WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental procedures utilized

  1. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  2. Differences in utilization of dental procedures by children enrolled in Wisconsin Medicaid and Delta Dental insurance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavatula, Pradeep; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko; Eichmiller, Fredrick; Okunseri, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have directly compared dental procedures provided in public and private insurance plans for enrollees living in dental health professional shortage areas (DHPSAs). We examined the rates for the different types of dental procedures received by 0-18-year-old children living in DHPSAs and non-DHPSAs who were enrolled in Medicaid and those enrolled under Delta Dental of Wisconsin (DDW) for years 2002 to 2008. Medicaid and DDW dental claims data for 2002 to 2008 was analyzed. Enrollees were divided into DDW-DHPSA and non-DHPSA and Medicaid-DHPSA and non-DHPSA groups. Descriptive and multivariable analyses using over-dispersed Poisson regression were performed to examine the effect of living in DHPSAs and insurance type in relation to the number of procedures received. Approximately 49 and 65 percent of children living in non-DHPSAs that were enrolled in Medicaid and DDW received at least one preventive dental procedure annually, respectively. Children in DDW non-DHPSA group had 1.79 times as many preventive, 0.27 times fewer complex restorative and 0.51 times fewer endodontic procedures respectively, compared to those in Medicaid non-DHPSA group. Children enrolled in DDW-DHPSA group had 1.53 times as many preventive and 0.25 times fewer complex restorative procedures, compared to children in Medicaid-DHPSA group. DDW enrollees had significantly higher utilization rates for preventive procedures than children in Medicaid. There were significant differences across Medicaid and DDW between non-DHPSA and DHPSA for most dental procedures received by enrollees. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-07-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities.

  4. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-01-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities. PMID:24082719

  5. Epilepsy and dental procedures. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkas, Charles K; Gopinathan, Manju K; Singh, Anuradha; Devinsky, Orrin; Lin, Louis M; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2008-03-01

    This paper is a review of the dental management of patients with epilepsy. It includes discussion of the effects anti-epileptic drugs have on dental procedures and addresses complications and side effects of these drugs. A clinical case photo is presented to show gingival hyperplasia, along with four tables on which common antiepileptic medications are enumerated.

  6. First Aid Procedures for Dental Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Nancy Happel; Londeree, Kathy

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for first aid procedures for temporary relief of dental emergencies include information on: (1) dental first aid supplies; (2) treatment of oral injuries; (3) orthodontic emergencies; (4) toothaches; and (5) prolonged bleeding due to an extraction. Consulting a dentist as soon as possible is strongly recommended. (JN)

  7. First Aid Procedures for Dental Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Nancy Happel; Londeree, Kathy

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for first aid procedures for temporary relief of dental emergencies include information on: (1) dental first aid supplies; (2) treatment of oral injuries; (3) orthodontic emergencies; (4) toothaches; and (5) prolonged bleeding due to an extraction. Consulting a dentist as soon as possible is strongly recommended. (JN)

  8. The supply and utilization of dental services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Postma, J.H.M.

    1984-01-01

    In this article the question is addressed whether regional differences in the supply of dental manpower influences the utilization of dental services. The percentage of the population that visits the dentist, is indeed higher in regions with a higher density of dentists. The number of people that vi

  9. Is endocarditis prophylaxis for dental procedures necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Kathryn A; Wilson, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our purpose is to address whether antimicrobial prophylaxis is necessary before certain dental procedures for patients at increased risk for acquiring infective endocarditis (IE). Methods We reviewed recommendations for IE prophylaxis made by the American Heart Association (AHA) from 1995 to the present time. We also compared and contrasted the current recommendations from the AHA, European Society of Cardiology (ESC), United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and a consortium of French organisations. We further reviewed recent papers that have observed the incidence of IE since these current recommendations were published. Results Beginning in the 1990s, questions were raised about the advisability of using antimicrobial prophylaxis before certain dental procedures to prevent IE. Various groups in Europe and the US were increasingly aware that there were not any clinical trials showing the effectiveness, or lack thereof, of such prophylaxis. In the early to mid-2000s, the AHA, ESC and French consortium published guidelines recommending restriction of prophylaxis before dental procedures to patients with highest risk for developing IE and/or the highest risk for an adverse outcome from IE. The NICE guidelines eliminated recommendations for prophylaxis before dental procedures. Studies published after these changes were instituted have generally shown that the incidence of IE has not changed, although two recent reports have observed some increased incidence (but not necessarily related to an antecedent dental procedure). Conclusion A multi-national randomised controlled clinical trial that would include individuals from both developed and developing countries around the world is needed to ultimately define whether there is a role for antibiotic prophylaxis administered before certain dental procedures to prevent IE.

  10. Provision of specific dental procedures by general dentists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network: questionnaire findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V; Korelitz, James J; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Oates, Thomas W; Rindal, D Brad; Gregory, Randall J

    2015-01-22

    Objectives were to: (1) determine whether and how often general dentists (GDs) provide specific dental procedures; and (2) test the hypothesis that provision is associated with key dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. GDs (n = 2,367) in the United States National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed an Enrollment Questionnaire that included: (1) dentist; (2) practice; and (3) patient characteristics, and how commonly they provide each of 10 dental procedures. We determined how commonly procedures were provided and tested the hypothesis that provision was substantively related to the three sets of characteristics. Two procedure categories were classified as "uncommon" (orthodontics, periodontal surgery), three were "common" (molar endodontics; implants; non-surgical periodontics), and five were "very common" (restorative; esthetic procedures; extractions; removable prosthetics; non-molar endodontics). Dentist, practice, and patient characteristics were substantively related to procedure provision; several characteristics seemed to have pervasive effects, such as dentist gender, training after dental school, full-time/part-time status, private practice vs. institutional practice, presence of a specialist in the same practice, and insurance status of patients. As a group, GDs provide a comprehensive range of procedures. However, provision by individual dentists is substantively related to certain dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. A large number and broad range of factors seem to influence which procedures GDs provide. This may have implications for how GDs respond to the ever-changing landscape of dental care utilization, patient population demography, scope of practice, delivery models and GDs' evolving role in primary care.

  11. Dental Care Utilization for Examination and Regional Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Sin; Han, Sun-Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Chul-Woung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Receiving proper dental care plays a significant role in maintaining good oral health. We investigated the relationship between regional deprivation and dental care utilization. Methods: Multilevel logistic regression was used to identify the relationship between the regional deprivation level and dental care utilization purpose, adjusting for individual-level variables, in adults aged 19+ in the 2008 Korean Community Health Survey (n=220 258). Results: Among Korean adults, 12.8% used dental care to undergo examination and 21.0% visited a dentist for other reasons. In the final model, regional deprivation level was associated with significant variations in dental care utilization for examination (pdental care utilization for other reasons in the final model. Conclusions: This study’s findings suggest that policy interventions should be considered to reduce regional variations in rates of dental care utilization for examination. PMID:26265665

  12. Dental Care Utilization and Satisfaction of Residential University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamise CT

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to provide information on the level of utilization and satisfaction of residential university students with the dental services provided by the dental clinic of a teaching hospital. Volunteers and Material: A stratified sampling technique was used to recruit volunteers from the outpatient clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Information was collected by a self-administered questionnaire composed of questions that measure the level of utilization and satisfaction with the dental services provided. Questionnaires were provided to 650 randomly chosen students residing in the University hostels. There were 39 refusals, and 6 incomplete questionnaires were discarded. This left a sample size of 605 volunteers. Results: Forty seven students (7.8% indicated that they visited the dental hospital within the last 12 months. Males and females utilized the dental services equally, and utilization increased with age and the number of years spent on campus. Anticipation of painful dental treatment, high dental charges, long waiting times and being too busy for a dental visit were cited as the most important impediments to seeking dental treatment. Females expressed greater satisfaction with the services. Conclusion: Dental service utilization among the students was found to be low. Oral health awareness campaigns, improving the quality of the services, and shortening the waiting time are expected to increase service utilization and satisfaction.

  13. Relationship Between Children’s Dental Needs and Dental Care Utilization: United States, 1988–1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Clemencia M.; Ronzio, Cynthia R.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study describes the relationship between dental needs and dental care utilization among children. Methods. Data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) were used to analyze dental care needs and dental care utilization. Results. Younger children with perceived needs (needs perceived by the child or responsible adult) were more likely to be episodic users of dental care than children without perceived needs. Younger children with normative needs (defined by the presence of untreated caries diagnosed by a dentist) were less likely to be regular users. Older children with perceived or normative needs were more likely to be episodic users and less likely to have had a previous-year visit than children with no needs. Conclusions. Despite their presence, dental needs do not drive dental care use among children, and children’s dental care utilization is inadequate. PMID:12406814

  14. Use of dental services: an analysis of visits, procedures and providers, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J; Moeller, John F

    2002-02-01

    While many studies have provided data on Americans' access to dental care, few have provided a detailed understanding of what specific treatments patients receive. This article provides detailed information about the types of dental services that Americans receive and the types of providers who render them. The authors provide national estimates for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population in several socioeconomic and demographic categories regarding dental visits, procedures performed and the types of providers who performed them, using household data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, or MEPS. Data show that while the combination of diagnostic and preventive services adds up to 65 percent of all dental procedures, the combination of periodontal and endodontic procedures represents only 3 percent. Additionally, while 81 percent of all dental visits were reported as visits to general dentists, approximately 7 percent and 5 percent of respondents who had had a dental visit reported having visited orthodontists or oral surgeons, respectively. MEPS data show the magnitude and nature of dental visits in aggregate and for each of several demographic and socioeconomic categories. This information establishes a nationally representative baseline for the U.S. population in terms of rates of utilization, number and types of procedures and variations in types of providers performing the procedures. These nationally representative estimates include data elements that describe specific dental visits, dental procedures and type of provider, and they offer details that are useful, important and not found elsewhere. By understanding these analyses, U.S. dentists will be better positioned to provide care and better meet the dental care needs of all Americans.

  15. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised ...

  16. Utilization of dental health services by Danish adolescents attending private or public dental health care systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Petersen, Poul Erik; Bastholm, Annelise

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the study were: 1) to describe the choice of dental care system among 16-year-olds, 2) to describe the utilization of dental services among 16-17-year-olds enrolled in either public or private dental care systems, and to compare the dental services provided by the alternative...... systems. The study comprised 1,245 adolescents from 3 municipalities; the historical cohort study design was applied; and data were collected from dental records (public dental service) and dental claims (private practice). At age 16, 12% preferred being enrolled in the private practice system, while 88......% remained in the public dental care system. During the 2-year study period the attendance rate was 99% for the public system, while 90% attended the private practice system (Pdental services were provided more frequently by the public than the private system (P

  17. Sterilization and Disinfection Procedures by Dental Practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sterilization and Disinfection Procedures by Dental Practitioners in Nigeria. ... At least one HIV/AIDS known and at least one suspected HIV/AIDS patients ... a reasonable percentage of them are conscientious and aware of the risk factors.

  18. Cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema due to a dental procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarine, Mityanand; Dubin, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Dental procedures, though commonplace and usually very safe, are not without complications. We report on a case of extensive cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema after a routine dental procedure, initially masquerading as an allergic reaction in an otherwise young and healthy woman. A review of the relevant literature on this clinical entity is presented, which serves to underscore the need for awareness by the treating clinician of this condition and its potential sequela.

  19. Cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema due to a dental procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mityanand Ramnarine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental procedures, though commonplace and usually very safe, are not without complications. We report on a case of extensive cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema after a routine dental procedure, initially masquerading as an allergic reaction in an otherwise young and healthy woman. A review of the relevant literature on this clinical entity is presented, which serves to underscore the need for awareness by the treating clinician of this condition and its potential sequela.

  20. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants.

  1. Evaluating components of dental care utilization among adults with diabetes and matched controls via hurdle models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Monica

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About one-third of adults with diabetes have severe oral complications. However, limited previous research has investigated dental care utilization associated with diabetes. This project had two purposes: to develop a methodology to estimate dental care utilization using claims data and to use this methodology to compare utilization of dental care between adults with and without diabetes. Methods Data included secondary enrollment and demographic data from Washington Dental Service (WDS and Group Health Cooperative (GH, clinical data from GH, and dental-utilization data from WDS claims during 2002–2006. Dental and medical records from WDS and GH were linked for enrolees continuously and dually insured during the study. We employed hurdle models in a quasi-experimental setting to assess differences between adults with and without diabetes in 5-year cumulative utilization of dental services. Propensity score matching adjusted for differences in baseline covariates between the two groups. Results We found that adults with diabetes had lower odds of visiting a dentist (OR = 0.74, p  0.001. Among those with a dental visit, diabetes patients had lower odds of receiving prophylaxes (OR = 0.77, fillings (OR = 0.80 and crowns (OR = 0.84 (p 0.005 for all and higher odds of receiving periodontal maintenance (OR = 1.24, non-surgical periodontal procedures (OR = 1.30, extractions (OR = 1.38 and removable prosthetics (OR = 1.36 (p  Conclusions Patients with diabetes are less likely to use dental services. Those who do are less likely to use preventive care and more likely to receive periodontal care and tooth-extractions. Future research should address the possible effectiveness of additional prevention in reducing subsequent severe oral disease in patients with diabetes.

  2. Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-03-01

    The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene.

  3. Dental procedures in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saour, J N; Ali, H A; Mammo, L A; Sieck, J O

    1994-05-01

    Over a 10-year period a uniform management plan for patients receiving long term oral anticoagulation therapy for prosthetic heart valves and needing dental procedures was instituted. Those undergoing dental extraction or gum hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology (Group A) had their oral anticoagulation discontinued two days prior to the procedure which was carried out only if the INR was 1.5 or less on the day of the procedure. Patients who needed dental fillings or gum hygiene in the absence of gross gum pathology (Group B) continued their anticoagulation therapy and had these procedures completed provided the INR was 3.0 or less. The main outcome measured were valve thrombosis, thromboembolism and excessive bleeding requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion. In Group A, 240 procedures were carried out; 212 dental extractions and 28 dental hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology. They had a brief period of under-anticoagulation (3-7 days) to an INR of 1.5 or less. In Group B, 156 procedures were performed. No patient developed valve thrombosis or thromboembolism. Two patients, both in Group A needed hospitalization for observation but no blood transfusion. This management plan was easy to implement. Patients needed one extra visit to the anticoagulation clinic within one week of the procedure. It was both safe and effective.

  4. Utilization of Dental General Anaesthesia for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Zarina Abdul; Musa, Normaizura; Noor, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd

    2008-01-01

    Dental treatment under general anaesthesia may be needed for some children and adolescents due to medical or behaviour problem. The objective of the study is to identify the type of treatment that has been carried out under GA in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). A retrospective record review study from hospital records of dental patients (under 18 years old) receiving dental treatment under GA from 2003 until 2007 were retrieved from the database. Information such as the reason for GA, and the type of treatment provided was recorded in data sheet. The data were analyzed using SPSS 12.0.1 for Windows. It was checked and verified for errors. A total of 349 cases were treated of which 43.6% had medical problems. Patients were mostly diagnosed to have rampant caries (77.1%) and some of them have behavioural problems (34.4%). Treatment pattern in deciduous dentition revealed more extraction (97.8%) as compared to restoration (75.7%) whereas in permanent dentition more restoration was done (24.3%) as compared to extraction (2.2%). Majority of the restorations were done using Glass Ionomer Cements (47.5%). Biopsy (4.3%) contributed mainly to the surgery (24.1%) done during GA. General anesthesia is necessary when dental disease is interfering with health and general well-being of patient and it can facilitated dental treatment allowing dentists to benefit from improved treatment conditions and provide a higher quality of care. PMID:22570587

  5. Utilization of Dental Services in Public Health Center: Dental Attendance, Awareness and Felt Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewa, Preksha; Garla, Bharath K; Dagli, Rushabh; Bhateja, Geetika Arora; Solanki, Jitendra

    2015-10-01

    In rural India, dental diseases occur due to many factors, which includes inadequate or improper use of fluoride and a lack of knowledge regarding oral health and oral hygiene, which prevent proper screening and dental care of oral diseases. The objective of the study was to evaluate the dental attendance, awareness and utilization of dental services in public health center. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 251 study subjects who were visiting dental outpatient department (OPD) of public health centre (PHC), Guda Bishnoi, and Jodhpur using a pretested proforma from month of July 2014 to October 2014. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect the data regarding socioeconomic status and demographic factors affecting the utilization of dental services. Pearson's Chi-square test and step-wise logistic regression were applied for the analysis. Statistically significant results were found in relation to age, educational status, socioeconomic status and gender with dental attendance, dental awareness and felt needs. p-value dental services, thereby increasing the oral health status of the population.

  6. [Special considerations in dental surgery procedures on organ transplantation patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzeisen, R; Eckardt, A; Knoll, M; Girod, S

    1991-01-01

    In 150 patients 366 (95%) of 385 dental surgery procedures performed prior to organ transplantations were free of complications. In 6 patients circumscribed wound infections occurred, and 5 post-operative hemorrhages as well as 2 injection hematomas were observed. In the group of patients where dental surgery was performed after organ transplantation, all 123 procedures were free of complications. Treatment of transplantation patients in the dental office requires a profound understanding of the complex clinical problems these patients might present, a good coordination of the required measures and close cooperation between the transplantation center and the attending dentist. Special considerations of the treatment of organ transplantation patients and the indications for dental surgery are discussed.

  7. Management of oral anticoagulation in patients undergoing minor dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaali, Yathreb; Barnes, Geoffrey D; Froehlich, James B; Kaatz, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Approximately 4.2 million patients in the United States are taking warfarin, making it the 11th most prescribed drug. Warfarin is primarily used for treatment of venous thromboembolic disease and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves. Dentists frequently encounter anticoagulated patients and are faced with management decisions in these patients who require dental procedures. Observational studies suggest the risk of thrombosis if anticoagulation is suspended during dental procedures is higher than the risk of bleeding if anticoagulation is not suspended. Several groups now offer guidelines that recommend most minor dental procedures should be performed while on therapeutic warfarin. The recent approval of several new oral anticoagulants has introduced greater complexity to the management of the anticoagulated patient, and this narrative review will discuss current guidelines, the scientific underpinnings of the guidelines, and offer some practical suggestions for patients that are receiving the new agents.

  8. A virtual reality simulator for teaching and evaluating dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhienmora, P; Haddawy, P; Khanal, P; Suebnukarn, S; Dailey, M N

    2010-01-01

    We present a dental training system with a haptic interface that allows dental students or experts to practice dental procedures in a virtual environment. The simulator is able to monitor and classify the performance of an operator into novice or expert categories. The intelligent training module allows a student to simultaneously and proactively follow the correct dental procedures demonstrated by an intelligent tutor. The virtual reality (VR) simulator simulates the tooth preparation procedure both graphically and haptically, using a video display and haptic device. We evaluated the performance of users using hidden Markov models (HMMs) incorporating various data collected by the simulator. We implemented an intelligent training module which is able to record and replay the procedure that was performed by an expert and allows students to follow the correct steps and apply force proactively by themselves while reproducing the procedure. We find that the level of graphics and haptics fidelity is acceptable as evaluated by dentists. The accuracy of the objective performance assessment using HMMs is encouraging with 100 percent accuracy. The simulator can simulate realistic tooth surface exploration and cutting. The accuracy of automatic performance assessment system using HMMs is also acceptable on relatively small data sets. The intelligent training allows skill transfer in a proactive manner which is an advantage over the passive method in a traditional training. We will soon conduct experiments with more participants and implement a variety of training strategies.

  9. Optimizing the procedure for mercury recovery from dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Godoy Iano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury, as any other heavy metal, may cause environmental damages due to its accumulation and biotransformation. Dental offices, whether private or institutional, use dental amalgam as a restorative material on a daily basis. Dental amalgam is composed of mercury (50%, silver (30% and other metals. Approximately 30% of the amalgam prepared in dental offices (0.6 g per capsule are wasted and inadequately discarded without any treatment. Methods for mercury recovery have been proposed previously, using high temperatures through exposure to direct flame (650°C, long processing time, and hazardous reagents as potassium cyanide. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to replace the direct flame by an electrical mantle in the process of mercury recovery. Results showed an average mercury recovery of 90% from 2 kg of amalgam after 30 minutes of processing time, thus optimizing the procedure. The proposed modifications allowed a significant reduction in processing time and a mercury recovery with high purity. The modified process also provided minimization of operator exposure to physical, chemical and ergonomic hazards, representing a technological advance compared to the risks inherent to the original method. It also provided environmental health and economy of energy resources by replacing a finite energy source (fossil and organic by a more environmentally appropriate electric source, resulting in significant improvement of the procedure for mercury recovery from dental amalgam.

  10. Time series analysis of dental care procedures in Brazilian public services, 1994-2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger Keller Celeste; Jacqueline Furtado Vital; Washington Leite Junger; Michael Eduardo Reichenheim

    2011-01-01

      The objectives of this study were to describe the time series of monthly rates of five dental care procedures in the Brazilian public health system and to assess changes in trends of dental procedures from 1994 to 2007...

  11. Do dental procedures affect lung function and arterial oxygen saturation in asthmatic patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Mahmoud Emara

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: Asthmatic patients may be at a higher risk of developing oxygen desaturation after dental procedures regardless of their type with and without local anesthesia and a decrease in PEF after dental procedures with local anesthesia.

  12. Finishing procedures in Orthodontics: dental dimensions and proportions (microesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carlos Bodart Brandão

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present article is to describe procedures that can be performed to achieve excellence in orthodontic treatment finishing. The content is limited to microesthetics, which comprises the concept of ideal dental dimensions and proportions (white esthetics and its correlation with the periodontium (pink esthetics. Standards of normality are described both in their real dimensions (dental height and width, and in those effectively perceived by the observer, the virtual dimensions. METHODS: The best scientific evidence was sought in the literature to support the clinical procedures that must guide the professional to obtain maximum esthetic quality on their treatments. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate what the other specialties in Dentistry expect from Orthodontics and, specially, what they have to offer. Clinical cases will be used to illustrate the dental movement that might maximize treatment outcome and to confront the ideal standards with the current state of the art. CONCLUSION: Treatment quality is directly related to the amount of procedures implemented by the orthodontist, associated with concepts and resources from Periodontics and Dental Prosthesis. Microesthetics cannot be seen in isolation, but rather as the key to establish a pleasant smile (miniesthetics in addition to a harmonious face (macroesthetics and a human being with high self-esteem (hyper-esthetics.

  13. Utilization of Preventive Dental Services Before and After Health Insurance Covered Dental Scaling in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young-Eun; Kim, Chun-Bae; Kim, Nam-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Health insurance reduces the economic burden of diseases and enhances access to medical services. This study compared, among social classes, the utilization of preventive dental service before and after health insurance covered dental scaling. We analyzed time-series secondary data for 3  175  584 participants from 253 survey areas nationwide in the Community Health Survey (2009-2014) in Korea. The weighted proportion of participants who underwent dental scaling was defined as the scaling rate. Data regarding demographic and socioeconomic characteristics were collected. Scaling rates continuously increased over the 6-year period, particularly in 2014. College graduates had significantly higher scaling rates. Monthly income and scaling rate were positively related. Differences by education decreased over time. Differences by income were particularly high between 2012 and 2014. For women, the temporal rate was 2 times higher for professionals than for the unemployed. Despite increased dental scaling rates since the health coverage change in 2013, socioeconomic differences persist.

  14. The utility of dental patterns in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-de-Las-Heras, Stella; Valenzuela, Aurora; Luna, Juan de Dios; Bravo, Manuel

    2010-02-25

    The comparison of antemortem and postmortem dental patterns, which reflect a combination of dental states, can be quantified for human identification. However, the utility derived from the uniqueness of these patterns is limited by variations in oral health status related to population, age, and birth cohort. We analyzed dental pattern diversity from reference datasets that documented differences in oral health. Our analysis was based on full dentitions and partial dentitions available in forensic situations. To analyze the diversity of dental patterns, data from 3166 adults were extracted from the last 3 contemporary Spanish National Oral Health Examination Surveys, corresponding to the years 1993, 2000, and 2005. Each survey comprised 2 adult age groups (35-44 years and 65-74 years), therefore six datasets were available for our study. Our six samples showed substantial variability in oral health status (caries history) and dental code distribution, not only between age groups within the same survey year, but also between different survey years for the same age group. To test the overall diversity of dental patterns in each datasets, pairwise comparisons were performed and the total number of pattern matches was generated. We calculated total and conditional diversity (excluding individuals in whom all teeth were classified as unrestored or missing) for each forensic situation. To test the homogeneity of diversity estimates among the six datasets we used a random effect model that requires a parameter estimate together with its standard error. Total diversity values were low and heterogeneous. However, conditional diversities were high and homogeneous, which allowed all data to be pooled into a single database. Once data were pooled, high combined diversity values (above 0.99) were obtained for each forensic situation. This indicates their usefulness for forensic purposes. We conclude that the conditional diversity value derived from dental patterns is a

  15. Triggered by Medication Used in Dental Procedures: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristo Vojdani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced intestinal permeability and food sensitivity are two of the many proven causes of gastrointestinal disorders. This present report describes a woman with no previous gastrointestinal (GI complaints, who underwent dental root canal, bone graft, and implant procedures. Postsurgery she experienced an allergic reaction to the combined medications. In the weeks that followed, she presented with multiple food intolerances. Four weeks after the final dental procedure, she was assessed serologically for mucosal immune function, salivary, and blood-gluten reactivity, intestinal permeability, and other food sensitivities. Compared to her test reports from two months prior to her first dental procedure, the patient’s results showed high total secretory IgA (SIgA and elevated salivary antibodies to alpha-gliadin, indicating abnormal mucosal immunity and loss of tolerance to gluten. Her serologic assessments revealed immunoglobulin G (IgG and IgA antibodies to a range of wheat/gluten proteins and peptides, gut bacterial endotoxins and tight junction proteins. These test results indicate gut dysbiosis, enhanced intestinal permeability, systemic gluten-reactivity, and immune response to other dietary macromolecules. The present case suggests that patients who experience severe allergic or pseudoallergic reactions to medication should be assessed and monitored for gut dysfunction. If left untreated this could lead to autoimmune reactions to self tissues.

  16. Evaluation of Glove Damage during Dental Procedures among Dental Specialists in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nezafati

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Dental practitioners are prone to occupational risk of infection. This can be prevented in part by wearing gloves. However, for this to be effective, gloves should be intact during the entire course of dental procedure. Leaky surgical latex gloves have been seen in 0.9% of cases before use. As much as 1.9% of latex gloves have been reported to be damaged during dental procedures. In this study, we decided to assess glove damage during dental procedures among dental specialists in Tabriz.

    Materials and methods. Thirty-six dental specialists were selected for this study. Each practitioner received 40 pairs of intact powdered latex gloves. Upon the completion of dental procedures, the gloves were retrieved and any tears were evaluated separately for right and left hands. Data was analyzed using chi-square test.

    Results. 159 punctures were detected in 144 gloves (5% out of 2880 unpaired gloves used by practitioners. They noticed the tear(s in 60 cases (2%, however, 99 cases (3% of tear(s were not noted during the procedure. The highest rate of glove damage was observed in the prosthodontists’ group (12.3%, which was statistically significant comparing to other groups (p=0.048. The lowest rate of the damage was observed in the oral surgeons’ group (2% which showed no significant difference (p=0.134. The highest rate of punctures in the gloves was observed in the first and second fingers of the non-dominant hand.

    Conclusion. The damage to 5% of the gloves is highly significant, with a potential role in occupational hazards. The higher rate of leaks in the prosthodontists’ group compared to other groups demands for greater prudence in this field. The high rate of leaks in the first and second fingers of the non-dominant hand requires more attention to this area during daily practice.

  17. Diagnostic procedures employed by dental practitioners in Australia with a focus on endodontic diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Asj; Bennett, G W; Tan, Jcw; Abbott, P V

    2017-09-01

    An accurate diagnosis is the foundation for determining prognosis and appropriate management. This study adds to pre-existing (albeit limited) evidence by exploring the use of diagnostic techniques amongst dental practitioners. The main aim of the study was to identify the availability, usage and clinician preference for specific diagnostic tests. A secondary aim was to investigate the use of diagnostic tests for common clinical scenarios. A cross-sectional survey was distributed online to dental practitioners registered with the Australian Dental Association. Quantitative data on clinician demography, and the availability and preference of diagnostic tests was summarized with Stata 13 software. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to determine associations. General dental practitioners (GDP) and specialists comprised 86% and 14% of the 433 respondents, respectively. Unlike light transillumination, most GDP had radiography, biting tests and pulp sensibility tests available. The electric pulp test and ethyl chloride were first choices of most practitioners despite markedly lower availability relative to cold spray. Symptoms and endodontic assessments generally attracted wider usage of pulp testing. More dental practitioners should utilize diagnostic testing in order to arrive at accurate diagnoses. The availability of diagnostic tests did not completely translate to usage and none of the scenarios presented warranted pulp sensibility testing from all respondents. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Washington state foster care: dental utilization and expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, Molly L R; Chi, Donald L; Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen E; Grembowski, David

    2014-01-01

    To identify factors associated with dental utilization and expenditures for children enrolled in Washington State (WA) foster care (FC). This cross-sectional study used 2008 Medicaid enrollment and claims files for children ages Foster Home Care, Kinship Care, Group Care, Other), and urbanicity. Only 43 percent of the children utilized any dental care; the adjusted mean expenditure was $198.35 [95% confidence interval (CI) $181.35, $215.36]. Fewer utilized diagnostic (41 percent), preventive (39 percent), restorative (11 percent), or complex (5 percent) services. Associated with utilization (P ≤ 0.01) were: female [ARR = 1.05, 95% CI(1.01, 1.10)]; 0-2 years [ARR = 0.18, 95% CI(0.15, 0.21)], [3-5 years ARR = 0.78, 95% CI(0.74, 0.83)]; Native American [ARR = 0.85, 95% CI(0.80, 0.91)]; SSI [ARR = 1.10, 95% CI(1.04, 1.17)]; Kinship Care [ARR = 0.94, 95% CI(0.90, 0.98)]; Group Care [ARR = 1.25 95% CI(1.15, 1.37)]; and urban/rural urbanicity with population Care [$28.57 95% CI($14.00, $43.15)]. Most children enrolled in WA FC for ≥11 months during 2008 did not receive dental care. Research is needed to determine the level of unmet need among children in FC and interventions to improve access to oral health of the children. Enforcement of existing federal legislation is needed. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  19. Dental Care Utilization among North Carolina Rural Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Savoca, Margaret R.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Chen, Haiying; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Bell, Ronny A.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Reynolds, Teresa; Quandt, Sara A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This analysis delineates the predisposing, need, and enabling factors that are significantly associated with regular and recent dental care in a multi-ethnic sample of rural older adults. Methods A cross-sectional comprehensive oral health survey conducted with a random, multi-ethnic (African American, American Indian, white) sample of 635 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older was completed in two rural southern counties. Results Almost no edentulous rural older adults received dental care. Slightly more than one-quarter (27.1%) of dentate rural older adults received regular dental care and slightly more than one-third (36.7%) received recent dental care. Predisposing (education) and enabling (regular place for dental care) factors associated with receiving regular and recent dental care among dentate participants point to greater resources being the driving force in receiving dental care. Contrary to expectations of the Behavioral Model of Health Services, those with the least need (e.g., better self-rated oral health) received regular dental care; this has been referred to as the Paradox of Dental Need. Conclusions Regular and recent dental care are infrequent among rural older adults. Those not receiving dental care are those who most need care. Community access to dental care and the ability of older adults to pay for dental care must be addressed by public health policy to improve the health and quality of life of older adults in rural communities. PMID:22536828

  20. Practical implications of incentive systems are utilized by dental franchises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavner, S B

    1989-01-01

    The success of any dental practice depends, among other factors, on the critical role of staff employees. In order to encourage desired staff behaviors, incentive systems can be designed for employee dentists, assistants/hygienists and managers. A survey of dental franchises was conducted in 1987 for the purpose of examining their incentive control systems. The specific incentives employed by these dental franchises for their employees are analyzed. The implications of these incentive systems used by dental franchise organizations for all dental practices are then discussed.

  1. Dental services utilization by women of childbearing age by socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaylor, Mary B; Polivka, Barbara J; Chaudry, Rosemary; Salsberry, Pamela; Wee, Alvin G

    2010-04-01

    For women of childbearing age, oral health not only affects their physical and psychological well-being but also that of their children. This study used the 2003-2004 Ohio Family Health Survey (N = 9,819) to examine dental need and utilization by women in Ohio. Predisposing, enabling, and need variables were examined as they effect dental health service utilization by women of childbearing age at different socioeconomic status (SES) levels. The proportion of women in the low SES group self reporting a dental need (18%) was 3 times that of the proportion of women in the higher SES group with a self reported need (6%). Results of bivariate analysis showed that having a dental visit in the past year varied significantly by SES, race, insurance status, provider density, and need. A racial disparity in dental service utilization was noted in the bivariate analysis of the middle SES group. While dental need and type of dental coverage varied by SES, both were significantly associated with utilization of dental services within all 3 SES categories in the logistic regressions. These results suggest that measures need to be implemented to meet the goal of increasing access and utilization of dental health services by low-income populations.

  2. Social support and dental utilization among children of Latina immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahouraii, Helen; Wasserman, Melanie; Bender, Deborah E; Rozier, R Gary

    2008-05-01

    Latino children use fewer professional dental services and experience more dental decay than non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black children. This study tested the association between four types of social support (information, influence, material aid, emotional aid) and dental use among children of Latina immigrants in North Carolina. Latina mothers age 15-44 years (N=174) were sampled from four counties using a multistage church-based sampling design. Each mother reported dental care use for her oldest child younger than 11 years of age. Instrumental aid (information) alone was not associated with dental care use, but receiving any of the other types of social support was associated with dental care use at the bivariate level (pdental-related social support could help Latina immigrant mothers overcome barriers to dental care for their children.

  3. Use of statistical procedures in Brazilian and international dental journals

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Pereira,Antônio Carlos

    2004-01-01

    A descriptive survey was performed in order to assess the statistical content and quality of Brazilian and international dental journals, and compare their evolution throughout the last decades. The authors identified the reporting and accuracy of statistical techniques in 1000 papers published from 1970 to 2000 in seven dental journals: three Brazilian (Brazilian Dental Journal, Revista de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo and Revista de Odontologia da UNESP) and four international jo...

  4. Dental procedures among children age birth to 20, United States, 1999 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J; Vargas, Clemencia M; Brown, Erwin; Carper, Kelly V; Macek, Mark D; Cohen, Leonard A

    2015-01-01

    To describe dental procedures received by US children and adolescents by poverty status and dental insurance coverage. Data for this analysis came from the 1999 and 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. The primary outcome variable represented the types of dental procedures that were received during dental visits in the preceding year. Descriptive variables included dental insurance and poverty status. Analysis was restricted to children from birth to 20 years. Overall, diagnostic (41.2 percent) and preventive (35.8 percent) procedures accounted for most of the procedures received by children from birth to 20 years of age, while restorative procedures accounted for just 5 percent. Children from low-income families received a higher proportion of restorative procedures than children in higher-income families. The proportion of diagnostic and preventive services was lower among uninsured children than among publicly insured children. Orthodontic services, on the other hand, represented a greater percentage of these procedures among uninsured children than among publicly insured children. The vast majority of procedures received by children from birth to 20 years were diagnostic and preventive. Most children with at least one dental visit received a diagnostic or preventive service. Between 1999 and 2009, the proportion of all services received accounted for by diagnostic or preventive services increased. However, the proportion in which each type of procedure was received by children who made at least one visit who received did not change. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  5. Factors associated with dental care utilization in early childhood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darmawikarta, Denise; Chen, Yang; Carsley, Sarah; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Schroth, Robert J; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2014-01-01

    To identify sociodemographic, dietary, and biological factors associated with families who do not receive dental care in early childhood and to identify risk factors associated with having cavities...

  6. Dental utilization by children in Hispanic agricultural worker families in California

    OpenAIRE

    Finlayson, TL; Gansky, SA; Shain, SG; Weintraub, JA

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural worker families encounter multiple barriers to accessing all needed dental care. This study investigated predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with children's past year dental utilization among Hispanic agricultural worker families in central California.Oral health survey and clinical data were collected from families participating in a larger, population-based study in 2006-7. Generalized estimating equation logit regression assessed effects on a dental visit among...

  7. Common Fears and Their Relationship to Dental Fear and Utilization of the Dentist

    OpenAIRE

    Fiset, Louis; Milgram, Peter; Weinstein, Philip; Melnick, Sandra

    1989-01-01

    Common fears were studied by household telephone interviews and mail survey in Seattle, Washington, to determine their relationship to dental fear and to utilization of the dentist. Dental fear was either the first or second most common fear, with a prevalence estimated between 183 and 226 persons per 1000 population. Dental fear was associated with fears of heights, flying, and enclosures. Respondents with multiple common fears other than fear of dentistry were more likely to delay or cancel...

  8. Flumazenil reversal of midazolam sedation for dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Attar, A; Adu-Gyamfi, Y; Tawfique, K

    1992-06-01

    The efficacy of flumazenil in the reversal of midazolam sedation was assessed in double-blind placebo controlled study. Thirty patients undergoing oral surgical procedures were included. Flumazenil administration was followed by immediate rise of the CNS functions scores to almost the baseline awake values. Compared to control group, patients were significantly more oriented and had better comprehension up to 15 minutes, more alert for 30 minutes and had better memory function up to 60 minutes. Peripheral oxygen saturation was significantly higher up to 15 minutes. Flumazenil allows better utilization and higher turn over rate where space and nursing resources are scarce.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not indicated prior to dental procedures for prevention of periprosthetic joint infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Willem M H; Walenkamp, Geert H I M; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Hendriks, Johannes G E; Goedendorp, Theo A; Rozema, Frederik R

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose - To minimize the risk of hematogenous periprosthetic joint infection (HPJI), international and Dutch guidelines recommended antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental procedures. Unclear definitions and contradictory recommendations in these guidelines have led to unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions. To formulate new guidelines, a joint committee of the Dutch Orthopaedic and Dental Societies conducted a systematic literature review to answer the following question: can antibiotic prophylaxis be recommended for patients (with joint prostheses) undergoing dental procedures in order to prevent dental HPJI? Methods - The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), reviews, and observational studies up to July 2015. Studies were included if they involved patients with joint implants undergoing dental procedures, and either considered HPJI as an outcome measure or described a correlation between HPJI and prophylactic antibiotics. A guideline was formulated using the GRADE method and AGREE II guidelines. Results - 9 studies were included in this systematic review. All were rated "very low quality of evidence". Additional literature was therefore consulted to address clinical questions that provide further insight into pathophysiology and risk factors. The 9 studies did not provide evidence that use of antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the incidence of dental HPJI, and the additional literature supported the conclusion that antibiotic prophylaxis should be discouraged in dental procedures. Interpretation - Prophylactic antibiotics in order to prevent dental HPJI should not be prescribed to patients with a normal or an impaired immune system function. Patients are recommended to maintain good oral hygiene and visit the dentist regularly.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Dental Implants: A Utility Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A measure of dental patients' values and preferences was used to assess attitudes of 92 edentulous patients receiving implant and other dental reconstructive therapies. The implant group tended to be younger and better educated and to rate implant reconstruction as more desirable than the nonimplant denture group. (DB)

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Dental Implants: A Utility Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A measure of dental patients' values and preferences was used to assess attitudes of 92 edentulous patients receiving implant and other dental reconstructive therapies. The implant group tended to be younger and better educated and to rate implant reconstruction as more desirable than the nonimplant denture group. (DB)

  12. Financial record-keeping simulation in the dental auxiliary utilization clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, E G; Waller, R R

    1975-09-01

    A financial record-keeping and billing simulation program which is part of the Dental Auxiliary Utilization (DAU) didactic and clinical experiences has been reported. Evaluation of student performance has demonstrated a satisfactory level of accomplishment. The students' performance may reflect their awareness regarding the importance of understanding the management of the financial affairs of a dental practice.

  13. Use of statistical procedures in Brazilian and international dental journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Pereira, Antônio Carlos

    2004-01-01

    A descriptive survey was performed in order to assess the statistical content and quality of Brazilian and international dental journals, and compare their evolution throughout the last decades. The authors identified the reporting and accuracy of statistical techniques in 1000 papers published from 1970 to 2000 in seven dental journals: three Brazilian (Brazilian Dental Journal, Revista de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo and Revista de Odontologia da UNESP) and four international journals (Journal of the American Dental Association, Journal of Dental Research, Caries Research and Journal of Periodontology). Papers were divided into two time periods: from 1970 to 1989, and from 1990 to 2000. A slight increase in the number of articles that presented some form of statistical technique was noticed for Brazilian journals (from 61.0 to 66.7%), whereas for international journals, a significant increase was observed (65.8 to 92.6%). In addition, a decrease in the number of statistical errors was verified. The most commonly used statistical tests as well as the most frequent errors found in dental journals were assessed. Hopefully, this investigation will encourage dental educators to better plan the teaching of biostatistics, and to improve the statistical quality of submitted manuscripts.

  14. Dental Hygiene Students' Self-Assessment of Ergonomics Utilizing Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partido, Brian B

    2017-10-01

    Due to postural demands, dental professionals are at high risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Dental clinicians' lack of ergonomic awareness may impede the clinical application of recommendations to improve their posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether feedback involving photography and self-assessment would improve dental hygiene students' ergonomic scores and accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. The study involved a randomized control design and used a convenience sample of all 32 junior-year dental hygiene students enrolled in the autumn 2016 term in The Ohio State University baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Sixteen students were randomly assigned to each of two groups (control and training). At weeks one and four, all participants were photographed and completed ergonomic self-evaluations using the Modified-Dental Operator Posture Assessment Instrument (M-DOPAI). During weeks two and three, participants in the training group were photographed again and used those photographs to complete ergonomic self-assessments. All participants' pre-training and post-training photographs were given ergonomic scores by three raters. Students' self-assessments in the control group and faculty evaluations of the training group showed significant improvement in scores over time (F(1,60)=4.25, phygiene students' self-assessments using photographs resulted in improvements in their ergonomic scores and increased accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. Any improvement in ergonomic score or awareness can help reduce the risks for WMSDs, especially among dental clinicians.

  15. Factors associated with dental care utilization in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawikarta, Denise; Chen, Yang; Carsley, Sarah; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Schroth, Robert J; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2014-06-01

    To identify sociodemographic, dietary, and biological factors associated with families who do not receive dental care in early childhood and to identify risk factors associated with having cavities among children who receive early dental care. A cross-sectional study of healthy Canadian children seen for primary health care between September 2011 and January 2013 was conducted through the TARGet Kids! practice-based research network in Toronto, Canada. Adjusted logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with children who were not seen by a dentist in early childhood and to determine risk factors associated with having dental cavities among children who received early dental care. Of the 2505 children included in the analysis, cavities. Among healthy urban children seen by a primary care provider, those most susceptible to cavities were least likely to receive early dental care. These findings support the need for publicly funded universal early preventive dental care and underscore the importance for primary care physicians to promote dental care in early childhood. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. WEALTH EFFECT AND DENTAL CARE UTILIZATION IN THE U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J.; Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan; Clair, Patricia A. St.; Schimmel, Jody; Pepper, John V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship of wealth and income and the relative impact of each on dental utilization in a population of older Americans, using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Methods Data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were analyzed for U.S. individuals aged 51 years and older during the 2008 wave of the HRS. The primary focus of the analysis is the relationship between wealth, income and dental utilization. We estimate a multivariable model of dental use controlling for wealth, income and other potentially confounding covariates. Results We find that both wealth and income each have a strong and independent positive effect on dental care use of older Americans [pdental care utilization as wealth increases depends on a person's income level, or, alternatively, that the impact on dental use as income increases depends on a person's household wealth status [p>.05]. Conclusions Relative to those living in the wealthiest U.S. households, the likelihood of utilizing dental care appears to decrease with a decline in wealth. The likelihood of utilizing dental care also appears to decrease with a decline in income as well. PMID:22515635

  17. Structure of non-reimbursed and reimbursed therapeutic procedures provided at a general dental care office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgardzinska Sylwia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental care in Poland is based both on the public system (reimbursement by the National Health Fund and on the private funding (non-reimbursed. The aim of the paper was an analysis of the structure of non-reimbursed and reimbursed therapeutic procedures provided at a general dental care office. The study material was medical documentation of 669 patients treated for 3 months (the third quarter of 2013 at a general dental care office. The structure of therapeutic procedures, with the exception of orthodontic and prosthetic treatment, was analyzed, taking into account the patients’ gender, age, place of residence, the kind of procedure, and the payment type they made. The procedures reimbursed by the National Health Fund constituted 60.1% of all the procedures provided to patients at a dental office. Both among the procedures reimbursed by the National Health Fund and non-reimbursed procedures, the therapeutic procedures prevailed significantly over the prophylactic ones; in all age groups conservative treatment was predominant. An increase in the number of extractions in patients over 40 years of age, in comparison to younger patients, was found. The number of the dental procedures reimbursed by the National Health Fund, compared to the number of the non-reimbursed ones, increased with the patients’ age.

  18. [Utilization of dental services for children: a review of the influencing factors and the possible improvements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M L; Si, Y

    2017-05-09

    It has been reported that children's oral health conditions are correlated with their attendance to dental health services. Evaluating the influencing factors of utilization of dental services for children may give ways to improve the services per se, and furtherly the children's oral health. The present review retrieved and summarized domestic and foreign studies on the utilization of oral health services for children based on the Andersen behavior model. It was concluded that the utilization of dental services for children was affected by demographic characteristics, social structure, health belief, family factors, community factors and perceived/evaluated needs. To improve the utilization of dental services for children, effort should be made by means of changing caregivers' health belief, developing oral health insurance system, setting up regular oral health resources and increasing the financial support for oral health services by government.

  19. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Practitioners in Ta-briz Regarding Infection Control Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdipour, Masoomeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Gholizadeh, Narges

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims Blood-borne infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV might be transmitted from one individual to another during dental procedures. Therefore, sterilization and personal protection procedures are of utmost significance in dental offices. The importance of awareness of cross-infection and antiseptic principles lies in the fact that in most cases it is not possible to identify patients with hepatitis or AIDS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate awareness o...

  20. Massive Cervicothoracic Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum Developing during a Dental Hygiene Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchialini, Gabriele; Ambrosi, Serena; Castellani, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema is rare during or after dental procedures (usually extractions). Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old woman who developed massive cervicothoracic subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum during a dental hygiene procedure employing an artificial airflow. She was diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and computed tomography (CT). CT revealed massive subcutaneous emphysema extending from the superior left eyelid to the diaphragm. We describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of this rare case.

  1. Utilization of dental health care services in context of the HIV epidemic- a cross-sectional study of dental patients in the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åstrøm Anne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infected patients should be expected in the Sudanese dental health care services with an increasing frequency. Dental care utilization in the context of the HIV epidemic is generally poorly understood. Focusing on Sudanese dental patients with reported unknown HIV status, this study assessed the extent to which Andersen's model in terms of predisposing (socio-demographics, enabling (knowledge, attitudes and perceived risk related to HIV and need related factors (oral health status predict dental care utilization. It was hypothesized that enabling factors would add to the explanation of dental care utilization beyond that of predisposing and need related factors. Methods Dental patients were recruited from Khartoum Dental Teaching Hospital (KDTH and University of Science and Technology (UST during March-July 2008. A total of 1262 patients (mean age 30.7, 56.5% females and 61% from KDTH were examined clinically (DMFT and participated in an interview. Results A total of 53.9% confirmed having attended a dental clinic for treatment at least once in the past 2 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that predisposing factors; travelling inside Sudan (OR = 0.5 were associated with lower odds and females were associated with higher odds (OR = 2.0 for dental service utilization. Enabling factors; higher knowledge of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6 and higher HIV related experience (OR = 0.7 were associated with lower odds, whereas positive attitudes towards infected people and high perceived risk of contagion (OR = 1.3 were associated with higher odds for dental care utilization. Among need related factors dental caries experience was strongly associated with dental care utilization (OR = 4.8. Conclusion Disparity in the history of dental care utilization goes beyond socio-demographic position and need for dental care. Public awareness of HIV infection control and confidence on the competence of dentists should be improved to

  2. Using Standardized Patients to Teach Complete Denture Procedures in Second Year of Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gary M; Halket, Christine A; Ferguson, Gilda P; Perry, Jeffrey

    2017-03-01

    Second-year dental students are commonly instructed on the process of complete denture fabrication with a traditional didactic lecture and preclinical dental laboratory education model. The problem with this limited mode of instruction is that dental students often fail to understand the various chairside procedures required to fabricate a complete denture. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of standardized dental patients to enhance students' understanding of the procedures involved with each appointment in the complete denture process. The Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona created an event using standardized patients in four simulated chairside dental appointments for complete denture instruction of second-year dental students. Each appointment simulated the various sequential chairside procedures required to fabricate complete dentures. Following the didactic and dental laboratory instruction and the standardized patient event, a survey was conducted requesting the students' response to six statements regarding their understanding of the denture fabrication process. Of the 110 students who participated in the instructional events, 107 responded to the survey (97% response rate). These students responded very favorably to the simulated appointments, with the majority agreeing or strongly agreeing that their best understanding of the complete denture process was obtained through the standardized patient experiences. The use of standardized patients in simulated denture fabrication appointments enhanced the educational experience of these students when added to the traditional didactic lecture and preclinical laboratory education format. The experience has since been incorporated into the school's second-year oral health science laboratory curriculum.

  3. Utilization of dental health services among middle-aged people in Sweden and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronström, Mats; Palmqvist, Sigvard; Söderfeldt, Björn; Vigild, Merete

    2002-10-01

    In 1999, questionnaires were sent to random samples of 1001 Swedish citizens aged 55-79 years and 1175 Danish citizens aged 45-69 years. Various questions were asked concerning dental conditions, dental visit frequency per year, and money spent annually on dental care, etc. The objectives were to assess differences in the utilization of dental services and to compare out-of-pocket costs for dental care in Sweden and Denmark with control for age, gender, dental conditions and income. More than 80% of the subjects reported that a dentist had examined them less than 1 year previously. However, 77% of the Danes reported dental visits twice a year or more compared to 28% of the Swedes. Although the Danes reported a more frequent use of dental services, they had poorer dental conditions compared to the Swedes. Even though the Swedes used dental services less often than the Danes did, more subjects reported high 12-month out-of-pocket costs. In the present study, separate models were constructed for the two countries because there could be different mechanisms at play, as indicated by the results. The different insurance systems along with different degrees of commercialization in the two countries might be the most decisive factors in this context.

  4. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  5. A Hybrid Segmentation Framework for Computer-Assisted Dental Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosntalab, Mohammad; Aghaeizadeh Zoroofi, Reza; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, Ali; Shirani, Gholamreza; Reza Asharif, Mohammad

    Teeth segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images is a major and challenging task for various computer assisted procedures. In this paper, we introduced a hybrid method for quantification of teeth in CT volumetric dataset inspired by our previous experiences and anatomical knowledge of teeth and jaws. In this regard, we propose a novel segmentation technique using an adaptive thresholding, morphological operations, panoramic re-sampling and variational level set algorithm. The proposed method consists of several steps as follows: first, we determine the operation region in CT slices. Second, the bony tissues are separated from other tissues by utilizing an adaptive thresholding technique based on the 3D pulses coupled neural networks (PCNN). Third, teeth tissue is classified from other bony tissues by employing panorex lines and anatomical knowledge of teeth in the jaws. In this case, the panorex lines are estimated using Otsu thresholding and mathematical morphology operators. Then, the proposed method is followed by calculating the orthogonal lines corresponding to panorex lines and panoramic re-sampling of the dataset. Separation of upper and lower jaws and initial segmentation of teeth are performed by employing the integral projections of the panoramic dataset. Based the above mentioned procedures an initial mask for each tooth is obtained. Finally, we utilize the initial mask of teeth and apply a variational level set to refine initial teeth boundaries to final contour. In the last step a surface rendering algorithm known as marching cubes (MC) is applied to volumetric visualization. The proposed algorithm was evaluated in the presence of 30 cases. Segmented images were compared with manually outlined contours. We compared the performance of segmentation method using ROC analysis of the thresholding, watershed and our previous works. The proposed method performed best. Also, our algorithm has the advantage of high speed compared to our previous works.

  6. The impact of the global budget system on dynamics of dental manpower and utilization of dental services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yueh-Guey Huang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study has demonstrated a stabilizing effect of the global budget system on dynamics of dental manpower in Taiwan. A relationship between HHI and dentists′ move-out rate has been found. The relationship between municipal socioeconomic status and the density of dentists has also been confirmed. In addition, reduced utilization of amalgam restorations was accompanied by increased utilization of tooth-colored material restorations. Further investigations are indicated.

  7. The effect of health and dental insurance on US children's dental care utilization for urgent and non-urgent dental problems - 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naavaal, Shillpa; Barker, Laurie K; Griffin, Susan O

    2017-12-01

    We examined the association between utilization of care for a dental problem (utilization-DP) and parent-reported dental problem (DP) urgency among children with DP by type of health care insurance coverage. We used weighted 2008 National Health Interview Survey data from 2,834 children, aged 2-17 years with at least one DP within the 6 months preceding survey. Explanatory variables were selected based on Andersen's model of healthcare utilization. Need was considered urgent if DP included toothache, bleeding gums, broken or missing teeth, broken or missing filling, or decayed teeth and otherwise as non-urgent. The primary enabling variable, insurance, had four categories: none, private health no dental coverage (PHND), private health and dental (PHD), or Medicaid/State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). Predisposing variables included sociodemographic characteristics. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to identify explanatory variables' association with utilization-DP. Using logistic regression, we obtained adjusted estimates of utilization-DP by urgency for each insurance category. In bivariate analyses, utilization-DP was associated with both insurance and urgency. In multivariate analyses, the difference in percent utilizing care for an urgent versus non-urgent DP among children covered by Medicaid/SCHIP was 32 percentage points; PHD, 25 percentage points; PHND, 12 percentage points; and no insurance, 14 percentage points. The difference in utilization by DP urgency was higher for children with Medicaid/SCHIP compared with either PHND or uninsured children. Expansion of Medicaid/SCHIP may permit children to receive care for urgent DPs who otherwise may not, due to lack of dental insurance. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  8. Procedure for detecting underground utilities with specific shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Aleksandar; Vrtunski, Milan; Govedarica, Miro; Bugarinovic, Zeljko

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays GPR technology is acknowledged as a reliable, fast, non-destructive remote sensing technology whose area of applications is wider every day. One of its most common applications is underground utility detection. Not only it is possible to detect the utility in the field, but using certain algorithms utilities which haven't been detected in the field can be detected in radargrams. There is a number of procedures for automated detection of utility in the radargrams. Further, there are procedures that can estimate certain parameters such as propagation velocity, diameter or even characteristics of the material. However, the majority of these procedures is designed to detect cylindrical shape utilities, which, in a radargram, are represented with hyperbolic reflection. According to geometry of hyperbola, utility parameters can be estimated. In this paper we present a procedure that is designed to estimate characteristics of non-cylindrical utilities. It is worth mentioning that these utilities are not so rare. Some underground tanks and sewage collectors are among them. Heat line is consisted of two insulated pipes of the same diameter, often placed in a concrete channel and covered with plates made from reinforced concrete. Therefore, it can be considered as non-cylindrical utility and such structure has characteristic signature in a radargram. The main idea of the proposed procedure is to detect this signature, and then, based on standardized parameters for the heat lines, to estimate the diameter of the pipes. The proposed procedure is based on artificial neural network. As a training set we made a number of radargrams collected on different locations which contain heat lines of various dimensions. Pipe diameters were in a range from 65 to 250 mm. 400MHz antenna was used since the depth hasn't exceeded 2m. After the network is trained it is validated using radargrams that haven't been used in the training set. Further tests were done with radargrams that

  9. Utilization of dental services among secondary school students in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joycelyn Odegua Eigbobo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular use of dental services has been associated with optimal oral health. Reports in some parts of Nigeria have shown the poor utilization of dental services, but there is a paucity of information relating to oral health care seeking behavior in the South-South region of Nigeria. Aim: To determine the pattern of utilization and identify barriers to utilization of dental services among children. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study done among children aged 12-15 years in secondary schools in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Information was elicited by means of a self-administered structured questionnaire. These included sociodemographic characteristics, views on dental visits, reported visits during the previous year, pattern of dental visits, and the barriers to utilization. Demographic variables and associations were tested using Chi-squared tests with the level of statistical significance set at P < 0.05 at 95% confidence interval. Results: There were 200 school children; 98 (49% males and 102 (51% females with a mean age of 13.3 (΁1.1 years. Dental visits were deemed important by 187 (93.5% children, and 32.0% respondents suggested that visits should be when there are symptoms. Only 42 (21% pupils had been to the dentist in the last 12 months. The barriers to utilization of dental services majorly included no perceived needs (64.3%. Demographic variables had no significant association with reported visits and pattern of visits. Conclusion: Utilization of dental services among these school children was low and the major barrier was no perceived need. Oral health awareness needs to be improved on the importance of a regular checkup.

  10. Utility of salivary biomarker for stress induced by dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Ohura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To appropriately and smoothly perform dental treatment, the objective evaluation of patients' stress during treatment is important, for which effective means and methods to measure stress-related markers in simply and noninvasively collectable saliva have been investigated. In this review, saliva was collected from pediatric patients before and after treatment, and sIgA, α-amylase, and cortisol were measured to evaluate the stress of dental treatment on them. On analysis of the duration and content of treatment in dental records, the sIgA level showed a clearer response to stress compared to α-amylase and cortisol. Measurement of changes in the salivary sIgA level may be a useful, noninvasive stress evaluation method, and sIgA may serve as a stress marker.

  11. Utilization of Radiographs for a State Dental Hygiene Board Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Brad G.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study documented the number of x-rays acquired during screening and subsequent treatment of patients for a state dental hygiene licensing examination for 109 candidates. Results indicate that patient exposure guidelines attempt to minimize radiographic exposure but that some exposures should be reevaluated for need and effect on patients. (MSE)

  12. INTRODUCTION Dental care utilization can be defined as the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the population who access dental services over a specified period of ... problem with universal distribution and affecting all age ... The younger age groups were noticed to be more ..... income African-American children: J.Am Dent Ass. 2007 ...

  13. Common fears and their relationship to dental fear and utilization of the dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiset, L; Milgrom, P; Weinstein, P; Melnick, S

    1989-01-01

    Common fears were studied by household telephone interviews and mail survey in Seattle, Washington, to determine their relationship to dental fear and to utilization of the dentist. Dental fear was either the first or second most common fear, with a prevalence estimated between 183 and 226 persons per 1000 population. Dental fear was associated with fears of heights, flying, and enclosures. Respondents with multiple common fears other than fear of dentistry were more likely to delay or cancel dental appointments, report a longer period since their last visit to the dentist, and report poorer oral health and less satisfaction with oral appearance. Over 22 percent of the dentally fearful group reported two or more accompanying common fears.

  14. Patterns of dental service utilization following nontraumatic dental condition visits to the emergency department in Wisconsin Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Nicholas M; Okunseri, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    To examine patterns of dental service utilization for adult Medicaid enrollees in Wisconsin following nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC) visits to the emergency department (ED). This is a retrospective, observational study of claims for NTDC visits to the ED and dental service encounters from the Wisconsin Medicaid Evaluation and Decision Support database (2001-2009). We used competing risk models to predict probabilities of returning to the ED versus obtaining follow-up care from a dentist. We observed a 43 percent increase in the rate of NTDC visits to the ED, with most of this increase occurring from 2001 to 2005. Within 30 days of an NTDC visit to the ED, ∼29.6 percent of enrollees will first visit a dentist office, while ∼9.9 percent will return to the ED. Young to middle-aged adults (18 to dental providers were more likely to return to the ED following a NTDC visit. Among the enrollees that first visited a dental office following an ED visit, 37.6 percent had an extraction performed at this visit. Almost one in five adult Medicaid enrollees will subsequently return to the ED following a previous NTDC visit. The provision of definitive care for these individuals appears to primarily consist of extractions. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  15. [The dispute and prospect of sedation and analgesia treatments in outpatient dental procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The topic of eliminating the fear or pain of patients during dental therapy is gaining increasing attention from dentists across the country. The field of painless dental therapeutics involves a wide range of subjects, including stomatology, anesthesiology, and hospital management. We summarized the characteristics of sedation and analgesia technology in outpatient oral therapy, reviewed the common sedative and analgesic treatments, and discussed the disputes on the use of sedation and analgesia in dental procedures. We also reviewed the trends and breakthroughs in this area on the basis of our own clinica experiences.

  16. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Nidhi M; Patro MN; Kusumvalli S; Kusumdevi V

    2016-01-01

    Malviya Nidhi,1 M Nagaraju Patro,1 Somisetty Kusumvalli,2 Vemula Kusumdevi1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Al-Ameen College of Pharmacy, 2Department of Endodontics and Conservative Dentistry, Sri Rajiv Gandhi College of Dental Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India Abstract: Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and s...

  17. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Practitioners in Tabriz Regarding Infection Control Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taghavi Zenouz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Blood-borne infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV might be transmitted from one individual to another during dental procedures. Therefore, sterilization and personal protection procedures are of utmost significance in dental offices. The importance of awareness of cross-infection and antiseptic principles lies in the fact that in most cases it is not possible to identify patients with hepatitis or AIDS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate awareness of infection control procedures among dental practitioners in Tabriz.

    Materials and methods. In this descriptive study, 150 dental practitioners working in clinics and private offices of Tabriz were randomly selected. Data was collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire, which included respondents’ personal profile and questions on infection control and sterilization methods.

    Results. There were no statistically significant differences in the level of knowledge between male and female dental practitioners regarding infection control; however, there was a decline in awareness as age increased.

    Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest that in some cases dental practitioners neglect the principles for personal protection and cross-infection control. Therefore, our society is subject to widespread infection in dental offices and clinics. This potential risk necessitates careful monitoring along with government support of treatment procedures, the inclusion of infection control costs into treatment expenses and an emphasis on continuing education about infection control procedures through seminars and congresses.

  18. Stress management for dental students performing their first pediatric restorative procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza-Waggoner, Carrie A; Cohen, Lindsey L; Kohli, Kavita; Taylor, Brandie K

    2003-05-01

    Research has demonstrated that dental students experience considerable stress during their training. Students' anxiety is likely to be especially high when they perform their first pediatric restorative procedure. The aims of this study were to provide a description of dental students' level of anxiety and typical coping strategies and to evaluate the use of a distress management intervention for reducing anxiety around their first pediatric restorative procedure. Dental students were randomly assigned to either an Anxiety Management or an Attention Control group. The management group received training on relaxation strategies (i.e., deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation). The control group attended a lecture on the relation among stress, anxiety, and health. No significant differences were found between group levels of anxiety related to their first pediatric restorative procedure. Information is provided on students' reported level of anxiety and general coping strategies. Limitations of the current study and suggestions for future research are provided.

  19. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Pu Chang

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation.Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls.In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001. After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.47. This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39-2.26.Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should consider dental procedures to be a

  20. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Methods Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Results In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.26). Conclusions Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should

  1. Evidence-based Update of Pediatric Dental Restorative Procedures: Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V; Hsu, K L; Coll, J A; Ginsberg, E; Ball, B M; Chhibber, S; Johnson, M; Kim, M; Modaresi, N; Tinanoff, N

    2015-01-01

    The science of dental materials and restorative care in children and adolescent is constantly evolving, and the ongoing search for ideal restorative materials has led to plethora of research. To provide an evidence base to assist dental practitioners choose appropriate restorative care for children and adolescents. This evidence-based review appraises this literature, primarily between the years 1995-2013, for efficacy of dental amalgam, composites, glass ionomer cements, compomers, preformed metal crowns and anterior esthetic restorations. The assessment of evidence for each dental material was based on a strong evidence, evidence in favor, expert opinion, and evidence against by consensus of the authors. There is varying level of evidence for the use of restorative materials like amalgam, composites, glass ionomers, resin-modified glass-ionomers, compomers, stainless steel crowns and anterior crowns for both primary and permanent teeth. A substantial amount data is available on restorative materials used in pediatric dentistry; however, there exists substantial evidence from systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials and clinicians need to examine and understand the available literature evidence carefully to aid them in clinical decision making.

  2. The Influence of Changes in Dental Care Coverage on Dental Care Utilization Among Retirees and Near-Retirees in the United States, 2004–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F.; St Clair, Patricia A.; Schimmel, Jody; Chen, Haiyan; Pepper, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined dental care utilization transition dynamics between 2004 and 2006 in the context of changing dental coverage status. Methods. We used data from the Health and Retirement Study for persons aged 51 years and older to estimate a multivariable model of dental care use transitions with controls for dental coverage and retirement transitions and other potentially confounding covariates. Results. We found that Americans aged 51 years and older who lost dental coverage between the 2004 and 2006 survey periods were more likely to stop dental care use between periods, and those who gained coverage were more likely to start dental care use between periods, than those without coverage in both periods. Conclusions. Dental coverage transitions and status have a strong effect on transitions in dental care use. Given that retirement is a time when many experience a loss of dental coverage, older adults may be at risk for sporadic dental care and even stopping use, leading to worse dental and potentially overall health. PMID:21852656

  3. Clinical Usefulness of Proseal Laryngeal Mask Airway for Anesthesia during Dental Procedures in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Kim, Jung-Wook; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Chong-Chul; Shin, Teo Jeon; Koo, Yong-Seo

    2015-01-01

    Although the Proseal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) has been widely used in anesthesia, little is known about its clinical effectiveness during dental procedures. We describe the clinical feasibility of the PLMA for managing airways in the field of pediatric dentistry. . We reviewed the medical records of children who underwent airway management with the use of the PLMA from January 2011 to December 2012 at an outpatient facility at Seoul National Dental University Hospital. During the study period, the airways of 19 children were managed with the PLMA for dental procedures. During its placement, blood pressure and heart rate were stably maintained. There were no interruptions of the dental procedures. None of the children experienced oxygen desaturation or ventilation difficulty. In one patient, the PLMA was dislodged for a short time, but the problem was easily solved with repositioning. After transferring to the post-anesthetic care unit, there were no incidences of oxygen desaturation or vomiting. All of the children were discharged from the hospital without complications. The PLMA can be successfully used in airway management during dental treatment in children.

  4. Bioassay studies support the potential for iatrogenic transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease through dental procedures.

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    Elizabeth Kirby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence is required to quantify the potential risks of transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob (vCJD through dental procedures. Studies, using animal models relevant to vCJD, were performed to address two questions. Firstly, whether oral tissues could become infectious following dietary exposure to BSE? Secondly, would a vCJD-contaminated dental instrument be able to transmit disease to another patient? METHODS: BSE-301V was used as a clinically relevant model for vCJD. VM-mice were challenged by injection of infected brain homogenate into the small intestine (Q1 or by five minute contact between a deliberately-contaminated dental file and the gingival margin (Q2. Ten tissues were collected from groups of challenged mice at three or four weekly intervals, respectively. Each tissue was pooled, homogenised and bioassayed in indicator mice. FINDINGS: Challenge via the small intestine gave a transmission rate of 100% (mean incubation 157±17 days. Infectivity was found in both dental pulp and the gingival margin within 3 weeks of challenge and was observed in all tissues tested within the oral cavity before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Following exposure to deliberately contaminated dental files, 97% of mice developed clinical disease (mean incubation 234±33 days. INTERPRETATION: Infectivity was higher than expected, in a wider range of oral tissues, than was allowed for in previous risk assessments. Disease was transmitted following transient exposure of the gingiva to a contaminated dental file. These observations provide evidence that dental procedures could be a route of cross-infection for vCJD and support the enforcement of single-use for certain dental instruments.

  5. Gaps in need, demand, and effective demand for dental care utilization among residents of Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Y.; Chakravarty, Kalyan K.; Simhadri, Kavya; Ghenam, Alexis; Naidu, Guntipalli M.; Vundavalli, Sudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To identify the relation between need, demand, and effective demand for dental services in Andhra Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study performed among populations residing in the rural and urban areas of Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Data were collected from 3102 individuals who were selected through multiphase random sampling. Data regarding self-perceived dental need, dental service utilization, and barriers for utilization were collected through s pretested questionnaire followed by type-III clinical examination to assess the normative need of the individuals. Chi-square test was used to compare independent and dependent variables, and further comparison was done with multivariate logistic regression analysis for significant variables. Results: Less than half (40%) of the participants perceived a need for dental care. Among the people who perceived need for care, only 21.4% utilized dental care and 78.6% of them had unmet dental needs. The two main reasons for not seeking dental care was lack of money, i.e., unaffordable dental treatment (48%) and having the perception that they do not have any dental problem (19.4%). Conclusions: There is an enormous difference between normative need, demand, and actual utilization rates in dental care, and hindrances for effective demand need to be addressed to improve dental care delivery system. PMID:27652242

  6. Factors associated with utilization of dental services in a long-term care facility: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, Frank A; Amin, Summar; Salme, Marc; Tezal, Mine

    2017-03-01

    To describe factors associated with the utilization of dental services in a long-term care facility (LTCF) in Western New York. A descriptive cross-sectional study reviewed the dental and medical records of residents of an LTCF discharged between January 1, 2008 and December 30, 2012. Information on demographic and health variables at admission was extracted from electronic health records. Information on oral health variables was extracted from patient charts. A total of 2,516 residents were discharged between 2008 and 2012. From those, 259 (10.3%) utilized dental services at least once during their stay. Those who utilized dental services were significantly older at admission (78.5 vs. 82.0 years, p dental services. Dental services appear to be underutilized by residents of LTCF. Significant differences exist in demographic and health variables between residents who utilize these services compared to those who do not. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Could conscious sedation with midazolam for dental procedures be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-25

    Apr 25, 2012 ... Minor oral surgical procedures and tooth extraction processes requiring no saline irrigation, however, ..... ketamine conscious ıntravenous sedation on pain, swelling, and trismus after surgical extraction of third molars.

  8. Specialist management of routine dental procedures in adults with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransford, N; Soryal, I; McCorry, D; Sander, J W; Duncan, F; Huggins, N

    2014-04-01

    Little published information exists about the management of dental treatment procedures for people with epilepsy who, despite their medication, continue to have seizures. This paper draws on relevant literature in neurology and anaesthetics to provide a multi-speciality consensus on methods of assessment and adjunctive treatment options in order to manage the risk of a clinically significant seizure occurring during a procedure. It aims to enhance current guidelines and practice in the provision of specialist care for this diverse group.

  9. Effectiveness of radio waves application in modern general dental procedures: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Arslan; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Pikos, Michael A; Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to review indexed literature and provide an update on the effectiveness of high-frequency radio waves (HRW) application in modern general dentistry procedures. Indexed databases were searched to identify articles that assessed the efficacy of radio waves in dental procedures. Radiosurgery is a refined form of electrosurgery that uses waves of electrons at a radiofrequency ranging between 2 and 4 MHz. Radio waves have also been reported to cause much less thermal damage to peripheral tissues compared with electrosurgery or carbon dioxide laser-assisted surgery. Formation of reparative dentin in direct pulp capping procedures is also significantly higher when HRW are used to achieve hemostasis in teeth with minimally exposed dental pulps compared with traditional techniques for achieving hemostasis. A few case reports have reported that radiosurgery is useful for procedures such as gingivectomy and gingivoplasty, stage-two surgery for implant exposure, operculectomy, oral biopsy, and frenectomy. Radiosurgery is a relatively modern therapeutic methodology for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia; however, its long-term efficacy is unclear. Radio waves can also be used for periodontal procedures, such as gingivectomies, coronal flap advancement, harvesting palatal grafts for periodontal soft tissue grafting, and crown lengthening. Although there are a limited number of studies in indexed literature regarding the efficacy of radio waves in modern dentistry, the available evidence shows that use of radio waves is a modernization in clinical dentistry that might be a contemporary substitute for traditional clinical dental procedures.

  10. Primary language spoken at home and children's dental service utilization in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyce, Matthew; Szabo, Aniko; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Jackson, Scott; Bradley, T Gerard; Okunseri, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Language barriers have been well documented as a contributing factor to disparities in the receipt of medical services, especially for Hispanic children. However, there is a paucity of information on the effect of language barriers on children's dental service utilization. We examined the association of primary language spoken at home with the receipt of preventive and routine dental care for children in the United States. We analyzed data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2002-2004), which contains data on 21,049 children weighted to represent 75.8 million children nationally. Among children aged 1-18 years, 13 percent spoke a language other than English at home. Whites, females, children between the ages of 7 and 12 years, and those whose parents spoke English at home had the highest marginal rates of preventive and routine dental visits. However, the large marginal effect of language, even among Hispanics, was not significant after adjusting for other covariates. Parental education and having a primary provider were the strongest predictors of preventive and routine dental visits. Children that did not speak English at home were less likely to receive preventive or routine dental care. However, after adjusting for other socio-economic factors, our study suggests that language barriers may not play as pronounced a role in the receipt of dental care as that documented for medical services.

  11. Utilization of stainless steel crowns by general dentists and pediatric dental specialists in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowolik, Joan; Kozlowski, Diana; Jones, James E

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate utilization of the stainless steel crown by both the general and pediatric dentists in Indiana. Although reports indicate that there has been a dramatic reduction in dental caries in the US, almost 20 percent of children have dental decay by age four, with almost 80 percent having a cavity by 17 years of age. After reviewing the literature, Seale has recommended that the stainless steel crown is the most successful restoration for children with a rate of high caries. All dental schools in North America teach the value of using stainless steel crowns and the method of tooth preparation. We hypothesized that greater use of the stainless steel crowns would be made by specialists than by general dentists. In this study, of the 200 questionnaires distributed, 62.5 percent were returned and analyzed. The results imply that stainless steel crowns are being significantly underutilized in general dental practice. It is interesting, and perhaps of concern, that the general dentists are not interested in continuing education courses about this subject. Over the next few years, with the aging of the pediatric dental community in Indiana, general (not specialty) dentists will treat most of the children. Because of this, pre-doctoral education needs to place more emphasis on preparation and utilization of the stainless steel crown.

  12. Operating room waste: disposable supply utilization in neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Yoon, Seungwon; Valencia, Victoria; Boscardin, Christy; Moriates, Christopher; Gonzales, Ralph; Lawton, Michael T

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Disposable supplies constitute a large portion of operating room (OR) costs and are often left over at the end of a surgical case. Despite financial and environmental implications of such waste, there has been little evaluation of OR supply utilization. The goal of this study was to quantify the utilization of disposable supplies and the costs associated with opened but unused items (i.e., "waste") in neurosurgical procedures. METHODS Every disposable supply that was unused at the end of surgery was quantified through direct observation of 58 neurosurgical cases at the University of California, San Francisco, in August 2015. Item costs (in US dollars) were determined from the authors' supply catalog, and statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS Across 58 procedures (36 cranial, 22 spinal), the average cost of unused supplies was $653 (range $89-$3640, median $448, interquartile range $230-$810), or 13.1% of total surgical supply cost. Univariate analyses revealed that case type (cranial versus spinal), case category (vascular, tumor, functional, instrumented, and noninstrumented spine), and surgeon were important predictors of the percentage of unused surgical supply cost. Case length and years of surgical training did not affect the percentage of unused supply cost. Accounting for the different case distribution in the 58 selected cases, the authors estimate approximately $968 of OR waste per case, $242,968 per month, and $2.9 million per year, for their neurosurgical department. CONCLUSIONS This study shows a large variation and significant magnitude of OR waste in neurosurgical procedures. At the authors' institution, they recommend price transparency, education about OR waste to surgeons and nurses, preference card reviews, and clarification of supplies that should be opened versus available as needed to reduce waste.

  13. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  14. High educational attainment moderates the association between dental health-care supply and utilization in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Maike; Kunst, Anton E; Brockmann, Hilke

    2016-02-01

    In line with the theory of supplier-induced demand, an increased physician density often goes along with a higher utilization of medical services, including dental services. This study aimed to assess whether dentist density and self-employment are related to dental care use, and whether these relationships are moderated by patients' educational attainment. We used data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) from over 20,000 respondents, 50 + yr of age, in 13 countries. We conducted multilevel logistic regressions with probability and type of dental treatment on individual education, country-specific dentist density, and dentist remuneration, and their cross-level interaction. Patients with a high educational level were more likely to report a dentist visit (OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.912-2.305) and to receive preventive care (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.697-2.043) than those with a low educational level (reference category). Cross-level interaction effects indicated that high dentist density decreases dental care utilization differences between patients with high (OR = 0.996, 95% CI: 0.993-0.999), medium (OR = 0.995, 95% CI: 0.991-0.999), and low education levels. This was also true for prevention use (OR = 0.996, 95% CI: 0.992-0.999 for patients with a high education level, and OR = 0.996, 95% CI: 0.993-1.000 for patients with a medium education level). The findings suggest that although dentist density is positively associated with dental care utilization, patients have differing susceptibilities to dental care supply.

  15. Modelling dental implant extraction by pullout and torque procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A; Shemtov-Yona, K

    2017-07-01

    Dental implants extraction, achieved either by applying torque or pullout force, is used to estimate the bone-implant interfacial strength. A detailed description of the mechanical and physical aspects of the extraction process in the literature is still missing. This paper presents 3D nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations of a commercial implant extraction process from the mandible bone. Emphasis is put on the typical load-displacement and torque-angle relationships for various types of cortical and trabecular bone strengths. The simulations also study of the influence of the osseointegration level on those relationships. This is done by simulating implant extraction right after insertion when interfacial frictional contact exists between the implant and bone, and long after insertion, assuming that the implant is fully bonded to the bone. The model does not include a separate representation and model of the interfacial layer for which available data is limited. The obtained relationships show that the higher the strength of the trabecular bone the higher the peak extraction force, while for application of torque, it is the cortical bone which might dictate the peak torque value. Information on the relative strength contrast of the cortical and trabecular components, as well as the progressive nature of the damage evolution, can be revealed from the obtained relations. It is shown that full osseointegration might multiply the peak and average load values by a factor 3-12 although the calculated work of extraction varies only by a factor of 1.5. From a quantitative point of view, it is suggested that, as an alternative to reporting peak load or torque values, an average value derived from the extraction work be used to better characterize the bone-implant interfacial strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimisation need of dental radiodiagnostic procedures: results of effective dose evaluation from Rando phantom measurements

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    Borio, R.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Degli Esposti, P.; Rongoni, A.; Sabatini, P.; Saetta, D.M.S. (Perugia Univ. (Italy). Health Physics Lab. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Perugia (Italy)); Regi, L.; Caprino, G. (Perugia Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology)

    1994-01-01

    Radiological examinations of different types are needed in dental practice both to make a correct diagnosis and to carry out an adequate therapy. Particularly in orthodentic practices, because of the youth of the majority of the patients, an assessment of the detriment to health (through the effective dose equivalent) caused by medical diagnostic exposure to ionising radiation is needed to make decisions about the optimisation of dental radiodiagnostic procedures. Experimental data from measurements on a Rando phantom were collected for the radiological examinations required for dental and for orthodontic practices (with and without protective apron and collar). The results show the effectiveness of the leaded apron and collar in all the examinations carried out, particularly in reducing thyroid dose. (author).

  17. The impact of the global budget system on dynamics of dental manpower and utilization of dental services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Laura Yueh-Guey; Huang, Boyen

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to investigate dentists’ supply and practice patterns following the implementation of the global budget system in Taiwan. Materials and Methods: Data of reimbursement claims, municipal socioeconomic status and dental manpower were collected from the National Health Insurance administration, the Ministry of Internal Affair, and the Ministry of Health and Welfare, respectively. A multivariate linear regression method was used for data analysis. Results: A municipality that reported a higher percentage of tertiary educated population (t = 3.718, P amalgam restorations in total claims reduced from 19.82% to 17.94%, while the percentage of tooth-colored material restorations increased from 25.46% to 28.79%. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated a stabilizing effect of the global budget system on dynamics of dental manpower in Taiwan. A relationship between HHI and dentists’ move-out rate has been found. The relationship between municipal socioeconomic status and the density of dentists has also been confirmed. In addition, reduced utilization of amalgam restorations was accompanied by increased utilization of tooth-colored material restorations. Further investigations are indicated. PMID:27076827

  18. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ON ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY UNDERGOING DENTAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES. Review Article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanaska Dinkova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental treatment performed in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drug therapy is becoming increasingly common in dental offices.The aim of oral anticoagulant therapy is to reduce blood coagulability to an optimal therapeutic range within which the patient is provided some degree of protection from thromboembolic events. This is achieved at the cost of a minor risk of haemorrhage. Frequently raised questions concern the safety and efficacy of the various anticoagulation regimens and their accompanying thromboembolic and bleeding risks relative to invasive dental procedures.The aim of this literature review is to evaluate the available evidence on the impact of anticoagulant medications on dental treatment and highlight certain patient management issues closely interrelated to various aspects of dental treatment. For that purpose literature search in the electronic database of Medscape, Pubmed-Medline, Science Direct, and EBSCO host, in the data base of Medical University Plovdiv and specialised published books in general medicine and dentistry was made.A total of 33 publications between 1995 and 2013 were identified: 12 review articles, 11 randomized controlled and non-randomised studies, 6 guidelines and practical guides, 1 meta-analysis and 3 specialised books.

  19. Rubber dam use during routine operative dentistry procedures: findings from the dental PBRN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Amundson, Craig W; Gordan, Valeria V

    2013-04-01

    Rubber dam use during operative dentistry procedures has been quantified based on questionnaires completed by dentists. However, based on the knowledge of the authors of the current study, there are no reports based on use during actual clinical procedures other than in dental materials studies and none based on routine care. The objectives of the current study were to: 1) quantify how commonly the rubber dam is used during operative dentistry procedures; 2) test the hypothesis that certain dentist, restoration and patient-level factors are associated with its use. A total of 229 dentist practitioner-investigators in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) participated. DPBRN comprises 5 regions: Alabama/Mississippi, Florida/Georgia, Minnesota, Permanente Dental Associates; and Scandinavia. Practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations done in previously unrestored tooth surfaces from 5,810 patients. Most dentists (63%) did not use a rubber dam for any restoration in this study. A rubber dam was used for only 12% of restorations, 83% of which were used in 1 DPBRN region. With regions accounted for, no other dentist characteristics were significant. A multi-level multiple logistic regression of rubber dam use was done with restoration and patient-level variables modeled simultaneously. In this multi-variable context, these restoration-level characteristics were statistically significant: tooth-arch type, restoration classification and reason for placing the restoration. These patient-level characteristics were statistically significant: ethnicity, dental insurance, and age. These results, obtained fromactual clinical procedures rather than questionnaires, document a low prevalence of usage of the rubber dam during operative dentistry procedures. Usage varied with certain dentist, restoration, and patient level characteristics.

  20. Rubber dam use during routine operative dentistry procedures: findings from the Dental PBRN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Amundson, Craig W; Gordan, Valeria V

    2010-01-01

    Rubber dam use during operative dentistry procedures has been quantified based on questionnaires completed by dentists. However, based on the knowledge of the authors of the current study, there are no reports based on use during actual clinical procedures other than in dental materials studies and none based on routine care. The objectives of the current study were to: 1) quantify how commonly the rubber dam is used during operative dentistry procedures; 2) test the hypothesis that certain dentist, restoration and patient-level factors are associated with its use. A total of 229 dentist practitioner-investigators in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) participated. DPBRN comprises five regions of the USA: Alabama/Mississippi, Florida/Georgia, Minnesota, Permanente Dental Associates and Scandinavia. Practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations done in previously unrestored tooth surfaces from 5,810 patients. Most dentists (63%) did not use a rubber dam for any restoration in this study. A rubber dam was used for only 12% of restorations, 83% of which were used in one DPBRN region. With regions accounted for, no other dentist characteristics were significant. A multi-level multiple logistic regression of rubber dam use was done with restoration and patient-level variables modeled simultaneously. In this multi-variable context, these restoration-level characteristics were statistically significant: tooth-arch type, restoration classification and reason for placing the restoration. These patient-level characteristics were statistically significant: ethnicity, dental insurance and age. These results, obtained from actual clinical procedures rather than questionnaires, document a low prevalence of usage of the rubber dam during operative dentistry procedures. Usage varied with certain dentist, restoration and patient-level characteristics.

  1. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography

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    Cosmin Sinescu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT, is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures.

  2. Assessment of the changes in the stress-related salivary cortisol levels to the various dental procedures in children

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    Sharmila J Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fear and pain are the factors producing stress and there is evidence that dental fear acquired in childhood may persist to influence adult behavior. Dental treatment is often considered as anxiety producing and stressful. Aim: To assess the levels of stress displayed by the healthy children undergoing routine dental procedures like oral examination, restoration, and extraction by analyzing salivary levels of cortisol before, during, and after the procedures. Materials and Methods: Twenty healthy children aged between 4 and 8 years having their first dental visit and requiring at least one restoration and one extraction were selected. In each patient, three procedures were carried out: (i Routine dental examination, (ii restoration, and (iii extraction. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected 10 min before, during the procedure, and 30 min after each procedure at three different visits for comparison of cortisol production in response to anxiety and stress over time. Total 180 samples were collected to determine salivary cortisol levels using UBI-MAGIWEL TM kit and the readings were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software with paired t-test, two independent sample t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to analyze the findings. Results: A correlation between salivary cortisol and stress in dental procedure was noticed. Cavity preparation is more stressful procedure in children, so alternative methods can be used in anxious children. Stress associated with extraction persists to a postoperative period. No correlation exists in between Corah′s anxiety scale and salivary cortisol.

  3. Assessment of the changes in the stress-related salivary cortisol levels to the various dental procedures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sharmila J; Shah, Preetam P; Patil, Jayakumar A; Shigli, Anand; Patil, Anil T; Tamagond, Sridevi B

    2015-01-01

    Fear and pain are the factors producing stress and there is evidence that dental fear acquired in childhood may persist to influence adult behavior. Dental treatment is often considered as anxiety producing and stressful. To assess the levels of stress displayed by the healthy children undergoing routine dental procedures like oral examination, restoration, and extraction by analyzing salivary levels of cortisol before, during, and after the procedures. Twenty healthy children aged between 4 and 8 years having their first dental visit and requiring at least one restoration and one extraction were selected. In each patient, three procedures were carried out: (i) Routine dental examination, (ii) restoration, and (iii) extraction. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected 10 min before, during the procedure, and 30 min after each procedure at three different visits for comparison of cortisol production in response to anxiety and stress over time. Total 180 samples were collected to determine salivary cortisol levels using UBI-MAGIWEL TM kit and the readings were noted. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software with paired t-test, two independent sample t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze the findings. A correlation between salivary cortisol and stress in dental procedure was noticed. Cavity preparation is more stressful procedure in children, so alternative methods can be used in anxious children. Stress associated with extraction persists to a postoperative period. No correlation exists in between Corah's anxiety scale and salivary cortisol.

  4. Oral health experience during pregnancy and dental service utilization in Bariadi District, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangosi, Ibrahim E A T; Kiango, Mary M

    2012-04-01

    A substantial proportion of pregnant women reports experiencing oral health problems during pregnancy. However, most of them perceive that such problems are normal in pregnancy and hence do not seek dentist consultation. The objective of this study was to determine the prenatal oral health experience and the utilization of dental care services among pregnant women attending reproductive and child health clinics in Bariadi District in Tanzania. Data was collected using a questionnaire-guided interview. Key variables were socio-demographic characteristics of pregnant women, oral health experience, and dental visits during pregnancy with reasons and treatment received. A total of 305 pregnant women (mean age=25.7 years) were involved in the study. Most of the listed oral health problems during pregnancy were reported by women with 2+ children. The frequent oral health problems among the pregnant women were bleeding gums (22.6%, N=69), pain in gums (21.6%, N=66), swollen gums (21.3%, N=65), dental pain (30.5, N=93), and tooth decay (25.6%, n=78). However, only 31.8% (N=97) visited a dental clinic for consultation most whom, were those with three or more children (χ²=.682; P=002). The pregnant women who had visited a dentist in the past 12 months were 11.1% (N=34), mostly those aged >24 years and those with informal employment (Pdental screening, emphasizing active family and community participation as part of regular prenatal care.

  5. Complication risks of invasive dental procedures in HIV/AIDS patients

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    Miftakhul Cahyati

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A total number of people living with HIV reached since it was first reported. Indonesia is on the brink of rapidly worsening AIDS epidemic. Oral health was a frequent problem among HIV-infected person. Opportunistic oral lesions and infections were often one of the first manifestations of HIV. The aim of this literature review was to discuss complication risks and management undergoing invasive dental procedures. Thereby, dentists have been expected to increase awareness of dental treatment needs for HIV-infected patients by pay attention to applied standard procedure. The complications of HIV-infected patients were reported minor, self-limiting, non-life threatening and readily treated. Treatment planning for the patient with HIV follows the same sequences as with other patients priorities are to assuage pain, restore function, prevent further disease and consider esthetic results. We concluded that no different complication risks between HIV-infected and non-infected. Dentists can provide care for HIV-infected patients with assessing the current immunosuppression stage, intake systemic medications, opportunistic infection potential and minimize contagion possibility to dental care professional or other patients.

  6. Postoperative complications of pediatric dental general anesthesia procedure provided in Jeddah hospitals, Saudi Arabia

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    Almushayt Abdullah

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Review of post-operative morbidity reports for pediatric dental care under general anesthesia (GA show great variations. Until now, no morbidity data has been available to estimate the safety of pediatric patients under GA for dental rehabilitation in Saudi Arabia. The purposes of this study were to (1 investigate post-operative complications associated with dental care under GA and (2 correlate morbidity reports with patient's characteristics, dental procedures, and hospital protocol. Methods Study sample included 90 children attending GA for dental treatment at major governmental hospitals in Jeddah. Data were collected from every patient on three occasions, intra-operatively at the operating room, and post-operatively via phone calls in the first and third days after operation. Results Results showed that 99% of the children had one or more complaints in the first day in contrast to only 33% in the third day. Inability to eat (86%, sleepiness (71%, and pain (48% were the most common complaints in the first day, followed by bleeding (40%, drowsiness (39%, sore throat (34%, vomiting (26%, psychological changes (24%, fever (21%, cough (12%, and nausea (8%. A great significant complaints reduction was reported by the third post-operative day. Age, gender, admission type of the patients and GA duration were the factors that showed a significant relationship with post-operative complaints. Conclusion Post-operative morbidity was common, but mostly of mild severity and limited to the first day. Hospital staff efforts should be directed to control commonly reported postoperative complaints.

  7. Dental health services utilization and associated factors in children 6 to 12 years old in a low-income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Solis, Carlo Eduardo; Maupomé, Gerardo; del Socorro, Herrera Miriam; Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Hector

    2008-01-01

    To determine the factors associated with the dental health services utilization among children ages 6 to 12 in León, Nicaragua. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 1,400 schoolchildren. Using a questionnaire, we determined information related to utilization and independent variables in the previous year. Oral health needs were established by means of a dental examination. To identify the independent variables associated with dental health services utilization, two types of multivariate regression models were used, according to the measurement scale of the outcome variable: a) frequency of utilization as (0) none, (1) one, and (2) two or more, analyzed with the ordered logistic regression and b) the type of service utilized as (0) none, (1) preventive services, (2) curative services, and (3) both services, analyzed with the multinomial logistic regression. The proportion of children who received at least one dental service in the 12 months prior to the study was 27.7 percent. The variables associated with utilization in the two models were older age, female sex, more frequent toothbrushing, positive attitude of the mother toward the child's oral health, higher socioeconomic level, and higher oral health needs. Various predisposing, enabling, and oral health needs variables were associated with higher dental health services utilization. As in prior reports elsewhere, these results from Nicaragua confirmed that utilization inequalities exist between socioeconomic groups. The multinomial logistic regression model evidenced the association of different variables depending on the type of service used.

  8. Effects of music on sedation depth and sedative use during pediatric dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkalayci, Ozlem; Araz, Coskun; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru; Kayhan, Zeynep

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of listening to music or providing sound isolation on the depth of sedation and need for sedatives in pediatric dental patients. Prospective, randomized, and controlled study. Tertiary, university hospital. In total, 180 pediatric patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, who were scheduled for dental procedures of tooth extraction, filling, amputation, and root treatment. Patients were categorized into 3 groups: music, isolation, and control. During the procedures, the patients in the music group listened to Vivaldi's The Four Seasons violin concertos by sound-isolating headphones, whereas the patients in the isolation group wore the headphones but did not listen to music. All patients were sedated by 0.1 mg/kg midazolam and 1 mg/kg propofol. During the procedure, an additional 0.5 mg/kg propofol was administered as required. Bispectral index was used for quantifying the depth of sedation, and total dosage of the propofol was used for sedative requirements. The patients' heart rates, oxygen saturations, and Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation Scale and bispectral index scores, which were monitored during the operation, were similar among the groups. In terms of the amount of propofol used, the groups were similar. Prolonged postoperative recovery cases were found to be significantly frequent in the control group, according to the recovery duration measurements (P = .004). Listening to music or providing sound isolation during pediatric dental interventions did not alter the sedation level, amount of medication, and hemodynamic variables significantly. This result might be due to the deep sedation levels reached during the procedures. However, listening to music and providing sound isolation might have contributed in shortening the postoperative recovery duration of the patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found.

  10. A systematic review of complication risks for HIV-positive patients undergoing invasive dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lauren L; Shugars, Daniel A; Bonito, Arthur J

    2002-02-01

    This systematic literature review determined the strength of evidence regarding whether patients with human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, are at higher risk of developing complications from invasive oral procedures than similar patients without HIV. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches of the English literature from the early 1980s through April 2000 yielded five articles meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria: original research, concurrent treatment of HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects, presence of complications (for example, local or systemic infection, bleeding, alveolitis, delayed healing) resulting from extractions, orthognathic surgery, periodontal therapy, endodontic therapy, placement of dental implants, prophylaxis, or scaling and root planing. The authors found no studies involving orthognathic surgery, periodontal therapy, dental implants, prophylaxis, or scaling and root planing, and only one study reporting few immediate endodontic therapeutic complications. Thus, the evidence is insufficient with respect to any additional risk associated with these procedures among people with HIV/AIDS. Because of the few studies, low overall complication rates and variability in results from different analytic approaches, the authors consider the evidence to be too poor to rule in or out a meaningful relationship between HIV status and complications from tooth extractions. Limited published scientific evidence is available to guide clinicians in regard to possible increased risks of invasive oral procedures associated with the HIV status of the patient.

  11. Teaching nightguard bleaching and other tooth-whitening procedures in North American dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, K B; Haywood, V B

    2000-05-01

    Tooth-whitening using carbamide peroxide delivered in a custom-fitted tray (nightguard bleaching) is a relatively new procedure, yet it is currently one of the most commonly used types of esthetic dental treatment in private practice. This study determined the extent that nightguard bleaching (NGB) has been included in dental school curricula. All sixty-five dental schools in North America were surveyed about curriculum content and treatment protocol for the use of nightguard and other bleaching procedures, generating an 82 percent response. The survey covered eighteen subject areas related to NGB ranging from clinical requirements and indications to products and recall intervals used. The most commonly taught tooth-whitening procedure was NGB, which was most often taught by operative and restorative faculty. Although no schools had clinical requirements for NGB, 92 percent taught it. The most common indications for NGB were esthetic shade change and pre-restorative lightening of teeth. Unrestored caries, defective restorations, and pre-existing sensitivity were common contraindications. Most schools do not use a specific NGB consent form, but most use written patient instructions. Most schools use at least two different NGB products, bleach for two to four weeks, and use reservoired and scalloped trays. An average of 25 percent of NGB patients were estimated to develop sensitivity, for which treatment recommendations include fluoride, desensitizing toothpaste, and reduced exposure time. Curriculum time and safety concerns were reasons for not teaching NGB (8 percent schools). Most schools indicated that the relative importance of NGB in the curriculum was increasing.

  12. Dental trauma: restorative procedures using composite resin and mouthguards for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Filho, Paulo César de Freitas; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Simamoto, Paulo Cézar; Soares, Carlos José

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a step-by-step protocol for emergency care of a patient with a dentoalveolar injury in the anterior region of the mouth as well as the fabrication of a mouthguard to prevent future trauma. Dental trauma is one of the most serious oral health problems in active children and adolescents. Care of traumatized patients requires immediate initial emergency treatment followed by integrated procedures to restore damaged oral structures along with a subsequent trauma prevention strategy. Dentoalveolar injuries in the anterior region of the mouth are often characterized by tooth avulsion and coronal fracture. They are managed using procedures such as dental splinting, endodontic therapy with its unique characteristics, and restorative techniques to re-establish function and esthetics as well as protective mouthguards. A 16-year-old male presented with avulsion of his maxillary central incisors as a result of a direct, unintentional impact with an opponent during a basketball game. The teeth had been stored in physiological serum immediately following the injury and the patient received immediate care. On clinical examination, the right central incisor was fractured at the incisal third of the crown but no bone fractures were found. The teeth were reimplanted and splinted. The fractured right central incisor was restored following endodontic treatment and a mouthguard was fabricated for the patient. The dentist must be knowledgeable about the most efficient and suitable treatment for each traumatic scenario in order to provide appropriate care for dental injuries. Coordinated multi-disciplinary action is fundamental in the successful treatment of these injuries. The dental mouthguard is an effective device for protecting the teeth and supportive structures during physical activities and must be part of the protective equipment used by athletes. It is the responsibility of the dental professional to make parents, trainers, and athletic

  13. Dental health state utility values associated with tooth loss in two contrasting cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassani, M Z; Locker, D; Elmesallati, A A; Devlin, H; Mohammadi, T M; Hajizamani, A; Kay, E J

    2009-08-01

    The study aimed to assess the value placed on oral health states by measuring the utility of mouths in which teeth had been lost and to explore variations in utility values within and between two contrasting cultures, UK and Iran. One hundred and fifty eight patients, 84 from UK and 74 from Iran, were recruited from clinics at University-based faculties of dentistry. All had experienced tooth loss and had restored or unrestored dental spaces. They were presented with 19 different scenarios of mouths with missing teeth. Fourteen involved the loss of one tooth and five involved shortened dental arches (SDAs) with varying numbers of missing posterior teeth. Each written description was accompanied by a verbal explanation and digital pictures of mouth models. Participants were asked to indicate on a standardized Visual Analogue Scale how they would value the health of their mouth if they had lost the tooth/teeth described and the resulting space was left unrestored. With a utility value of 0.0 representing the worst possible health state for a mouth and 1.0 representing the best, the mouth with the upper central incisor missing attracted the lowest utility value in both samples (UK = 0.16; Iran = 0.06), while the one with a missing upper second molar the highest utility values (0.42, 0.39 respectively). In both countries the utility value increased as the tooth in the scenario moved from the anterior towards the posterior aspect of the mouth. There were significant differences in utility values between UK and Iranian samples for four scenarios all involving the loss of anterior teeth. These differences remained after controlling for gender, age and the state of the dentition. With respect to the SDA scenarios, a mouth with a SDA with only the second molar teeth missing in all quadrants attracted the highest utility values, while a mouth with an extreme SDA with both missing molar and premolar teeth in all quadrants attracted the lowest utility values. The study

  14. Two-stage dental implants inserted in a one-stage procedure : a prospective comparative clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijdenrijk, Kees

    2002-01-01

    The results of this study indicate that dental implants designed for a submerged implantation procedure can be used in a single-stage procedure and may be as predictable as one-stage implants. Although one-stage implant systems and two-stage.

  15. Two-stage dental implants inserted in a one-stage procedure : a prospective comparative clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijdenrijk, Kees

    2002-01-01

    The results of this study indicate that dental implants designed for a submerged implantation procedure can be used in a single-stage procedure and may be as predictable as one-stage implants. Although one-stage implant systems and two-stage.

  16. Capitation and fee-for-service dental benefit plans: economic incentives, utilization, and service-mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazoglou, T J; Guay, A H; Heffley, D R

    1988-04-01

    Insurance carriers, corporations, and labor groups are actively developing and marketing dental capitation benefit plans. Incentives to both dentists and patients in these plans differ from those in the traditional fee-for-service system used with conventional benefit plans. This paper describes the likely effects of these incentive differences on utilization and service-mix patterns in both systems. Data for a large (approximately 10,000), homogenous group of subscribers are presented and discussed. Faced with a dual option, at no cost to the employee, 60% of the subscribers chose the fee-for-service plan, and 40% chose the capitation plan. Observed differences in the utilization and mix of services between the two plans cannot be explained solely in terms of dentists' responses. Employee response to altered economic incentives appears to be strong.

  17. Standard operating procedures approach for the implementation of the evidence-based dentistry concept in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clóvis M; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2007-09-01

    Evidence-based dentistry is a concept that when applied to clinical practice may improve the quality of dental treatment. However, dentists' reluctance to change their behavior may be a barrier to the implementation of the process. The main purpose of this study was to demonstrate that standard operating procedures (SOPs) may help dentists to apply scientific evidence to their dental practice. SOPs are written instructions on how to execute some specific tasks. A flowchart model demonstrated how an ordinary clinical procedure (composite restoration) can be performed using evidence-based information to support each executed step. Implementing the model into daily practice is straightforward, and the results are accessible to the whole dental team. In addition, the flowchart can be regularly updated with high-quality dental literature such as systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials and randomized controlled trials. This proposed model may help to bridge the gap between research and clinical dental practice by serving as a practical tool to improve the knowledge of dental practitioners and the quality of treatment.

  18. Comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia with 2% lignocaine in various minor pediatric dental procedures: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Dhindsa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most distressing aspects of dentistry for pediatric patients is the fear and anxiety caused by the dental environment, particularly the dental injection. The application and induction of local anesthetics has always been a difficult task, and this demands an alternative method that is convenient and effective. Electronic dental anesthesia, based on the principal of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS, promises to be a viable mode of pain control during various pediatric clinical procedures. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of TENS and to compare its efficacy with 2% lignocaine during various minor pediatric dental procedures. Pain, comfort and effectiveness of both the anesthetics were evaluated using various scales and no significant difference was observed between 2% lignocaine and TENS in the various pain scales, while TENS was perceived to be significantly effective in comfort and efficacy as judged by the operator and quite comfortable as judged by the patient himself/herself.

  19. Surface roughness of a novel dental porcelain following different polishing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Chen, Ji-Hua; Wang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the surface roughness of a novel dental porcelain following different polishing procedures. One hundred twenty Imagine Reflex porcelain disks were prepared and randomly assigned into six groups according to different treatments: Group 1: CeraMaster polishing system (CP); Group 2: CP + diamond polishing paste (DP); Group 3: Sof-Lex polishing system (SS); Group 4: SS + DP; Group 5: SiC paper polishing; Group 6: reglazing (control). After the respective treatments, surface roughness values were measured using a profilometer. Qualitative analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy. Results demonstrated that a combination of the CeraMaster polishing system and a diamond polishing paste could produce similar superficial smoothness to that of the reglazed surface of the tested porcelain.

  20. Procedure for utilizing the lift and thrust forces of ornithopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezard, C.

    1985-01-01

    This procedure is distinguished by two beating wings which together describe, in space, a succession of interlaced triangles. On these wings, whose incidence varies automatically, identical forces are exerted: simultaneous lift and thrust when they make their descent, which is inclined toward the front of the craft, and lift alone when they make their ascent, which is inclined toward the rear of the craft and follows a slide horizontal movement. A mechanical device makes these movements possible. It includes: two wings with hollow profiles, connected by a framework located above a rigid frame and attached to it by bars with joints. These bars are moved with control rods which gear down the drive force. A mechanism with elastic bands or springs automatically varies the incidence of the wings.

  1. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Gaia, Bruno Felipe; Cheng, Cheong Kuo; Trindade, Paulo Alceu Kiemle; Bastos, José Carlos da Cunha; Mattos, Beatriz Silva Câmara

    2012-02-01

    Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2) to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3) to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  2. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Kiemle Trindade-Suedam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1 to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2 to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3 to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  3. Assessment of cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures under the effect of benzodiazepines: a double blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, Fatima Neves; Armonia, Paschoal Laércio; Simone, José Leonardo; Tortamano, Nicolau

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures: systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures, and heart rate. Nineteen healthy normotensive patients (18-56 years of age) received restorative treatment on three maxillary molars. The patients were continuously monitored by a non-invasive automatic monitor for blood pressure and heart rate during the pre-, trans-, and post-operative periods at the following stages: 15 min prior to anesthesia; during topical anesthesia; during infiltrative anesthesia; for 5 minutes immediately after; during cavity preparation; during restorative procedure; for 10 min after completion. Patients were divided into three groups: A (without pre-medication), B (preceded by 10 mg diazepam), and C (preceded by placebo). All patients received infiltrative anesthesia containing 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine (36 mg) with epinephrine 1:100,000 (18 microg). There were no changes in the parameters during the clinical procedures. When groups were compared, there were significant differences in diastolic arterial pressures during anesthesia.

  4. Assessment of cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures under the effect of benzodiazepines: a double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraco Fatima Neves

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures: systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures, and heart rate. Nineteen healthy normotensive patients (18-56 years of age received restorative treatment on three maxillary molars. The patients were continuously monitored by a non-invasive automatic monitor for blood pressure and heart rate during the pre-, trans-, and post-operative periods at the following stages: 15 min prior to anesthesia; during topical anesthesia; during infiltrative anesthesia; for 5 minutes immediately after; during cavity preparation; during restorative procedure; for 10 min after completion. Patients were divided into three groups: A (without pre-medication, B (preceded by 10 mg diazepam, and C (preceded by placebo. All patients received infiltrative anesthesia containing 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine (36 mg with epinephrine 1:100,000 (18 µg. There were no changes in the parameters during the clinical procedures. When groups were compared, there were significant differences in diastolic arterial pressures during anesthesia.

  5. Examining related influential factors for dental calculus scaling utilization among people with disabilities in Taiwan, a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsien-Tang; Kung, Pei-Tseng; Su, Hsun-Pi; Tsai, Wen-Chen

    2014-09-01

    Limited studies with large samples have been conducted on the utilization of dental calculus scaling among people with physical or mental disabilities. This study aimed to investigate the utilization of dental calculus scaling among the national disabled population. This study analyzed the utilization of dental calculus scaling among the disabled people, using the nationwide data between 2006 and 2008. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression were performed to analyze related influential factors for dental calculus scaling utilization. The dental calculus scaling utilization rate among people with physical or mental disabilities was 16.39%, and the annual utilization frequency was 0.2 times. Utilization rate was higher among the female and non-aboriginal samples. Utilization rate decreased with increased age and disability severity while utilization rate increased with income, education level, urbanization of residential area and number of chronic illnesses. Related influential factors for dental calculus scaling utilization rate were gender, age, ethnicity (aboriginal or non-aboriginal), education level, urbanization of residence area, income, catastrophic illnesses, chronic illnesses, disability types, and disability severity significantly influenced the dental calculus scaling utilization rate.

  6. The routine utilization of dental care during pregnancy in Eastern China and the key underlying factors: a Hangzhou City study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, W.; Guo, J.; Li, X.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, H.; Wu, G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Oral diseases are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The routine utilization of dental care (RUDC) during pregnancy is an effective way to improve pregnant women’s oral health, and thus safeguard the health of their babies. As China has one fifth of the world’s population, it is

  7. Prevalence and Factors Associated with the Utilization of Dental Care Services among Factory Workers in Nava Nakorn Industrial Estate, Pathumthani Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaidee, Jeeratip; Ratanasiri, Amornrat; Chatrchaiwiwatana, Supaporn; Soonthon, Surasak

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to find out the utilization prevalence of dental care services among factory workers over a period of one year and factors associated with utilization of dental care services. This was a cross-sectional analytic study. The study population was factory workers in Nava Nakorn Industrial Estate randomly sampled using Probability Proportion to Size Cluster Sampling Method. The tool was a questionnaire about utilization of dental care services. Among the sample group of 1,500 workers from 16 factories, almost 2/3 (63.9%) had never used any dental care services in the previous year while only 36.1% did. A multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that workplace, accommodation, tooth decay, toothache history, transportation, experience in using social security fund for dental care services, availability and accessibility of dental care services, brushing teeth regularly after meals, using dental care services regularly in a dental clinic, and agreement with the idea that a tooth extraction and medication by a dentist could reduce the risk of progression of disease, statistical significance (p-value factory workers who did not use dental care services during the last one year was 63.9 percent. This study identified three groups of factors associated with the utilization of dental care services as: 1) Predisposing factors, 2) Enabling factors, and 3) Need factors.

  8. Racial and Ethnic Variations in Preventive Dental Care Utilization among Middle-aged and Older Americans, 1999-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei eWu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study examined recent trends of preventive dental care utilization among Americans aged 50 and above, focusing on variations across racial and ethnic groups including Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians. Methods: Self-reported information on oral health behaviors was collected from 644,635 participants in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS between 1999 and 2008.Results: Despite a significant upward trend of frequency of dental cleaning from 1999 to 2008 (OR=1.02, in 2008 still only 56 to 77% of any ethnic or racial group reported having had a dental cleaning in the previous 12 months. Relative to Whites, Blacks (OR=.64 were less likely to have a dental cleaning in the previous 12 months. These variations persisted even when SES, health conditions, health behaviors, and number of permanent teeth were controlled. In contrast, Hispanics, Asians, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives did not differ from Whites in dental cleanings. Discussion: This is the first study to provide national estimates of the frequency of dental cleaning and associated trends over time for five major ethnic groups aged 50 and above in the U.S. simultaneously. Our findings suggest that public health programs with an emphasis on educating middle-aged and older minority populations on the benefits of oral health could have a large impact, as there is much room for improvement. Given the importance of oral health and a population that is rapidly becoming older and more diverse, the need for improved dental care utilization is significant.

  9. Physical, mental and cognitive disabilities in relation to utilization of dental care services by nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Fidaa M; Bani-Issa, Wegdan

    2017-05-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate factors affecting dental care utilization among nursing home residents in Jordan. A total of 221 subjects with a mean age of 62.4 years (121 males and 100 females) taken from among nursing home residents across Jordan were recruited and composed a convenience sample for this study. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Tinetti Assessment Battery for gait and balance (TAB), Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand test (DASH) were administered and oral health status was assessed for all subjects and examined as expected correlates of dental care utilization among nursing home residents. The response rate was about 88%. One-third of residents suffered from total edentulism and most of the remaining dentate residents exhibited periodontal disease (90%). Of the dentate sample, 90% of residents had bleeding upon probing, 85% were diagnosed with tooth mobility, 88% had presence of dental calculus, and 30% were diagnosed with root caries. Of the denture wearers, 59.1 % reported having soreness with their dentures and 32% of denture wearers reported having poor quality dentures. MMSE score, suffering from tooth sensitivity and having diabetes mellitus were identified to be indicators for utilization of dental care services among the study population. Regular oral care, assessments, and rehabilitation services are considered to be limited for nursing home residents in Jordan. Based upon these findings, future interventions should address oral health among nursing home residents in Jordan. © 2017 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaju PP

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis.Keywords: dental implants, cone-beam computed tomography, panoramic radiography, computed tomography

  11. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Malviya Nidhi,1 M Nagaraju Patro,1 Somisetty Kusumvalli,2 Vemula Kusumdevi1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Al-Ameen College of Pharmacy, 2Department of Endodontics and Conservative Dentistry, Sri Rajiv Gandhi College of Dental Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India Abstract: Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs of diclofenac (Dic diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP

  12. [Determinants of dental services utilization by adults: a population-based study in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Camila Dal-Bó Coradini; Peres, Marco Aurélio

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of dental services utilization by adults and to identify associated socioeconomic, demographic, behavioral, and self-awareness factors. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted with adults living in the urban area of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, in 2009. Associations were tested between use of dental services and predisposing, enabling, and needs-based variables. Multivariate analysis was conducted using Poisson regression with estimates of prevalence ratios and was stratified by place of last dental appointment. Prevalence of dental services utilization was 66% (95%CI: 62.9-70.7). Dental visits were 20% more frequent among women and 72% more frequent among individuals with more schooling (the latter in both public and private dental services). Individuals with private dental plans used dental services 13% more than those without. Schooling was the most important variable in predicting utilization. The study's results show the importance of monitoring associated factors in order to promote more equitable use of dental services.

  13. Exploring the association of dental care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) - a prospective study of ageing people in Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülcan, Ferda; Ekbäck, Gunnar; Ordell, Sven; Klock, Kristin S; Lie, Stein Atle; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2017-09-10

    To explore the association of dental health care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) across time focusing ageing Norwegian and Swedish adults adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need related-factors as defined by Andersen's model. Data were based on Norwegian and Swedish 1942 birth-cohorts conducted in 2007 (age 65) and 2012 (age 70). In Norway, the response rates ranged from 54% to 58%. Corresponding figures in Sweden were from 72% to 73%. Self-administered questionnaires assessed OIDP, dental care utilization and predisposing, enabling and need related factors. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation was used to adjust for clustering in repeated data. Significant covariates of OIDP were satisfaction with dental services, dental care avoidance due to financial constraints, frightening experience with dental care during childhood and patient initiated dental visiting. Frequency and regularity of dental attendance were associated with OIDP in the Swedish cohort, only. In spite of country differences in the public co-financing of dental care, dental care utilization indicators were associated with OIDP across time in both cohorts. Encouraging regular and dentist initiated visiting patterns and strengthening beliefs in keeping own teeth could be useful in attempts to reduce poor oral health related quality of life in ageing people.

  14. Restrictive Behaviour Management Procedures with People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Require Dental Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. Materials and Methods: A review…

  15. Restrictive Behaviour Management Procedures with People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Require Dental Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. Materials and Methods: A review…

  16. Early Childhood Special Education. Dental and Oral Hygiene Procedures for Young Children with Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluder, R. S.; Luder, Linda C.

    1995-01-01

    Notes that children with special needs often require specific considerations with regard to dental care. Discusses some of the physical disabilities and how they interfere with dental hygiene, and how child caregivers can modify daily routines and assist disabled children with areas of hygiene the children may find difficult. (HTH)

  17. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Carolina; Buono Vicente; Mota Joao Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm) of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B) to composite resin (InTen-S) blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok). Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydroflu...

  18. Comparison of the pain perception in children using comfort control syringe and a conventional injection technique during pediatric dental procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Langthasa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the pain perception by the pediatric patients, while experiencing computerized injection device comfort control syringe (CCS and the conventional injection technique during dental clinical procedures. Materials and Methods: Fifty children (31 boys and 19 girls aged 6-14 years requiring local anaesthesia on both sides of the dental arch for various treatment procedures were selected for this study. The patients served as their own control, and on the appointed day CCS was used on one side of the dental arch and on the subsequent appointment, i.e., the very next day conventional injection technique was used. Visual analogue scale (VAS and faces pain rating scale (FRS were used to assess the child′s pain perception to each of the techniques immediately after the injection. Various physiological parameters were measured before, during and after the two injection procedures and compared for statistical variation. Results : Paired t-test revealed a statistically significant difference in the pain perception by children using VAS and FRS between computerized and conventional technique. No statistically significant difference was observed when physiological parameters (heart rate, blood pressure and temperature were compared at various intervals between the computerized and the conventional technique. Conclusion: Computerized injection device (CCS provides less painful injections when compared to the conventional injection technique.

  19. Algorithmic Procedure to Design Water Utilization Systems Featuring Multiple Contaminants in Process Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东明; 杨凤林; 张兴文

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-iterative algorithmic procedure to design water utilization networks with multiple contaminants in process plants. According to the water pinch analysis rules, the processes in water utilization systems were first divided into three groups, then water-supply priority algorithm was proposed. The results of case studies showed that the water networks designed by this method gave water consumption lower than that estimated by other approaches. In addition, the procedure was subiect to no limitation on the problem scale.

  20. Enteral Access Procedures: An 18-Year Analysis of Changing Patterns of Utilization in the Medicare Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wenshuai; Hawkins, C Matthew; Hemingway, Jennifer; Hughes, Danny; Duszak, Richard

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate national trends in enteral access and maintenance procedures for Medicare beneficiaries with regard to utilization rates, specialty group roles, and sites of service. Using Medicare Physician Supplier Procedure Summary Master Files for the period 1994-2012, claims for gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy access and maintenance procedures were identified. Longitudinal utilization rates were calculated using annual enrollment data. Procedure volumes by site of service and medical specialty were analyzed. Between 1994 and 2012, de novo enteral access procedure utilization decreased from 61.6 to 42.3 per 10,000 Medicare Part B beneficiaries (-31%). Gastroenterologists and surgeons performed > 80% of procedures (unchanged over study period) with 97% in the hospital setting. Over time, relative use of an endoscopic approach (62% in 1994; 82% in 2012) increased as percutaneous (21% to 12%) and open surgical (17% to 5%) procedures declined. Existing enteral access maintenance services increased 29% (from 20.1 to 25.9 per 10,000 beneficiaries). Radiologists (from 13% to 31%) surpassed gastroenterologists (from 36% to 21%) as dominant providers of maintenance procedures. Emergency physicians (from 8% to 23%) and nonphysician providers (from 0% to 6%) have seen rapid growth as maintenance services providers as these services have transitioned increasingly to the emergency department setting (from 18% to 32%). Among Medicare beneficiaries, de novo enteral access procedures have declined in the last 2 decades as existing access maintenance services have increased. The latter are increasingly performed by radiologists, emergency physicians, and nonphysician providers. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative evaluation of bispectral index system after sedation with midazolam and propofol combined with remifentanil versus ketamine in uncooperative during dental procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that intravenous sedation technique with PMR combination induces effective and safe sedation, with less pain and more forgetfulness and a shorter recovery time for children 3-7 years of age during dental procedures.

  2. Assessing Critical Thinking Outcomes of Dental Hygiene Students Utilizing Virtual Patient Simulation: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Joanna L

    2015-09-01

    Dental hygiene educators must determine which educational practices best promote critical thinking, a quality necessary to translate knowledge into sound clinical decision making. The aim of this small pilot study was to determine whether virtual patient simulation had an effect on the critical thinking of dental hygiene students. A pretest-posttest design using the Health Science Reasoning Test was used to evaluate the critical thinking skills of senior dental hygiene students at The University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston Dental Hygiene Program before and after their experience with computer-based patient simulation cases. Additional survey questions sought to identify the students' perceptions of whether the experience had helped develop their critical thinking skills and improved their ability to provide competent patient care. A convenience sample of 31 senior dental hygiene students completed both the pretest and posttest (81.5% of total students in that class); 30 senior dental hygiene students completed the survey on perceptions of the simulation (78.9% response rate). Although the results did not show a significant increase in mean scores, the students reported feeling that the use of virtual patients was an effective teaching method to promote critical thinking, problem-solving, and confidence in the clinical realm. The results of this pilot study may have implications to support the use of virtual patient simulations in dental hygiene education. Future research could include a larger controlled study to validate findings from this study.

  3. Influence of polishing procedures on the surface roughness of dental ceramics made by different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Junior, Osmir Batista; Buso, Leonardo; Fujiy, Fábio Hiroshi; Lombardo, Geraldo Henrique Leao; Campos, Fernanda; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Souza, Rodrigo Othavio Assuncao

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different surface polishing procedures-glazing and manual polishing-on the roughness of ceramics processed by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and conventional systems (stratification technique). Eighty ceramic discs (diameter: 8 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared and divided among 8 groups (n = 10) according to the type of ceramic disc and polishing method: 4 GZ and 4 MP. Specimens were glazed according to each manufacturer's recommendations. Two silicone polishing points were used on the ceramic surface for manual polishing. Roughness was measured using a surface roughness tester. The roughness measurements were made along a distance of 2 mm on the sample surface and the speed of reading was 0.1 mm/s. Three measurements were taken for each sample. The data (μm) were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Qualitative analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean (± SD) roughness values obtained for GZ were: 1.1 ± 0.40 μm; 1.0 ± 0.31 μm; 1.6 ± 0.31 μm; and 2.2 ± 0.73 μm. For MP, the mean values were: 0.66 ± 0.13 μm; 0.43 ± 0.14 μm; 1.6 ± 0.55 μm; and 2.0 ± 0.63 μm. The mean roughness values were significantly affected by the ceramic type (P = 0.0001) and polishing technique (P = 0.0047). The SEM images confirmed the roughness data. The manually polished glass CAD/CAM ceramics promoted lower surface roughness than did the glazed feldspathic dental ceramics.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  5. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, Malviya; Patro, M Nagaraju; Kusumvalli, Somisetty; Kusumdevi, Vemula

    2016-01-01

    Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of diclofenac (Dic) diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion-evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box-Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP) prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF) and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN "S8" were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in C max and area under the curve (AUC) of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP loaded with Lig base and Dic diethylamine-SLNs exhibited immediate and complete permeation with tissue accumulation of Lig followed by controlled prolonged release and tissue accumulation of Dic at the site of application. Thus, it could be anticipated from the in vivo studies that the developed

  6. Effect of the video output of the dental operating microscope on anxiety levels in a pediatric population during restorative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Abrar; Ranna, Vinisha; Padawe, Dimple; Takate, Vilas

    2016-01-01

    Adapting a child to the alien settings of a dental operatory is a major challenge to the dentist. Fear of the unknown and preconceived notions of dental pain causes anxiety in the pediatric patient. This often leads to disruptive and uncooperative behavior in the dental operatory. Many methods of behavior management have been described, of which the Tell-Show-Do (TSD) is an established and time-tested technique of behavior management. To determine if a live visual output of the dental operating microscope (DOM) could be used as an adjunct to the TSD technique, to involve the child more completely in the procedure and reduce the fear of the unknown. The study was a randomized, controlled, crossover, and cross-sectional clinical trial. Data were obtained from two visits. 90 children having carious lesions on both lower first molars, in the 7-9 years age group were selected and divided randomly into two groups. Restorative procedures were performed on one tooth per visit, with visits 1 week apart. Live display of the procedure was shown to the patient using video output of the DOM displayed on a 72 inch LCD monitor, angled for best visibility of the child. Anxiety levels were evaluated using Venhams picture selection test and pulse oximetry. Student's t-test was used to compare the anxiety scores obtained from the two groups. The results showed there was a decrease in the anxiety from the first visit to the second visit. (P = 0.05 for Group A and P = 0.003 for Group B). The patients preferred the visit in which the DOM was used. The operator reported an increased patient compliance and reduced patient movement in the visits in which the DOM was used. There is a reduction in anxiety from the first visit to the second visit for restorative treatment when the DOM is used.

  7. Effect of the video output of the dental operating microscope on anxiety levels in a pediatric population during restorative procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Sayed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adapting a child to the alien settings of a dental operatory is a major challenge to the dentist. Fear of the unknown and preconceived notions of dental pain causes anxiety in the pediatric patient. This often leads to disruptive and uncooperative behavior in the dental operatory. Many methods of behavior management have been described, of which the Tell-Show-Do (TSD is an established and time-tested technique of behavior management. Aim: To determine if a live visual output of the dental operating microscope (DOM could be used as an adjunct to the TSD technique, to involve the child more completely in the procedure and reduce the fear of the unknown. Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized, controlled, crossover, and cross-sectional clinical trial. Data were obtained from two visits. 90 children having carious lesions on both lower first molars, in the 7-9 years age group were selected and divided randomly into two groups. Restorative procedures were performed on one tooth per visit, with visits 1 week apart. Live display of the procedure was shown to the patient using video output of the DOM displayed on a 72 inch LCD monitor, angled for best visibility of the child. Anxiety levels were evaluated using Venhams picture selection test and pulse oximetry. Statistical Analysis: Student′s t-test was used to compare the anxiety scores obtained from the two groups. Results: The results showed there was a decrease in the anxiety from the first visit to the second visit. (P = 0.05 for Group A and P = 0.003 for Group B. The patients preferred the visit in which the DOM was used. The operator reported an increased patient compliance and reduced patient movement in the visits in which the DOM was used. Conclusion: There is a reduction in anxiety from the first visit to the second visit for restorative treatment when the DOM is used.

  8. ON THE UTILITY OF SOME SALIVARY TESTS FOR THE DETECTION AND MONITORIZATION OF DENTAL CARIES RISK

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    Daniela Luminița ICHIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries represents a destructive condition of the hard dental tissue.The occurrence and advance of carious lesions is a complex phenomenon, involving the interaction of the microbial factor (the action of bacteria upon the tooth with the factors related to the host, alimentary regime, time factor. For an as correct as possible appreciation of the cariogenic risk of an individual, several tests, based on different (microbiological, clinical, epidemiological principles, are usually recommended [1]. Also, especially important is to check up the existence of a possible statistical association between the prevalence of dental caries and the results of the salivary tests performed on the experimental group [2].

  9. Utility and effectiveness of computer-aided diagnosis of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Kyle D; Dykstra, Bradley A; Gakenheimer, David C; Scheetz, James P; Lacina, Stephani; Scarfe, William C; Farman, Allan G

    2011-01-01

    Digital radiography has created a growing opportunity for computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) tools. The Logicon Caries Detector (LCD), with upgraded CAD software based on user feedback, was re-evaluated for its effectiveness via a retrospective clinical study. Using the upgraded LCD software, 12 dentists (evaluators) blindly assessed 17 radiographs taken by another (attending) dentist, who restored 28 proximal surfaces. The attending dentist confirmed the presence of early dentinal caries, as well as identifying 48 surfaces as caries-free or with enamel caries only subject to noninvasive treatment. The radiographs, imported into the software using a digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) reader, were visually assessed under typical operatory lighting conditions, then with the aid of the software's density analysis tool. The effectiveness of the evaluators was gauged by calculating two measures of performance, sensitivity and specificity, for the detection and classification of dentinal caries. Sensitivity among all evaluator dentists was 30% with the initial image; 34% with the brightness and contrast adjusted image; 39% when the image was sharpened; and 69% when the density analysis tool was utilized. Specificity was found to be 97% with the initial image; 95% with the brightness and contrast adjusted image; 93% with the sharpened image; and 94% when the density analysis tool was used. Compared to the unaided eye, the LCD can significantly improve dentists' ability to detect and classify caries. Dentists may be able to find twice as much early dentinal caries requiring restoration (or at least aggressive noninvasive treatment) than previously, while not unnecessarily restoring additional healthy teeth. The LCD enables dentists to obtain more information from dental digital radiography than is possible with the unaided eye, leading to improved patient care.

  10. Association Between Intensive Care Unit Utilization During Hospitalization and Costs, Use of Invasive Procedures, and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong W; Shapiro, Martin F

    2016-10-01

    Maximizing the value of critical care services requires understanding the relationship between intensive care unit (ICU) utilization, clinical outcomes, and costs. To examine whether hospitals had consistent patterns of ICU utilization across 4 common medical conditions and the association between higher use of the ICU and hospital costs, use of invasive procedures, and mortality. Retrospective cohort study of 156 842 hospitalizations in 94 acute-care nonfederal hospitals for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), pulmonary embolism (PE), upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), and congestive heart failure (CHF) in Washington state and Maryland from 2010 to 2012. Hospitalizations for DKA, PE, UGIB, and CHF were identified from the presence of compatible International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to determine the predicted hospital-level ICU utilization during hospitalizations for the 4 study conditions. For each condition, hospitals were ranked based on the predicted ICU utilization rate to examine the variability in ICU utilization across institutions. The primary outcomes were associations between hospital-level ICU utilization rates and risk-adjusted hospital mortality, use of invasive procedures, and hospital costs. The 94 hospitals and 156 842 hospitalizations included in the study represented 4.7% of total hospitalizations in this study. ICU admission rates ranged from 16.3% to 81.2% for DKA, 5.0% to 44.2% for PE, 11.5% to 51.2% for UGIB, and 3.9% to 48.8% for CHF. Spearman rank coefficients between DKA, PE, UGIB, and CHF showed significant correlations in ICU utilization for these 4 medical conditions among hospitals (ρ ≥ 0.90 for all comparisons; P utilization rate was not associated with hospital mortality. Use of invasive procedures and costs of hospitalization were greater in institutions with higher ICU utilization for all 4 conditions. For medical

  11. The Impact of Improved Oral Health on the Utilization of Dental Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Stephen A

    2017-08-01

    Since the mid-20th century, there has been a remarkable decline in dental caries in the United States. The effects of that caries decline have now been demonstrated well into the adult population. These improvements in oral health are resulting in substantial declines in the reparative and restorative dental services being provided to the affected individuals, who comprise a growing part of the population. Because of fewer compromised teeth, extractions and their sequelae also are declining. Much of the recall and periodontal maintenance care can be provided by allied dental personnel. As the older age cohorts, who were children before the caries decline occurred, become an ever-smaller part of the population, the number of patients an individual dentist can treat in a year is likely to increase. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  12. THE INVASIVE DENTAL PROCEDURES IN PATIENTS TREATING WITH WARFARIN: POSSIBILITIES AND PROSPECTS FOR SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Kozlova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Details of the management of patients receiving oral anticoagulants (vitamin K antagonists for a long time and needed in dental treatment are discussed. Assessment of bleeding and thromboembolism risk in the perioperative continuation or termination of warfarin therapy is shown. Potential of the local hemostatic agents is specified. Modifications of the patient dental health card are offered to prevent complications associated with blood clotting disorders.

  13. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ON ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY UNDERGOING DENTAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES. Review Article.

    OpenAIRE

    Atanaska Dinkova; Donka G. Kirova; Delyan Delev

    2013-01-01

    Dental treatment performed in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drug therapy is becoming increasingly common in dental offices.The aim of oral anticoagulant therapy is to reduce blood coagulability to an optimal therapeutic range within which the patient is provided some degree of protection from thromboembolic events. This is achieved at the cost of a minor risk of haemorrhage. Frequently raised questions concern the safety and efficacy of the various anticoagulation regimens and their a...

  14. Evaluation of ergonomic dental stools through clinical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsell, D E; Weber, M D; Anderson, B C; Cobb, G W

    2000-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal pain occurs commonly within the dental community. Three stool designs were utilized in this study: a standard dental stool, a stool with dual arm supports, and a stool with dual arm supports and chest support. Electromyographic data from four muscle groups were collected on 13 clinicians during a simulated crown preparation procedure. Clinical simulation suggests that a potential musculoskeletal benefit to the clinician exists through utilization of dental stool designs which incorporate static arm supports.

  15. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  16. Dental anxiety and salivary cortisol levels before urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Kazue; Penha, Sibele S; Munhoz, Carolina D; Rocha, Rodney G

    2009-12-01

    Dental anxiety is still prevalent, despite advances in treatment, and affects the utilization of health care services. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if patients with different degrees of dental anxiety and pain undergoing emergency dental care have different stress reactions as measured by salivary cortisol. Seventy three patients completed the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and described any previous dental traumatic experience. Their socio-demographic characteristics were also recorded. They also rated pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A saliva sample was collected before the procedure, and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Thirty patients were dentally anxious and forty one complained of pain. In this sample, dental anxiety was not related to gender, age, educational level and family income; however, a previous traumatic event was related to dental anxiety. There was no association between salivary cortisol concentrations and gender or dental anxiety. Patients with pain showed higher cortisol levels. When gathering patient information, the dentist should note patients' negative dental experiences in order to provide more effective, less traumatic treatment.

  17. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, Malviya; Patro, M Nagaraju; Kusumvalli, Somisetty; Kusumdevi, Vemula

    2016-01-01

    Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of diclofenac (Dic) diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP) prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF) and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP loaded with Lig base and Dic diethylamine-SLNs exhibited immediate and complete permeation with tissue accumulation of Lig followed by controlled prolonged release and tissue accumulation of Dic at the site of application. Thus, it could be anticipated from the in vivo studies that the

  18. Comparative clinical evaluation of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator over conventional local anesthesia in children seeking dental procedures: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Varadharaja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study to evaluate the effectiveness of pain control by employing transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (TENS over conventional injectable local anesthesia for children requiring restorative procedures under rubber dam. Materials and Methods: The study design considered was the split mouth design, in experiment (right side, dental procedures under rubber dam was performed under TENS and in control (left side, dental procedures under rubber dam was performed under conventional injectable local anesthetic (LA. The level of comfort and discomfort experienced during TENS and conventional LA was determined using visual analog scale (VAS and heart rate. Result: Increase in mean heart rate associated with TENS (0.78% was significantly less compared to increase in heart rate with administration of conventional local anesthesia (11.78%. In VAS, the mean values for pain indicate that minimum pain was felt with TENS, which was closely followed by LA. Conclusion: TENS can offer many safer and psychological advantages and is a valuable alternative to conventional LA for children.

  19. Cell-based land use screening procedure for regional siting analysis. [Utilizing spatial analysis procedures and computer graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalbert, J.S.; Dobson, J.E.

    1976-10-03

    An energy facility site-screening methodology which permits the land resource planner to identify candidate siting areas was developed. Through the use of spatial analysis procedures and computer graphics, a selection of candidate areas is obtained. Specific sites then may be selected from among candidate areas for environmental impact analysis. The computerized methodology utilizes a cell-based geographic information system for specifying the suitability of candidate areas for an energy facility. The criteria to be considered may be specified by the user and weighted in terms of importance. Three primary computer programs have been developed. These programs produce thematic maps, proximity calculations, and suitability calculations. Programs are written so as to be transferrable to regional planning or regulatory agencies to assist in rational and comprehensive power plant site identification and analysis.

  20. Paget-Schroetter syndrome after a dental procedure in a patient with factor V Leiden (R506Q) heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabin

    2017-04-01

    : Paget-Schroetter syndrome or effort thrombosis is characterized by spontaneous thrombosis of the upper extremity venous system, commonly seen in a young healthy patient after repetitive use of the upper extremities. It is rarely associated with coagulopathy and thus, hypercoagulable work-up is not usually a part of the investigation. We present a first case of a young woman, who was diagnosed with left upper extremity effort thrombosis following a dental procedure. Interestingly, she was also noted to be heterozygous for factor V Leiden mutation.

  1. Comparison of acceptance, preference and efficacy between pressure anesthesia and classical needle infiltration anesthesia for dental restorative procedures in adult patients

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    Chetana Sachin Makade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraoral local anesthesia is essential for delivering dental care. Needless devices have been developed to provide anesthesia without injections. Little controlled research is available on its use in dental restorative procedures in adult patients. The aims of this study were to compare adult patients acceptability and preference for needleless jet injection with classical local infiltration as well as to evaluate the efficacy of the needleless anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Twenty non fearful adults with no previous experience of dental anesthesia were studied using split-mouth design. The first procedure was performed with classical needle infiltration anesthesia. The same amount of anesthetic solution was administered using MADA jet needleless device in a second session one week later, during which a second dental restorative procedure was performed. Patients acceptance was assessed using Universal pain assessment tool while effectiveness was recorded using soft tissue anesthesia and pulpal anesthesia. Patients reported their preference for the anesthetic method at the third visit. The data was evaluated using chi square test and student′s t-test. Results: Pressure anesthesia was more accepted and preferred by 70% of the patients than traditional needle anesthesia (20%. Both needle and pressure anesthesia was equally effective for carrying out the dental procedures. Conclusion: Patients experienced significantly less pain and fear (p<0.01 during anesthetic procedure with pressure anesthesia. However, for more invasive procedures needle anesthesia will be more effective.

  2. Factors affecting utilization of dental care among 6–12-year-old school children in Bangarpet taluk, Karnataka

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    C Priyadarshini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral diseases qualify as major public health problems owing to their high prevalence and incidence worldwide. Access to oral healthcare refers to patient's ability to obtain or utilize oral healthcare. Aim: To assess the dentition status and treatment needs among 6–12-year-old school children and to assess the factors affecting utilization of dental care among parents. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 420 school children (6–12 years in Bangarpet taluk. Factors affecting utilization of dental care were assessed using a validated questionnaire and dentition status and treatment needs was recorded according to WHO 1997 proforma. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Results: The proportion of children with dmft was 62 (30% and 54 (26% in urban and rural children, respectively whereas the proportion of children with DMFT was 48 (23% and 79 (38% in urban and rural children, respectively. Among urban children 99 (47% did not need any treatment when compared to 87 (41% rural children. Around 32 (15.2% needed one surface filling in urban children and 20 (9.52% in rural children. About 30 (14.28% urban and 40 (19.04 in rural children needed preventive care, respectively. Most of the parents were not aware of fluoride content in the toothpaste. Parents agreed that maintenance of oral health is their duty. There was a significant difference between urban and rural parents for the barriers "no time to visit" (P = 0.0002, "affects my work" (P = 0.048 and "scared of injection" (P = 0.0033. Dental visits were found to be low in both urban 37 (18% and rural 56 (27% children. Conclusion: The caries experience was similar among urban and rural children. Most of the children required restorative and preventive care. Fear of injection and lack of time to visit dentist were the major barriers to parents for utilization of dental care. Hence, integrated approach is suggested to strengthen preventive and

  3. Dental procedures, antibiotic prophylaxis, and endocarditis among people with prosthetic heart valves: nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, Sarah; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Hoen, Bruno; Lesclous, Philippe; Millot, Sarah; Rudant, Jérémie; Weill, Alain; Coste, Joel; Alla, François; Duval, Xavier

    2017-09-07

    Objective To assess the relation between invasive dental procedures and infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci among people with prosthetic heart valves.Design Nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.Setting French national health insurance administrative data linked with the national hospital discharge database.Participants All adults aged more than 18 years, living in France, with medical procedure codes for positioning or replacement of prosthetic heart valves between July 2008 and July 2014.Main outcome measures Oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was identified using primary discharge diagnosis codes. In the cohort study, Poisson regression models were performed to estimate the rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis during the three month period after invasive dental procedures compared with non-exposure periods. In the case crossover study, conditional logistic regression models calculated the odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals comparing exposure to invasive dental procedures during the three month period preceding oral streptococcal infective endocarditis (case period) with three earlier control periods.Results The cohort included 138 876 adults with prosthetic heart valves (285 034 person years); 69 303 (49.9%) underwent at least one dental procedure. Among the 396 615 dental procedures performed, 103 463 (26.0%) were invasive and therefore presented an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis, which was performed in 52 280 (50.1%). With a median follow-up of 1.7 years, 267 people developed infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci (incidence rate 93.7 per 100 000 person years, 95% confidence interval 82.4 to 104.9). Compared with non-exposure periods, no statistically significant increased rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was observed during the three months after an invasive dental procedure (relative rate 1.25, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1

  4. Efficacy of Preventive Dental Treatment Procedures on Oral Tissues in Naval Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study is an attempt to evaluate new and current clinical methods, agents and techniques employed for the treatment of dental caries, periodontal ...supragingival calculus in relation to the composition of serum and saliva , respectively; (d) study the calculus-tooth structure interface with the

  5. Utilization of therapies for stress management in Chilean clinical dental students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pérez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dental students suffer greater stress than the rest of the university population. In general, most health students seek little assistance to help them cope with stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of therapies to manage stress in Chilean clinical dental students. A cross-sectional study was conducted nationwide; this report is a secondary data analysis. The study population was dental students in clinical years (4th and 5th of 5 Chilean dental schools: Antofagasta, Valparaíso, Viña del Mar, Concepción, and La Frontera. This paper reports the use of therapies for stress management during the past six months considering four options: medical/psychiatric, psychological, self-medication and alternative. Tabulation and analysis were done in STATA 10/SE. Three hundred thirty-seven students were surveyed, 54.01% were men and 64.99% were in fourth year, with an average age of 22.94±2.04. The 48.07% of students have used any of the four types of therapies; women and fourth-year students use more any form of therapy with 53.30% (p=.037 and 48.86% (p=.694, respectively, than men and fifth year students. About half of the students have used some form of therapy to manage stress in the last six months; of the students that received therapy, the percentage of women was significantly higher.

  6. Efficacy of panoramic radiography as a screening procedure in dental examination compared with clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Seo Young; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Karp Shik [Kyungpook National Univ. School of Dentistry, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of panoramic radiography by comparing the results of clinical examination with radiographic findings. We studied 190 patients (20 men and 170 women; mean age, 40 years; range, 22 to 68 years) who visited the health promotion center of Korea Medical Science Institute and were examined both clinically and by panoramic radiography. We compared results from both examinations. Treatment options by clinical examination were described as 'no treatment indicated', 'treatment of dental caries', 'removal of calculus', 'treatment of periodontal disease'. 'prothodonic treatment' and 'extraction of the third molar'. Findings taken from the panoramic radiography were: dental caries, peroapical lesion, alveolar bone loss, calculus deposition, retained root, impaction of the third molar, disease of maxillary sinus, bony change of mandibular condyle, etc. The prevalence of panoramic findings were: 37.9% of dental caries, 17.4% of periapical lesions, 44.7% of alveolar bone losses, 62.6% of calculi deposition. 7.9% of retained roots, 26.8% of third molar impactions, 6.3% of disease of maxillary sinus, 2.1% of bony changes of mandibular condlye and 35.8% of miscellaneous lesions. Abnormal conditions revealed by panoramic radiography which had not been discovered on clinical examination were: 24.2% of the patients had dental caries, 17.4% had periapical lesions, 7.4% had calculi deposition, 5.3% had retained roots, 15.3% had third molar impactions. The opposite cases were: 5.2% had dental caries, 12.6% had calculi deposition, and 9.5% had third molar impactions. The use of panoramic radiography as a supplement to the clinical examination might be a valuable screening technique.

  7. Effect of Pre-Procedural Chair-Side Finger Stretches on Pinch Strength amongst Dental Cohort- A Biomechanical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Ashvini Mukul; Gupta, Himani Swatantrakumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Ergonomics is the essential principle behind the health and successful practice for a dentist and dental hygienist. During the procedure of dental Scaling and Root Planing (SRP), a high level of pinch force is exerted by the finger muscles resulting in early muscle fatigue. Aim This pilot study comparatively evaluated the Pinch Strength (PS) of the finger muscles, prior to and after SRP, amongst dental cohort performing chair-side hand and finger stretches to those not performing the same. Materials and Methods Forty dental professionals were recruited by purposive sampling for the study and allocated into a test and control group. PS was recorded for both groups following which the test group performed finger stretches comprising of rubber band stretch, tendon glide, finger flexion and extension, thumb flexion and finger webbing. The subjects of both the groups carried out SRP for 30 minutes after which PS was again recorded. Inter-group difference was analysed for variability at baseline and 30 minutes after SRP using independent samples/unpaired t-test. Within group comparison of PS measurement was done using paired t-test. Results The PS for the test group declined from 14.425±2.577 pounds (lbs) to 13.725±2.557 lbs, while for the control group, a decline in PS from 13.65±2.636 lbs to 10.675±2.478 lbs after SRP was noted. On comparing the difference of means of both groups, a statistically significant result was obtained. Conclusion Work-related musculoskeletal disorders can be reduced by performing a few simple chair-side stretches. These stretches can help prevent the finger muscle fatigue during SRP and thus, increase its efficacy. PMID:28571269

  8. The potential of the Child Health Utility 9D Index as an outcome measure for child dental health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Child Health Utility 9D (CHU9D) is a relatively new generic child health-related quality of life measure (HRQoL)—designed to be completed by children—which enables the calculation of utility values. The aim is to investigate the use of the CHU9D Index as an outcome measure for child dental health in New Zealand. Method A survey was conducted of children aged between 6 and 9 years attending for routine dental examinations in community clinics in Dunedin (New Zealand) in 2012. The CHU9D, a HRQoL, was used, along with the Child Perceptions Questionnaire (CPQ), a validated oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) measure. Socio-demographic characteristics (sex, age, ethnicity and household deprivation) were recorded. Dental therapists undertook routine clinical examinations, with charting recorded for each child for decayed, missing and filled deciduous teeth (dmft) at the d3 level. Results One hundred and forty 6-to-9-year-olds (50.7% female) took part in the study (93.3% participation rate). The mean d3mft was 2.4 (SD = 2.6; range 0 to 9). Both CHU9D and CPQ detected differences in the impact of dental caries, with scores in the expected direction: children who presented with caries had higher scores (indicating poorer OHRQoL) than those who were free of apparent caries. Children with no apparent caries had a higher mean CHU9D score than those with caries (indicating better HRQoL). The difference for the CPQ was statistically significant, but for CHU9D the difference was not significant. When the two indices were compared, there was a significant difference in mean CHU9D scores by the prevalence of CPQ and subscale impacts with children experiencing no impacts having mean CHU9D scores closer to 1.0 (representing perfect health). Conclusion The CHU9D may be useful in dental research. Further exploration in samples with different caries experience is required. The use of the CHU9D in child oral health studies will enable the calculation of

  9. Utilization of debate as an educational tool to learn health economics for dental students in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saad A; Omar, Hanan; Babar, Muneer Gohar; Toh, Chooi G

    2012-12-01

    Health economics, a special branch of science applying economic principles to the health delivery system, is a relatively young subdiscipline. The literature is scanty about teaching health economics in the medical and dental fields. Delivery methods of this topic vary from one university to another, with lectures, seminars, and independent learning reported as teaching/learning tools used for the topic. Ideally, debates should foster the development of logical reasoning and communication skills. Health economics in dentistry is taught under the community oral health module that constitutes part of an outcome-based dental curriculum in a private dental school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. For this study, the students were divided into two groups: active participants (active debaters) and supporting participants (nonactive debaters). The debate style chosen for this activity was parliamentary style. Active and nonactive debaters' perceptions were evaluated before and after the activity through a structured questionnaire using a five-point rating scale addressing the topic and perceptions about debate as an educational tool. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used as a measure of internal consistency for the questionnaire items. Among a total of eighty-two third-year dental students of two successive cohorts (thirty-eight students and forty-four students), seventy-three completed the questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 89 percent. Students' responses to the questionnaire were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance test. Results revealed that the students felt that their interest in debate, knowledge of the topic, and reinforcement of the previous knowledge had improved following participation in the debate. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that debate was a useful tool in teaching health economics to dental students.

  10. Maximum opening of the mouth by mouth prop during dental procedures increases the risk of upper airway constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ito

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Ito1, Hiroyoshi Kawaai1, Shinya Yamazaki1, Yosuke Suzuki21Division of Systemic Management, Department of Oral Function, 2Division of Radiology and Diagnosis, Department of Medical Sciences, Ohu University, Post Graduate School of Dentistry, Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture, JapanAbstract: From a retrospective evaluation of data on accidents and deaths during dental procedures, it has been shown that several patients who refused dental treatment died of asphyxia during dental procedures. We speculated that forcible maximum opening of the mouth by using a mouth prop triggers this asphyxia by affecting the upper airway. Therefore, we assessed the morphological changes of the upper airway following maximal opening of the mouth. In 13 healthy adult volunteers, the sagittal diameter of the upper airway on lateral cephalogram was measured between the two conditions; closed mouth and maximally open mouth. The dyspnea in each state was evaluated by a visual analog scale. In one subject, a computed tomograph (CT was taken to assess the three-dimensional changes in the upper airway. A significant difference was detected in the mean sagittal diameter of the upper airway following use of the prop (closed mouth: 18.5 ± 3.8 mm, maximally open mouth: 10.4 ± 3.0 mm. All subjects indicated upper airway constriction and significant dyspnea when their mouth was maximally open. Although a CT scan indicated upper airway constriction when the mouth was maximally open, muscular compensation was admitted. Our results further indicate that the maximal opening of the mouth narrows the upper airway diameter and leads to dyspnea. The use of a prop for the patient who has communication problems or poor neuromuscular function can lead to asphyxia. When the prop is used for patient refusal in dentistry, the respiratory condition should be monitored strictly, and it should be kept in mind that the “sniffing position” is effective for avoiding upper airway

  11. Utilization of dental health-care services and its barriers among the patients visiting community health centers in Nellore District, Andhra Pradesh: A cross-sectional, questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nagarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The primary health centers and community health centers (CHCs offer an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, dental health education, and institution of preventive measures in the remote areas. Aim: To assess the level of utilization of dental health care services and to determine barriers that prevent utilization of dental health-care services among the patients visiting CHCs in Nellore District, Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 600 patients aged 20 years and above visiting the randomly selected 10 CHCs during May 2015 in Nellore District. A multistage sampling method was followed. The source of data was primary in nature and it was obtained through self-administered questionnaire. Data was entered and analyzed using a software program IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp (P < 0.05. Results: Only 36% of patients had visited the dentist in the last 12 months. Males (54% visited dentist more frequently than females (46%. The most common reported reasons for the last dental visit were pain or a dental emergency (71%, followed by restorative treatment (17% and other reasons (12%. The most commonly reported reasons for not seeking dental care were “Not needed unless having pain” by 360 (60%, “I do not think dental diseases are very serious” by 304 (51%, “I have fear of dental procedures” by 290 (48.6%,“Lack of time” by 235 (45.6%, “Dental treatment is expensive” by 200 (33.3%, and “The dentist is at a long distance” by 158 (26.8%. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that only a small portion of population visited a dentist in previous year. Most of them believe that visiting dentist is necessary only for pain relief.

  12. Use of INR to assess degree of anticoagulation in patients who have dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, M J; Moores, J F

    1995-08-01

    Dental professionals frequently treat patients who are receiving anticoagulation therapy. Proper treatment may require adjustment of the anticoagulant dose usually on the basis of the patient's current prothrombin time. This test has been shown to be less accurate than previously thought. The international normalized ratio is another method that attempts to standardize the degree of anticoagulation and to improve reproducibility of results. This system is slowly being implemented in laboratories in the United States. Practitioners who treat patients taking anticoagulants need to be aware of this system in order to make appropriate management decisions.

  13. Knowledge and Self Perception among Dental Students (Interns) about Procedures Involved in Complete Denture Fabrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S Swathy; Ashish R Jain; M D A C U Varma

    2017-01-01

    .... Introduction Fabrication of complete dentures include various steps that include primary impression making, border moulding, final impression, laboratory procedures, jaw relation, teeth selection...

  14. The routine utilization of dental care during pregnancy in eastern China and the key underlying factors: a Hangzhou City study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Oral diseases are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The routine utilization of dental care (RUDC during pregnancy is an effective way to improve pregnant women's oral health, and thus safeguard the health of their babies. As China has one fifth of the world's population, it is especially meaningful to encourage RUDC there. However, the status of RUDC in China and the key underlying factors are largely unknown. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey investigated the current status of RUDC during pregnancy and the key underlying factors in Hangzhou City, Zhejiang Province, eastern China. We collected participants' demographics, individual oral-hygiene behaviors, individual lifestyle, oral-health conditions and attitudes, and also their RUDC during pregnancy. Binary Logistic Regression Analysis was used to analyze the key underlying factors. RESULTS: Only 16.70% of the participants reported RUDC during pregnancy. The percentage of RUDC was significantly lower among pregnant women with the following characteristics: aged 30 or less, an annual household income under $8,000, brushing once a day or less, never flossing or rinsing the mouth, paying no attention to pregnancy-related oral-health knowledge, and being dissatisfied with one's individual dental hygiene behavior. CONCLUSIONS: RUDC during pregnancy is very low in eastern China and is greatly influenced not only by a woman's age, annual income, individual hygiene behavior, but also by her attention and attitudes to oral health. To improve this population's access to and use of dental care during pregnancy, appropriate programs and policies are urgently needed.

  15. Impact of Technique-Specific Operative Videos on First-Year Dental Students' Performance of Restorative Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shalizeh A; Barros, Juliana A; Clark, Christina M; Frey, Gary N; Streckfus, Charles F; Quock, Ryan L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of psychomotor operative video demonstrations on first-year dental students who are performing specific procedures for the first time in a preclinical setting. The class was randomly divided into two groups, and three restorative procedures were selected. On the date on which each procedure was to be performed in the preclinical laboratory for the first time, one group (experimental, n=50) was shown a technique video for that specific procedure immediately before commencing the exercise; the control cohort (n=50) did not view the video. Technical performance on procedures was evaluated by students and two calibrated and blinded examiners. The students' perceptions of the experience were also collected in a survey. All first-year students participated in the study, for a 100% response rate. A Mann-Whitney U test did not show any group differences in technical performance (mean values on preparation: 77.1 vs. 77.8; amalgam: 82.7 vs. 82.8; composite: 79.7 vs. 78.0). A Spearman rho test revealed a significantly higher correlation in 13 out of 25 evaluation categories between student self-assessment and blinded examiner assessment for the experimental group. A chi-square test of questionnaire responses revealed a positive student perception of administering these videos for the preparation (X(2)=4.8, pstudent performance on preclinical operative procedures, but they were well received by students and augmented self-assessment ability. These findings suggest that videos can be a useful teaching aid in a preclinical environment, especially regarding comprehension of concepts.

  16. Comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia with 2% lignocaine in various minor pediatric dental procedures: A clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Dhindsa; I K Pandit; Nikhil Srivastava; Neeraj Gugnani

    2011-01-01

    One of the most distressing aspects of dentistry for pediatric patients is the fear and anxiety caused by the dental environment, particularly the dental injection. The application and induction of local anesthetics has always been a difficult task, and this demands an alternative method that is convenient and effective. Electronic dental anesthesia, based on the principal of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), promises to be a viable mode of pain control during various pediatri...

  17. The Effect of Oral Dexmedetomidine Premedication on Preoperative Cooperation and Emergence Delirium in Children Undergoing Dental Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Keles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to detect the effect of 1 μg/kg of oral dexmedetomidine (DEX as premedication among children undergoing dental procedures. Materials and Methods. The study involved 100 children between 2 and 6 years of age, ASA I, who underwent full-mouth dental rehabilitation. The DEX group (n=50 received 1 μg/kg DEX in apple juice, and the control group (n=50 received only apple juice. The patients’ scores on the Ramsay Sedation Scale (RSS, parental separation anxiety scale, mask acceptance scale, and pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale (PAEDS and hemodynamic parameters were recorded. The data were analyzed using chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Student’s t-test, and analysis of variance in SPSS. Results. RSS scores were significantly higher in the DEX group than group C at 15, 30, and 45 min (p<0.05. More children (68% easy separation, 74% satisfactory mask acceptance in the DEX group showed satisfactory ease of parental separation and mask acceptance behavior (p<0.05. There was no significant difference in the PAEDS scores and mean hemodynamic parameters of both groups. Conclusions. Oral DEX administered at 1 μg/kg provided satisfactory sedation levels, ease of parental separation, and mask acceptance in children but was not effective in preventing emergence delirium. The trial was registered (Protocol Registration Receipt NCT03174678 at clinicaltrials.gov.

  18. Development of utility generic functional requirements for electronic work packages and computer-based procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Nuclear Electronic Work Packages - Enterprise Requirements (NEWPER) initiative is a step toward a vision of implementing an eWP framework that includes many types of eWPs. This will enable immediate paper-related cost savings in work management and provide a path to future labor efficiency gains through enhanced integration and process improvement in support of the Nuclear Promise (Nuclear Energy Institute 2016). The NEWPER initiative was organized by the Nuclear Information Technology Strategic Leadership (NITSL) group, which is an organization that brings together leaders from the nuclear utility industry and regulatory agencies to address issues involved with information technology used in nuclear-power utilities. NITSL strives to maintain awareness of industry information technology-related initiatives and events and communicates those events to its membership. NITSL and LWRS Program researchers have been coordinating activities, including joint organization of NEWPER-related meetings and report development. The main goal of the NEWPER initiative was to develop a set of utility generic functional requirements for eWP systems. This set of requirements will support each utility in their process of identifying plant-specific functional and non-functional requirements. The NEWPER initiative has 140 members where the largest group of members consists of 19 commercial U.S. nuclear utilities and eleven of the most prominent vendors of eWP solutions. Through the NEWPER initiative two sets of functional requirements were developed; functional requirements for electronic work packages and functional requirements for computer-based procedures. This paper will describe the development process as well as a summary of the requirements.

  19. Utilization of free dental health care services provided to the perinatally infected human immunodeficiency virus children in Bangalore: longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvathy, Beena Javaregowda

    2014-01-01

    Use of Highly active anti-retroviral therapy have increased the life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients and hence it is imperative that all efforts have to be made by Pediatric dentists to provide a better oral health for these children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of utilization of free dental treatment provided to these perinatally infected HIV positive children who were previously screened as a part of oral health survey. Purposive sampling was used. Perinatally infected HIV children screened for oral health status. Patients not screened during the oral health survey. Attendance records of 319 perinatally HIV infected children consisting of 178 males and 141 females attending a specialized pediatric outpatient clinic at Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health were examined to compare treatment compliance rates. The number of patients in the severe category who completed treatment was significantly less compared with mild and advanced categories (P 0.05). The results show that children with HIV have significantly lower compliance. Even though all dental treatment provided to them was free of the cost it still had no impetus to encourage them to go through with the treatment.

  20. The utility and validity of current diagnostic procedures for defining temporomandibular disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G T; Delcanho, R E; Goulet, J P

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes the evolution of different concepts of classifying and defining Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) for both clinical and research settings. The literature is reviewed with respect to the utility and validity of the different questionnaire and examination procedures that have been used to assess TMD patients. The presented view is that many of these procedures have not been validated, that there is a lack of standardization in the use of the procedures themselves, and that an ideal method of classifying this broad group of patients into better-defined subgroups has not yet been developed. More standardized and better-defined research by trained and calibrated researchers is needed worldwide to elucidate these subgroups so that a better and widely agreed upon research classification system can be developed for widespread use. It also seems clear that as research requirements for defining TMD patient subgroups become more stringent over time, it may not be practical for the clinician to implement them on a day-to-day basis in his or her practice. As such, a practical utilitarian definition of the common subtype of TMD patients is also needed which parallels any research grouping, so that data from research are valuable and generalizable to the practicing clinician.

  1. Utilizing optical coherence tomography for CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chityala, Ravishankar; Vidal, Carola; Jones, Robert

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has seen broad application in dentistry including early carious lesion detection and imaging defects in resin composite restorations. This study investigates expanding the clinical usefulness by investigating methods to use OCT for obtaining three-dimensional (3D) digital impressions, which can be integrated to CAD/CAM manufacturing of indirect restorations. 3D surface topography `before' and `after' a cavity preparation was acquired by an intraoral cross polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) system with a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) scanning mirror. Image registration and segmentation methods were used to digitally construct a replacement restoration that modeled the original surface morphology of a hydroxyapatite sample. After high resolution additive manufacturing (e.g. polymer 3D printing) of the replacement restoration, micro-CT imaging was performed to examine the marginal adaptation. This study establishes the protocol for further investigation of integrating OCT with CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations.

  2. Effectiveness and feasibility of utilizing E4D technology as a teaching tool in a preclinical dental education environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Richard S; Palladino, Christie L; Furness, Alan R; Bundy, Emily L; Ange, Brittany L

    2014-10-01

    Recent efforts have been directed towards utilizing CAD/CAM technology in the education of future dentists. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of implementing CAD/CAM technology in instruction on preparing a tooth for restoration. Students at one dental school were assigned access to CAD/CAM technology vs. traditional preparation methods in a randomized, crossover design. In a convenience sample of a second-year class, seventy-six of the seventy-nine students volunteered to participate, for a response rate of 96 percent. Two analyses were performed on this pilot data: a primary effectiveness analysis comparing students' competency exam scores by intervention group (intention-to-treat analysis) and a secondary efficacy analysis comparing competency exam scores among students who reported using CAD/CAM versus those who did not. The effectiveness analysis showed no difference in outcomes by intervention group assignment. While student survey results indicated interest in utilizing the technology, the actual utilization rate was much less than one might anticipate, yielding a sample size that limited statistical power. The secondary analysis demonstrated higher mean competency exam scores for students reporting use of CAD/CAM compared to those who did not use the technology, but these results did not reach statistical significance (p=0.075). Prior research has investigated the efficacy of CAD/CAM in a controlled educational trial, but this study adds to the literature by investigating student use of CAD/CAM in a real-world, self-study fashion. Further studies should investigate ways in which to increase student utilization of CAD/CAM and whether or not increased utilization, with a larger sample size, would yield significant outcomes.

  3. Drug utilization pattern of analgesics in various departments of a tertiary care teaching rural dental hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirav N. Patel

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: Drug utilization data can help to formulate appropriate clinical guidelines for drug use and facilitate rational use of medicines in population. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 804-806

  4. Can evaluation of a dental procedure at the outset of learning predict later performance at the preclinical level? A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polyzois, Ioannis

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of conventional pre-clinical training in dentistry and to determine if evaluation of a dental procedure at the beginning of dental training can be a predictor for future performance. A group of second year dental students with no previous experience in operative dentistry were asked to prepare a conventional class I cavity on a lower first molar typodont. Their first preparation was carried out after an introductory lecture and a demonstration and their second at the end of conventional training. The prepared typodonts were coded and blindly scored for the traditional assessment criteria of outline form, retention form, smoothness, cavity depth and cavity margin angulation. Once the codes were broken, a paired t-test was used to compare the difference between the means of before and after scores (P<0.0001) and a Pearson\\'s linear correlation to test the association (r=0.4). From the results of this study, we could conclude that conventional preclinical training results in a significant improvement in the manual skills of the dental students and that the dental procedure used had only a limited predictive value for later performance at the preclinical level.

  5. General anesthesia time for pediatric dental cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Anna R; Seminario, Ana Lucia; Scott, Joanna; Berg, Joel; Ivanova, Iskra; Lee, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the use of operating room (OR) time for pediatric dental procedures performed under general anesthesia (GA) at a regional children's hospital over a 2-year period. A cross-sectional review of a pediatric dental GA records was performed at Seattle Children's Hospital. Data were collected for 709 0- to 21-year-old patients from January 2008 to December 2009. Demographic data, dental and anesthesia operator types, and procedures were recorded. Utilization of OR time was analyzed. The mean age of patients was 7.1 years (±4.2 SD), and 58% were male. Distribution by American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) classifications were: ASA I 226 (32%); ASA II 316 (45%); ASA III 167 (24%). Cases finished earlier than the scheduled time by an average of 14 minutes (±28). Overrun time was significantly associated with: patient age (P=.01); ASA classification (P=.006); treatment type (Ppediatric dental procedures.

  6. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  7. Analysis of the effectiveness of different hygiene procedures used in dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossato, Marisa Bagiotto; Unfer, Beatriz; May, Lilana Gressler; Braun, Katia Olmedo

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of bacterial plaque removal of six denture hygiene procedures used by patients to clean their dentures. Fifteen students randomly divided into groups G1, G2, G3, G4, G5 and G6 used maxillary intraoral appliances for 24 h without cleaning them. Afterwards, the appliances were submitted to the following procedures: P1: washing under running water for 20 s; P2 and P3: cleaning with alkaline peroxide (Corega Tabs®) for 5 and 30 min, respectively; P4: brushing with water and liquid soap for 40 s; P5: alkaline hypochlorite for 10 minutes; P6: home use chlorine solution (Q'boa® at 0.45% for 10 min), throughout a period of 6 consecutive weeks. The procedures followed a circulating scheme, so that all the appliances were submitted to all the hygiene methods studied. After the hygiene procedures, the appliances were stained, photographed and submitted to the weighing method. After ANOVA and Tukey's test, differences were observed: P5 = 0.73 ± 0.3 (b), P6 = 1.27 ± 0.4(b,c), P4 = 1.92 ± 0.5 (b,c), P3 = 2.24 ± 1.0 (b,c), P2 = 7.53 ± 2.5 (c) and P1 = 26.86 ± 15. 3 (a). From the results of the study, it could be concluded that the use of alkaline hypochlorite is the best way to remove bacterial plaque, followed by the home-use chlorine solution and brushing with water and liquid soap. Corega Tabs® must be used for 30 min of immersion to have a cleaning effectiveness similar to that of alkaline hypochlorite.

  8. Epidemiology and phospholipase activity of oral Candida spp. among patients with central nervous system diseases before and after dental cleaning procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Silva Ribeiro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering of diseases that affect central nervous system may be considered more susceptible to the infectious diseases of mouth. Sixty-nine patients suffering of cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and metal retardation were submitted to saliva examination for the presence of Candida spp. before and after a procedure of dental cleaning. The isolates were submitted to assay for verifying phospholipase production. 55.10% of the patients provided isolation of Candida spp. The frequency of isolation obtained before dental procedure was: C. albicans (83.33%, C. krusei (8.33% and C. kefyr, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (2.78% each. The frequency after the procedure was: C. albicans (68.57%, C. parapsilosis (11.43%, C. krusei and C. kefyr (8.57% each and Candida glabrata (2.86%. We verified significantly difference (p < 0.01 between populations obtained at the two examinations. Phospholipase production was verified only among C. albicans strains and the proportion of producers was higher when testing isolates obtained after dental cleaning procedure. Studies focused on Candida spp. isolation are useful for better comprehension of the role of these yeasts on the oral flora from patients with cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and metal retardation.

  9. On Utilizing Grounded Theory in Business Doctoral Research: Guidance on the Research Design, Procedures, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Boadu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Grounded theory is a powerful and rigorous theory building methodology that has attracted considerable interest in business research; however, it is a challenging endeavour especially for novice researchers and in particular at the doctoral level. Although several researchers have attempted to clarify the cannons of various grounded theory approaches, still there is a shortage in guidance for doctoral students who wish to apply grounded theory for their studies. Using an example from a grounded theory business doctoral thesis, this paper provides a guide on the research design and utilisation of the Straussian grounded theory at doctoral level. In doing so, the paper discusses the rationale, features, and benefits of grounded theory. Using an example from corporate governance research, the paper illustrates how the procedures of data analysis (coding, theoretical memoing, and theoretical sampling are applied to systematically generate a grounded theory. Finally, the paper discusses major challenges to utilising grounded theory and how these can be addressed by doctoral researchers. This paper provides a clear and pragmatic exposition that can be useful to guide doctoral researchers who are interested in utilizing the Straussian approach of grounded theory in their studies.

  10. An overview of herbal supplement utilization with particular emphasis on possible interactions with dental drugs and oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Worku

    2003-01-01

    Herbal medication in the United States is a popular form of therapy. This paper provides an overview of the utilization of herbal supplements with particular emphasis on possible interactions with oral health drugs and oral manifestations. Herbal supplements are regulated by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), which limits their regulation by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A number of studies indicate that there is a progressive increase in the utilization of herbal supplements. The majority of consumers of these products are white, middle-aged women who have some college education. Many of the consumers use pharmaceutical drugs concurrently, but most do not inform their health-care providers about their use of herbal supplements. Various herbal supplements have been reported or are suspected to interact with certain oral health drugs, the most important one being 1) bromelain, cayenne, chamomile, feverfew, dong quai, eleuthro/Seberian ginseng, garlic, ginkgo, ginger, ginseng and licorice interacting with aspirin; 2) aloe latex, ephedra, ginseng, rhubarb, cascara sagrada, licorice, and senna interacting with corticosteriods; 3) kava, St. John's wort, chamomile, and valerian interacting with central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs; and 4) herbs acting on the gastrointestinal system, altering the absorption of several orally administered drugs. Further, the use of some herbal supplements has been reported to be associated with oral manifestations, including aphthous ulcers, lip and tongue irritation, and swelling with feverfew; gingival bleeding with feverfew and ginkgo; tongue numbness with echinacea; xerostomia with St. John's wort; oral and lingual dyskinesia with kava; and salivation with yohimbe. These potential effects of herbal supplements in conjunction with factors related to regulation restrictions suggest that the use of these products may be associated with various adverse reactions that can affect oral health and

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Contamination on Dental Zirconia Ceramic by Silicone Disclosing Agents after Different Cleaning Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wille

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cleaning procedures for air-abraded zirconia after contamination with two silicone disclosing agents. Air-abraded zirconia ceramic specimens (IPS e.max ZirCAD were contaminated with either GC Fit Checker white or GC Fit Checker II. Untreated zirconia specimens were used as control. Afterwards the surfaces were cleaned either with waterspray or ultrasonically in 99% isopropanol or using a newly developed cleaning paste (Ivoclean. After cleaning X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS was performed and the relative peak intensities of Zr, C and Si were used for a qualitative comparison of the residuals. There was no significant difference between the two different silicone disclosing agents. An additional cleaning step with isopropanol led to a significantly lower amount of residuals on the surface, but an additional cleaning process with Ivoclean did not reduce the amount of carbon residuals in comparison to the isopropanol cleaning. Just the silicone amount on the surface was reduced. None of the investigated cleaning processes removed all residuals from the contaminated surface. Standard cleaning processes do not remove all residuals of the silicone disclosing agent from the surface. This may lead to a failure of the resin-ceramic bonding.

  12. Conscious Sedation Procedures Using Intravenous Midazolam for Dental Care in Patients with Different Cognitive Profiles: A Prospective Study of Effectiveness and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Valérie; Faulks, Denise; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Martine

    2013-01-01

    The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID) compared to dentally anxious patients (DA). Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale), and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS). 50% N2O/O2 was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test). Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test). Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions) and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA) and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA) (p<0.001, Fisher exact test) than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N2O/O2), were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists. PMID:23940729

  13. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam for dental care in patients with different cognitive profiles: a prospective study of effectiveness and safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Collado

    Full Text Available The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID compared to dentally anxious patients (DA. Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale, and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS. 50% N₂O/O₂ was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test. Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test. Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test. Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA (p<0.001, Fisher exact test than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N₂O/O₂, were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists.

  14. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam for dental care in patients with different cognitive profiles: a prospective study of effectiveness and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Valérie; Faulks, Denise; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Martine

    2013-01-01

    The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID) compared to dentally anxious patients (DA). Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale), and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS). 50% N₂O/O₂ was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test). Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test). Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions) and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA) and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA) (p<0.001, Fisher exact test) than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N₂O/O₂), were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists.

  15. Utilization of surgical procedures for pelvic organ prolapse: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1965-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Ebenezer O; Bharucha, Adil E; Melton, L Joseph; Schleck, Cathy D; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Klingele, Christopher J; Gebhart, John B

    2008-09-01

    To describe trends in the utilization of surgical procedures for pelvic organ prolapse among women in Olmsted County, MN, we retrospectively identified all county residents undergoing pelvic organ prolapse repair from January 1, 1965 through December 31, 2002. From 1965 to 2002, 3,813 women had pelvic organ prolapse surgeries: 3,126 had hysterectomy combined with pelvic floor repair (PFR) procedures and 687 had PFR alone. The age-adjusted utilization of hysterectomy plus PFR and of PFR alone decreased by 62% (P PFR and women aged 70 years and older undergoing PFR only. The most common indication for PFR was uterovaginal prolapse. Among women in the community, the rate of utilization and age distribution of pelvic organ prolapse surgery changed substantially between 1965 and 2002.

  16. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  17. Anesthetic management of dental procedures in patients with special needs: A retrospective analysis of 519 patients in North of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    YILMAZ, Mehmet; ÇAĞLAR TORUN, Aysun; Baş, Burcu; DURAN, Hatice; KÖSE, İlyas; FURUNCUOĞLU, Halit

    2015-01-01

    Special need patients have increased risk for oral diseases throughout their life. Sedation and general anesthesia is generally the preferred treatment for special needs patients though it provides optimal conditions for dental treatment. This study was aimed to describe our anesthetic experience in dental treatments of 519 special needs patients at a dental faculty in the north side of Turkey during a three-year period. The data referring to patient’s demographic information, anesthetic tech...

  18. Integration of a Gas Fired Steam Power Plant with a Total Site Utility Using a New Cogeneration Targeting Procedure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sajad Khamis Abadi; Mohammad Hasan Khoshgoftar Manesh; Marc A.Rosen; Majid Amidpour; Mohammad Hosein Hamedi

    2014-01-01

    A steam power plant can work as a dual purpose plant for simultaneous production of steam and elec-trical power. In this paper we seek the optimum integration of a steam power plant as a source and a site utility sys-tem as a sink of steam and power. Estimation for the cogeneration potential prior to the design of a central utility system for site utility systems is vital to the targets for site fuel demand as well as heat and power production. In this regard, a new cogeneration targeting procedure is proposed for integration of a steam power plant and a site utility consisting of a process plant. The new methodology seeks the optimal integration based on a new cogenera-tion targeting scheme. In addition, a modified site utility grand composite curve (SUGCC) diagram is proposed and compared to the original SUGCC. A gas fired steam power plant and a process site utility is considered in a case study. The applicability of the developed procedure is tested against other design methods (STAR® and Thermoflex software) through a case study. The proposed method gives comparable results, and the targeting method is used for optimal integration of steam levels. Identifying optimal conditions of steam levels for integration is important in the design of utility systems, as the selection of steam levels in a steam power plant and site utility for integration greatly influences the potential for cogeneration and energy recovery. The integration of steam levels of the steam power plant and the site utility system in the case study demonstrates the usefulness of the method for reducing the overall energy consumption for the site.

  19. EXAMINING THE UTILITY OF THE STIMULUS PAIRING OBSERVATION PROCEDURE WITH PRESCHOOL CHILDREN LEARNING A SECOND LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales, Rocio; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Huffman, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a stimulus pairing observation procedure to facilitate tact and listener relations in preschool children learning a second language. This procedure resulted in the establishment of most listener relations as well as some tact relations. Multiple-exemplar training resulted in the establishment of most of the remaining relations. The implications for the use of these procedures to establish simple vocabulary skills in children are discussed.

  20. Increasing spelling achievement: an analysis of treatment procedures utilizing an alternating treatments design.

    OpenAIRE

    Ollendick, T. H.; Matson, J L; Esveldt-Dawson, K; Shapiro, E S

    1980-01-01

    Two studies which examine the effectiveness of spelling remediation procedures are reported. In both studies, an alternating treatment design was employed. In the first study, positive practice overcorrection plus positive reinforcement was compared to positive practice alone and a no-remediation control condition. In the second study, positive practice plus positive reinforcement was compared to a traditional corrective procedure plus positive reinforcement and a traditional procedure when u...

  1. Examining the utility of the stimulus pairing observation procedure with preschool children learning a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rocio; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Huffman, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a stimulus pairing observation procedure to facilitate tact and listener relations in preschool children learning a second language. This procedure resulted in the establishment of most listener relations as well as some tact relations. Multiple-exemplar training resulted in the establishment of most of the remaining relations. The implications for the use of these procedures to establish simple vocabulary skills in children are discussed.

  2. Examining the Utility of the Stimulus Pairing Observation Procedure with Preschool Children Learning a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rocio; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Huffman, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a stimulus pairing observation procedure to facilitate tact and listener relations in preschool children learning a second language. This procedure resulted in the establishment of most listener relations as well as some tact relations. Multiple-exemplar training resulted in the establishment of most of the…

  3. Prevalence and characteristics of dental anxiety in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Birn, H.; Kirkegaard, E.;

    1993-01-01

    Prevalence, characteristics and consequences of dental anxiety in a randomly selected sample of 645 Danish adults were explored in telephone interviews. Participation rate was 88%. Demographics, fear of specific procedures, negative dentist contacts, general fear tendency, treatment utilization...... and perceived oral conditions were explored by level of dental anxiety using a modified Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). A Seattle fear survey item and a summary item from the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) were also included for fear description comparisons. Correlation between these indices (DAS-DFS: rs = 0.72; DAS......-Seattle item: rs = 0.68) aided semantic validation of DAS anxiety intensity levels. Extreme dental anxiety (DAS > or = 15) was found in 4.2% of the sample and 6% reported moderate anxiety (DAS scores 14-12). Bivariate (B) and logistic regression (L) odds ratios (OR) showed that high dental anxiety...

  4. Comparative evaluation of bispectral index system after sedation with midazolam and propofol combined with remifentanil versus ketamine in uncooperative during dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Mehrnaz; Kaviani, Nasser; Tahririan, Dana; Akhlaghi, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Proper analgesic agents should be used in combination with sedative agents. Remifentanil is a synthetic narcotic/analgesic agent with a short duration effect and decreases the risk of apnea during recovery. Bispectral index system (BIS) is a new noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the depth of sedation. The aim of present clinical trial was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of intravenous sedation with propofol/midazolam/remifentanil (PMR) in comparison to propofol/midazolam/ketamine (PMK) for dental procedures in children 3-7 years of age. In this clinical trial, 32 healthy uncooperative children who were candidates for dental treatments under sedation were randomly divided into two groups. Intravenous sedation was induced with PMR in one group and with PMK in the other group. After injection and during procedure BIS index, heart rate and respiratory rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation was evaluated every 5 min. After the procedure, recovery time was measured. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Friedman, Wilcoxon, and t-test. The BIS value was significantly low in ketamin group (P = 0.003) but respiratory rates and heart rates were same in both groups with no statistical difference (P = 0.884, P = 0.775). The recovery time was significantly shorter in remifentanil group (P = 0.008 and P = 0.003). It can be concluded that intravenous sedation technique with PMR combination induces effective and safe sedation, with less pain and more forgetfulness and a shorter recovery time for children 3-7 years of age during dental procedures.

  5. Quality control procedures of dental diagnostic radiology systems; Elaboracao de um procedimento para controle de qualidade em sistemas de radiodiagnostico odontologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Paula Serra Sasaki

    2007-07-01

    This work presents quality control reference procedures for dental diagnostic radiology systems, following the recommendations of the Publication 453 of the Brazilian Health Ministry (PF453), to be applied in dental clinics, in order to achieve an improvement in the radiological image qualities and the patient dose reduction. All tests were applied in an intraoral X rays system, following the methodology developed and the requirements of the PF 453. In order to verify the best quality of the image in relation to the smaller exposition time an object test was also developed in this work. The use of this object allowed the reduction of the exposition time of 0.5 seconds, the maximum value of the linear region of the characteristic curve, for 0.2 seconds. The tested X rays system showed a very good agreement with the applied procedures, detaching the reduction of the skin entrance dose using the film-holding devices. However, the size of the field increased and exceeded the maximum value of 6 cm recommended in the standard. The importance of the quality control in dental diagnostic radiology systems is essential due to the constant use of X radiation in dental clinics. The PF453 recommends the frequency of at least two years for the constancy tests. However, it is suggested that the professional, surgeon-dentist, should be responsible for the internal control of the image quality obtained from the X rays device. This can be done through monthly exposures of the object test developed in this work. (author)

  6. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams.

  7. Utilizing a Diabetes Risk Test and A1c Point-of-Care Instrument to Identify Increased Risk for Diabetes In an Educational Dental Hygiene Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Lori J; Rainchuso, Lori; Rothman, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate the number of patients at increased risk for type 2 diabetes development using a validated survey; and to assess the rate of compliance for A1c screening in an educational dental hygiene setting. This was a descriptive study using a purposive sample of patients in an academic dental hygiene clinic, who were 18 years or older, not diagnosed with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Utilizing the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey, patients determined to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes were offered the opportunity for further assessment by having their A1c tested using a point of care instrument. Patients demonstrating an increased risk for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, with either the survey or the point of care instrument, were referred to their primary physician for further evaluation. A total 179 of the 422 solicited patients agreed to participate in the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey. According to the survey guidelines, 77 participants were considered increased risk for type 2 diabetes for an at-risk prevalence of 48% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 40 to 56%). The at-risk participants were then asked to have an A1c test of which 45 agreed (compliance rate 58%, 95% CI: 47 to 70%). Using American Diabetes Association A1c parameters, 60.98% (n=25) indicated a prediabetes (5.7 to 6.4%) range, and 4.88% (n=2) indicated a diabetes (≥6.5%) range. Utilizing the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey in any dental setting could provide patients with invaluable health information, and potentially improve overall health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  8. Investing in Preventive Dental Care for the Medicare Population: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the use of preventive dental care services by the US Medicare population, and we assessed whether money spent on preventive dental care resulted in less money being spent on expensive nonpreventive procedures. Methods. We used data from the 2002 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey to estimate a multinomial logistic model to analyze the influence of predisposing, enabling, and need variables in identifying those beneficiaries who used preventive dental care, only nonpreventive dental care, or no dental care in a multiple-variable context. We used regression models with similar controls to estimate the influence of preventive care on the utilization and cost of nonpreventive dental care and all dental care. Results. Our analyses showed that beneficiaries who used preventive dental care had more dental visits but fewer visits for expensive nonpreventive procedures and lower dental expenses than beneficiaries who saw the dentist only for treatment of oral problems. Conclusions. Adding dental coverage for preventive care to Medicare could pay off in terms of both improving the oral health of the elderly population and limiting the costs of expensive nonpreventive dental care for the dentate beneficiary population. PMID:20864712

  9. A review and survey of policies utilized for interventional pain procedures: a need for consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Lynn; Salajegheh, Reza; Hamill-Ruth, Robin J; Yerra, Sandeep; Butz, John

    2017-01-01

    Background Other than the newly published anticoagulation guidelines, there are currently few recommendations to assist pain medicine physicians in determining the safety parameters to follow when performing interventional pain procedures. Little information exists regarding policies for oral intake, cumulative steroid dose limits, driving restrictions with and without sedation, and routine medication use for interventional procedures. Methods A 16-question survey was developed on common policies currently in use for interventional pain procedures. The questionnaire was distributed through the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and American Academy of Pain Medicine. We sought to statistically analyze the range of policies being used by pain medicine physicians and to determine if there are any commonly accepted standards. Results A total of 337 physicians out of 4037 members responded to our survey with a response rate of 8.4%. A total of 82% of these respondents used a sedative agent while performing an interventional pain procedure. The majority of respondents required drivers after procedures, except after trigger points. A total of 47% indicated that they have an nil per os (NPO) policy for procedures without sedation. A total of 98% reported that they had an anticoagulation policy before an interventional procedure. A total of 17% indicated that the interval between steroid doses was <2 weeks, while 53% indicated that they waited 2–4 weeks between steroid doses. Conclusion Our study has clearly demonstrated a wide variation in the current practice among physicians regarding sedation, NPO status, steroid administration, and the need for designated drivers. There was much higher endorsement of policies regarding anticoagulation. There is an obvious need for evidence-based guidelines for these aspects of interventional pain care to improve patient safety and minimize the risk of adverse events. PMID:28360531

  10. Surface roughness and morphology of dental nanocomposites polished by four different procedures evaluated by a multifractal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Lainović, Tijana; Vilotić, Marko; Blažić, Larisa; Alb, Sandu Florin; Kakaš, Damir

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different dental polishing methods on surface texture parameters of dental nanocomposites. The 3-D surface morphology was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifractal analysis. Two representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were investigated: a nanofilled and a nanohybrid composite. The samples were polished by two dental polishing protocols using multi-step and one-step system. Both protocols were then followed by diamond paste polishing. The 3-D surface roughness of samples was studied by AFM on square areas of topography on the 80 × 80 μm2 scanning area. The multifractal spectrum theory based on computational algorithms was applied for AFM data and multifractal spectra were calculated. The generalized dimension Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of dental nanocomposites polished by four different dental polishing protocols at nanometer scale. The results showed that the larger the spectrum width Δα (Δα = αmax - αmin) of the multifractal spectra f(α), the more non-uniform was the surface morphology. Also, the 3-D surface topography was described by statistical parameters, according to ISO 25178-2:2012. The 3-D surface of samples had a multifractal nature. Nanofilled composite had lower values of height parameters than nanohybrid composites, due to its composition. Multi-step polishing protocol created a better finished surface, for both tested materials, than one-step polishing protocol, even when it was followed by diamond paste polishing. Diamond paste polishing created smooth surface and reduced roughness of tested materials.

  11. Surface roughness and morphology of dental nanocomposites polished by four different procedures evaluated by a multifractal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ţălu, Ştefan, E-mail: stefan_ta@yahoo.com [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of AET, Discipline of Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Graphics, 103-105 B-dul Muncii St., Cluj-Napoca 400641, Cluj (Romania); Stach, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.stach@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, Institute of Informatics, Department of Biomedical Computer Systems, Będzińska 39, 41-205 Sosnowiec (Poland); Lainović, Tijana, E-mail: tijana.lainovic@gmail.com [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Medicine, School of Dentistry, Hajduk Veljkova 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Vilotić, Marko, E-mail: markovil@uns.ac.rs [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Department for Production Engineering, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Blažić, Larisa, E-mail: larisa.blazic@gmail.com [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Medicine, School of Dentistry, Clinic of Dentistry of Vojvodina, Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontics, Hajduk Veljkova 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Alb, Sandu Florin, E-mail: albflorin@yahoo.com [“Iuliu Haţieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology, 8 Victor Babeş St., 400012 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Kakaš, Damir, E-mail: kakasdam@uns.ac.rs [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Department for Production Engineering, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Multifractals are good indicators of polished dental composites 3-D surface structure. • The nanofilled composite had superior 3-D surface properties than the nanohybrid one. • Composite polishing with diamond paste created improved 3-D multifractal structure. • Recommendation: polish the composite with diamond paste if using the one-step tool. • Multifractal analysis could become essential in designing new dental surfaces. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different dental polishing methods on surface texture parameters of dental nanocomposites. The 3-D surface morphology was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifractal analysis. Two representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were investigated: a nanofilled and a nanohybrid composite. The samples were polished by two dental polishing protocols using multi-step and one-step system. Both protocols were then followed by diamond paste polishing. The 3-D surface roughness of samples was studied by AFM on square areas of topography on the 80 × 80 μm{sup 2} scanning area. The multifractal spectrum theory based on computational algorithms was applied for AFM data and multifractal spectra were calculated. The generalized dimension D{sub q} and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of dental nanocomposites polished by four different dental polishing protocols at nanometer scale. The results showed that the larger the spectrum width Δα (Δα = α{sub max} − α{sub min}) of the multifractal spectra f(α), the more non-uniform was the surface morphology. Also, the 3-D surface topography was described by statistical parameters, according to ISO 25178-2:2012. The 3-D surface of samples had a multifractal nature. Nanofilled composite had lower values of height parameters than nanohybrid composites, due to its composition. Multi-step polishing protocol

  12. Optimization in the utility maximization framework for conservation planning: a comparison of solution procedures in a study of multifunctional agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Kreitler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative methods of spatial conservation prioritization have traditionally been applied to issues in conservation biology and reserve design, though their use in other types of natural resource management is growing. The utility maximization problem is one form of a covering problem where multiple criteria can represent the expected social benefits of conservation action. This approach allows flexibility with a problem formulation that is more general than typical reserve design problems, though the solution methods are very similar. However, few studies have addressed optimization in utility maximization problems for conservation planning, and the effect of solution procedure is largely unquantified. Therefore, this study mapped five criteria describing elements of multifunctional agriculture to determine a hypothetical conservation resource allocation plan for agricultural land conservation in the Central Valley of CA, USA. We compared solution procedures within the utility maximization framework to determine the difference between an open source integer programming approach and a greedy heuristic, and find gains from optimization of up to 12%. We also model land availability for conservation action as a stochastic process and determine the decline in total utility compared to the globally optimal set using both solution algorithms. Our results are comparable to other studies illustrating the benefits of optimization for different conservation planning problems, and highlight the importance of maximizing the effectiveness of limited funding for conservation and natural resource management.

  13. Optimization in the utility maximization framework for conservation planning: a comparison of solution procedures in a study of multifunctional agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, Jason; Stoms, David M; Davis, Frank W

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative methods of spatial conservation prioritization have traditionally been applied to issues in conservation biology and reserve design, though their use in other types of natural resource management is growing. The utility maximization problem is one form of a covering problem where multiple criteria can represent the expected social benefits of conservation action. This approach allows flexibility with a problem formulation that is more general than typical reserve design problems, though the solution methods are very similar. However, few studies have addressed optimization in utility maximization problems for conservation planning, and the effect of solution procedure is largely unquantified. Therefore, this study mapped five criteria describing elements of multifunctional agriculture to determine a hypothetical conservation resource allocation plan for agricultural land conservation in the Central Valley of CA, USA. We compared solution procedures within the utility maximization framework to determine the difference between an open source integer programming approach and a greedy heuristic, and find gains from optimization of up to 12%. We also model land availability for conservation action as a stochastic process and determine the decline in total utility compared to the globally optimal set using both solution algorithms. Our results are comparable to other studies illustrating the benefits of optimization for different conservation planning problems, and highlight the importance of maximizing the effectiveness of limited funding for conservation and natural resource management.

  14. Utility of Pamphlets in Promoting Knowledge and Positive Attitudes about Two Early Cancer Detection Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.

    Informational pamphlets about breast self-examination (BSE) and testicular self-examination (TSE) are widely distributed in health care settings, but the pamphlets' effectiveness in promoting knowledge and positive attitudes about these early cancer detection procedures is largely unknown. A study compared pamphlets with alternative methods of…

  15. Urgências em traumatismos dentários: classificação, características e procedimentos Dental traumatism urgencies: classification, signs and procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Emi Sanabe

    2009-12-01

    briefly described so that it can be easily read and quickly accessible regarding procedures, urgency attention and correct choice for dental and fragment storage. CONCLUSIONS: The knowledge on the subject, the agility to deal with urgent situations and the correct patient follow-up improve prognosis.

  16. Pain and dental implantology: sensory quantification and affective aspects. Part I: At the private dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, E; Ríos Calvo, M P

    2001-01-01

    After an extensive review of the dental literature, few articles were found related to pain and implantology. Management of orofacial pain has traditionally been a difficult challenge for the dental-medical profession. Patients may be afraid of dental pain, particularly in cases of dental implantology. Therefore, a study to obtain more conclusive data was developed. Taking into account that the perception of pain and the threshold of pain vary among individuals, a 2-year clinical study was established in private practice utilizing a verbal method (double-blind). The study was used to quantify sensory and affective aspects of pain associated with dental implantology on 75 patients in a private dental office. All of the implants were placed by the same clinician. Data were recorded following a Pain Data Sheet designed for this particular study. The aim of this study was to obtain different aspects of data as follows: 1) Fear of the dentist and fear of dental implant procedures utilizing a descriptive scale of 1 to 10, with 1 indicative of no fear. 2) Dental areas and ridges: Dental pain, pain in edentulous areas, and pain in the implanted area utilizing a scale of 0 to 8, with 0 indicative of no pain. 3) Function and pain: during mastication, swallowing, speech, yawning, opening, closing, and lateral excursions and indication of cervical pain or back pain, each calibrated by the presence or absence of pain. 4) Palpation and pain of the temporomandibular joint, the temporal muscle, the area of the pterygoid muscles, masseter muscle, and sternocleidomastoid muscle, all calibrated on the indication of presence or absence of pain. 5) Others: ear pain, neuralgia, headaches, edema, and hematoma, calibrated on the basis of presence or absence. The aforementioned factors were evaluated immediately before surgery and after surgery, at 24 hours, and during a follow up for a period of 2 years at intervals of 1 week; 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 months; and 1 and 2 years after surgery

  17. Threaded connection qualification procedures utilized for an ultra-deep, high-pressure gas well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minge, J.C.; Pejac, R.D.; Asbill, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the premium connection qualification program used to qualify three different connections for the production tubular strings used in an ultra-deep, high pressure gas well. A total of eight connection types were tested during the program. Four connections failed to meet the program's acceptance criteria. Full-scale test procedures and the data acquisition system used to collect, store, reduce, and plot strain gauge data while testing are discussed.

  18. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    OpenAIRE

    Wotman, Stephen; Demko, Catherine A.; Victoroff, Kristin; Sudano, Joseph J; Lalumandier, James A

    2010-01-01

    This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral catego...

  19. Comparative evaluation of diffusion hypoxia and psychomotor skills with or without postsedation oxygenation following administration of nitrous oxide in children undergoing dental procedures: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Inder Singh Khinda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diffusion hypoxia is the most serious potential complication associated with nitrous oxide. It occurs during the recovery period. Hence, administration of 100% oxygen is mandatory as suggested by many authors. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence/nonoccurrence of diffusion hypoxia in two groups of patients undergoing routine dental treatment under nitrous oxide sedation when one group is subjected to 7 min of postsedation oxygenation and the second group of the patients is made to breathe room air for the similar period. Materials and Methods: A total of sixty patients within the age group of 7–10 years requiring invasive dental procedures were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each using chit method. In the control group, patients were administered 100% oxygen postsedation, whereas, in the study group, patients were made to breathe room air postsedation. Various parameters (pulse rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation [SpO2] were recorded pre- and post-operatively. Data were collected and then sent for statistical analysis. Results: The mean postoperative SpO2 at measurement times 1, 3, 5, and 7 min in both the groups was higher than the mean preoperative SpO2. This increase was statistically significant. No significant difference was found between the Trieger test scores. Conclusion: This study proves that clinical occurrence of diffusion hypoxia is not possible while following the routine procedure of nitrous oxide sedation.

  20. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  1. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  2. Children's tooth decay in a public health program to encourage low-income pregnant women to utilize dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirtcliff R Mike

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A community-based public health program to provide a dental home for women covered by the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid in Klamath County, Oregon USA was instituted with the long-term goal to promote preventive oral care for both mothers and their new infants provided by dental managed care companies. Methods As part of the evaluation of the program, children in Klamath and comparable non-program counties were examined in their 2nd year of life to begin to determine if benefits accrued to the offspring of the mothers in Klamath County. Results Eighty-five and 58.9% of the children were caries free in the Klamath and comparison county samples, respectively (RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.13, 1.93. The mean (SD number of teeth with any decay was .75 (2.5 in the test population and 1.6 (2.5 in the comparison population (t = 2.08, p = .04. Conclusions The assessment showed that children of mothers in the Klamath County program were about one and a half times more likely to be caries free than children in the comparison counties. Additional controlled studies are being undertaken.

  3. Children's tooth decay in a public health program to encourage low-income pregnant women to utilize dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Sutherland, Marilynn; Shirtcliff, R Mike; Ludwig, Sharity; Smolen, Darlene

    2010-02-18

    A community-based public health program to provide a dental home for women covered by the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid) in Klamath County, Oregon USA was instituted with the long-term goal to promote preventive oral care for both mothers and their new infants provided by dental managed care companies. As part of the evaluation of the program, children in Klamath and comparable non-program counties were examined in their 2nd year of life to begin to determine if benefits accrued to the offspring of the mothers in Klamath County. Eighty-five and 58.9% of the children were caries free in the Klamath and comparison county samples, respectively (RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.13, 1.93). The mean (SD) number of teeth with any decay was .75 (2.5) in the test population and 1.6 (2.5) in the comparison population (t = 2.08, p = .04). The assessment showed that children of mothers in the Klamath County program were about one and a half times more likely to be caries free than children in the comparison counties. Additional controlled studies are being undertaken.

  4. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wotman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction.Keywords: dental practice, dental practice core activities, direct observation of dental practice, Dental Davis Observation Code, dentist, hygienist patient behaviors

  5. Assessing use of a standardized dental diagnostic terminology in an electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi; White, Joel; Stark, Paul C; Vaderhobli, Ram; Walji, Muhammad F; Ramoni, Rachel; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta; Kimmes, Nicole; Tavares, Anamaria; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2013-01-01

    Although standardized terminologies such as the International Classification of Diseases have been in use in medicine for over a century, efforts in the dental profession to standardize dental diagnostic terms have not achieved widespread acceptance. To address this gap, a standardized dental diagnostic terminology, the EZCodes, was developed in 2009. Fifteen dental education institutions in the United States and Europe have implemented the EZCodes dental diagnostic terminology. This article reports on the utilization and valid entry of the EZCodes at three of the dental schools that have adopted this standardized dental diagnostic terminology. Electronic data on the use of procedure codes with diagnostic terms from the three schools over a period from July 2010 to June 2011 were aggregated. The diagnostic term and procedure code pairs were adjudicated by three calibrated dentists. Analyses were conducted to gain insight into the utilization and valid entry of the EZCodes diagnostic terminology in the one-year period. Error proportions in the entry of diagnostic term (and by diagnostic category) were also computed. In the twelve-month period, 29,965 diagnostic terms and 249,411 procedure codes were entered at the three institutions resulting in a utilization proportion of 12 percent. Caries and periodontics were the most frequently used categories. More than 1,000 of the available 1,321 diagnostic terms were never used. Overall, 60.5 percent of the EZCodes entries were found to be valid. The results demonstrate low utilization of EZCodes in an electronic health record and raise the need for specific training of dental providers on the importance of using dental diagnostic terminology and specifically how to use the terms in the electronic record. These findings will serve to increase the use/correct use of the EZCodes dental diagnostic terminology and ultimately create a reliable platform for undertaking clinical, outcomes, and quality improvement-related research.

  6. Dental operatory design and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M

    1993-08-01

    Improving and expanding the dental services of a practice can involve purchasing new equipment and even modifying or expanding the physical plant. Operatory design is important to the efficiency with which dental procedures can be performed. Equipment purchases to outfit the dental operatory should be made based on the specific needs and functions of a practice.

  7. Techniques and Materials Used by General Dentists during Root Canal Treatment Procedures: Findings from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleazer, Paul D.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Reams, G.J.; Law, A.S.; Benjamin, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about which materials and techniques general dentists (GDs) use during root canal procedures. The objectives were to: (1) quantify GD’s use of specific endodontic armamentarium; (2) quantify inappropriate use; and (3) ascertain if inappropriate use is associated with dentists’ practice characteristics. Methods GDs in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network reported in a questionnaire materials and techniques they use during root canal procedures. Results 1,490 (87%) of eligible GDs participated. Most (93%; n=1,383) used sodium hypochlorite to irrigate. The most commonly used sealers were zinc oxide-eugenol (43%) and resin (40%), followed by calcium hydroxide (26%). A majority (62%; n=920) used a compaction obturation technique; 36% (n=534) used a carrier-based method. Most (96%; n=1,423) used gutta percha as a filler; 5% used paste fillers. Few used irrigants (n=46), sealers (n=4), techniques (n=49) or fillers (n=10) that investigators classified as ‘inappropriate’. Conclusions GDs use a broad range of endodontic techniques and materials, often adapting to newer technologies as they become available. Few GDs use armamentarium that the investigators classified as inappropriate. Practical Implications GDs use many types of endodontic techniques and materials, but only a very small percentage is not appropriate. PMID:26562726

  8. The Maxillary Sinus Membrane Elevation Procedure: Augmentation of Bone around Dental Implants without Grafts—A Review of a Surgical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Riben

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Long-term edentulism may in many cases result in resorption of the alveolar process. The sinus lift procedure aims to create increased bone volume in the maxillary sinus in order to enable installation of dental implants in the region. The method is over 30 years old, and initially autogenous bone grafts were used and later also different bone substitutes. Since 1997, a limited number of studies have explored the possibility of a graftless procedure where the void under the sinus membrane is filled with a blood clot that enables bone formation. Aim. To describe the evolution of the sinus-lift technique and to review the literature related to the technique with a focus on long-term studies related to the graft-less technique. Methods. The electronic database PubMed was searched, and a systematic review was conducted regarding relevant articles. Results. A relatively few long-term studies using the described technique were found. However, the technique was described as reliable considering the outcome of the existing studies. Conclusion. All investigated studies show high implant survival rates for the graftless technique. The technique is considered to be cost-effective, less time-consuming, and related to lower morbidity since no bone harvesting is needed.

  9. Improving multiple-choice questions to better assess dental student knowledge: distractor utilization in oral and maxillofacial pathology course examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, C Alex; Pinckard, R Neal; Prihoda, Thomas J; Hendricson, William D; Jones, Anne Cale

    2013-12-01

    How many incorrect response options (known as distractors) to use in multiple-choice questions has been the source of considerable debate in the assessment literature, especially relative to influence on the likelihood of students' guessing the correct answer. This study compared distractor use by second-year dental students in three successive oral and maxillofacial pathology classes that had three different examination question formats and scoring resulting in different levels of academic performance. One class was given all multiple-choice questions; the two other were given half multiple-choice questions, with and without formula scoring, and half un-cued short-answer questions. Use by at least 1 percent of the students was found to better identify functioning distractors than higher cutoffs. The average number of functioning distractors differed among the three classes and did not always correspond to differences in class scores. Increased numbers of functioning distractors were associated with higher question discrimination and greater question difficulty. Fewer functioning distractors fostered more effective student guessing and overestimation of academic achievement. Appropriate identification of functioning distractors is essential for improving examination quality and better estimating actual student knowledge through retrospective use of formula scoring, where the amount subtracted for incorrect answers is based on the harmonic mean number of functioning distractors.

  10. Preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled senior adults: from community to nursing facility residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary C; Caplan, Daniel J; Bern-Klug, Mercedes; Cowen, Howard J; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Marchini, Leonardo; Momany, Elizabeth T

    2017-09-08

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the utilization rate of preventive oral health care services while senior adults were community-dwelling differed from the rate after those same senior adults were admitted to nursing facilities. A secondary objective was to evaluate other significant predictors of receipt of preventive oral health procedures after nursing facility entry. Iowa Medicaid claims from 2007-2014 were accessed for adults who were 68+ years upon entry to a nursing facility and continuously enrolled in Medicaid for at least three years before and at least two years after admission (n = 874). Univariate, bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted. During the five years that subjects were followed, 52.8% never received a dental exam and 75.9% never received a dental hygiene procedure. More Medicaid-enrolled senior adults received ≥1 preventive dental procedure in the two years while residing in a nursing facility compared to the three years before entry. In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictor of preventive oral health care utilization after entry was the receipt of preventive oral health services before entry (p dental procedures in the two years after nursing facility entry was the receipt of dental procedures in the three years before entry while community-dwelling. This underscores the importance of the senior adult establishing a source of dental care while community-dwelling. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  11. The development, implementation, utilization and outcomes of a comprehensive dental program for older adults residing in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Chris C L; So, Frankie H C; Williams, P Michele; Mithani, Akber; Zed, Christopher M; Yen, Edwin H K

    2006-06-01

    This paper documents the experience of the University of British Columbia's Geriatric Dentistry Program (GDP) with emphasis on the dental treatment needs of patients during its first year of operation. The GDP provided access to dental care for residents of longterm care facilities, education for hospital staff concerning daily mouth care, education of dental students and an opportunity for research. The first year of clinical activity saw a small, yet significant, improvement in oral health for residents using the dental services. We hope that the outcomes of this new dental program for long-term care facilities will encourage dentists to provide care for this vulnerable population.

  12. A new classification system for dental treatment under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo; Zavala-Alonso, Veronica; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Friedman, Clive

    2006-01-01

    The provision of comprehensive care for patients with special needs using dental general anesthesia (DGA) has changed over time, and now includes more complex procedures and the participation of many services. As a result, it is necessary to integrate, organize and describe all of the procedures that are carried out in different DGA settings. The aim of this study was to propose a systematic classification for dental treatment procedures be delivered under DGA, and to compare this classification system with an existing system. This new classification system has three distinct components: type, frequency and length of time needed to complete dental procedures for both primary and permanent teeth. A wide range of oral surgery procedures and endodontic treatment was also included. A retrospective cohort study utilizing 84 subjects was used to develop and compare the two classification systems. When comparing the different categories of procedures by both classifications, there were significant statistical differences between them (p dental or medical specialties. The classification system in this study includes detailed information regarding the procedures involved in the DGA. This helps to provide a clear understanding and specific information that enables the comparison of clinical experiences across populations where a DGA has been used for patients with special needs.

  13. Validation and scopolamine-reversal of latent learning in the water maze utilizing a revised direct platform placement procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, David H; Schaar, Krystal L; Izygon, Jonathan J; Nghiem, Duyen M; Jabitta, Sikirat Y; Henceroth, Mallori M; Chang, Yu-Hsuan; Daggett, Jenny M; Ward, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    The Morris water maze is routinely used to explore neurobiological mechanisms of working memory. Humans can often acquire working memory relevant to performing a task by mere sensory observation, without having to actually perform the task followed by reinforcement. This can be modeled in the water maze through direct placement of a rat on the escape platform so that it can observe the location, and then assessing the subject's performance in swimming back to the platform. However, direct placement procedures have hardly been studied for two decades, reflecting a controversy about whether direct placement resulted in sufficiently rapid and direct swims back to the platform. In the present study, utilizing revised training methods, a more comprehensive measure of trajectory directness, a more rigorous sham-trained control procedure and an optimal placement-test interval, rats swam almost directly back to the platform in under 4s, significantly more quickly and directly than sham-trained subjects. Muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms, which are inactivated by scopolamine, are essential to memory for standard learning paradigms in the water maze. This experiment determined whether this would also be true for latent learning. ANOVA revealed significant negative effects of scopolamine on both speed and accuracy of trajectory, as well as significant positive effects of direct placement training vs. sham-training. In a probe trial, placement-trained animals without scopolamine spent significantly more time and path length in the target quadrant than trained rats with scopolamine and sham-trained rats without scopolamine. Scopolamine impairments are likely due to effects on memory, since the same dose had little effect on performance with a visible platform. The revised direct placement model offers a means of further comparing the neural mechanisms of latent learning with those of standard instrumental learning.

  14. Felipressina aumenta pressão arterial durante procedimento odontológico em pacientes hipertensos Felypressin increases blood pressure during dental procedures in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Aparecida Bronzo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A felipressina foi adicionada ao anestésico local para aumentar a duração do efeito anestésico e reduzir a toxicidade nos procedimentos dentários. No entanto, o efeito sobre a pressão arterial é incerta, e isso pode ser altamente relevante no tratamento dentário de pacientes hipertensos. OBJETIVO: Investigar o efeito da felipressina sobre a pressão arterial em pacientes hipertensos com pressão arterial controlada. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 71 indivíduos com essas características e com necessidade de tratamento periodontal. Após 10 minutos de repouso, a anestesia local (prilocaína foi infiltrada com e sem adição de felipressina. Em seguida, uma raspagem subgengival profunda foi realizada. A pressão arterial foi medida por um equipamento oscilométrico automático (DIXTAL DX2010. Dez minutos após a administração do anestésico, o pico de ação anestésica foi gravado. O Inventário de Ansiedade Traço-Estado (IDATE foi utilizado para avaliar o traço de ansiedade nos pacientes. RESULTADOS: A pressão arterial sistólica aumentou após a anestesia, independentemente da associação com felipressina, durante todo o procedimento dentário (p BACKGROUND: Felypressin has been added to local anesthetic to increase the length of the anesthetic effect and reduce toxicity during dental procedures. However, the effect on blood pressure remains uncertain, and this may be highly relevant in the dental treatment of hypertensive patients. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of felypressin on blood pressure in hypertensive patients with controlled BP. METHODS: 71 subjects with these characteristics and in need of periodontal treatment were studied. After 10 minutes of rest, local anesthesia (prilocaine was infiltrated with and without addition of felypressin. Then, a deep subgingival scaling was performed. Blood pressure was measured by an automated oscillometric device (DIXTAL DX2010. Ten minutes after the administration of the

  15. 口腔种植上颌窦提升术临床要点%Clinical Guidelines for Maxillary Sinus Lift Procedures in Placing Dental Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢尚廷; 方敏智; 陈家玮; 张皓凯

    2013-01-01

    严重牙周病导致的上颌后牙缺失常伴有严重的牙槽嵴低平.因此,缺少足够的骨高度通常是在这个区域做牙种植的主要困难.1985年Boyne与James首先提出经上颌窦侧壁开窗的上颌窦底提升术,以提升足够的骨高度来进行上颌后牙种植修复.1998年,Summers提出了另外一种窦底提升方法,即从上颌牙槽嵴顶垂直向牙根方向,对上颌窦进行窦底提升,称为垂直提升技术或者牙槽嵴入路上颌窦提升术.本文将结合相关文献及我们的临床经验,叙述这两种手术方式的特点、适应证与禁忌证、临床步骤以及可能的并发症和处理方法.希望对读者理解上颌窦提升术有所帮助.%Most of peoples lost their maxillary posterior teeth because of the serious periodontal problems that usually associated with significant bone loss around.Thus,lack of enough bone height often became a major challenge to place dental implant at this area.Around 1985,lateral window sinus lift technique was first introduced to increase the bone height for placing dental implant at maxillary posterior regions by Dr.Boyne and James.Later in 1998,Dr.Summers reported another technique,which is to approach maxillary sinus vertically from the alveolar crest,so called vertical approach technique or crest approach technique.In this paper,I will describe the nature,indications,contraindications,and clinical procedures of both techniques.I will also state the possible complications and their managements.This paper is organized from reviewing reported papers and our clinical experiences,and hopefully,will benefit our readers in understanding the clinical outcomes of sinus lift procedures.

  16. A procedural manual for measurement of uranium and thorium isotopes utilizing the USGS-Stanford Finnegan Mat 262

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamp, Donald D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past several decades investigators have extensively examined the 238U-234U- 230Th systematics of a variety of geologic materials using alpha spectroscopy. Analytical uncertainty for 230Th by alpha spectroscopy has been limited to about 2% (2σ). The advantage of thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS), introduced by Edwards and co-workers in the late 1980’s is the increased detectability of these isotopes by a factor of ~200, and decreases in the uncertainty for 230Th to about 5‰ (2σ) error. This report is a procedural manual for using the USGS-Stanford Finnegan-Mat 262 TIMS to collect and isolate Uranium and Thorium isotopic ratio data. Chemical separation of Uranium and Thorium from the sample media is accomplished using acid dissolution and then processed using anion exchange resins. The Finnegan-Mat262 Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) utilizes a surface ionization technique in which nitrates of Uranium and Thorium are placed on a source filament. Upon heating, positive ion emission occurs. The ions are then accelerated and focused into a beam which passes through a curved magnetic field dispersing the ions by mass. Faraday cups and/or an ion counter capture the ions and allow for quantitative analysis of the various isotopes.

  17. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  18. A comparison of the effects of propofol and nitrous oxide on the electroencephalogram in epileptic patients during conscious sedation for dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei-Lim, V L; Kalkman, C J; Bouvy-Berends, E C; Posthumus Meyjes, E F; Makkes, P C; Vermeulen-Cranch, D M; Odoom, J A; van Wezel, H B; Bovill, J G

    1992-11-01

    The influence of sedative doses of propofol or nitrous oxide on the electroencephalogram was studied in 11 mentally handicapped patients with treated epilepsy undergoing dental procedures. At one session, propofol was titrated to achieve conscious sedation. The mean (+/- SD) dose requirements were 5.5 +/- 1.1 mg.kg-1.h-1. In six patients, the electroencephalogram was unchanged during propofol administration. In three patients, there was a decrease in epileptic activity, and in two patients, paroxysmal discharges disappeared. At another session, nitrous oxide was administered by nasal mask. The mean (+/- SD) concentration of nitrous oxide needed was 43.6% +/- 4.8%. The electroencephalogram did not change in nine patients, whereas in two patients epileptic activity decreased. There were no clinical epileptoid or other adverse manifestations during any treatment or up to 48 h thereafter. The results of the present study suggest that propofol or nitrous oxide can be administered in subanesthetic doses for conscious sedation in mentally handicapped patients with treated epilepsy.

  19. Reducing an already low dental diagnostic X-ray dose: does it make sense? Comparison of three cost-utility analysis methods used to assess two dental dose-reduction measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeveen, R C; Sanderink, G C H; van der Stelt, P F; Berkhout, W E R

    2015-01-01

    To find a method that is suitable for providing an objective assessment of the cost effectiveness of a dose-reducing measure used for diagnostic dental X-ray exposures. Three cost-utility analysis (CUA) methods were evaluated by comparing their assessments of two dose-reduction measures, a rectangular collimator and the combination of two devices that reduce the radiation dose received during orthodontic lateral cephalography. The following CUA methods were used: (1) the alpha value (AV), a monetary valuation of dose reduction used in the nuclear industry; (2) the value of a statistical life for valuation of the reduction in stochastic adverse effects; and (3) the time-for-time method, based on the postulate that risk reduction is effective when the number of years of life gained is more than the years that an average worker must work to earn the costs of the risk-reducing measure. The CUA methods were used to determine the minimum number of uses that was required for the dose-reducing device to be cost effective. The methods were assessed for coherence (are comparable results achieved for comparable countries?) and adaptability (can the method be adjusted for age and gender of specific patient groups?). The performance of the time-for-time method was superior to the other methods. Both types of dose-reduction devices tested were assessed as cost effective after a realistic number of uses with all three methods except low AVs. CUA for the methods of X-ray dose reduction can be performed to determine if investment in low dose reduction is cost effective. The time-for-time method proved to be a coherent and versatile method for performing CUA.

  20. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Domb, Ivor

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  1. Comparison of surgical procedures for vascular and airway anastomoses that utilize a modified non-suture external cuff technique for experimental lung transplantation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Sekine, Yasuo; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Fujisawa, Takehiko; Wilkes, David S

    2004-07-01

    Lung transplantation in rats is technically difficult and results may vary. The non-suture cuff technique (non-suture [NS]), which involves using a cuff for anastomoses of vessels and airways, is commonly utilized to perform transplant procedures. However, the standard bronchial cuff may occlude the lumen, resulting in diminished graft survival. In contrast, the non-suture cuff technique for vascular anastomoses with bronchial suturing (bronchial suture [BS]), although more technically difficult, is known to have prolonged bronchial patency. We developed a "modified" NS technique that uses a larger and longer cuff for anastomoses and compared the efficacy of this procedure to the BS technique for lung transplantation. The BS procedure was performed in 146 transplant procedures. The modified NS procedure, which uses a larger cuff than the standard NS procedure, was performed in 113 procedures. Although total ischemic times were comparable, the total operation time in the NS group was significantly shorter than in the BS group (p technique is widely acknowledged to provide prolonged patency of bronchial anastomosis, graft survival in the NS group was observed up 17 months post-transplant. These data show that the NS technique, which is less technically difficult, results in shorter operative times compared with the BS procedure, and results in durable anastomoses of lung grafts.

  2. The prevalence, causes, and relativity of dental anxiety in adult patients to irregular dental visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, Balgis O; Alagl, Adel S; Al-Ansari, Asim A

    2014-06-01

    To assess the frequency and causes of dental anxiety and their relation to irregular dental visits among adult dental patients. The Dental Anxiety Question (DAQ) included within a self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1025 patients attending the Interns' Dental Clinics in the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from March 2012 to February 2013. A cross-sectional study design was used. The questionnaire consisted of 22 closed-ended questions divided into 4 sections; 1) demographics, 2) regularity of dental visits, and related causes, 3) DAQ, cancellation of dental appointments, history of previous trauma, dental anxiety provoking factors within dental environment and procedures, and 4) patients' status in dental clinics, preferences of dentists, and perceptions regarding dental anxiety. The prevalence of dental anxiety among the study sample was 27%. Anesthetic injection was the main factor of dental fear (88.2%), while dental surgical procedures (35.7%) and extractions (23%) were the most terrifying dental procedures. Lack of time (79.5%), cost (71.5%), far-situated dental services (62.2%), and fear (57.1%) were causes listed for irregular dental visits; while 31.3% had no specific reason. Irregular dental visits were not related to dental anxiety. Dental anxiety continues to be an obstacle despite the vast improvement in dentistry; and this raises an alert regarding personal and communication factors in the patient-dentist relationship. Factors such as equal distribution of dental services, time, and cost should also be addressed.

  3. Integrating Monetary and Non-Monetary Retention Incentives for the U.S. Navy Dental Corps Officers Utilizing the Combinatorial Retention Auction Mechanism (CRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Pediatric Dentistry (1795) 10. Duty Assignments The dental officers receive duty assignments based on the needs of the naval service. Duty...1 Endodontics 1 Prosthodontics 1 Orthodontics 1 Oral Pathology/Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine 1 Pediatric Dentistry 1 Periodontics 1 Public...Dental Research 1790 0 Pediatric Dentistry 1795 5 Total 110 Of the 110 DC officer respondents, the responses were fairly distributed across all the

  4. A PORTABLE DENTAL STERILIZING CYLINDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes an aluminum cylinder in which dental instruments could be sterilized under emergency field conditions and at the same time be...protected against corrosion. The procedure involves loading the cylinder with dental instruments, flushing it with ethylene oxide-Freon gas, closing it...and then immersing it in boiling water for l hour. In preliminary experiments with a prototype of the sterilizing cylinder, dental instruments were

  5. [The Bambuí Project: a population-based study of factors associated with regular utilization of dental services in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, D L; Lima-Costa, M F; Guerra, H L; Marcenes, W

    2001-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Bambuí, Minas Gerais, to identify factors associated with regular use of dental services. Participants were interviewed with a structured questionnaire and previously validated questions. 999/1,221 (81.8%) randomly selected individuals aged > 18 years participated in the Bambuí dental survey. Of these, 654 out of 656 individuals who had at least one natural tooth and had visited a dentist during their lifetime participated in the study. Results adjusted by multiple logistic regression showed that regular use of dental services was significantly related to having > 8 and 4-7 years of schooling (OR = 9.90; 95% CI = 2.90-33.77 and OR = 3.87; 95% CI = 1.11-13.51, respectively), having a preference for restorative treatment rather than extraction (OR = 4.91; 95% CI = 2.23-10.79), having no present need of dental treatment (OR = 4.87; 95% CI = 3.17-7.49), and belief that visiting the dentist prevents tooth decay and gum disease (OR = 1.73; 95% CI = 1.13-2.65). The results show that regular use of dental services was related to factors distributed in the Andersen and Newman model (1973) explaining use of dentistry services.

  6. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in New York State is presented. In addition to identifying licensing requirements/procedures for dentists and dental hygienists, general provisions of Title VIII of the Education Law are covered, along with state management, professional misconduct,…

  7. Dental problems in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioło, Anna; Mielnik-Błaszczak, Maria

    2004-01-01

    On the grounds of literature and own clinical experience, pathological changes in epilepitic patients have been described. Dental management procedures in these patients have also been presented. The unquestionable importance of prophylaxis, which may markedly minimize the impact of epilepsy on the incidence of mouth diseases, has been emphasised. It has also been stated that epileptic patients should receive specialised and integrated dental treatment.

  8. 北京永定路社区居民口腔卫生服务需要和利用调查%Survey on the need and the utilization for dental care in Chinese community residents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫静; 宫琳; 张爱军; 路燕; 王瑞华; 李刚

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to survey the need for dental care and the utilization for oral health service in Chinese Community residents. Methods Based on world health organization guideline for oral health survey, random cluster sampling was used and 2 000 community residents were interviewed for a free dental checkup and questionnaire survey. The inquiry about the need for dental care and the utilization of oral health services were conducted. According to medical evacuation support, the need for dental care were classified into four degree. Results The data of 1 845 community residents had been collected. The survey results showed 13. 77% for oral health, 46. 83% for dental care in regularly, 38.75% for dental care in quickly, 0.6% for dental emergencies, 39.73% for community residents a year visiting rate. Conclusion These results above show that the need for dental care in Chinese community residents is very frequent, and oral health care seem to account for a significant problem, the work of dental care is suggested to be strengthened.%目的 了解北京社区居民口腔医疗需要和口腔卫生服务资源利用现况,为推动社区居民口腔医疗保健服务提供参考.方法 以世界卫生组织口腔健康调查基本方法为标准,采用随机等比抽样调查方法,对北京永定路社区2 000名居民进行口腔健康检查和问卷调查,了解其口腔医疗需要情况及口腔卫生服务资源利用情况.结果 共计1 845人的口腔健康调查表符合要求.其中254人(13.77%)不需要口腔医疗,864人(46.83%)需要择期口腔医疗,715人(38.75%)需要及早口腔医疗,12人(0.65%)需要紧急口腔医疗.社区居民1年内就诊率为39.73%.就诊选择国营口腔专科医院的占37.02%,选择私营口腔诊所的占35.88%.结论 社区居民的口腔医疗需求普遍,口腔医疗保健任务艰巨,应加强社区口腔疾病预防控制工作.

  9. 42 CFR 440.100 - Dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dental services. 440.100 Section 440.100 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.100 Dental services. (a) “Dental services” means diagnostic, preventive, or corrective procedures provided by or under the...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820 Section 868.5820 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device intended to protect a patient's teeth during manipulative procedures within...

  11. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  12. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  13. Optimization in the utility maximization framework for conservation planning: A comparison of solution procedures in a study ofmultifunctional agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Kreitler et al. Quantitative methods of spatial conservation prioritization have traditionally been applied to issues in conservation biology and reserve design, though their use in other types of natural resource management is growing. The utility maximization problemis one formof a covering problemwheremultiple criteria can represent the expected social benefits of conservation action. This approach allows flexibility with a problem formulation that is more general than typical reser...

  14. Latex Allergy in Dental Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermata A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber latex is found in numerous medical and dental products. Adverse latex reactions in dental patients and practitioners have significantly increased since the introduction of universal precautions for infection control. These reactions range from contact dermatitis to potentially life-threatening hypersensitivity. Patients with a history of spina bifida, urogenital anomalies, multiple surgical procedures, allergic reactions or atopy, health care personnel and latex production workers are at increased risk of latex allergy. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical history and laboratory tests. Identification of latex sources and the avoidance of latex exposure are critical for protecting both dental patients and dental personnel.

  15. Dental Interventions on First Permanent Molars

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The first permanent molars have the biggest dental morbidity and mortality of all permanent teeth. The main aim was to evaluate of the most common dental problems and procedures that are performed on the first permanent molars. Material and method: examination was performed in three private dental offices, two from urban and one from rural region, over a period of 2 years. The data was obtained by using dental charts from the patients and by the ambulatory register for performe...

  16. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  17. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips ... offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants ...

  18. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Dental Assistants PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary What They ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Dental Assistants Do About this section Assistants prepare and ...

  19. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  20. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  1. Clinical problems and their managements in dental bonding procedure%口腔粘接固定修复中常见的临床问题及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄翠; 杜习金

    2013-01-01

    经过几十年的发展,粘接技术已经成为一项重要的口腔临床技术.口腔粘接技术不仅应用在直接修复中,在间接修复中的应用也越来越广泛.临床医生在进行粘接修复时会碰到许多问题,如技术敏感性、术后牙齿敏感、继发龋、修复体边缘着色等.纤维桩和全瓷修复体的粘接也是美学修复工作的重要步骤.这些问题若处理不当,都可能影响修复体最终的修复效果.本文对口腔粘接固定修复中常见的临床问题加以总结和分析,强调针对具体的临床问题选择合适的解决方案,旨在为临床医生提供参考和建议.%Dental bonding technique has become an essential technique for dental clinical practice over the past several decades. Dental adhesion is widely used in direct and indirect restorations. However, problems such as technique sensitivity, postoperative sensitivity, secondary caries and marginal discoloration always appear in the dental bonding procedures. Fiber post and all-ceramic restoration bonding are essential step in esthetic dentistry. If these problems are not well handled, it will result in failure of the restorations. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide adequate consultations and advice for the clinical practitioners based on the author's experience and relevant literatures.

  2. Utilization of teledentistry as a tool to screen for dental caries among 12-year-old school children in a rural region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Bharathi M; Singh, Abhinav; Dwivedi, Ashish

    2017-03-01

    The study aims to assess the reliability of video-graphic method as a tool to screen the dental caries among 12-year-old school children in a rural region of India. A total of 139 school children participated in the study. Visual tactile examinations were conducted using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Simultaneously, standardized video recording of the oral cavity was performed. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated for video-graphic assessment of dental caries. Bland-Altman plot was used to assess agreement between the two methods of caries assessment. Likelihood ratio (LR) and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to assess the predictive accuracy of the video-graphic method. Mean DMFT for the study population was 2.47 ± 2.01 and 2.46 ± 1.91 by visual tactile and video-graphic assessment (P = 0.76; > 0.05). Sensitivity and specificity values of 0.86 and 0.58 were established for video-graphic assessment. A fair degree of agreement was noted between the two methods with Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) value of 0.56. LR for video-graphic assessment was 2.05. Bland-Altman plot confirmed the level of agreement between the two assessment methods. The area under curve was 0.69 (CI 0.57, 0.80, P = 0.001). Teledentistry examination is comparable to clinical examination when screening for dental caries among school children. This study provides evidence that teledentistry may be used as an alternative screening tool for assessment of dental caries and is viable for remote consultation and treatment planning. Teledentistry offers to change the dynamics of dental care delivery and may effectively bridge the rural-urban oral health divide. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. New Configuration and Novel Reclosing Procedure of Distribution System for Utilization of BESS as UPS in Smart Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Chul Seo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new configuration and novel reclosing procedure of a distribution system with a battery energy storage system (BESS used as an uninterruptible power supply (UPS in a smart grid. The proposed new configurations of the distribution systems are the installation of a circuit breaker (CB on both sides of the distribution line, the replacement of the recloser with a CB and protective relay, and the requirement of a communication method. The proposed reclosing procedure performs the reclosing of the CB at the load side and then judges the fault clearance using the load current. If the fault is cleared, the synchronism checking between the main source and the BESS is performed. After completing this, the CB at the main source side is reclosed. The smart grid environment, including a new distribution system, BESS, and reclosing method are modeled with the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP/ATPDraw. To verify the proposed method, the various simulations according to the fault clearance time are performed and analyzed. The simulation results show that the BESS can be operated as a UPS and successful reclosing is possible.

  4. Approaches to Accounting and Prediction of Fast Neutron Fluence on VVER Pressure Vessels for Estimation of RPV Residual Lifetime in Compliance with Russian Utility's Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodkin, Gennady; Borodkin, Pavel; Khrennikov, Nikolay; Ryabinin, Yuriy; Adeev, Valeriy

    2016-02-01

    The Paper describes a new Russian Utility's regulatory document (RD EO) which has been recently developed and implemented since the beginning of 2013. This RD EO includes the procedure of RPV FNF monitoring and provides recommendations on how to predict fluence over the design lifetime taking into account results of FNF monitoring. The basic method of RPV neutron fluence monitoring is neutron transport calculations of FR in the vicinity of the RPV. Reliability of the calculation results should be validated by ex-vessel neutron-activation measurements, which were performed during different fuel cycles with different core loadings including new types of fuel.

  5. Approaches to Accounting and Prediction of Fast Neutron Fluence on VVER Pressure Vessels for Estimation of RPV Residual Lifetime in Compliance with Russian Utility's Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodkin Gennady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paper describes a new Russian Utility's regulatory document (RD EO which has been recently developed and implemented since the beginning of 2013. This RD EO includes the procedure of RPV FNF monitoring and provides recommendations on how to predict fluence over the design lifetime taking into account results of FNF monitoring. The basic method of RPV neutron fluence monitoring is neutron transport calculations of FR in the vicinity of the RPV. Reliability of the calculation results should be validated by ex-vessel neutron-activation measurements, which were performed during different fuel cycles with different core loadings including new types of fuel.

  6. Survey practices in dental education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, J W; Kuster, C G

    1983-10-01

    Approximately 40 percent of the data-based articles reported in the Journal of Dental Education in the last five years have used survey research procedures. This study examines the use of one type of survey procedure, mailed questionnaires, in research on dental education. Specifically, the discussion identifies several factors that dental education researchers should consider when reporting mailed questionnaire research to journal editors. These factors are discussed using examples of adequate and inadequate procedures reported in the method sections of studies in the Journal of Dental Education in the last five years.

  7. Optimization of the k-edge filters utilization in the dental radiographs; Otimizacao da utilizacao dos filtros de aresta K na radiografias dentarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Luis M.G.; Almeida, Adelaide de [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2001-07-01

    The signal to noise ratio (S/N) of radiographic film images may be optimized if the thicknesses and atomic composition of the structures to be analyzed are known. With specifications and a knowledge of the interaction of photons with the materials, the photon energy for maximum contrast may be determined. We propose a K-edge filter in addition to the normal aluminum filter, to reduce the dose to the patient by the transmission of a narrow spectrum of photons with energies to optimize the image contrast. The optimum photon energy to obtain the best contrast between dental pulp and dentine and between dentine and dental enamel was determined to be 29-34 and 22-26 keV respectively. The filter material, which closely approximates these spectra, is made of Ce (Z=58) whose thickness is shown do depend on the parameters of the X-ray generator. (author)

  8. Reduction of metal artifacts due to dental hardware in computed tomography angiography: assessment of the utility of model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuya, Keita; Shinohara, Yuki; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Kato, Ayumi [Tottori Municipal Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yonago (Japan); Sakamoto, Makoto; Kurosaki, Masamichi [Tottori University, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the value of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) for reduction of metal artifacts due to dental hardware in carotid CT angiography (CTA). Thirty-seven patients with dental hardware who underwent carotid CTA were included. CTA was performed with a GE Discovery CT750 HD scanner and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), ASIR, and MBIR. We measured the standard deviation at the cervical segment of the internal carotid artery that was affected most by dental metal artifacts (SD{sub 1}) and the standard deviation at the common carotid artery that was not affected by the artifact (SD{sub 2}). We calculated the artifact index (AI) as follows: AI = [(SD{sub 1})2 - (SD{sub 2})2]1/2 and compared each AI for FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Visual assessment of the internal carotid artery was also performed by two neuroradiologists using a five-point scale for each axial and reconstructed sagittal image. The inter-observer agreement was analyzed using weighted kappa analysis. MBIR significantly improved AI compared with FBP and ASIR (p < 0.001, each). We found no significant difference in AI between FBP and ASIR (p = 0.502). The visual score of MBIR was significantly better than those of FBP and ASIR (p < 0.001, each), whereas the scores of ASIR were the same as those of FBP. Kappa values indicated good inter-observer agreements in all reconstructed images (0.747-0.778). MBIR resulted in a significant reduction in artifact from dental hardware in carotid CTA. (orig.)

  9. Utility of knowledge, attitude, and practice survey, and prevalence of dental caries among 11- to 13-year-old children in an urban community in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanskriti Khanal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The school oral health education program is believed to be a cost-effective method for promoting oral health. The KAP (knowledge–attitude–practice model of oral health education is often the foundation of most health education programs. Objectives: To assess the existing knowledge, attitude, and oral health care practices among 11- to 13-year-old children and the association of knowledge with attitude, oral health care practices, and dental caries prevalence. Design: Cross-sectional design, involving 858 children studying in class seven at various schools in the city of Mangalore, India. The children were selected using stratified random sampling method. Prevalence of dental caries was determined using decayed, missing, and filled permanent teeth (DMFT index. A self-administered questionnaire on self-care practices in oral health, knowledge, and attitude toward oral health care was filled by children. The association of different variables with knowledge was analyzed using binary logistic regression analysis. Results: The dental caries prevalence was 59.4%, and 54.5% had low knowledge. They lacked knowledge regarding use of fluoridated toothpaste and did not use them. Children with low knowledge had significantly higher odds of having DMFT ≥ 1, not using fluoridated toothpaste, and being afraid of going to the dentist due to possible pain. There was no association of other oral health care practices and attitudes with knowledge. Conclusion: Oral health care practices and attitudes are not fully explained by knowledge, and other models of health education need to be considered.

  10. The difference of dental anxiety in children based on frequency of dental appointment

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Giri Astri; Eka Chemiawan; Eriska Rriyanti

    2011-01-01

    Background: Problem of children’s anxiety during dental procedures is a common phenomenon. This is called dental anxiety. The anxiety children patien need to be paid a special attention, because it will affect the success of dental treatment. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to find out the difference of dental anxiety degree in children aged 8 to 12 years old based on the frequency of dental visits in dental community health centre Bandung. Methods: The method of this research was a...

  11. Exploration of Clinical Whitening Procedure for Dental Fluorosis Bleaching%氟斑牙临床有效治疗方法的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晖; 张英

    2015-01-01

    目的 将氟斑牙的治疗手段有序结合,探讨氟斑牙最佳临床美白治疗方法.方法 选取2013年1月至2014年12月本科室就诊且诊断为氟斑牙患者90例,患者均知情同意并签署知情同意书.按照症状(轻度、中度、重度)将患者随机均分为A、B、C组.A组患者(30例,180颗患牙)采取微打磨—酸处理(35%磷酸酸蚀牙面)—冷光美白(Beyond美白凝胶8 h)治疗;B组(30例,175颗患牙)采取微打磨—冷光美白(Beyond美白凝胶8 h)治疗;C组(30例,180颗患牙)采取酸处理—冷光美白(Beyond美白凝胶8 h)治疗.各组患者治疗前后利用Vita比色板进行比色,计算色阶提高值和有效率.结果 3组轻度氟斑牙患者的色阶提高值和治疗有效率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);A组中、重度氟斑牙患者色阶提高值和有效率与B组、C组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);结论 中重度氟斑牙采取微打磨—酸处理—美白有序结合治疗可以取得满意效果.%Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of combination of Beyond cold light whitening and fluoride removing material bleaching sys-tem for treatment of dental fluorosis. Methods Ninety patients with light,medium and heavy dental fluorosis were recruited for the study and ran-domly divided into three groups. Thirty patients with 180 dental fluorosis from the A group were treated with microbrasion and etch and Beyond cold light bleaching. Thirty patients with 175 dental fluorosis from the B group were treated with microbrasion and beyond cold light bleaching. Thirty pa-tients with 180 dental fluorosis from the C group were treated with etch and Beyond cold light bleaching. The effects of whitening were evaluated by Vita shade guide matching after treatment. Results Good lightening efficacy and 100%bleaching efficacy was achieved in the light dental fluorosis subjects from all the three groups. The Shade value improvement and overall efficacy of observer group were better than the

  12. Utilization of radiometric method in evaluation of wear on human dental enamel in vitro by dental porcelain glazed and polished; Utilizacao do metodo radiometrico na avaliacao in vitro do desgaste provocado ao esmalte dental humano por porcelanas dentais glazeadas e polidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki de; Adachi, Eduardo Makoto [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Protese]. E-mail: katekawa@usp.br; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mitiko@curiango.ipen.br

    2005-07-01

    The dental porcelain is a material commonly used in prosthesis. Disadvantages of dental porcelain use include possibility to cause tooth or dental materials wear. Before its use in the mouth, surfaces are treated with polishing and/or glazing. This research used the radiometric method to verify the influence of these surface treatments on the porcelains of commercial brands: Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse. This method was originally developed for dentifrice abrasiveness evaluation. Five specimens of dental enamel and 10 specimens of each porcelain (5 glazed, 5 polished) were used. The dental enamel was flattened and irradiated with neutrons from the IEA-R1 (IPEN/CNEN) nuclear reactor. Then it was weared by each porcelain in sliding motion, with water. After 2,500 cycles for each porcelain specimen, the released enamel residue was measured. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of {sup 32}P transferred to water from the irradiated tooth. Results varied from 2.57 to 5.81 {mu}g of enamel /mm{sup 2} weared surface. There was no statistical difference ({alpha}=0.05) between dental enamel wear caused by the same porcelains glazed or polished. The results suggest that adequate surface finishing depend on the type of dental porcelain. (author)

  13. Características do acesso e utilização de serviços odontológicos em municípios de médio porte Characteristics of the access and utilization of public dental services in medium-sized cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Cristina Lima Chaves

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo de corte transversal descreve as principais características de acesso e utilização de serviços odontológicos básicos e especializados em dois municípios de médio porte da Bahia com 100% de cobertura da Estratégia de Saúde da Família. Realizou-se um inquérito com 2.539 indivíduos de idade acima de 15 anos em 952 domicílios. As principais variáveis analisadas foram a necessidade de saúde bucal percebida, a procura pelo serviço, a barreira de acesso organizacional e o tipo de serviço e o procedimento utilizado. A utilização de serviços públicos odontológicos especializados foi de 11,7% e básicos de 26%. No município com maior utilização de serviços públicos odontológicos, foi menor o uso de serviços privados. A principal barreira de acesso situou-se na AP (Atenção Primária, entre 5,0% e 15,2%. Observou-se pouca interface da atenção secundária com a AP já que apenas 16,6% dos usuários retornaram a esse nível de atenção. Pode-se concluir que a principal barreira de acesso, em municípios com realidades organizacionais e geográficas específicas parece se situar na AP. Ações preventivas individuais foram pouco relatadas. Recomenda-se a redução de barreiras de acesso na AP, bem como a instituição de um protocolo que estimule a longitudinalidade do cuidado nesse nível.This cross-sectional study sought to describe the main characteristics of access and utilization of primary and specialized public dental services in two medium-sized cities in Bahia with 100% coverage of the Family Health Program. A survey of 952 households and 2.539 individuals aged over 15 years was conducted. The main variables analyzed were: perceived oral health needs, demand for the service, barriers of organizational access and the type of service and procedure utilized. The use of specialized public dental services was of 11.7% and primary care was 26%. In the city where there was greater use of public dental services

  14. Expanded function allied dental personnel and dental practice productivity and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazoglou, Tryfon J; Chen, Lei; Lazar, Vickie F; Brown, L Jackson; Ray, Subhash C; Heffley, Dennis R; Berg, Rob; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the impact of expanded function allied dental personnel on the productivity and efficiency of general dental practices. Detailed practice financial and clinical data were obtained from a convenience sample of 154 general dental practices in Colorado. In this state, expanded function dental assistants can provide a wide range of reversible dental services/procedures, and dental hygienists can give local anesthesia. The survey identified practices that currently use expanded function allied dental personnel and the specific services/procedures delegated. Practice productivity was measured using patient visits, gross billings, and net income. Practice efficiency was assessed using a multivariate linear program, Data Envelopment Analysis. Sixty-four percent of the practices were found to use expanded function allied dental personnel, and on average they delegated 31.4 percent of delegatable services/procedures. Practices that used expanded function allied dental personnel treated more patients and had higher gross billings and net incomes than those practices that did not; the more services they delegated, the higher was the practice's productivity and efficiency. The effective use of expanded function allied dental personnel has the potential to substantially expand the capacity of general dental practices to treat more patients and to generate higher incomes for dental practices.

  15. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  16. Applications of CBCT in dental practice: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Hadi Mohammed; Sadrameli, Mitra; Alshalhoob, Mazen Abdullah; Sadrameli, Mahtab; Alshehri, Mohammed Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the various clinical applications of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A literature search was conducted via PubMed for publications related to dental applications of CBCT published between January 1998 and June 15, 2010. The search revealed a total of 540 articles, 129 of which were clinically relevant and analyzed in detail. A literature review demonstrated that CBCT has been utilized for oral and maxillofacial surgery, endodontics, implantology, orthodontics, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, periodontics, and restorative and forensic dentistry. This literature review showed that the different indications for CBCT are governed by the needs of the specific dental discipline and the type of procedure performed.

  17. Dental amalgam: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations.

  18. Fall Protection Procedures for Sealing Bulk Waste Shipments by Rail Cars at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Sites - 13509

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, J.D. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, Buffalo, New York 14207 (United States); Fort, E. Joseph; Lorenz, William [Cabrera Services (Cabrera) East Harford, CT 06108 (United States); Mills, Andy [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc. (Shaw) Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Rail-cars loaded with radioactive materials must be closed and fastened to comply with United States Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements before they shipped. Securing waste shipments in a manner that meets these regulations typically results in the use of a sealable rail-car liner. Workers accessing the tops of the 2.74 m high rail-cars to seal and inspect liners for compliance prior to shipment may be exposed to a fall hazard. Relatively recent revisions to the Fall Protection requirements in the Safety and Health Requirements Manual (EM385-1-1, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) have necessitated modifications to the fall protection systems previously employed for rail-car loading at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In response these projects have developed site-specific procedures to protect workers and maintain compliance with the improved fall protection regulations. (authors)

  19. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-08-01

    The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception.

  20. Time and Cost Analysis: Pediatric Dental Rehabilitation with General Anesthesia in the Office and the Hospital Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashewsky, Stephanie; Parameswaran, Ashish; Sloane, Carole; Ferguson, Fred; Epstein, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric dental patients who cannot receive dental care in the clinic due to uncooperative behavior are often referred to receive dental care under general anesthesia (GA). At Stony Brook Medicine, dental patients requiring treatment with GA receive dental care in our outpatient facility at the Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine (SDM) or in the Stony Brook University Hospital ambulatory setting (SBUH). This study investigates the time and cost for ambulatory American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class I pediatric patients receiving full-mouth dental rehabilitation using GA in these 2 locations, along with a descriptive analysis of the patients and dental services provided. In this institutional review board–approved cross-sectional retrospective study, ICD-9 codes for dental caries (521.00) were used to collect patient records between July 2009 and May 2011. Participants were limited to ASA I patients aged 36–60 months. Complete records from 96 patients were reviewed. There were significant differences in cost, total anesthesia time, and recovery room time (P anesthesia end time minus anesthesia start time) to treat a child at SBUH under GA was 222 ± 62.7 minutes, and recovery time (time of discharge minus anesthesia end time) was 157 ± 97.2 minutes; the average total cost was $7,303. At the SDM, the average total time was 175 ± 36.8 minutes, and recovery time was 25 ± 12.7 minutes; the average total cost was $414. After controlling for anesthesia time and procedures, we found that SBUH cost 13.2 times more than SDM. This study provides evidence that ASA I pediatric patients can receive full-mouth dental rehabilitation utilizing GA under the direction of dentist anesthesiologists in an office-based dental setting more quickly and at a lower cost. This is very promising for patients with the least access to care, including patients with special needs and lack of insurance. PMID:23241037

  1. Degradability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-09-01

    The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as a result of abrasion and dissolution. The chemical durability of dental ceramics is excellent. With the exception of the excessive exposure to acidulated fluoride, ammonium bifluoride, or hydrofluoric acid, there is little risk of surface degradation of virtually all current dental ceramics. Extensive exposure to acidulated fluoride is a possible problem for individuals with head and/or neck cancer who have received large doses of radiation. Such fluoride treatment is necessary to minimize tooth demineralization when saliva flow rates have been reduced because of radiation exposure to salivary glands. Porcelain surface stains are also lost occasionally when abraded by prophylaxis pastes and/or acidulated fluoride. In each case, the solutes are usually not ingested. Further research that uses standardized testing procedures is needed on the chemical durability of dental ceramics. Accelerated durability tests are desirable to minimize the time required for such measurements. The influence of chemical durability on surface roughness and the subsequent effect of roughness on wear of the ceramic restorations as well as of opposing structures should also be explored on a standardized basis.

  2. Usefulness of Forensic Dental Symbols© and Dental Encoder© database in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Chicón, Jesús; Valenzuela, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    A new universal graphic dental system, Forensic Dental Symbols(©), has been created to provide precision in the construction of dental records, improve standardization, and increase efficiency in dental identification procedures. Two hundred and thirty-four different graphic symbols representing the most frequent clinical status for each tooth were designed. Symbols can be then converted to a typographic font and then are ready to use in any computer. For the appropriate use, manipulation, and storage of dental information generated by the Forensic Dental Symbols(©), Dental Encoder(©) database has been created. The database contains all the information required by INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification (DVI)-dental-forms. To explore the possibilities that Dental Encoder(©) offers, an antemortem dental database from a Spanish population of 3920 military personnel had been constructed. Data generated by Dental Encoder(©) were classified into sex and age groups. The program can perform an automatic search of the database for cases that match a selected clinical status presented in a single tooth or a combination of situations for several teeth. Moreover, Dental Encoder(©) allows information to be printed on INTERPOL DVI-dental-forms, or the inclusion of any completed form into any document, technical report, or identification of dental report.

  3. Dental visits and access to dental care among Maryland schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D; Wagner, Mark L; Goodman, Harold S; Manz, Michael C; Marrazzo, Ilise D

    2005-04-01

    Regular dental visits afford an opportunity for dentists to provide preventive services and to diagnose and treat disease. Not all children, however, have equal access to these services. The authors conducted this study to describe access to and utilization of oral health care services for Maryland schoolchildren in kindergarten and third grade. They obtained data from a questionnaire filled out by parents or guardians participating in the Survey of the Oral Health Status of Maryland School Children, 2000-2001 (N = 2,642). Outcome variables included having a dental visit in the last year, prophylaxis in the last year, usual source of medical care and usual source of dental care. Descriptor variables included region, grade, race/ethnicity, eligibility for free or reduced-fee meals, parents' or guardians' education and dental insurance status. Overall, general dental visit and dental prophylaxis visit rates were similar (74.1 and 71.3 percent, respectively). Schoolchildren, however, were more likely to have had a usual source of medical care than of dental care (96.0 and 82.9 percent, respectively). Third graders, those ineligible for free or reduced-fee meals and those with some dental insurance coverage were more likely to have received a prophylaxis in the last year and were more likely to have a usual source of dental care. Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black schoolchildren also were more likely to have had a usual source of dental care than were Hispanics. Schoolchildren most likely to have received regular preventive dental care were those who had parents or guardians with financial resources. Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) provide safety nets, but these programs could be improved. Dentistry's challenge is to determine which characteristics are unique to those who visit the dentist regularly and use this information to help meet the needs of the underserved.

  4. Disparities in unmet dental need and dental care received by pregnant women in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Garcia, A Isabel; Adams, Amy B; Cheng, Diana

    2014-09-01

    To examine prenatal dental care needs, utilization and oral health counseling among Maryland women who delivered a live infant during 2001-2003 and identify the factors associated with having a dental visit and having an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System is an ongoing population based surveillance system that collects information of women's attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to model dental visits and unmet dental need using predictor variables for Maryland 2001-2003 births. Less than half of all women reported having a dental visit and receiving oral health advice during pregnancy. Twenty-five percent of women reported a need for dental care, of which 33 % did not receive dental care despite their perceived need. Multivariate modeling revealed that racial minorities, women who were not married and those with annual income dental visit. Women who were not married, had low annual income, were older than 40 years of age, had an unintended pregnancy and received prenatal care later than desired were most likely to have an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Despite reported needs and existing recommendations to include oral health as a component of prenatal care, less than half of pregnant women have a dental visit during their pregnancy. One-third of women with a dental problem did not have a dental visit highlighting the unmet need for dental care during pregnancy.

  5. Dental Hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  6. Randomized controlled multicenter study comparing short dental implants (6 mm) versus longer dental implants (11-15 mm) in combination with sinus floor elevation procedures. Part 2: clinical and radiographic outcomes at 1 year of loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schincaglia, Gian Pietro; Thoma, Daniel S; Haas, Robert; Tutak, Marcin; Garcia, Abel; Taylor, Thomas D; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2015-11-01

    To compare, clinically and radiographically, short dental implants (6 mm) to long implants (11-15 mm) placed with sinus grafting. Participants with 5-7 mm of bone height in the posterior maxilla were randomly allocated to receive short implants (GS) or long implants with sinus grafting (GG). Implants were loaded with single crowns 6 months after placement (PR). Patients were re-evaluated 12 months after loading (FU-1). Outcome variables included: Implant survival rate (CSR), marginal bone level alteration (MBL), periodontal probing depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BoP), plaque control record (PCR) and crown-to-implant ratios (C/I). Statistical analysis was performed using parametric tests. In 97 subjects, 132 implants were re-evaluated at FU-1. The CSR was 100%. The MBL from implant placement (IP) to (PR) was -0.22 ± 0.4 mm for GG and -0.3 ± 0.45 mm for GS (p 0.05), PPD (p = 1) and PCR (p = 0.09). BoP was higher in the GS (p = 0.04). The C/I was 0.99 ± 0.17 for GG and 1.86 ± 0.23 for GS (p < 0.001). No correlation was observed between C/I and MBL, (GG: p = 0.13; GS: p = 0.38). Both treatment modalities provided similar outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulev Assen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  8. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  9. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2016-11-25

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered.

  10. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, M.; Zimmermann, F.; Schlegel, J.; Schwager, C.; Debus, J.; Jäkel, O.; Abdollahi, A.; Greilich, S.

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  11. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  12. Documento de consenso sobre la utilización de profilaxis antibiótica en cirugía y procedimientos dentales Consensus document on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental surgery and procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Gutiérrez

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología tiene como objetivo prevenir la aparición de infección a partir de la puerta de entrada que produce la actuación terapéutica, por lo que se encuentra indicada siempre que exista un riesgo importante de infección, ya sea por las características mismas de la operación o por las condiciones locales o generales del paciente. Sin embargo, los ensayos clínicos con antibióticos en patologías dentarias responden poco a los criterios metodológicos requeridos, y además no son lo suficientemente numerosos. Se presentan los resultados de una conferencia de expertos integrada por los Presidentes de Sociedades científicas españolas más representativas que han analizado la bibliografía existente y han aportado sus valiosas experiencias profesionales. Se describen las circunstancias técnicas, se analizan los fundamentos biológicos y farmacológicos y se aplican a las situaciones médicas más representativas. Se concluye que la profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología cuenta con indicaciones bien fundamentadas y precisas, ofreciendo a la comunidad científica internacional un protocolo práctico de actuación.The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis in Odontology is to prevent the onset of infections through the entrance way provided by the therapeutic action, therefore it is indicated provided there is a considerable risk of infection, either because of the characteristics of the operation itself or the patient’s local or general condition. Nonetheless, clinical trials with antibiotics in dental pathologies scarcely adhere to the required methodological criteria and, in addition, are not sufficiently numerous. This text presents the results of an expert conference comprising the Presidents of the most representative Scientific Societies in Spain who have analyzed the existing literature and have drawn on their valuable professional experience. It describes the technical circumstances, analyzes the

  13. Documento de consenso sobre la utilización de profilaxis antibiótica en cirugía y procedimientos dentales Consensus document on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental surgery and procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Gutiérrez

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología tiene como objetivo prevenir la aparición de infección a partir de la puerta de entrada que produce la actuación terapéutica, por lo que se encuentra indicada siempre que exista un riesgo importante de infección, ya sea por las características mismas de la operación o por las condiciones locales o generales del paciente. Sin embargo, los ensayos clínicos con antibióticos en patologías dentarias responden poco a los criterios metodológicos requeridos, y además no son lo suficientemente numerosos. Se presentan los resultados de una conferencia de expertos integrada por los Presidentes de Sociedades Científicas Españolas más representativas que han analizado la bibliografía existente y han aportado sus valiosas experiencias profesionales. Se describen las circunstancias técnicas, se analizan los fundamentos biológicos y farmacológicos y se aplican a las situaciones médicas más representativas. Se concluye que la profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología cuenta con indicaciones bien fundamentadas y precisas, ofreciendo a la comunidad científica internacional un protocolo práctico de actuación.The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis in Odontology is to prevent the onset of infections through the entranceway provided by the therapeutic action, therefore it is indicated providing there is a considerable risk of infection, either because of the characteristics of the operation itself or the patient’s local or general condition. Nonetheless, clinical trials with antibiotics in dental pathologies have had scant regard for the required methodological criteria and, in addition, are not sufficiently numerous. This text presents the results of an expert conference comprising the Presidents of the most representative Scientific Societies in Spain who have analyzed the existing literature and have drawn on their valuable professional experience. It describes the technical circumstances, analyzes the

  14. Plasma Rico en Plaquetas y su utilización en implantología dental PPR and his utilization in oral implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. García García

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una revisión sobre la utilización del Plasma Rico en Plaquetas en el ámbito de la implantología. El trabajo comienza con la definición de varios conceptos básicos sobre Regeneración Tisular Guiada. A continuación se explican los factores de crecimiento y su participación en los concentrados de plaquetas. Se hace hincapié en los estudios realizados con PRP e implantes y se describe la aparición de unos posibles efectos negativos con el empleo de esta técnica. Por último se exponen las conclusiones del trabajo.A review about using Platelet Rich Plasma in Implantology is presented. It begins with the basic concepts of Bone Guided Regeneration. Then, growth factors and its implication in Platelet Rich Plasma are described. We want to highlight the experiments with dental implants and PRP. It is also described the probably negative efects of PRP. Finally, we show the rewiev conclusions.

  15. [Quality evaluation of the orthodontic practice for certification by ISO 9001. A procedure beneficial for medical, medico-dental or hospital service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G

    2001-01-01

    The accreditation of the ISO 9001 certification (ISO = International Standard Organization) is an external evaluation procedure carried out by independent experts, whose object is the analysis of the operational methods and practices of a medical care facility (e.g. hospital, private clinic, general practitioner's or dentist's practice) which decided to assume the concept, implementation and control of its own quality policy. The whole accreditation procedure represents the basic structure of a continuous dynamic progressiveness within a cabinet eager to offer outstanding quality. Moreover, it guarantees active and voluntary participation of every single member of the medical administration or technical team involved in the realization of this primary objective. In other words, we are talking about a very strong dynamic innovation leading to a change of views and the improvement of communication means, while simultaneously enhancing the security and quality aspects of medical care. The continuous guarantee of high quality medical care calls for precise planning and systematization of actions. First of all, these actions are defined, analyzed and listed in precise work procedures. As they are defined with the agreement of the whole team, they implicate respect and self control. This requires of course transparency of the treatment methods, whose different steps and procedures are described in detail in a logogramm set up in common.

  16. Imperative Role of Dental Pulp Stem Cells in Regenerative Therapies: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ramchandra; Gupta, Manish; Aggarwal, Avanti; Sharma, Deepak; Sarin, Anurag; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive cells that can differentiate and regenerate organs in different parts of the body such as heart, bones, muscles and nervous system. This has been a field of great clinical interest with immense possibilities of using the stem cells in regeneration of human organ those are damaged due to disease, developmental defects and accident. The knowledge of stem cell technology is increasing quickly in all medical specialties and in dental field too. Stem cells of dental origin appears to hold the key to various cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine, but most avenues are in experimental stages and many procedures are undergoing standardization and validation. Long-term preservation of SHED cells or DPSC is becoming a popular consideration, similar to the banking of umbilical cord blood. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are the adult multipotent cells that reside in the cell rich zone of the dental pulp. The multipotent nature of these DPSCs may be utilized in both dental and medical applications. A systematic review of the literature was performed using various internet based search engines (PubMed, Medline Plus, Cochrane, Medknow, Ebsco, Science Direct, Hinari, WebMD, IndMed, Embase) using keywords like “dental pulp stem cells”, “regeneration”, “medical applications”, “tissue engineering”. DPSCs appears to be a promising innovation for the re-growth of tissues however, long term clinical studies need to be carried out that could establish some authentic guidelines in this perspective. PMID:24665194

  17. Imperative role of dental pulp stem cells in regenerative therapies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ramchandra; Gupta, Manish; Aggarwal, Avanti; Sharma, Deepak; Sarin, Anurag; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive cells that can differentiate and regenerate organs in different parts of the body such as heart, bones, muscles and nervous system. This has been a field of great clinical interest with immense possibilities of using the stem cells in regeneration of human organ those are damaged due to disease, developmental defects and accident. The knowledge of stem cell technology is increasing quickly in all medical specialties and in dental field too. Stem cells of dental origin appears to hold the key to various cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine, but most avenues are in experimental stages and many procedures are undergoing standardization and validation. Long-term preservation of SHED cells or DPSC is becoming a popular consideration, similar to the banking of umbilical cord blood. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are the adult multipotent cells that reside in the cell rich zone of the dental pulp. The multipotent nature of these DPSCs may be utilized in both dental and medical applications. A systematic review of the literature was performed using various internet based search engines (PubMed, Medline Plus, Cochrane, Medknow, Ebsco, Science Direct, Hinari, WebMD, IndMed, Embase) using keywords like "dental pulp stem cells", "regeneration", "medical applications", "tissue engineering". DPSCs appears to be a promising innovation for the re-growth of tissues however, long term clinical studies need to be carried out that could establish some authentic guidelines in this perspective.

  18. Imperative role of dental pulp stem cells in regenerative therapies: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandra Kabir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are primitive cells that can differentiate and regenerate organs in different parts of the body such as heart, bones, muscles and nervous system. This has been a field of great clinical interest with immense possibilities of using the stem cells in regeneration of human organ those are damaged due to disease, developmental defects and accident. The knowledge of stem cell technology is increasing quickly in all medical specialties and in dental field too. Stem cells of dental origin appears to hold the key to various cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine, but most avenues are in experimental stages and many procedures are undergoing standardization and validation. Long-term preservation of SHED cells or DPSC is becoming a popular consideration, similar to the banking of umbilical cord blood. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are the adult multipotent cells that reside in the cell rich zone of the dental pulp. The multipotent nature of these DPSCs may be utilized in both dental and medical applications. A systematic review of the literature was performed using various internet based search engines (PubMed, Medline Plus, Cochrane, Medknow, Ebsco, Science Direct, Hinari, WebMD, IndMed, Embase using keywords like "dental pulp stem cells", "regeneration", "medical applications", "tissue engineering". DPSCs appears to be a promising innovation for the re-growth of tissues however, long term clinical studies need to be carried out that could establish some authentic guidelines in this perspective.

  19. Current trends in pulp therapy: a survey analyzing pulpotomy techniques taught in pediatric dental residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Laquia A; Sanders, Brian J; Jones, James E; Williamson, C Andrew; Dean, Jeffrey A; Legan, Joseph J; Maupome, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The study's purpose was to survey directors of pediatric dental residency programs in order to evaluate the materials currently being taught and used for pulpotomy procedures for primary teeth in educational and clinical settings. A web-based survey was emailed to all graduate pediatric dental residency program directors in the United States. Seventy one emails were sent to program directors, 47 responded but only 39 respondents (55%) were included in the study. Results suggested a slight decrease in utilization of formocresol 1:5 dilution (Pformocresol (18% of respondents) were systemic health concerns and carcinogenicity, in addition to evidence-based literature. Even though 25% of respondents have begun to use MTA for primary pulpotomy procedures, the most common reason for utilization of other medicaments over MTA was its higher cost. With 82% of graduate pediatric dental residency programs still utilizing formocresol 1:5 dilution for pulpotomy procedures in primary teeth, there has been no major shift away from its clinical use, in spite of increased usage of newer medicaments over the last 5 years.

  20. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook. 1988 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The laws, rules and regulations of the New York State Education Department governing dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state are presented. In addition, the requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist in New York are discussed. The following chapters are provided: (1)…

  1. Saúde gengival de adolescentes e a utilização de serviços odontológicos, Estado de São Paulo Gingival health of adolescents and the utilization of dental services, state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Leopoldo Ferreira Antunes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a associação de condições de saúde gengival com a utilização de serviço odontológico. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se levantamento epidemiológico de saúde bucal de 1.799 adolescentes, em 35 cidades do Estado de São Paulo, em 2002. A saúde gengival foi avaliada pela prevalência de sangramento na gengiva à sondagem e cálculo dentário (índice periodontal comunitário e oclusão dentária (índice de estética dentária. A utilização de serviços odontológicos foi medida pelo índice de cuidado (O/CPO para cada cidade. Análise multinível de regressão logística ajustou modelos explicativos para fatores associados aos desfechos de interesse. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de sangramento gengival à sondagem foi 21,5%; de cálculo dentário foi 19,4%. Os participantes do sexo masculino, negros e pardos, moradores em áreas rurais, residentes em domicílios aglomerados e com atraso escolar apresentaram chance significantemente mais elevada para os agravos que seus respectivos pares de comparação. Características de oclusão dentária também associaram com gengiva não-saudável: apinhamento dos segmentos incisais, mordida aberta vertical anterior, relação molar antero-posterior. Cidades com maior utilização de serviço odontológico tiveram menor proporção de adolescentes com sangramento gengival e cálculo. CONCLUSÕES: A utilização de serviços odontológicos foi significativamente associada a melhores condições de saúde gengival (sangramento e cálculo. Essa associação independeu das características sociodemográficas individuais e contextuais, e de oclusão dentária.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between gingival health conditions and dental service utilization. METHODS: An epidemiological survey of the oral health of 1,799 adolescents was carried out in 35 cities of the state of São Paulo, in 2002. Gingival health was assessed through the prevalence of gingival bleeding on probing and dental

  2. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  3. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  4. 设计过程工业多杂质用水网络的计算方法%Algorithmic Procedure to Design Water Utilization Systems Featuring Multiple Contaminants in Process Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东明; 杨凤林; 张兴文

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-iterative algorithmic procedure to design water utilization networks with multiple contaminants in process plants. According to the water pinch analysis rules, the processes in water utilization systems were first divided into three groups, then water-supply priority algorithm was proposed. The results of case studies showed that the water networks designed by this method gave water consumption lower than that estimated by other approaches. In addition, the procedure was subject to no limitation on the problem scale.

  5. Safety of dental extraction among consecutive patients on oral anticoagulant treatment managed using a specific dental management protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Ezio; Martinelli, Franco; Bacci, Christian; Cordioli, GianPiero; Girolami, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    We found no prospective studies on dental extraction in anticoagulated patients in the literature, even though most authors suggest that there is no need to change anticoagulant treatment and to utilize a local haemostatic measure after extraction. In the present study, we have verified the incidence of bleeding complications after dental extraction in a group of 250 consecutive anticoagulated patients. Two hundred and fifty non-anticoagulated subjects requiring dental extraction represented the control group. In all patients, anticoagulant treatment was not changed (International Normalized Ratio, 1.8-4) and local haemostatic measures (fibrin sponge, silk suture and a gauze saturated with tranexamic acid) were used. All procedures were performed in an outpatient clinic setting. We registered four bleeding complications in the group of anticoagulated patients and three in the control group. The difference of bleeding complications in the two groups was not statistically different (relative risk, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-6.04; P = 0.7). None of the post-operative late bleeding required hospitalization and/or blood transfusions, and further local measures were sufficient to stop the bleeding. The protocol proposed in the present study makes dental extractions in anticoagulated patients possible on an outpatient basis with a cost reduction for the community and minor discomfort for the patients.

  6. Dental insurance and dental service use by U.S. women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaylor, Mary Beth; Polivka, Barbara J; Chaudry, Rosemary; Salsberry, Pamela; Wee, Alvin G

    2011-01-01

    Oral health has a significant effect on health, and for women, poor oral health can lead to poor birth outcomes and can affect their child's health. Nursing interventions to improve the oral health of at-risk women have the potential to increase maternal and child systemic and oral health. The identification of women at a high risk for poor oral health is a necessary to develop and evaluate these interventions. This study examined the factors related to dental insurance and dental service use for women of childbearing age in the United States. A secondary analysis of the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was completed to examine the predisposing, enabling, and need variables associated with dental insurance status and dental service use in a representative random sample of 1,071 women. The results showed that over 40% of women had no dental insurance. Women with less education, lower income, and dental need were significantly less likely to have dental insurance. Dental utilization by the uninsured was low and a racial/ethnic disparity was noted. A lack of dental insurance and dental service utilization is a significant concern. Nurses working with low-income women should educate the population about oral health and advocate for policies to increase dental insurance coverage. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. New procedure of quantitative mapping of Ti and Al released from dental implant and Mg, Ca, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn as physiological elements in oral mucosa by LA-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajnóg, Adam; Hanć, Anetta; Koczorowski, Ryszard; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2017-12-01

    A new procedure for determination of elements derived from titanium implants and physiological elements in soft tissues by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is presented. The analytical procedure was developed which involved preparation of in-house matrix matched solid standards with analyte addition based on certified reference material (CRM) MODAS-4 Cormorant Tissue. Addition of gelatin, serving as a binding agent, essentially improved physical properties of standards. Performance of the analytical method was assayed and validated by calculating parameters like precision, detection limits, trueness and recovery of analyte addition using additional CRM - ERM-BB184 Bovine Muscle. Analyte addition was additionally confirmed by microwave digestion of solid standards and analysis by solution nebulization ICP-MS. The detection limits are in range 1.8μgg(-1) to 450μgg(-1) for Mn and Ca respectively. The precision values range from 7.3% to 42% for Al and Zn respectively. The estimated recoveries of analyte addition line within scope of 83%-153% for Mn and Cu respectively. Oral mucosa samples taken from patients treated with titanium dental implants were examined using developed analytical method. Standards and tissue samples were cryocut into 30µm thin sections. LA-ICP-MS allowed to obtain two-dimensional maps of distribution of elements in tested samples which revealed high content of Ti and Al derived from implants. Photographs from optical microscope displayed numerous particles with µm size in oral mucosa samples which suggests that they are residues from implantation procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulating Dental Assistants: Revisions of the Michigan Dental Practice Act. Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No.: C2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Paul J.; And Others

    This document investigates the regulation of dental assistants in Michigan. Emphasis is placed on increased dental productivity from increased use of auxiliaries, utilization of dental auxiliaries, and educational and training requirements for certification and licensure. Results of the investigation indicate: (1) support should be given for the…

  9. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms ... KEYWORDS: Dental implants, surgical templates, surgical procedure, stent .... during the surgical stage for single implant therapy.[24] Afterward,.

  10. Differences Among Older Adults In The Types Of Dental Services Used In The United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J.; Hyde, Jody Schimmel; Chen, Haiyan; Moeller, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to explore differences in the socioeconomic, demographic characteristics of older adults in the United States with respect to their use of different types of dental care services. Methods The 2008 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) collected information about patterns of dental care use and oral health from individuals in the U.S. aged 55 years and older. We analyze these data and explore patterns of service use by key characteristics before modeling the relationship between service use type and those characteristics. Results The most commonly used service category was fillings, inlays or bonding, reported by 43.6 percent of those with any utilization. Just over one-third of those with any utilization reported a visit for a crown, implant or prosthesis, and one-quarter reported a gum treatment or tooth extraction. The strongest consistent predictors of use type are denture, dentate, and oral health status along with dental insurance coverage and wealth. Conclusions Our results provide insight into the need for public policies to address inequalities in access to dental services among an older US population. Our findings that showed lower income, less wealthy elderly with poor oral health are more likely to not use any dental services rather than using only preventive dental care, and that cost prevents most non-users who say they need dental care from going to the dentist, suggest a serious access problem and one that ultimately produces even worse oral health and expensive major procedures for this population in the future. PMID:27284127

  11. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    OpenAIRE

    Irfana Fathima Shajahan; Kandaswamy, D; Padma Srikanth; L Lakshmi Narayana; R Selvarajan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examina...

  12. AIDS and dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbert, B; Badner, V; Maguire, B

    1988-01-01

    Dental health care workers (DHCWs) can provide important diagnostic, treatment, and referral services for patients with AIDS and at risk for AIDS. They also have a responsibility to protect all patients in their practices, and themselves, from infectious disease transmission through the use of infection control. To determine the extent to which DHCWs are prepared to assume these responsibilities, a randomized survey of California DHCWs was conducted. Responses were obtained from 297 dentists, 128 hygienists, and 177 dental assistants. DHCWs who expressed a greater willingness to treat people with AIDS or HIV infection also practiced more thorough infection control. Respondents in all groups who perceived a greater percent of their patients to be at risk for AIDS were more likely to use infection control procedures (P less than .0001). They also were more willing to treat such patients (P less than .004) and were more likely to assess patients for AIDS by taking a thorough medical history (P less than .02) and sexual history (P less than .04). Since attitudes toward AIDS and perception of the percent of patients at risk in one's practice affect patient assessment and infection control procedures used by dental health care workers, educational programs designed to enhance DHCWs' response to the HIV epidemic should alert them to the extent of the problem and help them cope with their concerns.

  13. Factors affecting anxiety-fear of surgical procedures in dentistry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting anxiety-fear of surgical procedures in dentistry. ... the questions concerning previous dental experience, education level, and previous ... structure and gender are the significantly effective factors on dental anxiety and fear.

  14. A comparison of arthrocentesis teaching tools: cadavers, synthetic joint models, and the relative utility of different educational modalities in improving trainees' comfort with procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jessica R; Ben-Artzi, Ami; Fisher, Mark C; Bass, Anne R; Pillinger, Michael H

    2012-06-01

    Each year, rheumatology programs across the country teach incoming trainees the skill of arthrocentesis, but the relative effectiveness of various teaching techniques has not been assessed in a systematic way. We compared approaches to teaching arthrocentesis using cadavers versus anatomic models. In a pilot study, new rheumatology fellows (n = 7) from 2 academic institutions were surveyed at 3 points during arthrocentesis training: (1) before assuming patient care; (2) after lecture with handouts, followed by practice either on cadavers (group A) or on synthetic joint models (group B); and (3) 6 weeks into fellowship. Fellows rated their comfort levels for arthrocentesis of specific joints using 9-point Likert scales. Fellows also retrospectively rated the utility of individual teaching modalities in helping them to learn. As a follow-up study, internal medicine residents taking part in a month-long rheumatology rotation were similarly surveyed on their comfort level performing knee and shoulder arthrocentesis before a cadaver teaching laboratory and at the end of their month rotation. The initial mean comfort level performing arthrocentesis for all fellows was low (2.01). After the cadaver teaching session, group A fellows experienced an overall comfort level increase of 1.95, with the largest single increase reported for shoulder arthrocentesis (3.86). After the anatomic model teaching session, group B fellows reported a mean comfort increase of 1.29, with the largest increase reported for knee arthrocentesis (3.13). The subsequent study with residents confirmed significant increases in comfort after the cadaver laboratory. When surveyed, the learning experience fellows considered most effective was the opportunity to perform procedures under supervision and guidance, followed by training on cadavers. Although all teaching interventions for trainees learning arthrocentesis were helpful for increasing trainee's comfort with arthrocentesis, the use of cadavers

  15. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    , exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental......Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  16. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  17. HIV-positive status and preservation of privacy: a recent decision from the Italian Data Protection Authority on the procedure of gathering personal patient data in the dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Adelaide; Delbon, Paola; Laffranchi, Laura; Paganelli, Corrado; De Ferrari, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    The processing of sensitive information in the health field is subject to rigorous standards that guarantee the protection of information confidentiality. Recently, the Italian Data Protection Authority (Garante per la Protezione dei Dati Personali) stated their formal opinion on a standard procedure in dental offices involving the submission of a questionnaire that includes the patient's health status. HIV infection status is included on the form. The Authority has stated that all health data collection must be in accordance with the current Italian normative framework for personal data protection and respect the patient's freedom. This freedom allows the patient to decide, in a conscious and responsible way, whether to share health information with health personnel without experiencing any prejudice in the provision of healthcare requested. Moreover, data collection must be relevant and cannot exceed the principles of treatment goals with reference to the specific care of the concerned person. However, the need for recording information regarding HIV infection at the first appointment, regardless of the clinical intervention or therapeutic plan that needs to be conducted, should not alter the standard protection measures of the healthcare staff. In fact, these measures are adopted for every patient.

  18. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  19. Performance of Zirconia for Dental Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J. Kohal

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The positive results of the performance of zirconia for orthopedics devices have led the dental community to explore possible esthetical and mechanical outcomes using this material. However, questions regarding long-term results have opened strong and controversial discussions regarding the utilization of zirconia as a substitute for alloys for restorations and implants. This narrative review presents the current knowledge on zirconia utilized for dental restorations, oral implant components, and zirconia oral implants, and also addresses laboratory tests and developments, clinical performance, and possible future trends of this material for dental healthcare.

  20. Health Instruction Packages: Dental Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gary E.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct non-professional dental personnel in selected job-related skills. The first module, by Gary E. Hayes, describes how to locate the hinge axis point of the jaw, place and secure a bitefork, and perform a facebow transfer. The second module,…

  1. Tissue response: biomaterials, dental implants, and compromised osseous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu RS, Arvind; Ogle, Orrett

    2015-04-01

    Tissue response represents an important feature in biocompatibility in implant procedures. This review article highlights the fundamental characteristics of tissue response after the implant procedure. This article also highlights the tissue response in compromised osseous conditions. Understanding the histologic events after dental implants in normal and abnormal bone reinforces the concept of case selection in dental implants.

  2. Dental Training Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  3. Hygiene in dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, L; Mosca, G; Giuliani, A R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hygienic quality of dental practices on the basis of the self-awareness expressed by dentists respondents to a self-reported questionnaire about the health/hygiene characteristics of practice, the knowledge of biologic/toxicological risks and the preventive procedures and devices improvements in professional practice. Of the 127 practitioners contacted, 108 (85%) agreed to participate. The knowledge of infective risks was self- evaluated as good only in 24%: even if vaccinated, most of the dentists (57%) considered HBV the main infective agent to fear, not giving the same importance to the air-borne transmission of diseases. The presence of a single dental unit per surgery (90%) was considered an index of good health/hygiene education but, in spite of the use of disposable gloves, caps and masks, the dentists do not always change their coats or wash their hands between patients yet. The management of dental instruments can be considered efficient as long as they are sterilised in an autoclave (97%) and undergo periodic sterilization efficacy tests (76%). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION The results indicate a good structural and organisational status, but there is the need for continuous education concerning the prevention of cross-infections.

  4. Management of infection control in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A; Creanor, S; Hurrell, D; Bagg, J; McCowan, M

    2009-04-01

    This was an observational study in which the management policies and procedures associated with infection control and instrument decontamination were examined in 179 dental surgeries by a team of trained surveyors. Information relating to the management of a wide range of infection control procedures, in particular the decontamination of dental instruments, was collected by interview and by examination of practice documentation. This study found that although the majority of surgeries (70%) claimed to have a management policy on infection control, only 50% of these were documented. For infection control policies, 79% of surgeries had access to the British Dental Association Advice Sheet A12. Infection control policies were claimed to be present in 89% of surgeries, of which 62% were documented. Seventy-seven per cent of staff claimed to have received specific infection control training, but for instrument decontamination this was provided mainly by demonstration (97%) or observed practice (88%). Many dental nurses (74%) and dental practitioners (57%) did not recognise the symbol used to designate a single-use device. Audit of infection control or decontamination activities was undertaken in 11% of surgeries. The majority of surgeries have policies and procedures for the management of infection control in dental practice, but in many instances these are not documented. The training of staff in infection control and its documentation is poorly managed and consideration should be given to development of quality management systems for use in dental practice.

  5. Survey of Infection Control Policies within Dental/Educational Patient Treatment Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Keith Winfield

    1986-01-01

    The article describes a survey of 36 dental education programs to identify educators' reactive policies and procedures in their patient treatment centers to minimize dental contamination and cross-contamination. (Author/CT)

  6. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes and Oral Health > Diabetes: Dental Tips Diabetes: Dental Tips Main Content Diabetes can cause serious problems ... FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, ...

  7. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they're most treatable. When to have a dental exam Various factors might determine how frequently your ... wisdom teeth (third molars) at the appropriate age. Dental X-ray A dental X-ray (radiograph) allows ...

  8. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share with Women Dental Care in Pregnancy Why is dental care in pregnancy important? During pregnancy, you are more likely to have problems ... There are 2 major reasons women can have dental problems during pregnancy: Pregnancy gingivitis— During pregnancy, changes ...

  9. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  10. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  11. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  13. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  14. Strategies for service-learning assessment in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sharlee

    2013-10-01

    A large body of literature exists on the instructional pedagogy known as service-learning. Service-learning is a teaching and learning approach characterized by the dental hygiene student's practical application of academic studies and occurs within a community setting, to the benefit of both the student and community. Dental hygiene educators use service-learning to enhance student knowledge and application of oral health curriculum. This manuscript reports on the importance of service-learning assessment to the National Dental Hygiene Research Agenda as well as the future of the profession of dental hygiene and the successful strategies in service-learning evaluation available for utilization by dental hygiene educators.

  15. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  16. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  17. Exploration of different school of thoughts among undergraduate dental students regarding dental caries and periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anmol Mathur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The concepts about dental caries and periodontal diseases are learned at dental schools may directly influence the conduct of the future dentists regarding the control and treatment of these diseases. Aim: To assess the variation in the understanding of the concepts of dental caries and periodontal diseases among first to final year undergraduate dental students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted among 400 students pursuing their graduation in a private dental college situated in Sri Ganganagar city, Rajasthan, India. Descriptive analysis was done, and Chi-square test with a significance level of 5% was done to compare the frequency based data. Results: For concepts related to dental caries, the 1st year students' response showed shift toward biological concept, which was also present for the 2nd year but the 3rd year onwards the majority of students cited the comprehensive multi-factorial concept (P = 0.0002. Final year students were more knowledgeable than the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year students regarding gingival bleeding, swelling, redness, and bad breath being the most important signs of periodontal disease (P = 0.004. Conclusion: Significant variation in the school of thoughts and limited knowledge regarding the concepts of common dental diseases among dental undergraduate students is seen. There might be a need to reform the initial concept building methods utilized in dental institutions to improve the basic knowledge of undergraduate students of the common dental diseases.

  18. [Syncope in the dental environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findler, M; Elad, S; Garfunkel, A; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Galili, D; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Syncope or Fainting is, by far, the most common emergency situation in the dental practice. Syncope is defined as an abrupt, transient, short term loss of consciousness and postural tone, followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The pathophysiology of syncope consists of a sudden cessation or decrease in cerebral perfusion. Differential diagnosis of these medical conditions is of paramount importance in uncovering unrecognized systemic diseases. The dental team plays an important role in the process of establishing the correct diagnosis by its ability to recognize and document all the clinical symptoms and signs evident at the time of fainting. The dental surgeon is expected to be familiar with the various etiologies of syncope and should be able to differentiate between them. This article provides the essentials of the diagnostic procedure and an approach to the evaluation of the unconscious patient.

  19. Factors for determining dental anxiety in preschool children with severe dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanto, Jenny; Vidigal, Evelyn Alvarez; Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Sá, Stella Núbia Coelho de; Bönecker, Marcelo

    2017-01-16

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and socioeconomic indicators associated with dental anxiety in preschool children with severe dental caries. A total of 100 children between 3 and 5 years of age were selected during a dental screening procedure. The selection criteria were having at least one tooth with dental caries and a visible pulpal involvement, ulceration, fistula, and abscess (PUFA) index of ≥1 in primary teeth. Before the clinical examination or any treatment procedure was performed, we evaluated the children's dental anxiety using the Facial Image Scale (FIS). Parents completed a questionnaire on socioeconomic conditions, which included the family structure, number of siblings, parental level of education, and family income. A dentist blinded to FIS and socioeconomic data performed the clinical examination. Poisson regressions associate clinical and socioeconomic conditions with the outcome. Most of the children (53%) experienced extensive dental caries (dmf-t ≥ 6), and all children had severe caries lesions, with a PUFA index of ≥1 in 41% and that of ≥2 in 59%. The multivariate adjusted model showed that older children (4-5-year old) experienced lower dental anxiety levels compared with younger children (3-year old) (RR = 0.35; 95%CI: 0.17-0.72 and RR = 0.18; 95%CI: 0.04-0.76, respectively), and children with three or more siblings were associated with higher levels of dental anxiety (RR = 2.27; 95%CI: 1.06-4.87). Older age is associated with low dental anxiety, and more number of siblings is associated with high dental anxiety in preschool children, whereas the severity or extent of dental caries is not associated with dental anxiety.

  20. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Student Resources National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Transforming Dental Hygiene Education Advocacy Practice Issues Direct Access Scope ...

  1. Dental Forensics: Bitemark Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Forensic odontology (dental forensics can provide useful evidence in both criminal and civil cases, and therefore remains a part of the wider discipline of forensic science. As an example from the toolbox of forensic odontology, the practice and experience on bitemark analysis is reviewed here in brief. The principle of using visible bitemarks in crime victims or in other objects as evidence is fundamentally based on the observation that the detailed pattern of dental imprints tend to be practically unique for each individual. Therefore, finding such an imprint as a bitemark can bear a strong testimony that it was produced by the individual that has the matching dental pattern. However, the comparison of the observed bitemark and the suspected set of teeth will necessarily require human interpretation, and this is not infallible. Both technical challenges in the bitemarks and human errors in the interpretation are possible. To minimise such errors and to maximise the value of bitemark analysis, dedicated procedures and protocols have been developed, and the personnel taking care of the analysis need to be properly trained. In principle the action within the discipline should be conducted as in evidence-based dentristy, i.e. accepted procedures should have known error rates. Because of the involvement of human interpretation, even personal performance statistics may be required from legal expert statements. The requirements have been introduced largely due to cases where false convictions based on bitemark analysishave been overturned after DNA analysis.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i2.76

  2. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  3. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  4. Health promotion and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Marisa; Jardim, Juliana Jobim; Alves, Luana Severo

    2010-01-01

    The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene), among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene) should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  5. Health promotion and dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Maltz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene, among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  6. Prosthodontic treatment of patients with disabilities at dental specialist clinics in the County of Västra Götaland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahm, Carl-Otto; Klingberg, Gunilla; Ekfeldt, Anders

    2009-01-01

    In 1998 the Swedish Parliament decided about increased financing of dental support and service given to persons with disabilities who were dependent on nursing personnel or others in their activities of daily life including oral hygiene procedures. One part of the legislation called "Necessary dental care, group 3" (NDC3) includes persons with intellectual disabilities and disabilities due to brain damage, autism and autism-like disorders, and persons with lasting mental and physical disabilities not related to normal ageing. The objectives where to investigate persons affected by this legislation; how many and what patients covered by NDC3 in Västra Götaland County received prosthodontic therapy from 2001 through 2004, at hospital dental clinics or dental specialist clinics. Patients treated with prosthodontic restorations covered financially by the county council under the terms of NDC3 were identified through the county council's registers. The application forms for NDC3 were retrieved and information about patient characteristics and type of treatments were compiled. It was shown that 57 patients covered by NDC3 in Västra Götaland County received prosthodontic therapy at dental specialist clinics and 50 were treated at the hospital dental clinics for extensive prosthodontic treatment needs. The mean age for the patients rehabilitated with removable dentures was higher (56.2 years) compared with patients treated with single tooth implants (39.7 years). About 30 patients, representing 1 to 2% of the NDC3 population in Västra Götaland County were rehabilitated with more advanced prosthodontic restorations in hospital dental clinics or dental specialist clinics each year. In conclusion and with respect to the probably large need for prosthodontic therapy among persons with disabilities, the use of NDC3 has not been properly utilized.

  7. Standardization of Code on Dental Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-13

    Steel. Aluminum, Tin, Composite.and/or Glass Ionomer. A crown used for short-term temporization or for pediatric dentistry treatment. Credit one per...provided as a management tool and should not be construed to represent the total practice of military dentistry . Category of Service Code Series 1...Class I. Occlusal surface restoration of molars and premolars, including buccal or occlusal pits, cast crown repairs, and small lingual surface

  8. Laser therapy in general dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbar, Arun A.

    2006-02-01

    This is a clinical presentation on the use of laser therapy in a private dental practice using a 810nm diode. A wide range of conditions involving pain management, treatment and as an adjunct to procedures to enhance patient comfort and experience. This will include cases treated for TMD (Temporo mandibular dysfunction), apthous ulcers, angular chelitis, cold sores, gingival retraction, periodontal treatment and management of failing dental implants. The case presentation will include the protocols used and some long term reviews. The results have been very positive and will be shared to enable this form of treatment to be used more frequently and with confidence within dental practice.

  9. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  10. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson TM; Xu Z.

    2015-01-01

    Travis M Nelson, Zheng Xu Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases th...

  11. Evaluation of linear dimensional stability of various combinations of dental stone and plaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbulugbe, I C; Oderinu, O H; Shaba, O P; Oremosu, O A

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that due to the cheaper cost of dental plaster compared to dental stone, casts on which most of the dental prostheses and appliances were being fabricated in various laboratories were often mixtures of dental stone and dental plaster in order to reduce production cost. To evaluate the dimensional stability of various combinations of Dental Stone and Dental Plaster mixtures used to make dental casts. Alginate impressions of a master model of truncated metal cones were made and casts were produced by pouring with various combinations of dental stone and dental plaster mixtures. The linear dimensional differences between the inter-abutment distances on the casts were measured with an electronic caliper. One sample t-test and percentage differences were calculated. Dimensional variations for the distances measured using either 50% dental stone or 25% dental stone with plaster were statistically significant (p d" 0.05). Mixture of 75% dental stone and 25% dental plaster produced casts with no statistically significant dimensional variation from the master model (p e" 0.05). A mixture of 75% dental stone and 25% dental plaster could be used for procedures not requiring very accurate replica like mounting of teeth for dental training and for study models.

  12. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  13. Haptic rendering for dental training system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG DangXiao; ZHANG YuRu; WANG Yong; L(U) PeiJun; ZHOU RenGe; ZHOU WanLin

    2009-01-01

    Immersion and Interaction are two key features of virtual reality systems,which are especially important for medical applications.Based on the requirement of motor skill training in dental surgery,haptic rendering method based on triangle model is investigated in this paper.Multi-rate haptic rendering architecture is proposed to solve the contradiction between fidelity and efficiency requirements.Realtime collision detection algorithm based on spatial partition and time coherence is utilized to enable fast contact determination.Proxy-based collision response algorithm is proposed to compute surface contact point.Cutting force model based on piecewise contact transition model is proposed for dental drilling simulation during tooth preparation.Velocity-driven levels of detail hapUc rendering algorithm is proposed to maintain high update rate for complex scenes with a large number of triangles.Hapticvisual collocated dental training prototype is established using half-mirror solution.Typical dental operations have been realized Including dental caries exploration,detection of boundary within dental crose-section plane,and dental drilling during tooth preparation.The haptic rendering method is a fundamental technology to improve Immersion and interaction of virtual reality training systems,which is useful not only in dental training,but also in other surgical training systems.

  14. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Home > Medicaid > Benefits > Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  15. Surgical Procedures in Predoctoral Periodontics Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radentz, William H.; Caffesse, Raul G.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 58 dental school periodontics departments revealed the frequency of predoctoral dental students performing surgery, the frequency of specific procedures, the degree of participation or performance of students, incidence of preclinical surgical laboratories in the curricula, and materials and anesthesia used. A wide range in…

  16. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  17. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Rai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG. Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials.

  18. Dental Usage Under Changing Economic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J.; Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan; Schimmel, Jody; St Clair, Patricia A.; Pepper, John V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between changes in household finances (wealth and income) and changes in dental utilization at the onset of the recent recession in a population of older Americans. Methods Data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were analyzed for U.S. individuals aged 51 years and older during the 2006 and 2008 waves of the HRS. We estimated logistic models of (1) starting and (2) stopping dental use between 2006 and 2008 survey periods as a function of changes in household wealth and income, controlling for other potentially confounding covariates. Results We found that only when household wealth falls by 50 percent or more were older adults less likely to seek dental care. Changes in household income and other changes in household wealth were not associated with changes in dental utilization among this population. Conclusions Older Americans’ dental care utilization appeared to be fairly resilient to changes in household finances; only when wealth fell by 50 percent or more did individuals decrease dental use. This finding might extend to other health care services that are preventive, routine, and relatively inexpensive. PMID:22994647

  19. Dental usage under changing economic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J; Moeller, John F; Chen, Haiyan; Schimmel, Jody; St Clair, Patricia A; Pepper, John V

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between changes in household finances (wealth and income) and changes in dental utilization at the onset of the recent recession in a population of older Americans. Data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were analyzed for U.S. individuals aged 51 years and older during the 2006 and 2008 waves of the HRS. We estimated logistic models of (a) starting and (b) stopping dental use between 2006 and 2008 survey periods as a function of changes in household wealth and income, controlling for other potentially confounding covariates. We found that only when household wealth falls by 50 percent or more were older adults less likely to seek dental care. Changes in household income and other changes in household wealth were not associated with changes in dental utilization among this population. Older Americans' dental care utilization appeared to be fairly resilient to changes in household finances; only when wealth fell by 50 percent or more did individuals decrease dental use. This finding might extend to other health-care services that are preventive, routine, and relatively inexpensive. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  20. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  1. A survey of dental treatment under general anesthesia in a Korean university hospital pediatric dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bisol; Yoo, Seunghoon; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Jongbin

    2016-09-01

    In South Korea, the number of cases of dental treatment for the disabled is gradually increasing, primarily at regional dental clinics for the disabled. This study investigated pediatric patients at a treatment clinic for the disabled within a university hospital who received dental treatment under general anesthesia. This data could assist those that provide dental treatment for the disabled and guide future treatment directions and new policies. This study was a retrospective analysis of 263 cases in which patients received dental treatment under general anesthesia from January 2011 to May 2016. The variables examined were gender, age, reason for anesthesia, type of disability, time under anesthesia, duration of treatment, type of procedure, treatment details, and annual trends in the use of general anesthesia. Among pediatric patients with disabilities who received dental treatment under general anesthesia, the most prevalent age group was 5-8 years old (124 patients, 47.1%), and the primary reason for administering anesthesia was dental anxiety or phobia. The mean time under anesthesia was 132.7 ± 77.6 min, and the mean duration of treatment was 101.9 ± 71.2 min. The most common type of treatment was restoration, accounting for 158 of the 380 treatments performed. Due to increasing demand, the number of cases of dental treatment performed under general anesthesia is expected to continue increasing, and it can be a useful method of treatment in patients with dental anxiety or phobia.

  2. Pediatric dental chair vs. traditional dental chair: A pediatric dentist′s poll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Barjatya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Proper positioning of the child patient, can not only have positive ramifications for the operator′s posture, comfort, and career longevity - it can also lead to better treatment and increased productivity. The aim of the survey questionnaire was to assess the utilization, need, and attitude concerning dental chairs among pediatric dentist while working on and managing the child patient. Study Design: The questions were structured using adobe forms central online software, regarding the user-friendliness of pediatric dental chair vs. traditional adult dental chair available in the market. Results: Our result shows that out of 337 respondents, 79% worked on pediatric dental chair, whereas 21% had no experience of it. Of these 79% pediatric dentist, 48% preferred pediatric dental chair. But pediatric dental problem still has certain disadvantages like higher cost, leg space problem, lower availability, etc. Conclusion: During the research it was found that ergonomics and usability issues were the main problems. Thus, pediatric dental chair is not so popular in the current scenario. This study allowed for general ideas for the improvement of dental chairs and thus improved dental chair would fill the gap in the current scenario.

  3. Regenerative medicine in dental and oral tissues: Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janti Sudiono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative medicine is a new therapeutic modality using cell, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies. Purpose. To describe the regenerative capacity of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell. Review. In dentistry, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies develop incredibly and attract great interest, due to the capacity to facilitate innovation in dental material and regeneration of dental and oral tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp, periodontal ligament and dental follicle, can be isolated, cultured and differentiated into various cells, so that can be useful for regeneration of dental, nerves, periodontal and bone tissues. Tissue engineering is a technology in reconstructive biology, which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biological mediators to facilitate regeneration or reconstruction of a particular tissue. The multipotency, high proliferation rates and accessibility, make dental pulp as an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. Revitalized dental pulp and continued root development is the focus of regenerative endodontic while biological techniques that can restore lost alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum is the focus of regenerative periodontic. Conclucion. Dentin-derived morphogens such as BMP are known to be involved in the regulation of odontogenesis. The multipotency and angiogenic capacity of DPSCs as the regenerative capacity of human dentin / pulp complex indicated that dental pulp may contain progenitors that are responsible for dentin repair. The human periodontal ligament is a viable alternative source for possible primitive precursors to be used in stem cell therapy.

  4. Benzodiazepines for conscious sedation in the dental office

    OpenAIRE

    Theodoro Weissheimert; Alexandre da Silveira Gerzson; Henderson Eduarth Schwengber; Angelo Menuci Neto

    2016-01-01

    Conventional behavioral conditioning techniques are usually suf fi cient for management of patients with fear and anxiety during dental treatment. When such techniques do not produce the expected results, dental anxiety can be managed using drug-based treatments known as conscious sedation. Anxiety can complicate dental procedures because of effects such as increased blood pressure, hyperventilation, and fainting. Medications such as benzodiazepines can be used to avoid these complicat...

  5. Public perceptions of dental implants: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward C M

    2015-07-01

    Dental implants have become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information on dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners at various levels/disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate the public's information acquisition and their perceptions of dental implants and the effects of these on their care-seeking and decision making. A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join six focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64 years of age, had never been engaged in dentally related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, and had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered into any dental consultation regarding dental implants. All of the focus groups discussions were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following a grounded theory approach. Participants acquired information on dental implants through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected dental implants to restore the patients' appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implants as a panacea for all cases of missing teeth, overestimated their functions and longevity, and underestimated the expertise needed to carry out the clinical procedures. They were deterred from seeking dental implant treatment by the high price, invasive procedures, risks, and complications. Members of the public were exposed to information of varying quality and had some unrealistic expectations regarding dental implants. Such perceptions may shape their care-seeking behaviours and decision-making processes in one way or another. The views and experiences gathered in this qualitative study could assist clinicians to better understand the public's perspectives, facilitate constructive patient-dentist communication, and contribute

  6. Dental Assistant Specialty, AFS 981X0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    from radiation Irrigate root canals Wear and maintain film badges Take dental impressions Mix acrylics Mix impression pastes Cut or remove sutures...patients Mix silver alloys Irrigate oral cavities Remove subgingival calculus, stains, or plaque from teeth Polish teeth Advise patients on home care...PROCEDURES 12J(3). ASSIST IN ENDODONTIC PROCEDURES 12K(2). PREPARE PERIODONTIC MATERIALS 12K(3). ASSIST IN PERIODONTIC PROCEDURES 12L(2). ASSIST IN

  7. Expanding dental hygiene to include dental therapy: improving access to care for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A

    2009-01-01

    Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, and the subsequent National Call to Action to Promote Oral Health contributed significantly to raising the awareness of the American public and the dental profession regarding the lack of access to oral health care by many Americans, especially minorities and low income populations, with resulting disparities in oral health. The problem is particularly acute among children. The current workforce of dentists in the United States is inadequate to meet the oral health care needs of children in terms of numbers of dentists, as well as their distribution, ethnicity, education, and practice orientation. Dental hygienists trained in an expanded scope of practice, can help address the workforce inadequacy. Dental therapists, educated in 2-year programs of postsecondary education, comparable to America's associate degree dental hygiene programs, have been used throughout the world to provide basic, primary oral health care for children. Research has documented that utilizing dental therapists is a cost effective method of improving access to care for children. Countries that have led the way in introducing dental therapists to care for their children are now integrating their separate 2-year curriculum in dental therapy and dental hygiene into a 3-year curriculum to prepare a clinician dually trained in both dental therapy and dental hygiene. This clinician is being designated an oral health therapist. Expanding the education of dental hygienists in the United States to include skills of the internationally acclaimed dental therapist can produce oral health therapists, individuals capable of addressing the basic preventive, restorative, and minor surgical needs of children, but also able to continue to address the preventive and periodontal needs of adults.

  8. An Epidemiologic Analysis of the Use of Dental Services and of Attitudes of Students at a Major University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Steven; Tuthill, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented of an undergraduate and graduate student survey investigating (1) the state of oral pathology of the students, (2) utilization of dental services during the fifteen-months preceeding the study, (3) perceptions and utilization of local dental services, and (4) attitudes toward emergency and routine dental services at the…

  9. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    OpenAIRE

    Eshghi, Alireza; Samani, Mahdi Jafarzadeh; Najafi, Naghme Feyzi; Hajiahmadi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: General anesthesia (GA) allows dental treatment to be rendered under optimal conditions, theoretically ensuring ideal outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of restorative dental procedures performed under GA. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 305 pediatric patients who had been treated under GA 6 to 24 months before our survey at Isfahan's hospitalized dentistry center were examined. The examination was performed on dental ...

  10. A General Synthetic Procedure for 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinone Derivatives and Their Utilization in the Preparation of Novel Anticancer Agents with 4-Anilinoquinazoline Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lan Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In our ongoing research on novel anticancer agents with 4-anilinoquinazoline scaffolds, a series of novel 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinones were needed as key intermediates. An improved one-step synthesis of 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinones utilizing o-anthranilic acids as starting materials was described. Based on it, 2-hydroxy-methyl-4(3H-quinazolinones were conveniently prepared in one pot. Moreover, two novel 4-anilinoquinazoline derivatives substituted with chloromethyl groups at the 2-position were synthesized and showed promising anticancer activity in vitro.

  11. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples.

  12. Management of the anticoagulated dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J H

    1996-11-01

    An understanding of the primary mechanisms of hemostasis, including the coagulation pathways and the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common systems, is the basis for treating the anticoagulated patient. Two major anticoagulants are used for treating those who may be at risk for thromboembolic crisis. These drugs include Coumadin, which is an oral anticoagulant, and heparin, a parenteral anticoagulant, which is often used for acute thromboembolic episodes or for hospitalization protocols that include significant surgical procedures. The practitioner should be familiar with common dental drugs that can interact with anticoagulants and should consult with the patient's physician before administering any such drugs. By placing the patient into one of three dental treatment categories, appropriate anticoagulation therapy can be rendered to each patient according to his or her needs. Low-risk procedures require no change in anticoagulation medication. For moderate-risk procedures, withdrawal of anticoagulation medication 2 days before the procedure and verified with the PT the day of the procedure is indicated. For high-risk dental procedures, using a heparin protocol should be strongly considered. In all instances of dental treatment, the oral tissues should be treated atraumatically using local hemostatic measures for control of hemorrhage. Treating medically compromised patients who are on a variety of medications is becoming more common in dentistry today. Understanding the underlying disease and the appropriate protocol for treatment of anticoagulated patients reduces the risk of thromboembolism and hemorrhagic complications.

  13. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni g

  14. The Effect of Dental Insurance on the Use of Dental Care For Older Adults: A Partial Identification Analysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Brent; Moeller, John; Manski, Richard J.; Pepper, John

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of dental insurance on the use of dental services using a potential outcomes identification framework designed to handle uncertainty created by unknown counterfactuals – that is, the endogenous selection problem – as well as uncertainty about the reliability of self-reported insurance status. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we estimate that utilization rates of adults older than 50 would increase from 75% to around 80% under universal dental coverage. PMID:24890257

  15. Utility of recorded guided imagery and relaxing music in reducing patient pain and anxiety, and surgeon anxiety, during cutaneous surgical procedures: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Roongpisuthipong, Wanjarus; Kim, Natalie A; Goyal, Amita; Swary, Jillian H; Brindise, Renata T; Iyengar, Sanjana; Pace, Natalie; West, Dennis P; Polavarapu, Mahesh; Yoo, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Guided imagery and music can reportedly reduce pain and anxiety during surgery, but no comparative study has been performed for cutaneous surgery to our knowledge. We sought to determine whether short-contact recorded guided imagery or relaxing music could reduce patient pain and anxiety, and surgeon anxiety, during cutaneous surgical procedures. Subjects were adults undergoing excisional surgery for basal and squamous cell carcinoma. Randomization was to guided imagery (n = 50), relaxing music (n = 54), or control group (n = 51). Primary outcomes were pain and anxiety measured using visual analog scale and 6-item short-form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Secondary outcomes were anxiety of surgeons measured by the 6-item short-form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and physical stress of patients conveyed by vital signs, respectively. There were no significant differences in subjects' pain, anxiety, blood pressure, and pulse rate across groups. In the recorded guided imagery and the relaxing music group, surgeon anxiety was significantly lower than in the control group. Patients could not be blinded. Short-contact recorded guided imagery and relaxing music appear not to reduce patient pain and anxiety during excisional procedures under local anesthetic. However, surgeon anxiety may be reduced when patients are listening to such recordings. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dental caries: Therapeutic possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary tendencies in dentistry are based on the concept of maximal protection of healthy tooth tissues. Caries removal has been done traditionally with mechanical rotary instruments that are fast and precise. However, conventional cavity preparation has potential adverse effects to the pulp due to heat, pressure and vibrations. Moreover, drilling often causes pain and requires local anaesthesia, and these procedures are frequently perceived as unpleasant. Etiology, development and prevention of dental caries are better understood today and new restorative materials that bond micromechanically and/or chemically to dental tissues have been introduced. Thus, development of a new, less destructive caries removal technique is allowed. In the last decades, many alternative methods have been introduced in an attempt to replace rotary instruments. These are claimed to be efficient and selective for diseased tissues and to offer comfortable treatment to the patients. New methods include air abrasion, air polishing, ultrasonic, polymer burs, enzymes, systems for chemo-mechanical caries removal, and lasers. The aim of this paper was to discuss various caries removal techniques and possibilities of their use in clinical practice. Based on the literature review it can be concluded that none of the new caries removal methods can completely replace conventional rotary instruments.

  17. A Dental Education Perspective on Dental Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1985-01-01

    Two issues related to dental health policy are examined: the contribution of dental education to the process by which dental health policy is established, and the nature of dental education's response to established policies. (MLW)

  18. Dental neglect among children in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Gurunathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child dental neglect is the failure of a parent or guardian to meet the child′s basic oral health needs such that the child enjoys adequate function and freedom from pain and infection, where reasonable resources are available to family or caregiver. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the phenomenon of dental neglect among children in Chennai and to associate dental neglect with oral health status of children aged 3-12 years. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study involving 478 pairs of parents and children. Dental neglect scale and a questionnaire were used to assess the dental neglect score among parents of the children involved in the study. Oral health status of children was clinically assessed using oral hygiene index, decayed, extracted, filled teeth (def(t, pulp, ulcers, fistula, abscess (pufa, decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT, PUFA as per the World Health Organization criteria and pufa/PUFA index. Student′s t-test and one-way ANOVA were used appropriately for statistical analysis using SPSS software version 20.0. Results: A significant higher dental neglect score was reported among the parents who reside in the suburban location (P 3 years (P = 0.001. A significant higher DMFT (P = 0.003, deft (P = 0 < 0.001, pufa (P = 0.011, and debris index (P = 0.002 scores were seen in the higher dental neglect group. Conclusion: Child dental neglect is seen among the parents whose educational qualification was secondary, who reside in the suburban location, and who have not utilized the dental services for more than 3 years in Chennai. This dental neglect results in poorer oral health of children.

  19. Chelating resin-based extraction of DNA from dental pulp and sex determination from incinerated teeth with Y-chromosomal alphoid repeat and short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Tsukasa; Iwasa, Mineo; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Ichiro; Matoba, Ryoji; Yokoi, Motoo; Nagao, Masataka

    2002-09-01

    A procedure utilizing Chelex 100, chelating resin, was adapted to extract DNA from dental pulp. The procedure was simple and rapid, involved no organic solvents, and did not require multiple tube transfers. The extraction of DNA from dental pulp using this method was as efficient, or more so, than using proteinase K and phenol-chloroform extraction. In this study, the Chelex method was used with amplification and typing at Y-chromosomal loci to determine the effects of temperature on the sex determination of the teeth. The extracted teeth were incinerated in a dental furnace for 2 minutes at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 300 degrees C, 400 degrees C, and 500 degrees C. After the isolation of DNA from the dental pulp by the Chelex method, alphoid repeats, and short tandem repeats, the human Y chromosome (DYZ3), DYS19, SYS389, DYS390, and DYS393 could be amplified and typed in all samples incinerated at up to 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. The DYS389 locus in some samples could not be amplified at 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. An autopsy case is described in which genotypings of DYS19, DYS390, and DYS393 from dental pulp obtained from a burned body were needed. The data presented in this report suggest that Chelex 100-based DNA extraction, amplification, and typing are possible in burned teeth in forensic autopsy cases.

  20. Impact of the University of Colorado's Advanced Clinical Training and Service (ACTS) Program on dental students' clinical experience and cognitive skills, 1994-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rob; Call, Richard L; Maguire, Kerry; Berkey, Douglas B; Karshmer, Bernard A; Guyton, Brad; Tawara-Jones, Karen

    2010-04-01

    The University of Colorado Denver School of Dental Medicine has operated a community-based dental education program for all of its students since 1985. A database of student productivity has been maintained in a standardized format, capable of multiyear compilation, since 1994. This study utilizes twelve years of these data to profile the type and amount of clinical treatment that can be provided by a typical fourth-year dental student during a 100-day community-based training experience. Between 1994 and 2006, the school's 423 graduates provided a mean of 922 treatment procedures per student at a mean of 498 patient visits per student. During a typical four-week clinical affiliation, each student provided a mean of approximately twenty-seven restorations on permanent teeth, sixteen restorations on primary teeth, and twenty-four oral surgery procedures (extractions). Students also gained considerable experience in periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, and endodontics. Self-assessed competency ratings tended to increase after completing the program, as did willingness to treat underserved populations after graduation. About 16 percent of graduates reported planning to practice in the public sector after completing dental school. A community-based experience such as this appears to offer an opportunity to substantially augment dental students' clinical training experiences.

  1. Patient satisfaction during and following procedural sedation for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia 2015; 21(4):29-34 ... consecutive patients undergoing procedural sedation for dental-related outpatient procedures were .... and from patients, a response rate of 50% for mailing methods.

  2. Factors Affecting Anxiety-Fear of Surgical Procedures in Dentistry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-16

    May 16, 2017 ... Aim: To compare dental anxiety and fear during procedures performed under local anesthesia ... of the procedure trigger psychosomatic diseases in the ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ¦ Volume 20 ¦ Issue 4 ¦ April 2017.

  3. Teaching dental anatomy with light-activated resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Y; Denehy, G E; Schulein, T M

    1984-04-01

    A method has been described in which light-activated resins are incorporated into the dental anatomy laboratory. This procedure is a valuable addition to the anatomy course because students (1) work with a restorative material appropriate for anterior teeth, (2) learn the unique properties of the light-activated resins, and (3) apply the principles of dental anatomy to a clinically relevant task.

  4. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  5. Effects of propranolol on fear of dental extraction: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Steenen (Serge A.); A.J. van Wijk (Arjen); R. van Westrhenen (Roos); J. de Lange (Jan); A. de Jongh (Ad)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Undergoing an extraction has been shown to pose a significantly increased risk for the development of chronic apprehension for dental surgical procedures, disproportionate forms of dental anxiety (that is, dental phobia), and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Evidence

  6. Effects of propranolol on fear of dental extraction: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Steenen (Serge A.); A.J. van Wijk (Arjen); R. van Westrhenen (Roos); J. de Lange (Jan); A. de Jongh (Ad)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Undergoing an extraction has been shown to pose a significantly increased risk for the development of chronic apprehension for dental surgical procedures, disproportionate forms of dental anxiety (that is, dental phobia), and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Evidence sugges

  7. Effects of propranolol on fear of dental extraction: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Steenen; A.J. van Wijk; R. van Westrhenen; J. de Lange; A. de Jongh

    2015-01-01

    Background Undergoing an extraction has been shown to pose a significantly increased risk for the development of chronic apprehension for dental surgical procedures, disproportionate forms of dental anxiety (that is, dental phobia), and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Evidence suggests that intru

  8. Assessing the utility of phase-space-localized basis functions: Exploiting direct product structure and a new basis function selection procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we show that it is possible to use an iterative eigensolver in conjunction with Halverson and Poirier's symmetrized Gaussian (SG) basis [T. Halverson and B. Poirier, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 224101 (2012)] to compute accurate vibrational energy levels of molecules with as many as five atoms. This is done, without storing and manipulating large matrices, by solving a regular eigenvalue problem that makes it possible to exploit direct-product structure. These ideas are combined with a new procedure for selecting which basis functions to use. The SG basis we work with is orders of magnitude smaller than the basis made by using a classical energy criterion. We find significant convergence errors in previous calculations with SG bases. For sum-of-product Hamiltonians, SG bases large enough to compute accurate levels are orders of magnitude larger than even simple pruned bases composed of products of harmonic oscillator functions.

  9. Prevention and dental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widström, Eeva

    2004-01-01

    There has been, and still is a firm belief that regular use of dental services is beneficial for all. Thus governments in most European countries have shown some interest in training oral health care professionals, distributing the dental workforce and cost sharing. Constantly evolving treatment options and the introduction of new methods make dental clinicians feel uncertain as to which treatments are most useful, who would benefit from them, and which treatments will achieve cost-effective health gain. Although there is a considerable quantity of scientific literature showing that most available preventive measures are effective, and the number of sensible best-practice guidelines in prevention is growing, there are few studies on cost-efficiency of different methods and, secondly, the prevention and treatment guidelines are poorly known among general practitioners. In the eyes of the public, it is obvious that preventive methods practised by patients at home have been eclipsed by clinical procedures performed in dental clinics. Reliance on an increasingly individualistic approach to health care leads to the medicalisation of issues that are not originally health or medical problems. It is important to move general oral disease prevention back to the people who must integrate this in their daily routines. Prevention primarily based on healthy lifestyles, highlighted in the new public health strategy of the European Union (EU), is the key to future health policy.

  10. Dental caries in Victorian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M; Hopcraft, M; Morgan, M

    2014-09-01

    The poor oral health of nursing home residents is the cause of substantial morbidity and has major implications relating to health care policy. The aim of this study was to measure dental caries experience in Australians living in nursing homes, and investigate associations with resident characteristics. Clinical dental examinations were conducted on 243 residents from 19 nursing homes in Melbourne. Resident characteristics were obtained from nursing home records and interviews with residents, family and nursing home staff. Two dental examiners assessed coronal and root dental caries using standard ICDAS-II criteria. Residents were elderly, medically compromised and functionally impaired. Most required assistance with oral hygiene and professional dental care was rarely utilized. Residents had high rates of coronal and root caries, with a mean 2.8 teeth with untreated coronal caries and 5.0 root surfaces with untreated root caries. Functional impairment and irregular professional dental care were associated with higher rates of untreated tooth decay. There were no significant associations with medical conditions or the number of medications taken. Nursing home residents have high levels of untreated coronal and root caries, particularly those with high needs due to functional impairment but poor access to professional services. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  11. Moving research knowledge into dental hygiene practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobban, Sandra J; Edgington, Eunice M; Clovis, Joanne B

    2008-01-01

    Dental hygiene, as an emerging profession, needs to increase the number of intervention studies that identify improvements in oral health outcomes for clients. Historically, dental hygiene studies have typically been atheoretical, but the use of theoretical frameworks to guide these studies will increase their meaningfulness. Rogers' theory of diffusion of innovations has been used to study research utilization across many disciplines, and may offer insights to the study of research use in dental hygiene. Research use is an important component of evidence-based practice (EBP), and diffusion of research knowledge is an important process in implementing EBP. The purpose of this paper is to use diffusion of innovations theory to examine knowledge movement in dental hygiene, specifically through the example of the preventive practice of oral cancer screening by dental hygienists, considered as an innovation. Diffusion is considered to be the process by which an innovation moves through communication channels over time among a social network. We suggest diffusion theory holds promise for the study of knowledge movement in dental hygiene, but there are limitations including access to and understanding research studies as innovations. Nevertheless, using a theoretical framework such as Rogers' diffusion of innovations will strengthen the quality of intervention research in dental hygiene, and subsequently, health outcomes for clients.

  12. Emerging Dental Applications of Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G.

    Until recently, the application of Raman spectroscopy to investigate dental tissues has primarily focused on using microspectroscopy to characterize dentin and enamel structures as well as to understand the adhesive interface of various resin and bonding agents used in restorative procedures. With the advent of improved laser, imaging/mapping and fibre optic technologies, the applications have expanded to investigate various biomedical problems ranging from oral cancer, bacterial identification and early dental caries detection. The overall aim of these applications is to develop Raman spectroscopy into a tool for use in the dental clinic. This chapter presents the recent dental applications of Raman spectroscopy as well as discusses the potential, strengths and limitations of the technology in comparison with alternative techniques. In addition, a discussion and rationale about combining Raman spectroscopy with other optical techniques will be included.

  13. Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H. (Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (USA))

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices.

  14. Role of dental expert in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anoop K; Kumar, Sachil; Rathore, Shiuli; Pandey, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Forensic dentistry has become an integral part of forensic science over the past 100 years that utilizes dental or oro-facial findings to serve the judicial system. This has been due to the dedication of people like Gustafson's, Keiser-Nielson, and Suzuki for this field. They established the essential role which forensic dentistry plays mainly in the identification of human remains. The tooth has been used as weapons and under certain circumstances, may leave information about the identity of the biter. Dental professionals have a major role to play in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize mal practice, negligence, fraud or abuse, and identity of unknown individuals. This paper will try to summarize the various roles of dental experts in forensic medicine.

  15. BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS IN COMMUNITY ORAL HEALTH PROBLEMS: A STUDY ON DENTAL TREATMENT DISCONTINUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Aryadi Joelimar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The low value of F/DMF-T ration on Performed Treatment Index in Indoneisa gives an indication of great problems in dental treatment utilization. Dental treatment utilization is affected by several obstacles, the greatest among which is psychosocial obstacles. In this study the psychosocial obstacles were detected through Intrinsic Obstacles, Obstacles in Transportation, and Obstacles in Dental Clinic related to their effects on their discontinuation of dental treatments at Balkesmas Kiara, Kecamatan Senen, Jakarta Pusat. The discontinuation of dental treatments was mostly affected by Intrinsic Obstacles, through its components as Types of Cases, Dental Anxiety Scale, and Intrinsic Motivation. Generally Obstacles in Transportation had no effects, excpet its components of Travel Time and Tiredness. Obstacles in Dental Clinic had a significant effect on the discontinuation of dental treatments through the unpleasant manner of the druggist, the hot waiting room, and the high expense on drugs.

  16. Description of dental arch form using the Fourier series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, A Patricia; Pardo, Marco A; Yezioro, Salomon

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the form of the human superior dental arch using Fourier transformations. Forty models made in dental stone from impressions of the maxillary dental arch were used to obtain the reference data, which were expressed in Cartesian coordinates, from the mesovestibular cuspid vertices of molar teeth, vestibular cuspid of premolars, and incisal edge. Fourth-grade equations and Fourier series were calculated from these data. The results indicate that Fourier series more precisely express the form and size of different dental arches, with mixed or permanent dentition, than fourth-grade equations. Details of the mathematical procedure and the precision obtained were provided.

  17. A Novel Operative Procedure for Pelvic Organ Prolapse Utilizing a MRI-Visible Mesh Implant: Safety and Outcome of Modified Laparoscopic Bilateral Sacropexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Joukhadar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sacropexy is a generally applied treatment of prolapse, yet there are known possible complications of it. An essential need exists for better alloplastic materials. Methods. Between April 2013 and June 2014, we performed a modified laparoscopic bilateral sacropexy (MLBS in 10 patients using a MRI-visible PVDF mesh implant. Selected patients had prolapse POP-Q stages II-III and concomitant OAB. We studied surgery-related morbidity, anatomical and functional outcome, and mesh-visibility in MRI. Mean follow-up was 7.4 months. Results. Concomitant colporrhaphy was conducted in 1/10 patients. Anatomical success was defined as POP-Q stage 0-I. Apical success rate was 100% and remained stable. A recurrent cystocele was seen in 1/10 patients during follow-up without need for intervention. Out of 6 (6/10 patients with preoperative SUI, 5/6 were healed and 1/6 persisted. De-novo SUI was seen in 1/10 patients. Complications requiring a relaparoscopy were seen in 2/10 patients. 8/10 patients with OAB were relieved postoperatively. The first in-human magnetic resonance visualization of a prolapse mesh implant was performed and showed good quality of visualization. Conclusion. MLBS is a feasible and safe procedure with favorable anatomical and functional outcome and good concomitant healing rates of SUI and OAB. Prospective data and larger samples are required.

  18. Dental health behavior in a migrant perspective: use of dental services of Pakistani immigrants in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selikowitz, H S; Holst, D

    1986-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the utilization pattern of dental services in a group of Pakistani immigrants in Norway. Use was related to sociodemographic characteristics, level of urbanization in Pakistan, knowledge and belief about dental diseases and evaluated and perceived dental health. A total of 160 immigrants were clinically examined and interviewed by a structured questionnaire. The effect change analysis was performed, and separate analyses were performed for men and women. Altogether 60% had visited the dentist during the last 3 yr. While 69% coming from the cities had been to the dentist in Norway, this was the case for only 38% of those from the villages of Pakistan. Pain was given as the main reason for dental visits, and the data indicated insufficient ability to perform self-assessment of own dental health. The independent variables could explain more of the variance in use of dental services among the Pakistani men (R2 = 40%) than among the women (R2 = 21%). While number of decayed teeth and level of urbanization were among the strongest predictors among the men, dental behavior in Pakistan and number of years in Norway were of importance among the women. The latter variable indicated that the women in terms of dental behavior had a higher degree of acculturation than the men, leading to a change in traditional health behavior.

  19. A potentially fatal complication that may occur during dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-01-14

    Jan 14, 2015 ... performed under sedation (Dental or oral procedures) are all risky in terms of aspiration ... A 23-year-old male presented with cough, shortness of breath, .... We describe two separate cases of foreign bodies swallowed during.

  20. Assessment of the Survival of Dental Implants in Irradiated Jaws ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In patients undergoing head and neck surgery for various pathologic ... Dentistry and Endodontics, PDU Dental College, Solapur, Maharashtra, 3Department of Pedodontics, Buddha ... were reconstructed through flap procedure and a total of.

  1. Dental magnetic resonance imaging; MRT der Zaehne und des Zahnhalteapparats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2016-03-15

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  2. The use of CdTe detectors for dental X-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcus Aurelio P. dos; Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao F.; Oliveira, Mercia L.; Lima, Ricardo de A.; Hazin, Clovis A. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mails: masantos@cnen.gov.br; mariacc05@yahoo.com.br; mercial@cnen.gov.br; ralima@cnen.gov.br; chazin@cnen.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    he cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detector provides high detection efficiency for use in the diagnostic x-rays energy range, because of the high atomic number and high density of the crystal. Moreover, it has the great advantage of working at room temperature, in contrast to the germanium detector, which operates in liquid nitrogen temperature. The CdTe detector has been utilized in diagnostic x-ray spectroscopy, but only scarce information about its use in dental X-ray beams has been published. In this way, a portable 3x3x1 mm{sup 3} CdTe solid state detector (XR-100T CdTe by Amptek, Inc.) with tungsten pinhole collimators, alignment device and associated software was utilized in this work for measuring the photon spectra in the dental x-ray kVp range. A single-phase dental unit with adjustable kVp and mA was employed and the x-ray spectra were experimentally determined at 50, 60 and 70 kVp with 0.5 mA tube current. The pulse height distribution obtained with this detector, however, does not represent the 'true' photon spectra. For this reason, a stripping procedure was implemented to correct the distribution in order to determine the real photon spectra. The x-ray spectra obtained with the CdTe detector were compared with the ones measured with a high-purity germanium detector (EGP200-13-TR by Eurisys Mesures). The reasonable agreement between the results obtained with both detectors for the 50 to 70 keV range show that CdTe detectors can be utilized for dental x-ray spectrometry. (author)

  3. Mozart effect on dental anxiety in 6–12 year old children

    OpenAIRE

    Arlette Suzy Setiawan; Hilnia Zidnia; Inne Suherna Sasmita

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children anxiety in dental treatment often becomes a barrier for dentist to perform optimum dental treatment procedure. Various methods to manage anxiety and fear in children have been applied including listening to classical music during dental treatment. One of the classical music usually used is music by Mozart. Purpose: This study is aimed to discover the role of classical music by Mozart in dental anxiety changes. Method: This study was a quasi experimental study using purpos...

  4. The status of mineral trioxide aggregate in endodontics education in dental schools in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanalp, Jale; Karapinar-Kazandag, Meriç; Ersev, Handan; Bayirli, Gündüz

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the current status of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as an educational material in dental schools in Turkey. A survey was sent to senior members of the endodontic departments of seventeen dental schools; fourteen responded. All respondents reported that they used MTA in their clinical practice, with apexification, perforations, retrograde fillings, and root resorptions being the most frequently occurring treatment procedures. All reported that information was given to students regarding MTA mainly as part of the curriculum. The third and fourth years were the periods when MTA was introduced to students in most of the schools. Twelve schools reported that students had the opportunity to observe procedures in which MTA was used, but students had the chance to use the material in a very minor proportion of the schools, mainly under the supervision of clinical instructors. Ten schools agreed that MTA should be included in the regular endodontic curriculum. Financial constraints seemed to be the predominant reason for those who answered this question negatively, followed by difficult handling properties and low radiopacity of the material. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that ways should be sought to prevent financial difficulties from depriving dental students of the opportunity to receive information about contemporary methodologies such as MTA utilization.

  5. Biological aspects of dental implant; Current knowledge and perspectives in oral implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukant Sahoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of dental implants became a scientifically accepted treatment modality for the rehabilitation of fully and partially edentulous patients. The evolution of dental implants has completely changed dentistry. Implants can offer a number of benefits, from improved esthetics, to reducing bone loss, to improving denture retention for edentulous patients. Branemark et al., was the first person to examined submerged titanium implants with a machined surface in dogs and later called this procedure as osseointegration, which is now defined as "A direct structural and functional connection between ordered, living bone and the surface of a load-bearing implant." Commercially pure titanium is recognized today as a material of choice, since it is characterized by excellent biological and also good mechanical properties. In this comprehensive review, authors have sought to explore various biological aspects of dental implant as pertinent to clinical procedure so as to provide research foundation for the establishment of suitable strategies that can assist in successful implant therapy.

  6. Utility of ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin type A for muscle imbalance in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy: Description of the procedure and action protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ron, A; Gallardo, R; Huete Hernani, B

    2017-03-24

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) usually has a favourable prognosis. However, nearly one third of all severe cases have permanent sequelae causing a high level of disability. In this study, we explore the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) and describe the procedure. We designed a prospective, descriptive study including patients with moderate to severe OBPP who were treated between January 2010 and December 2014. We gathered demographic data, type of OBPP, and progression. Treatment effectiveness was assessed with the Active Movement Scale (AMS), the Mallet classification, and video recordings. We gathered a total of 14 133 newborns, 15 of whom had OBPP (1.6 per 1000 live births). Forty percent of the cases had severe OBPP (0.4/1000), a dystocic delivery, and APGAR scores < 5; mean weight was 4038g. Mean age at treatment onset was 11.5 months. The muscles most frequently receiving BoNT-A injections were the pronator teres, subscapularis, teres major, latissimus dorsi, and pectoralis major. All the patients who completed the follow-up period (83%) experienced progressive improvements: up to 3 points on the AMS and a mean score of 19.5 points out of 25 on the Mallet classification at 2 years. Treatment improved muscle function and abnormal posture in all cases. Surgery was avoided in 3 patients and delayed in one. Adverse events were mild and self-limited. Due to its safety and effectiveness, BoNT-A may be used off-label as an adjuvant to physical therapy and/or surgery in moderate to severe OBPP. Ultrasound may increase effectiveness and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  8. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  9. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  10. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... and rinsing daily. It also includes having routine dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, ...

  11. AUTHORITARIANISM AND DENTAL CARIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    in particular. If so, dental decay among nonauthoritarians might well progress further than among authoritarians. To determine whether or not there...is any relationship between dental decay and authoritarianism is the purpose of the present study. (Author)

  12. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  13. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  14. Smile dental journal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    "Smile dental journal is quarterly issued, peer-reviewed open access journal. Subject coverage is dentistry, dealing with all specialties of dentistry, its management, besides dental health related subjects...

  15. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  16. Dental implants and diabetes mellitus—a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Naujokat, Hendrik; Kunzendorf, Burkhard; Wiltfang, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Dental implant surgery has developed to a widely used procedure for dental rehabilitation and is a secure and predictable procedure. Local and systemic risk factors can result in higher failure rates. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that goes in with hyperglycemia and causes multifarious side effects. Diabetes as a relative contraindication for implant surgery is controversially discussed. Because the number of patients suffering from diabetes increases, there are more diabetic patient...

  17. Components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, Joseph L; Gordan, Valeria V; Rindal, D Brad;

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify components of patient satisfaction with restorative dental care and to test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient and procedure factors are associated with patient satisfaction.......The authors conducted a study to identify components of patient satisfaction with restorative dental care and to test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient and procedure factors are associated with patient satisfaction....

  18. Compliance with infection control practices in an university hospital dental clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutters, Nico T.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aim: Compliance with infection control practices is the key to quality care and excellence in dentistry. Infection control remains one of the most cost-beneficial interventions available. However, implementing control procedures requires full compliance of the whole dental team. The aim of our study was to measure the compliance in daily clinical practice.Methods: The compliance with infection control practices in dentistry by dental health care personnel (DHCP in a German university dental clinic was observed during clinical work. In addition, a survey was conducted to assess the individual knowledge about infection control procedures. Contamination of the workplace during invasive dental procedures was tested, as well.Results: A total of 58 invasive dental treatments implying close contacts between HCWs and patients were scrutinized. All HCWs (100% wore gloves during dental work, but in some cases (female dentists: 14.3%; dental assistants: 28.6% gloves were neither changed nor hands were disinfected between different activities or patient contacts (female dentists: 68.6%; male dentists: 60.9%; dental assistants: 93%. Only 31.4% of female and 39.1% of male dentists carried out adequate hygienic hand disinfection after removing gloves. Male dentists wore significantly more often (100% protective eyewear compared to 77.1% of female dentists (p<0.05. In addition, most of female dentists (62.9% and dental assistants (80.7% wore jewelry during dental procedures. Conclusion: Despite the knowledge of distinct hygiene procedures only a small percentage of dental staff performs hygiene practices according to recommended guidelines. Strict audit is clearly needed in the dental setting to ensure compliance with infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of pathogens. Our results provide insights for the development of a targeted education and training strategy to enhance compliance of dental staff especially of dental assistants with

  19. Dental Practice Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    the population. Private dental practices in Romania require personnel specialized in dental management. Success in dentistry depends, on the one hand, on the management of clinical aspects, and equallyon the efficient management of the dental practice. Patient satisfaction is influenced by factors related to the communication between the physicianand the patient, technical competence and by the environment provided by dental practice. The realization of the paper followed a review...

  20. Factors associated with the satisfaction of millennial generation dental residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hwai-Tai C; O'Toole, Terry G; Arola, Patricia E; Kashner, T Michael; Chang, Barbara K

    2012-11-01

    Data from the 2010 Learners' Perceptions Survey (LPS) administered through the Office of Academic Affiliations, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) were analyzed to identify factors associated with dental residents' satisfaction with the VA as a clinical training environment. Satisfaction scores were linked to clinic workloads, dental procedure complexity levels, staffing patterns, and facility infrastructure data to explore conditions that may improve residents' satisfaction. Findings supported the construct validity of the LPS survey data and underscored the importance of maintaining optimal ratios of attending dentists, dental assistants, and administrative staff to residents so that each trainee will have opportunities to perform an adequate level of dental workload. As programs strive to improve the quality of graduate dental education, findings from this study are vital for setting curriculum design guidelines and for providing infrastructure support for dental resident education.

  1. History of the Dental Trauma Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno

    2012-10-01

    The history of the Dental Trauma Guide dates back to 1965, where guidelines were developed for trauma records and treatment of various trauma entities at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Hospital in Copenhagen. In 1972, a unique possibility came up at the Serum Institute in Copenhagen to test various dental trauma procedures in monkeys, which served as kidney donors in the polio vaccine production. Over the years, 40 000 dental trauma patients were treated at the Trauma Centre according to established guidelines, and 4000 of these have been enrolled in long-term follow-up of various trauma entities. This has resulted in 79 clinical studies, and 64 studies in monkeys have examined the effect of various treatment procedures and the aetiology of most healing complications.

  2. History of the Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    The history of the Dental Trauma Guide dates back to 1965, where guidelines were developed for trauma records and treatment of various trauma entities at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Hospital in Copenhagen. In 1972, a unique possibility came up at the Serum...... Institute in Copenhagen to test various dental trauma procedures in monkeys, which served as kidney donors in the polio vaccine production. Over the years, 40 000 dental trauma patients were treated at the Trauma Centre according to established guidelines, and 4000 of these have been enrolled in long......-term follow-up of various trauma entities. This has resulted in 79 clinical studies, and 64 studies in monkeys have examined the effect of various treatment procedures and the aetiology of most healing complications....

  3. DEALING WITH DENTAL IMPLANT FAILURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them. PMID:19089213

  4. Dealing with dental implant failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options.When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  5. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  6. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Thamer AlShahrani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  7. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  8. [Dental records and responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, W.G.

    2006-01-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist i

  9. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  10. Dental Assistant, Advanced. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    a jaw fracture, leukemia, dental caries, and periodontal disease. Dental diabetes mellitus , rheumatic fever, allergies, car- disease can be prevented...Dentistry ........................ 4-1 5. Oral Surgery, Endodontics, and Periodontics ................ 5-1 6. Prosthodontics...Diagnosis Periodontics Medical clinics may have branch clinics subor- Operative Dentistry Preventive Dentistry dinate to them. Although dental

  11. The demand for preventive and restorative dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhoefer, Chad D; Zuvekas, Samuel H; Manski, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Chronic tooth decay is the most common chronic condition in the United States among children ages 5-17 and also affects a large percentage of adults. Oral health conditions are preventable, but less than half of the US population uses dental services annually. We seek to examine the extent to which limited dental coverage and high out-of-pocket costs reduce dental service use by the nonelderly privately insured and uninsured. Using data from the 2001-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and an American Dental Association survey of dental procedure prices, we jointly estimate the probability of using preventive and both basic and major restorative services through a correlated random effects specification that controls for endogeneity. We found that dental coverage increased the probability of preventive care use by 19% and the use of restorative services 11% to 16%. Both conditional and unconditional on dental coverage, the use of dental services was not sensitive to out-of-pocket costs. We conclude that dental coverage is an important determinant of preventive dental service use, but other nonprice factors related to consumer preferences, especially education, are equal if not stronger determinants. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Predictors of Dental Care Use: Findings from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Garcia, Raul I.; Visotcky, Alexis (Dye); Szabo, Aniko

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine longitudinal trends and associated factors in dental service utilization by adolescents progressing to early adulthood in the United States. Data Source The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health from Waves I (1994-95), II (1996), III (2001-2002) and IV (2007-2008). Study Design This is a retrospective, observational study of adolescents' transition to early adulthood. We obtained descriptive statistics and performed logistic regression analyses to identify the effects of baseline and concurrent covariates on dental service utilization from adolescence to early adulthood over time. Principal Findings Dental service utilization within the prior 12 months peaked at age 16 (72%), gradually decreased until age 21 (57%), and thereafter remained flat. Whites and Asians had a 10-20 percentage points higher proportion of dental service utilization at most ages compared to Blacks and Hispanics. Dental service utilization at later follow-up visits was strongly associated with baseline utilization with OR= 10.7, 2.4 and 1.5 at the 1-year, 7-year and 13-year follow-ups respectively. These effects decreased when adjusted for current income, insurance and education. Compared to Whites, Blacks were consistently less likely to report any dental examination. Conclusion Dental service utilization was highest in adolescents. Gender, education, health insurance and income in young adulthood were significant predictors of reporting a dental examination. Blacks had lower odds of reporting a dental examination either as adolescents or as young adults. PMID:23850156

  13. Dental Implants and General Dental Practitioners of Nepal: A study of existing knowledge and need for further education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhageshwar Dhami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The use of dental implants in partially or completely edentulous patients has proved effective and an accepted treatment modality with predictable long-term success. Dental implants are becoming a popular choice for replacing the missing teeth because of increased awareness about implants both in dentists and patients. The objective of the study was to assess the basic knowledge and education about dental implants among general dental practitioners (GDPs of Nepal.Materials & Methods:  A cross sectional questionnaire was carried out among 110 GDPs which consist of twenty questions that were divided into three categories; first with some basic knowledge in implant dentistry, second with clinical knowledge of dental implants and third with dental implant education and training.Results: Out of 110 GDPs, 72.7% had basic knowledge about implant dentistry and 65.5% were not aware about advance surgical procedures like sinus lift and guided bone regeneration. All the GDPs were positive regarding more training and education in dental implants and 95.5% of them would like to incorporate dental implant treatment in their practice in future. Conclusion: GDPs should have adequate knowledge and training of dental implants which can be incorporated at undergraduate or post doctoral level so that they are skilled to provide quality dental implant therapy to their patients confidently.

  14. Dental resin cure monitoring by inherent fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Zhou, Jack X.; Li, Qingxiong; Wang, Sean X.

    2008-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the inherent fluorescence of a dental composite resin can be utilized to monitor the curing status, i.e. degree of conversion of the resin. The method does not require any sample preparation and is potentially very fast for real time cure monitoring. The method is verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  15. Short dental implants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibali, S; Cristalli, M P; Dell'Aquila, D; Bignozzi, I; La Monaca, G; Pilloni, A

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence has suggested the utility of short dental implants for oral reconstructive procedures in clinical situations of limited vertical bone height. The aim of this review was to systematically evaluate clinical studies of implants type of edentulism, and prosthetic restoration. Two randomized controlled trials and 14 observational studies were selected and analyzed for data extraction. In total, 6193 short-implants were investigated from 3848 participants. The observational period was 3.2 ± 1.7 yrs (mean ± SD). The cumulative survival rate (CSR) was 99.1% (95%CI: 98.8-99.4). The biological success rate was 98.8% (95%CI: 97.8-99.8), and the biomechanical success rate was 99.9% (95%CI: 99.4-100.0). A higher CSR was reported for rough-surfaced implants. The provision of short implant-supported prostheses in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges appears to be a successful treatment option in the short term; however, more scientific evidence is needed for the long term.

  16. Dental and General Trauma in Team Handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Mateja; Kühl, Sebastian; Šlaj, Martina; Connert, Thomas; Filippi, Andreas

    Handball has developed into a much faster and high-impact sport over the past few years because of rule changes. Fast sports with close body contact are especially prone to orofacial trauma. Handball belongs to a category of sports with medium risk for dental trauma. Even so, there is only little literature on this subject. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and the type of injuries, especially the occurrence of orofacial trauma, habits of wearing mouthguards, as well as degree of familiarity with the tooth rescue box. For this purpose, 77.1% (n=542/703) of all top athletes and coaches from the two highest Swiss leagues (National League A and National League B), namely 507 professional players and 35 coaches, were personally interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. 19.7% (n=100/507) of the players experienced dental trauma in their handball careers, with 40.8% (n=51/125) crown fractures being the most frequent by far. In spite of the relatively high risk of lip or dental trauma, only 5.7% (n=29/507) of the players wear mouthguards. The results of this study show that dental trauma is common among Swiss handball players. In spite of the high risk of dental trauma, the mouthguard as prevention is not adequately known, and correct procedure following dental trauma is rarely known at all.

  17. The use of general anesthesia in pediatric dental care of children at multi-dental centers in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba'akdah, Rania; Farsi, Najat; Boker, Abdulaziz; Al Mushayt, Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    High caries reports in young Saudi children strongly suggest the need occasionally for general anesthesia to provide quality dental work. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of patients, dental procedures and hospital protocols for Pediatric Dental General Anesthesia (PDGA) procedure at multi-dental centers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Study sample included 90 children attending PDGA treatment at three governmental hospitals in Jeddah. Collected data included patient's demographics, medical condition, admission type, intra-operative protocols, and dental procedures. Results showed the mean age of treated children was 5 +/- 2 years and the majority of them (93%) were treated for the first time under general anesthesia (GA). Long waiting duration for PDGA procedure was reported regardless of the patient age and medical status. Being very young with extensive caries was the major indication for GA (58%). Children mean preoperative fasting times were 10 +/- 2 hours. Hospitals were significantly different in some protocols for PDGA procedures. Child behavior during GA induction was significantly related to child's age, premedication use, and hospital admission type. The mean number of treated teeth per child was 14 +/- 3.8 and the treatment mostly included restorations. Age was found to significantly affect the type of dental treatment, while gender and medical status did not. PDGA procedure is used mostly for young children with extensive dental caries. Children treated under GA received a comprehensive dental care in Saudi hospitals. Efforts should be directed to improve some of the existing hospitals protocols with PDGA procedure. The long waiting period for PDGA operation indicated the need to improve available facilities in the three hospitals.

  18. Evaluation of sexual function outcomes in women undergoing vaginal rejuvenation/vaginoplasty procedures for symptoms of vaginal laxity/decreased vaginal sensation utilizing validated sexual function questionnaire (PISQ-12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert D; Miklos, John R; Chinthakanan, Orawee

    2014-03-01

    Sexual function outcomes were analyzed in a group of women (n = 78) presenting for vaginal rejuvenation/vaginoplasty procedure for a chief complaint of vaginal laxity and decreased sensation with intercourse. Outcomes were analyzed utilizing the validated Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) before and at least 6 months after repair with vaginal rejuvenation/vaginoplasty procedure (VR). Mean age was 43.6 ± 7.9 (range 25-62), and 19 patients (24.3%) were found to have prolapse at time of initial exam and underwent vaginal vault suspension in addition to VR. Compared preoperatively and postoperatively, the overall sexual function (Total PISQ-12) statistically improved (30.3 ± 6.6 vs. 38.2 ± 5.2, P sexual satisfaction improved as well as subcategories of increased sexual excitement during intercourse and overall increase in intensity of orgasms. Pain with intercourse subscores were found to be no different from preoperatively to postoperatively. Previous studies have shown that sexual function improves with repair of prolapse; however, this is the first study to show improved function using a validated questionnaire in patients undergoing VR for laxity.

  19. A survey of dental residents' expectations for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manguno, Christine; Murray, Peter E; Howard, Cameron; Madras, Jonathan; Mangan, Stephen; Namerow, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The objective was to survey a group of dental residents regarding their expectations for using regenerative endodontic procedures as part of future dental treatments. After institutional review board approval, the opinions of 32 dentists who were having postgraduate residency training to become specialists in a dental school were surveyed. The survey had 40 questions about professional status, ethical beliefs, judgment, and clinical practice. It was found that 83.9% of dentists had no continuing education or training in stem cells or regenerative endodontic procedures. Results showed that 96.8% of dentists are willing to receive training to be able to provide regenerative endodontic procedures for their patients. Of the total group, 49.1% of dentists already use membranes, scaffolds, or bioactive materials to provide dental treatment. It was determined that 47.3% of dentists agree that the costs of regenerative procedures should be comparable with current treatments. It was also found that 55.1% of dentists were unsure whether regenerative procedures would be successful. Dentists are supportive of using regenerative endodontic procedures in their dental practice, and they are willing to undergo extra training and to buy new technology to provide new procedures. Nevertheless, dentists also need more evidence for the effectiveness and safety of regenerative treatments before they will be recommended for most patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. A comparison of the clinical and experimental characteristics of four acute surgical pain models: dental extraction, bunionectomy, joint replacement, and soft tissue surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neil K; Desjardins, Paul J; Chang, Phoebe D

    2014-03-01

    When a clinical trial of an analgesic produces a negative finding, it is important to consider the influence (if any) of experimental error on the validity of that result. Although efforts to identify and minimize experimental error in chronic pain investigations have begun in earnest, less work has been performed on the optimization of acute pain methodology. Of the acute surgical pain methodology articles that have been published over the last decade, almost all focus on either the dental or bunion model. Analgesics are typically evaluated in a variety of surgical models that eventually include hospital-based models (eg, joint replacement and soft tissue surgery). Every surgical procedure has unique clinical characteristics that must be considered to optimize study design and conduct. Much of the methodological knowledge garnered from bunion and dental studies is applicable to other surgical models, but some extrapolations are hazardous. The purposes of this review were (1) to qualitatively describe the clinical and experimental characteristics of the 4 classic surgical models: dental extraction, bunionectomy, joint replacement, and soft tissue surgery; and (2) to quantitatively compare the models by analyzing 3 factors: effect size, enrollment rate, and demographics. We found that the dental extraction and bunionectomy models had higher assay sensitivity than the joint replacement and soft tissue surgery models. It is probable that this finding is secondary to the superior experimental conditions under which the dental and bunion models are executed (utilization of few centers that have the ability to reduce surgical, anesthetic, and postoperative confounders).

  1. Dental caries vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from carious lesions of which S. mutans , Lactobacillus acidophilus , and Actinomyces viscosus are the main pathogenic species involved in the initiation and development of dental caries. In India, surveys done on school children showed caries prevalence of approximately 58%. Surveys among the U.S. population showed an incidence of 45.3% in children and 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries. Huge amounts of money and time are spent in treating dental caries. Hence, the prevention and control of dental caries is the main aim of public health, eventually the ultimate objective of public health is the elimination of the disease itself. Recently, dental caries vaccines have been developed for the prevention of dental caries. These dental caries vaccines are still in the early stages.

  2. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries.

  3. Occupational hazards to dental staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Ayatollahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental professionals are predisposed to a number of occupational hazards. These include exposure to infections (including Human Immunodeficiency Virus and viral hepatitis; percutaneous exposure incidents, dental materials, radiation, and noise; musculoskeletal disorders; psychological problems and dermatitis; respiratory disorders; and eye insults. Percutaneous exposure incidents remain a main concern, as exposure to serious infectious agents is a virtual risk. Minimizing percutaneous exposure incidents and their consequences should continue to be considered, including sound infection control practices, continuing education, and hepatitis B vaccination. Basically, for any infection control strategies, dentists should be aware of individual protective measures and appropriate sterilization or other high-level disinfection utilities. Strained posture at work disturbs the musculoskeletal alignment and leads to stooped spine. The stooped posture also involved certain groups of muscles and joints. This may lead to diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Continuous educating and appropriate intervention studies are needed to reduce the complication of these hazards. So, it is important for dentists to remain constantly up-to-date about measures on how to deal with newer strategies and dental materials, and implicates the need for special medical care for this professional group.

  4. Can midlevel dental providers be a benefit to the American public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Tobias E; Galka, Audrey L; Lacy, Ernestine S; Pellegrini, August D; Sweier, Domenica G; Romito, Laura M

    2013-05-01

    The use of midlevel dental providers (MLDPs) is being debated as a means of reducing oral health disparities and increasing access to care among underserved populations. Midlevel dental providers include the advanced dental hygiene practitioner, community dental health coordinator, dental health aide therapist, and dental therapist. While midlevel providers are new to the U.S. dental profession, medicine has utilized these positions for years. Medical literature has shown mixed results as to whether midlevel providers improve access to care and increased practice efficiency, however, it has demonstrated clearly that the quality of care outcomes of these providers have been comparable to those of physicians. Studies of MLDPs suggest potential practice and public health benefits. With appropriate training, licensure, supervision, and deployment to geographical areas of significant need, we believe MLDPs could increase access to care to underserved populations and help in the prevention of deaths attributable to untreated dental disease.

  5. Traumatic dental injuries: etiology, prevalence and possible outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleckiene, Vaida; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Brukiene, Vilma; Drukteinis, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    . The aim was to overview the etiology, prevalence and possible outcomes of dental trauma. An electronic search of Medline (PubMed), Cochrane, SSCI (Social Citation Index), SCI (Science Citation Index) databases from 1995 to the present, using the following search words: tooth injuries, tooth trauma, traumatized teeth, dental trauma, dentoalveolar trauma, oral trauma, epidemiology, etiology, prevalence, prevention, pulp necrosis, inflammatory resorption, ankylosis, cervical resorption, was performed. During last decade traumatic dental injuries were recognized as public dental health problem worldwide. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries varies between countries. According to the existing data they are more prevalent in permanent than in primary dentition. All treatment procedures in case of dental trauma are directed to minimize undesired consequences despite that treatment of traumatic dental injuries in the young patient is often complicated and can continue during the rest of his/her life. The changing lifestyle and requirements of modern society lead to an emergence of new patterns of dental trauma. A regular update of knowledge in dental traumatology is required.

  6. Salivary cortisol, salivary alpha amylase, and the dental anxiety scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Hana; Finkelman, Matthew; Rosenberg, Morton

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between dental anxiety, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase (sAA) levels. Furthermore, the aim was to look into individual differences such as age, race, gender, any existing pain, or traumatic dental experience and their effect on dental anxiety. This study followed a cross-sectional design and included a convenience sample of 46. Every patient was asked to complete the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and a basic demographic/dental history questionnaire. A saliva sample, utilizing the method of passive drooling, was then collected in 2-mL cryovials. Samples were analyzed for salivary cortisol and sAA levels by Salimetrics. Significant associations were observed between DAS scores and presence of pain and history of traumatic dental experience. However, no significant correlations were observed between DAS, cortisol, and sAA levels. Our study reconfirms that dental anxiety is associated with presence of pain and a history of traumatic dental experience. On the other hand, our study was the first to our knowledge to test the correlation between the DAS and sAA; nevertheless, our results failed to show any significant correlation between dental anxiety, cortisol, and sAA levels.

  7. Does pneumoconiosis of dental technician cause to calcific pleural lesions? (Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman ŞENYİĞİT

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The articles about various pneumoconiosis in dental technicians who work in inconvenient conditions have been increasing in recent years. Exposure to dust and fume that occur during the dental procedure may play role in pneumoconiosis of dental technicians.A 53 years old male patient conveyed that he has worked in dental prosthesis procedures for 22 years (1968-1990.Environmental asbestosis was not established in the history of the case but there were calcified pleural plaques in the chest x-ray graphy.There were appearance of calcific asbest plaques in many section of thorax CT.A case of pneumoconiosis in dental technician who work in unadequate preventive conditions was reported in this paper. Probably ,exposure to the asbest fibers that occurs during the procedure of dental prosthesis were the main reason for developing calcific pleural lesions.

  8. Sex Differences in Pediatric Dental Pain Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gabriela F; Longo, Daniele L; Trevizan, Mariana; de Carvalho, Fabrício K; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Küchler, Erika C; Queiroz, Alexandra M

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate sex-related differences in dental pain perception in children. Fifty-two children who received a dental procedure with local anesthesia were selected to participate. Pain perception levels were assessed with the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale. Twenty-four and 48 hours following the procedure, the parents were contacted by phone for a verbal survey to assess their child's postoperative pain. Age, type of dental procedure, and behavior were also evaluated as covariables. The data were analyzed using Epi Info 7.0 software and GraphPad Prism 5.0 software. Chi-square or t test were performed with a significance level of five percent. The mean age of the children was 6.7 (±2.4 [SD]) years. Twenty-seven (51.9 percent) were boys. None of the parents reported pain at 48 hours. None of the covariables were differentially distributed among the sexes (P>0.05). There was no statistical difference between sex and pain perception immediately after the procedure (P=0.64) and after 24 hours (P=0.41). However, when the analysis was performed according to age group, a borderline association was found. Female preschoolers reported more pain immediately after the procedure than male preschoolers (P=0.06). There was no statistical difference in pain perception between sexes.

  9. Oral breathing and dental malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, A M; Albani, F; Ntrekou, P; Rugiano, A; Duse, M; Mattei, A; Marzo, G

    2009-06-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate existing correlations between oral breathing and dental malocclusions. The study was conducted on a paediatric group of 71 oral breathers selected at the Allergology and Paediatric Immunology Department of Umberto I General Hospital, University of Rome "La Sapienza" (Italy). The children were selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. Children aged 6 to 12 years with no history of craniofacial malformations or orthodontic treatment were included. The results were compared with a control group composed of 71 patient aged 6 to 12 years with nasal breathing. After their medical history was recorded, all patients underwent orthodontic/otolaryngological clinical examinations. The following diagnostic procedures were then performed: latero-lateral projection teleradiography, orthopantomogram, dental impressions, anterior rhinomanometry before and after administering a local vasoconstrictor, nocturnal home pulse oximetry (NHPO) recording, spirometry test, skin prick test, study cast evaluation and cephalometric analysis following Tweed's principles. The intraoral examination assessed: dental class type, overbite, overjet, midlines, crossbite, and presence of parafunctional oral habits such as atypical swallowing, labial incompetence, finger sucking and sucking of the inner lip. Evaluation of the study casts involved arch perimeter and transpalatal width assessment, and space analysis. The results showed a strong correlation between oral breathing and malocclusions, which manifests itself with both dentoskeletal and functional alterations, leading to a dysfunctional malocclusive pattern. According to the authors' results, dysfunctional malocclusive pattern makes it clear that the association between oral breathing and dental malocclusions represents a self-perpetuating vicious circle in which it is difficult to establish if the primary alteration is respiratory or maxillofacial. Regardless, the problem needs to be addressed and

  10. Use of selected ambulatory dental services in Taiwan before and after global budgeting: a longitudinal study to identify trends in hospital and clinic-based services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chienhung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Taiwan government adopted National Health Insurance (NHI in 1995, providing universal health care to all citizens. It was financed by mandatory premium contributions made by employers, employees, and the government. Since then, the government has faced increasing challenges to control NHI expenditures. The aim of this study was to determine trends in the provision of dental services in Taiwan after the implementation of global budgeting in 1998 and to identify areas of possible concern. Methods This longitudinal before/after study was based on data from the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1996 to 2001. These data were subjected to logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to examine changes in delivery of specific services after global budgeting implementation. Utilization of hospital and clinic services was compared. Results Reimbursement for dental services increased significantly while the number of visits per patient remained steady in both hospitals and clinics. In hospitals, visits for root canal procedures, ionomer restoration, tooth extraction and tooth scaling increased significantly. In dental clinics, visits for amalgam restoration decreased significantly while those for ionomer restoration, tooth extraction, and tooth scaling increased significantly. After the adoption of global budgeting, expenditures for dental services increased dramatically while the number of visits per patient did not, indicating a possible shift in patients to hospital facilities that received additional National Health Insurance funding. Conclusions The identified trends indicate increased utilization of dental services and uneven distribution of care and dentists. These trends may be compromising the quality of dental care delivered in Taiwan.

  11. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... the prevalence of dental caries and gingivitis among. 12-year-old children .... chemical, bacterial and mechanical irritation from dental plaque and ..... We thank the School of Dental Sciences and Colgate. Palmolive for part ...

  12. Pareto utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masako, I.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  13. Maintaining dental education and specialist dental care during an outbreak of a new coronavirus infection. Part 1: a deadly viral epidemic begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smales, F C; Samaranyake, L P

    2003-11-22

    During the three months from March 2003 the economically vibrant city of Hong Kong was seriously dislocated after becoming 'second port of call' of the new and potentially fatal disease, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The uncertainties during that period had a significant impact on the provision of dental care. However the city's only dental hospital continued to function and to support the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Hong Kong in educating dental students and other members of the dental team. At the time of writing no transmissions of the disease have been attributed to procedures associated with dental healthcare. This article chronicles the sequence of events during the outbreak from a dental perspective. It highlights information that may be useful to dental colleagues who might someday be confronted with similar outbreaks of newly emerged potentially lethal infections.

  14. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  15. Dental erosion, summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  16. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...... dental pain, they expect that the dentist starts treatment at once and that the treatment should provide pain relief. In this situation many patients are fragile, anxious and nervous. If the dentist is able to manage emergency treatment of acute dental pain this will build confidence and trust between...

  17. Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  18. Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Oshida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities.

  19. Real-time detection of dental calculus by blue-LED-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y L; Luan, X L; Bi, L J; Lü, Z; Sheng, Y Q; Somesfalean, G; Zhou, C N; Zhang, Z G

    2007-05-25

    Successful periodontal therapy requires sensitive techniques to discriminate dental calculus from healthy teeth. The aim of the present study was to develop a fluorescence-based procedure to enable real-time detection and quantification of dental calculus. Thirty human teeth--15 teeth with sub- and supragingival calculus and 15 healthy teeth--covered with a layer of physiological saline solution or blood were illuminated by a focused blue LED light source of 405 nm. Autofluorescence spectra recorded along a randomly selected line stretching over the crown-neck-root area of each tooth were utilized to evaluate a so called calculus parameter R, which was selected to define a relationship between the integrated intensities specific for healthy teeth and for calculus in the 477-497 nm (S(A)) and 628-685 nm (S(B)) wavelength regions, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed and a cut-off threshold of R=0.2 was found to distinguish dental calculus from healthy teeth with 100% sensitivity and specificity under various experimental conditions. The results of the spectral evaluation were confirmed by clinical and histological findings. Automated real-time detection and diagnostics for clinical use were implemented by a corresponding software program written in Visual Basic language. The method enables cost-effective and reliable calculus detection, and can be further developed for imaging applications.

  20. Ketoprofen Dental Pain Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, L M; Cooper, S A; Betts, N J; Wedell, D; Hermann, D G; Lamp, C; Secreto, S A; Hersh, E V

    1997-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, recently approved as an over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic at a 12.5 mg dosage strength. This is the first published study which explores the analgesic efficacy and safety of ketoprofen 12.5 mg in patients experiencing pain following the removal of impacted third molars. This study was single-dose, double-blind and randomized utilizing a 6-hour in-patient evaluation period. Patients ingested a single dose of ketoprofen 12.5 mg (n = 30), ketoprofen 37.5 mg (n = 32) or placebo (n = 15) when their post-surgical pain reached at least a moderate intensity on a 5-point categorical (CAT) scale and greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Measures of pain intensity and relief were gathered every 20 minutes for the first 2 hours, and then hourly from hours 3 through 6. Adverse drug reactions were also recorded as they occurred. Both dosages of ketoprofen were significantly more efficacious than placebo (two way ANOVAs, p measures (SPID(VAS), SPID(CAT), TOTPAR) than placebo, with the exception of the 6-hr SPID(CAT) measure for ketoprofen 12.5 mg. No serious side effects were observed in this study. We conclude that ketoprofen in a dose range of 12.5 mg to 37.5 mg is a safe and effective analgesic for the relief of post-operative dental pain.

  1. Accidental Ingestion of Instruments in Pediatric Dental Patients: Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amey Panse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Very young children are at risk of swallowing or aspirating numerous household things. This risk is enhanced during dental procedures of these children as they tend to be very unco-operative due to their age and lack of maturity to understand the importance of the treatment. Use of physical barriers, sedation or general anesthesia is not practically possible in every child scheduled for dental treatment. Dentist must be able to manage emergency situations in which patients accidentally swallow dental instruments or materials during treatment and procedures. This article presents ingestion of dental objects in 3 children and attempts to discuss the management and prevention of such mishaps.

  2. Design of Web Content Management System for Dental Laboratories

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    Reham Alabduljabbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Web Content Management system is a management tool for creating a dynamic website. It ensures logical structure of data organization and ease of content accessing and presenting. Dental laboratories need Web Content Management system (WCMS to control their business. Maintaining a long-term relationship between dental laboratories and their customers (dental clinics and dentists urges an active communication process between the two sides. The main contribution of this paper is to design a simple Web Content Management System for Dental Laboratories. The system adopts three layers of technical architecture. The paper will also discuss why there is a need to develop a standalone WCMS for Dental Laboratories whilst other open source WCMSs can be utilized such as Joomla, Drupal and WordPress.

  3. Factors influencing use of dental services in rural and urban communities: considerations for practitioners in underserved areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Lisa J; Smith, Timothy A; Raybould, Ted P

    2004-10-01

    Individuals' utilization of dental services depends upon an array of factors, including access to care, financial restrictions, attitudes toward dental care, and dental fear. These factors, in turn, may vary across geographic locations and demographic groups. The goals of this study were to assess the use of dental services in both rural and urban areas of Kentucky and to examine challenges facing practitioners in rural areas. Individuals sampled from a rural population and patients in rural and urban dental clinics completed questionnaires about use of dental services, self-rated dental health, and dental fear. While these variables were strongly interrelated, differences emerged across locations. Patients in the urban area reported having more dental insurance but not better dental health. Patients in more rural areas reported seeking more emergency dental treatment but not more dental fear. While these factors are important considerations across locations, dental practitioners in rural areas in particular should be aware of barriers to dental care facing individuals in these areas. They have unique opportunities to provide education to their patients regarding the importance of dental care and the role of oral health in overall physical health.

  4. The use of articulators in UK dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, J R; Craddock, H L

    2006-11-01

    The increasing complexity of many restorative procedures often involves articulation of study and working casts to ensure accurate fabrication of restorations. Correct selection and use of articulators can be crucial to successful restoration. The aim of this paper is to determine which articulators are recommended for various restorative procedures in UK dental schools, for use by undergraduate students. A questionnaire-based study of all UK dental schools was carried out, with a 100% response rate. Recommended articulator application for specified procedures was established from the literature and questionnaire results were compared with this. The results indicated that dental schools in the UK generally teach appropriate articulator use for most procedures. However, there are some limited areas of what may be argued to be inappropriate recommendation in some establishments.

  5. Here or There: Recent U.S. Immigrants' Medical and Dental Tourism and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sou Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Applying Andersen's health care utilization model, this paper shows the prevalence of immigrants' medical and dental tourism and associated factors. An analysis of the 2003 New Immigrant Survey data shows that about 17% of immigrants received medical care in a foreign country, whereas about one-third obtained dental care outside the United States. Latino immigrants have a higher prevalence of both types of tourism than their Asian counterparts. Race, level of education, and health insured status are commonly associated with medical and dental tourism. The findings contribute to the scarce literature on immigrants' health care utilization and medical and dental tourism.

  6. Dental practice satisfaction with preferred provider organizations

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    Schilling Elizabeth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite their increasing share of the dental insurance market, little is known about dental practices' satisfaction with preferred provider organizations (PPOs. This analysis examined practice satisfaction with dental PPOs and the extent to which satisfaction was a function of communications from the plan, claims handling and compensation. Methods Data were collected through telephone surveys with dental practices affiliated with MetLife between January 2002 and December 2004. Each respondent was asked a series of questions related to their satisfaction with a systematically selected PPO with which they were affiliated. Six different PPO plans had sufficient observations to allow for comparative analysis (total n = 4582. Multiple imputation procedures were used to adjust for item non-response. Results While the average level of overall satisfaction with the target plan fell between "very satisfied" and "satisfied," regression models revealed substantial differences in overall satisfaction across the 6 PPOs (p Conclusion Results demonstrate the importance of compensation to dental practice satisfaction with PPOs. However, these results also highlight the critical role of service-related factors in differentiating plans and suggest that there are important non-monetary dimensions of PPO performance that can be used to recruit and retain practices.

  7. Dental fluorosis: exposure, prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanto Alvarez, Jenny; Rezende, Karla Mayra P C; Marocho, Susana María Salazar; Alves, Fabiana B T; Celiberti, Paula; Ciamponi, Ana Lidia

    2009-02-01

    Dental fluorosis is a developmental disturbance of dental enamel, caused by successive exposures to high concentrations of fluoride during tooth development, leading to enamel with lower mineral content and increased porosity. The severity of dental fluorosis depends on when and for how long the overexposure to fluoride occurs, the individual response, weight, degree of physical activity, nutritional factors and bone growth. The risk period for esthetic changes in permanent teeth is between 20 and 30 months of age. The recommended level for daily fluoride intake is 0.05 - 0.07 mg F/Kg/day, which is considered of great help in preventing dental caries, acting in remineralization. A daily intake above this safe level leads to an increased risk of dental fluorosis. Currently recommended procedures for diagnosis of fluorosis should discriminate between symmetrical and asymmetrical and/or discrete patterns of opaque defects. Fluorosis can be prevented by having an adequate knowledge of the fluoride sources, knowing how to manage this issue and therefore, avoid overexposure.

  8. [Music therapy in different dental specialties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Katarzyna; Wyganowska-Swiatkowska, Marzena; Kowalkowska, Iwona; Kurhańska-Flisykowska, Anna; Piotrowski, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    Music is generally recognized as the best and, in parallel, the simplest medium of communication. The music therapy, applied in various spheres linked to a therapeutic process, is particularly valued in rehabilitation, medicine, humanities and social sciences. Present study aimed at determination of usefulness of selected techniques of music therapy in different dental specialties. The studies were conducted on 81 generally healthy patients aging 18 to 62 years. Various planned dental procedures were performed first time or were appraised by the patients as unpleasant ones. On the basis of pilot studies, a stable scheme of the visits was established. At the beginning of the studies, music therapy according to Kierył was conducted. Subsequently, basing on description of Schwabe, a form of regulatory individual music therapy was conducted. Depending on psychoemotional condition of the patient, music programming was based on ISO and LEVEL principles, taking into account musical preferences of the patient and his/her age. After every visit the patients filled questionnaires and appropriate results, together with results of studies performed by the dentist, were subjected to statistical analysis. 1. Results of the studies encourage application of musicotherapeutic techniques in different dental specialties. 2. Dental visit can be made attractive and patient's visits in dental office can be facilitated with no significant financial input or organizational.

  9. Future Recommendations for School Dental Health Program in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorakkal SHAMIM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental Surgeons working in public sector have an important role to play in school dental health pro-gram to reinstitute the oral and dental health of growing population of India. Even though the oral health policy was drafted in India in 1995, it was not implemented till this date (1. It is im-portant to enhance the knowledge about good oral health in teachers and parents by caring out workshops and seminars on oral and dental health by dental Surgeons working in public health sector. Dental surgeons working in public health sector should carry out oral screening to improve the future of oral health care in India (2. Mobile den-tal unit is an effective method to render oral and dental health-care in the public sector and it should be implemented in school set up in multi-ple situations such as educating school children regarding oral and dental health, screening of school children for various oral diseases, school and community dental health program(3.In an interventional study conducted among rural school children in Nalgonda district to assess the oral health promotion, it was interfered that the School teachers may be utilized as good medium for oral health promotion among school children in India and other developing countries(4.The following recommendations should be incor-porated in school health program in India. The government should incorporate dental surgeons in school health programs to give lecture on oral health, oral hygiene, plaque control, oral and den-tal diseases, oral cancer or smokeless tobacco use and hazards counseling and topical fluoride appli-cation. The government should incorporate oral and dental health related topic in School curric-ulum. Compulsory fitness regarding oral and den-tal health should be made mandatory for class promotion. Dental Surgeons play an important role in recognizing child abuse in school set up (5. Dentists should evaluate child abuse cases and child abuse cases will present clinically as

  10. Use of social media by dental educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, M R; Loewen, J M; Romito, L M

    2013-11-01

    Social networking applications have become an established means of communication; applications that did not exist ten years ago are now used daily. Social media can be used for a myriad of reasons including instructional tools to supplement learning. This project was designed to assess the usage of social media applications by dental school faculty members and identify the types of accounts they prefer. Four hundred forty-three full-time dental and dental hygiene faculty members from five U.S. dental schools were invited to complete a twelve-item online survey regarding their social media usage. The response rate was 50 percent (n=221). Of the respondents, nearly half were dentists, and 62 percent were ≥51 years of age. Facebook was the most popular social network, reportedly used by 111 respondents. The most often reported frequency of use was weekly (20.4 percent, n=221); users indicated utilizing a network primarily for personal rather than professional purposes. However, 37 percent of the respondents reported not using any social media. The most frequently cited barriers to the use of social media were time (48 percent) and privacy concerns (48 percent). Although few would dispute the influence social media has on today's students, the suitability and appropriateness of social media technology and its integration into dental curricula require further evaluation.

  11. Dental fraud: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Max H

    2003-01-01

    A manager of a dental benefits program defines fraud and abuse in the dental context. Such practices may cost as much as four billion dollars annually and have a damaging effect on the trust the profession places in the profession and on the way dentists relate to each other.

  12. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  13. Recovery of silver residues from dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva Pereira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam residues are probably the most important chemical residues generated from clinical dental practice because of the presence of heavy metals among its constituents, mainly mercury and silver. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative method for the recovery of silver residues from dental amalgam. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The residue generated after vacuum distillation of dental amalgam for the separation of mercury was initially diluted with 32.5% HNO3, followed by precipitation with 20% NaCl. Sequentially, under constant heating and agitation with NaOH and sucrose, the sample was reduced to metallic silver. However, the processing time was too long, which turned this procedure not viable. In another sequence of experiments, the dilution was accomplished with concentrated HNO3 at 90ºC, followed by precipitation with 20% NaCl. After washing, the pellet was diluted with concentrated NH4OH, water and more NaCl in order to facilitate the reaction with the reducer. RESULTS: Ascorbic acid was efficiently used as reducer, allowing a fast reduction, thus making the procedure viable. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed methodology is of easy application and does not require sophisticated equipment or expensive reagents.

  14. The management of dental patients taking new generation oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alun; Gibson, John; Crighton, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin. While national guidelines for treatment of dental patients taking warfarin as an anticoagulant are well-established, no such information is available for these novel therapeutic agents. At present, the local guidance available is contradictory between different health boards/health planning units, and liaison with the medical practitioner managing the individual patient's anticoagulation is imperative if any invasive procedure is proposed. This paper examines the available evidence regarding these drugs and sets out proposals for clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care.

  15. The recasting effects on the high gold dental alloy properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Noble dental alloys are often reused in dental practice by recasting. The aim of this study was to determine if repeated casting of high gold dental alloys has a detrimental effect on alloy microstructure, type of porosity, structure and microhardness. Results showed that recasting procedure had a strong effect on the change of alloy porosity type. It was also found that alloy microhardness increased with the increase of the number of recasting cycles. At the same time the grain growth and changes of the solid solution phases in the microstructure were observed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45012

  16. Doing qualitative research in dentistry and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, S; Brown, G

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist dental researchers to develop their expertise in qualitative research. It sketches the key characteristics of qualitative research; summarises theoretical perspectives; outlines the core skills of qualitative data collection and the procedures which underlie three methods of qualitative research: interviewing, focus groups and concept maps. The paper offers some guidance on writing qualitative research and provides examples of qualitative research drawn from dentistry and dental education.

  17. Dental implants in medically complex patients-a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Yifat; Simon, Roy; Haim, Doron; Garfunkel, Adi; Moses, Ofer

    2017-03-01

    Dental implant insertion for oral rehabilitation is a worldwide procedure for healthy and medically compromised patients. The impact of systemic disease risks on the outcome of implant therapy is unclear, since there are few if any published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The objective of this study is to investigate the rate of complications and failures following dental implantation in medically compromised patients in order to elucidate risk factors and prevent them. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from patient files treated with dental implantation between the years 2008-2014. The study group consisted of medically complex patients while the control group consisted of healthy patients. Preoperative, intraoperative, and post operative clinical details were retrieved from patients' files. The survival rate and the success rate of the dental implants were evaluated clinically and radiographically. A total of 204 patients (1003 dental implants) were included in the research, in the study group, 93 patients with 528 dental implants and in the control group, 111 patients with 475 dental implants. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding implant failures or complications. The failure rate of dental implants among the patients was 11.8 % in the study group and 16.2 % in the control group (P = 0.04). It was found that patients with a higher number of implants (mean 6.8) had failures compared with patients with a lower number of implants (mean 4.2) regardless of their health status (P dental implantation in medically complex patients and in healthy patients. Medically complex patients can undergo dental implantation. There are similar rates of complications and failures of dental implants in medically complex patients and in healthy patients.

  18. [Dental practice and AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, S

    1991-01-01

    In Thailand nowadays AIDS is not completely under control. This is evident from reports which show an increasing number of HIV-positive patients. Since an unknown number of HIV-infected persons who are either undiagnosed or asymptomatic come to get dental service, fears of getting infected with HIV have been developed among dental professionals. This article summarizes a number of past studies and reports on HIV transmission in dental work and discusses the possibility of AIDS infection and dental occupational risk. It also urges dental professionals to take effective safety precaution against the infection. This is for their own and their patients' well-being and hopefully for Thailand's success in controlling AIDS.

  19. Experiences of dental care: what do patients value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbaraini Alexandra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dentistry in Australia combines business and health care service, that is, the majority of patients pay money for tangible dental procedures such as fluoride applications, dental radiographs, dental fillings, crowns, and dentures among others. There is evidence that patients question dentists’ behaviours and attitudes during a dental visit when those highly technical procedures are performed. However, little is known about how patients’ experience dental care as a whole. This paper illustrates the findings from a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. It focuses on patients’ experiences of dental care, particularly on the relationship between patients and dentists during the provision of preventive care and advice in general dental practices. Methods Seventeen patients were interviewed. Data analysis consisted of transcript coding, detailed memo writing, and data interpretation. Results Patients described their experiences when visiting dental practices with and without a structured preventive approach in place, together with the historical, biological, financial, psychosocial and habitual dimensions of their experience. Potential barriers that could hinder preventive activities as well as facilitators for prevention were also described. The offer of preventive dental care and advice was an amazing revelation for this group of patients as they realized that dentists could practice dentistry without having to “drill and fill” their teeth. All patients, regardless of the practice they came from or their level of clinical risk of developing dental caries, valued having a caring dentist who respected them and listened to their concerns without “blaming” them for their oral health status. These patients complied with and supported the preventive care options because they were being “treated as a person not as a patient” by their dentists. Patients valued dentists who made

  20. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Decontamination methods using a dental water jet and dental floss for microthreaded implant fixtures in regenerative periimplantitis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Shin, Seung-Yun; Koo, Ki-Tae; Lee, Yong-Moo; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Seol, Yang-Jo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated decontamination methods using a dental water jet and dental floss on microthreaded implants for regenerative periimplantitis therapy. In 6 beagle dogs, experimental periimplantitis was induced, and decontamination procedures, including manual saline irrigation (control group), saline irrigation using a dental water jet (group 1) and saline irrigation using a dental water jet with dental flossing (group 2), were performed. After in situ decontamination procedures, some of the implant fixtures (n = 4 per group) were retrieved for analysis by SEM, whereas other fixtures (n = 4 per group) underwent regenerative therapy. After 3 months of healing, the animals were killed. The SEM examination indicated that decontamination of the implant surfaces was the most effective in group 2, with no changes in implant surface morphology. The histological examination also revealed that group 2 achieved significantly greater amounts of newly formed bone (6.75 ± 2.19 mm; P = 0.018), reosseointegration (1.88 ± 1.79 mm; P = 0.038), and vertical bone fill (26.69 ± 18.42%; P = 0.039). Decontamination using a dental water jet and dental floss on microthreaded implants showed positive mechanical debridement effects and positive bone regeneration effects.

  2. Use of virtual patients in dental education: a survey of U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Robert A; Bentley, Dan A; Halpin, Richard; Valenza, John A

    2012-10-01

    The use of virtual patients in dental education is gaining acceptance as an adjunctive method to live patient interactions for training dental students. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which virtual patients are being utilized in dental education by conducting a survey that was sent to sixty-seven dental schools in the United States and Canada. A total of thirty dental schools responded to the web-based survey. Sixty-three percent of the responding dental schools use virtual patients for preclinical or clinical exercises. Of this group, 31.3 percent have used virtual patients in their curricula for more than ten years, and approximately one-third of those who do use virtual patients expose their students to more than ten virtual patient experiences over the entirety of their programs. Of the schools that responded, 90.5 percent rated the use of virtual patients in dental education as important or very important. An additional question addressed the utilization of interactive elements for the virtual patient. Use of virtual patients can provide an excellent method for learning and honing patient interviewing skills, medical history taking, recordkeeping, and patient treatment planning. Through the use of virtual patient interactive audio/video elements, the student can experience interaction with his or her virtual patients during a more realistic simulation encounter.

  3. Qualitative description of dental hygiene practices within oral health and dental care perspectives of Mexican-American adults and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; Aguirre-Zero, Odette; Westerhold, Chi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify dental hygiene themes voiced by adults and teenagers of Mexican origin [or Mexican Americans (MAs)] and place these themes within the larger landscape of oral health and dental care perceptions. Interviews with urban-based MAs were analyzed to identify barriers, beliefs, and behaviors influencing engagement in dental hygiene practices. Adult (n = 16, ages 33-52) and teenage (n = 17, ages 14-19) MAs reported themes pertaining to structural factors (financial and economic-related barriers, the dual challenges of reduced access to care vis-à-vis successfully navigating the dental care system, and the effects of reduced social support derived from migration) and to individual factors (different agendas between MAs and health systems for dental care utilization and indications for oral self-care, including limited dental hygiene instruction from professionals and larger impacts from school-based and mass media). Also, prior experiences with dental hygiene, prevention, and associated themes were characterized by a range of attitudes from fatalistic to highly determined agency. Good family upbringing was instrumental for appropriate dental hygiene, anteceding good oral health; and outlining a loose structure of factors affecting oral health such as diet, having "weak" teeth, or personal habits. Themes from adults and teenagers in the Midwest United States were generally similar to other groups of MA parents and younger children. Dental hygiene was not salient relative to other oral health and dental care matters. Several opportunities for improvement of knowledge and enhancing motivation for dental hygiene practices were identified, both within and outside professional resources. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Richard John

    2016-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the University of Manchester by Richard Macey for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy entitled “Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists”, February 2016.Many adult patients that attend NHS dental practices on a regular basis are asymptomatic and do not need any further treatment other than a routine dental examination (“check-up”). As the oral health of the adult population is predicted to improve further, using the General Dental Practitioner to und...

  5. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth"…

  6. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyonyi, Kristina L; Radford, David R; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2017-01-01

    This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England. Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008-2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients' individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status) and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence), with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments. Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (dental service and show that individual and contextual factors predict common treatments received. Implications of this research include the importance of making provision for our aging population and ensuring that preventative care is available to all. Further research is required to explain the interaction of organisational and system policies, practitioner and patient perspectives on care and, thus, inform effective commissioning and provision of dental services.

  7. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix Corporation, Including On-Site Leased...

  8. Effect of furazolidone quadruple regimen plus dental plaque removal procedures as rescue treatment of refractory Helicobacter pylori infection%含呋喃唑酮的四联疗法联合口腔洁治对幽门螺杆菌根除多次失败的补救治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文; 胡伏莲; 王晓敏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of furazolidone quadruple regimen plus dental plaque removal procedures as rescue treatment of refractory H.pylori infection.Methods A total of 104 patients with H.pylori positive [13 C-urea breath test (UBT) or rapid urease test positive] failing in previous treatment two or more were enrolled and divided into 2 groups.One group (n = 64) were given quadruple regimen [proton pump inhibitor (PPI) + bismuth + amoxicillin + furazolidone,10 days] treatment and dental plaque removal treatment.And the others (n =40) received only quadruple regimen treatment.The status of H.pylori was detected by 13 C-UBT at 4 weeks post-therapy and the eradication rates of two groups were compared.Results The eradication rate of quadruple regimen + dental treatment group was 85.9%(55/64) while that of the other group 72.5% (29/40) (P = 0.091 ).Conclusion The PPI + bismuth quadruple regimen plus dental plaque removal procedures as rescue treatment may boost the eradication rate of refractory H.pylori infection patients.And the furazolidone quadruple therapy can be chosen for the treatment of refractory H.pylori infection.Oral H.pylori infection may play a role in the failure of H.pylori infection treatment.%目的 观察含呋哺唑酮的四联疗法联合口腔洁治进行补救治疗对幽门螺杆菌根除多次失败患者的治疗效果及根除率.方法 入选者为幽门螺杆菌根除治疗失败至少2次或以上,经13C-UBT或RUT检测确诊幽门螺杆菌感染的患者104例,随机分为2组,一组64例给予四联方案(雷贝拉唑+铋剂+阿莫西林+呋喃唑酮)10 d,同时进行口腔洁治;另一组40例仅给予四联方案(雷贝拉唑+铋剂+阿莫四林+呋喃唑酮)10 d,不进行口腔洁治.两组治疗结束后,停药1个月后复查13C-UBT.比较两组患者的幽门螺杆菌根除率.结果 口腔洁治组64例,成功根除55例,根除率85.9%(55/64).未进行口腔洁治组40例,成功根除29例,根除率72.5%(29/40).两组根

  9. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Della Bona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different substrates, which has offered a great challenge to dental zirconia research and development. This study characterizes zirconia as a dental biomaterial, presenting the current consensus and challenges to its dental applications.

  10. Anxiety control in the dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Orrett E; Hertz, Marc B

    2012-01-01

    Oral sedation with benzodiazepines and anxiolysis with nitrous oxide are 2 effective methods to help alleviate anxiety and fear of dental procedures. Many patients would prefer to have their dentistry performed with sedation if it were offered to them. This article presents a detailed discussion on minimal sedation that should give the reader a good understanding of this valuable aspect of clinical care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Accuracy of Small Base Metal Dental Castings,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-10

    in military’ dental practice is not warranted. 80 7 23 12 DD t JAN., 1473 EoIlp OF INov 65 SOIL UCASFE -7\\CRT CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAO& CWile. bet...RESEARCH WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CENTER WASHINGTON, D.C. 20012 Commercial materials and equipment are identified in this report to specify the...experimental procedure. Such identification does not imply official recommendation or endorsement or that the equipment and materials are necessarily the best

  12. Effects of Waxed Dental Floss Inclusion in the Regimen of Oral Health of Antarctic Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral health indices were compared for two groups of subjects. One group was trained to use dental floss, the other was not. Professional guidance was...inference drawn from the data gathered suggests that dental floss, used regularly as an adjunct to other home care procedures, can aid in achieving and...maintaining a significantly higher level of gingival health than is attainable without the use of dental floss.

  13. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  14. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  15. Feline dental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P; Williams, C A

    1986-09-01

    Periodontal disease and chronic gingivitis/stomatitis are the most common feline dental diseases. With routine dental care and increased emphasis on home oral hygiene, these diseases can be controlled. Cats can be seen with a number of other dental disorders, and improved treatment methods such as restorations of early subgingival resorptive lesions, endodontic therapy, and orthodontic therapy can be performed successfully. More study and research are necessary about the gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and subgingival resorptive lesions so that improved prevention and treatment recommendations can be made.

  16. Difficult factors in Management of Impacted Dental Prosthesis in Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efiaty A. Soepardi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A dental prosthesis which ingested and impacted in esophagus, is an emergency case and life threatening, so require immediate esophagoscopy intervention for removing. The objective of this study is to assess some factors can caused dtfficulties in diagnosing and treating the ingested and impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus and their complications. This retrospective study analyzed patient’s chart whose underwent esophagoscopy for removing the impacted dental prosthesis in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia during a period between January 1997 and December 2003. Neck-chest X-ray and esophagoscopy were performed in all patients to identify the existence of the dental prosthesis as a diagnostic and treatment procedure. The length of time for removing the dental prosthesis was recorded and stated as a less difficult esophagoscopy when it takes time less than 60 minutes and as a difficult  esophagoscopy takes 60 minutes or longer. Some risk difficulties factors were statistically analyzed. There were 53 patients of ingested dental prosthesis in esophagus. Only 51 cases were analyzed According to the length of time for removing the dental prosthesis by esophagoscopy, 22 patients were recorded as less difficult cases and 29 patients as difficult cases. Two cases among the cases needed cervicotomy after unsuccessful esophagoscopy removal. The difficulties to diagnose an impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus caused by unreliable clinical history, unclear signs and symptoms, unable to be detected by X-ray and was not found during esophagoscopy. The difficulties in treating due to mucosal laceration, edema, bleeding, failure of the first extraction and conformity with the size and shape, the wire outside the dental prosthesis and the length of time stayed in the esophagus. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 33-6Keywords: ingested dental prosthesis, radioluscent foreign body, length of time of esophagoscopy

  17. [Dental caries--therapeutic possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić, Tamara; Marković, Dejan; Zivković, Slavoljub

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary tendencies in dentistry are based on the concept of maximal protection of healthy tooth tissues. Caries removal has been done traditionally with mechanical rotary instruments that are fast and precise. However, conventional cavity preparation has potential adverse effects to the pulp due to heat, pressure and vibrations. Moreover, drilling often causes pain and requires local anaesthesia, and these procedures are frequently perceived as unpleasant. Etiology, development and prevention of dental caries are better understood today and new restorative materials that bond micromechanically and/or chemically to dental tissues have been introduced. Thus, development of a new, less destructive caries removal technique is allowed. In the last decades, many alternative methods have been introduced in an attempt to replace rotary instruments. These are claimed to be efficient and selective for diseased tissues and to offer comfortable treatment to the patients. New methods include air abrasion, air polishing, ultrasonic, polymer burs, enzymes, systems for chemo-mechanical caries removal, and lasers. The aim of this paper was to discuss various caries removal techniques and possibilities of their use in clinical practice. Based on the literature review it can be concluded that none of the new caries removal methods can completely replace conventional rotary instruments.

  18. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  19. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  20. 10 CFR 766.101 - Data utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Data utilization. 766.101 Section 766.101 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND; PROCEDURES FOR SPECIAL ASSESSMENT OF DOMESTIC UTILITIES Procedures for Special Assessment § 766.101 Data utilization. DOE shall use...