of improvement. The PIDAQ can be used in assessing the psychosocial effects of implantation in missing anterior teeth.

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and knee prosthesis surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Meunier, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Adverse effects of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors on bone healing have previously been demonstrated in diaphyseal fracture models in animals. In spite of that, they are widely used as postoperative analgesics in orthopaedic surgery. After joint replacement, a bone repair process starts at the interface between bone and cement. If this process is disturbed, the prosthesis may never become rigidly fixed to the bone, leading to migration and with time loosening. This thesis investigates the eff...

  10. [The esthetics of lower limb prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardrat, Franck

    2015-01-01

    The amputation, which is upper or lower limb, entails important consequences and often traumatic into subject amputee from a physical, psychological, interpersonal and social point of view. It acts on the body image unleashing different psychological disorders and alterations in the social and professional reality. The aesthetic prosthesis can be considered a good support to help the person regain a new body image of themselves, facilitating the process of physical rehabilitation and social integration.

  11. Development and clinical application of a new testicular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ye; Cai, Zhikang; Chen, Huixing; Ping, Ping; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhong; Li, Zheng

    2011-11-01

    A new type of testicular prosthesis made of silastic with an elliptical shape to mimic a normal testis was developed by our team and submitted for patenting in China. The prosthesis was produced in different sizes to imitate the normal testis of the patient. To investigate the effects and safety of the testicular prosthesis, 20 patients receiving testicular prosthesis implantation were recruited for this study. Follow-up after 6 months revealed no complications in the patients. All the patients answered that they were satisfied with their body image and the position of the implants, 19 patients were satisfied with the size and 16 patients were satisfied with the weight. These results show that the testicular prosthesis used in this study can meet patient's expectations. Patients undergoing orchiectomy should be offered the option to receive a testicular prosthesis implantation. The dimensions and weight of the available prosthetic implants should be further addressed to improve patient satisfaction.

  12. A retrospective 3- to 5-year study of the reconstruction of oral function using implant-supported prostheses in patients with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Duohong; Wu, Yiqun; Wang, Xu Dong; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate oral function rehabilitation in patients with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) using implant-supported prostheses based on bone augmentation. From September 2005 and March 2009, 25 HED patients were chosen for clinical data analysis in this study. The criteria for patient selection included the following: the display of clinical features of HED, the number of congenitally missing teeth (>5), the patient age (>16 years), the patient's willingness, and the patient's tolerance for bone graft surgery and implant placement. Follow-up evaluations were initiated from the time of implant prosthetic placement and scheduled annually for 3-5 years. The effects of oral function reconstruction were assessed based on the cumulative survival and success rates of implants, the health of the peri-implant area, and the degree of patient satisfaction. Twenty-five HED patients received 169 conventional implants and 10 zygomatic implants (179 total implants). During 3-5 years of post-loading evaluations, 5 of the 179 implants failed and 3 implants were removed. The 3-year success and cumulative survival rates were 97.2% and 98.3%, respectively. Furthermore, periodontal probing and radiographic assessments showed that the 3-year incidence of peri-implantitis was 4.5%. Finally, HED patients expressed high degrees of satisfaction with their facial contours, masticatory function, pronunciation ability, and comfort with the implant-supported prostheses. The results of this 3- to 5-year retrospective study indicate that the oral function of HED patients can be effectively reconstructed using bone augmentation and implant-supported prostheses; however, longer term results are warranted in the future.

  13. Modified section method for laser-welding of ill-fitting cp Ti and Ni-Cr alloy one-piece cast implant-supported frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiossi, R; Falcão-Filho, H; Aguiar Júnior, F A; Rodrigues, R C; Mattos, M da G; Ribeiro, R F

    2010-05-01

    This study aimed to verify the effect of modified section method and laser-welding on the accuracy of fit of ill-fitting commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) and Ni-Cr alloy one-piece cast frameworks. Two sets of similar implant-supported frameworks were constructed. Both groups of six 3-unit implant-supported fixed partial dentures were cast as one-piece [I: Ni-Cr (control) and II: cp Ti] and evaluated for passive fitting in an optical microscope with both screws tightened and with only one screw tightened. All frameworks were then sectioned in the diagonal axis at the pontic region (III: Ni-Cr and IV: cp Ti). Sectioned frameworks were positioned in the matrix (10-Ncm torque) and laser-welded. Passive fitting was evaluated for the second time. Data were submitted to anova and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference tests (P screws tightened, one-piece cp Ti group II showed significantly higher misfit values (27.57 +/- 5.06 microm) than other groups (I: 11.19 +/- 2.54 microm, III: 12.88 +/- 2.93 microm, IV: 13.77 +/- 1.51 microm) (P screw-tightened test, with readings on the opposite side to the tightened side, Ni-Cr cast as one-piece (I: 58.66 +/- 14.30 microm) was significantly different from cp Ti group after diagonal section (IV: 27.51 +/- 8.28 microm) (P 0.05). Results showed that diagonally sectioning ill-fitting cp Ti frameworks lowers misfit levels of prosthetic implant-supported frameworks and also improves passivity levels of the same frameworks when compared to one-piece cast structures.

  14. Oral health-related quality of life of implant-supported overdentures versus conventional complete prostheses: Retrospective study of a cohort of edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Estevan, Lucia; Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo J; Montero, Javier; Sola-Ruiz, Fernanda

    2015-07-01

    This work aims to confirm if implant-supported overdentures are a good treatment option for edentulous patients and offer an improvement in quality of life compared with traditional complete prostheses (dentures). This retrospective clinical descriptive study included three evaluation groups: validation group (n=57); control group of patients with complete removeable prostheses (n=56); study group of patients with implant-supported overdentures retained with the Locator® system (n=80). The study also validated the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 questionnaire. Individual protocols were created that included socio-demographic data, the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) questionnaire and Oral Satisfaction Scale (OSS). Descriptive and bivariate statistical analysis was carried out applying χ², Pearson, Kruskal-Wallis, and Student t tests, transferring data into SPSS-Windows® software from a Microsoft® Excel spreadsheet. The OHIP-20 proved to be a valid instrument and provided reliable assessment of health-related quality of life among both the Spanish general population and edentulous patients. The control and study groups proved comparable, showing socio-demographic homogeneity. For patients with overdentures retained by means of the Locator® system, these restorations had significantly lower impact on quality of life (19 vs 33), both generally and for each individual questionnaire item, and much higher satisfaction with the state of their oral cavities (8.3 vs 5.3) than patients wearing dentures; both sets of data showed a direct linear relationship, so that as the level of impact on quality of life increased, perceived oral satisfaction worsened. Patients rehabilitated with implant supported overdentures retained by the Locator® system, presented significantly lower levels of impact on their quality of life and significantly higher oral satisfaction than patients with conventional complete prostheses.

  15. Influence of implant position on clinical crown length and peri-implant soft tissue dimensions at implant-supported single crowns replacing maxillary central incisors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Min; Fei, Wei; Hosseini, Mandana

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the influence of implant position on clinical crown length and marginal soft tissue dimensions at implant-supported single crowns of maxillary central incisors, and to validate the papilla index score (PIS). Twenty-five patients, who had lost one of ...... abutments and did not necessarily result in an increased crown length. The distal implant papilla heightwas obviously shorter, althoughthe mesial papilla height was similar to thatof the healthy dentition.The papilla index score was tested to be a valid index for papilla fill....

  16. Rehabilitation of amputed thumb with a silicone prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Asnani, Pooja; Shivalingappa, Chandu Giriyapura; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Somkuwar, Kirti; Khan, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Creating prosthesis, having realistic skin surface and seamless visual integration with the surrounding tissues, requires both artistic and technical skill. Anatomical design, thin margins, lifelike fingernails and realistic color/contours are essential for patient satisfaction. Prosthesis is especially useful in case of lost body parts, as reconstructive surgery cannot fully restore aesthetics. This case report describes a simple technique for fabricating silicon finger prosthesis for a pati...

  17. Self-contained inflatable penile prosthesis: magnetic resonance appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, M.F.; Munk, P.L.; Vellet, A.D.; Chin, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The appearance of an inflatable penile prosthesis, visualized on a short tau inversion recovery sequence, is reported, in a patient who had magnetic resonance imaging for pelvic pain subsequent to radical cystoprostatectomy for bladder carcinoma. With suppression of adjacent fat signal, the prosthesis is well delineated from adjacent structures. The fluid-containing cylinders of the prosthesis are of very bright signal intensity, with the relief valve assembly of low signal intensity. 5 refs., 2 figs

  18. Laser-assisted fixation of a nitinol stapes prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrötzlmair, Florian; Suchan, Fabian; Pongratz, Thomas; Krause, Eike; Müller, Joachim; Sroka, Ronald

    2018-02-01

    Otosclerosis is an inner ear bone disease characterized by fixation of the stapes and consequently progressive hearing loss. One treatment option is the surgical replacement of the stapes by a prosthesis. When so called "smart materials" like nitinol are used, prosthesis fixation can be performed using a laser without manual crimping on the incus. However, specific laser-prosthesis interactions have not been described yet. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the thermo-mechanical properties of the NiTiBOND® prosthesis as a basis for handling instructions for laser-assisted prosthesis fixation. Closure of the NiTiBOND® prosthesis was induced ex vivo by either a diode laser emitting at λ = 940 nm or a CO 2 laser (λ = 10,600 nm). Total energy for closure was determined. Suitable laser parameters (pulse duration, power per pulse, distance between tip of the laser fiber and prosthesis) were assessed. Specific laser-prosthesis interactions were recorded. Especially the diode laser was found to be an appropriate energy source. A total energy deposit of 60 mJ by pulses in near contact application was found to be sufficient for prosthesis closure ex vivo. Energy should be transmitted through a laser fiber equipollent to the prosthesis band diameter. Specific deformation characteristics due to the zonal prosthesis composition have to be taken into account. NiTiBOND® stapes prosthesis can be closed by very little energy when appropriate energy sources like diode lasers are used, suggesting a relatively safe application in vivo. Lasers Surg. Med. 50:153-157, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fabrication of a Cranial Prosthesis Combined with an Ocular Prosthesis Using Rapid Prototyping: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Shankaran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid prototyping (RP is a technique of manufacturing parts by the additive layer manufacturing technology; where, a three-dimensional (3D model created in a computer aided design (CAD system is sectioned into 2D profiles, which are further constructed by RP layer by layer. Its use is not limited to industrial or engineering fields and has extended to the medical field for the manufacturing of custom implants and prostheses, the study of anatomy and surgical planning. Nowadays, dentists are more frequently encountered with the individuals affected with craniofacial defects due to trauma. In such cases, the cranio-maxillofacial rehabilitation is a real challenge to bring the patients back to society and promote their well-being. The conventional impression technique for facial prosthesis fabrication has the disadvantage of deforming the soft tissue and causing discomfort for the patient. Herein, we describe the fabrication of a cranial prosthesis combined with an ocular prosthesis with RP and stereolithography.

  20. Fabrication of a Cranial Prosthesis Combined with an Ocular Prosthesis Using Rapid Prototyping: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Gayatri; Deogade, Suryakant Chhagan; Dhirawani, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) is a technique of manufacturing parts by the additive layer manufacturing technology; where, a three-dimensional (3D) model created in a computer aided design (CAD) system is sectioned into 2D profiles, which are further constructed by RP layer by layer. Its use is not limited to industrial or engineering fields and has extended to the medical field for the manufacturing of custom implants and prostheses, the study of anatomy and surgical planning. Nowadays, dentists are more frequently encountered with the individuals affected with craniofacial defects due to trauma. In such cases, the craniomaxillofacial rehabilitation is a real challenge to bring the patients back to society and promote their well-being. The conventional impression technique for facial prosthesis fabrication has the disadvantage of deforming the soft tissue and causing discomfort for the patient. Herein, we describe the fabrication of a cranial prosthesis combined with an ocular prosthesis with RP and stereolithography.

  1. Functional aspects of treatment with implant-supported single crowns: a quality control study in subjects with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goshima, Kenichi; Lexner, Michala O; Thomsen, Carsten Eckhart

    2010-01-01

    -Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in subjects with tooth agenesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In nine females and nine males (32 + or - 10 years) with agenesis treated with one to four ISSC (68% in the premolar region), the treatment effect and masticatory function were assessed. The evaluation was performed first...... after implant placement shortly before crown cementation, and again 1 month after cementation. It consisted of questionnaires [including Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49)] and functional examination with plastic strips, the Dental Prescale Film and the Occluzer system, Xylitol color-changeable gum...... with ISSCs in subjects with tooth agenesis significantly increased masticatory function subjectively and clinically as well as OHRQoL. However, as the functional parameters before replacement of the teeth corresponded to values in subjects with complete dentitions, the functional importance of the increase...

  2. Improvements in dental care using a new mobile app with cloud services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yung Lin

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Our new mobile app, Dental Calendar, in combination with cloud services, provides efficient service to both dentists and patients, and helps establish a better relationship between them. It also helps dentists to arrange appointments for patients with sudden worsening of prosthesis function.

  3. Rehabilitation of a Patient with an Intra Oral Prosthesis and an Extra Oral Orbital Prosthesis Retained with Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanaik, Seema; Wadkar, Aarti P.

    2011-01-01

    This clinical case report deals with a rehabilitation of a patient with an extensive maxillary and orbital defect using an intra oral prosthesis obturating the maxillary defect and extra oral orbital prosthesis retained with rare-earth magnets for secondary retention; primary retention was derived by snug fit of the prosthesis to underlying and adjacent tissues. The rehabilitation resulted in improved function, esthetics and comfort to the patient thus enabling him to lead a normal life.

  4. Oral hygiene in patients with oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation: protocol proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapone, B; Nardi, G M; DI Venere, D; Pettini, F; Grassi, F R; Corsalini, M

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the effectiveness and the importance of an oral hygiene (OH) protocol in patients undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation, in order to reduce or minimize oral complications. This study was carried out at the Department of Dental Science, at the University of Bari-Italy from December 2012 to December 2015 on 34 selected patients with primary oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation. They were divided into 2 groups according to their age, sex and cancer therapy. Seventeen patients were assigned to the control group and seventeen in the experimental one. In the experimental group (Table 1), patients underwent an oral hygiene protocol whereas in the control group (Table 2) patients received the usual care provided within the clinical setting. All the patients gave written informed consent. It has been asked and obtained the authorisation from the Ethics Committee of the Dental Science and Surgery Department. Results show that in patients undergoing the oral hygiene protocol, the complications and the risks of infection and permanent dental problems have been minimized. Indeed, of the seventeen patients undergoing the OH protocol, 70% obtained positive results and were satisfied with the program outcome. The role of the health care providers is essential to educate patients to adhere to the prescribed treatments and reinforce their motivation in oral hygiene. The oral hygiene procedures prevent and ameliorate oral complications due to the radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  5. The role of superstructure material on the stress distribution in mandibular full-arch implant-supported fixed dentures. A CT-based 3D-FEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Mayara Barbosa; Barão, Valentim Adelino; Faverani, Leonardo Perez; Hipólito, Ana Carolina; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the stress distribution in mandibular full-arch implant-supported fixed dentures with different veneering and metallic infrastructure materials, using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Ten models were obtained from an edentulous human mandible with a complete denture fixed by four implants. Acrylic resin (RES) and porcelain (POR) teeth were associated with infrastructures of titanium (Ti), gold (Au), silver-palladium (AgPd), chrome-cobalt (CoCr) and nickel-chrome (NiCr). A 100-N oblique was applied. The von Mises (σvM) and maximum (σmax) and minimum (σmin) principal stresses were obtained. The RES-AgPd group showed the lowest σvM values, while the RES-Ni-Cr group showed the highest. In the bone tissue, the RES-Au group was the only one that showed different σmax values with a 12% increase in comparison to the other groups which had similar stress values. In the implants, the groups with Ti, Au and AgPd infrastructures, either with porcelain or resin teeth, showed σvM values similar and lower in comparison to the groups with CoCr and NiCr infrastructures. The tooth veneering material influenced the stress values in metallic infrastructures, in which the acrylic resin had the highest values. The veneering and infrastructure materials have influence on stress values of implant-supported dentures, except for the peri-implant bone tissue. © 2013.

  6. Fabrication of custom made ocular prosthesis with three different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loss of eye has a bad effect on the psychology of the patient. Eye prosthesis is fabricated to regain the patient's confidence by meticulous replacement of the missing eye. Immediate fitting of an anophthalmic socket with an artificial eye may not always be possible, and a delayed prosthesis delivery may result in settling and ...

  7. Treatment of femoral neck fracture by Moore Prosthesis in Cotonou ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of femoral neck fracture by Moore Prosthesis in Cotonou. AHM Akue, M Lawson, S Madougou, R Zannou, J Padonou. Abstract. Keywords: Benin; hip; Moore prosthesis; results. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  8. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of the Nijdam voice prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, GJ; deVries, MP; Schutte, HK; vandenHoogen, FJA; Rakhorst, G

    1997-01-01

    The valveless Nijdam prosthesis is a new voice prosthesis for laryngectomized patients using tracheoesophageal speech. An ''umbrella-like hat'' covers the esophageal side of the tracheoesophageal fistula and is deformed during speech by air pressure. To decrease pressure loss during speech, a good

  9. Patient satisfaction with maxillofacial prosthesis. Literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Ramos da Silva, Cristina; Gennari Filho, Humberto; Micheline Dos Santos, Daniela

    2009-02-01

    Obturators and facial prostheses are important not only in rehabilitation and aesthetics, but also in patient re-socialisation. The level of reintegration is directly related to the degree of satisfaction with rehabilitation. So, the maxillofacial prosthetics must provide patient satisfaction during treatment. This study aimed to search information in database and conduct a literature review on patient satisfaction with maxillofacial prosthesis. The problems experienced by these patients may decrease when specialists keep the patient on regular inspection. Rehabilitation through alloplasty or prosthetic restoration provides satisfactory conditions in aesthetics and well-being and reinstates individuals in familial and social environment.

  10. Penile Corporeal Reconstruction during Difficult Placement of a Penile Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Q. Tran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For some patients with impotence and concomitant severe tunical/corporeal tissue fibrosis, insertion of a penile prosthesis is the only option to restore erectile function. Closing the tunica over an inflatable penile prosthesis in these patients can be challenging. We review our previous study which included 15 patients with severe corporeal or tunical fibrosis who underwent corporeal reconstruction with autologous rectus fascia to allow placement of an inflatable penile prosthesis. At a mean follow-up of 18 months (range 12 to 64, all patients had a prosthesis that was functioning properly without evidence of separation, herniation, or erosion of the graft. Sexual activity resumed at a mean time of 9 weeks (range 8 to 10. There were no adverse events related to the graft or its harvest. Use of rectus fascia graft for coverage of a tunical defect during a difficult penile prosthesis placement is surgically feasible, safe, and efficacious.

  11. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzoneri, Elisa; Marzolla, Marilena; Amoresano, Amedeo; Verni, Gennaro; Serino, Andrea

    2013-10-03

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearing or not wearing their prosthesis. When patients performed the tasks on the amputated limb, without the prosthesis, the perception of arm length shrank, with a concurrent shift of PPS boundaries towards the stump. Conversely, wearing the prosthesis increased the perceived length of the stump and extended the PPS boundaries so as to include the prosthetic hand, such that the prosthesis partially replaced the missing limb.

  12. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  13. Evaluation of metal-polymeric fixed partial prosthesis using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, C.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Duma, V. F.; Marcauteanu, C.; Topala, F. I.; Rominu, M.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2013-11-01

    Metal-Polymeric fixed partial prosthesis is the usual prosthetic treatment for many dental patients. However, during the mastication the polymeric component of the prosthesis is fractured and will be lost. This fracture is caused by the material defects or by the fracture lines trapped inside the esthetic components of the prosthesis. This will finally lead to the failure of the prosthetic treatment. Nowadays, there is no method of identification and forecast for the materials defects of the polymeric materials. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a non-invasive clinical method that can be used for the evaluation of metal-polymeric fixed partial prostheses. Twenty metal-polymeric fixed partial prostheses were used for this study. The esthetic component of the prostheses has been Adoro (Ivoclar). Optical investigations of the metal prostheses have revealed no material defects or fracture lines. All the prostheses were temporary cemented in the oral cavities of the patients for six month. The non-invasive method used for the investigations was OCT working in Time Domain mode at 1300 nm. The evaluations of the prostheses were performed before and after their cementation in the patient mouths. All the imagistic results were performed in 2D and than in 3D, after the reconstruction. The results obtained after the OCT evaluation allowed for the identification of 4 metal-polymeric fixed partial prostheses with material defects immediately after finishing the technological procedures. After 6 month in the oral environment other 3 fixed partial prostheses revealed fracture lines. In conclusion, OCT proved to be a valuable tool for the noninvasive evaluation of the metal-polymeric fixed partial prostheses.

  14. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation of crowns, cement excess and technical complications. The aesthetic outcome was assessed by using the Copenhagen Index Score, and the patient-reported outcomes were recorded using the OHIP-49 questionnaire. The statistical analyses were mainly performed by using mixed model of ANOVA for quantitative data and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic crowns were significantly less optimal than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.020). The professional-reported aesthetic outcome demonstrated significantly superior colour match of all-ceramic over metal

  15. Correction of a mandibular asymmetry after fibula reconstruction using a custom-made polyetheretherketone (PEEK) onlay after implant supported occlusal rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrone, M; Aldiano, C; Pentenero, M; Berrone, S

    2015-10-01

    This study describes an unusual case of mandibular asymmetry after fibula free flap reconstruction in a young man following major facial trauma that was corrected using a custom-made polyetheretherketone prosthesis. There is little information in the literature on the use of alloplasts to correct mandibular asymmetry as interest in 'aesthetic re-modelling' has traditionally focused on nasal, zygomatic and chin regions. This report demonstrates that this technique can be used successfully to address selected cases of mandibular asymmetry.

  16. VARIABLE STIFFNESS HAND PROSTHESIS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cecilia Tapia-Siles

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetics is an important field in engineering due to the large number of amputees worldwide and the associated problems such as limited functionality of the state of the art. An important functionality of the human hand is its capability of adjusting the stiffness of the joints depending on the currently performed task. For the development of new technology it is important to understand the limitations of existing resources. As part of our efforts to develop a variable stiffness grasper for developing countries a systematic review was performed covering technology of body powered and myoelectric hand prosthesis. Focus of the review is readiness of prosthetic hands regarding their capability of controlling the stiffness of the end effector. Publications sourced through three different digital libraries were systematically reviewed on the basis of the PRISMA standard. We present a search strategy as well as the PRISMA assessment of the resulting records which covered 321 publications. The records were assessed and the results are presented for the ability of devices to control their joint stiffness. The review indicates that body powered prosthesis are preferred to myoelectric hands due to the reduced cost, the simplicity of use and because of their inherent ability to provide feedback to the user. Stiffness control was identified but has not been fully covered in the current state of the art. In addition we summarise the identified requirements on prosthetic hands as well as related information which can support the development of new prosthetics.

  17. An analysis of reliability and validity of the papilla index score of implant-supported single crowns of maxillary central incisors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Min; Fei, Wei; Hosseini, Mandana

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To test the reliability and validity of the papilla index scores of the implant-supported single crowns (ISSCs) of maxillary central incisors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with 25 ISSCs were included. Two prosthodontists evaluated the papilla index score (PIS) of three...... inter-observer agreement. The PIS score demonstrated significant correlation to the corresponding PP value (rs=.567, p=.000). Conclusions: The feasibility, reliability and validity of the PIS made the parameter useful for quality control of the pri-implant soft tissue of ISSCs....... fill percent (PP) was calculated. The validity of PIS was tested against the corresponding papilla fill percent (PP) by using the Spearman correlation analysis. Results: The intra-observer agreement was >70% in 4/5 and >50% in all observations, the pooled Cohen’s ¿ was 0.64 and 0.70 for two observers...

  18. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    -tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow......-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation...... and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. RESULTS: The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three...

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of the natural abutment teeth in combined tooth-implant-supported telescopic prostheses: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chao; Huang, Yuanding; Feng, Tianming; Zou, Huawei; Fan, Yubo

    2017-07-01

    Telescopic overdentures supported by the combination of natural teeth and implants have been thought a valuable treatment for the severely compromised partially edentulous patients. But the combination of teeth and implants involves highly complex biomechanical problems. This study is to evaluate biomechanical behaviors of the natural abutment teeth with the treatment of combined tooth-implant supported telescopic crown prostheses in mandible through 3D FEA. According to this study, the prosthetic option supported by a combination of teeth and implants and retained by double crowns could protect teeth and their periodontal support tissues acting as a rigid splint, and may be a valuable treatment option for partially edentulous patients with severely reduced remaining teeth in mandible.

  20. A Technique to Facilitate Tooth Modification for Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis Guide Planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberle, C Brent; Abreu, Amara; Metzler, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The technique in this article was developed to provide a means to create prepared guide planes of proper dimension to ensure a more stable and retentive removable partial denture prosthesis (RPDP) framework when providing this service for a patient. Using commonly found clinical materials, a paralleling device can be fabricated from the modified diagnostic cast of the patient's dental arch requiring an RPDP. Polymethyl methacrylate or composite added to an altered thermoplastic form can be positioned intraorally and used as a guide to predictably adjust tooth structure for guide planes. Since it can potentially minimize the number of impressions and diagnostic casts made during the procedure, this can help achieve the desired result more efficiently and quickly for the patient. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  2. Heat-cured acrylic resin versus light-activated resin: a patient, professional and technician-based evaluation of mandibular implant-supported overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asal, S A; Al-AlShiekh, H M

    2017-12-01

    Although light-activated resins (Eclipse) have been reported to possess superior physical and mechanical properties compared with the heat-cured acrylic resins (Lucitone-199), a few studies have compared overdentures with a locator attachment constructed from heat-cured acrylic resins with those constructed from light-activated resins. This clinical study was designed to compare the performance of a mandibular implant-supported overdenture constructed from a heat-cured acrylic resin (Lucitone-199) with that of an overdenture constructed from a light-activated resin (Eclipse). Ten participants received two identical mandibular implant-retained overdentures (Lucitone-199 and Eclipse) opposing one maxillary denture in a random order. Each mandibular overdenture was delivered and worn for 6 months, and two weeks of rest was advised between wears to minimize any carryover effects. Three questionnaires were devised. The first questionnaire (patient evaluation) focused on evaluating different aspects of the denture and overall satisfaction. The second questionnaire (professional dentist evaluation) was based on a clinical evaluation of soft tissues, complications, and the applied technique. The third questionnaire (technician evaluation) involved ranking the different manufacturing steps of the denture and overall preferences. The obtained data was statistically analyzed using an independent sample t-test and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The clinician and technician preferred the Eclipse dentures because of their technical aspects, whereas the patients preferred the Lucitone-199 dentures for their aesthetic properties. Implant-supported overdentures constructed from a heat-cured acrylic resin showed superior aesthetics and had a better odor compared with those constructed from a light-cured resin.

  3. Vertical misfit of laser-sintered and vacuum-cast implant-supported crown copings luted with definitive and temporary luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-de-Oyagüe, Raquel; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José-Francisco; Albaladejo, Alberto; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Montero, Javier; Suárez-García, Maria-Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the vertical discrepancy of implant-supported crown structures constructed with vacuum-casting and Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technologies, and luted with different cement types. Crown copings were fabricated using: (1) direct metal laser sintered Co-Cr (LS); (2) vacuum-cast Co-Cr (CC); and (3) vacuum-cast Ti (CT). Frameworks were luted onto machined implant abutments under constant seating pressure. Each alloy group was randomly divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10 each) according to the cement system utilized: Subgroup 1 (KC) used resin-modified glass-ionomer Ketac Cem Plus; Subgroup 2 (PF) used Panavia F 2.0 dual-cure resin cement; Subgroup 3 (RXU) used RelyX Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive dual-cure resin cement; Subgroup 4 (PIC) used acrylic/urethane-based temporary Premier Implant Cement; and Subgroup 5 (DT) used acrylic/urethane-based temporary DentoTemp cement. Vertical misfit was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run to investigate the effect of alloy/fabrication technique, and cement type on vertical misfit. The statistical significance was set at α = 0.05. The alloy/manufacturing technique and the luting cement affected the vertical discrepancy (p Laser sintering may be an alternative to vacuum-casting of base metals to obtain passive-fitting implant-supported crown copings. The best marginal adaptation corresponded to laser sintered structures luted with glass-ionomer KC, or temporary PIC or DT cements. The highest discrepancies were recorded for Co-Cr and Ti cast frameworks bonded with PF or RXU resinous agents. All groups were within the clinically acceptable misfit range.

  4. Impact of hip prosthesis on dose distribution of pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Jiangping; Zhang Songfang; Zhu Qibao; Guo Jianxin; Zha Yuanzi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the scattering effect of Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis which was high Z material for patients undergoing pelvic irradiation. Methods: The hip prosthesis was set in water phantom (30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm), determining points were chosen on the entrance side of both 6 MV and 10 MV beams at the distance of 0.5 cm, 1.0 cm, 2.0 cm to the hip prosthesis, and also on the exit side of both 6 MV and 10 MV beams at the distance of 3.0 cm, 5.0 cm, 7.0 cm to the hip prostheses. Dose behind the hip prosthesis at depths of 5.0 cm and 10.0 cm for 6 MV and 10 MV beams are also measured. Results: The dose deviation on the beams' entrance side is between 0 to 5.0%, the backscatter effect was more obviously with the higher energy beam. The dose deviation on the beams' exit side was between 21.6%-30.8%. With the same field size and depth, dose deviation becomes smaller when the beam energy was higher; while with the same energy and depth, dose deviation becomes smaller when the field size was bigger. Dose profiles behind the head of the hip prosthesis indicate obvious attenuation of the beam. Conclusions: Beam arrangements that avoid the prosthesis should be considered first or we should at least reduce the weight of the beam that pass through the prosthesis. (authors)

  5. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human t...

  6. Structural valve deterioration in the Mitroflow biological heart valve prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issa, Issa Farah; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Waziri, Farhad

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Concern has been raised regarding the long-term durability of the Mitroflow biological heart valve prosthesis. Our aim was to assess the incidence of structural valve degeneration (SVD) for the Mitroflow bioprosthesis in a nationwide study in Denmark including all patients alive......: A total of 173 patients were diagnosed with SVD by echocardiography. Of these, 64 (11%) patients had severe SVD and 109 (19%) patients moderate SVD. Severe SVD was associated with the age of the prosthesis and small prosthesis size [Size 21: hazard ratio (95% confidence interval, CI) 2.72 (0.97-8.56), P...

  7. A modified technique for retention of orbital prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera R Shaikh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An orbital defect (congenital or acquired causes severe facial asymmetry and disfigurement, which results in psychological and social disturbances to the patient. It becomes a challenging task for a maxillofacial prosthodontist to fabricate a prosthesis that replicates the healthy side of the face. Success of the prosthesis depends primarily on satisfactory retention of the same. This clinical report illustrates rehabilitation of a patient with an orbital defect by fabricating a hollow orbital prosthesis, utilizing anatomical undercuts for retention using an acrylic resin template relined by a resilient denture liner.

  8. Dosimetric influence of hip prosthesis during radiotherapeutic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschwind, R.; Buffard, E.; Masset, H.; Makovicka, L.; David, C.; David, C.; Buffard, E.

    2008-01-01

    As the population become aged, many patients with hip prosthesis are treated for a pelvic cancer. The recommended ballistic must avoid to pass in the prosthesis, but sometimes it is inevitable. So it is essential to quantify with accuracy the dose modifications linked to the presence of metallic implant. The aim of this study is to analyze by Monte Carlo method these modifications in simple and complex models (anthropomorphic phantom) which take into account the geometry and the composition of the prosthesis and its coatings. Then, this methodology was used to study the behaviour of a treatment planning system in theses extreme conditions. (authors)

  9. The Use of Digital Impressions to Fabricate Tooth-Supported Partial Removable Dental Prostheses: A Clinical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mohamed; Sanchez, Eliana; Machado, Camilo

    2016-08-01

    Impression making is a critical step in the fabrication of a partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP). A technique is described for making final impressions to fabricate partial RDPs for Kennedy class III patients using a computer-aided design and computer-assisted manufacturing digital impression system. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Improvements in dental care using a new mobile app with cloud services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Yung; Peng, Kang-Lin; Chen, Ji; Tsai, Jui-Yuan; Tseng, Yu-Chee; Yang, Jhih-Ren; Chen, Min-Huey

    2014-10-01

    Traditional dental care, which includes long-term oral hygiene maintenance and scheduled dental appointments, requires effective communication between dentists and patients. In this study, a new system was designed to provide a platform for direct communication between dentists and patients. A new mobile app, Dental Calendar, combined with cloud services specific for dental care was created by a team constituted by dentists, computer scientists, and service scientists. This new system would remind patients about every scheduled appointment, and help them take pictures of their own oral cavity parts that require dental treatment and send them to dentists along with a symptom description. Dentists, by contrast, could confirm or change appointments easily and provide professional advice to their patients immediately. In this study, 26 dentists and 32 patients were evaluated by a questionnaire containing eight dental-service items before and after using this system. Paired sample t test was used for statistical analysis. After using the Dental Calendar combined with cloud services, dentists were able to improve appointment arrangements significantly, taking care of the patients with sudden worse prosthesis (p cloud services, provides efficient service to both dentists and patients, and helps establish a better relationship between them. It also helps dentists to arrange appointments for patients with sudden worsening of prosthesis function. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Prototyping a robotic dental testing simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemzadeh, K; Hyde, R A; Gao, J

    2007-05-01

    A parallel robot based on the Stewart platform is being developed to simulate jaw motion and investigate its effect on jaw function to test the wearing away of dental components such as individual teeth, crowns, bridges, full set of dentures, and implant-supported overdentures by controlling chewing motion. The current paper only describes the comparison between an alternative configuration proposed by Xu and the Stewart platform configuration. The Stewart platform was chosen as an ideal structure for simulating human mastication as it is easily assembled, has high rigidity, high load-carrying capacity, and accurate positioning capability. The kinematics and singularities of the Stewart platform have been analysed and software developed to (a) test the control algorithms/strategy of muscle movement for the six degree of freedom of mastication cycle and (b) simulate and observe various design options to be able to make the best judgement in product development. The human replica skull has been analysed and reverse engineered with further simplification before integration with the Stewart platform computer-aided design (CAD) to develop the robotic dental testing simulator. Assembly modelling of the reproduced skull was critically analysed for good occlusion in CAD environment. A pulse-width modulation (PWM) circuit plus interface was built to control position and speed of the chosen actuators. A computer numerical control (CNC) machine and wire-electro-discharge machining (wire EDM) were used to manufacture the critical parts such as lower mandible, upper maxilla, and universal joints.

  12. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life......, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  13. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  14. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  15. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humayun, M

    2001-01-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis is under development to treat retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, two presently incurable diseases of the outer retina that afflict millions world-wide...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3750 - External prosthesis adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used to fasten to the body an external aesthetic restoration prosthesis, such as an artificial nose. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in...

  17. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humayun, M

    2001-01-01

    .... Previous studies have established the feasibility of the retinal prosthesis. Short-term tests in blind humans have shown that degenerated retina will respond to light in a way that is consistent with form vision...

  18. Metabolics of stair ascent with a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, E D; Lawson, B E; Shultz, A H; Bartlett, H L; Goldfarb, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of a powered knee and ankle prosthesis for stair ascent through a metabolic assessment comparing energy expenditure of a single transfemoral amputee subject while ascending stairs with the powered prosthesis relative to his passive daily use device, as well as comparing the kinematics and kinetics obtained with the passive prosthesis to healthy biomechanics. The subject wore a portable system that measured pulmonary gaseous exchange rates of oxygen and carbon dioxide while he ascended stairs with each of the prostheses in alternating tests. The results indicated that the amputee's energy expenditure decreased by 32 percent while climbing with the powered prosthesis as compared to his passive one, and the kinematics and kinetics achieved were representative of healthy biomechanics.

  19. Utilization of radiometric method in evaluation of wear on human dental enamel in vitro by dental porcelain glazed and polished

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki de; Adachi, Eduardo Makoto

    2005-01-01

    The dental porcelain is a material commonly used in prosthesis. Disadvantages of dental porcelain use include possibility to cause tooth or dental materials wear. Before its use in the mouth, surfaces are treated with polishing and/or glazing. This research used the radiometric method to verify the influence of these surface treatments on the porcelains of commercial brands: Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse. This method was originally developed for dentifrice abrasiveness evaluation. Five specimens of dental enamel and 10 specimens of each porcelain (5 glazed, 5 polished) were used. The dental enamel was flattened and irradiated with neutrons from the IEA-R1 (IPEN/CNEN) nuclear reactor. Then it was weared by each porcelain in sliding motion, with water. After 2,500 cycles for each porcelain specimen, the released enamel residue was measured. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of 32 P transferred to water from the irradiated tooth. Results varied from 2.57 to 5.81 μg of enamel /mm 2 weared surface. There was no statistical difference (α=0.05) between dental enamel wear caused by the same porcelains glazed or polished. The results suggest that adequate surface finishing depend on the type of dental porcelain. (author)

  20. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  1. Rehabilitation of single finger amputation with customized silicone prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Niharika; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Finger amputations are common in accidents at home, work, and play. Apart from trauma, congenital disease and deformity also leads to finger amputation. This results in loss of function, loss of sensation as well as loss of body image. Finger prosthesis offers psychological support and social acceptance in such cases. This clinical report describes a method to fabricate ring retained silicone finger prosthesis in a patient with partial finger loss.

  2. Kinematic analysis of a posterior-stabilized knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-20

    The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0-135° flexion. Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, "rollback" compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis.

  3. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xin Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0-135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee′s kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, "rollback" compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis.

  4. [Influence of coping material selection and porcelain firing on marginal and internal fit of computer-aided design/computer- aided manufacturing of zirconia and titanium ceramic implant-supported crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuiling, Liu; Liyuan, Yang; Xu, Gao; Hong, Shang

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of coping material and porcelain firing on the marginal and internal fit of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of zirconia ceramic implant- and titanium ceramic implant-supported crowns. Zirconia ceramic implant (group A, n = 8) and titanium metal ceramic implant-supported crowns (group B, n = 8) were produced from copings using the CAD/CAM system. The marginal and internal gaps of the copings and crowns were measured by using a light-body silicone replica technique combined with micro-computed tomography scanning to obtain a three-dimensional image. Marginal gap (MG), horizontal marginal discrepancy (HMD), and axial wall (AW) were measured. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0. Prior to porcelain firing, the measurements for MG, HMD, and AW of copings in group A were significantly larger than those in group B (P 0.05). Porcelain firing significantly reduced MG (P 0.05). The marginal fits of CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic implant-supported crowns were superior to those of CAD/CAM titanium ceramic-supported crowns. The fits of both the CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic implant- and titanium ceramic implant-supported crowns were obviously influenced by porcelain firing.

  5. Function of obturator prosthesis after maxillectomy and prosthetic obturator rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Ren, Wenhao; Gao, Ling; Cheng, Zheng; Zhang, Linmei; Li, Shaoming; Zhi, Pro Ke-qian

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary defects are usually rehabilitated by a prosthetic obturator. This study aimed to evaluate the functioning of obturators prosthesis in patients with unilateral defects after maxillectomy. Of 49 patients, 28 underwent to maxillectomy as a result of tumor ablative surgery, and acquired unilateral maxillary defects. Evaluation of the function was performed by applying the Obturator Functional Scale (OFS). From a total of 49 patients, 28 were treated as follows: 9 with a conventional retained obturator prosthesis (COP), 11 (39%) with an enhanced retentive obturator prosthesis with stud attachment (POP) and 8 (28%) with an enhanced retentive obturator prosthesis with magnetic attachment (POM). The mean OFS score was 80. Scores on functions of speech, swallowing and chewing reached statistical significances (p<0.05) among these three subgroups. Comparing COP and MOP groups, the scores of OFS in the domains of "Speech-ability to speak in public" and "Swallowing-leakage with liquids" were significantly higher in AOP group. Comparing COP group, the scores of OFS in "Swallowing-leakage with solid" and "Chewing/eating" domains were increased significantly (p<0.05) both in MOP and AOP groups. Obturator prosthesis improves oral function of patients after maxillary defects; the retention of the obturator prosthesis enhanced by the addition of attachments showed more benefits in oral function. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Function of obturator prosthesis after maxillectomy and prosthetic obturator rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Maxillary defects are usually rehabilitated by a prosthetic obturator. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the functioning of obturators prosthesis in patients with unilateral defects after maxillectomy. METHODS: Of 49 patients, 28 underwent to maxillectomy as a result of tumor ablative surgery, and acquired unilateral maxillary defects. Evaluation of the function was performed by applying the Obturator Functional Scale (OFS. RESULTS: From a total of 49 patients, 28 were treated as follows: 9 with a conventional retained obturator prosthesis (COP, 11 (39% with an enhanced retentive obturator prosthesis with stud attachment (POP and 8 (28% with an enhanced retentive obturator prosthesis with magnetic attachment (POM. The mean OFS score was 80. Scores on functions of speech, swallowing and chewing reached statistical significances (p < 0.05 among these three subgroups. Comparing COP and MOP groups, the scores of OFS in the domains of "Speech-ability to speak in public" and "Swallowing-leakage with liquids" were significantly higher in AOP group. Comparing COP group, the scores of OFS in "Swallowing-leakage with solid" and "Chewing/eating" domains were increased significantly (p < 0.05 both in MOP and AOP groups. CONCLUSION: Obturator prosthesis improves oral function of patients after maxillary defects; the retention of the obturator prosthesis enhanced by the addition of attachments showed more benefits in oral function.

  7. Failed total carpometacarpal joint prosthesis of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Homilius, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis. T...... in eight of 10 patients, but the mean Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores, self-reported pinch-grip-related function, and pain were comparable with our earlier published results with the Elektra carpometacarpal total joint prosthesis.......Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis....... The male:female ratio was 1:4 and the mean duration of observation 32 months (range 6-52). In three patients the revised implant was a MOJE uncemented carpometacarpal joint prosthesis and in seven patients an Elektra uncemented one. At follow-up grip strength was reduced to less than 90% of the other hand...

  8. Clinical and patient-reported outcomes of zirconia-based implant fixed dental prostheses: Results of a prospective case series 5 years after implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Witkowski, Siegbert; Vach, Kirstin; Kohal, Ralf-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and patient-reported outcome of all-ceramic zirconia implant supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) 5 years after implant installation. Thirteen patients were treated with two terminally placed one-piece zirconia implants for a three-unit FDP each. The FDPs consisted of a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework over-pressed with a fluor-apatite veneering ceramic and were adhesively cemented. Survival and success were assessed by applying modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria and preparation of Kaplan-Meier (KM) plots. Alpha and Bravo ratings were accepted for success (among others including small area veneer chippings and occlusal roughness), whereas Charlie ratings allowing for intra-oral correction (e.g., polishing) were accepted for survival. Furthermore, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were analyzed with the help of visual analogue scales (VAS). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test (USPHS criteria) and linear mixed models (PROMs) were used to evaluate time effects on response variables. All patients were available 61.8 ± 1.1 months after implant installation (53.6 ± 3.1 months after final prosthesis insertion). FDP survival was 100%. Significant incidence of veneer chipping (p = .0096) and occlusal roughness (p = .0019) was observed. Charlie rated extent of both phenomena resulted in a KM success estimate of 38.5% (95% CI: 14.1%-62.8%; seven FDPs with obvious roughness, three of them with extended veneer chipping). Compared with the pre-treatment assessments (30%-81% of satisfaction), all surveys at prosthetic delivery showed significantly improved VAS scores (66%-93%; p ≤ .038), except for speech (p = .341). Concerning function, esthetics and self-esteem, no decrease in satisfaction could be observed until the end of follow-up (90%-96%; p ≥ .057), whereas perception of sense (92%) and speech (95%) increased over time (p ≤ .030). Occurrence of technical complications did not correlate

  9. Prevalence of Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis in Patients Treated with a Combination of Axial and Tilted Implants Supporting a Complete Fixed Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Cavalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the incidence and prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in patients with a fixed full-arch prosthesis supported by two axial and two tilted implants. Materials and Methods. Sixty-nine patients were included in the study. Each patient received a fixed full-arch prosthesis supported by two mesial axial and two distal tilted implants to rehabilitate the upper arch, the lower arch, or both. Three hundred thirty-six implants for 84 restorations were delivered. Patients were scheduled for follow-up visits every 6 months in the first 2 years and yearly after. At each follow-up visit peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were diagnosed if present. Results. The overall follow-up range was from 12 to 130 months (mean 63,2 months. Three patients presented peri-implantitis. The prevalence of peri-implant mucositis ranged between 0 and 7,14% of patients (5,06% of implants while the prevalence of peri-implantitis varied from 0 to 4,55% of patients (3,81% of implants. Conclusions. The prevalence and incidence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis are lower than most of the studies in literature. Therefore this kind of rehabilitation could be considered a feasible option, on the condition of adopting a systematic hygienic protocol.

  10. Prosthetic replacement of the medial meniscus in cadaveric knees - Does the prosthesis mimic the functional behavior of the native meniscus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, TG; Verdonschot, N; Heijkants, RGJC; Buma, R; Scholten, JGF; van Kampen, A; Veth, RPH

    2004-01-01

    Meniscus replacement by a polymer meniscus prosthesis in dogs resulted in generation of new meniscal tissue. Hypothesis: Optimal functioning of the prosthesis would involve realistic deformation and motion patterns of the prosthesis during knee joint motion. Study Design: Controlled laboratory

  11. In vitro comparison of fracture load of implant-supported, zirconia-based, porcelain- and composite-layered restorations after artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Futoshi; Taguchi, Kohei; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Kamio, Shingo; Iwasaki, Taro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated fracture load of single-tooth, implant-supported, zirconia-based, porcelain- and indirect composite-layered restorations after artificial aging. Forty-four zirconia-based molar restorations were fabricated on implant abutments and divided into four groups, namely, zirconia-based all-ceramic restorations (ZAC group) and three types of zirconia-based composite-layered restorations (ZIC-P, ZIC-E, and ZIC groups). Before layering an indirect composite material, the zirconia copings in the ZIC-P and ZIC-E groups were primed with Clearfil Photo Bond and Estenia Opaque Primer, respectively. All restorations were cemented on the abutments with glass-ionomer cement and then subjected to thermal cycling and cyclic loading. All specimens survived thermal cycling and cyclic loading. The fracture load of the ZIC-P group (2.72 kN) was not significantly different from that of the ZAC group (3.05 kN). The fracture load of the zirconia-based composite-layered restoration primed with Clearfil Photo Bond (ZIC-P) was comparable to that of the zirconia-based all-ceramic restoration (ZAC) after artificial aging.

  12. Implant Supported Distal Extension over Denture Retained by Two Types of Attachments. A Comparative Radiographic Study by Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrous, Ahmed I; Aldawash, Hussien A; Soliman, Tarek A; Banasr, Fahad H; Abdelwahed, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to compare and evaluate the effect of two different attachments (locator attachment and ball and socket [B&S] attachment) on implants and natural abutments supporting structures, in cases of limited inter-arch spaces in mandibular Kennedy Class I implant supported removable partial over dentures by measuring the bone height changes through the cone beam radiographic technology. Materials and Methods: Two implants were positioned in the first or second molar area following the two-stage surgical protocol. Two equal groups were divided ten for each: Group I: Sides were the placed implants restored by the locator attachment. Group II: The other sides, implants were restored by B&S attachment. Evaluation of the implants and main abutments supporting structures of each group was done at the time of removable partial over denture insertion, 6, 12 and 18 months by measuring the bone height changes using cone beam computed tomography. Results: Implants with locator attachment showed marginal bone height better effects on implants and main abutments supporting structures. Conclusion: Implants restored by locator attachment shows better effects on bone of both main natural abutments and implant than those restored with ball and socket. PMID:26028894

  13. Clinical experiences of implant-supported prostheses with laser-welded titanium frameworks in the partially edentulous jaw: a 5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortorp, A; Jemt, T

    1999-01-01

    Titanium frameworks have been used in the endentulous implant patient for the last 10 years. However, knowledge of titanium frameworks for the partially dentate patient is limited. To report the 5-year clinical performance of implant-supported prostheses with laser-welded titanium frameworks in the partially edentulous jaw. A consecutive group of 383 partially edentulous patients were, on a routine basis, provided with fixed partial prostheses supported by Brånemark implants in the mandible or maxilla. Besides conventional frameworks in cast gold alloy, 58 patients were provided with titanium frameworks with three different veneering techniques, and clinical and radiographic 5-year data were collected for this group. The overall cumulative survival rate was 95.6% for titanium-framework prostheses and 93.6% for implants. Average bone loss during the follow-up period was 0.4 mm. The most common complications were minor veneering fractures. Loose and fractured implant screw components were fewer than 2%. An observation was that patients on medications for cardiovascular problems may lose more implants than others (p laser-welded titanium frameworks was similar to that reported for conventional cast frames in partially edentulous jaws. Low-fusing porcelain veneers also showed clinical performance comparable to that reported for conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal techniques.

  14. Importance of a distal proximal contact on load transfer by implant-supported single adjacent crowns in posterior region of the mandible: a photoelastic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Afranio de Aguiar Junior

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the importance of a distal proximal contact on the load transfer to the posterior region of the mandible by non-splinted adjacent implant-supported crowns using photoelastic stress analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A rectangular model (68x30x15 mm was made of polymethylmethacrylate resin to simulate half of the mandibular arch. One model was completed with resin replicas representing the first premolar and second molar and with two 3.75 mm dia.x11 mm internal hexagon threaded implants replacing the second premolar and first molar. The other model was manufactured in the same way but without the second molar. Both models were duplicated using photoelastic resin. The roots of the teeth replicas were covered with a layer of polyether impression material to simulate the periodontal ligament. Two different vertical loads were applied to the crowns as follows: 1 - single static point load alternately applied to the crowns replacing the second premolar and first molar (50 N; 2 - simultaneous static point loads applied to both of the crowns replacing the second premolar and first molar (100 N. The resulting isochromatic fringe pattern in the photoelastic model was monitored and photographed. RESULTS: All loading conditions studied showed that the presence of the second molar has changed the load transmission and the pattern of stresses. CONCLUSION: Results showed that the presence of a second molar proximal contact can help minimize the stresses around the implants.

  15. A 3-year prospective clinical study of telescopic crown, bar, and locator attachments for removable four implant-supported maxillary overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Duohong; Wu, Yiqun; Huang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Shen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate telescopic crown (TC), bar, and locator attachments used in removable four implant-supported overdentures for patients with edentulous maxillae. A total of 30 maxillary edentulous patients were enrolled in a 3-year prospective study. Ten patients (group A) were treated with overdentures supported by TCs, 10 patients (group B) with overdentures supported by bar attachments, and 10 patients (group C) with overdentures supported by locator attachments. A total of 120 implants were used to restore oral function. During the 3-year follow-up period, implant survival and success rates, biologic and mechanical complications, prosthodontic maintenance efforts, and patient satisfaction were evaluated. All 30 patients were available for the 3-year follow-up and exhibited 100% implant survival and success rates. Peri-implant marginal bone resorption was not statistically significant for the three groups. There were lower plaque, bleeding, gingiva, and calculus indices in group C compared with groups A and B. The number of prosthodontic maintenance visits revealed eight complications in the TC group, seven complications in the bar group, and four complications in the locator group. However, there were no differences in the clinical effects of the overdentures in the three groups. Within the limits of this prospective study, it was concluded that the locator system produced superior clinical results compared with the TC and bar attachments in terms of peri-implant hygiene parameters, the frequency of prosthodontic maintenance measures, cost, and ease of denture preparation. However, longer-term prospective studies are required to confirm these results.

  16. Short dental implants versus standard dental implants placed in the posterior jaws: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Ferro-Alves, Marcio Luiz; Okamoto, Roberta; Mendonça, Marcos Rogério; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare short implants (equal or less than 8mm) versus standard implants (larger than 8mm) placed in posterior regions of maxilla and mandible, evaluating survival rates of implants, marginal bone loss, complications and prosthesis failures. This review has been registered at PROSPERO under the number CRD42015016588. Main search terms were used in combination: dental implant, short implant, short dental implants, short dental implants posterior, short dental implants maxilla, and short dental implants mandible. An electronic search for data published up until September/2015 was undertaken using the PubMed/Medline, Embase and The Cochrane Library databases. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, randomized controlled trials and/or prospective studies, which evaluated short implants in comparison to standard implants in the same study. The search identified 1460 references, after inclusion criteria 13 studies were assessed for eligibility. A total of 1269 patients, who had received a total of 2631 dental implants. The results showed that there was no significant difference of implants survival (P=.24; RR:1.35; CI: 0.82-2.22), marginal bone loss (P=.06; MD: -0.20; CI: -0.41 to 0.00), complications (P=.08; RR:0.54; CI: 0.27-1.09) and prosthesis failures (P=.92; RR:0.96; CI: 0.44-2.09). Short implants are considered a predictable treatment for posterior jaws. However, short implants with length less than 8 mm (4-7 mm) should be used with caution because they present greater risks to failures compared to standard implants. Short implants are frequently placed in the posterior area in order to avoid complementary surgical procedures. However, clinicians need to be aware that short implants with length less than 8mm present greater risk of failures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Consensus report - reconstructions on implants. The Third EAO Consensus Conference 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Wiskott, Anselm

    2012-01-01

    This group was assigned the task to review the current knowledge in the areas of implant connections to abutments/reconstructions, fixation methods (cement vs. screw retained) for implant-supported reconstructions, as well as the optimal number of implants for fixed dental prosthesis and implant...

  18. Dental Implant Placement with Simultaneous Anterior Maxillary Reconstruction with Block and Particulate Fresh Frozen Allograft Bone: A Case Report with 24-Month Follow-Up Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Vieira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresh frozen allograft bone is routinely used in orthopedic surgery for the reconstruction of large bone defects, and its use in oral and maxillofacial surgery is increasing. The purpose of this case was to demonstrate the installation of dental implants and the use of fresh frozen bone for reconstruction of anterior maxilla in the same surgery. This case report presents the insertion of dental implants followed immediately by a placement of fresh frozen allograft in block and particle for a reconstruction of atrophic anterior maxillary in the same surgery. Ten months subsequent to this procedure, provisional fixed prosthesis was installed on the implants. Four months later (postoperative month 14, the final fixed prosthesis was installed and the clinical success was observed. The insertion of dental implants followed immediately by a placement of fresh frozen allograft is a safe and efficient process that results in the successful return of dental function and aesthetic rehabilitation for the patient.

  19. Automated estimation of hip prosthesis migration: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebroucke, Jef; Deklerck, Rudi; Temmermans, Frederik; Van Gompel, Gert; Buls, Nico; Scheerlinck, Thierry; de Mey, Johan

    2013-09-01

    A common complication associated with hip arthoplasty is prosthesis migration, and for most cemented components a migration greater than 0.85 mm within the first six months after surgery, are an indicator for prosthesis failure. Currently, prosthesis migration is evaluated using X-ray images, which can only reliably estimate migrations larger than 5 mm. We propose an automated method for estimating prosthesis migration more accurately, using CT images and image registration techniques. We report on the results obtained using an experimental set-up, in which a metal prosthesis can be translated and rotated with respect to a cadaver femur, over distances and angles applied using a combination of positioning stages. Images are first preprocessed to reduce artefacts. Bone and prosthesis are extracted using consecutive thresholding and morphological operations. Two registrations are performed, one aligning the bones and the other aligning the prostheses. The migration is estimated as the difference between the found transformations. We use a robust, multi-resolution, stochastic optimization approach, and compare the mean squared intensity differences (MS) to mutual information (MI). 30 high-resolution helical CT scans were acquired for prosthesis translations ranging from 0.05 mm to 4 mm, and rotations ranging from 0.3° to 3° . For the translations, the mean 3D registration error was found to be 0.22 mm for MS, and 0.15 mm for MI. For the rotations, the standard deviation of the estimation error was 0.18° for MS, and 0.08° for MI. The results show that the proposed approach is feasible and that clinically acceptable accuracies can be obtained. Clinical validation studies on patient images will now be undertaken.

  20. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  1. Golf hand prosthesis performance of transradial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Stephanie L; Wernke, Matthew M; Lura, Derek J; Kahle, Jason T; Dubey, Rajiv V; Highsmith, M Jason

    2015-06-01

    Typical upper limb prostheses may limit sports participation; therefore, specialized terminal devices are often needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of transradial amputees to play golf using a specialized terminal device. Club head speed, X-factor, and elbow motion of two individuals with transradial amputations using an Eagle Golf terminal device were compared to a non-amputee during a golf swing. Measurements were collected pre/post training with various stances and grips. Both prosthesis users preferred a right-handed stance initially; however, after training, one preferred a left-handed stance. The amputees had slower club head speeds and a lower X-factor compared to the non-amputee golfer, but increased their individual elbow motion on the prosthetic side after training. Amputees enjoyed using the device, and it may provide kinematic benefits indicated by the increase in elbow flexion on the prosthetic side. The transradial amputees were able to swing a golf club with sufficient repetition, form, and velocity to play golf recreationally. Increased elbow flexion on the prosthetic side suggests a potential benefit from using the Eagle Golf terminal device. Participating in recreational sports can increase amputees' health and quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  2. Clareamento Dental

    OpenAIRE

    Sossai, Najara; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Verdinelli, Ellen Carla; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Bassegio, Wagner; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR

    2011-01-01

    O clareamento dental já é utilizado há bastante tempo na Odontologia e atualmente é um dos tratamentos odontológicos mais solicitados para obtenção de um sorriso mais estético. Classificado em clareamento caseiro e/ou de consultório, ambas as técnicas são motivo de polêmica quanto aos seus benefícios, riscos, limitações e efeito clareador, bem como sobre qual é a melhor técnica existente para a promoção de um clareamento dental eficaz e seguro. Neste contexto, o presente estudo tem por objeti...

  3. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  4. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  5. Need of implant dentistry at undergraduate dental curriculum in Indian dental colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chowdhary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Edentulism is the major problem in the developing countries, and is widely spread in the current population, although the prevalence is declining and incidence of tooth loss is decreasing in the developed nations. The prevalence of edentulism in India varies from 60% to 69% of 25 years and above age group. It is obvious that the number of lost teeth increases with age leading to an increase in prevalence of partially edentulous patients. From a biological point of view, the replacement of a single missing tooth with an implant rather than a three-unit fixed partial denture, and the implant-supported complete denture has been proved more efficient in improving the mastication and maintaining the bone for a longer time and also more cost-effective treatment. Many dental schools throughout Europe and America have to a various extent introduced implant dentistry as part of the compulsory undergraduate curriculum. Thus, it becomes more essential to introduce implant dentistry at undergraduate level in Indian dental schools to manage the higher percentage of edentulism.

  6. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  7. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  8. Predicting the Failure of Dental Implants Using Supervised Learning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hui Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Prosthodontic treatment has been a crucial part of dental treatment for patients with full mouth rehabilitation. Dental implant surgeries that replace conventional dentures using titanium fixtures have become the top choice. However, because of the wide-ranging scope of implant surgeries, patients’ body conditions, surgeons’ experience, and the choice of implant system should be considered during treatment. The higher price charged by dental implant treatments compared to conventional dentures has led to a rush among medical staff; therefore, the future impact of surgeries has not been analyzed in detail, resulting in medial disputes. Previous literature on the success factors of dental implants is mainly focused on single factors such as patients’ systemic diseases, operation methods, or prosthesis types for statistical correlation significance analysis. This study developed a prediction model for providing an early warning mechanism to reduce the chances of dental implant failure. We collected the clinical data of patients who received artificial dental implants at the case hospital for a total of 8 categories and 20 variables. Supervised learning techniques such as decision tree (DT, support vector machines, logistic regressions, and classifier ensembles (i.e., Bagging and AdaBoost were used to analyze the prediction of the failure of dental implants. The results show that DT with both Bagging and Adaboost techniques possesses the highest prediction performance for the failure of dental implant (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC: 0.741; the analysis also revealed that the implant systems affect dental implant failure. The model can help clinical surgeons to reduce medical failures by choosing the optimal implant system and prosthodontics treatments for their patients.

  9. Closed-eye orbital prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watson, Jason; Srinivasan, Dilip

    2015-03-01

    One of the most challenging prostheses to fabricate is an acceptable orbital prosthesis. Successful reconstruction of the complex missing tissues, the globe, muscle, skin, and bony elements requires time and high levels of practical skill. A good match to the contralateral nondefect side will help mask the underlying defect and give the patient confidence to return to normal, routine life. The contralateral eye opening will commonly dictate the eye opening of such a prosthesis, but because of the expressive nature of the eye and its high levels of mobility, this can be difficult to achieve. This clinical report presents a patient who had an extended orbital exenteration and right maxillectomy to remove a maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. An alternative approach to constructing an orbital prosthesis was undertaken with the eye closed. Compared to the normal method of fabrication, this process was less complex and quicker, made the prosthesis less "staring," camouflaged the defect, and reduced the detection of the prosthesis because of movements in the remaining eye. The patient engaged in his routine daily life, which reinforced his self-esteem, confidence, and reintegration into the community. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantifying risk of penile prosthesis infection with elevated glycosylated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S K; Carson, C C; Cleves, M A; Delk, J R

    1998-05-01

    Elevation of glycosylated hemoglobin above levels of 11.5 mg.% has been considered a contraindication to penile prosthesis implantation in diabetic patients. We determine the predictive value of glycosylated hemoglobin A1C in penile prosthesis infections in diabetic and nondiabetic patients to confirm or deny this prevalent opinion. We conducted a 2-year prospective study of 389 patients, including 114 diabetics, who underwent 3-piece penile prosthesis implantation. All patients had similar preoperative preparation without regard to diabetic status, control or glycosylated hemoglobin A1C level. Risk of infection was statistically analyzed for diabetics versus nondiabetics, glycosylated hemoglobin A1C values above and below 11.5 mg.%, insulin dependent versus oral medication diabetics, and fasting blood sugars above and below 180 mg.%. Prosthesis infections developed in 10 diabetics (8.7%) and 11 nondiabetics (4.0%). No increased infection rate was observed in diabetics with high fasting sugars or diabetics on insulin. There was no statistically significant increased infection risk with increased levels of glycosylated hemoglobin A1C among all patients or among only the diabetics. In fact, there was no meaningful difference in the median or mean level of glycosylated hemoglobin A1C in the infected and noninfected patients regardless of diabetes. Use of glycosylated hemoglobin A1C values to identify and exclude surgical candidates with increased risk of infections is not proved by this study. Elevation of fasting sugar or insulin dependence also does not increase risk of infection in diabetics undergoing prosthesis implantation.

  11. Design and Control of a Pneumatically Actuated Transtibial Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Shen, Xiangrong

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the design and control of a pneumatically actuated transtibial prosthesis, which utilizes a pneumatic cylinder-type actuator to power the prosthetic ankle joint to support the user's locomotion. The pneumatic actuator has multiple advantages over the traditional electric motor, such as light weight, low cost, and high power-to-weight ratio. The objective of this work is to develop a compact and lightweight transtibial prosthesis, leveraging the multiple advantages provided by this highly competitive actuator. In this paper, the design details of the prosthesis are described, including the determination of performance specifications, the layout of the actuation mechanism, and the calculation of the torque capacity. Through the authors' design calculation, the prosthesis is able to provide sufficient range of motion and torque capacity to support the locomotion of a 75 kg individual. The controller design is also described, including the underlying biomechanical analysis and the formulation of the finite-state impedance controller. Finally, the human subject testing results are presented, with the data indicating that the prosthesis is able to generate a natural walking gait and sufficient power output for its amputee user.

  12. Outcome of total knee arthroplasty with insall burstein-11 prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, M.Z.; Qayum, H.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with severe degenerative knee joint disease often require knee arthroplasty to reduce pain, improve stability and restore function. Insall Burstein II prosthesis is posteriorly stabilized condylar prosthesis, which provide posterior cruciate ligament substitution. It was designed to improve range of motion, stair climbing ability and to prevent posterior subluxation. Evaluate the functional outcome of total knee arthroplasty with IB II prosthesis and Evaluate the alignment of prosthetic components by radiological parameters and its correlation with functional outcome. Sixty knees of sixty patients were replaced by using Insall Burstein II prosthesis. Postoperative radiographs were evaluated for alignment of knee and prosthetic components by criteria selected from knee society roentogenographic evaluation system. Functional outcome was evaluated by rationale of knee society knee rating system. Prosthetic component was aligned in 93% and mal-alignment in 7% of the cases. There was significant improvement in functions core from mean score 33.83 +-15.5 to 59.5+-17.7 and knee score from 37 +- 12.5 to 76.4 +-2.2. Postoperative functional score was found correlated with alignment significantly. Conclusion: Total knee arthroplasty with I-B-II prosthesis is a safe durable and predictable procedure with proper surgical technique and expertise good alignment and satisfactory functional out come can be achieved. (author)

  13. FACTORS RELATED TO ORAL CANDIDIASIS IN ELDERLY USERS AND NON-USERS OF REMOVABLE DENTAL PROSTHESES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Cyra Maria Pires de Carvalho; Bianchi, Hélcio Aparecido; Tadano, Tomoko; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues de; Hoffmann-Santos, Hugo Dias; Leite, Diniz Pereira; Hahn, Rosane Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the association between oral candidiasis in elderly users and nonusers of prosthesis and its predisposing factors. To this end, we performed a cross-sectional study where saliva samples from 48 patients were collected they used prosthesis and 43 patients (control group) who did not use. Among the 91 patients, Candida spp were isolated in 40 (83.3%) who used prosthesis and in 23 (53.5%) in the control group. A statistically significant association was determined between the two groups, the isolation of yeasts and dental prosthesis (p oral candidiasis (n = 24), 83.3% (n = 20) belonged to the group that wore dentures, while only 16.7% (n = 4) belonged to the control group. Elderly patients with diabetes had 4.4 times higher estimated risk of developing oral candidiasis when compared with individuals without this condition. There was no statistically significant association between being user prostheses and have diabetes with the onset of candidiasis. No statistically significant association was determined between xerostomia, use of prosthesis and oral candidiasis. The use of prosthetics and poor oral hygiene in elderly patients predisposes to the development of oral candidiasis.

  14. Numerical analysis of an osseointegrated prosthesis fixation with reduced bone failure risk and periprosthetic bone loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomaszewski, P. M.; van Diest, M.; Bulstra, S. K.; Verdonschot, N.; Verkerke, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Currently available implants for direct attachment of prosthesis to the skeletal system after transfemoral amputation (OPRA system. Integrum AB, Sweden and ISP Endo/Exo prosthesis, ESKA Implants AG, Germany) show many advantages over the conventional socket fixation. However, restraining

  15. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  16. Fully 3-dimensional digitally planned reconstruction of a mandible with a free vascularized fibula and immediate placement of an implant-supported prosthetic construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Rutger H.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; Lahoda, Lars U.; Van der Meer, W. Joerd; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Reintsema, Harry; Witjes, Max J.

    Background Reconstruction of craniofacial defects becomes complex when dental implants are included for functional rehabilitation. We describe a fully 3-dimensional (3D) digitally planned reconstruction of a mandible and immediate prosthetic loading with a fibula graft in a 2-step surgical approach.

  17. Effects of abutment diameter, luting agent type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Sina; Hosseini Ghavam, Fereshteh; Amini, Parviz; Yaghmaei, Kaveh

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment diameter, cement type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments. Sixty abutments with two different diameters, the height of which was reduced to 3 mm, were vertically mounted in acrylic resin blocks with matching implant analogues. The specimens were divided into 2 diameter groups: 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm (n=30). For each abutment a CAD/CAM metal coping was manufactured, with an occlusal loop. Each group was sub-divided into 3 sub-groups (n=10). In each subgroup, a different cement type was used: resin-modified glass-ionomer, resin cement and zinc-oxide-eugenol. After incubation and thermocycling, the removal force was measured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In zinc-oxide-eugenol group, after removal of the coping, the cement remnants were completely cleaned and the copings were re-cemented with resin cement and re-tested. Two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests, and paired t-test were used to analyze data (α=.05). The highest pulling force was registered in the resin cement group (414.8 N), followed by the re-cementation group (380.5 N). Increasing the diameter improved the retention significantly ( P =.006). The difference in retention between the cemented and recemented copings was not statistically significant ( P =.40). Resin cement provided retention almost twice as strong as that of the RMGI. Increasing the abutment diameter improved retention significantly. Re-cementation with resin cement did not exhibit any difference from the initial cementation with resin cement.

  18. Effects of abutment diameter, luting agent type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Sina; Amini, Parviz; Yaghmaei, Kaveh

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment diameter, cement type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty abutments with two different diameters, the height of which was reduced to 3 mm, were vertically mounted in acrylic resin blocks with matching implant analogues. The specimens were divided into 2 diameter groups: 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm (n=30). For each abutment a CAD/CAM metal coping was manufactured, with an occlusal loop. Each group was sub-divided into 3 sub-groups (n=10). In each subgroup, a different cement type was used: resin-modified glass-ionomer, resin cement and zinc-oxide-eugenol. After incubation and thermocycling, the removal force was measured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In zinc-oxide-eugenol group, after removal of the coping, the cement remnants were completely cleaned and the copings were re-cemented with resin cement and re-tested. Two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests, and paired t-test were used to analyze data (α=.05). RESULTS The highest pulling force was registered in the resin cement group (414.8 N), followed by the re-cementation group (380.5 N). Increasing the diameter improved the retention significantly (P=.006). The difference in retention between the cemented and recemented copings was not statistically significant (P=.40). CONCLUSION Resin cement provided retention almost twice as strong as that of the RMGI. Increasing the abutment diameter improved retention significantly. Re-cementation with resin cement did not exhibit any difference from the initial cementation with resin cement. PMID:29503708

  19. Active Bone Conduction Prosthesis: BonebridgeTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zernotti, Mario E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bone conduction implants are indicated for patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss, as well as for patients with single-sided deafness (SSD. The transcutaneous technology avoids several complications of the percutaneous bone conduction implants including skin reaction, skin growth over the abutment, and wound infection. The Bonebridge (MED-EL, Austria prosthesis is a semi-implantable hearing system: the BCI (Bone Conduction Implant is the implantable part that contains the Bone Conduction-Floating Mass Transducer (BC-FMT, which applies the vibrations directly to the bone; the external component is the audio processor Amadé BB (MED-EL, Austria, which digitally processes the sound and sends the information through the coil to the internal part. Bonebridge may be implanted through three different approaches: the transmastoid, the retrosigmoid, or the middle fossa approach. Objective This systematic review aims to describe the world́s first active bone conduction implant system, Bonebridge, as well as describe the surgical techniques in the three possible approaches, showing results from implant centers in the world in terms of functional gain, speech reception thresholds and word recognition scores. Data Synthesis The authors searched the MEDLINE database using the key term Bonebridge. They selected only five publications to include in this systematic review. The review analyzes 20 patients that received Bonebridge implants with different approaches and pathologies. Conclusion Bonebridge is a solution for patients with conductive/mixed hearing loss and SSD with different surgical approaches, depending on their anatomy. The system imparts fewer complications than percutaneous bone conduction implants and shows proven benefits in speech discrimination and functional gain.

  20. In vivo performance of photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Yossi; Goetz, George; Lavinsky, Daniel; Huie, Phil; Mathieson, Keith; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore; Manivanh, Richard; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis, in which camera-captured images are projected onto the retina using pulsed near-IR light. Each pixel in the subretinal implant directly converts pulsed light into local electric current to stimulate the nearby inner retinal neurons. 30 μm-thick implants with pixel sizes of 280, 140 and 70 μm were successfully implanted in the subretinal space of wild type (WT, Long-Evans) and degenerate (Royal College of Surgeons, RCS) rats. Optical Coherence Tomography and fluorescein angiography demonstrated normal retinal thickness and healthy vasculature above the implants upon 6 months follow-up. Stimulation with NIR pulses over the implant elicited robust visual evoked potentials (VEP) at safe irradiance levels. Thresholds increased with decreasing pulse duration and pixel size: with 10 ms pulses it went from 0.5 mW/mm2 on 280 μm pixels to 1.1 mW/mm2 on 140 μm pixels, to 2.1 mW/mm2 on 70 μm pixels. Latency of the implant-evoked VEP was at least 30 ms shorter than in response evoked by the visible light, due to lack of phototransduction. Like with the visible light stimulation in normal sighted animals, amplitude of the implant-induced VEP increased logarithmically with peak irradiance and pulse duration. It decreased with increasing frequency similar to the visible light response in the range of 2 - 10 Hz, but decreased slower than the visible light response at 20 - 40 Hz. Modular design of the photovoltaic arrays allows scalability to a large number of pixels, and combined with the ease of implantation, offers a promising approach to restoration of sight in patients blinded by retinal degenerative diseases.

  1. The making of indigenous vascular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madathipat Unnikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Vascular illnesses are on the rise in India, due to increase in lifestyle diseases and demographic transition, requiring intervention to save life, organ or limbs using vascular prosthesis. The aim of this study was to develop indigenous large diameter vascular graft for treatment of patients with vascular pathologies. Methods: The South India Textile Research Association, at Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India, developed seamless woven polyester (Polyethylene terephthalate graft at its research wing. Further characterization and testing followed by clinical trials were conducted at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. Fifteen in vivo experiments were carried out in 1992-1994 in pigs as animal model. Controlled (phase I clinical trial in ten patients was performed along with control graft. Thereafter, phase II trial involved 22 patients who underwent multi-centre clinical trial in four centres across India. Results: Laboratory testing showed that polyester graft was non-toxic, non-leeching and non-haemolytic with preserved long-term quality, further confirming in pigs by implanting in thoracic aorta, comparable to control Dacron grafts. Perigraft incorporation and smooth neointima formation which are prime features of excellent healing characteristics, were noted at explantation at planned intervals. Subsequently in the phase I and II clinical trials, all patients had excellent recovery without mortality or device-related adverse events. Patients receiving the test graft were followed up for 10 and 5 years, respectively. Serial clinical, duplex scans and CT angiograms performed periodically confirmed excellent graft performance. Interpretation & conclusions: Indigenously developed Chitra vascular graft was comparable to commercially available Dacron graft, ready for clinical use at affordable cost to patients as against costly imported grafts.

  2. Clinical predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Astudillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to ascertain predictors of Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, an independent predictor of mortality, in patients with aortic stenosis using bioprosthetic valves. METHOD: We analyzed 2,107 sequential surgeries. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was calculated using the effective orifice area of the prosthesis divided by the patient's body surface area. We defined nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch as effective orifice area indexes of .0.85 cm²/m, 0.85-0.66 cm²/m², and <0.65 cm²/m², respectively. RESULTS: A total of 311 bioprosthetic patients were identified. The incidence of nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 41%, 42, and 16%, respectively. Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was significantly more prevalent in females (82%. In severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, the perfusion and the crossclamp times were considerably lower when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch and moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. Patients with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch had a significantly higher likelihood of spending time in the intensive care unit and a significantly longer length of stay in the hospital. Body surface area was not different in severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. In-hospital mortality in patients with nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 2.3%, 6.1%, and 8%, respectively. Minimally invasive surgery was significantly associated with moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch in 49% of the patients, but not with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. CONCLUSION: Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch is more common in females, but not in those with minimal available body surface area. Though operative times were shorter in these patients, intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay were longer. Surgeons and cardiologists should be cognizant of these clinical

  3. Research, design and development project Myoelectric Prosthesis of Upper Limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galiano, L; Montaner, E; Flecha, A [Bioparx, J Hernandez 1101, Parana, ERios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A Research Design and Development Project was developed of a myoelectric prosthesis for a pediatric patient presenting congenital amputation of the left forearm below the elbow. A multidisciplinary work-team was formed for this goal, in order to solve the several (/various) aspects regarding this project (mechanical, ergonomics, electronics, physical). The prosthesis as an electromechanical device was divided in several blocks, trying to achieve a focused development for each stage, acording to requisites. A mechanical prototype of the prothesis was designed and built along with the circuitry needed for EMG aquisition, control logic and drivers. Having acomplished the previuos stages, the project is now dealing with the definitions of the interface between the prosthesis and the patient, with promising perspectives.

  4. Research, design and development project Myoelectric Prosthesis of Upper Limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano, L; Montaner, E; Flecha, A

    2007-01-01

    A Research Design and Development Project was developed of a myoelectric prosthesis for a pediatric patient presenting congenital amputation of the left forearm below the elbow. A multidisciplinary work-team was formed for this goal, in order to solve the several (/various) aspects regarding this project (mechanical, ergonomics, electronics, physical). The prosthesis as an electromechanical device was divided in several blocks, trying to achieve a focused development for each stage, acording to requisites. A mechanical prototype of the prothesis was designed and built along with the circuitry needed for EMG aquisition, control logic and drivers. Having acomplished the previuos stages, the project is now dealing with the definitions of the interface between the prosthesis and the patient, with promising perspectives

  5. Acetabular prosthesis: Proff of migration with ruler and pencil?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederichs, C.G.; Fischer, U.; Vosshenrich, R.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional X-ray films were made with varying degrees of tilt of a pelvic phantom containing an acetabular prosthesis. The position of the prosthesis was then reconstructed graphically. The measurement errors were calculated and an estimate was made for the tilt. There is a linear correlation between the measurement error and the tilt of the prosthesis. Therefore a tilt dependent maximum error can be calculated. This error is very small for small degrees of tilt, so that acetabular migration can in this instance be evaluated with greater confidence than with other graphical methods. The error also correlates with the determination of the selected region of the acetabulum, but not with the position of the central focus spot or image magnification. (orig.) [de

  6. Nasal prosthesis for a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired facial defects caused by extirpation of neoplasms, congenital malformations or traumatic injury results in a huge functional, cosmetic and psychological handicap in those patients. These defects can be restored by facial prosthesis using different materials and retention methods to achieve a lifelike appearance and function. This clinical report describes a treatment schedule using silicone nasal prosthesis, which is mechanically retained for a patient who has undergone a partial rhinectomy due to basal cell carcinoma of the nose. The prosthesis was made to restore the esthetic appearance of patient with a mechanically retained design using a spectacle glass frame without any prosthetic adhesives so that the patient is more comfortable and confident to resume daily activities.

  7. Changes in performance over time while learning to use a myoelectric prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Training increases the functional use of an upper limb prosthesis, but little is known about how people learn to use their prosthesis. The aim of this study was to describe the changes in performance with an upper limb myoelectric prosthesis during practice. The results provide a basis

  8. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a one...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3730 - Toe joint phalangeal (hemi-toe) polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Toe joint phalangeal (hemi-toe) polymer prosthesis. 888.3730 Section 888.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-toe) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A toe joint phalangeal (hemi-toe) polymer prosthesis...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a one-piece...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a one...

  13. Dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhdar, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiography must comply with the same regulations with which conventional radiography complies. Radiation doses to individual patients are low but, because of the large number of patients X-rayed, the collective dose to the population is not negligible. Care in siting and regular maintenance of the equipment will reduce doses to both staff and patients. To produce X-ray films with a good image quality using a low radiation dose requires attention to film processing; this is often a neglected area. (Author)

  14. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  15. Heterotopic ossification associated with myelopathy following cervical disc prosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2016-04-01

    This case report presents a 37-year-old man with clinical signs of myelopathy almost 9 years after implantation of a Bryan disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) for C5/C6 soft disc herniation. As demonstrated on MRI and CT scan, spinal cord compression was caused by bony spurs due to heterotopic ossification posterior to the still moving prosthesis. The device, as well as the ectopic bone deposits, had to be removed because of myelopathy and its imminent aggravation. Conversion to anterior spondylodesis was performed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aspiration of tracheoesophageal prosthesis in a laryngectomized patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conte Sergio C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The voice prosthesis inserted into a tracheoesophageal fistula has become the most widely used device for voice rehabilitation in patients with total laryngectomy. Case presentation We describe a case of tracheoesophageal prosthesis’ (TEP aspiration in a laryngectomized patient, with permanent tracheal stoma, that appeared during standard cleaning procedure, despite a programme of training for the safe management of patients with voice prosthesis. Conclusions The definitive diagnosis and treatment were performed by flexible bronchoscopy, that may be considered the procedure of choice in these cases, also on the basis of the literature.

  17. High-resolution MR imaging for dental impressions: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Julian; Rottner, Kurt; Schmitter, Marc; Hopfgartner, Andreas; Jakob, Peter; Richter, Ernst-Jürgen; Tymofiyeva, Olga

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging technology in dental medicine. While low-resolution MRI has especially provided means to examine the temporomandibular joint due to its anatomic inaccessibility, it was the goal of this study to assess whether high-resolution MRI is capable of delivering a dataset sufficiently precise enough to serve as digital impression of human teeth. An informed and consenting patient in need of dental restoration with fixed partial dentures was chosen as subject. Two prepared teeth were measured using MRI and the dataset subjected to mathematical processing before Fourier transformation. After reconstruction, a 3D file was generated which was fed into an existing industry standard CAD/CAM process. A framework for a fixed dental prosthesis was digitally modeled and manufactured by laser-sintering. The fit in situ was found to be acceptable by current clinical standards, which allowed permanent placement of the fixed prosthesis. Using a clinical whole-body MR scanner with the addition of custom add-on hardware, contrast enhancement, and data post-processing, resolution and signal-to-noise ratio were sufficiently achieved to allow fabrication of a dental restoration in an acquisition time comparable to the setting time of common dental impression materials. Furthermore, the measurement was well tolerated. The herein described method can be regarded as proof of principle that MRI is a promising option for digital impressions when fixed partial dentures are required.

  18. Do preoperative antibiotics prevent dental implant complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevi, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Registry, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline and Embase were consulted to find relevant work. Searches were made by hand of numerous journals pertinent to oral implantology. There were no language restrictions. Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCT) with a followup of at least 3 months were chosen. Outcome measures were prosthesis failures, implant failures, postoperative infections and adverse events (gastrointestinal, hypersensitivity, etc.). Two reviewers independently assessed the quality and extracted relevant data from included studies. The estimated effect of the intervention was expressed as a risk ratio together with its 95% confidence interval (CI). Numbers-needed-to-treat (NNT) were calculated from numbers of patients affected by implant failures. Meta-analysis was done only if there were studies with similar comparisons that reported the same outcome measure. Significance of any discrepancies between studies was assessed by means of the Cochran's test for heterogeneity and the I2 statistic. Only two RCT met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of these two trials showed a statistically significantly higher number of patients experiencing implant failures in the group not receiving antibiotics (relative risk, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.06-0.86). The NNT to prevent one patient having an implant failure is 25 (95%CI, 13-100), based on a patient implant failure rate of 6% in people not receiving antibiotics. The following outcomes were not statistically significantly linked with implant failure: prosthesis failure, postoperative infection and adverse events (eg, gastrointestinal effects, hypersensitivity). There is some evidence suggesting that 2 g of amoxicillin given orally 1 h preoperatively significantly reduces failures of dental implants placed in ordinary conditions. It remains unclear whether postoperative antibiotics are beneficial, and which is the most effective antibiotic. One dose of

  19. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  20. The Biological Activity of Propolis-Containing Toothpaste on Oral Health Environment in Patients Who Underwent Implant-Supported Prosthodontic Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Morawiec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The soft and periodontal tissues surrounding dental implants are particularly susceptible to bacteria invasion and inflammatory reactions due to complex histological structures. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of a propolis-containing hygienic agent on selected oral health parameters, oral microflora, and the condition of periodontal health. Sixteen subjects who underwent an oral rehabilitation with dental implants were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, which received a newly formulated propolis-containing toothpaste (3% (CA or a negative control without an active ingredient (CC. Approximal plaque index (API, oral hygiene index (OHI, debris component, and sulcus bleeding index (SBI were assessed in three subsequent stages. During the first and last examinations, the swabs were employed for microbiological inoculation. Propolis-containing toothpaste was found to be distinctively effective in improving oral health and the occurrence of gingivitis triggered by dental plaque. The qualitative and quantitative changes in oral bacteria spectrum were observed. Antibacterial measures containing propolis might be used as a natural adjuvant to other active substances in individuals with a high risk of periodontal problems against pathogenic oral microflora.

  1. Intermittent, noncyclic dysfunction of a mechanical aortic prosthesis by pannus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Sylvie K; Labinaz, Marino X; Grisoli, Dominique; Klug, Andrew P; Veinot, John P; Burwash, Ian G

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical aortic prosthesis dysfunction can result from thrombosis or pannus formation. Pannus formation usually restricts systolic excursion of the occluding disk, resulting in progressive stenosis of the aortic prosthesis. Intermittent dysfunction of a mechanical aortic prosthesis is usually ascribed to thrombus formation. We describe an unusual case of intermittent, noncyclic dysfunction of a mechanical aortic prosthesis due to pannus formation in the absence of systolic restriction of disk excursion that presented with intermittent massive aortic regurgitation, severe ischemia, and shock. Pannus formation should be considered as a potential cause of acute intermittent severe aortic regurgitation in a patient with a mechanical aortic prosthesis.

  2. Management of long span partially edentulous maxilla with fixed removable denture prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahilan I Jeyavalan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of a long span partially edentulous maxilla with tooth supported prosthesis is challenging because of inherent anatomic limitations and unfavourable biomechanics present after the loss of teeth. A tooth supported fixed-removable prosthesis is a treatment option for restoration of such long span partially edentulous maxillary arches. This prosthesis meets the requirements for esthetics, phonetics, comfort, and hygiene, as well as favourable biomechanical stress distribution to the remaining natural tooth abutments. This article presents a procedure for fabrication of a fixed-removable prosthesis that has cement-retained custom cast bar metal substructure and a ball attachment retained removable superstructure prosthesis.

  3. Management of long span partially edentulous maxilla with fixed removable denture prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyavalan, Mahilan I; Narasimman, M; Venkatakrishnan, C J; Philip, Jacob M

    2012-07-01

    Restoration of a long span partially edentulous maxilla with tooth supported prosthesis is challenging because of inherent anatomic limitations and unfavourable biomechanics present after the loss of teeth. A tooth supported fixed-removable prosthesis is a treatment option for restoration of such long span partially edentulous maxillary arches. This prosthesis meets the requirements for esthetics, phonetics, comfort, and hygiene, as well as favourable biomechanical stress distribution to the remaining natural tooth abutments. This article presents a procedure for fabrication of a fixed-removable prosthesis that has cement-retained custom cast bar metal substructure and a ball attachment retained removable superstructure prosthesis.

  4. Percutaneous Revision of a Testicular Prosthesis is Safe, Cost-effective, and Provides Good Patient Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene B. Cone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Office-based percutaneous revision of a testicular prosthesis has never been reported. A patient received a testicular prosthesis but was dissatisfied with the firmness of the implant. In an office setting, the prosthesis was inflated with additional fluid via a percutaneous approach. Evaluated outcomes included patient satisfaction, prosthesis size, recovery time, and cost savings. The patient was satisfied, with no infection, leak, or complication after more than 1 year of follow-up, at significantly less cost than revision surgery. Percutaneous adjustment of testicular prosthesis fill-volume can be safe, inexpensive, and result in good patient satisfaction.

  5. Is bruxism a risk factor for dental implants? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Poggio, Carlo E; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2014-06-01

    To systematically review the literature on the role of bruxism as a risk factor for the different complications on dental implant-supported rehabilitations. A systematic search in the National Library of Medicine's Medline Database was performed to identify all peer-reviewed papers in the English literature assessing the role of bruxism, as diagnosed with any other diagnostic approach (i.e., clinical assessment, questionnaires, interviews, polysomnography, and electromyography), as a risk factor for biological (i.e., implant failure, implant mobility, and marginal bone loss) or mechanical (i.e., complications or failures of either prefabricated components or laboratory-fabricated suprastructures) complications on dental implant-supported rehabilitations. The selected articles were reviewed according to a structured summary of the articles in relation to four main issues, viz., "P" - patients/problem/population, "I" - intervention, "C" - comparison, and "O" - outcome. A total of 21 papers were included in the review and split into those assessing biological complications (n = 14) and those reporting mechanical complications (n = 7). In general, the specificity of the literature for bruxism diagnosis and for the study of the bruxism's effects on dental implants was low. From a biological viewpoint, bruxism was not related with implant failures in six papers, while results from the remaining eight studies did not allow drawing conclusions. As for mechanical complications, four of the seven studies yielded a positive relationship with bruxism. Bruxism is unlikely to be a risk factor for biological complications around dental implants, while there are some suggestions that it may be a risk factor for mechanical complications. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Esthetic and Clinical Performance of Implant-Supported All-Ceramic Crowns Made with Prefabricated or CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments: A Randomized, Multicenter Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittneben, J G; Gavric, J; Belser, U C; Bornstein, M M; Joda, T; Chappuis, V; Sailer, I; Brägger, U

    2017-02-01

    Patients' esthetic expectations are increasing, and the options of the prosthetic pathways are currently evolving. The objective of this randomized multicenter clinical trial was to assess and compare the esthetic outcome and clinical performance of anterior maxillary all-ceramic implant crowns (ICs) based either on prefabricated zirconia abutments veneered with pressed ceramics or on CAD/CAM zirconia abutments veneered with hand buildup technique. The null hypothesis was that there is no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Forty implants were inserted in sites 14 to 24 (FDI) in 40 patients in 2 centers, the Universities of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland. After final impression, 20 patients were randomized into group A, restored with a 1-piece screw-retained single crown made of a prefabricated zirconia abutment with pressed ceramic as the veneering material using the cut-back technique, or group B using an individualized CAD/CAM zirconia abutment (CARES abutment; Institut Straumann AG) with a hand buildup technique. At baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y clinical, esthetic and radiographic parameters were assessed. Group A exhibited 1 dropout patient and 1 failure, resulting in a survival rate of 94.7% after 1 y, in comparison to 100% for group B. No other complications occurred. Clinical parameters presented stable and healthy peri-implant soft tissues. Overall, no or only minimal crestal bone changes were observed with a mean DIB (distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact) of -0.15 mm (group A) and 0.12 mm (group B) at 1 y. There were no significant differences at baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y for DIB values between the 2 groups. Pink esthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) values at all 3 examinations indicated stability over time for both groups and pleasing esthetic outcomes. Both implant-supported prosthetic pathways represent a valuable treatment option for the restoration of single ICs in the anterior maxilla

  7. Effect of platform connection and abutment material on stress distribution in single anterior implant-supported restorations: a nonlinear 3-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marco Aurélio; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Pessanha Henriques, Guilherme Elias

    2014-11-01

    Although various abutment connections and materials have recently been introduced, insufficient data exist regarding the effect of stress distribution on their mechanical performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different abutment materials and platform connections on stress distribution in single anterior implant-supported restorations with the finite element method. Nine experimental groups were modeled from the combination of 3 platform connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse tapered) and 3 abutment materials (titanium, zirconia, and hybrid) as follows: external hexagon-titanium, external hexagon-zirconia, external hexagon-hybrid, internal hexagon-titanium, internal hexagon-zirconia, internal hexagon-hybrid, Morse tapered-titanium, Morse tapered-zirconia, and Morse tapered-hybrid. Finite element models consisted of a 4×13-mm implant, anatomic abutment, and lithium disilicate central incisor crown cemented over the abutment. The 49 N occlusal loading was applied in 6 steps to simulate the incisal guidance. Equivalent von Mises stress (σvM) was used for both the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the implant and abutment in all the groups and the maximum (σmax) and minimum (σmin) principal stresses for the numerical comparison of the zirconia parts. The highest abutment σvM occurred in the Morse-tapered groups and the lowest in the external hexagon-hybrid, internal hexagon-titanium, and internal hexagon-hybrid groups. The σmax and σmin values were lower in the hybrid groups than in the zirconia groups. The stress distribution concentrated in the abutment-implant interface in all the groups, regardless of the platform connection or abutment material. The platform connection influenced the stress on abutments more than the abutment material. The stress values for implants were similar among different platform connections, but greater stress concentrations were observed in internal connections

  8. Referral of sensation to an advanced humanoid robotic hand prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, Birgitta; Ehrsson, H Henrik; Antfolk, Christian; Cipriani, Christian; Sebelius, Fredrik; Lundborg, Göran

    2009-01-01

    Hand prostheses that are currently available on the market are used by amputees to only a limited extent, partly because of lack of sensory feedback from the artificial hand. We report a pilot study that showed how amputees can experience a robot-like advanced hand prosthesis as part of their own body. We induced a perceptual illusion by which touch applied to the stump of the arm was experienced from the artificial hand. This illusion was elicited by applying synchronous tactile stimulation to the hidden amputation stump and the robotic hand prosthesis in full view. In five people who had had upper limb amputations this stimulation caused referral touch sensation from the stump to the artificial hand, and the prosthesis was experienced more like a real hand. We also showed that this illusion can work when the amputee controls the movements of the artificial hand by recordings of the arm muscle activity with electromyograms. These observations indicate that the previously described "rubber hand illusion" is also valid for an advanced hand prosthesis, even when it has a robotic-like appearance.

  9. Task-Oriented Gaming for Transfer to Prosthesis Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Ludger; Sluis, van der Corry K.; van Dijk, Hylke W.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the effect of task-oriented video gaming on using a myoelectric prosthesis in a basic activity of daily life (ADL). Forty-one able-bodied right-handed participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups. In three of these groups the participants trained to

  10. Strain-stress analysis of surface prosthesis of hip joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Návrat, Tomáš; Fuis, Vladimír; Florian, Z.; Hlavoň, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2007), S559-S559 ISSN 0021-9290. [ISB 2007. Taipei, 01.07.2007-05.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/05/0136 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : surface prosthesis * hip joint * FEM Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2007

  11. Wispy Prosthesis: A Novel Method in Denture Weight Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne, Gopinadh; Budeti, Sreedevi; Anche, Sampath Kumar; Zakkula, Srujana; Atla, Jyothi; Jyothula, Ravi Rakesh Dev; Appana, Krishna Chaitanya; Peddinti, Vijaya Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Stability and retention of the denture becomes at stake with the increase in weight of the denture prosthesis. As a consequence, different materials and methods have been introduced to overcome these issues but denture weight reduction still remains to be a cumbersome and strenuous procedure. To introduce a novel technique for the fabrication of denture prosthesis where in the weight of the denture will not affect the retention and stability of the denture. Four groups with a sample size of 10 each, were included where in one group was control and other three were study groups. The control group samples were made completely solid and the study group samples were packed with materials like bean balls, cellulose balls and polyacrylic fibers. The weight of all the samples of each study group was measured and compared with the control group. The observations were analyzed statistically by paired t-test. It was observed that the bean balls group produced a weight reduction of 31.3%, cellulose balls group 27.4% and polyacrylic fibers group 24.5% when compared to that of the control group. This novel technique will eliminate the problems that were associated in creating hollowness and at the same time will reduce the weight of the prosthesis and among all the study groups, bean balls group were found to reduce maximum weight of the prosthesis.

  12. Design of a Fully-Passive Transfemoral Prosthesis Prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrens, Sebastiaan Maria; Behrens, S.M.; Ünal, Ramazan; Unal, R.; Hekman, Edsko E.G.; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    In this study, we present the mechanical design of a prototype of a fully-passive transfemoral prosthesis for normal walking. The conceptual working principle at the basis of the design is inspired by the power flow in human gait, with the main purpose of realizing an energy efficient device. The

  13. Biomechanical conceptual design of a passive transfemoral prosthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ünal, Ramazan; Carloni, Raffaella; Hekman, Edsko E.G.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    In this study, we present the conceptual design of a fully-passive transfemoral prosthesis. The proposed design is inspired by the analysis of the musculo-skeletal activity of the healthy human leg. In order to realize an energy efficient device, we introduce three storage elements, which are

  14. Simplified technique for orbital prosthesis fabrication: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerareddy, Chandrika; Nair, K Chandrasekharan; Reddy, G Ramaswamy

    2012-10-01

    Loss of orbital content can cause functional impairment, disfigurement of the face, and psychological distress. Rehabilitation of an orbital defect is a complex task, and if reconstruction by plastic surgery is not possible or not desired by the patient, the defect can be rehabilitated by an orbital prosthesis. The prosthetic rehabilitation in such cases depends on the precisely retained, user-friendly removable maxillofacial prosthesis. Many times, making an impression of the orbital area with an accurate record of surface details can be a difficult procedure. The critical areas are making a facial moulage, mold preparation, and attaching the retention device, particularly when eyeglass frames are used. This case focuses on these hindrance factors. A simple basket was used for the impression tray to obtain the facial moulage. A putty mold was used, and attachment of the prosthesis to a retention device was accomplished with positional distance. This method proves to be an economical and simple way of making an orbital prosthesis. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant...

  16. Verge of Collapse: The Pros/thesis of Art Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoian, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores "prosthesis" as a metaphor of embodiment in art-based research to challenge the utopian myth of wholeness and normality in art and the human body. Bearing in mind the correspondences between amputated bodies and the cultural dislocations of art, I propose "prosthetic epistemology" and "prosthetic ontology" as embodied knowing…

  17. [Medial unicompartmental knee prosthesis for patients with unicompartmental gonarthrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, N.P.; Deutman, R.; Raay, J.J. van; Horn, J.R. van

    2004-01-01

    The function and survival time of unicompartmental knee prostheses for patients with severe gonarthrosis have been improved the past few years by developments in their design, the instrumentarium and the surgical technique. A medial unicompartmental knee prosthesis may be indicated in patients with

  18. Strategy to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch: aortic root enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dharmendra Kumar; Sanki, Prokash; Bhattacharya, Subhankar; Siddique, Javed Veqar

    2014-02-01

    The choice of a valve with an effective orifice area matching the body surface area and providing efficient hemodynamics is an important factor affecting mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. Our preventative strategy was to implant a larger prosthetic valve by aortic root enlargement using the Nunez procedure in 17 patients between February 2010 and January 2011. The decision to enlarge the aortic root was taken when the 19-mm sizer could not be negotiated easily through the aortic root, or on the basis of body surface area of the patient or type of prosthesis available. Postoperative reductions in peak and mean pressure gradients across aortic valve of 12.8-16.5 and 10.2-12.6 mm Hg, respectively, were observed. Postoperative effective orifice areas of the aortic valves were 1.1-1.5 cm(2). By upsizing the aortic valve, we were able to eliminate patient-prosthesis mismatch in 5 patients, and reduce severe patient-prosthesis mismatch to moderate in 11. Aortic root enlargement is a safe procedure. Therefore, cardiac surgeons should not be reluctant to enlarge the aortic root with an autologous pericardial patch to permit implantation of an adequate size of aortic valve prosthesis, with minimal additional aortic crossclamp time and no added cost.

  19. Cranioplasty prosthesis manufacturing based on reverse engineering technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzan, Robert; Urbanik, Andrzej; Karbowski, Krzysztof; Moskała, Marek; Polak, Jarosław; Pyrich, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Most patients with large focal skull bone loss after craniectomy are referred for cranioplasty. Reverse engineering is a technology which creates a computer-aided design (CAD) model of a real structure. Rapid prototyping is a technology which produces physical objects from virtual CAD models. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of these technologies in cranioplasty prosthesis manufacturing. Material/Methods CT was performed on 19 patients with focal skull bone loss after craniectomy, using a dedicated protocol. A material model of skull deficit was produced using computer numerical control (CNC) milling, and individually pre-operatively adjusted polypropylene-polyester prosthesis was prepared. In a control group of 20 patients a prosthesis was manually adjusted to each patient by a neurosurgeon during surgery, without using CT-based reverse engineering/rapid prototyping. In each case, the prosthesis was implanted into the patient. The mean operating times in both groups were compared. Results In the group of patients with reverse engineering/rapid prototyping-based cranioplasty, the mean operating time was shorter (120.3 min) compared to that in the control group (136.5 min). The neurosurgeons found the new technology particularly useful in more complicated bone deficits with different curvatures in various planes. Conclusions Reverse engineering and rapid prototyping may reduce the time needed for cranioplasty neurosurgery and improve the prosthesis fitting. Such technologies may utilize data obtained by commonly used spiral CT scanners. The manufacturing of individually adjusted prostheses should be commonly used in patients planned for cranioplasty with synthetic material. PMID:22207125

  20. Custom-made silicone hand prosthesis: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S; Lenka, P K; Equebal, A; Biswas, A

    2016-09-01

    Up to now, a cosmetic glove was the most common method for managing transmetacarpal (TMC) and carpometacarpal (CMC) amputations, but it is devoid of markings and body color. At this amputation level, it is very difficult to fit a functional prosthesis because of the short available length, unsightly shape, grafted skin, contracture and lack of functional prosthetic options. A 30-year-old male came to our clinic with amputation at the 1st to 4th carpometacarpal level and a 5th metacarpal that was projected laterally and fused with the carpal bone. The stump had grafted skin, redness, and an unhealed suture line. He complained of pain projected over the metacarpal and suture area. The clinical team members decided to fabricate a custom-made silicone hand prosthesis to accommodate the stump, protect the grafted skin, improve the hand's appearance and provide some passive function. The custom silicone hand prosthesis was fabricated with modified flexible wires to provide passive interphalangeal movement. Basic training, care and maintenance instructions for the prosthesis were given to the patient. The silicone hand prosthesis was able to restore the appearance of the lost digits and provide some passive function. His pain (VAS score) was reduced. Improvement in activities of daily living was found in the DASH questionnaire and Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function test. A silicone glove is a good option for more distal amputations, as it can accommodate any deformity, protect the skin, enhance the appearance and provide functional assistance. This case study provides a simple method to get passively movable fingers after proximal hand amputation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Prosthesis Prescription Protocol of the Arm (PPP-Arm) : The implementation of a national prosthesis prescription protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijdenes, Paula; Brouwers, Michael; van der Sluis, Corry K

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: In order to create more uniformity in the prescription of upper limb prostheses by Dutch rehabilitation teams, the development and implementation of a Prosthesis Prescription Protocol of the upper limb (PPP-Arm) was initiated. The aim was to create a national digital protocol to

  2. Prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Linden, Arnaud; Kempfert, Jörg; Blumenstein, Johannes; Rastan, Ardawan; Holzhey, David; Lehmann, Sven; Mohr, Friedrich W; Walther, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is defined as a too small effective orifice area (EOA) of the prosthetic valve in relation to the patient's body size and has been documented to be related to adverse outcomes after conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR). Aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of PPM after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (T-AVI) using the Edwards SAPIEN prosthesis and its relation to postoperative outcome. 200 consecutive high-risk patients underwent transapical aortic valve implantation (TA-AVI) between February 2006 and January 2009 and fulfilled 1 year follow-up were included. Severe PPM was defined as indexed EOA (EOAi) <0.65 cm2/m2 and moderate PPM as EOAi = 0.65-0.85 cm2/m2, EOA was calculated from transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) measurements using the continuity equation. Total 112 patients with sufficient postoperative TTE image quality formed the study group. EOAi increased from 0.3 ± 0.1 cm2/m2 (preoperatively) to 1.1 ± 0.4 cm2/m2 after TA-AVI (p < 0.001). According to the standard definitions, PPM was seen in 38.4% of the patients and 9.8% presented with severe PPM. The occurrence of PPM had neither an effect on clinical outcome in terms of NYHA class nor on survival. Patients with PPM had significantly higher postoperative transprosthetic gradients (mean gradient 10.4 ± 4.1 versus 7.1 ± 3.0 mm Hg, p < 0.001). Based on the in vitro EOA data obtained from pulse duplicator measurements, however, none of the patients was judged to have PPM. Transcatheter AVI provides good antegrade hemodynamic function and EOAi improves significantly. According to standardized evaluations PPM occurs after TA-AVI, but it is not associated with adverse outcomes. Thus use of the continuity equation may not adequately reflect the situation after T-AVI or the current definition of PPM is not suitable for T-AVI prostheses. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Alternative materials study for dental magnetics attachments applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Rogerio Albuquerque

    2009-01-01

    Ferromagnetic alloys have been investigated as potential candidates for dental prosthesis applications in replacement for magnetic attachments made of noble and expensive alloys. Three stainless steels were investigated: 17-4 PH produced by powder injection (PIM), PM2000 obtained by mechanical alloying and oxide dispersion strengthened, and nickel free stainless steel 1802. In the in vitro cytotoxicity analysis, none of the three steels tested showed cytotoxic effects. The corrosion resistance of stainless steels was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic potentiodynamic polarization, in sodium phosphate buffer solutions (PBS) at 25 degree C. The AISI 316L stainless steel was also tested under the same conditions for comparison reasons. All the stainless steel samples were passive in the electrolyte used and presented susceptibility to pitting. The steel that showed the highest pitting resistance was the PM2000, whereas the 1802 had the lowest resistance to pitting among the tested ones. The Mott-Schottky diagrams suggested that the passive film over the surface of PM2000 steel is at least one decade less doped compared to 316L stainless steel, so less defective in its structure. The results pointed out to the PM2000 as a potential candidate for substitution of high cost magnetic alloys used in dental prosthesis. (author)

  4. Prosthetic management of mid-facial defect with magnet-retained silicone prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed M

    2014-02-01

    Mid-facial defect is one of the most disfiguring and impairing defects. A design of prosthesis that is aesthetic and stable can be precious to a patient who has lost part of his face due to surgical excision. Prosthesis can restore the patients' self-esteem and confidence, which affects the patients and their life style. The aim of this case report is to describe a technique of mid-facial silicone prosthesis fabrication. To provide an aesthetic and stable facial prosthesis, the extra-oral prosthesis was fabricated using silicone material, while the intra-oral defect was restored with obturator prosthesis, and then both prostheses were connected and attached to each other using magnets. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a large mid-facial defect with a two-piece prosthesis. The silicone facial prosthesis was made hollow and lighter by using an acrylic framework. Two acrylic channels were included within the facial prosthesis to provide the patient with clean and patent airways. A sectional mid-facial prosthesis was made and retained in place by using magnets, which resulted in a significant improvement in the aesthetical and functional outcome without the need for plastic surgery. Silicone prostheses are reliable alternatives to surgery and should be considered in selected cases.

  5. [The endo-exo prosthesis for patients with a problematic amputation stump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölke, Jan Paul M; van de Meent, Henk

    2010-01-01

    Following lower limb amputation, quality of life is highly related to the ability to use a prosthetic limb. The conventional way to attach a prosthetic limb to the body is with a socket. Many patients experience serious discomfort wearing a conventional prosthesis because of pain, instability during walking, pressure sores, bad smell or skin irritation. In addition, sitting is uncomfortable and pelvic and lower back pain due to unstable gait is often seen in these patients. The main disadvantage of the current prosthesis is the attachment of a rigid prosthesis socket to a soft and variable body. The socket must fit tightly for stability during walking but should also be comfortable for sitting. The implantation of an osseointegrated, intramedullary, transcutaneously conducted prosthesis is a new procedure for attaching a limb prosthesis to the human body without the disadvantages of the conventional prosthesis. The intramedullary prosthesis is designed with a rough surface resembling cancellous bone to enable a secure solid integration with the long bone. We treated two patients with this new prosthesis, a 44-year-old man after a transfemoral amputation, and a 32-year-old woman after a lower leg amputation; both amputations were necessary because of trauma. Those two patients are now, more than one year after the operation, showing excellent functional results without infectious complications. We assume that endo-exo prosthesis may be a promising option for selected patients unable to use a conventional prosthesis because of a problematic amputation stump.

  6. Rehabilitación implantosoportada en el colgajo libre de peroné Implant-supported rehabilitation using the fibula free flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Navarro Cuéllar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available El colgajo de peroné ha demostrado ser el más versatil para la reconstrucción oromandibular, gracias a la gran longitud ósea que podemos utilizar y a la posibilidad de incorporar una amplia paleta cutánea para cobertura de tejidos blandos intraorales. El uso de implantes dentales osteointegrados proporciona un importante método terapéutico para la rehabilitación oral de estos pacientes. Los implantes osteointegrados proporcionan la forma más rígida de estabilización protésica para soportar las fuerzas masticatorias. Estos implantes pueden ser insertados de forma inmediata o diferida. A la hora de utilizar el colgajo libre de peroné realizamos la implantología de forma diferida a los 6-12 meses debido a la gran cantidad de material de osteosíntesis necesaria para la fijación del colgajo. Cuatro o seis meses después, cuando el proceso de osteointegración ha ocurrido, los implantes son cargados con una rehabilitación dental. Analizamos 12 casos de reconstrucción mandibular con colgajo libre de peroné y su rehabilitación estética y funcional con implantes osteointegrados y un seguimiento mínimo de 2 años. Se han colocado un total de 56 implantes, presentando todos ellos excepto uno, una correcta osteointegración. Todos estos pacientes han recuperado la función masticatoria, y mejorado de forma considerable la competencia labial, la continencia salival, la pronunciación y la armonía facial.Free fibula flap has proved to be one of the most versatile for oromandibular reconstruction due to the available length of bone and the possibility of incorporating a long skin paddle to cover intraoral soft tissues. The use of osseointegrated dental implants is an important technique for the oral rehabilitation of these patients. Osseointegrated implants provide the most rigid prosthetic stabilization available to withstand masticatory forces.These implants can be placed immediately or in a second time procedure.In our case

  7. A new and simple method of fabrication of tracheostomal prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Vidya Sankari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a tracheostomy stoma experience compromised speech and function due to the associated changes in airflow patterns. Rehabilitation of a patient with tracheal stoma is a highly challenging task. The main objective is to design an inexpensive, easily fabricated stomal prosthesis for postlaryngectomy patients who require prolonged tracheotomy. This clinical case report describes a 29-year-old male patient who underwent for tracheotomy 3 months before for respiratory distress following a suicidal attempt. Hence tracheotomy was done, and the patient has been with the tracheostomal tube since surgery for the past 3 months. Laryngoscopy examination reported as restricted bilateral vocal cord movements, and the cords were in the adducted position with minimal glottic chink. No history of difficulty in swallowing. On examination, no scar or ulceration is seen around the stoma. The skin around the stoma is healthy. The patient was referred to the oral and maxillofacial Prosthodontics Department from the Department of ENT. The patient′s old tracheostomal tube was used as the dimensions of the custom made tracheal prosthesis without making a functional impression of the mature stoma. A tracheal button was made with 2 mm polyethylene urethane sheet to maintain the airway patency of the mature stoma. Width and length of the old tracheostomal tube were measured and customized with polyurethane sheet by directly flaming over heat. The finished product was thin, flexible, maintains enhanced tear strength, require no tapes or adhesives and less technique sensitive. These properties of the prosthesis make more advantageous than the commercially available tracheal buttons. The result in this patient was excellent with no postoperative complications. An innovative approach for fabrication of tracheostomal prosthesis was discussed to increase its successful use in tracheostomal patients. The patient′s old tracheostomal tube was used as the dimensions

  8. Total Ossicular Replacement Prosthesis: A New Fat Interposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issam Saliba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare audiometric results between the standard total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP-S and a new fat interposition total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP-F in pediatric and adult patients and to assess the complication and the undesirable outcome. Study design: This is a retrospective study. Methods: This study included 104 patients who had undergone titanium implants with TORP-F and 54 patients who had undergone the procedure with TORP-S between 2008 and 2013 in our tertiary care centers. The new technique consists of interposing a fat graft between the 4 legs of the universal titanium prosthesis (Medtronic Xomed Inc, Jacksonville, FL, USA to provide a more stable TORP in the ovale window niche. Normally, this prosthesis is designed to fit on the stapes’ head as a partial ossicular replacement prosthesis. Results: The postoperative air-bone gap less than 25 dB for the combined cohort was 69.2% and 41.7% for the TORP-F and the TORP-S groups, respectively. The mean follow-up was 17 months postoperatively. By stratifying data, the pediatric cohort shows 56.5% in the TORP-F group (n = 52 compared with 40% in the TORP-S group (n = 29. However, the adult cohort shows 79.3% in the TORP-F group (n = 52 compared with 43.75% in the TORP-S group (n = 25. These improvements in hearing were statistically significant. There were no statistically significant differences in the speech discrimination scores. The only undesirable outcome that was statistically different between the 2 groups was the prosthesis displacement: 7% in the TORP-F group compared with 19% in the TORP-S group ( P  = .03. Conclusions: The interposition of a fat graft between the legs of the titanium implants (TORP-F provides superior hearing results compared with a standard procedure (TORP-S in pediatric and adult populations because of its better stability in the oval window niche.

  9. Total Ossicular Replacement Prosthesis: A New Fat Interposition Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Issam; Sabbah, Valérie; Poirier, Jackie Bibeau

    2018-01-01

    To compare audiometric results between the standard total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP-S) and a new fat interposition total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP-F) in pediatric and adult patients and to assess the complication and the undesirable outcome. This is a retrospective study. This study included 104 patients who had undergone titanium implants with TORP-F and 54 patients who had undergone the procedure with TORP-S between 2008 and 2013 in our tertiary care centers. The new technique consists of interposing a fat graft between the 4 legs of the universal titanium prosthesis (Medtronic Xomed Inc, Jacksonville, FL, USA) to provide a more stable TORP in the ovale window niche. Normally, this prosthesis is designed to fit on the stapes' head as a partial ossicular replacement prosthesis. The postoperative air-bone gap less than 25 dB for the combined cohort was 69.2% and 41.7% for the TORP-F and the TORP-S groups, respectively. The mean follow-up was 17 months postoperatively. By stratifying data, the pediatric cohort shows 56.5% in the TORP-F group (n = 52) compared with 40% in the TORP-S group (n = 29). However, the adult cohort shows 79.3% in the TORP-F group (n = 52) compared with 43.75% in the TORP-S group (n = 25). These improvements in hearing were statistically significant. There were no statistically significant differences in the speech discrimination scores. The only undesirable outcome that was statistically different between the 2 groups was the prosthesis displacement: 7% in the TORP-F group compared with 19% in the TORP-S group ( P  = .03). The interposition of a fat graft between the legs of the titanium implants (TORP-F) provides superior hearing results compared with a standard procedure (TORP-S) in pediatric and adult populations because of its better stability in the oval window niche.

  10. Preparation of hydroxyapatite/zirconia bioceramic nanocomposites for orthopaedic and dental prosthesis applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Yun-Mo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young-Keun [Technical Support Division, Korloy Incorporated, Cheongjoo-si, Choongbook 361-290 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Jun [Department of Prosthodontics, Medical School, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-14

    Homogeneous mixtures of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using chemical co-precipitation and subsequent calcination. For the synthesis of HAp/YSZ nanopowder, the Ca/P atomic ratio was 1.73 to obtain high-content stoichiometric hydroxyapatite phase and to suppress {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) formation. The agglomerated crystalline powders were milled using YSZ ball media to obtain well-separated nanoparticles. The final particle size of the HAp and YSZ was {approx}50-70 and {approx}15-30 nm, respectively. The crystallinity and morphological feature of the nanopowder was analysed using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analyses. The ball-milled nanopowder mixture was hot pressed at 1100 deg. C for 1 h under 20 MPa in vacuum atmosphere. The sintered HAp/YSZ nanocomposites exhibited approximately 99% of the theoretical density, due not only to the fine nanoscale of the particles, but also to the homogeneous distribution of the nanoparticle mixture. They also showed fine grain structures of the HAp phase due to the suppressed grain growth by YSZ particles. The nanocomposites showed improved mechanical properties, flexural strength of {approx}155 MPa and fracture toughness of {approx}2.1 MP m{sup 1/2}, due to the YSZ contribution to the HAp matrix.

  11. Tensile strength of cementing agents on the CeraOne system of dental prosthesis on implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Alexandre Campos; Machado, Aldir Nascimento; Depes Gouvêa, Cresus Vinicius

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tensile strength of titanium cylinders cemented on stainless steel abutment mock-ups by the Cerazone system. Four types of cements were used: glass ionomer, Fuji I (GC); zinc phosphate, Cimento LS (Vigodent); zinc oxide without eugenol, Rely x Temp NE (3M ESPE); and resin cement, Rely x ARC (3M ESPE). Four experimental groups were formed, each composed of 5 test specimens. Each test specimen consisted of a set of 1 cylinder and 1 stainless steel abutment mock-up. All cements tested were manipulated in accordance with manufacturers' instructions. A static load of 5 Newtons (N) for 2 minutes was used to standardize the procedure. The tensile tests were performed by a mechanical universal testing machine (EMIC DL500MF) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The highest bonding values resulting from the experiment were obtained by Cimento LS (21.86 MPa mean), followed by the resin cement Rely x ARC (12.95 MPa mean), Fuji I (6.89 MPa mean), and Rely x Temp NE (4.71 MPa mean). The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Student's t test. The cements differed amongst them as regards tensile strength, with the highest bonding levels recorded with zinc phosphate (Cimento LS) and the lowest with the zinc oxide without eugenol (Rely x Temp NE).

  12. Oral health-related quality of life and complications after treatment with partial removable dental prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Imam, H; Özhayat, E B; Benetti, A R

    2016-01-01

    and inflammation of the oral mucosa, followed less frequently by fractures of the clasps. Treatment with RDPs improved OHRQoL, but denture-related problems partly remained, and new problems related to RDPs occurred 1-5 years after treatment. The two most frequent complications were ill-fitting RDPs...

  13. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  14. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  15. American Dental Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CE providers and find CE courses. Commission on Dental Accreditation Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations Learn about the examinations used in licensing ...

  16. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  17. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Autumn Giving: ‘Fall’ into the Future of Dental Hygiene Support the Institute for Oral Health! Give ... best for your patients! Learn More Sidebar Menu Dental Hygiene Programs Continuing Education Career Center Annual Conference ...

  18. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  19. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  20. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...