WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental practitioners gdps

  1. The estimation of patients' views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice by general dental practitioners: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truin Gert-Jan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the changes in dental healthcare, such as the increasing assertiveness of patients, the introduction of new dental professionals, and regulated competition, it becomes more important that general dental practitioners (GDPs take patients' views into account. The aim of the study was to compare patients' views on organizational aspects of general dental practices with those of GDPs and with GDPs' estimation of patients' views. Methods In a survey study, patients and GDPs provided their views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice. In a second, separate survey, GDPs were invited to estimate patients' views on 22 organizational aspects of a general dental practice. Results For 4 of the 22 aspects, patients and GDPs had the same views, and GDPs estimated patients' views reasonably well: 'Dutch-speaking GDP', 'guarantee on treatment', 'treatment by the same GDP', and 'reminder of routine oral examination'. For 2 aspects ('quality assessment' and 'accessibility for disabled patients' patients and GDPs had the same standards, although the GDPs underestimated the patients' standards. Patients had higher standards than GDPs for 7 aspects and lower standards than GDPs for 8 aspects. Conclusion On most aspects GDPs and patient have different views, except for social desirable aspects. Given the increasing assertiveness of patients, it is startling the GDP's estimated only half of the patients' views correctly. The findings of the study can assist GDPs in adapting their organizational services to better meet the preferences of their patients and to improve the communication towards patients.

  2. General dental practitioners and hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messano, Giuseppe Alessio; Petti, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) remains a problem among dentists Hearing loss at speech frequencies was recently reported among dentists and dental hygienists. This study aimed to investigate prevalence and factors associated with perceived HI among dentists. In 2009-2010, 100 general dental practitioners (GDPs) and 115 general (medical) practitioners (GPs) (mean ages, 43.7 and 44.4 years) from Rome (Italy), who commenced practice ≥ 10 years ago, were interviewed on a series of occupation- and recreation-related HI risk factors and on HI-associated symptoms (tinnitus, sensation of fullness, hypoacusis). Prevalence of presumptive HI (≥ 1 symptom perceived during workdays and weekends) was assessed and factors associated with presumptive HI were investigated. Prevalence was 30.0% (95% confidence interval, 21.0-39.0%) and 14.8% (95% confidence interval, 8.3-21.3%) among GDPs and GPs, respectively. Occupation (GDP vs. GP), family history of hypoacusis, hypertension, ear diseases and smoking were significantly associated with presumptive HI. Within GDPs alone, significant associations were found for frequent use of ultrasonic scalers, use of dental turbines aged≥1 year and prosthodontics as prevalent specialty. GDPs experienced HI risk than GPs. Such a risk was not generalized to all dentists, but was specific for those who frequently used noisy equipment (aged turbines, ultrasonic scalers) during their daily practice. GDPs with 10 or more years of practice who routinely use potentially noisy equipment, could be at risk of HI. In order to prevent such condition, daily maintenance and periodical replacement of dental instruments is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dental Implants and General Dental Practitioners of Nepal: A study of existing knowledge and need for further education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhageshwar Dhami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The use of dental implants in partially or completely edentulous patients has proved effective and an accepted treatment modality with predictable long-term success. Dental implants are becoming a popular choice for replacing the missing teeth because of increased awareness about implants both in dentists and patients. The objective of the study was to assess the basic knowledge and education about dental implants among general dental practitioners (GDPs of Nepal.Materials & Methods:  A cross sectional questionnaire was carried out among 110 GDPs which consist of twenty questions that were divided into three categories; first with some basic knowledge in implant dentistry, second with clinical knowledge of dental implants and third with dental implant education and training.Results: Out of 110 GDPs, 72.7% had basic knowledge about implant dentistry and 65.5% were not aware about advance surgical procedures like sinus lift and guided bone regeneration. All the GDPs were positive regarding more training and education in dental implants and 95.5% of them would like to incorporate dental implant treatment in their practice in future. Conclusion: GDPs should have adequate knowledge and training of dental implants which can be incorporated at undergraduate or post doctoral level so that they are skilled to provide quality dental implant therapy to their patients confidently.

  4. Knowledge, management and perceived barriers to treatment of molar-incisor hypomineralisation in general dental practitioners and dental nurses in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, A S; Ghanim, A M; Abu-Hassan, M I; Manton, D J

    2014-10-01

    Molar-incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) is a global dental problem, yet little is known about the knowledge of the general dental practitioners (GDPs) and dental nurses (DNs) regarding this defect in South East Asia. To assess and compare the knowledge of the GDPs and DNs in Malaysia regarding the frequency of occurrence of MIH within their practice, its diagnosis, putative aetiological factors and management. A questionnaire was distributed to GDPs and DNs during a nationwide dental conference in Melaka, Malaysia and who were asked to answer questions about demographic variables, knowledge, attitudes and practices in the management of MIH. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis were performed. A 5% level of statistical significance was applied for the analyses. A response rate of 58.2% (131/225) was obtained. Most respondents were aware of MIH and encountered it in their practice (GDPs = 82.5%, DNs = 82.4%). The condition was observed by respondents less in primary molars compared to first permanent molars. Full agreement between GDPs and DNs did not exist concerning the aetiological factors and management of MIH. Glass ionomer cements were the most popular material used in treating MIH. Most respondents (GDPs = 93%, DNs = 76.5%) indicated that they had not received sufficient information about MIH and were willing to have clinical training in the diagnosis and therapeutic modalities of MIH. MIH is identified and encountered by most respondents. Agreement did not exist between GDPs and DNs concerning MIH frequency of occurrence within their practice, its diagnosis, aetiological factors and management.

  5. Predictors of recall assignment decisions by general dental practitioners performing routine oral examinations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettes, Th.G.P.H.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Mulder, J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the decision-making behavior of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in performing routine oral examinations (ROEs). Change over time was studied by comparing data from a cohort sample of participants in two surveys in 2000 and 2005. A written questionnaire was se

  6. Contemporary views of dental practitioners' on patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, E

    2015-12-01

    There is little known about general dental practitioners' (GDPs) views on patient safety in dentistry; we believe this to be the first paper describing their opinions and ideas for maintaining or improving safe practices. Focus groups were used to gather the views of 12 GDPs (who also hold university teaching contracts) on the following topics: Defining patient safety, the important issues in patient safety, safeguards and tools for maintaining safe care, never events and research priorities. Thematic analysis was performed on the verbatim transcripts. Key themes from the practitioners included: Medical history (polypharmacy and co-morbidities), competence and skill level, the use of safeguards and tools to ensure safety, the importance of effective communication (including working with a chaperone) and the role of reflective practice. Suggestions for improvement included: effective sharing of information with other healthcare professionals, easy access to guidelines and educational tools, adoption of practice protocols, team working and the use of universal charting systems to limit ambiguity. GDPs are well versed in the concept of patient safety and are keen to implement evidence based tools and/or interventions designed to improve safety for their patients.

  7. Bullying in schoolchildren - its relationship to dental appearance and psychosocial implications: an update for GDPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehra, J; Newton, J T; DiBiase, A T

    2011-05-14

    Bullying in school-aged children is a global phenomenon. The effects of bullying can be both short- and long-term, resulting in both physiological and psychological symptoms. It is likely that dental care professionals will encounter children who are subjected to bullying. The aim of this narrative review is to discuss the incidence of bullying, the types of bullying, the effects of bullying and the interventions aimed at combating bullying in schoolchildren. The role of dentofacial aesthetics and the relationship of bullying and the presence of a malocclusion are also discussed.

  8. Routine oral examination: differences in characteristics of Dutch general dental practitioners related to type of recall interval.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettes, Th.G.P.H.; Bruers, J.J.M.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Verdonschot, E.H.A.M.; Mulder, J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore differences in behaviour (characteristics and opinions) among general dental practitioners (GDPs), using either a fixed (Fx) or an individualized recall interval (Iv) between successive routine oral examinations (ROEs). METHODS: In the year 2000, data

  9. Library service to dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashin, E R

    1983-01-01

    Dental school libraries offer resources of value to dental practitioners, but do not always consider practitioners to be primary clientele. A survey was conducted among the sixty U.S. dental school libraries to examine policies and attitudes toward service to practitioners. Although library use by dentists is estimated to be low, most libraries are willing to serve them as long as it does not reduce the libraries' ability to assist students and faculty. Of the respondents, 57% replied that they do not use promotional methods to inform dentists of available services. Greater involvement in marketing activities may benefit both libraries and dentists. PMID:6652300

  10. Current sedation practice among general dental practitioners and dental specialists in Jordan: an example of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shayyab MH

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad H Al-Shayyab,1 Soukaina Ryalat,1 Najla Dar-odeh,1 Firas Alsoleihat21Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, 2Department of Conservative Dentistry and Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, JordanPurpose: The study reported here aimed to identify current sedation practice among general dental practitioners (GDPs and specialist dental practitioners (SDPs in Jordan in 2010.Methods: Questionnaires were sent by email to 1683 GDPs and SDPs who were working in Jordan at the time of the study. The contact details of these dental practitioners were obtained from a Jordan Dental Association list. Details on personal status, use of, and training in, conscious sedation techniques were sought by the questionnaires.Results: A total of 1003 (60% questionnaires were returned, with 748 (86.9% GDPs and 113 (13.1% SDPs responding. Only ten (1.3% GDPs and 63 (55.8% SDPs provided information on the different types of treatments related to their specialties undertaken under some form of sedation performed by specialist and/or assistant anesthetists. Approximately 0.075% of the Jordanian population received some form of sedation during the year 2010, with approximately 0.054% having been treated by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The main reason for the majority of GDPs (55.0% and many SDPs (40% not to perform sedation was lack of training in this field. While some SDPs (26.0% indicated they did not use sedation because of the inadequacy of sedative facilities.Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the provision of conscious sedation services in general and specialist dental practices in Jordan is inconsistent and inadequate. This stresses the great need to train practitioners and dental assistants in Jordan to enable them to safely and effectively perform all forms of sedation.Keywords: Jordan Dental

  11. Management of orthodontic emergencies in primary care - self-reported confidence of general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popat, H; Thomas, K; Farnell, D J J

    2016-07-08

    Objective To determine general dental practitioners' (GDPs) confidence in managing orthodontic emergencies.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Primary dental care.Subjects and methods An online survey was distributed to dentists practicing in Wales. The survey collected basic demographic information and included descriptions of ten common orthodontic emergency scenarios.Main outcome measure Respondents' self-reported confidence in managing the orthodontic emergency scenarios on a 5-point Likert scale. Differences between the Likert responses and the demographic variables were investigated using chi-squared tests.Results The median number of orthodontic emergencies encountered by respondents over the previous six months was 1. Overall, the self-reported confidence of respondents was high with 7 of the 10 scenarios presented scoring a median of 4 indicating that GDPs were 'confident' in their management. Statistical analysis revealed that GDPs who saw more orthodontic emergencies in the previous six months were more confident when managing the presented scenarios. Other variables such as age, gender, geographic location of practice and number of years practising dentistry were not associated with self-reported confidence.Conclusions Despite GDPs encountering very few orthodontic emergencies in primary care, they appear to be confident in dealing with commonly arising orthodontic emergency situations.

  12. Knowledge of managing avulsed tooth among general dental practitioners in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Dalia; Soo, Suet Yeo; Kanagasingam, Shalini

    2016-12-01

    Dental and maxillofacial injuries are one of the areas of concern highlighted in the Malaysian National Oral Health Plan 2011-2020. General dental practitioners (GDPs) have the responsibility of diagnosing and assessing dental trauma and determining the prognosis and outcomes of trauma along with its management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge base and preferred methods of general dental practitioners regarding the management of avulsed tooth. A random convenient sampling methodology was employed for sample selection. A pre-tested 11-item questionnaire was validated on the dental officers. The survey was distributed to 182 GDPs attending the annual Malaysian Dental Association conference in January 2010. The data obtained was statistically analyzed using descriptive analysis and logistic regression was employed to predict the probability of achieving high scores. A total of 182 general dental practitioners participated in the study, with the majority being female (n=153, 75%). The place of practice significantly affected the knowledge score. In the group that scored more than 80 points (n=84, 46%), 76% of them worked with government hospitals. Age, work duration and number of traumatised teeth previously treated had no significant effect. The odds ratio for place of practice indicates that respondents who work in government hospitals are 3.6 times more likely to score more than 80 points compared to those who worked in private clinics (OR=3.615, P=0.001). The knowledge level on the management of avulsed tooth among general dental practitioners in Malaysia needs to be improved. Strategies in improvement of the Malaysian dental educational system, continuous dental educational activities and utilisation of guidelines on trauma management should be recommended to increase the knowledge level of avulsed tooth management to ensure good treatment outcomes. Trauma prevention and further education regarding the management of avulsed tooth is an

  13. [Halitosis management by the general dental practitioner- results of an International Consensus Workshop*].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Rainer; Duarte da Conceicao, Mauricio; Filippi, Andreas; Greenman, John; Lenton, Patricia; Nachnani, Sushma; Quirynen, Marc; Roldán, Silvia; Schulze, Hendrik; Sterer, Nir; Tangerman, Albert; Winkel, Edwin G; Yaegaki, Ken; Rosenberg, Mel

    2014-01-01

    Clinical investigations on patients suffering from halitosis clearly reveal that in the vast majority of cases the source for an offensive breath odor can be found within the oral cavity (90%). Based on these studies, the main sources for intra-oral halitosis where tongue coating, gingivitis/periodontitis and a combination of the two. Thus, it is perfectly logical that general dental practitioners (GDPs) should be able to manage intra-oral halitosis under the conditions found in a normal dental practice. However, GDPs who are interested in diagnosing and treating halitosis are challenged to incorporate scientifically based strategies for use in their clinics. Therefore, the present paper summarizes the results of a consensus workshop of international authorities held with the aim to reach a consensus on general guidelines on how to assess and diagnose patients’ breath odor concerns and general guidelines on regimens for the treatment of halitosis.

  14. Halitosis management by the general dental practitioner--results of an international consensus workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, R; Conceicao, M D; Filippi, A; Greenman, J; Lenton, P; Nachnani, S; Quirynen, M; Roldan, S; Schulze, H; Sterer, N; Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; Yaegaki, K; Rosenberg, M

    2014-03-01

    Clinical investigations on patients suffering from halitosis clearly reveal that in the vast majority of cases the source for an offensive breath odor can be found within the oral cavity (90%). Based on these studies, the main sources for intra-oral halitosis where tongue coating, gingivitis/periodontitis or a combination of the two. Thus, it is perfectly logical that general dental practitioners (GDPs) should be able to manage intra-oral halitosis under the conditions found in a normal dental practice. However, GDPs who are interested in diagnosing and treating halitosis are challenged to incorporate scientifically based strategies for use in their clinics. Therefore, the present paper summarizes the results of a consensus workshop of international authorities held with the aim to reach a consensus on general guidelines on how to assess and diagnose patients' breath odor concerns and general guidelines on regimens for the treatment of halitosis.

  15. 'What has been your experience of providing short-term orthodontics?'--A pilot survey of GDPs in East Sussex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqmani, S

    2016-03-11

    Short-term orthodontics (STO) aims to enhance a patient's smile by aligning their anterior teeth. It is considered a quicker alternative to conventional orthodontics and less destructive than veneers. As such, it has recently gained much popularity in cosmetic dentistry worldwide. STO is provided almost exclusively by general dental practitioners (GDPs), however, the current literature on this subject focuses largely on the opinions of orthodontists and cosmetic dentists, respectively. The aim of this paper, on the other hand, is to examine the opinions of GDPs and what experience they have had of providing STO. It concludes that GDPs performing STO in East Sussex have expressed a wish to receive more teaching and support from their local orthodontists. It also suggests a need for orthodontic professional bodies to issue guidelines on case selection for STO in order to assist GDPs in recognising which malocclusions are beyond their scope of practice.

  16. Disaster Management and General Dental Practitioners in India: An Overlooked Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Kumar Gaurav; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Chhabra, Chaya; Binnal, Almas; Sharma, Ashish; Pachori, Yashpal

    2015-12-01

    To assess General Dental Practitioners' (GDPs) in India willingness to participate in disaster management and their previous training pertaining to disaster management, and to assess GDP objective knowledge, attitude, and behavior regarding disaster management. This study was a cross-sectional survey conducted on all GDPs of Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. Willingness to participate, perceived knowledge, perceived effectiveness, objective knowledge, attitude, and behavior regarding disaster management were assessed through questionnaire method. Information also was collected regarding age, gender, religion, and residence. A total of 142 out of 180 GDPs participated in the study, representing a response rate of 79%. A majority (85%) of respondents were willing to participate in disaster management. Mean score for knowledge was 12.21%, for attitude was 33.56%, for behavior was 14.50%, and for perceived effectiveness was 9.08%. Significant correlations were observed between qualification and perceived effectiveness (P=.003), and between attitude and years of practice (P=.04). Willingness to participate in disaster management and age showed significant association (P=.000). High willingness and attitude to participate in disaster management was observed among respondents. Low knowledge and behavior scores were observed among GDPs.

  17. Opinions and attitudes of endodontists and general dental practitioners in the UK towards the intra-canal fracture of endodontic instruments. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madarati, A A; Watts, D C; Qualtrough, A J E

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) and endodontists in the UK towards management of fractured endodontic instruments. A questionnaire was sent to 330 systemically selected GDPs and all endodontists working in the UK (170). It was accompanied by a covering letter explaining the aims of the study and indicating that all the information given would remain confidential. Those who did not respond to the first mailing were sent another two mailings. Data were analysed using chi-square test at P ultrasonics for removal of fractured instruments compared with GDPs (75.8%). The most common complication of fractured instrument retrieval was thought to be excessive removal of dentine (67%). The majority of respondents (88.5%) reported that they would leave the unsuccessfully removed file in situ and obturate the root canal. Both endodontists and GDPs were aware of the limitations of root canal anatomy when removal of fractured instruments was considered. Excessive removal of dentine, the most common complication associated with the removal process, suggests the need for more conservative techniques. Both endodontists and GDPs demonstrated a conservative approach when management of fractured instruments failed. Further studies regarding attitudes of GDPs and endodontists towards some specific aspects of fractured instruments management are required.

  18. 'It's good enough': Swedish general dental practitioners on reasons for accepting substandard root filling quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlström, L; Lindwall, O; Rystedt, H; Reit, C

    2017-01-17

    The concept of 'good enough' is central and necessary in the assessment of root filling quality. The aim was to explore the concept by analysing reasons and arguments for the acceptance or rejection of substandard root filling quality as reported by general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Sweden. The study was designed as a qualitative and exploratory study based on seven videotaped focus group interviews analysed by means of qualitative content analysis. Thirty-three GDPs employed in the Public Dental Health Service in Gothenburg, Sweden, participated (4-6 GDPs/interview). In all, nine predetermined questions were followed. Before each focus group, the participants received radiographs of 37 root fillings and were asked to assess the root filling quality. The three cases representing the most divergent assessments served as a basis for the discussion. The cases were presented without clinical information; the dentists would relate to the cases as being just root filled by themselves. The radiographs did not provide a sufficient basis for decisions on whether or not to accept the root filling. This study emphasized that dentists did not primarily look for these arguments in the technical details of the root filling per se, but instead, they considered selected features of the contextual situation. The GDPs constantly introduced relevant 'ad hoc considerations' to account for the decisions they made. These contextual considerations were related to aspects of pulpal and periapical disease, risks (e.g. technical complications) or to consumed resources (personal and/or economic). It was obvious that the concept of 'good enough' does not exist as a general formula ready to be applied in particular situations. Instead, it is necessarily and irremediably tied to contextual properties that emerge from case to case. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Use of the theoretical domains framework to further understanding of what influences application of fluoride varnish to children's teeth: a national survey of general dental practitioners in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnich, Wendy; Bonetti, Debbie; Sherriff, Andrea; Sharma, Shilpi; Conway, David I; Macpherson, Lorna M D

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent improvements in the oral health of Scotland's population, the persistence of childhood dental caries underscores a need to reduce the disease burden experienced by children living in Scotland. Application of fluoride varnish (FV) to children's teeth provides an evidence-based approach to achieving this goal. Despite policy, health service targets and professional recommendations supporting application, not all children receive FV in line with guidance. The objective of this study was to use the theoretical domains framework (TDF) to further an understanding of what may influence fluoride varnish application (FVA) in General Dental Practice in Scotland. A postal questionnaire assessing current behaviour (frequency of FVA) and theoretical domains (TDs) was sent to all General Dental Practitioners (GDPs) in Scotland. Correlations and linear regression models were used to examine the association between FVA and the TDs. One thousand and ninety (53.6%) eligible GDPs responded. Respondents reported applying FV more frequently to increased risk and younger children (aged 2-5 years). Higher scores in eight TDs (Knowledge, Social/professional role and identity, Beliefs about consequences, Motivation and goals, Environmental context and resources, Social influences, Emotion and Behavioural regulation) were associated with greater frequency of FVA. Four beliefs in particular appear to be driving GDPs' decision to apply FV (recognizing that FVA is a guideline recommended behaviour (Knowledge), that FVA is perceived as an important part of the GDPs' professional role (Professional role/identity), that FV is something parents want for their children (Social influences) and that FV is something GDPs really wanted to do (Emotion). The findings of this study support the use of the TDF as a tool to understand GDPs application of FV and suggest that a multifaceted intervention, targeting dental professionals and families, and more specifically those domains and items

  20. Orthodontic First Aid for General Dental Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodipo, Ibukunoluwa; Birdsall, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Orthodontic emergencies occasionally arise and although they can cause discomfort to the patient, they can usually be stabilized by a general dentist and then followed up by the orthodontist. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment may initially present to their general dental practitioner with an orthodontic emergency as opposed to their orthodontist. It is therefore important that general dental practitioners are aware of common orthodontic emergencies and their management.

  1. Knowledge, attitude and practices of denture adhesives use among private dental practitioners' of jabalpur city, madhya pradesh: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantri, Sneha; Vinay, S; Deogade, Suryakant; Mishra, Prateek; Galav, Ankit; Sharma, Kush

    2014-09-01

    The use of denture adhesives (DA) and their role in prosthodontics has been a conflicted topic both in clinical practice and dental education. The use of adhesives, are viewed as poor reflection of their clinical skills and prosthetic expertise or to provide retention to an ill-fitting prosthesis by many dentists. These conflicting views have raised many doubts among practicising dentists on the use of DAs in their clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of DA use among private dental practitioners' of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh. This descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire involving private dental practitioners of Jabalpur city. A total of 172 private dental practitioners of Jabalpur made up the sample of the study. A comprehensive, closed-ended, self-administered questionnaire was employed which was designed to collect the sociodemographic details and to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of DA use among private dental practitioners'. The institutional review committee approved the study. Data were imported to the SPSS 13.01 program to draw the means and percentages. Majority of the dentists were males (55 %), preponderance (68 %) of the dentists were in the 21-30 years age-group. Greater part of the study population comprised of general dental practitioners (GDPs) (81 %). When the subjects were questioned if DA were soluble in saliva, 32 % of the GDPs replied wrongly. Similarly 25 % of the GDPs didn't know that using DA with incompletely removed old DA affected tissue health. Zinc containing DA are recently held responsible for causing neurological diseases on their prolonged usage, 71 % of the GDPs and 74 % of other specialists were unaware in this context. A total of 115 (83 %) GDPs, 6 (100 %) prosthodontists and 22 (81 %) other specialist's used DA as a beneficial adjunct in their clinical practice. DA being used frequently by the

  2. General dental practitioners' opinions on orthodontics in primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, J A

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 232 general dental practitioners was undertaken by the purchasing authorities in Hereford and Worcester, England, in 1993, to establish local practitioners' views on primary and secondary care orthodontics. The response rate was 90.1%. The dentists overestimated their orthodontic case-load: 66.6% of contract holders submitted no claims for upper removable appliances (URA) treatment, but 70.8% claimed they undertook removable appliance therapy. Dentists believed orthodontics should be a feature of the General Dental Services (GDS) but did not seem inclined to commit themselves to providing it. A majority of GDPs (54.9%) felt orthodontics was uneconomic under the GDS. There was support for the treatment planning role of hospitals, but although this was available locally it did not appear to have stimulated primary care provision. Consultant outreach clinics were not generally supported but there was a desire for more opportunities for hospital clinical attachments in orthodontics. The implications for the policies of National Health Service (NHS) purchasers are considered: purchasing health authorities need to carry out systematic assessment of the views of their general dental practitioners and take account of their desired patterns of specialist provision. Policies encouraging the shift of orthodontics into primary care are called into question by this study. If demand for orthodontics is to be met, policy should concentrate on the development of hospital services and specialist practitioners.

  3. Diagnostic performance of general dental practitioners after lecture in identifying post-menopausal women with low bone mineral density by panoramic radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthiprapaporn, P; Taguchi, A; Nakamoto, T; Ohtsuka, M; Mallick, P C; Tsuda, M; Kodama, I; Kudo, Y; Suei, Y; Tanimoto, K

    2006-07-01

    Mandibular cortical erosion detected on panoramic radiographs may be useful for identifying post-menopausal women with low skeletal bone mineral density (BMD). The purposes of this study were to calculate the diagnostic performance of general dental practitioners (GDPs) who attended a lecture on identifying post-menopausal women with low BMD from findings on panoramic radiographs and to evaluate the influence of GDPs' age on diagnostic performance. After a 1 h lecture, 111 GDPs were asked to classify the mandibular cortex (normal or eroded) on panoramic radiographs obtained from 100 post-menopausal women who have had skeletal BMD assessment. Low BMD was defined as a BMD T score of -1.0 or less. Diagnostic performance was analysed by comparing two groups classified by mandibular cortex (women with normal cortex and women with any eroded cortex) with those classified by BMD (women with normal BMD and women with low BMD). The mean sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and likelihood ratio for a positive risk result were 73.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]; 71.3 to 74.7%), 49.0% (95% CI; 46.4 to 51.5%), 66.9% (95% CI; 66.0 to 67.8%), 57.0% (95% CI; 55.8 to 58.2%), 62.9% (95% CI; 62.1 to 63.7%) and 1.51 (95% CI; 1.44 to 1.58), respectively. GDPs' age did not influence diagnostic performance. Our results suggest that 73.0% of women who had low skeletal BMD can be identified by GDPs after a lecture on the use of panoramic radiographs as an aid in diagnosing low BMD; however, the diagnostic performance may not be influenced by GDPs' age.

  4. Failure on all fronts: general dental practitioners' views on promoting oral health in high caries risk children--a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljafari, Ahmad K; Gallagher, Jennifer Elizabeth; Hosey, Marie Therese

    2015-04-09

    Despite overall improvements in oral health, a large number of children in United Kingdom (UK) are affected by dental caries; and the implementation of oral health promotion in some families remains a challenge. As such, children from those families suffer high caries rates, and are frequently referred for tooth extraction under General Anaesthesia (GA), one of the commonest reasons for paediatric hospital admissions. The aim of this investigation is to explore referring primary care General Dental Practitioners' (GDPs) views and experiences in trying to promote better oral health for those children. A qualitative study, utilizing face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with GDPs in three London boroughs who refer children for extraction of decayed teeth under GA selected based on referral rate. Qualitative Framework Analysis was used to present the results. Eighteen GDPs (56% male) were interviewed: average age 42 years (range: 26-73 years). informants reported challenges to promotion of oral health categorised as: (1) child's young age, poor cooperation, and high treatment need; (2) parental skills to face up to modern day challenges and poor attitudes towards good oral health (3); social inequality, exclusion and cultural barriers in immigrant families; (4) National Health Services (NHS) primary care practice remuneration, constraints and training; (5) inadequate secondary care communication and engagement; and (6) failure in establishing national policy to grasp the width and depth of the problem. GDPs feel frustrated and isolated in their efforts to promote oral health in those children. These findings suggest difficult challenges on all fronts. Reform of preventive dentistry funding and delivery, as well as a multiagency multidimensional approach that is mindful of the social determinants of children's oral health and barriers to application of oral and wider health initiatives are needed to address this important public health issue.

  5. The response of 1578 school leavers to a campaign combining commercial, Health Boards' and GDPs' sponsorship in an effort to improve dental attendance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craven, R; Blinkhorn, A S; Schou, L

    1993-01-01

    was high at 62% and 16% actually initiated a dental visit. However, only 2% claimed that the campaign was their main reason for attending. The project demonstrated the feasibility of collaboration between a commercial company and a health board in a health promotion effort. The results underline...

  6. Musculoskeletal Disorders among Dental Practitioners: Does It Affect Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Muralidharan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Literature reviews world over have shown a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among dental practitioners. Prevalence of MSD among dental practitioners in India is not well documented. Aim. To determine the prevalence and distribution of MSD among dental practitioners in a city in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India. Material and Methods. A cross sectional descriptive study in which a self-administered questionnaire (the Standardized Nordic questionnaire was used to assess the musculoskeletal symptoms among dental practitioners. The recorded data was analyzed with SPSS 13. -value 0.05 was considered to statistically significant. Results. Seventy-three dental practitioners participated in the study of which seventy-eight percent had a prevalence of at least one MSD symptom over the past twelve months. Most common areas affected by MSD in order of magnitude were neck (52%, low back (41%, shoulders (29% and wrist (26%. One third of the practitioners (40% required sick leave from their practice during the preceding twelve months. Conclusions. High prevalence of MSD exists among our dental practitioners affecting the daily practice of more than one third. Further studies are needed to identify the specific risk factors for MSD so as to introduce effective remedial measures.

  7. Sterilization and Disinfection Procedures by Dental Practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sterilization and Disinfection Procedures by Dental Practitioners in Nigeria. ... At least one HIV/AIDS known and at least one suspected HIV/AIDS patients ... a reasonable percentage of them are conscientious and aware of the risk factors.

  8. Use of online sources of information by dental practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funkhouser, Ellen; Agee, Bonita S; Gordan, Valeria V

    2014-01-01

    other and to offline users. CONCLUSION: A relatively small proportion of dental practitioners use information from online sources for practice guidance. Variation exists regarding practitioners' use of online source resources and how they rate the value of offline information sources for practice......OBJECTIVE: Estimate the proportion of dental practitioners who use online sources of information for practice guidance. METHODS: From a survey of 657 dental practitioners in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network, four indicators of online use for practice guidance were calculated: read...... journals online, obtained continuing education (CDE) through online sources, rated an online source as most influential, and reported frequently using an online source for guidance. Demographics, journals read, and use of various sources of information for practice guidance in terms of frequency...

  9. Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking Among Dental Practitioners: Prevalence and Health Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar-Odeh, Najla; Alnazzawi, Ahmad; Shoqair, Noora; Al-Shayyab, Mohammad H; Abu-Hammad, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking prevalence, practice, and the associated health perceptions among dental practitioners have not been previously reported. This study aims to determine the prevalence of waterpipe smoking among dental practitioners and to evaluate their awareness of health hazards of waterpipe smoking, particularly the adverse effects on oral health. This was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey among dental practitioners. Surveyed dental practitioners practiced dentistry in the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, a city in the Central-Western Region of Saudi Arabia, and the study was conducted during March 2015. The questionnaire consisted of questions on demographic data, history and practices of tobacco use, and perceptions toward the health hazards of smoking. Dentists were approached at their work places and invited to participate. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample's demographic and smoking characteristics, while cross-tabulation and chi-square test were used to determine the statistical significance of association between the groups (P ≤ 0.05). One hundred dental practitioners participated in the survey, with 55 males and 45 females. Twenty-six percent indicated that they were waterpipe smokers. Male gender and cigarette smoking were the only factors to be significantly associated with waterpipe smoking (P = 0.008 and P = 0.000, respectively). Most participants stated that waterpipe smoking is harmful to health, and the most commonly reported health hazard was respiratory disease, which was reported by 81% of participants. Prevalence of waterpipe smoking among dental practitioners is comparable to adult populations but lower than younger populations of university students. Health awareness of dental practitioners regarding waterpipe smoking was judged to be insufficient.

  10. Awareness of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai: A knowledge, attitude, practice study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethi, S; Einstein, A; Sivapathasundharam, B

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the study is to analyze the knowledge, attitude and practice of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 322 dental practitioners in Chennai and data was collected by means of a questionnaire. Twenty-one percent of the dental practitioners did not maintain dental records in their clinic/workplace, with only 12% of the practitioners maintaining complete records. Ninety-three percent of dental practitioners were not maintaining dental records for more than seven years. The significance of ante-mortem records in identifying deceased suspects was not known to 17% of the dental practitioners. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were not aware of child abuse and the actions to be taken. Dental age estimation was not known to 41% of the dental practitioners. Thirty-eight percent of the practitioners were unaware of the accurate method of individual identification. About 18% of the dental practitioners did not know the significance of bite mark patterns of the teeth. Ninety-three percent of the practitioners lacked formal training in collecting, evaluating and presenting dental evidence. Thirty percent of dental practitioners did not know they can testify as an expert witness in the court of law. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were unaware of identifying the age and gender of an individual in mass disasters. Our study revealed inadequate knowledge, poor attitude and lack of practice of forensic odontology prevailing among the dental practitioners in Chennai.

  11. Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H. (Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (USA))

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices.

  12. Awareness of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai: A knowledge, attitude, practice study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Preethi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study is to analyze the knowledge, attitude and practice of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 322 dental practitioners in Chennai and data was collected by means of a questionnaire. Results: Twenty-one percent of the dental practitioners did not maintain dental records in their clinic/workplace, with only 12% of the practitioners maintaining complete records. Ninety-three percent of dental practitioners were not maintaining dental records for more than seven years. The significance of ante-mortem records in identifying deceased suspects was not known to 17% of the dental practitioners. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were not aware of child abuse and the actions to be taken. Dental age estimation was not known to 41% of the dental practitioners. Thirty-eight percent of the practitioners were unaware of the accurate method of individual identification. About 18% of the dental practitioners did not know the significance of bite mark patterns of the teeth. Ninety-three percent of the practitioners lacked formal training in collecting, evaluating and presenting dental evidence. Thirty percent of dental practitioners did not know they can testify as an expert witness in the court of law. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were unaware of identifying the age and gender of an individual in mass disasters. Conclusion: Our study revealed inadequate knowledge, poor attitude and lack of practice of forensic odontology prevailing among the dental practitioners in Chennai.

  13. Awareness of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai: A knowledge, attitude, practice study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethi, S; Einstein, A; Sivapathasundharam, B

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to analyze the knowledge, attitude and practice of forensic odontology among dental practitioners in Chennai. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 322 dental practitioners in Chennai and data was collected by means of a questionnaire. Results: Twenty-one percent of the dental practitioners did not maintain dental records in their clinic/workplace, with only 12% of the practitioners maintaining complete records. Ninety-three percent of dental practitioners were not maintaining dental records for more than seven years. The significance of ante-mortem records in identifying deceased suspects was not known to 17% of the dental practitioners. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were not aware of child abuse and the actions to be taken. Dental age estimation was not known to 41% of the dental practitioners. Thirty-eight percent of the practitioners were unaware of the accurate method of individual identification. About 18% of the dental practitioners did not know the significance of bite mark patterns of the teeth. Ninety-three percent of the practitioners lacked formal training in collecting, evaluating and presenting dental evidence. Thirty percent of dental practitioners did not know they can testify as an expert witness in the court of law. Forty percent of the dental practitioners were unaware of identifying the age and gender of an individual in mass disasters. Conclusion: Our study revealed inadequate knowledge, poor attitude and lack of practice of forensic odontology prevailing among the dental practitioners in Chennai. PMID:22408322

  14. Nutrition and health: guidelines for dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, C; Joshipura, Kj; Willett, Wc

    2009-09-01

    Good nutrition is vital to overall health, and poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nutritional factors are implicated in many oral and systemic diseases and conditions, including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, dental caries and some cancers including oral cancers. This review focuses on the evidence for the relations between key nutritional factors and health. Energy intake is related to body weight and obesity, highlighting the importance of lower-energy diets and regular physical activity for body weight maintenance and for preventing obesity. Evidence is presented for the health benefits of high quality carbohydrates, such as whole grain products, and fruits and vegetables, in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The adverse effects of sugar, sweetened beverages, and trans and saturated fats on several diseases including caries, diabetes and cardiovascular disease are described. The health benefits of unsaturated fats, antioxidants, B vitamins and vitamin D in cardiovascular disease, periodontitis, cancer, and other conditions are documented. Both benefits and harmful effects of dairy product intake on health are discussed. Based on the evidence, nutritional guidelines are provided, as well as key recommendations for preventing obesity. Dentists can play a critical role in motivating and enabling healthy food choices.

  15. Novel anticoagulants: general overview and practical considerations for dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, S; Marshall, J; Meyerowitz, C; Connolly, G

    2016-01-01

    Currently, 4 novel Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs) were approved by the FDA. This review focuses on these agents and proposes a matrix for the general dentists to assess bleeding risk in dental management of patient on DOACs. The outline covers the pharmacology of DOACs (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban and dabigatran), bleeding complications, risk associated with discontinuation, monitoring/reversal, and implications for the dental practitioners. A total of 18 randomized controlled trials were identified with mixed results in regards to the risk for bleeding. Considering the pharmacology of DOACs and challenges in monitoring and reversing their effect, the dentist should consider carefully the management of patients on DOACs as it may differ from patients on conventional anticoagulants. Based on the type of dental procedure and the medical risk assessment, several general treatment approaches can be considered: continue DOACs, time dental treatment as late as possible after the last DOACs dose, discontinue DOACs for 24hrs, or discontinue DOACs for 48hrs. Based on the current reported dental literature, limited dental surgery may benefit from the first 2 conservative options. However, this needs to be proven in comparative clinical trials.

  16. Choice of root canal irrigants by Serbian dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosić, Goran; Miladinović, Milan; Kovaević, Milorad; Stojanović, Miodrag

    2016-01-01

    Root canal treatment is considered to be the one of the most important procedures in endodontic treatment. To irrigate the root canal it is most common to use sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexodine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), local anesthetic solution, while the most used in Serbia is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The aim of this survey was to reveal the preferred root canal irrigants used by general dental practitioners in Serbia and to determine the influence of the continuing education program, delivered over the 3-year observation period, on work habits of dental practitioners. This was the first comprehensive survey of this nature carried out in Serbia. The survey was conducted in two instances, a 4-month observation period each, from November 1, 2009 to March 1, 2010 and from November 1, 2012 to March 1, 2013. Internet Web Page Survey was posted on the official web site of the Serbian Association of Private Dentists. In the first survey, 569 completed questionnaires were subjected to analysis. In the next attempt (3 years later), the survey was launched again and 615 completed questionnaires were analyzed using the same criteria. The statistical analysis was carried out with simple descriptive statistics applying the x2 test, at a significance level of p irrigant solution was H2O2 in 2009, while in 2012 it was yet H2O2, but also NaOCl, chlorhexodine, and a little less EDTA. This study shows significant changes in the irrigation protocol applied in Serbian dental community. After 3 years of observation, NaOCl became widely accepted as the irrigant of choice, whereas H2O2 lost its popularity.

  17. Career satisfaction among dental practitioners in Srikakulam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipa, Sudhakar; Pydi, Siva Kumar; Krishna Kumar, Rathikota Veeravenkata Sathyasai; Srinivasulu, Gomasani; Darsi, Venkata Rajesh Kumar; Sode, Munikumar

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to measure the level and distribution of job satisfaction of registered dental practitioners and to explore the factors associated with it. The study was conducted among 66 registered dentists in Srikakulam, India. Job satisfaction was measured by using a modified version of the Dentists Satisfaction Survey questionnaire. The statistical tests employed were "t" test and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Post hoc test (Scheffe test) was employed for multiple comparisons. The response rate was 82.5%. The mean score of overall job satisfaction among dentists was 3.08 out of 5. The most satisfying aspect was income (3.7) and the least satisfying aspect was staff (2.5). Overall satisfaction increased with age. Male practitioners showed less satisfaction with staff, income, and overall satisfaction and more satisfaction in professional relations and time, when compared to females. Job satisfaction was found to be more in practitioners with postgraduate qualification. This study suggests that patient relations, perception of income, personal time, and staff are the important factors for job satisfaction among dentists. The findings of this study will be helpful to policymakers to design plans in order to increase the level of job satisfaction.

  18. Information-Seeking Behaviors of Dental Practitioners in Three Practice-Based Research Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Botello-Harbaum, Maria T; Demko, Catherine A.; Curro, Frederick A.; Rindal, D Brad; Collie, Damon; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Hilton, Thomas J.; Craig, Ronald G.; Wu, Juliann; Funkhouser, Ellen; Lehman, Maryann; McBride, Ruth; Thompson; Lindblad, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Research on the information-seeking behaviors of dental practitioners is scarce. Knowledge of dentists’ information-seeking behaviors should advance the translational gap between clinical dental research and dental practice. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to examine the self-reported information-seeking behaviors of dentists in three dental practice-based research networks (PBRNs). A total of 950 dentists (65 percent response rate) completed the survey. Dental journals and continuing ...

  19. General dental practitioners' perceptions of removable prosthodontics in the undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, C T; Pan, N; Tiang, R; Payne, A G; Thomson, W M

    1999-09-01

    The undergraduate dental curriculum is undergoing rapid change and revision in dental schools worldwide. Decreasing edentulism, the advent of the clinical dental technician, and advances in technology (such as dental implantology) have led to changes in patient management and treatment options for general dental practitioners in New Zealand. The current undergraduate removable prosthodontic curriculum has seen very little change in past years at the School of Dentistry, University of Otago, and is under review to facilitate the teaching of general dental practice in the Final Year. A questionnaire-based survey of 150 general dental practitioners (response rate 74.6 percent) supported modification of the existing removable prosthodontics curriculum to improve its relevance to modern general dental practice. Integration of fixed and removable prosthodontic teaching was recommended.

  20. Barriers to the adoption of the ART approach as perceived by dental practitioners in governmental dental clinics, in Tanzania.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikwilu, E.N.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Mulder, J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the magnitude of the barriers to the practice of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) as perceived by dental practitioners working in pilot dental clinics, and determine the influence of these barriers on the practice of ART. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A valida

  1. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Binnal, Almas; rajesh, gururaghavendran; Denny, Ceena; Ahmed, Junaid; Nayak, Vijayendra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. Materials and Methods All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions...

  2. General medicine and surgery for dental practitioners: part 4. Infections and infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, N; Greenwood, M; Meechan, J G

    2014-07-01

    Infection control and knowledge of common infectious agents is a cornerstone of safe dental practice. This paper summarises the measures that need to be taken to control cross infection and discusses some of the infectious agents of concern to dental practitioners.

  3. Use of online sources of information by dental practitioners: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Ellen; Agee, Bonita S; Gordan, Valeria V; Rindal, D Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Qvist, Vibeke; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2014-01-01

    Estimate the proportion of dental practitioners who use online sources of information for practice guidance. From a survey of 657 dental practitioners in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network, four indicators of online use for practice guidance were calculated: read journals online, obtained continuing education (CDE) through online sources, rated an online source as most influential, and reported frequently using an online source for guidance. Demographics, journals read, and use of various sources of information for practice guidance in terms of frequency and influence were ascertained for each. Overall, 21 percent (n = 138) were classified into one of the four indicators of online use: 14 percent (n = 89) rated an online source as most influential and 13 percent (n = 87) reported frequently using an online source for guidance; few practitioners (5 percent, n = 34) read journals online, fewer (3 percent, n = 17) obtained CDE through online sources. Use of online information sources varied considerably by region and practice characteristics. In general, the four indicators represented practitioners with as many differences as similarities to each other and to offline users. A relatively small proportion of dental practitioners use information from online sources for practice guidance. Variation exists regarding practitioners' use of online source resources and how they rate the value of offline information sources for practice guidance. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. Information-Seeking Behaviors of Dental Practitioners in Three Practice-Based Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Harbaum, Maria T.; Demko, Catherine A.; Curro, Frederick A.; Rindal, D. Brad; Collie, Damon; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Hilton, Thomas J.; Craig, Ronald G.; Wu, Juliann; Funkhouser, Ellen; Lehman, Maryann; McBride, Ruth; Thompson, Van; Lindblad, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Research on the information-seeking behaviors of dental practitioners is scarce. Knowledge of dentists’ information-seeking behaviors should advance the translational gap between clinical dental research and dental practice. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to examine the self-reported information-seeking behaviors of dentists in three dental practice-based research networks (PBRNs). A total of 950 dentists (65 percent response rate) completed the survey. Dental journals and continuing dental education (CDE) sources used and their influence on practice guidance were assessed. PBRN participation level and years since dental degree were measured. Full-participant dentists reported reading the Journal of the American Dental Association and General Dentistry more frequently than did their reference counterparts. Printed journals were preferred by most dentists. A lower proportion of full participants obtained their CDE credits at dental meetings compared to partial participants. Experienced dentists read other dental information sources more frequently than did less experienced dentists. Practitioners involved in a PBRN differed in their approaches to accessing information sources. Peer-reviewed sources were more frequently used by full participants and dentists with fifteen years of experience or more. Dental PBRNs potentially play a significant role in the dissemination of evidence-based information. This study found that specific educational sources might increase and disseminate knowledge among dentists. PMID:23382524

  5. Diagnostic procedures employed by dental practitioners in Australia with a focus on endodontic diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Asj; Bennett, G W; Tan, Jcw; Abbott, P V

    2017-09-01

    An accurate diagnosis is the foundation for determining prognosis and appropriate management. This study adds to pre-existing (albeit limited) evidence by exploring the use of diagnostic techniques amongst dental practitioners. The main aim of the study was to identify the availability, usage and clinician preference for specific diagnostic tests. A secondary aim was to investigate the use of diagnostic tests for common clinical scenarios. A cross-sectional survey was distributed online to dental practitioners registered with the Australian Dental Association. Quantitative data on clinician demography, and the availability and preference of diagnostic tests was summarized with Stata 13 software. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to determine associations. General dental practitioners (GDP) and specialists comprised 86% and 14% of the 433 respondents, respectively. Unlike light transillumination, most GDP had radiography, biting tests and pulp sensibility tests available. The electric pulp test and ethyl chloride were first choices of most practitioners despite markedly lower availability relative to cold spray. Symptoms and endodontic assessments generally attracted wider usage of pulp testing. More dental practitioners should utilize diagnostic testing in order to arrive at accurate diagnoses. The availability of diagnostic tests did not completely translate to usage and none of the scenarios presented warranted pulp sensibility testing from all respondents. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Awareness of the Complications from Impacted Third Molar Surgeries among General Dental Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farokh Farhadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgery of impacted third molars and the resultant complications are common occurrences in dental offices. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the awareness of general dental practitioners in Tabriz of complications of surgeries of impacted third molars. Materials and methods: In the present study a researcher-made questionnaire was completed by 186 randomly selected general dentists in Tabriz. After collecting the questionnaires and extractions of data, descriptive statistical methods and chi-squared test were used to evaluate the relationship between personal demographic variables (independent and the dependent variable of the study with SPSS 14. Statistical significance was set at P0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results, the awareness of general dental practitioners in Tabriz of the complications of impacted third molar surgeries was at a moderate level.   Key words: Awareness; general dental practitioner; impacted third molar; complications;

  7. Assessment of the perception of smile esthetics by laypersons, dental students and dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cracel-Nogueira, Flávia; Pinho, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the esthetic perception of some components of the smile such as gingival exposure, level of the gingival margins, length of the crowns, maxillary midline and inter-incisor diastema by laypersons, dental students and dental professionals. Six hundred and thirty-four Portuguese people (292 laypersons, 241 dental students and 101 practitioners) assessed the esthetics of 13 altered pictures of the same smile arranged at random. The manipulated components (gingival exposure, level of the gingival margins, length of the crowns, maxillary midline and inter-incisor diastema) were altered using Adobe Photoshop® CS6 software. The classification of the pictures was done using the visual analogue scale (VAS), scored 1 to 10. The responses were then analyzed and processed with SPSS® version 21.0 using tests of average equality and correlation. The medium smile was the most appreciated smile, whereas the high smile and diastemas were considered to be the least esthetic. Among all the modified parameters, the midline shift was the least perceptible. The preference for asymmetry of the gingival margin at the maxillary lateral incisors (MLI) and the symmetry in the length of the crowns of the maxillary central incisors (MCI) reflected the importance given to MCI during smiling. Gender did not influence the scores given, except for gummy smiles, while younger people gave the highest scores. Regarding academic/professional training, there was an intra-group homogeneity of opinions as laypersons tended to give higher scores and professionals tended to give lower scores, but with no correlation between the variables. The fact that the laypersons had received orthodontic treatment, or not, had no influence on their perception. Laypersons, dental students and dental professionals had different perceptions of attractiveness when evaluating different modified features, except for diastemas, but with no significant differences between them. Gender

  8. An endodontic practice profile amongst general dental practitioners in Kathmandu: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Shrestha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the endodontic practice profile of general dental practitioners. To explore the materials and methods employed by them in Kathmandu valley. To compare these findings with well acknowledged international academic standards. Methods Questionnaires with 18 closed-ended questions were distributed among randomly chosen 120 general dental practitioners of Kathmandu, working in various government or private hospital or clinics.The data were collected and descriptive statistical analysis was done. Results Out of 120 questionnaires, only 110 that were completely filled were included in the study .Most general dental practitioners (97% regularly did multi-rooted root canal treatments and followed multivisit root canal treatment.. Radiograph with instrument in canal was used by 80% of general dental practitioners to determine the working length while only 36% used electronic apex locator which is considered to be more reliable. Half of them (57% used nickel-titanium files for cleaning and shaping but only 23% used crown down technique. Sodium hypochlorite and calcium hydroxide was the most popular irrigation solution and intra-canal medicament respectively. Majority of general dental practitioners (91% used lateral compaction technique for root canal obturation. Sixty three percent used zinc oxide eugenol as root canal sealer and 46% used endomethasone. They seem to overuse antibiotics in cases requiring endodontic therapy. Only 48% used autoclave for sterilization of endodontic files while 86% never used rubber dam. Eight three percent of them felt the need of further endodontic training and 42% of them preferred post-graduate dental program. Conclusion This study shows that the standard guidelines and new technologies for endodontic treatments are not implemented by many general dental practitioners of Kathmandu and require further endodontic trainings. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-4, 40-50 DOI

  9. Awareness of the association between periodontal disease and pre-term births among general dentists, general medical practitioners and gynecologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzia Tarannum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decades, periodontal disease has been identified as a risk factor for pre-term deliveries. Hence, it is important to evaluate the awareness of health-care providers of the association between periodontal diseases and pre-term birth. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to random samples representing general medical practitioners (GMPs, general dental practitioners (GDPs and Gynecologists for this study. A knowledge score was calculated for correct answers to 11 survey questions related to oral health effects during pregnancy and compared among the three groups. In this study, 133 physicians, 135 dentists and 100 Gynecologists completed the questionnaire. More GDPs (67.4% than GMPs (56.4% and Gynecologists (63% reported there was an association between periodontal disease and pre-term low birth weight. Efforts to increase this awareness may prove valuable in improving preventive care during pregnancy.

  10. Routines for interocclusal appliance therapy among general dental practitioners in a Swedish county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnauck, Maja; Helkimo, Martti; Magnusson, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate what kind of interocclusal appliances that were chosen among Swedish dentists when treating temporomandibular disorders (TMD), the clinical rationale for the treatment, the diagnoses that warranted the appliance treatment, the use of adjunct TMD treatments and prognostic considerations, and possible differences in these respects between children/adolescents and adults with TMD, and, finally, possible differences between private practitioners and general practitioners in the public dental service. During the 12-months-period April 2009-March 2010 all general dental practitioners in the county of Jönköping, Sweden, were asked to fill in a questionnaire when performing a TMD treatment with an interocclusal appliance. A total of 394 questionnaires were filled in and returned, 216 (55%) from dentists in public dental service and 178 (45%) from private practitioners. It was found that in 40% of the cases, no pre-treatment recording of the functional status in the masticatory system had been made. The commonest reasons for the treatment were bruxism, headache, and replacement of a previous appliance. Less than half of the appliances made were hard acrylic appliances. Some kind of adjunct therapy had been made in 22% of the cases treated in public dental service. The corresponding figure for those treated by private practitioners was 25%. Therapeutic jaw exercises was the commonest adjunct therapy followed by selective occlusal adjustment. In the vast majority of cases, the dentists judged the prognosis of the treatment to be good. It is concluded that a large number of appliances made to treat TMD were soft appliances, especially in public dental service. This reflects a possible overuse of soft appliances at the expense of hard acrylic appliances. Furthermore, in a large number of cases, the treatment was performed without any pre-treatment registrations, and adjunct therapies were rarely used. In all these respects,there is

  11. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Practitioners in Tabriz Regarding Infection Control Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taghavi Zenouz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Blood-borne infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV might be transmitted from one individual to another during dental procedures. Therefore, sterilization and personal protection procedures are of utmost significance in dental offices. The importance of awareness of cross-infection and antiseptic principles lies in the fact that in most cases it is not possible to identify patients with hepatitis or AIDS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate awareness of infection control procedures among dental practitioners in Tabriz.

    Materials and methods. In this descriptive study, 150 dental practitioners working in clinics and private offices of Tabriz were randomly selected. Data was collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire, which included respondents’ personal profile and questions on infection control and sterilization methods.

    Results. There were no statistically significant differences in the level of knowledge between male and female dental practitioners regarding infection control; however, there was a decline in awareness as age increased.

    Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest that in some cases dental practitioners neglect the principles for personal protection and cross-infection control. Therefore, our society is subject to widespread infection in dental offices and clinics. This potential risk necessitates careful monitoring along with government support of treatment procedures, the inclusion of infection control costs into treatment expenses and an emphasis on continuing education about infection control procedures through seminars and congresses.

  12. Quality-Shaping Factors and Endodontic Treatment amongst General Dental Practitioners with a Focus on Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Sune; Markvart, Merete; Bjørndal, Lars

    2012-01-01

    There is a gap between the endodontic outcome that can be achieved and the outcome observed on the basis of worldwide general dental practitioner data. The quality of root canal treatment (RCT) is shaped by the dentist's knowledge, attitude, and skills, but it may also be influenced by the patient...

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis - an update for general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, S; Bansal, R K; Galloway, J

    2016-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder which significantly impacts patients' lives and can lead to permanent disability. Inflammation in RA not only affects joints; but can affect organs including the heart and lungs. Early diagnosis, initiation of intensive drug therapy, and a multidisciplinary care approach have vastly improved the long-term prognosis for those living with the condition. However, RA patients often present with co-morbidities which add to the complexity of clinical management. Orofacial conditions associated with RA which dental professionals need to be aware of include periodontal disease, temporomandibular dysfunction and salivary gland dysfunction. In this article, we provide information on RA, oral health in RA and guidance on how best to manage patients with RA in general dental practice.

  14. Knowledge of dental ethics and jurisprudence among dental practitioners in Chennai, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kesavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ethics is a science of ideal human character and behavior in situations where the distinction should be made between what is right and wrong. Dental jurisprudence is a set of legal regulations set forth by each state's legislature describing the legal limitations and regulations related to the practice of dentistry. Objectives: (1 To assess the dental practitioners' awareness about dentists (Code of Ethics regulation and jurisprudence. (2 To assess the awareness of dentists regarding Consumer Protection Act (COPRA and its implications in dentistry. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted. A pilot study was conducted to validate the questionnaire and to get the required sample size which was 346. A specially designed questionnaire consisting of 24 close-ended questions divided into two sections was used. The resulting data were coded, and statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software version 17.0. Results: The results showed that about 65% of the dentists were aware that the Dentist Act was given in the year 1948 and 76% knew that the dentists (Code of Ethics regulation was given by the Dental Council of India. Only 33% knew that it is not unethical for a dental surgeon to supply or sell drugs related to dentistry in his clinic. Only 31% responded correctly that it is not necessary to obtain informed consent for clinical examination and routine radiography. Nearly, half of the respondents (43% were not aware of professional indemnity insurance. Conclusion: The study concludes that majority of the dental practitioners are aware of dental ethics but their knowledge on jurisprudence and COPRA needs to be enriched. Although recommendations can be made to the dental profession to alter their behavior, real improvement is unlikely without changes in legislation and social policy.

  15. Factors influencing use of dental services in rural and urban communities: considerations for practitioners in underserved areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Lisa J; Smith, Timothy A; Raybould, Ted P

    2004-10-01

    Individuals' utilization of dental services depends upon an array of factors, including access to care, financial restrictions, attitudes toward dental care, and dental fear. These factors, in turn, may vary across geographic locations and demographic groups. The goals of this study were to assess the use of dental services in both rural and urban areas of Kentucky and to examine challenges facing practitioners in rural areas. Individuals sampled from a rural population and patients in rural and urban dental clinics completed questionnaires about use of dental services, self-rated dental health, and dental fear. While these variables were strongly interrelated, differences emerged across locations. Patients in the urban area reported having more dental insurance but not better dental health. Patients in more rural areas reported seeking more emergency dental treatment but not more dental fear. While these factors are important considerations across locations, dental practitioners in rural areas in particular should be aware of barriers to dental care facing individuals in these areas. They have unique opportunities to provide education to their patients regarding the importance of dental care and the role of oral health in overall physical health.

  16. Facets of job satisfaction of dental practitioners working in different organisational settings in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R V; Ashcroft, A; Burnside, G; Dancer, J M; Smith, D; Grieveson, B

    2008-01-12

    Before April 2006, English dentists were either working as an NHS general dental service (GDS) practitioner (fee-per-item, no local contractual obligations); an NHS personal dental service (PDS) practitioner (block contract with the primary care trust (PCT)); a private practitioner (either fee-per-item or capitation-based, independent of the PCT); or in a situation where they were mixing their NHS work (either under the GDS or PDS arrangements) with private work. To a) investigate the extent of the mix of NHS and private work in English dentists working in the GDS and PDS, b) to compare global job satisfaction, and c) to compare facets of job satisfaction for practitioners working in the different organisational settings of PDS practices, GDS practices and practices where there is a mix of NHS and private provision. Method A questionnaire was sent to 684 practitioners, containing 83 attitudinal statements relating to job facets, a global job satisfaction score and questions concerning workload. Response rate was 65.2%. More PDS than GDS dentists were found to treat the majority of their patients under the NHS. GDS dentists working fully in the NHS were least likely to be satisfied with their job, followed by PDS practitioners and then GDS dentists working in mixed NHS/private practices. Private practitioners were the most satisfied. Differences between GDS, PDS and private practitioners were found in global job satisfaction and in the facets of job satisfaction related to restriction in being able to provide quality care, control of work and developing clinical skills.

  17. Non-prescription medications: considerations for the dental practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingon, Angus

    2012-04-01

    The widespread availability of non-prescription medications has a significant potential impact on dental practice. Dentists are trained to provide scientifically-based advice on the appropriate use of medications, but it is not uncommon for patients to take matters into their own hands, especially if it is felt that the treatment provided is not solving a specific problem, or is insufficient. Well-meaning but often ill-informed family and friends frequently have an opinion as to what should be done. Not only may the suggested treatment not be effective, it may also be harmful. Over-the-counter medications can easily be obtained, and there is nothing to stop individuals exceeding recommended doses, and if this occurs, there could be adverse medical sequelae. Patient compliance in taking prescription medications is known to be problematic, and when combined with the ready availability of complementary medications, probiotics and illicit drugs, the risk of self-harm can be seen to be a distinct possibility. To compound the position, sometimes there seems to be, in a practical sense, little regulation on the advertising and marketing of non-prescription medications, which can leave consumers not only confused but potentially vulnerable. While complementary medicines may not have a significant role in dental practice in 2012, that may not always be the case as research continues, and reference is made to some aspects of ongoing work. Non-prescription medications are discussed, and some effects on oral health are considered.

  18. Evidence-based dentistry resources for dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbecz, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The American Dental Association has taken an active role in support of an evidence-based approach to the practice of dentistry. This concept integrates clinically relevant scientific evidence into a clinician's decision-making process, along with the patient's oral and medical history, the dentist's own expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences. The purpose of this article is to assist dentists in locating and retrieving quality research reports and research evidence which can be integrated into the clinical decision making process. The research methodologies which constitute the foundation of evidence-based dentistry are described. The advantages and disadvantages associated with literature that summarizes research, such as the literature review, the systematic review and meta-analysis are described. Evidence-based resources for dentists are described, such as journals specializing in an evidence-based approach, online resources such as PubMed and the Cochrane Collaboration.

  19. Understanding continuous professional development participation and choice of mid-career general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T; Wassif, H S

    2017-02-01

    Participating in continuing professional development (CPD) activities is a requirement for dental practitioners to keep their skills and knowledge up to date. Understanding the ways dental practitioners engage with professional development and the impact on practice is not fully known (Eaton et al. 2011, http://www.gdc-uk.org/Aboutus/policy/Documents/Impact%20Of%20CPD%20In%20Dentistry.pdf). The aim of this study was to gain insights into the ways that dentists reflect on their professional development and what may be influencing their choices. Empirical qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interviewing of five mid-career dentists. Using grounded theory, the data were analysed for themes about CPD choice and participation. Three themes were identified as influences to dentists' choices of CPD with pragmatic considerations of how new learning could benefit their patients and their practices. Dental practitioners were influenced by the requirements of external regulatory bodies which they did not consider to necessarily improve practice. Dentists working in primary care in the UK are undertaking CPD which is influenced by the pragmatic requirements of running a small business and to meet regulatory requirements. In this sample, dentists are not critically reflecting on their education needs when choosing their CPD activity. Protected learning time and organisational feedback and support are recommended as a way to promote more meaningful reflection on learning and to improve professional development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mercury and Other Biomedical Waste Management Practices among Dental Practitioners in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghuwar D. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of the study was to assess the awareness and performance towards dental waste including mercury management policy and practices among the dental practitioners in North India. Materials and Methods. An epidemiologic survey was conducted among 200 private dental practitioners. The survey form was composed of 29 self-administered questions frame based on knowledge, attitude, and those regarding the practices of dentists in relation to dental health-care waste management. The resulting data were coded and a statistical analysis was done. Results and Discussion. About 63.7% of the dentists were not aware of the different categories of biomedical waste generated in their clinics. Only 31.9% of the dentists correctly said that outdated and contaminated drugs come under cytotoxic waste. 46.2% said they break the needle and dispose of it and only 21.9% use needle burner to destroy it. 45.0% of the dentists dispose of the developer and fixer solutions by letting them into the sewer, 49.4% of them dilute the solutions and let them into sewer and only 5.6% return them to the supplier. About 40.6% of the dentists dispose of excess silver amalgam by throwing it into common bin. Conclusion. It was concluded that not all dentists were aware of the risks they were exposed to and only half of them observe infection control practices.

  1. Keeping up with Dental Literature: A Study on Continuing Professional Development among Dental Practitioners in Hubli-Dharwad, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nandita Subba; Ali, Anzil K S; Thadeethra, Mathews Jude

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Continuing Professional Development (CPD) refers to skills and knowledge attained for both personal development and career advancement. In India, very few studies have been documented to discover the patterns of information update by dental practitioners. Aim To discover the educational tools that dentists of Hubli - Dharwad, Karnataka, India, prefer for updating their knowledge on new therapeutic methods and to assess the perceived usefulness of these CPD activities. Materials and Methods Face to face interview was carried out using questionnaire comprising questions on various CPD activities among all the practicing dentists. Pearson’s chi-square test was used to evaluate any association between the frequency of information update and perceived usefulness with gender, qualification, practice types and academic attachments. Results Out of 112 practicing dentists in Hubli-Dharwad, 104 consented for the study. Mean age group of the study population was 32.3±7.56 (SD) years. Discussion with colleagues and discussion with medical sales representatives were the most frequently utilized information sources. On the other hand, attending dental fairs was found to be the most rarely utilized method of information access. Discussion with colleagues, reading textbooks and accessing internet were rated as most useful CPD activities and discussion with sales representatives and attending dental fairs were rated as least useful CPD activities. Conclusion Both conventional methods of information sources like discussions with colleagues and textbook reading as well as contemporary information sources like accessing internet were the preferred methods of information update by dental practitioners of Hubli-Dharwad. PMID:28571256

  2. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnal, Almas; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Denny, Ceena; Ahmed, Junaid; Nayak, Vijayendra

    2013-12-01

    Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions towards the need to spread awareness, and willingness to gain and implement knowledge about radiation hazards and protection. Information regarding each respondent's age, gender, education, and type and duration of practice was collected. Overall, 87 out of 120 practitioners participated in the study. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice scores were 9.54±2.54, 59.39±7.01, and 5.80±3.19, respectively. Overall, 25.3% of the respondents had undergone training in radiation protection, 98.9% perceived a need to spread awareness, and 94.3% were willing to improve their knowledge. Previous training showed a significant correlation with age, sex, and duration of practice; attitude was significantly correlated with education and type of practice; and knowledge scores showed a significant correlation with type of practice. Although the knowledge and practices of respondents were poor, they had a positive attitude and were willing to improve their knowledge. Age, sex, and duration of practice were associated with previous training; education and type of practice with attitude scores; and type of practice with knowledge scores. The findings of this study suggest a policy is needed to ensure the adherence of dental practitioners to radiation protection guidelines.

  3. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnal, Almas; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Denny, Ceena; Ahmed, Junaid; Nayak, Vijayendra [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal University, Mangalore (India)

    2013-12-15

    Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions towards the need to spread awareness, and willingness to gain and implement knowledge about radiation hazards and protection. Information regarding each respondent's age, gender, education, and type and duration of practice was collected. Overall, 87 out of 120 practitioners participated in the study. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice scores were 9.54±2.54, 59.39±7.01, and 5.80±3.19, respectively. Overall, 25.3% of the respondents had undergone training in radiation protection, 98.9% perceived a need to spread awareness, and 94.3% were willing to improve their knowledge. Previous training showed a significant correlation with age, sex, and duration of practice; attitude was significantly correlated with education and type of practice; and knowledge scores showed a significant correlation with type of practice. Although the knowledge and practices of respondents were poor, they had a positive attitude and were willing to improve their knowledge. Age, sex, and duration of practice were associated with previous training; education and type of practice with attitude scores; and type of practice with knowledge scores. The findings of this study suggest a policy is needed to ensure the adherence of dental practitioners to radiation protection guidelines.

  4. Brazilian young dental practitioners' use and acceptance of digital radiographic examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovaris, Karla; De Faria Vasconcelos, Karla; Do Nascimento, Eduarda Helena Leandro; Oliveira, Matheus Lima; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; Haiter-Neto, Francisco [Div. of Oral Radiology, Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use and acceptance of digital radiographic examinations by Brazilian dental practitioners in daily practice and to evaluate the advances that have occurred over the past 5 years. Dental practitioners enrolled in extension courses at the Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Brazil, responded to a self-administered questionnaire in the years 2011 and 2015. They were asked about sociodemographic factors and their knowledge and use of digital radiographic examinations. Descriptive analysis was performed, as well as the chi-square and Fisher exact tests, with a significance level of 5% (α=0.05). A total of 181 participants responded to the questionnaire in the years 2011 and 2015. Most of the respondents worked in private practice, had graduated within the last 5 years, and were between 20 and 30 years old. In 2011, 55.6% of respondents reported having ever used digital radiographic examinations, while in 2015 this number increased significantly to 85.4% (p<.0001), out of which 71.4% preferred it to conventional images. Moreover, 21.4% of respondents reported having used digital radiographic examinations for more than 3 years. A significant increase in use of intraoral digital radiography (p=0.0316) was observed in 2015. In both years, image quality and high cost were indicated, respectively, as the main advantage and disadvantage of digital radiographic examinations. This study showed that digital radiology has become more common in Brazil over the past 5 years. Most of the Brazilian dental practitioners evaluated in 2015 used digital radiographic examinations.

  5. General Dental Practitioners’ Concept towards Using Radiography and Apex-Locators in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, Maryam; Heidaripour, Maryam; Shahravan, Arash; Haghani, Jahangir; Afkham, Arash; Razifar, Mahsa; Mohammadizadeh, Sakineh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Despite being the gold standard as well as a routine technique in endodontics, radiographic working length (WL) determination owns many drawbacks. Electronic apex-locators (EALs) are recommended to complement radiographies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of Iranian general dental practitioners (GDPs) towards using radiography and EAL. Methods and Materials: Three hundred and ninety one GDPs attending the 53th Iranian Dental Association Congress completed a questionnaire focusing on the use of radiography and EALs during the various stages of root canal treatment. The data was analyzed with the chi-square test with the level of significance set at 0.05. The results were then calculated as frequencies and percentages. Results: More than half of the GDPs reported using radiographs as the sole method for WL determination. A total of 30.4% of the practitioners were using the combined approach during root canal therapy of a single-rooted tooth, while 38.9% used this method in multi-rooted teeth. Approximately half of the respondents would not order follow-up radiographies after root canal treatment. Conclusion: Radiography continues to be the most common method for WL determination in Iran. PMID:25386209

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Dental Practitioners Pertaining to Preventive Measures in Paediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Amitkumar; Kambalimath, Halaswamy V; Panchakshari, Bharath Kashetty; Jain, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prevention at primary level is of great value in Paediatric Dentistry. Since use of preventive measures can prevent future complications, dental professionals share an important responsibility toward early screening, prompt referral and treatment and this knowledge must transfer into the practice of dentistry. Aim To evaluate Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) among dental practitioners in Bhopal city (central part of India) pertaining to sealants, topical fluorides usage and orthodontic consideration in paediatric patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted using a 20-item self-administered, closed ended, structured questionnaire. A total of 200 available private dental practitioners of Bhopal city made up the sampling frame of study. Results Out of 200 practicing dentists, 147 participated with response rate of 73.5% in which 69.4% were males and 30.6% were females. A total of 83% dentists were less than 35 years of age, while 17% were equal to or more than 35 years of age. Qualification distribution revealed 67.3% dental graduate and 32.6% dental specialist. A highly significant difference in knowledge in relation to age was observed. The mean±SD were found for Knowledge as 8.46±1.82, Attitude as 2.65±0.780, and Practice as 1.66±1.57. Statistically significant correlations were found between attitude and practice (r=0.58, p<0.001). Conclusion Dentists in Bhopal city have vast knowledge towards preventive dentistry. The attitude is highly commendable but underutilized in practice, which needs to be improved. PMID:28209009

  7. A comparison of paediatric dentists' and general dental practitioners' care patterns in paediatric dental care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorer-Jensma, M.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the care patterns of paediatric dentists and general dentists in the dental treatment of children in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A case control study was completed based on the financial records of one of the largest Dutch health insurance com

  8. Perception of dental practitioners regarding the use of antioxidants in oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Ravneet Kaur; Gupta, Nidhi; Bansal, Mohit; Arora, Vikram; Gupta, Preety; Thakar, Sahil

    Free radicals play a key role in the development of several pathological conditions. Therefore, antioxidants (AOs) are the first line of defense against free radical damage and are critical for maintaining optimum health and well-being. To assess the perception of dental practitioners regarding use of antioxidants in oral health. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 296 dental practitioners in Tricity (Chandigarh, Mohali, Panchkula, India). A self-structured close-ended questionnaire was used to assess the perception of dentists regarding the use of antioxidants in their patients. It consisted of 12 questions with dichotomous response and five point likert scale ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data, followed by the Chi-square test to check significant differences between the responses. Correlation between responses were analysed through the Spearman's rank correlation. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20 (Illinois, Chicago, USA). A statistically significant difference was observed between genders, with females 181 (61%) having more knowledge than males 115 (39%) regarding the use of antioxidants in their clinical practice. It has been found that dental professionals in academics prescribes more antioxidants to their patients than the private practitioners. Postgraduates 76 (77.6%) had a higher level of knowledge than graduates 86 (43%). Knowledge about antioxidants should be highlighted in the health sciences curriculum. It is recommended to expand the use of antioxidants in oral health to bring down the burden of chronic diseases like periodontitis and catastrophic diseases like precancerous lesions and oral cancer. antioxidants, free radicals, mouth neoplasms, oral health.

  9. [Diagnosis and classification of orofacial pain by dental and general practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G M

    2006-11-01

    Dental practitioners as well as general practitioners are frequently confronted with patients complaining of pain in the orofacial region. Diagnosing these pains often poses a challenge to the clinician. Currently, the diagnosis of orofacial pains is biaxial. In determining a diagnosis, it is important to consider, in addition to the condition which is causing the pain (axis I-diagnosis), the impact of the pain on the patient's ability to function (axis II-diagnosis). The compilation of a thorough medical history represents the most important diagnostic tool and basis for clinical examination. Based on the axis I-diagnosis several treatment options are suggested; the strategy for managing the pain is, however, largely determined by the axis II-diagnosis.

  10. Evidence-based dentistry--overcoming the challenges for the UK's dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, C; Kay, E J; Anderson, R

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the historical origins and purpose of 'evidence-based practice' and describes the barriers to the growth of evidence-based practice within dentistry. It describes a new research agenda-setting process for dentistry, which includes identifying and prioritising the topics of most relevance to the work of primary dental care practitioners. By undertaking the work described in this paper we were striving to make research more relevant to the day to day decisions made by dentists in practice by introducing a new process, the intention being to promote and promulgate the practice of evidence-based dentistry.

  11. Referral patterns of general dental practitioners for bone grafting and implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; Shadbolt, B; Hyam, D

    2017-09-01

    Dental implant rehabilitation is a well-established procedure often conducted in the general dental practise setting. The outcomes for implant placement are reliable when the recipient site is favourable. The goal of this study was to assess the accuracy with which general dental practitioners (GDP) assess the bone volume available for implant placement and their referral patterns for implant sites, which may require bone grafting. Fifty-three GDP were surveyed and asked to assess five different scenarios and cone-beam scans for difficulty (0, 'no difficulty'; 5, 'the most difficult'), and bone grafting requirements ('yes'/'no' and 'who to perform'), prior to implant placement. The GDP assessment of difficulty for the cases was: no graft required, 1.88; aesthetic zone involvement, 3.25; vertical deficiency, 2.8; sinus lift required, 3.68; and horizontal deficiency, 4.4. GDP seemed to have some difficulty identifying which cases required a bone graft, occasionally grafting a site with sufficient bone (12.5%), or not grafting a site with insufficient bone (45-75%). These results show that GDP are accurate in assessing the difficulty of an implant case and conservative when it comes to attempting these complex cases. GDP are less confident when it comes to recognizing cases that require bone grafting, and what options are available. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries among Contact Sport Practitioners in Northeast of Iran in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Rouhani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contact sports may lead to dental injures, which may often be prevented by using mouthguards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries (TDI in professional contact sport athletes and to determine the awareness regarding use of mouthguards in this group. Methods: A questionnaire containing a number of  questions regarding the demographic data of participants, experiences of trauma and their behavior after that and use of mouthguard, was distributed amongst 100 contact sport athletes. Results: eighty athletes returned the questionnaire. The age range of most of the participants (44.2%  was between 20-30  .Also most of them had been practicing in contact sports for 1 to 5 years (37.3%. 26.2% of the athletes had experienced some sort of dental trauma. There was no significant difference between the injuries in males and females (p> 0.05. Luxation injuries were the most common type of TDI (47.7%, followed by crown fractures (42.1% and avulsion (10.5%. 89.7% of athletes had already been informed about using mouthguards, however only 10.3% reported having used them. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the rate of TDI among contact sport practitioners in Iran is high; however the use of mouthguards by athletes is low. Dentists and sports authorities should promote the use of mouthguards in contact sports to decreases the risk of dental trauma and tooth loss.

  13. Occupational Hazards Among Western Indian Private Dental Practitioners: A Questionnaire-Based Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitender Solanki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occupational hazards among oral health care providers are becoming a major problem. Aims: To assess various occupational hazards and assess the musculoskeletal problems and their association with the work pattern. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based descriptive study was conducted among 525 private dental practitioners of Jodhpur city. Self-administered questionnaire was distributed and obtained immediately after the participants filled it. The data collected were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA version 18 software. Chi-square test was used to find the association. Results: Among the study group of 525 dentists, 300 were males and 225 females. Sitting dentistry was practiced by 61.7% and only 18.8% practiced standing dentistry. Dentists suffering from back pain were 40.7% whereas only 4.1% of dentists had shoulder pain. A highly significant correlation was observed between posture of dentists and musculoskeletal problems (P = 0.001. When chi-square test was used to assess the correlation among years of working experience and musculoskeletal problems, a significant relation was observed (P = 0.000. Conclusion: Almost all the private dental practitioners were suffering from the occupational hazards. Back problems were common. Regular training and workshops can help lower such problems.

  14. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in dental practitioners in Davangere, Karnataka: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D J Veeresh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite numerous advances in dentistry many occupational health problems still persist in modern dentistry, of which the most common is a musculoskeletal disorder (MSD and pain is the most common symptom of MSD. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among the dental practitioners in Davangere and the prevalence of pain in different anatomic location. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 70 dental practitioners residing in Davangere city. A self-designed questionnaire containing eight questions was self-administered to all the available dentists at their place of work. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi- square test. Results: The prevalence of at least one musculoskeletal pain among the dentists was found to be 34.71%, and they reported a higher frequency of pain in the neck region (71%. Conclusions: Among the dentists practicing in Davangere, there was relatively lower prevalence of at least one musculoskeletal pain and the most common site of pain was neck region.

  15. Self-reported smoking cessation interventions among dental practitioners: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghad Hashim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the attitudes and practices of dentists toward smoking cessation intervention (SCI; to identify the barriers that prevent them from advising their patients to quit smoking and to determine the level of interest in future training in smoking cessation. Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to all (122 dentists practicing in private sectors in the Emirate of Ajman, United Arab Emirates. The questionnaire was personally administered, and the dental practitioners were given explanations regarding how to complete it. Only descriptive statistics was calculated. Results: More than half of the respondents (55% inquired about their patients smoking status, whereas 40% of the dentists documented it. The most common barrier cited by the respondents was the lack of training and preparation in the smoking cessation techniques, followed by lack of availability of educational material. Almost three-quarters of the respondent were interested in further training in SCI; being provided to them through full-day training course. Conclusions: Dentists require more access to appropriate forms of training in the SCI and more support needed to enable the dentist to help their patient to quit the habit. Providing training program to the dental practitioners in the United Arab Emirates to equip them with the required skill to deliver SCI would be highly beneficial.

  16. A survey of root canal treatment of molar teeth by general dental practitioners in private practice in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practice and depth of knowledge of root canal treatment by general dental practitioners working in private dental centers in different cities within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was distributed to 400 general dental practitioners. Completed questionnaires were analyzed in term of simple summary statistics. A total of 252 (63%) practitioners responded. The majority of the respondents were Syrians (59%) and Egyptians (32%). Ninety-one per cent of the respondents indicated that they performed root canal treatment. Amongst those who carried out root canal treatment, only seven practitioners (3%) used rubber dam for isolation. More than half of the respondents (55%) used saline to irrigate canals during treatment. Forty-six per cent of practitioners used formocresol as an inter appointment medicament. The standardized and step-back preparation techniques were the method of choice for the majority of the respondents (91%). Ninety-seven per cent of the practitioners used stainless steel hand instruments to prepare root canals and the majority (92%) used gutta-percha for obturation. Seventy-four per cent of the respondent used cold lateral condensation. The average number of radiographs routinely taken for root canal treatment was four. Ninety-three per cent indicated that they usually completed a root canal treatment of molar teeth in three or more visits. Eighty-eight per cent of the practitioners preferred waiting for 1 or 2 weeks to restore the teeth permanently. Results of this study confirm that many general dental practitioners are not following quality guidelines for endodontic treatment. PMID:23960485

  17. A survey of root canal treatment of molar teeth by general dental practitioners in private practice in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid S

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practice and depth of knowledge of root canal treatment by general dental practitioners working in private dental centers in different cities within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was distributed to 400 general dental practitioners. Completed questionnaires were analyzed in term of simple summary statistics. A total of 252 (63%) practitioners responded. The majority of the respondents were Syrians (59%) and Egyptians (32%). Ninety-one per cent of the respondents indicated that they performed root canal treatment. Amongst those who carried out root canal treatment, only seven practitioners (3%) used rubber dam for isolation. More than half of the respondents (55%) used saline to irrigate canals during treatment. Forty-six per cent of practitioners used formocresol as an inter appointment medicament. The standardized and step-back preparation techniques were the method of choice for the majority of the respondents (91%). Ninety-seven per cent of the practitioners used stainless steel hand instruments to prepare root canals and the majority (92%) used gutta-percha for obturation. Seventy-four per cent of the respondent used cold lateral condensation. The average number of radiographs routinely taken for root canal treatment was four. Ninety-three per cent indicated that they usually completed a root canal treatment of molar teeth in three or more visits. Eighty-eight per cent of the practitioners preferred waiting for 1 or 2 weeks to restore the teeth permanently. Results of this study confirm that many general dental practitioners are not following quality guidelines for endodontic treatment.

  18. Preferred Materials and Methods Employed for Endodontic Treatment by Iranian General Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, Maryam; Zeini, Negar; Haghani, Jahangir; Sadr, Saeedeh; Mohammadalizadeh, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to gather information on the materials and methods employed in root canal treatment (RCT) by general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Iran. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed among 450 dentists who attended the 53th Iranian Dental Association congress. Participants were asked to consider demographic variables and answer the questions regarding the materials and methods commonly used in RCT. Descriptive statistics were given as absolute frequencies and valid percentages. The chi-square test was used to investigate the influence of gender and the years of professional activity for the employed materials and techniques. Results: The response rate was 84.88%. The results showed that 61.5% of the participants did not perform pulp sensitivity tests prior to RCT. Less than half of the general dental practitioners (47.4%) said that they would trace a sinus tract before starting the treatment. Nearly 16% of practitioners preferred the rubber dam isolation method. Over 36% of the practitioners reported using formocresol for pulpotomy. The combined approach of working length (WL) radiographs and electronic apex locators was used by 35.2% of the practitioners. Most of the respondents used K-file hand instruments for canal preparation and the technique of choice was step-back (43.5%), while 40.1% of respondents used NiTi rotary files, mostly ProTaper and RaCe. The most widely used irrigant was normal saline (61.8%). Calcium hydroxide was the most commonly used inter appointment medicament (84.6%). The most popular obturation technique was cold lateral condensation (81.7%) with 51% using zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealers. Conclusions: The majority of Iranian GDPs who participated in the present survey do not comply with quality guidelines of endodontic treatment. PMID:25834595

  19. Blood Mercury Level and Its Determinants among Dental Practitioners in Hamadan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vahedi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exposure to mercury can occur in occupational and environmental settings.During clinical work with dental amalgam, the dental personnel are exposed to both metallic mercury and mercury vapor. The aim of the present study was to investigate bloodmercury level (BML and its determinants among dentists practicing in Hamadan city,Iran.Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was done on all dental practitioners of Hamadan (n=43. Dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire, and then 5 ml bloodsamples were obtained from them. After preparation, mercury concentration of each sample was measured by cold vapor atomic absorption device. Pearson correlation test and regression models served for statistical analysis.Results: The mean blood concentration of mercury was 6.3 μg/l (SD=1.31 range 4.15-8.93. BML was positively associated with age, years in practice, working hours per day,number of amalgam restorations per day, number of amalgam removal per week, sea foodconsumption, working years in present office, using amalgam powder, using diamond bur for amalgam removal, dry sterilization of amalgam contaminated instruments, and deficient air ventilation.Conclusion: BML of dentists in Hamadan was higher than standards. Working hours and number of amalgam restorations per day were significantly correlated with blood mercury.

  20. A survey of dental practitioners on their use of electronic mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhumuza, R; Moles, D R; Bedi, R

    1999-02-13

    To assess the feasibility of using electronic-mail as a tool for surveying dental practitioners; to determine both response rates and response times for this method; and provide baseline information on e-mail usage. Self-administered questionnaire distributed by e-mail to 309 practitioners on Monday morning, 1 June 1998. 53.4% response rate within 1 month; 10.2% of replies were sent within 2 hours; and nearly half the replies were sent within 48 hours. Qualified dentists were more likely to respond early than undergraduates. The most popular point of access for e-mail was home (69.1%). The majority of responders (56.8%) use e-mail every day with 1 in 7 (14.2%) using it at least four times a day. 72.4% stated that they found e-mail useful for communicating with professional bodies, while 41.3% used it to communicate with colleagues about patients and patient referrals. 34.0% found e-mail useful for ordering goods, and supplies and 14.6% were using electronic mail to make patient appointments at least some of the time. Responses can be obtained at much greater speed than conventional postal techniques will allow, but response rates were only 53.4%. E-mail is predominately used at home and for inter-professional communications, only a small proportion of responders use it for direct communication with patients.

  1. Levels of Stress among General Practitioners, Students and Specialists In Pediatric Dentistry during Dental Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich, E; Pessov, Y; Baniel, A; Ram, D

    2015-01-01

    To assess self-reported stress during the performance of different procedures in pediatric dentistry, according to the professional experience of the dentists. During the years 2010 to 2011, an anonymous survey was administered by means of an internet link, and by distribution at professional meetings of dentists . No statistically significant differences in stress were reported for maxilla and mandibular procedures. Placement of a rubber dam was rated as the most stressful procedure among dental students. For general practitioners and specialists, injection of local anesthesia to an anxious child was the most stressful procedure, regardless of age, sex, or years of professional experience. A negative correlation was found between years of experience and level of stress for all the procedures surveyed, but not for the use of nitrous oxide. No differences were found between male and female dentists in stress scores for any of the procedures. Higher rates of stress during operative procedures were reported among dental students than among experienced dentists. Anxiety of the pediatric patients, but not the location of the procedure: maxillary or mandibular, affected the dentists' reported level of stress.

  2. Knowledge and Practice of Pulp Therapy in Deciduous Teeth among General Dental Practitioners in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togoo, Ra; Nasim, Vs; Zakirulla, M; Yaseen, Sm

    2012-07-01

    It has been observed that the general dentists and pedodontists differ in their treatment recommendations for pulp therapy in deciduous teeth. To determine the knowledge and practice of pulp therapy in deciduous teeth by general dental practitioners (GDP) in two cities of southern Saudi Arabia. Fifty GDP selected at random from government and private dental clinics were questioned about pulp therapy in deciduous teeth in Abha and Najran cities using a 10-item questionnaire. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS software version 11.0 and descriptive statistics were obtained. All 50 participants responded to the survey. Pulpotomy was suggested as the first line of treatment for pulp-exposed primary tooth by 32 respondents with 44 using Buckley's formocresol and 32 applying it on the pulp for 5 minutes. 43 respondents squeeze dried the cotton pellet before application on the pulp. In pulpectomy procedure 44 respondents preferred zinc oxide eugenol as obturation material with 22 using handheld reamers and 15 using slow-speed lentilospirals for obturation. 12 respondents used obturation techniques which had no scientific relevance. In order of preference Glass ionomer cement (GIC), silver amalgam, and stainless steel crowns were the materials of choice for final restoration of endodontically treated deciduous teeth. All 50 answered in the affirmative when asked if they would like to have additional information about pulp therapy in deciduous teeth. The study concluded that general dentists were regularly performing pulp therapy in decidous teeth and therefore need to be frequently updated about these procedures.

  3. Evaluation of preparedness for medical emergencies among dental practitioners in Khammam town: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Surya Chandra Varma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical emergencies can occur frequently in the dental setting. Effective management of an emergency situation in the dental office is ultimately the dentist responsibility. The assessment of preparedness of dental practitioners would help to bring about required changes in the teaching aspects of dental institutions, which would ultimately help dental graduates to improve knowledge regarding management of medical emergencies. This would also make dental offices available with required emergency drugs. Aim: To evaluate the preparedness for medical emergencies among the dental practitioners in Khammam town. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study with a sample of 301 was conducted among dental clinicians at Khammam to evaluate their knowledge regarding medical emergencies. The questionnaire consisted of nineteen questions. First nine questions are objective questions, requiring a simple yes or no reply. Next ten questions are multiple choice questions regarding Emergency Medical Services and basic life support. Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 is considered significant. Results: The results of this study showed that almost all the participants (94.02% enquired about medical and drug history, but only 67.11% of them obtained a complete health history proforma of the patient. About 83.06% record vital signs, 74.09% of members report about attending workshops on emergency training and management, and 50.5% of members were either not sure or not in a position to handle the emergency condition. Conclusion: The results of this study reflect an alarming situation of the capability of dentists to deal with medical emergencies at dental offices and make available all the emergency drugs at their offices.

  4. Knowledge and Practice of Pulp Therapy in Deciduous Teeth among General Dental Practitioners in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togoo, RA; Nasim, VS; Zakirulla, M; Yaseen, SM

    2012-01-01

    Background: It has been observed that the general dentists and pedodontists differ in their treatment recommendations for pulp therapy in deciduous teeth. Aim: To determine the knowledge and practice of pulp therapy in deciduous teeth by general dental practitioners (GDP) in two cities of southern Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: Fifty GDP selected at random from government and private dental clinics were questioned about pulp therapy in deciduous teeth in Abha and Najran cities using a 10-item questionnaire. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS software version 11.0 and descriptive statistics were obtained. Results: All 50 participants responded to the survey. Pulpotomy was suggested as the first line of treatment for pulp-exposed primary tooth by 32 respondents with 44 using Buckley's formocresol and 32 applying it on the pulp for 5 minutes. 43 respondents squeeze dried the cotton pellet before application on the pulp. In pulpectomy procedure 44 respondents preferred zinc oxide eugenol as obturation material with 22 using handheld reamers and 15 using slow-speed lentilospirals for obturation. 12 respondents used obturation techniques which had no scientific relevance. In order of preference Glass ionomer cement (GIC), silver amalgam, and stainless steel crowns were the materials of choice for final restoration of endodontically treated deciduous teeth. All 50 answered in the affirmative when asked if they would like to have additional information about pulp therapy in deciduous teeth. Conclusion: The study concluded that general dentists were regularly performing pulp therapy in decidous teeth and therefore need to be frequently updated about these procedures. PMID:23440030

  5. An Overview of the Peer Assessment Rating (par) Index for Primary Dental Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James Ij

    2016-11-01

    The Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index is a valid and reliable measure of orthodontic treatment outcome and is the most widely accepted such index. Assessing outcomes with the PAR index requires the examination of pre-treatment and post-treatment orthodontic study models. Beginning with the pre-treatment models, a score is given to each feature that deviates from an ideal occlusion (all anatomical contact points adjacent, good interdigitation between posterior teeth and non-excessive overjet/overbite), the scores are then added together to give a total that represents the severity of the malocclusion. The process is then repeated with the post-treatment models. The difference between the pre-treatment and the post-treatment scores reflects the improvement that has taken place during treatment. A score of zero represents an ideal occlusion and in general the higher the score, the more extensive the malocclusion. It is currently a condition of the NHS orthodontic contract for providers to monitor a proportion of their cases using the PAR index. This paper aims to provide primary dental care practitioners with an overview of the PAR index and should provide a useful guide for those wishing to seek calibration in the use of the index.

  6. Behaviour of general dental practitioners in Germany regarding posterior restorations with flowable composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Rainer; Pfefferkorn, Frank; Hickel, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Because the recommendation to use flowables for posterior restorations is still a matter of debate, the objective of this study was to determine in a nationwide survey in Germany how frequently, for what indications, and for what reasons, German dentists use flowable composites in posterior teeth. In addition, the acceptance of a simplified filling technique for posterior restorations using a low stress flowable composite was evaluated. Completed questionnaires from all over Germany were returned by 1,449 dentists resulting in a response rate of 48.5%; 78.6% of whom regularly used flowable composites for posterior restorations. The most frequent indications were cavity lining (80.1%) and small Class I fillings (74.2%). Flowables were less frequently used for small Class II fillings (22.7%) or other indications (13.6%). Most frequent reasons given for the use of flowables in posterior teeth were the prevention of voids (71.7%) and superior adaptation to cavity walls (72.9%), whereas saving time was considered less important (13.8%). Based on the subjective opinion of the dentists the simplified filling technique seemed to deliver advantages compared to the methods used to date particularly with regard to good cavity adaptation and ease of use. In conclusion, resin composites are the standard material type used for posterior restorations by general dental practitioners in Germany and most dentists use flowable composites as liners.

  7. Prevalence of low back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome among dental practitioners in Dakshina Kannada and Coorg District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Anupama Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dental practitioners who usually have to work for long durations in a particular fixed posture are more prone to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs, particularly those involving the hand and wrist and also of the lower back. Aims: To study the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and low back pain (LBP among dental practitioners and to correlate the symptoms with the duration of practice. Subjects and Methods: A closed-end questionnaire was distributed to 100 dental practitioners from Dakshina Kannada and Coorg districts of Karnataka, India. Statistical Analysis Used: Analyses were carried out using Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: The study found that 86% of the total population of dentists practicing for more than 5 years showed symptoms of CTS and 54.0% experienced LBP. Conclusion: Symptoms of MSDs related to hands, wrists, and low back is widely prevalent among the dentists, which severely impact their work efficiency. Precautionary measures early in the clinical practice such as proper ergonomics in the operating field and few strengthening exercises as described in this study can reduce the onset and progression of the symptoms.

  8. Knowledge regarding Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever among private dental practitioners in Tricity, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Mehta, Nishant; Gupta, Preety; Arora, Vikram; Setia, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Ebola viral fever, a highly contagious haemorrhagic disease has today become a major public health concern in the developing countries worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge among dental practitioners regarding Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever (Ebola HF) in Tricity, (Chandigarh, Panchkula and Mohali). A total of 500 private dental practitioners were randomly approached to participate in this cross-sectional survey. A self-structured, closed ended questionnaire was administered to each participant to record demographic and professional characteristics followed by their knowledge regarding Ebola HF. Knowledge section included questions related to communicability; symptomatology and diagnostics; at-risk individuals; prevention and treatment; and, virus characteristics of Ebola HF. The results were expressed in percentages. Multivariable linear regression analysis was carried out to assess the association of participants's demographic and professional characteristics with the knowledge scores. Statistically significant difference was seen when mean knowledge scores were compared based on the locality and qualification of the participants (P < 0.05). Dental practitioners from urban areas with higher qualification had better knowledge yet there were notable deficiencies regarding the virus characteristics, diagnostics, elimination and treatment.

  9. Changing guidelines of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and basic life support for general dental practitioners and oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadipelly, Srinivas; Neshangi, Srisha

    2015-06-01

    Every general dental practitioner and oral and maxillofacial surgeon needs a thorough knowledge of the diagnosis and management of medical emergencies. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most urgent of emergencies and diagnosis must be done as soon as possible. This paper discusses the importance of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation which forms the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), highlighting the important changes in the guidelines of CPR from the year 2000 to 2010, the basic sequence of performing CPR and also the role of defibrillation and the use of automated external defibrillators. Finally the five part chain of survival which is of utmost importance to dental health care professionals and oral and maxillofacial surgeons. All dental health care personnel and oral & maxillofacial surgeons should recognize the importance of the changes in the guidelines of CPR, be trained and allowed to use a properly maintained defibrillator, to respond to cardiac arrest victims.

  10. Dental Therapists as New Oral Health Practitioners: Increasing Access for Underserved Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickle, Colleen M; Self, Karl D

    2017-09-01

    The development of dental therapy in the U.S. grew from a desire to find a workforce solution for increasing access to oral health care. Worldwide, the research that supports the value of dental therapy is considerable. Introduction of educational programs in the U.S. drew on the experiences of programs in New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom, with Alaska tribal communities introducing dental health aide therapists in 2003 and Minnesota authorizing dental therapy in 2009. Currently, two additional states have authorized dental therapy, and two additional tribal communities are pursuing the use of dental therapists. In all cases, the care provided by dental therapists is focused on communities and populations who experience oral health care disparities and have historically had difficulties in accessing care. This article examines the development and implementation of the dental therapy profession in the U.S. An in-depth look at dental therapy programs in Minnesota and the practice of dental therapy in Minnesota provides insight into the early implementation of this emerging profession. Initial results indicate that the addition of dental therapists to the oral health care team is increasing access to quality oral health care for underserved populations. As evidence of dental therapy's success continues to grow, mid-level dental workforce legislation is likely to be introduced by oral health advocates in other states. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  11. Continuing professional development amongst dental practitioners in the United Kingdom: how far are we from lifelong learning targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Dave; Newton, Tim

    2002-02-01

    This study was conducted to identify the extent to which qualified dental practitioners in the UK currently undertake three distinct activities of Continuing Professional Development (CPD): reading professional journals; attending courses; and undertaking retraining courses. Also, to determine the impact of gender, age, length of time since qualification, current working hours and career breaks upon the extent to which dental practitioners engage in CPD. Data were analysed from a questionnaire survey of a systematic sample of one in 10 dentists taken from the Dentists Register of the UK General Dental Council. The response rate was 66.6%. Only dentists practising at the time of the survey were included in the analysis (N = 1550). A high proportion of the sample reported regularly undertaking activities related to CPD. Approximately 87% read professional journals at least once per month; just over half had attended five or more days at professional meetings and courses in the last year. Only a small proportion of dentists (12%) had undertaken a retraining course in the past three years. Those dentists who had been qualified for between 21 and 30 years, those who had gained additional qualifications after qualifying as a dentist, and those who had taken a career break at some point in their life were more likely to read professional journals. Attendance at postgraduate dental courses was related to being male, not having taken a career break, possessing an additional qualification, longer working hours, and not being a General Dental Practitioners (GDP). Attendance at a retraining course was less likely for those who had taken a career break, those who had attended fewer courses in the last year and for those who worked 30--40 h per week. A large proportion of dental practitioners are currently undertaking sufficient CPD to meet the UK requirements of recertification. Greater attention should be directed towards identifying the barriers to CPD among female dentists

  12. Evaluation of dental practitioners with special interest in minor oral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, A; Nanjappa, S; Diu, S

    2010-02-13

    This paper reports an evaluation of dental practitioners with special interest (DPwSI) in minor oral surgery (MOS). To: i) audit the appropriateness of referrals to a DPwSI-MOS service, ii) determine its cost-effectiveness, iii) gather the views of patients who had been treated, and iv) assess the referring dentists' views. Analysis of management information, telephone interviews with patients, postal questionnaire survey of referring dentist. Of 83 referrals received, 51 (five for consultation and 46 for extractions) were seen by a DPwSI. The average waiting time between the referral and the treatment dates was 36 days. The cost of treating 51 cases was pound 8,020, compared to pound 43,608 under secondary care, a difference of pound 35,588 and a projected annual difference of pound 142,352. Eighteen patients were interviewed after attending for treatment. Most reported that they were seen within two weeks (ten, 57%) and four weeks (five, 28%) from the time they were referred. The majority (15, 83%) rated the service as good to excellent. Of the questionnaires mailed to 90 referring dentists, 45 (50%) were returned. Of the 40 (90%) dentists who reported being aware of the DPwSI-MOS, 24 (60%) reported having used the service. This pilot has demonstrated that the provision of MOS in the primary care setting by DPwSIs can provide a good service for patients, potentially improve access for patients, support patient management for referring dentists and reduce costs for the PCT.

  13. Does Smoking Hamper Oral Self-Care Among Dental Professionals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghasemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Smoking may impact oral self-care (OSC.  This study aimed to analyze the role of smoking in OSC among Iranian dental health professionals.Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional data were collected at two annual dental meetings and seven randomly selected dental schools in Iran. A total of 1,459 respond- ents composed of 967 general dental practitioners (GDPs, 229 dental educators (DE, and 263 senior dental students (DS anonymously completed a self-administered ques- tionnaire inquiring about smoking status and OSC.Results: Thirty percent of the men and 12% of women reported smoking with no dif-ference according to their professional status. Women reported better OSC than did men, but only 26% of the women and 17% of the men followed the three most important recommendations for OSC. Smoking was associated with infrequent tooth brushing and flossing, irregular use of fluoride containing toothpaste, consumption of sugary snacks, and weak adherence to the recommended OSC guidelines.Conclusion: Dental health education should place more emphasis on smoking counsel-ing and cessation among dental health professionals.

  14. Improving Knowledge of General Dental Practitioners on Antibiotic Prescribing by Raising Awareness of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Zahabiyoun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cases of antimicrobial resistance are increasing, partly due to inappropriate prescribing practices by dentists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prescrib- ing practices and knowledge of dentists with regards to antibiotics. Moreover, this study aimed to determine whether the prescriptions comply with the recommended guidelines and whether clinical audit can alter the prescribing practices of dentists leading to better use of antibiotics in the dental service.Materials and Methods: A clinical audit (before/after non-controlled trial was carried out in two dental clinics in the northeast of England. Retrospective data were collected from 30 antibiotic prescriptions, analysed and compared with the recommended guide- lines. Data collected included age and gender of patients, type of prescribed antibiotics and their dosage, frequency and duration, clinical condition and reason for prescribing. The principles of appropriate prescribing based on guidance by the Faculty of General Dental Practice in the United Kingdom (UK, FGDP, were discussed with the dental clini- cians. Following this, prospective data were collected and similarly managed. Pre and post audit data were then compared. Changes were tested for significance using McNemar's test and P value<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: After intervention, data revealed that antibiotic prescribing practices of dentists improved, as there was an increase in the percentage of prescriptions that were in accor- dance with the FGDP (UK guidelines.Conclusion: In view of the limited data collected, this study concludes that there are inap- propriate antibiotic prescribing practices amongst general dental practitioners and that clinical audit can address this situation, leading to a more rational use of antibiotics in dental practice.

  15. Quality evaluation of clinical records of a group of general dental practitioners entering a quality assurance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R G

    2001-10-27

    This paper discusses the importance of maintaining high quality clinical records. Evidence from studies carried out in the USA, Australia and Scandinavia shows that record keeping often falls well below accepted standards. Evidence of current standards in the UK, however, has tended to be anecdotal or circumstantial. An assessment was carried out on 47 general practitioners entering the quality assurance programme of a private capitation scheme. A sample of clinical records from each practitioner was analysed, and the presence or absence of key diagnostic and treatment planning entries were recorded. Overall, the quality of record keeping was poor, and in line with the findings of the other worldwide studies. Fundamental clinical entries that could impact on basic dental care provision were missing from many records. The frequency of recording for patients whose treatment was funded under NHS regulations was significantly worse than for patients whose treatment was privately funded.

  16. Virtual Reality-Based Technologies in Dental Medicine: Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice among Students and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabalic, Maja; Schoener, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality-based technologies have been used in dentistry for almost two decades. Dental simulators, planning software and CAD/CAM (computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing) systems have significantly developed over the years and changed both dental education and clinical practice. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitudes…

  17. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Gyanendra; Sharma, Swati; Gupta, Basant

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and awareness among parents and general dental practitioners regarding rehabilitation with full coverage restoration in children following pulp therapy. Materials and methods: A multiple choice questionnaire was given to 1,000 parents and 400 general practitioners in this multicentric trial. The questionnaire assessed their beliefs, knowledge regarding care of primary teeth, assessment of treating children, and knowledge regarding importance of primary teeth. All the questionnaires were then compiled and statistically analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results and discussion: 53% parents did not know the importance of primary teeth and 73% parents also thought that no treatment is possible for pulpally involved primary teeth. 20% parents believed that root canal treatment can be possible for children and only 10% knew about full coverage restorations. 40% of the general dentists felt that the best treatment in the case of primary necrotic teeth is extraction and only 13% knew about stainless steel crowns. 62% of general dental practitioners pointed out patients’ noninterest in providing crowns whereas 68% parents reported non-information by dentists. Conclusion: Both parents and general dental practitioners have incomplete and inadequate knowledge regarding full coverage restorations, and we need to improve the knowledge and dental awareness of the parents and the general dental practitioners. How to cite this article: Moda A, Saroj G, Sharma S, Gupta B. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):177-180. PMID:27365944

  18. Dental practitioners with a special interest in periodontics: the West Sussex experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, P D; Saner, P; Lesley, R; Beckerson, J; Butler, M; Zanjani, B

    2011-02-12

    The experience of a pilot service involving practitioners with a special interest in periodontics is described. The service functioned as a clinical network between the primary and secondary sector and featured consultant outreach. Between June 2006 and May 2007 it experienced 441 referrals. It improved patient access to periodontal care and was successful in targeting specific disease categories and in meeting key performance indicators. The service was non-surgical and emphasised patient self-efficacy. It produced highly effective clinical outcomes. It was well accepted by both patients and referring practitioners. It did not replace the need for a consultant-led service in the eyes of the referring practitioners. The BPE was used to identify suitable patients; audit indicated that there was a tendency for practitioners to underscore the level of periodontal disease.

  19. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Practitioners in Ta-briz Regarding Infection Control Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdipour, Masoomeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Gholizadeh, Narges

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims Blood-borne infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV might be transmitted from one individual to another during dental procedures. Therefore, sterilization and personal protection procedures are of utmost significance in dental offices. The importance of awareness of cross-infection and antiseptic principles lies in the fact that in most cases it is not possible to identify patients with hepatitis or AIDS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate awareness o...

  20. Ionizing radiation regulations and the dental practitioner: 1. The nature of ionizing radiation and its use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, John; Brown, Jackie

    2012-04-01

    Legislation governing the use of ionizing radiation in the workplace and in medical treatment first became law in 1985 and 1988, being superseded by the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1999 (IRR99) and the Ionizing Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000, (IR(ME)R 2000), respectively. This legislation ensures a safe environment in which to work and receive treatment and requires that those involved in the radiographic process must be appropriately trained for the type of radiographic practice they perform. A list of the topics required is detailed in Schedule 2 of IR(ME)R 2000 and is paraphrased in Table 1, with the extent and amount of knowledge required depending on the type of radiographic practice undertaken. Virtually all dental practitioners undertake radiography as part of their clinical practice. Legislation requires that users of radiation, including dentists and members of the dental team, understand the basic principles of radiation physics, hazards and protection, and are able to undertake dental radiography safely with the production of high quality, diagnostic images.

  1. Knowledge of evidence-based dentistry among academic dental practitioners of Bhopal, India: a preliminary survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the knowledge of evidence-based dentistry (EBD among dental faculty members in the city of Bhopal in central India. A cross-sectional questionnaire was administered at two dental colleges in Bhopal City. All dental faculty members who were present on the day of the study and who agreed to participate were included in the study. A total of 50 dental faculty members returned the questionnaire. Six Likert-type questions were asked, and the percentages of various responses were used for analysis. Sixteen faculty members (32.0% strongly agreed that EBD is a process of making decisions based on scientifically proven evidence. Fifteen faculty members (30.0% strongly disagreed or disagreed with the item stating that the best and quickest way to find evidence is by reading textbooks or asking experienced colleagues. Thirteen faculty members (26.0% strongly agreed that EBD allows dentists to improve their scientific knowledge and clinical skills. It is recommended that EBD be included in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula and in intensive continuing dental education programs that are conducted for dental faculty members.

  2. Knowledge of evidence-based dentistry among academic dental practitioners of Bhopal, India: a preliminary survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aishwarya; Saxena, Sudhanshu; Tiwari, Vidhatri; Tiwari, Utkarsh

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the knowledge of evidence-based dentistry (EBD) among dental faculty members in the city of Bhopal in central India. A cross-sectional questionnaire was administered at two dental colleges in Bhopal City. All dental faculty members who were present on the day of the study and who agreed to participate were included in the study. A total of 50 dental faculty members returned the questionnaire. Six Likert-type questions were asked, and the percentages of various responses were used for analysis. Sixteen faculty members (32.0%) strongly agreed that EBD is a process of making decisions based on scientifically proven evidence. Fifteen faculty members (30.0%) strongly disagreed or disagreed with the item stating that the best and quickest way to find evidence is by reading textbooks or asking experienced colleagues. Thirteen faculty members (26.0%) strongly agreed that EBD allows dentists to improve their scientific knowledge and clinical skills. It is recommended that EBD be included in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula and in intensive continuing dental education programs that are conducted for dental faculty members.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of carious lesions in digital radiographs at a public dental clinic - can it be improved by optimizing viewing conditions and further education?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Westerberg, Jane; Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the diagnostic accuracy of digital dental radiograpny for detecting carious lesions on approximal surfaces before and after optimization of the environ- ment, and after joint training on evaluation and review of x-rays. A further aim was to evaluate differences in diagnostic accuracy between general dental practitioners (GDPs) and dental hygienists (DHs). One hundred extracted teeth (premolars and molars) underwent standardized radiography. Eleven participants (seven GDPs and four DHs) evaluated digital images for approximal carious lesions in three sessions: (1) at current conditions with no optimization or further training, (2) under optimized viewing conditions, and (3) under optimized viewing conditions after a short educational session. Receiver operating characteristic curves were,used to evaluate the results. Histological evaluation was made and served as a cri- terion standard for differentiating sound teeth and teeth with carious lesions. Kappa statistics evaluated intra-observer agreement. Diagnostic accuracy in the GDP group differed sig- nificantlyfor all types of carious lesions between the first and third evaluations (p=0.002), and also between the second and third (p=0.015). Diagnostic accuracy also differed significantly for carious lesions into the dentin between the first and third evaluations (p=0.010) and between the second and third (p=0.015). Most of the staff had optimized the environment when evaluating digital radiographs. A short educational session highlighting the difficulty of caries diagnostics in digital dental radiography can increase diagnostic accuracy. Diagnostic accuracy in the detection of approximal carious lesions on digital radiographs did not differ between GDPs and DHs.

  4. Complete denture impression techniques practiced by private dental practitioners: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakatkar, Vinay R

    2013-09-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested.

  5. [The routine oral examination in The Netherlands. An orientation from the perspective of general dental practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettes, T.G.P.H.; Bruers, J.J.M.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Verdonschot, E.H.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    In The Netherlands the routine oral examination (ROE) can be characterized as an important tool in dental care. As a result of the changing prevalence of oral diseases of the Dutch population the content of the routine oral examination has changed over time. A representative survey among general den

  6. [A survey on infection control practices, knowledge and attitudes toward AIDS/HIV among dental practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, F; Yonemitsu, M; Aizawa, Y; Hanada, N; Akada, H

    1996-05-01

    A survey was conducted in December 1993 by sending questionnaires to all 566 dentists of the Iwate Dental Association. The questionnaires consisted of 68 items including infection control practices, knowledge, and attitudes towards AIDS/HIV. The response rate was 51.1 percent (N = 289). The average age of dentists in the sample was 43.7 +/- 9.5 (S.D.) (range: 28 to 85). Data was evaluated statistically by Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney's U test and Chi-square test, and significant differences were observed. Gloves, masks, and other protective garments were generally worn, but most dentists did not always use them during the full course of treatment limiting usage to surgical treatment, and when treating patients in "high-risk groups". Other infection control procedures, such as instrument sterilization, did not comply with the guidelines of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Two dentists responded that they had treated AIDS patients and three dentists treated possible AIDS/HIV patients in their dental offices. Despite 71.3% expressing a belief that they have a moral responsibility as a dentist to treat AIDS/HIV patients only 15.6% were willing to treat AIDS/HIV patients. Over 40% of the respondents were not certain as to whether they had treated AIDS/HIV patients or not, and over 60% believed AIDS/HIV patients would come to their dental offices in the near future. Therefore, to practice dentistry on AIDS/HIV patients safely, dentists must provide effective infection control in their dental offices on the assumption that all patients are AIDS/HIV positive, and additional information about AIDS/HIV and adequate training on procedures in the care of AIDS/HIV patients are needed.

  7. Knowledge of Future Dental Practitioners towards Oral Cancer: Exploratory Findings from a Public University in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Bin Zakaria, Nazrin; Jamshed, Shazia Qasim

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess knowledge and awareness of oral cancer in the early identification of risk factors among undergraduate dental students. Methods. A total of 162 undergraduate (third, fourth, and fifth year) dental students at International Islamic University, Malaysia, were approached to participate in the study, and those who agreed were administered. A 9-item pretested questionnaire contains questions on oral examination, oral cancer risk factors, and requests for further information. Descriptive statistics were conducted using chi-square testing. Results. The response rate of the study was 70.3% (114/162), with 26 (22.8%) males and 88 (77.2%) females. All undergraduate dental students were familiar with examining the oral mucosa of their patients and most were likely to advise patients about the risk factors for developing oral cancer (98.2%). Nearly one-third (32.4%) of students reported examining patients with oral lesions as early signs for oral cancer (P < 0.001) and nearly 70% agreed that they did not have sufficient knowledge regarding the prevention and detection of oral cancer (P < 0.001). In addition, more than 95.6% agreed that there is a need for additional information/teaching regarding oral cancer. Further, 61.3% and 14.1% identified tobacco smoking and drinking alcohol as major risk factors for developing oral cancer. Conclusion. This study demonstrated lack of awareness about risk factors among undergraduate dental students regarding oral cancer. Reinforcing awareness and enhancing the benefits of early detection on prevention of oral cancer should be done through training and/or educational intervention.

  8. Survey of attitudes, materials and methods employed in endodontic treatment by general dental practitioners in North Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Omari Wael M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General dental practitioners provide the majority of endodontic treatment in Jordan. The aim of this study was to gather information on the methods, materials and attitudes employed in root canal treatment by dentists in North Jordan, in order to evaluate and improve the quality of current practice. Methods A questionnaire was posted to all registered general dental practitioners working in private practice in Irbid Governate in North Jordan (n = 181. The questionnaire included information on methods, materials and techniques used in endodontic treatment. Results Reply rate was 72% (n = 131. The results demonstrated that only five dentists used rubber dam occasionally and not routinely. The majority used cotton rolls for isolation solely or in combination with a high volume saliva ejector (n = 116. The most widely used irrigants were sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide, which were used by 32.9% (n = 43 and 33.6% (n = 44 of the respondents, respectively. Forty eight percent of the respondents (n = 61 used the cold lateral condensation technique for canal obturation, 31.3% (n = 41 used single cone, 9.9% (n = 13 used vertical condensation and 12.2% (n = 16 used paste or cement only for the obturation. The majority used zinc oxide eugenol as a sealer (72.5%. All, but one, respondents used hand instruments for canal preparation and the technique of choice was step back (52.7%. More than 50% (n = 70 of the dentists took one radiograph for determining the working length, whilst 22.9% (n = 30 did not take any radiograph at all. Most practitioners performed treatment in three visits for teeth with two or more root canals, and in two visits for teeth with a single root canal. Conclusions This study indicates that dentists practicing in North Jordan do not comply with international quality standards and do not use recently introduced techniques. Many clinicians never take a radiograph for determining the working length and never

  9. A cluster randomised controlled trial in primary dental care based intervention to improve professional performance on routine oral examinations and the management of asymptomatic impacted third molars: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grol Richard PTM

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Routine oral examination (ROE refers to periodic monitoring of the general and oral health status of patients. In most developed Western countries a decreasing prevalence of oral diseases underpins the need for a more individualised approach in assigning individualised recall intervals for regular attendees instead of systematic fixed intervals. From a quality-of-care perspective, the effectiveness of the widespread prophylactic removal of mandibular impacted asymptomatic third molars (MIM in adolescents and adults is also questionable. Data on the effectiveness of appropriate interventions to tackle such problems, and for promoting continuing professional development in oral health care are rare. Methods/design This study is a cluster randomised controlled trial with groups of GDPs as the unit of randomisation. The aim is to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of small group quality improvement on professional decision-making of general dental practitioners (GDPs in daily practice. Six peer groups ('IQual-groups' shall be randomised either to the intervention arm I or arm II. Groups of GDPs allocated to either of these arms act as each other's control group. An IQual peer group consists of eight to ten GDPs who meet in monthly structured sessions scheduled for discussion on practice-related topics. GDPs in both trial arms receive recently developed evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPG on ROE or MIM. The implementation strategy consists of one interactive IQual group meeting of two to three hours. In addition, both groups of GDPs receive feedback on personal and group characteristics, and are invited to make use of web-based patient risk vignettes for further individual training on risk assessment policy. Reminders (flow charts will be sent by mail several weeks after the meeting. The main outcome measure for the ROE intervention arm is the use and appropriateness of individualised risk assessment in

  10. Organoleptic assessment of halitosis for dental professionals--general recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, J; Lenton, P; Seemann, R; Nachnani, S

    2014-03-01

    An organoleptic assessment of an odor is defined as a method that can measure the strength of target odors and expresses the value in terms of a point or number with reference to a pre-defined organoleptic scale. Organoleptic assessments are performed using different scales and are used widely in industry (e.g. for measuring the effectiveness of anti-odor agents), in research (to discover relationships between bad breath and microbiology of the tongue, or the generation of particular volatile compounds), but it is also a prerequisite for the diagnosis of halitosis in individual patients required before directing appropriate treatment. An organoleptic assessment of halitosis patients may be carried out in specialized institutions but--based on the fact that in most cases the odor originates from oral structures--also by dental professionals including general dental practitioners (GDPs). Thus, this paper describes the scientific background for recommendations on how a GDP or dental hygienist or general practitioner with cases of bad breath should use organoleptic methods as a valid approach to assess malodor in patients, with a view to diagnosis and treatment, and subsequent treatment monitoring.

  11. The Caries Management System: an evidence-based preventive strategy for dental practitioners. Application for adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R W; Pakdaman, A; Dennison, P J; Howe, E L C

    2008-03-01

    In the absence of effective caries preventive methods, operative care became established as the means for caries control in general practice. Water fluoridation resulted in a declining caries incidence which decreased further following the advent of fluoridated toothpaste. The challenge today is to develop a non-invasive model of practice that will sustain a low level of primary caries experience in the younger generation and reduce risk of caries experience in the older generations. The Caries Management System is a ten step non-invasive strategy to arrest and remineralize early lesions. The governing principle of this system is that caries management must include consideration of the patient at risk, the status of each lesion, patient management, clinical management and monitoring. Both dental caries risk and treatment are managed according to a set of protocols that are applied at various steps throughout patient consultation and treatment. The anticipated outcome of implementing the Caries Management System in general dental practice is reduction in caries incidence and increased patient satisfaction. Since the attainment and maintenance of oral health is determined mainly by controlling both caries and periodontal disease, the implementation of the Caries Management System in general practice will promote both outcomes.

  12. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  13. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found.

  14. Dentistry – a professional contained career in healthcare. A qualitative study of Vocational Dental Practitioners' professional expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Kenneth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New graduates in the UK presently spend one year in training as Vocational Dental Practitioners (VDPs in preparation for primary dental care. There is a growing recognition that the emerging workforce has very different professional expectations to those of earlier generations, with implications for the profession, patients and the performance of health systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate why VDPs' in England and Wales perceive they chose dentistry as a professional career; how they perceive their vision has changed and the implications for their professional career plans, both short- and longterm. Methods Purposive sampling of schemes was undertaken to include urban, rural and metropolitan schemes, schemes in areas with and without dental schools and geographic coverage across England and Wales. All VDPs in these schemes were initiated to participate in this qualitative study using focus groups. A topic guide was utilised to standardise data collection. Informants' views were recorded on tape and in field notes. Data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology. Results A total of 99 VDPs participated in the 10 focus groups. Their choice of dentistry as a professional career was motivated by multiple categories of influence: 'academic', 'healthcare', 'lifestyle', the influence of 'family', 'friends', 'careers advice' and 'work experience'. Consideration of the features of the 'professional job' appears to have been key to their choice of dentistry and the 'active rejection of medicine' as an alternative career. Entry into the profession was proving a challenging process for some but not all VDPs. Informants perceived that their vision had been moderated as a result of 'personal student debt', 'national workforce initiatives', 'limitations on clinical practice' and the 'cost of additional training'. Short term goals focused around 'recovery from the past' and 'preparation for the future

  15. A question of value: a qualitative study of vocational dental practitioners' views on oral healthcare systems and their future careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Clarke, Wendy; Eaton, Kenneth A; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2009-01-01

    New dental graduates in England and Wales spend one year as vocational dental practitioners (VDPs) preparing for independent clinical practice. In recent years, they have entered a state-funded healthcare system undergoing the greatest period of change since the inception of the National Health Service (NHS) and a profession in which there has been a significant shift of care to the private sector. Against this background, the objectives of this study were to investigate VDPs' vision of their future professional career and the influences that will impact on their choice of state-funded (NHS) and/or private dentistry, and to identify what factors may attract graduates to work for the NHS. In 2004/2005, purposive sampling of a range of VDP training schemes across England and Wales was used to select the VDPs from ten schemes to take part in focus groups. To standardise data collection, a topic guide was used. Respondents' views were recorded on tape and field notes. The data were transcribed and analysed using framework methodology. Ninety-nine VDPs from all parts of England and Wales participated in ten focus groups. They identified three main categories of future practice: private, state-funded (NHS), and mixed. Private practice was perceived as providing 'professional independence', 'financial reward', 'time with patients' and 'clinical freedom'. NHS practice was associated with 'providing access to specialist training' and 'gaining clinical experience', often as preparation for private practice. Providing NHS care was attractive for VDPs who valued the ethos of public service. The VDPs considered that NHS practice could be made more attractive to young dentists by a range of factors, involving the funding, culture and philosophy of the system and the degree of fit with their personal and professional vision. They reported that they would welcome 'incentives to work in areas of high need', 'assistance with debt' and a 'culture of valuing NHS dentists'. The

  16. Prevalence of Rubber Dam Usage Among Dental Practitioners and Final Year Students in Tirgu Mures: A Questionnaire Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of rubber dam usage among endodontists, other specialized practitioners, general practitioners and undergraduate final year students in Tirgu-Mures, Romania.

  17. Postdoctoral Education in Dentistry: Preparing Dental Practitioners To Meet the Oral Health Needs of America in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Paul; Meyerowitz, Cyril

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the history of postdoctoral programs in dentistry and medicine, focusing on postdoctoral general dentistry education, and describes the changing health-care environment in which future dental professionals will practice, relating the dental postdoctoral experience to that in medicine. A strategy is presented to prepare dental practitioners…

  18. The Staphylococcus aureus protein-coding gene gdpS modulates sarS expression via mRNA-mRNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Zhang, Xu; Shang, Fei; Sun, Haipeng; Sun, Baolin; Xue, Ting

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for numerous diseases ranging from localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic infections. The virulence of S. aureus is essentially determined by a wide spectrum of factors, including cell wall-associated proteins and secreted toxins that are precisely controlled in response to environmental changes. GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus (GdpS) is the only conserved staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein that is involved not in c-di-GMP synthesis but in the virulence regulation of S. aureus NCTC8325. Our previous study showed that the inactivation of gdpS generates an extensive change of virulence factors together with, in particular, a major Spa (protein A) surface protein. As reported, sarS is a direct positive regulator of spa. The decreased transcript levels of sarS in the gdpS mutant compared with the parental NCTC8325 strain suggest that gdpS affects spa through interaction with sarS. In this study, site mutation and complementary experiments showed that the translation product of gdpS was not involved in the regulation of transcript levels of sarS. We found that gdpS functioned through direct RNA-RNA base pairing with the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of sarS mRNA and that a putative 18-nucleotide region played a significant role in the regulatory process. Furthermore, the mRNA half-life analysis of sarS in the gdpS mutant showed that gdpS positively regulates the mRNA levels of sarS by contributing to the stabilization of sarS mRNA, suggesting that gdpS mRNA may regulate spa expression in an RNA-dependent pathway.

  19. Direct pulp capping of permanent teeth in New Zealand general dental practice--a practice based research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, L; McElroy, K; Daniel, B; Cullinan, M; Hanlin, S

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate treatment protocols and opinions towards direct pulp capping (DPC) amongst New Zealand (NZ) general dental practitioners (GDP) through a Practice Based Research Network (PBRN) study. Mixed-methods approach using qualitative thematic and quantitative analysis. An on-line survey containing Likert scale items and open-ended questions was distributed to GDPs on the Dental Council of New Zealand (DCNZ) register (2012) to collect information on practitioner demographics, treatment protocols, continuing professional development (CPD) and philosophies towards DPC. RESULTs: Two hundred and ten GDPs from North and South Islands providing care in main centres and rural areas engaged with the PBRN and participated in the study. Almost all performed DPC treatment although it was not a common procedure. DPC was perceived as 'successful' or 'very successful' by 95% of respondents, mostly for cases of reversible pulpitis. Most provided DPC for patients of all ages but younger patients were perceived to have the best clinical outcomes. Calcium hydroxide and MTA were the most commonly used materials for DPC. MTA was believed to have the best outcome but cost and handling properties were barriers to its use. The majority of respondents had participated in CPD related to vital pulp therapy and regarded this treatment as conservative and providing time and financial benefits compared with more invasive treatment. Clinicians' timeframes for assessing healing were variable, and combined clinical and radiographic findings were considered most useful. New Zealand dentists perceive DPC as a successful and conservative treatment in selected cases. The findings have provided insights into engagement of NZ dentists in using research to inform everyday clinical practice through a PBRN study.

  20. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresan, Vinay; Mantri, Sneha; Deogade, Suryakant; Sumathi, K; Panday, Pragya; Galav, Ankit; Mishra, Kanika

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have concentrated their focus on denture wearer's attitude and practice toward denture cleansing despite the fact that they should be more focused on the attitudes of the dentists' themselves towards patient education at the time of denture delivery. It is an obligation of every dentist to motivate, instruct and provide the means and methods of plaque control for their patients. The aim was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes and practice towards patient education in denture care among dental practitioners (DPs) of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India. A total of 168 dental practitioners completed a comprehensive questionnaire. All participants signed an informed consent before answering the questionnaire. The institutional review committee approved the study. Chi-square test for non-parametric study was employed to determine the statistical difference between the two groups. A P-value of 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Most of the subjects were qualified with a bachelor degree 142 (85%). 25 (18%) subjects did not associate oral biofilms on complete denture with conditions like denture stomatitis and other serious systemic diseases. Approximately half of the DPs 69 (48%) and specialists 8 (31%) agreed that explaining denture hygiene instructions to old patients can be very time consuming. A recall program for their patients is of importance according to 39 (27%) of DPs and 3 (12%) specialists. It may be concluded that the study subjects had limited knowledge of denture cleansing materials and denture hygiene importance. Attitudes varied among the subjects when it came to sharing information with their patients.

  1. Knowledge, Attitudes and Performance of Dental Practitioners in Isfahan-Iran about Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Protection Against them in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Badrian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing use of dental radiography makes necessitates of increasing awareness and appropriate performance about ionizing radiation protection. The present study was done with the aim of evaluation of awareness, attitude and performance levels of dental practitioners in the city of Isfahan about ionizing radiation and protection against them.Materials & Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study a questionnaire including questions for evaluating of awareness, attitude and performance levels and demographic information was distributed among 184 dentists in the city of Isfahan. The data were analyzed by means of student t test and Pearson correlation coefficient in SPSS software (α=0.05. Results: In the present study 73.2% of dentists had weak awareness level 25.6% and 1.2% of dentists had moderate and good awareness levels respectively. Twentyfour and 76 percent had good and apathetic attitudes. Ten and 4.5 percent of dentists have been using lead apron and thyroidal necklace for their patients respectively. Experience and awareness had significant inverse correlation with eachother (P=0.004, r =-0.218.Conclusion: According to the results of the presents study, the awareness of dentists was weak and academic education as well as post-graduate education is necessary.

  2. State-of-the-art techniques in operative dentistry: contemporary teaching of posterior composites in UK and Irish dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Frazier, K B; McConnell, R J; Blum, I R; Wilson, N H F

    2010-08-14

    -transmitting wedges for occluso-proximal composites (eight schools) and the teaching of bevels on the cavosurface enamel margins of both the occlusal and proximal box margins (three schools). The teaching of posterior composites in the Irish and UK dental schools has substantially increased over the last five years. Dental students in these schools often gain more experience in the placement of posterior composites than amalgam. However, practice trends indicate that a majority of GDPs continue to place amalgam in preference to composite, thereby suggesting a source of tension as current dental students emerge into the dental workforce over the coming years. There is, as a consequence, a challenge to the dental profession and its funding agencies in the UK to encourage more of a shift towards the minimally interventive use of composite systems in the restoration of posterior teeth, in particular among established practitioners.

  3. Diagnostic Methods for Dental Caries Used by Private Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... types of diagnostic tools and methods used by private dental practitioners in. Ankara for .... and treatment approaches, and patient records. ..... detection aids. ... approximal and occlusal dental caries in a low risk population.

  4. Recommendations by the EACD for examination, diagnosis, and management of patients with temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain by the general dental practitioner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boever, JA De; Nilner, M.; Orthlieb, J.D.; Steenks, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    The Council of the European Academy of Craniomandibular Disorders charged the Educational Committee with the task of establishing Guidelines and Recommendations for the examination, diagnosis, and management of patients with temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain by the general dental practi

  5. Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Richard John

    2016-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the University of Manchester by Richard Macey for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy entitled “Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists”, February 2016.Many adult patients that attend NHS dental practices on a regular basis are asymptomatic and do not need any further treatment other than a routine dental examination (“check-up”). As the oral health of the adult population is predicted to improve further, using the General Dental Practitioner to und...

  6. Orthodontic evolution: an update for the general dental practitioner. Part 2: psychosocial aspects of orthodontic treatment, stability of treatment, and the TMJ-orthodontic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Niall J P

    2008-01-01

    As a result of recent innovations and improvements, orthodontic treatment has become easier and more efficient to carry out, allowing greater numbers of patients to receive treatment. The main result of orthodontic treatment is improved dental alignment and aesthetics. Treatment has no effect on caries or periodontal disease, and the dental health gain is modest, apart from a very small percentage of destructive malocclusions. Psychological improvements using different psychological parameters show differing results and it is not clear that any psychological gains are long lasting. Social gain (greater willingness to smile, feeling good about oneself, satisfaction with dental appearance, etc.), and reported improved quality of life (QoL measures), are now becoming more important as consumer-related outcomes and may, ultimately, contribute to psychosocial and psychological status. Stability of orthodontic treatment results cannot be guaranteed and all patients need to be informed of this, and of the need for long-term retention. Malocclusion has little or no relationship to temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction and orthodontic treatment neither causes nor cures such problems. Extractions as part of orthodontic treatment do not cause TMD, nor do they cause collapse of the vertical dimension. The major improvements in dental health in the last 40 years have been accompanied by a great increase in demand for treatment. In any public health service that is free at the point of use, demand for treatment invariably exceeds the ability of resources to supply this. Indices of treatment need are widely used to determine treatment need and eligibility for treatment in public health systems. Demand for orthodontic treatment among adolescents can be as high as 60% in the general population, while the professionally-assessed need for treatment is approximately half this figure. Age, sex, socio-economic status, perceived unattractiveness of dental appearance, and availability of

  7. Introduction of the ART approach in Egypt: Intentions, clinical effects and perceived barriers. A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farag, A.S.E.D.; Sanden, W.J. van der; Mulder, J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim. To evaluate the effect of the introduction of ART in Upper-Egypt and assess the participating General Dental Practitioners' (GDPs) opinions, intentions, expectations and experiences regarding barriers related to using ART. Methods. Thirty-five GDPs were selected and trained on ART for

  8. The Hall Technique; a randomized controlled clinical trial of a novel method of managing carious primary molars in general dental practice: acceptability of the technique and outcomes at 23 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innes Nicola P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scotland has high levels of untreated dental caries in primary teeth. The Hall Technique is a simplified method of managing carious primary molars using preformed metal crowns (PMCs cemented with no local anaesthesia, caries removal or tooth preparation. This study compared the acceptability of the Hall Technique for children, their carers, and dentists, and clinical outcomes for the technique, with conventional restorations. Methods General dental practice based, split mouth, randomized controlled trial (132 children, aged 3–10. General dental practitioners (GDPs, n = 17 in Tayside, Scotland (dmft 2.7 placed conventional (Control restorations in carious primary molars, and Hall Technique PMCs on the contralateral molar (matched clinically and radiographically. Dentists ranked the degree of discomfort they felt the child experienced for each procedure; then children, their carers and dentists stated which technique they preferred. The teeth were followed up clinically and radiographically. Results 128 conventional restorations were placed on 132 control teeth, and 128 PMCs on 132 intervention teeth. Using a 5 point scale, 118 Hall PMCs (89% were rated as no apparent discomfort up to mild, not significant; for Control restorations the figure was 103 (78%. Significant, unacceptable discomfort was recorded for two Hall PMCs (1.5% and six Control restorations (4.5%. 77% of children, 83% of carers and 81% of dentists who expressed a preference, preferred the Hall technique, and this was significant (Chi square, p a 'Major' failures (signs and symptoms of irreversible pulpal disease: 19 Control restorations (15%; three Hall PMCs (2% (P b 'Minor' failures (loss of restoration, caries progression: 57 Control restorations (46%; six Hall PMCs (5% (P c Pain: 13 Control restorations (11%; two Hall PMCs (2% (P = 0.003. Conclusion The Hall Technique was preferred to conventional restorations by the majority of children, carers and GDPs

  9. Self-Perceptions of Value, Barriers, and Motivations for Graduate Education Among Dental Hygienists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Amy N; Boyd, Linda D; Rogers, Christine Macarelli; Le Jeune, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the knowledge base of its practitioners through formal education is vital to advancing the dental hygiene profession, ensuring practitioners' readiness for participation in future health...

  10. Evaluation of the Problems of General Dental Practitioners in the Usage of Composite Materials in Posterior Teeth in the City of Isfahan-Iran in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Mirzakoucheki Boroujeni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posterior composite restorations are the one of the most usual dental treatments among patients. The goal of this study was determining dentists’ problems during and after treatment of posterior – composite restorations in the city of Isfahan.Materials & Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, we used a questionnaire including questions about the problems of posterior composite treatments during and after operation among dentists in Isfahan in 2009-2010. The data were analysed by chi-Square test.Results: The most frequent problem during composite restoration was achieving good proximal contact (30.8% and after it, sensitivity of teeth while chewing which would not be repaired by correct occlusion (34.8%. Most of the dentists pushed the matrix strip toward the adjacent teeth while polymerization, applied the composite in different layer, did the company instructions for bonding layer and used wet polishing during restoration. Most of the dentists (55.8% used two step total etch dentinal bonding and selected the composite because of its ability in making isolation and good restoration (42.5%.Conclusion: Providing correct education for the dentists and increasing their knowledge about these restorations result in reduction of associated problems during and after the operation.

  11. Epilepsy in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J J; McArdle, N S; Wilson, M H; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological condition characterised by seizure activity. It has an approximate incidence of 1%. General dental practitioners will encounter these patients in practice. This article discusses the types of epilepsy, the medical management and considerations in dental management of epileptic patients. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence, with respect to prescribing of medications. The management of an epileptic seizure is discussed. Status epilepticus is a rare but serious complication of epileptic seizures. An easy-to-follow algorithm is provided to assist the practitioner in managing seizures.

  12. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  13. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  14. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  15. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  16. Dental Practitioners and Smoking Cessation in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Keogan

    2015-10-01

    Smoking prevalence is low among dentists in Ireland. Most recognized the need to provide adequate smoking cessation support and advice to patients but felt under-trained to do so. Most were not aware of existing referral pathways to specialist smoking cessation services and, thus, referral rates were low.

  17. ROLE OF THE GENERAL DENTAL PRACTITIONER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment would be the amount and quality of information available. Some studies6 ... necessary to control disease or restore function for example, when teeth are .... Transparent. / tooth coloured ceramic brackets as well as lingual appliances.

  18. Image Post-Processing in Dental Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gormez, Ozlem; Yilmaz, Hasan Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    Image post-processing of dental digital radiographs, a function which used commonly in dental practice is presented in this article. Digital radiography has been available in dentistry for more than 25 years and its use by dental practitioners is steadily increasing. Digital acquisition of radiographs enables computer-based image post-processing to enhance image quality and increase the accuracy of interpretation. Image post-processing applications can easily be practiced in dental office by ...

  19. Latex Allergy in Dental Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermata A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber latex is found in numerous medical and dental products. Adverse latex reactions in dental patients and practitioners have significantly increased since the introduction of universal precautions for infection control. These reactions range from contact dermatitis to potentially life-threatening hypersensitivity. Patients with a history of spina bifida, urogenital anomalies, multiple surgical procedures, allergic reactions or atopy, health care personnel and latex production workers are at increased risk of latex allergy. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical history and laboratory tests. Identification of latex sources and the avoidance of latex exposure are critical for protecting both dental patients and dental personnel.

  20. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-06-19

    Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to identify strategies that could improve collaboration between these disciplines from the perspective of dental participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2013 and 2015 with visiting, local and regional dental practitioners (n = 12) who had provided dental services to patients from eight rural and remote Queensland communities that did not have a resident dentist. Participants were purposely recruited through a snow ball sampling technique. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis with the assistance of QSR Nvivo v.10. Four major themes emerged from the data: (1) Communication between dental practitioners and rural primary care providers; (2) Relationships between dental and primary care providers; (3) Maintenance of professional dualism; (4) Strategies to improve interprofessional relationships (with subthemes: face to face meetings; utilisation of technology; oral health training for primary care providers; and having a community based oral health contact person). Participants observed that there was a lack of communication between the dental providers who saw patients from these rural communities and the primary care providers who worked in each community. This was attributed to poor communication, the high turnover of staff and the siloed behaviours of some practitioners. Visiting dental practitioners were likely to have stronger professional relationships with hospital nursing, administrative and allied health care staff who were often long term

  1. Adverse effects of dental local anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meechan, J G; Rood, J P

    1997-10-01

    This paper considers the adverse effects that a patient may suffer as a result of anticipating an injection of dental local anaesthetic. Although most of these are extremely rare (a testimony to good technique), the dental practitioner should be aware of the possibility of their occurrence and of ways to deal with them.

  2. Development of an interactive dental trauma guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2009-01-01

    resulting in 54 trauma scenarios of which many have specific requirements for treatment The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two dentitions have very different treatment demands. As a result it's impossible even for experienced practitioners to provide evidence-based treatment...... be available on the internet at: "www.DentalTraumaGuide.org". We hope that the Dental Trauma Guide can help improve the knowledge about dental traumatology worldwide and hereby improve the quality of treatment....

  3. Development of an interactive dental trauma guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2009-01-01

    resulting in 54 trauma scenarios of which many have specific requirements for treatment The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two dentitions have very different treatment demands. As a result it's impossible even for experienced practitioners to provide evidence-based treatment...... be available on the internet at: "www.DentalTraumaGuide.org". We hope that the Dental Trauma Guide can help improve the knowledge about dental traumatology worldwide and hereby improve the quality of treatment....

  4. Examining whether dental therapists constitute a disruptive innovation in US dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton L

    2011-10-01

    Dental therapists-midlevel dental providers who are roughly analogous to nurse practitioners in medicine-might constitute a disruptive innovation within US dentistry. Proponents tend to claim that dental therapists will provide more equitable access to dental care; opponents tend to view them from a perspective that focuses on retaining the current attributes of the dental profession. Therapists display traits similar to those of disruptive innovations: their attributes are different from dentists', they may not initially be valued by current dental patients, they may appeal to current dental underutilizers, and they may transform the dental delivery system. Whether dental therapists constitute a disruptive innovation will only be determined retrospectively.

  5. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... combined, the result is that more than 100 trauma scenarios exist, when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios has a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnosis and treatment, it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.DentalTrauma...

  6. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Domb, Ivor

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  7. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  8. Image post-processing in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormez, Ozlem; Yilmaz, Hasan Huseyin

    2009-10-01

    Image post-processing of dental digital radiographs, a function which used commonly in dental practice is presented in this article. Digital radiography has been available in dentistry for more than 25 years and its use by dental practitioners is steadily increasing. Digital acquisition of radiographs enables computer-based image post-processing to enhance image quality and increase the accuracy of interpretation. Image post-processing applications can easily be practiced in dental office by a computer and image processing programs. In this article, image post-processing operations such as image restoration, image enhancement, image analysis, image synthesis, and image compression, and their diagnostic efficacy is described. In addition this article provides general dental practitioners with a broad overview of the benefits of the different image post-processing operations to help them understand the role of that the technology can play in their practices.

  9. Dental stories for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Ian W; Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; McKinney, Christy M; Scott, JoAnna M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate caregivers' preference regarding dental stories to prepare children with autism for dental visits. Caregivers of children with autism were allowed use of dental stories available via different media (paper, tablet computer, computer) and image types (comics or drawings, photographs, video). Caregivers completed pre- and postintervention surveys. Fisher's exact tests were used to determine associations between predictive factors and preferences. Forty initial and 16 follow-up surveys were completed. Subjects were primarily male (85%). Mean child age was 6.7 years. Nine (64%) caregivers found the dental story useful for themselves and their child. Two (14%) caregivers found the aid only helpful for themselves. Preferred media type was associated with language understanding (p = .038) and home media preference (p = .002). Practitioners should consider using dental stories to help prepare families and children for dental visits. Individual preferences for dental stories vary; using prior history can aid in selection. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Differences in treatment approach between Dutch paediatric dentists and general practitioners, a case control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuin, D.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: This case control study was to assess whether paediatric dentists perform significantly more diagnostic, preventive and curative care in a clinical setting then do general dental practitioners. METHODS: 16 paediatric dentists were approached and a matching control group of 16 general dental pra

  11. NICE guideline on antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis: attitudes to the guideline and implications for dental practice in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-03-28

    To investigate attitudes of Irish dental practitioners, cardiologists and patients with cardiac lesions to the new NICE guideline for antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis and to determine the implications of this guideline for dental practice in Ireland.

  12. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2016-11-25

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered.

  13. Dental fear and satisfaction with dental services in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Jason M; Enkling, Norbert; Wolf, Christian A; Ramseier, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Dental satisfaction is associated with continuity of dental care, compliance with dentist advice, and positive health outcomes. It is expected that people with higher dental fear might have less dental satisfaction because of more negative dental experiences. The objective of this study was to examine satisfaction and reasons for satisfaction with dental practitioners in Switzerland and variations by dental fear. A national sample of 1,129 Swiss residents aged 15-74 (mean = 43.2 years) completed a personal interview at their home with questions assessing dental fear, dental service use, general satisfaction with their dentist, and reasons for satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Overall, 47.9 percent of participants responded that they were satisfied with their dentist and 47.6 percent that they were very satisfied. Satisfaction differed significantly by gender, language spoken, region of residence, and educational attainment. Greater dental fear was significantly associated with greater dissatisfaction with the dentist. The percentage of people who were very satisfied with the dentist ranged from 56.0 percent among people with no fear to 30.5 percent for participants with "quite a lot" of fear but was higher (44.4 percent) for people who stated that they were "very much" afraid of the dentist. The most common reasons attributed for satisfaction with dentists were interpersonal characteristics of the dentist and staff. People with "quite a lot" of fear were found to endorse these sentiments least. Although higher dental fear was associated with more dissatisfaction with the dentist, the level of satisfaction among fearful individuals in Switzerland is still high. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  14. [The transformation of the dental services market and the battle over a monopoly in 19th century dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiana Leite

    2006-01-01

    The article analyzes the process by which dentistry acquired the status of a profession. The setting is the mid-nineteenth-century United States, where the West's first professional dental organizations were founded, and the focus is on some aspects of the development of a dental market and on the professional disputes among practitioners of the dental trade, who wanted a monopoly within this field of knowledge. Certain outside factors played a major role in the emergence of the profession, including changes in patterns of sugar consumption (which spread dental caries disease throughout society) as well as the expansion of the dental service market. The subsequent proliferation of distinct groups of dental practitioners--both qualified and unqualified to practice dentistry--and their competition for a place in the dental market reflect the battle waged to establish jurisdiction in this field and the emergence of dentistry as a 'modern profession'.

  15. Hepatitis-B Vaccination Status Among Dental Surgeons in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    vaccination rates among health workers include lack of opportunity, lack of motivation, lack of information, lack of awareness, non-availability, high .... was comparable to the 78% of Malaysian dental practitioners who believed that their risk of ...

  16. Knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of dental students towards obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.H. Awan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Obesity-related education should be implemented as a formal component of dental student training. Oral health practitioners should also provide their patients with information about how weight loss is beneficial to both general and oral health.

  17. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Dental Professionals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Without knowledge and positive attitude of dental practitioners towards teledentistry, it will not ... and have positive attitude towards teledentistry. .... scale for knowledge and attitude. ..... The author declares that there is no conflict of interest in.

  18. Drug therapy for the pregnant dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendia, Jonathan; Cuddy, Michael A; Moore, Paul A

    2012-09-01

    Providing needed dental treatment, managing oral infection, and controlling pain are essential functions of dentists for helping patients maintain overall health during pregnancy. Medications commonly required for dental care consist of local anesthetics and associated vasoconstrictors, centrally and peripherally acting analgesics, sedative and anxiolytic agents, and antibiotics. Therapeutic drugs routinely used in dental practice are selected because of their known safety and effectiveness. However, for a pregnant patient requiring dental care, the agents routinely prescribed should be reevaluated for potential risks to the mother and/or fetus. The decision to administer a specific drug requires that the benefits outweigh the potential risks of the drug therapy. This article reviews and updates the recommendations for using dental therapeutic agents, thereby enabling general practitioners to select the safest drugs when treating pregnant dental patients.

  19. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  20. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  1. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined......, the result is, that more than 100 trauma scenario exist when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios have a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnose and treatment it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have problems may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  2. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips ... offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants ...

  3. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Dental Assistants PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary What They ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Dental Assistants Do About this section Assistants prepare and ...

  4. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  5. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  6. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  7. Infant oral exam and first dental home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize general practitioners with the components of a dental home including an infant oral exam, and to the First Dental Home initiative, which is unique to the State of Texas. This article encourages the general practitioners to actively participate in providing care for young children under the age of 3. Components of an infant oral examination are described here with emphasis on knee-to-knee or lap exam, caries risk assessment, preventive treatment, age-appropriate anticipatory guidance, and parent education. The First Dental Home is uniquely designed to help pediatric clients 6 months through 35 months of age to establish a dental home. The objectives, goal and components of FDH are discussed in detail.

  8. [Autism-friendly dental care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, L S; van Gemert-Schriks, M C M; Elhorst, J H

    2016-02-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) occurs in approximately 1% of the Dutch population. Among the group of patients with this disorder, there is a substantial diversity regarding skills, intelligence and treatability. However, there are also common characteristics; people with ASD often have difficulty with social interaction, communication, and exhibit typical patterns of behaviour. Therefore, problems may arise in the various areas of development, such as language development and responding to sensory stimuli. Dental practitioners will also be confronted with individuals with ASD. Care can be significantly improved, considering that negative experiences and dental anxiety are widespread at this time.

  9. Consent for Dental Therapy in Severely Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litch, C. Scott; Liggett, Martha L.

    1992-01-01

    Legal standards for informed consent are discussed in the context of dental care for the elderly and severely ill. Variations in state common law and legislation are analyzed, focusing on differences between practitioner-oriented and patient-oriented approaches to informed consent. Implications for educators and practitioners are examined.…

  10. Reflective Practitioner Account

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    干青

    2009-01-01

    This article focus on the reflective account of an English teacher learning and teaching in higher education with the British post-graduate certificate program of the Yunnan Agdculture University.As n practitioner for smny years in English learning and teaching for many years,it reflects in four fields.

  11. Australian Dental Students Views on a Compulsory Internship Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Johnson, Newell W.; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.; Ichim, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission Report suggests introducing an internship period for all newly qualified dental/oral health practitioners in Australia. This study gauged the opinions of undergraduates from three dental schools in Australia. Methods: An online survey collected demographic information on gender and…

  12. The Effect of Recent Trends on Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Chester W.

    1991-01-01

    Six trends affecting dental hygiene practice are discussed: demographic changes; disease pattern changes; higher societal expectations; financing and delivery system changes; technological advancement; and regulatory and legislative trends. It is argued that, though the trends reflect positively on dental hygiene, practitioners need to increase…

  13. Australian Dental Students Views on a Compulsory Internship Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Johnson, Newell W.; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.; Ichim, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission Report suggests introducing an internship period for all newly qualified dental/oral health practitioners in Australia. This study gauged the opinions of undergraduates from three dental schools in Australia. Methods: An online survey collected demographic information on gender and…

  14. [Dental amalgams and mercury polemic in Abidjan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoaka-Boni, M-C; Adou-Assoumou, N M; Sinan, A A; Abouattier-Mansilla, E C

    2007-12-01

    Dental amalgam is metallic biomaterials which has raised a number of controversies in the past few years, because of mercury potential toxicity. Considering the significance of theses controversies, this study was carried out with a view to evaluating the behaviour of Abidjan-based practitioners with respect to dental amalgam. The contemplated objective is to determine the frequency in the use of dental amalgam, to identify the problems encountered using dental amalgam and to propose solutions for fighting mercury contamination. The results show that dental amalgam is used in 81.8% for posterior teeth restoration. The side effects mentioned are metallic taste, gingival tattoo, galvanic corrosion and tooth pain. This is why 21.8 % of practitioners believe that the controversy over dental amalgam has merits while 45.5% hold the contrary opinion because of lack of scientific arguments. However, considering the absence of means to treat amalgam waste, dentist practitioners and authorities have to get involved to fight against mercury contamination.

  15. Child Dental Neglect: A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazani, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Context: Child dental neglect is a terrible tragedy with a high prevalence. Dealing with this issue is important regarding psychological and physical health policies. The current review was conducted to provide health professionals insight into the different aspects of child dental neglect as reported in previous literature. Evidence Acquisition: Our review was prepared through an electronic search using Pub Med, Science Direct, Medline, Google, Cochran Library, Google Scholar and EMBASE databases. Relevant papers published since 2000 until now in English, discussing child dental neglect were retrieved. Both original and review papers were included. Eligible articles were fully read by the author. A data form was used to record useful findings. Results: Distinguishing the direct and indirect signs of dental neglect is the first step for improvement of this matter. The dental team are the main professionals who can improve parental knowledge about the consequences of child dental neglect. Victims suffer from short and long-term adverse outcomes. Collaborative attempts need to be made by different health professionals to deal with this problem. Conclusions: Child dental neglect has many long-term impacts. The main professionals who are responsible for identification, intervention and treatment of child dental neglect are dental practitioners. However, other professionals cannot ignore this task. Finally, child dental neglect, despite its derivative outcomes, may be a presentation of a broader maltreatment. PMID:25741483

  16. Dental responsibility loadings and the relative value of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, D N; Ju, X; Brennan, D S

    2017-09-01

    To estimate responsibility loadings for a comprehensive list of dental services, providing a standardized unit of clinical work effort. Dentists (n = 2500) randomly sampled from the Australian Dental Association membership (2011) were randomly assigned to one of 25 panels. Panels were surveyed by questionnaires eliciting responsibility loadings for eight common dental services (core items) and approximately 12 other items unique to that questionnaire. In total, loadings were elicited for 299 items listed in the Australian Dental Schedule 9th Edition. Data were weighted to reflect the age and sex distribution of the workforce. To assess reliability, regression models assessed differences in core item loadings by panel assignment. Estimated loadings were described by reporting the median and mean. Response rate was 37%. Panel composition did not vary by practitioner characteristics. Core item loadings did not vary by panel assignment. Oral surgery and endodontic service areas had the highest proportion (91%) of services with median loadings ≥1.5, followed by prosthodontics (78%), periodontics (76%), orthodontics (63%), restorative (62%) and diagnostic services (31%). Preventive services had median loadings ≤1.25. Dental responsibility loadings estimated by this study can be applied in the development of relative value scales. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  17. A practitioner survey of opinions toward regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelman, Ingrid; Murray, Peter E; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Kuttler, Sergio; Namerow, Kenneth N

    2009-09-01

    The success of regenerative endodontic procedures requires practitioner acceptance, but little or no evidence is available. The purpose of this survey was to collect the opinions of attendee's of the 2008 Endodontic Board of Diplomates 2008 Summer Conference on the issue of regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). After Nova Southeastern University institutional review board approval, 100 copies of a survey were circulated, and 56 completed surveys were returned anonymously. The survey found that 96% of participants thought that more regenerative therapies should be incorporated into treatments. Although only 14% of participants had used umbilical cord or stem cell banking for themselves or a relative, 63% thought that stem cell banking would be useful to regenerate dental tissues. Most (89%) of the participants would be willing to save teeth and dental tissues for stem cell banking. These results suggest that endodontic practitioners are supportive and optimistic about the future use of REPs.

  18. The management of dental patients taking new generation oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alun; Gibson, John; Crighton, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin. While national guidelines for treatment of dental patients taking warfarin as an anticoagulant are well-established, no such information is available for these novel therapeutic agents. At present, the local guidance available is contradictory between different health boards/health planning units, and liaison with the medical practitioner managing the individual patient's anticoagulation is imperative if any invasive procedure is proposed. This paper examines the available evidence regarding these drugs and sets out proposals for clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care.

  19. Today's students, tomorrow's practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heape, Chris

    2015-01-01

    There is an inherent dilemma that some research indicates ways and means of doing design practice, in particular how practitioners bring what this paper identifies as informal resources into play, that are seldom reflected in how and what design students are taught or learn. The question is posed...... as to whether today’s design students are in fact equipped to be tomorrow’s practitioners. This paper introduces a range of literature and empirical observations that describe a number of different appreciations of process and practice, from both design and non-design perspectives. This in order to draw up...... an alternative understanding of collaborative design practice as participatory inquiry. The paper suggests that participatory inquiry, as it more fully takes into account the learning driven and relational nature of design practice, could help inform alternative design educational strategies....

  20. Specialization and competition in dental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, Jostein; Skau, Irene

    2009-04-01

    The number of specialists within dental health services has increased over the last few years. This raises the issue of how the services should be organized and funded. We describe the effect of one way of organizing the services, which is by relying on competition. In Norway, some oral specialists face real competition with general dental practitioners for the same patients (prosthetists, periodontists and endodontists), while other specialists do not (orthodontists and oral surgeons). The latter specialists have skills that give them exclusive possibilities to practice their profession. We find that competition can be effective for the specialists who experience real competition with general dental practitioners for patients. In situations where real competition does not exist, specialists can obtain market power and raise their fees. Our results are based on an analysis of a representative set of data from general dental practitioners and specialists in Norway. The specialities in which practitioners can exercise market power raise challenges related to the type of public policy that can reduce this market power in an appropriate way, and without involving too large costs for the authorities.

  1. Hygiene in dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, L; Mosca, G; Giuliani, A R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hygienic quality of dental practices on the basis of the self-awareness expressed by dentists respondents to a self-reported questionnaire about the health/hygiene characteristics of practice, the knowledge of biologic/toxicological risks and the preventive procedures and devices improvements in professional practice. Of the 127 practitioners contacted, 108 (85%) agreed to participate. The knowledge of infective risks was self- evaluated as good only in 24%: even if vaccinated, most of the dentists (57%) considered HBV the main infective agent to fear, not giving the same importance to the air-borne transmission of diseases. The presence of a single dental unit per surgery (90%) was considered an index of good health/hygiene education but, in spite of the use of disposable gloves, caps and masks, the dentists do not always change their coats or wash their hands between patients yet. The management of dental instruments can be considered efficient as long as they are sterilised in an autoclave (97%) and undergo periodic sterilization efficacy tests (76%). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION The results indicate a good structural and organisational status, but there is the need for continuous education concerning the prevention of cross-infections.

  2. The Gemini Deep Planet Survey - GDPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Marois, C; Nadeau, D; Oppenheimer, B R; Roche, P F; Rigaut, F; Graham, J R; Jayawardhana, R; Johnstone, D; Kalas, P G; Macintosh, B; Racine, R

    2007-06-01

    We present the results of the Gemini Deep Planet Survey, a near-infrared adaptive optics search for giant planets and brown dwarfs around nearby young stars. The observations were obtained with the Altair adaptive optics system at the Gemini North telescope and angular differential imaging was used to suppress the speckle noise of the central star. Detection limits for the 85 stars observed are presented, along with a list of all faint point sources detected around them. Typically, the observations are sensitive to angular separations beyond 0.5-inch with 5{sigma} contrast sensitivities in magnitude difference at 1.6 {micro}m of 9.6 at 0.5-inch, 12.9 at 1-inch, 15 at 2-inch, and 16.6 at 5-inch. For the typical target of the survey, a 100 Myr old K0 star located 22 pc from the Sun, the observations are sensitive enough to detect planets more massive than 2 M{sub Jup} with a projected separation in the range 40-200 AU. Depending on the age, spectral type, and distance of the target stars, the minimum mass that could be detected with our observations can be {approx}1 M{sub Jup}. Second epoch observations of 48 stars with candidates (out of 54) have confirmed that all candidates are unrelated background stars. A detailed statistical analysis of the survey results, which provide upper limits on the fractions of stars with giant planet or low mass brown dwarf companions, is presented. Assuming a planet mass distribution dn/dm {proportional_to} m{sup -1.2} and a semi-major axis distribution dn/da {proportional_to} a{sup -1}, the upper limits on the fraction of stars with at least one planet of mass 0.5-13 M{sub Jup} are 0.29 for the range 10-25 AU, 0.13 for 25-50 AU, and 0.09 for 50-250 AU, with a 95% confidence level; this result is weakly dependent on the semi-major axis distribution power-law index. Without making any assumption on the mass and semi-major axis distributions, the fraction of stars with at least one brown dwarf companion having a semi-major axis in the range 25-200 AU is 0.018{sub -0.014}{sup +0.078}, with a 95% confidence level. The observations made as part of this survey have resolved the stars HD 14802, HD 135363, HD 160934, HD 166181, and HD 213845 into close binaries for the first time.

  3. Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source (DOSS): a collection for dental research and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swogger, Susan E; Samsky, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source from EBSCO Information Services provides indexing and full-text access to an extensive selection of dental journal literature, as well some full-text dental monographs. As stated by EBSCO, titles are chosen from those commonly held in dental school libraries. The database aims to support practitioners, researchers, and advanced dental education. This column includes sample searches from Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source as well as a discussion of its special content and features.

  4. Dental Hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  5. The “Wal-Martization” of Dental Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Willis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The economic environment of dental practices is undergoing rapid change. Franchise and network practices are increasing in number because of many underlying economic factors, including supply and demand for services, banking requirements, student debt, proliferation of managed care plans, and healthcare reform. These franchise practices compete very effectively with traditional solo dental practices, leading to the “Wal-Martization“ of dental practice, in which dental services are bought and sold more as a commodity than as an individually unique service. These chains compete with private practices on efficiency, convenience, insurance plan participation, and aggressive marketing. There are advantages and disadvantages for both the patients and dental practitioners for participating in this practice mode. This paper explores the reasons that these entities are growing, and offers suggestions for independent solo practitioners to compete with them.

  6. Ethnic classification in primary dental care and dental health services research: time to pause for thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, D J; Malik, S; Murphy, N; Patel, V; Singh, S; Syed, B; Vora, N

    2001-04-01

    'Ethnicity' is an important concept in dental health services research and in enabling general dental practitioners to gain insight into their patients values and expectations. Since more health services research is being undertaken in primary dental care settings it is becoming an important issue for dental professionals and researchers in primary care to be aware of. Ethnicity is thought to be related to dental health inequalities and access and is often used as a stratifying variable in many dental studies. The meaning and use of the term however differs among researchers and among the public. It is clear that researchers and professionals need to pause for thought when considering what this often bandied about term actually means and the impact of different definitions. This is illustrated using examples from the authors' own research and published papers in the medical and dental literature. There is also much debate about whether ethnicity--however defined--is an important predictor of differences in dental health in itself or is merely a marker for other factors such as social deprivation or the impact of 'place' on dental health. While the jury on this debate is out we suggest guidelines on the reporting of ethnicity should be outlined in the dental literature--perhaps updating those published in 1996 in the British Medical Journal.

  7. [Conditions of dental extractions in areas health centers of Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, D; Tine, S D; Cisse, D; Lo, C M; Mbodj, El B; Diouf, M; Diallo, P D

    2009-12-01

    Dental extraction is a surgical act frequently carried out in the African dental structures. It requires the rigorous respect of the conditions of asepsis and antisepsis. Equipments and anaesthetic and avulsional products must be also sufficient. Our study undertaken among 46 dental services in areas health centers of Senegal aimed to determine the conditions under which dental extractions are carried out. The principle results of our study showed that 93% of dental practitioners wore sterilized gloves. 49% of the dentist's care activity consisted in dental extractions. 50% of the practitioners re-use anaesthetic needles, 2% re-use anaesthetic carpules. We noticed that the dental structures were facing a deficit of materials and products of extraction. Face to the outbreak of serious illnesses as infections of HIV and Hepatitis B, the practitioner and his team must be sensitized and trained to struggle against the transmissible infections and to carry out the dental extraction only if the conditions of asepsis and antisepsis are joined together. A pleading towards the medical authorities must be done to support the services in equipments and periodic renewals of the materials and products of extractions.

  8. Transforming Dental Technology Education: Skills, Knowledge, and Curricular Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobich, Anita M; Mitchell, Betty L

    2017-09-01

    Dental technology is one of the core allied dental health professions supporting the practice of dentistry. By definition, it is the art, science, and technologies that enable the design and fabrication of dental prostheses and/or corrective devices to restore natural teeth and supporting structures to fulfill a patient's physiological and esthetic needs. Dental technology educational programs are faced with serious challenges, including rapid changes in technology, inadequate funding for educational programs, and the need to develop curricula that reflect current industry needs. Better communications between dental technologists and practitioners are needed to gain greater recognition of the contribution that technologists make to patient health. Amid these challenges, the technology workforce is dedicated to providing patients with the best possible restorative dental prostheses. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  9. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  10. Contemporary medico-legal dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Brad

    2012-03-01

    The advent of extraoral radiology in general dental practice has become more widespread since 2000, particularly with digital systems. With this comes a range of medico-legal risks for dentists not adverted to previously. These risks include a higher than expected radiation dose for some surveys, and the risk of a 'loss of a chance' for a patient whereby the images may disclose pathology not diagnosed by general dental practitioners using OPG and CBVT radiology. Practitioners need to apply relevant legal principles in deciding which surveys to order and record, and also need to explain to patients the dosages of the radiation that they will likely receive. Practitioners also need to assess whether the resultant survey ought to be interpreted by a radiologist to diagnose any wider pathology with which a general practitioner may not be familiar. Extra caution needs to be used in ordering high dose radiology in paediatric patients. Dentists should not assume patients fully understand the nature of CBVT and MCT, and its risks and benefits. Consideration ought to be given to the volume of CBVT ordered dependent on factors such as patient age, symptoms, history and procedural intent. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  11. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  12. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis – an update for general dental practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Savia; Bansal, Rupinder k.; Galloway, James

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder which significantly impacts patients’ lives and can lead to permanent disability. Inflammation in RA not only affects joints; but can affect organs including the heart and lungs. Early diagnosis, initiation of intensive drug therapy, and a multidisciplinary care approach have vastly improved the long-term prognosis for those living with the condition. However, RA patients often present with co-morbidities which add...

  14. Professional satisfaction among dental practitioners in Ghaziabad city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venisha Pandita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Professional satisfaction is an important determinant of health worker motivation, retention and performance and are critical improving the functioning of health systems in low-and middle income countries. Objective: To measure professional satisfaction among registered clinical dentists in Ghaziabad city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 107 dentists practicing in clinics. A questionnaire measuring dimensions of professional satisfaction was distributed manually to the participating dentists. All items were written in 5 point Likert format with a score ranging from 5 (strongly satisfied to 1 (strongly dissatisfied. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 19.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA and Student′s t-test measuring the difference of means between the subgroups for each dimension was performed. Results: Analysis showed significant differences (P < 0.05 in levels of satisfaction for various dimensions of professional satisfaction by gender, educational qualification and work status type. There were differences in professional satisfaction between male and female dentists-related to the personal time dimension. Results also showed that postgraduates were more satisfied than graduates. It was reported that full time dentists expressed dissatisfaction in the time spent with their family and leading to troubles in their personal relationships. Conclusion: Overall, dentists have a high level of professional satisfaction and the level of satisfaction is influenced by various socio demographic and psycho-behavioral factors.

  15. Pattern of Prescription of Antibiotics among Dental Practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    consistency in the antibiotic prescription pattern among dentists in Jeddah and overall low adherence to the ..... manuscript editing and review. Appendix I: Clinical case ... adhesion deficiency, antibiotic therapy is indicated. a*Adapted from ...

  16. Ramsay hunt syndrome: A diagnostic challenge for general dental practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramsay hunt syndrome is not just a syndrome but it's rather an infectious disease caused by reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus in geniculate ganglion. This was first explained by J. Ramsay Hunt as a triad of complications like otalgia, mucosal and cutaneous rashes with or without trigeminal facial palsy. The facial palsy can occur with characteristic vesicles along the path of nerve. We present a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome in a 48-year-old male. The unilateral pattern of facial involvement and presence of vesicles assisted us for early diagnosis, distinguishing the syndrome with diseases mimicking other severe neurological illnesses and prompt treatment.

  17. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Travis M; Xu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a result of these changes, it is possible that dental providers will abandon the practice of personally administering large amounts of

  18. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson TM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Nelson, Zheng Xu Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a

  19. Managing Intraoral Lesions in Oral Cancer Patients in a General Dental Practice: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Reuben Han-Kyu; Yang, Paul; Sung, Eric C

    2016-02-01

    As medical technology advances in the area of cancer therapeutics, dental practitioners will encounter patients with active cancer or a history of cancer. Typically, these patients may have had or are undergoing therapies such as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or a combination of therapies. These patients may present with multiple side effects that dental practitioners can manage or prevent. We discuss some of these concerns and provide management strategies.

  20. Facial and Dental Injuries Facial and Dental Injuries in Karate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovic-Stesevic, Vesna; Verna, Carlalberta; Krastl, Gabriel; Kuhl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Karate is a martial art that carries a high trauma risk. Trauma-related Swiss and European karate data are currently unavailable. This survey seeks to increase knowledge of the incidence of traumatic facial and dental injuries, their emergency management, awareness of tooth rescue boxes, the use of mouthguards and their modifications. Interviews were conducted with 420 karate fighters from 43 European countries using a standardized questionnaire. All the participants were semi-professionals. The data were evaluated with respect to gender, kumite level (where a karate practitioner trains against an adversary), and country. Of the 420 fighters interviewed, 213 had experienced facial trauma and 44 had already had dental trauma. A total of 192 athletes had hurt their opponent by inflicting a facial or dental injury, and 290 knew about the possibility of tooth replantation following an avulsion. Only 50 interviewees knew about tooth rescue boxes. Nearly all the individuals interviewed wore a mouthguard (n = 412), and 178 of them had made their own modifications to the guard. The results of the present survey suggest that more information and education in wearing protective gear are required to reduce the incidence of dental injuries in karate.

  1. Management of infection control in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A; Creanor, S; Hurrell, D; Bagg, J; McCowan, M

    2009-04-01

    This was an observational study in which the management policies and procedures associated with infection control and instrument decontamination were examined in 179 dental surgeries by a team of trained surveyors. Information relating to the management of a wide range of infection control procedures, in particular the decontamination of dental instruments, was collected by interview and by examination of practice documentation. This study found that although the majority of surgeries (70%) claimed to have a management policy on infection control, only 50% of these were documented. For infection control policies, 79% of surgeries had access to the British Dental Association Advice Sheet A12. Infection control policies were claimed to be present in 89% of surgeries, of which 62% were documented. Seventy-seven per cent of staff claimed to have received specific infection control training, but for instrument decontamination this was provided mainly by demonstration (97%) or observed practice (88%). Many dental nurses (74%) and dental practitioners (57%) did not recognise the symbol used to designate a single-use device. Audit of infection control or decontamination activities was undertaken in 11% of surgeries. The majority of surgeries have policies and procedures for the management of infection control in dental practice, but in many instances these are not documented. The training of staff in infection control and its documentation is poorly managed and consideration should be given to development of quality management systems for use in dental practice.

  2. Prevention and dental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widström, Eeva

    2004-01-01

    There has been, and still is a firm belief that regular use of dental services is beneficial for all. Thus governments in most European countries have shown some interest in training oral health care professionals, distributing the dental workforce and cost sharing. Constantly evolving treatment options and the introduction of new methods make dental clinicians feel uncertain as to which treatments are most useful, who would benefit from them, and which treatments will achieve cost-effective health gain. Although there is a considerable quantity of scientific literature showing that most available preventive measures are effective, and the number of sensible best-practice guidelines in prevention is growing, there are few studies on cost-efficiency of different methods and, secondly, the prevention and treatment guidelines are poorly known among general practitioners. In the eyes of the public, it is obvious that preventive methods practised by patients at home have been eclipsed by clinical procedures performed in dental clinics. Reliance on an increasingly individualistic approach to health care leads to the medicalisation of issues that are not originally health or medical problems. It is important to move general oral disease prevention back to the people who must integrate this in their daily routines. Prevention primarily based on healthy lifestyles, highlighted in the new public health strategy of the European Union (EU), is the key to future health policy.

  3. [Asepsis and antisepsis in dental offices in Dakar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C M M; Cisse, D; Faye, D; Kane, A W

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate hygiene in dental offices in Dakar, the authors questioned 64 public, private and semi-private dentists. From 62 practitioners who completed their questionnaire, it appeared that the dry-heated sterilizer (poupinel) was 5 times more used than the autoclave; The almost practitioners sayed respecting the sterilisation process and 66% of them said wearing gloves, masks and glasses during interventions. In spite of the hope these results give, this study is limited because it doesn't take into account many aspects of asepsis and antisepsis in dental office which require a rigorous application next to a personal who needs to be better trained.

  4. Predictors of Job Satisfaction in Dental Professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhic, Edin; Plancak, Darije; Lajnert, Vlatka; Muhic, Asja

    2016-09-01

    Working in a healthy work environment is the ultimate goal of every employee. Dentistry is a stressful career, and the reasons for dissatisfaction are numerous. The aim of this study was to determine the factors of work satisfaction in dental professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation. A total of 134 dental professionals selected randomly from the Registry of Dental Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation were included in the study. All of them filled out the Demographic Questionnaire and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). An increase in the influence of work on the quality of life as well as an increase in its frequency results in leaving the job and significantly reducing the overall job satisfaction. General dental practitioners are significantly more satisfied as compared with specialists. Significant predictors of the job satisfaction are employment status, type of the practice, and availability of dental assistants. General dental practitioners with a dental assistant employed at a private practice are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. Employment status, practice type and availability of dental assistants are significant predictors of job satisfaction. General dental practitioners working in a private practice with a dental assistant are most likely to be satisfied.

  5. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    , exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental......Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  6. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  7. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  8. Management of pulps exposed during carious tissue removal in adults: a multi-national questionnaire-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangvaltaite, Lina; Schwendicke, Falk; Holmgren, Christopher; Finet, Marion; Maltz, Marisa; Elhennawy, Karim; Kerosuo, Eero; Doméjean, Sophie

    2016-12-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the management of pulps exposed during carious tissue removal by French, German, and Norwegian general dental practitioners (GDPs). We further aimed to assess possible dentist- and patient-related factors associated with these management decisions. A structured questionnaire was send via mail to a simple random sample of dentists. The analyzed sample consisted of 661 (33%) French GDPs, 622 (25%) German GDPs, and 199 (34%) Norwegian GDPs. No single management method gained uniform consensus in any of the three countries. However, the most preferred management option in all three countries was direct pulp capping (DPC) (68-93%) mainly performed with calcium hydroxide paste/slurry (CH). Alternatively, root canal treatment was performed (7-22%). The reasons that guided GDPs were the same in all three countries; "good results" and "ease of use, familiar with the technique." Having read scientific articles about cariology/operative dentistry in the last 5 years increased the odds for the preference of DPC instead of root canal treatment (OR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.2). Among GDPs in France, Germany, and Norway, there was no uniform management option for pulp exposures during carious tissue removal. DPC with CH was the most preferred management, even though the current evidence suggests DPC with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to be more successful. The outcome expectations and the assumed ease of use were reasons for GDPs' choice. Moreover, knowledge on current evidence towards such management options influenced treatment decisions. GDPs are encouraged to adopt management options based on current scientific evidence.

  9. Student Perceptions of Effective Clinical Teaching Characteristics in Dental Hygiene Programs in Northeastern States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearor, Dawn E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical education component provided to dental hygiene students is an essential part of their development as competent practitioners. Instructor approaches to clinical teaching are therefore critical in providing quality clinical learning experiences. This study sought to identify dental hygiene students' perceptions of "best" and…

  10. Student Perceptions of Effective Clinical Teaching Characteristics in Dental Hygiene Programs in Northeastern States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearor, Dawn E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical education component provided to dental hygiene students is an essential part of their development as competent practitioners. Instructor approaches to clinical teaching are therefore critical in providing quality clinical learning experiences. This study sought to identify dental hygiene students' perceptions of "best" and…

  11. Restrictive Behaviour Management Procedures with People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Require Dental Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. Materials and Methods: A review…

  12. Restrictive Behaviour Management Procedures with People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Require Dental Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. Materials and Methods: A review…

  13. [Death from generalized sepsis of dental origin. Contribution to clinical casuistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo Flores, P; Limón Mejía, A L; Bustillos Lucas, J; Silva Sánchez, V

    1991-01-01

    The presentation of the Death by generalized sepsis of dental origen has the purpose to aid the dental practitioner in the fields of diagnosis, etiologi, treatment and evolution in other cases with similar situations where a better diagnosis can give a better chance for survival in similar circumstances.

  14. The ageing practitioner: ANZCA's recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A B

    2016-04-01

    The aim is to present recommendations of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) with respect to practice implications for ageing specialists, together with brief discussion of effects of ageing on professional medical capabilities and recommendations on preparing to retire from medical practice. Practitioners should recognise that planning for retirement is part of good management of a medical career, and that the ageing process will inevitably compromise their ability to treat patients safely unless they retire at the appropriate time. Planning should include adequate financial preparation, and cultivation of interests and friends outside medicine. Practitioners should also realise that insight is likely to be compromised, so that they should seek colleagues who are trusted to advise them if/when they begin to lose competency. Lastly all practitioners should ensure that they consult a General Practitioner frequently, and that they have arranged all the proper legal instructions such as a Will, a Power of Attorney and an Advanced Health Directive.The ANZCA recommendations concerning ageing specialists have wide application to all medical specialties, not just for anaesthetists, and therefore all Medical Colleges should generate their own specific recommendations for ageing practitioners and the general effects of fatigue particularly for aged practitioners. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  15. [Outcomes of Infection Control Team Inspections at the Dental Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Okihata, Rie; Tsuruoka, Hiromi; Yamada, Yuichi; Adachi, Toshiko; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    In the Dental Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, an infection control team (ICT) has been formed to inspect each diagnosis department of clinics and wards in order to identify problems regarding nosocomial infection control. In this study, we analyzed the inspection reports and highlighted the following serious problems: 1) inadequate hygienic hand-washing for out- and in-patient treatment, 2) incomplete wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) by dental health care workers, 3) necessity of environmental improvement in the clinics, and 4) cross-infection risk induced by. the continuous use of treatment devices without appropriate disinfection. The ICT provided feedback to the inspected departments, suggesting solutions to problems regarding nosocomial infection control. In order to enhance infection control in our hospital, dental healthcare practitioners must make further efforts on nosocomial infection control and prevention, and act according to their position by continuously educating students and enlightening hospital staff about the importance of infection control.

  16. Negotiation: a necessary art for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, William G; Renshaw, John; Batchelor, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This brief paper explains why the art of negotiation has become far more important for general dental practitioners. It explains that negotiations take place with patients, with practice staff, and with funding agencies such as Primary Care Trusts. It sets out the principles for successful negotiation and gives two examples of how they can be applied. It concludes that negotiation is a skill that can be learned and that it will be a key skill as the profession faces future challenges.

  17. Can midlevel dental providers be a benefit to the American public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Tobias E; Galka, Audrey L; Lacy, Ernestine S; Pellegrini, August D; Sweier, Domenica G; Romito, Laura M

    2013-05-01

    The use of midlevel dental providers (MLDPs) is being debated as a means of reducing oral health disparities and increasing access to care among underserved populations. Midlevel dental providers include the advanced dental hygiene practitioner, community dental health coordinator, dental health aide therapist, and dental therapist. While midlevel providers are new to the U.S. dental profession, medicine has utilized these positions for years. Medical literature has shown mixed results as to whether midlevel providers improve access to care and increased practice efficiency, however, it has demonstrated clearly that the quality of care outcomes of these providers have been comparable to those of physicians. Studies of MLDPs suggest potential practice and public health benefits. With appropriate training, licensure, supervision, and deployment to geographical areas of significant need, we believe MLDPs could increase access to care to underserved populations and help in the prevention of deaths attributable to untreated dental disease.

  18. Can they really be opposite? A new look at four critical aspects of anterior dental morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joseph R

    2008-09-01

    Human dental anatomy has not changed significantly in hundreds of years. Dental students and students of dental laboratory technology learn human dental anatomy as fundamental to their didactic work. Yet, so often we see dental restorations that do not follow the accepted basic design criteria of natural teeth. A possible conclusion is that the information was correctly presented as a basic science, but not completely carried over into clinical practice. When visually essential aspects of dental anatomy and composition are not accurately incorporated into esthetic restorations, patients are not completely served, and practitioners may be frustrated as well. This article reviews four essential aspects of anterior dental morphology--anterior tooth width/length proportions, bilateral symmetry, incisal edges, and incisal embrasures--that often are not accurately incorporated into dental restorations, and positions them in an easy to remember format: opposites.

  19. Public perceptions of dental implants: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward C M

    2015-07-01

    Dental implants have become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information on dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners at various levels/disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate the public's information acquisition and their perceptions of dental implants and the effects of these on their care-seeking and decision making. A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join six focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64 years of age, had never been engaged in dentally related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, and had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered into any dental consultation regarding dental implants. All of the focus groups discussions were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following a grounded theory approach. Participants acquired information on dental implants through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected dental implants to restore the patients' appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implants as a panacea for all cases of missing teeth, overestimated their functions and longevity, and underestimated the expertise needed to carry out the clinical procedures. They were deterred from seeking dental implant treatment by the high price, invasive procedures, risks, and complications. Members of the public were exposed to information of varying quality and had some unrealistic expectations regarding dental implants. Such perceptions may shape their care-seeking behaviours and decision-making processes in one way or another. The views and experiences gathered in this qualitative study could assist clinicians to better understand the public's perspectives, facilitate constructive patient-dentist communication, and contribute

  20. Dental Training Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  1. A Call for School Counseling Practitioner Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffenberger, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the repeated call to increase the number of practitioner research manuscripts being published in counseling publications, practitioner research accounts for less than five percent of all manuscripts published. This article describes the challenges faced by practitioners seeking to publish their research, defines practitioner research, and…

  2. 1.4 Research and the dental student

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DePaola, Dominick; Howell, Howard; Baker, Charles G

    2002-01-01

    in new and emerging technologies in their application to patient care. It is the challenge of this section to try to ascertain the best method or methods by which dental education promotes research to the dental student and what research represents in terms of critical thinking and evidence....... It appears that there is an opportunity through this global congress to identify the best practices in the various global curricula that could change this paradigm in dental education and lead us toward the education of a more scientifically orientated practitioner-one who can take advantage of innovations...

  3. Implications of apixaban for dental treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin and acenocoumarol. In Europe, the European Medicines Agency has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. Their advantages include: predictable pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and limited food, rapid onset of action and short half-life. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through November 2015 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Library using the keywords “apixaban”, “rivaroxaban”, “dabigatran”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “dental treatment” and “dental implications”. We included studies published in English and Spanish over the last 10 years. Results Apixaban has been recently introduced in the daily medical practices for the control of thromboembolism. The number of patients taking apixaban is increasing. Management of patients on anticoagulation therapy requires that dentists can accurately assess the patient prior to dental treatments. It is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action and management guidelines for patients taking new oral anticoagulants. Conclusions The dentist should consider carefully the management of patients on apixaban. This paper sets out a clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients. There is a need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for dental patients requiring apixaban. Key words:Apixaban, new oral anticoagulants, dental treatment. PMID:27957279

  4. A randomized double-blinded trial of chloral hydrate with or without hydroxyzine versus placebo for pediatric dental sedation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luciane Ribeiro de Rezende Sucasas da Costa; Paulo Sérgio Sucasas da Costa; Alessandra Rodrigues de Almeida Lima

    2007-01-01

    Chloral hydrate and hydroxyzine are a drug combination frequently used by practitioners to sedate pediatric dental patients, but their effectiveness has not been compared to a negative control group in humans...

  5. PRACTITIONERS OF DESIGN FOR QUALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Antony John

    1999-01-01

    Building in high quality continues to be the driving force of new product development activity in industry. Yet Design for Quality does not appear to attract the attention or interest of many design researchers. If research attention is not paid to Design for Quality, how can we expect to educate...... and train future design practitioners to master this critical dimension of product development?The purpose of this paper is to consider the current status of Design for Quality, explore the skills designers require to be effective practitioners of Design for Quality, and to identify some of the challenges...... the design research community needs to face.The paper argues that Design for Quality provides a robust framework, which can be used by the industrial, research, and educational communities as a platform for improving the skills and capability of the practitioners of Design for Quality.If engineering...

  6. Respiratory functions in Kalaripayattu practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, C Kesava; Nair, R Harikumaran; Shashidhar, S

    2004-04-01

    Kalaripayattu, an ancient traditional martial art form of Kerala, is considered as the basis for all martial arts viz. Karate, Kungfu, etc. physiological studies are more concentrated on Karate, Kungfu and other martial arts due to their global acceptance. Considering the limited knowledge available regarding the physiological profiles of Kalaripayattu practitioners, the present study was taken up for filling the lacunae in the field. Lung function tests were carried out in ten Kalari practitioners. Residual volume was measured by indirect method. Higher lung volumes and flow rates were achieved in Kalari practitioners compared to age and height-matched controls. Better mechanical factors and lower airway resistance influenced during Kalari practice might have benefited in improving hung volumes and flow rates.

  7. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes and Oral Health > Diabetes: Dental Tips Diabetes: Dental Tips Main Content Diabetes can cause serious problems ... FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, ...

  8. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they're most treatable. When to have a dental exam Various factors might determine how frequently your ... wisdom teeth (third molars) at the appropriate age. Dental X-ray A dental X-ray (radiograph) allows ...

  9. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share with Women Dental Care in Pregnancy Why is dental care in pregnancy important? During pregnancy, you are more likely to have problems ... There are 2 major reasons women can have dental problems during pregnancy: Pregnancy gingivitis— During pregnancy, changes ...

  10. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  11. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  12. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  14. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  15. Toxicology for the Equine Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dissi, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    A wide variety of toxins cause diseases in the horse and are investigated routinely by veterinarians and veterinary pathologists to identify the cause of illness and death. A complete investigation involves performing a thorough necropsy and requires macroscopic and microscopic examination of lesions and a variety of laboratory testing to obtain an accurate diagnosis. The identification of gross lesions by equine practitioners is often the first step in formulating a diagnostic plan. This article provides a description of selected common toxins producing detectable gross lesions in horses in North America. The article is useful to equine practitioners and veterinary pathologists investigating a toxicology-related death.

  16. Biofilm models for the practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Wanner, O.

    2000-01-01

    Even though mathematical biofilm models are extensively used in biofilm research, there has been very little application of these models in the engineering practice so far. However, practitioners would be interested in models that can be used as tools to control plant operation under dynamic...... conditions or to help them handle complex interactions between particle removal, carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and biological phosphorus removal. But even though there is a whole range of biofilm models available, it is difficult for the practitioner to select the appropriate modeling...

  17. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  18. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  19. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Student Resources National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Transforming Dental Hygiene Education Advocacy Practice Issues Direct Access Scope ...

  20. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  1. Clinical reporting: the practitioner's responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauser, W W

    1980-08-01

    Information contained in a clinical report represents new directions in the practice of physical therapy and provides the stimulus for reseach and growth in the profession. The responsibility of the practitioner to share information on problems and solutions generated in the practice of physical therapy is of paramount importance. A clinical report is one method by which this information can be disseminated.

  2. CHALLENGES FACING THE ESP PRACTITIONER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMION MINODORA OTILIA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ESP teacher has to face certain challenges in his profession: One of the biggest challenges of the ESP teacher is the fact that he/she lacks the necessary knowledge of the subject to teach Business English, for instance, some researchers believing that such courses should be taught by subject teachers. The task of teaching ESP by ESL teachers is not an easy one. Dudley- Evans and St. John pointed out its complexity, identifying five key roles of the ESP practitioner: teacher, course designer and materials provider, collaborator, researcher and evaluator and this is probably the biggest challenge of the profession. The ESP practitioner has also to be aware of the fact that using a foreign language for workplace or study purposes requires not only linguistic proficiency and knowledge but also knowledge of work –related and disciplinary concepts.Last but not least, another challenge for the ESP practitioner is the use of technology in class, a valuable tool for helping with traditional forms of teaching and for creating new forms of communicating.Thus, the ESP practitioner has many things in common with the teacher of general English: he has to be familiar with linguistic development and teaching theories ,he has to be aware of contemporary ideas related to his position and role and he has to become familiar with the new technologies which can be used to improve his methodology.However,his role is more complex than that of a General English teacher.

  3. Biofilm models for the practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Wanner, O.

    2000-01-01

    conditions or to help them handle complex interactions between particle removal, carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and biological phosphorus removal. But even though there is a whole range of biofilm models available, it is difficult for the practitioner to select the appropriate modeling...

  4. The patient as skilled practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilbourn, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare is leaking away from the hospital and clinic into everyday life, disrupting work and play. It is no longer confined to a strictly medical sphere. Overwhelmed medical practitioners care for the expanding ranks of chronic dependents. One solution has to been to expand healthcare activities...

  5. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as family practice or pediatrics. Pediatric and family practice NPs can provide regular health care for kids. Nurse practitioners (also referred to as advanced practice nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ...

  6. Job satisfaction among recreation practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Parks; Andrew Holdnak

    2002-01-01

    Job satisfaction among recreation professionals can be affected by many working conditions. This study has investigated the impact fourteen variables had on the job satisfaction of recreation practitioners. The sample consisted of 106 responses from members of the Resort and Commercial Recreation Association (RCRA). The results of the regression analysis for job...

  7. Burnout contagion among general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.B.; Schaufeli, W.B.; Sixma, H.J.; Bosveld, W.

    2001-01-01

    This study used a representative sample of 507 general practitioners (GPs) to test the hypothesis that burnout is contagious. Following a two-dimensional conceptualization of burnout, it is assumed that burnout is comprised of emotional exhaustion and negative attitudes (i.e., depersonalization and

  8. American Dental Association's Resources to Support Evidence-Based Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamudhan, K; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie

    2009-09-01

    Time and access have often been cited as barriers to implementing Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD). This paper describes a new web-based resource launched by the American Dental Association to enable practitioners to incorporate evidence into treatment planning. The website offers a database of systematic reviews, critical summaries of systematic reviews, evidence-based clinical recommendations and links to external resources to enable practitioners to access evidence at the point of care. In addition the site offers an online space for clinicians to suggest clinical scenarios where evidence is lacking. This could potentially be a source of topics to drive future research. With the explosion in the use of information technology within a dental office, this web-site will serve as the one-stop resource for credible scientific information for practitioners.

  9. [The inducement of demand in dental medicine in Belgium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaluwe, Frida; Renckens, An

    2006-01-01

    Many factors are important for the existence of supplier-induced demand (SID). Not just the individual practitioner is responsible; his or her behaviour might be influenced by the specific organisation of the market for health care/dental care. The article investigates the characteristics of the Belgian market for dental care and analyses the way in which they might influence the occurrence of SID and/or overconsumption. Attention goes to the payment system of dentists in Belgium, the health insurance system, dentist density and the regulation of the sector. Also mentioned are the recall system and other (governmental) initiatives that may influence patients' and practitioners' behaviour. Some factors--not yet systematically investigated--may be relevant as well: personal characteristics of the dentist (gender in particular) and the way companies direct practitioners' and patients' behaviour.

  10. Access to dental care-parents' and caregivers' views on dental treatment services for people with disabilities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prabhu, Neeta T

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this study was to elicit the views of patients or parents\\/caregivers of patients with disabilities regarding access to dental care. A questionnaire was generated both from interviews with patients\\/parents\\/caregivers already treated under sedation or general anesthesia as well as by use of the Delphi technique with other stakeholders. One hundred thirteen patients from across six community dental clinics and one dental hospital were included. Approximately, 38% of the subjects used a general dental practitioner and 35% used the community dental service for their dental care, with only 27% using the hospital dental services. Overall waiting time for an appointment at the secondary care setting was longer than for the primary care clinics. There was a high rate of parent\\/caregiver satisfaction with dental services and only five patients reported any difficulty with travel and access to clinics. This study highlights the need for a greater investment in education and training to improve skills in the primary dental care sector.

  11. Access to dental care-parents' and caregivers' views on dental treatment services for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Neeta T; Nunn, June H; Evans, D J; Girdler, N M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to elicit the views of patients or parents/caregivers of patients with disabilities regarding access to dental care. A questionnaire was generated both from interviews with patients/parents/caregivers already treated under sedation or general anesthesia as well as by use of the Delphi technique with other stakeholders. One hundred thirteen patients from across six community dental clinics and one dental hospital were included. Approximately, 38% of the subjects used a general dental practitioner and 35% used the community dental service for their dental care, with only 27% using the hospital dental services. Overall waiting time for an appointment at the secondary care setting was longer than for the primary care clinics. There was a high rate of parent/caregiver satisfaction with dental services and only five patients reported any difficulty with travel and access to clinics. This study highlights the need for a greater investment in education and training to improve skills in the primary dental care sector.

  12. A Case of Successfully Treated Rhinocerebral Mucormycosis: Dental Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Papadogeorgakis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case of rhinocerebral mucormycosis in a 22-year-old female patient with type I diabetes mellitus, who was successfully treated with surgery and long-term antifungal medication. The patient had initially been submitted to extraction of an upper third molar by a general dental practitioner but was referred to our department three days postoperatively because of double vision. Immediately following histopathological confirmation of the infection, the patient was administered Amphotericin B and Posaconazole intravenously. Surgical excision of the affected site was relatively conservative. The patient was free of the disease 15 months after initial admission to the hospital and has recently returned for reconstruction. The aim of this paper is to increase the awareness of general dental practitioners regarding uncommon serious conditions in diabetic patients, which may be confused with periodontal or dental diseases.

  13. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  14. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Home > Medicaid > Benefits > Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  15. Assessing Cultural Competence among Florida's Allied Dental Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cyndi W; Su, Yu; Feng, Xiaoying; Catalanotto, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation requires that dental, dental hygiene and dental assisting schools offer educational experiences to ensure that prospective dental health care providers become culturally competent, socially responsible practitioners. To assert that these mandates are met requires that the faculty are knowledgeable and capable of providing this type of training. Currently, little is known about the cultural competence of the state of Florida allied dental faculty. The purpose of this study was to assess the cultural competence among the dental hygiene and dental assistant faculty in the state of Florida. One hundred ninety-three faculty were invited to take the Knowledge, Efficacy and Practices Instrument (KEPI), a validated measure of cultural competence. Respondents included 77 (74%) full-time and 27 (26%) part-time faculty. Data were analyzed descriptively and reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) were computed. Mean scores and internal estimates of reliability on the KEPI subscales were: knowledge of diversity 3.3 (ɑ=0.88), culture-centered practice 3.6 (ɑ=0.88) and efficacy of assessment 2.9 (ɑ=0.74). The participant's score of 3.6 on the culture-centered practice exceeds scores among dental students and faculty who participated in previous studies suggesting the allied dental faculty have a greater awareness of sociocultural and linguistically diverse dental patients' oral health needs. Participants' score on knowledge of diversity subscales suggests a need for moderate training, while their score on the efficacy of assessment subscale indicates a need for more intense training. Assessing faculty beliefs, knowledge and skills about cultural competency is critically important in ensuring that accreditation standards are being met and represents one step in the process of ensuring that faculty demonstrate the type of sensitivity and responsiveness, which characterizes behaviors associated with cultural competence. Copyright © 2016 The

  16. Knowledge of Brazilian general dentists and endodontists about the emergency management of dento-alveolar trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li Wen; Prisco, Cleide Rosana Duarte; Bombana, Antonio Carlos

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine Brazilian dentists' knowledge of emergency management of dento-alveolar trauma. A two-part questionnaire containing questions on demographic data and knowledge were mailed to 230 general dental practitioners (GDPs) and 70 endodontists. Questionnaires were returned by 42.6% of the GDPs and 62.8% of the endodontists. The survey data were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-test for practitioners' knowledge and Pearson's correlation coefficient for association between knowledge scores and practitioner age or years since graduation. The mean knowledge score of endodontists was significantly greater than for GDPs (Ptrauma experience in their practices and those who had attended postgraduate courses on dental trauma had a significant higher mean knowledge score. In contrast, there was a poor correlation between the knowledge score and the ages of the respondents (r=0.086) or the years since graduation (r=0.108). In conclusion, this survey showed a poor knowledge of dental trauma management among the surveyed dentists and highlights the need to develop strategies to improve the knowledge base in this area of dentistry for the benefit of the dental trauma patient.

  17. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  18. Outcomes from the first mouth cancer awareness and clinical check-up day in the Dublin Dental University Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacCarthy, Denise

    2012-04-01

    To increase public awareness about mouth cancer, the Dublin Dental University Hospital (DDUH) hosted an awareness day and free mouth check-up in September 2010. The messages of information, self-examination and risk management, and the importance of early detection, were available to all attendees. The role of general dental and medical practitioners in examination of the mouth was stressed.

  19. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  20. Appropriate and inappropriate referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J; Goodall, C A; Hayes, F

    1999-10-01

    Inappropriate referrals to secondary care are an unnecessary cost, notwithstanding the effect on waiting lists. It is essential therefore that only those patients whose referrals are appropriate are actually referred for secondary care. This project aimed to determine whether referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry are appropriate. The records of 120 consecutive new patient referrals who had been examined by one consultant in the unit of conservative dentistry at Glasgow Dental Hospital and School were obtained. A pro forma was designed on which synopses of the relevant clinical findings were written. These synopses were examined by four general dental practitioners (GDPs). A referral was considered appropriate if three or four of the GDPs considered it to be so, a referral was considered inappropriate if three or four of the GDPs concurred. Of the 120 cases examined, a majority of the GDP assessors agreed that 54 warranted referral, with 23 of these being referrals for toothwear. Agreement was not reached in 35 cases, while 31 referrals were considered inappropriate. Of the 31 cases which were considered inappropriate, 27 were thought to be within the scope of general practitioners. In conclusion, the results suggest that around one quarter of referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry are inappropriate. It would appear that a number of GDPs are unable or unwilling to treat a variety of simple conditions in practice and it may be that the development of referral guidelines is necessary to ensure that only those patients who merit a specialist opinion are referred for this service.

  1. Rethinking knowledge and pedagogy in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, J L; Ferguson, D J; Wells, L M; Iacopino, A M

    2000-12-01

    Dentistry as a profession has often been considered both art and science. Traditional dental education has attempted to address both; however, in many places only the science of dentistry is emphasized. The move toward competency-based curricula in dental education requires an expansion of what constitutes meaningful knowledge in the curriculum and what pedagogies best support that curriculum. The scientific and technical knowledge considered foundational to clinical practice is not sufficient to teach competencies associated with the art of dentistry. Habermas, a social scientist, offers a way of looking beyond technical knowledge to consider two other forms of knowledge: practical and emancipatory. Pedagogy that supports development of practical and emancipatory knowledge includes problem-based learning and case methods, heuristics, reflective practica, journals, storytelling, and performance-based assessment methods. These important teaching strategies are being integrated into various dental curricula including a new competency-based dental curriculum at Marquette University's School of Dentistry. It will be critical for dental educators to continue developing these methods to provide efficient and effective education for future practitioners in both the art and science of dentistry.

  2. Development of an interactive dental trauma guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is a complex task and the diagnostic process of reaching a correct diagnosis and treatment can sometimes be very difficult. Traumatic dental injures often occur as combination injuries between one of the 6 luxations and the 9 fracture types resulting in 54 trauma scenarios of which many have specific requirements for treatment The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two dentitions have very different treatment demands. As a result it's impossible even for experienced practitioners to provide evidence-based treatment on the basis of personal experience alone. Based on 60 clinical studies of 4000 cases with long-term follow-up treatment and prognosis has been determined for almost all fractures and luxation and their combinations. Information on treatment and prognosis relating to these 4000 cases will now in the future be available on the internet at: "www.DentalTraumaGuide.org". We hope that the Dental Trauma Guide can help improve the knowledge about dental traumatology worldwide and hereby improve the quality of treatment.

  3. RADIATION PROTECTION – AN ISSUE OF KNOWLEDGE AND TECHNIQUE IN DENTAL OFFICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana CONSTANTINIUC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiological examination is indispensable in current dental practice. Lately, dentists have become not only the beneficiaries of radiographic investigations required for diagnosis, but also their authors, as many dental offices have been authorized to have X-ray machines and carry out radiological activity. This is why dentists who perform dental X-rays have the legal and moral obligation to possess thorough theoretical and practical knowledge about the radiological technique and also about their own and patients’ radiation protection. This study investigates to what extent medical practitioners providing dental radiology services know and apply the technical norms for work and patient protection

  4. Faculty development for community practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, T G

    1996-12-01

    Developing the academic skills of the individuals who will serve as educators and role models in the community is critical to pediatric resident education in community settings. The main focus of any faculty development program must be on teaching, although for a subset of individuals, the development of research skills should also be a consideration. The three key elements that must be considered for an effective faculty development program include: (1) creating a culture of mutual respect between full-time and community faculty; (2) basing the program on sound principles of education theory, especially adult learning theory, using appropriately trained faculty; and (3) establishing ongoing institutional financial and philosophical support. Effectively addressing these elements should create a faculty development program that will help the community practitioner become an effective role model and practitioner- preceptor-educator.

  5. Statistical literacy for clinical practitioners

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, William H

    2014-01-01

    This textbook on statistics is written for students in medicine, epidemiology, and public health. It builds on the important role evidence-based medicine now plays in the clinical practice of physicians, physician assistants and allied health practitioners. By bringing research design and statistics to the fore, this book can integrate these skills into the curricula of professional programs. Students, particularly practitioners-in-training, will learn statistical skills that are required of today’s clinicians. Practice problems at the end of each chapter and downloadable data sets provided by the authors ensure readers get practical experience that they can then apply to their own work.  Topics covered include:   Functions of Statistics in Clinical Research Common Study Designs Describing Distributions of Categorical and Quantitative Variables Confidence Intervals and Hypothesis Testing Documenting Relationships in Categorical and Quantitative Data Assessing Screening and Diagnostic Tests Comparing Mean...

  6. Software engineering a practitioner's approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pressman, Roger S

    1997-01-01

    This indispensable guide to software engineering exploration enables practitioners to navigate the ins and outs of this rapidly changing field. Pressman's fully revised and updated Fourth Edition provides in-depth coverage of every important management and technical topic in software engineering. Moreover, readers will find the inclusion of the hottest developments in the field such as: formal methods and cleanroom software engineering, business process reengineering, and software reengineering.

  7. Risk perception for paragliding practitioners.

    OpenAIRE

    Paixão, Jairo Antônio da; Tucher, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    As an adventure sport, paragliding exposes participants to different levels of life risk. However, the boundary between calculated risk and real risk is a subtle one, depending on the practitioner’s perception. Thus, this study aimed to analyze risk perception of 73 paragliding practitioners. The descriptive-exploratory study method was used. Data was col-lected via a questionnaire validated according to the Delphi technique. Variables were evaluated from a bipolar Likert type scale, ranging ...

  8. Altmetric: Top 50 dental articles in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahi, J; Khazaei, S

    2016-06-10

    Introduction Altmetrics is a new and emerging scholarly tool that measures online attention surrounding journal articles. Altmetric data resources include: policy documents, news outlets, blogs, online reference managers (eg Mendeley and CiteULike), post-publication peer-review forums (eg PubPeer and Publons), social media (eg Twitter, Facebook, Weibo, Google(+), Pinterest, Reddit), Wikipedia, sites running Stack Exchange (Q&A), and reviews on F1000 and YouTube.Methods To identify the top 50 dental articles in 2014, PubMed was searched using the following query "("2014/1/1"[PDAT]:"2014/12/31"[PDAT]) and jsubsetd[text]" in December, 2015. Consequently, all PubMed records were extracted and sent to Altmetric LLP (London, UK) as a CSV file for examination. Data were analysed by Microsoft Office Excel 2010 using descriptive statistics and charts.Results Using PubMed searches,15,132 dental articles were found in 2014. The mean Altmetric score of 50 top dental articles in 2014 was 69.5 ± 73.3 (95% CI: -74.14 to 213.14). The British Dental Journal (48%) and Journal of Dental Research (16%) had the maximum number of top articles. Twitter (67.13%), Mendeley (15.89%) and news outlets (10.92%) were the most popular altmetric data resources.Discussion Altmetrics are intended to supplement bibliometrics, not replace them. Altmetrics is a fresh and emerging arena for the dental research community. We believe that dental clinical practitioners, research scientists, research directors and journal editors must pay more attention to altmetrics as a new and rapid tool to measure the social impact of scholarly articles.

  9. Preparing the Future Dental Hygiene Workforce: Knowledge, Skills, and Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jacquelyn L; Maxey, Hannah L; Battani, Kathryn; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Byrd, Tammi O; Brunick, Ann

    2017-09-01

    With the health care delivery system in transition, the way in which oral health care services are delivered in 2040 will inevitably change. To achieve the aims of reduced cost, improved access, and higher quality and to advance population wellness, oral health care will likely become a more integrated part of medical care. An integrated primary care system would better meet the needs of an increasingly diverse and aging U.S. population with uneven access to health care services. By 2040, trends suggest that a smaller proportion of dental hygienists will work in traditional solo dental offices; many more will practice with multidisciplinary health care teams in large-group dental and medical practices and in a variety of non-traditional community settings. This integration will require changes in how dental hygienists are educated. To shape the skill sets, clinical judgment, and knowledge of future practitioners, current dental hygiene curricula must be reexamined, redirected, and enhanced. This article examines some of the factors that are likely to shape the future of dental hygiene practice, considers the strengths and weaknesses of current curricula, and proposes educational changes to prepare dental hygienists for practice in 2040. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  10. Maintaining dental records: Are we ready for forensic needs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Astekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dental remains are usually the last to get destroyed among body parts after death. They may be useful for personal identification in cases of mass disasters and decomposed unidentified bodies. Dental records may help in the identification of suspects in criminal investigations and in medicolegal cases. Maintenance of dental records is legally mandatory in most of the European and American countries. Unfortunately, the law is not very clear in India, and the awareness is very poor. Aims: To assess the awareness regarding the dental record maintenance among dentists in Rajasthan, to deduce the quality of average dental records kept by them and to evaluate the potential use of their maintained records, in any of forensic or medicolegal cases. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 100 dental practitioners of different cities in Rajasthan, India. Materials and Methods: Data were collected through a structured questionnaire, which was responded by the study population in the course of a telephonic interview. The questionnaire addressed on the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice. Statistical Analysis Used: The data so gathered were subjected for descriptive analysis. Results: As for knowledge or awareness about maintaining dental records, surprisingly a very low percentile (about 38% of surveyed dentists maintained records. Sixty-two percent of the dentists were maintaining no records at all. Conclusion : Nonmaintenance or poor quality of records maintained indicates that the dentists in Rajasthan are not prepared for any kind of forensic and medicolegal need if it arises.

  11. Efficiency of mobile dental unit in public health programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost all dental Colleges run a mobile dental operation for people living in far inaccessible areas who are not able to avail dental care. Mobile dental clinics provide a mode of reaching the unreached by delivering dental care in areas where alternative i.e. private practitioners and fixed clinics are unavailable or inaccessible. Oral diseases account for high morbidity in the community which is compounded by the gross mal-distribution of provision of oral health services in India. In order to ensure accessibility to basic oral health services innovative models of service delivery are being explored. In this context the health economics of mobile oral health care is critically evaluated in this paper. Thus a cost analysis was undertaken to determine the operating expenses for the existing mobile dental unit. Requisite permission of Head of institution was obtained and data was extracted from the records of the mobile dental unit for the year 2014-15.Information on the operating expenses was collected. Costing was done using step down accounting method. Total operating cost of the unit for the year 2014-15 was Rs. 184888/-.Unit cost for each camp was Rs.3625/- and for each patient Rs.76/-. Mobile dental programs can play a vital role in providing access to care to underserved populations and ensuring their mission requires long-term planning. Careful cost analysis based on sound assumptions is of utmost importance.

  12. An overview of the distribution of dental care facilities in Mangalore taluk, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Prashanth Shenoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Equitable distribution of health care facilities is a guiding principle of Primary Heath Care. Although Mangalore taluk is a reputed center for medical education and health care, location of these facilities has not been evaluated to date. Therefore, a systematic survey was conducted to evaluate distribution of dental care facilities in Mangalore taluk, India. Material and Methods: List of Primary Health Centers, Community Health Centers and government hospitals, and details of the dental personnel and dental care facilities available at these centers was obtained from the District Health Officer (DHO. Data on registered private dental practitioners was obtained from the DHO and the Indian Dental Association. Information was obtained from dental colleges in the taluk regarding outreach activities and collaborations with the public sector. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Dentists are posted only at the CHCs and the District Hospital where they provide only basic dental services due to a lack of infrastructure. Of the 189 private dental clinics, 91% are located in urban areas of the taluk. They provide all modalities of dental care but are inaccessible to a majority of the rural population. Dental schools provide dental services to people in their vicinity, conduct outreach camps and have adopted four PHCs. Conclusion: An uneven distribution of dental care facilities exists with an overwhelming majority concentrated in the urban areas of the taluk. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 163-166

  13. The role of the general practitioner and the orthodontist in the provision of orthodontic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge, L

    1987-06-01

    Orthodontics is a small branch of dentistry but one of the oldest and most widespread of dental specialties. It is characterized by long-term treatment objectives which are related to dentofacial morphology and function, growth, facial balance and maturation. Owing to the lack of baseline data it has not been included in the recommendations of the FDI for a stepwise procedure towards 'Health for All by the Year 2000'. Serious efforts should be made to allow inclusion of orthodontics by overcoming this data problem. It is strongly recommended that an internationally acceptable index for orthodontic purposes at the community level be developed. Problems of integration of orthodontic services within oral health care programmes are most significant at medium resource levels when priorities have to be established among many highly desirable dental services. In upper resource levels with less caries and periodontal disease than before the general practitioner should be aware of the rapidly increasing needs for service among elderly people due to improved oral health in adults. For the sake of efficiency, control and quality orthodontic treatment should preferably be carried out by appropriately educated orthodontists, even if the case appears simple in the beginning. Simple cases treated by specialists consume fewer resources than are needed for a system of effective communication and delegation to the general practitioner. Continuing education of all practitioners and other members of the dental team should be carried out in personnel categories and across the boundaries between them.

  14. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni g

  15. A Dental Education Perspective on Dental Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1985-01-01

    Two issues related to dental health policy are examined: the contribution of dental education to the process by which dental health policy is established, and the nature of dental education's response to established policies. (MLW)

  16. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyonyi, Kristina L; Radford, David R; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2017-01-01

    This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England. Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008-2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients' individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status) and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence), with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments. Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (dental service and show that individual and contextual factors predict common treatments received. Implications of this research include the importance of making provision for our aging population and ensuring that preventative care is available to all. Further research is required to explain the interaction of organisational and system policies, practitioner and patient perspectives on care and, thus, inform effective commissioning and provision of dental services.

  17. Dental Impression Materials and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punj, Amit; Bompolaki, Despoina; Garaicoa, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Dental impression making is the process of creating a negative form of the teeth and oral tissues, into which gypsum or other die materials can be processed to create working analogues. Contemporary dentistry generates new information every year and digital dentistry is becoming established and influential. Although dentists should stay abreast of new technologies, some of the conventional materials and time-tested techniques remain widely used. It is important to review the impression-making process to ensure that practitioners have up-to-date information about how to safely and effectively capture the exact form of the oral tissues to provide optimal patient management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  19. Autoclave use in dental practice in the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, C M; Kearns, H P O; Coulter, W A; Stevenson, M; Burke, F J T

    2004-08-01

    To assess by postal questionnaire, cross-infection control methods, especially sterilisation procedures, of 700 general dental practitioners in the Republic of Ireland, and to biologically monitor steam pressure sterilisers or autoclaves in their practices. Methods of instrument cleaning and sterilisation, autoclave efficacy. A response rate of 40% with all, except one practitioner, using steam sterilisation. 49% also reported the use of chemical sterilisation with a quarter of these using glutaraldehyde. However, instrument soaking time varied greatly from 2.5 minutes to 74 hours. Methods of instrument cleaning prior to autoclaving were as follows: scrubbing by hand 41.5%, ultrasonic cleaning 7.0%, combination of both 50%. 52.9% of the respondents did not autoclave their dental handpieces and only 44.7% disinfected impressions before sending them to the laboratory. The autoclaves of thirty practitioners (11.3%) did not pass the initial biological test. Following counselling about possible causes of failure, four autoclaves (1.5%) failed a repeat biological test. However, seven practitioners did not return the repeat biological test. Some aspects of recommended cross-infection control procedures are well adhered to, e.g. instrument cleaning, but further education is required in certain key areas, in particular the use of chemical sterilisation, dental handpiece autoclaving and impression disinfection. There is also a need to increase awareness of the importance of routine autoclave servicing and calibration, along with validation and monitoring.

  20. Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-03-01

    The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene.

  1. Evaluation of Glove Damage during Dental Procedures among Dental Specialists in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nezafati

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Dental practitioners are prone to occupational risk of infection. This can be prevented in part by wearing gloves. However, for this to be effective, gloves should be intact during the entire course of dental procedure. Leaky surgical latex gloves have been seen in 0.9% of cases before use. As much as 1.9% of latex gloves have been reported to be damaged during dental procedures. In this study, we decided to assess glove damage during dental procedures among dental specialists in Tabriz.

    Materials and methods. Thirty-six dental specialists were selected for this study. Each practitioner received 40 pairs of intact powdered latex gloves. Upon the completion of dental procedures, the gloves were retrieved and any tears were evaluated separately for right and left hands. Data was analyzed using chi-square test.

    Results. 159 punctures were detected in 144 gloves (5% out of 2880 unpaired gloves used by practitioners. They noticed the tear(s in 60 cases (2%, however, 99 cases (3% of tear(s were not noted during the procedure. The highest rate of glove damage was observed in the prosthodontists’ group (12.3%, which was statistically significant comparing to other groups (p=0.048. The lowest rate of the damage was observed in the oral surgeons’ group (2% which showed no significant difference (p=0.134. The highest rate of punctures in the gloves was observed in the first and second fingers of the non-dominant hand.

    Conclusion. The damage to 5% of the gloves is highly significant, with a potential role in occupational hazards. The higher rate of leaks in the prosthodontists’ group compared to other groups demands for greater prudence in this field. The high rate of leaks in the first and second fingers of the non-dominant hand requires more attention to this area during daily practice.

  2. A marketing strategy for the dental public health profession: what is it? Why is it needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Rusinowitz, L

    1988-01-01

    A personnel management problem exists within dental public health that interferes with its mission of improving the nation's oral health. A major cause of this problem may be that many administrators who write position descriptions and hire professional staff are unaware of differences between clinical and public health dental practitioners. A marketing plan has been developed to address this lack of awareness about proper use of dental public health professionals. Its main goal is to establish more appropriate personnel and employment practices within dental public health. The expected outcomes of this plan could assist both recipients of dental public health services and members of the profession. The purpose of this article is to introduce the marketing strategy to dental public health professionals.

  3. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  4. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  5. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  6. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... and rinsing daily. It also includes having routine dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, ...

  7. AUTHORITARIANISM AND DENTAL CARIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    in particular. If so, dental decay among nonauthoritarians might well progress further than among authoritarians. To determine whether or not there...is any relationship between dental decay and authoritarianism is the purpose of the present study. (Author)

  8. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  9. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  10. Smile dental journal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    "Smile dental journal is quarterly issued, peer-reviewed open access journal. Subject coverage is dentistry, dealing with all specialties of dentistry, its management, besides dental health related subjects...

  11. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  12. The dead center of the dental curriculum: changing attitudes of dental students during dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Christopher J; Townsend, Grant C

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in dental students' perceptions of professionalism, knowledge, and emotion over the period of dissection in a human anatomy course. Whether human dissection needs to be a part of the modern dental curriculum is often called into question, particularly with the plethora of electronic and other aids available to support the learning of anatomy. The influence of the dissection process on development of professional attitudes and emotional maturity has been studied in medical students, but how dental students react to this part of their education is less well known. To investigate this question, a survey was administered before and after the dissection course to two sequential year groups of dental students. It was found that these students had high levels of understanding of professional values before commencing dissection and continued to value the role of teamwork in aiding their learning over the survey period. The majority of students coped well with the assimilation of knowledge and developed coping mechanisms to handle the emotional aspects of dissection. The students remained excited by and interested in dissection, and the majority valued it as the most positive aspect of their anatomy course. The students increasingly valued the use of prosected specimens as an aid to learning. This study confirmed that significant changes occur in dental students' attitudes during the period of dissection, which we believe contribute to the development of more empathetic and caring practitioners.

  13. Dental Practice Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    the population. Private dental practices in Romania require personnel specialized in dental management. Success in dentistry depends, on the one hand, on the management of clinical aspects, and equallyon the efficient management of the dental practice. Patient satisfaction is influenced by factors related to the communication between the physicianand the patient, technical competence and by the environment provided by dental practice. The realization of the paper followed a review...

  14. Management of the anticoagulated dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J H

    1996-11-01

    An understanding of the primary mechanisms of hemostasis, including the coagulation pathways and the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common systems, is the basis for treating the anticoagulated patient. Two major anticoagulants are used for treating those who may be at risk for thromboembolic crisis. These drugs include Coumadin, which is an oral anticoagulant, and heparin, a parenteral anticoagulant, which is often used for acute thromboembolic episodes or for hospitalization protocols that include significant surgical procedures. The practitioner should be familiar with common dental drugs that can interact with anticoagulants and should consult with the patient's physician before administering any such drugs. By placing the patient into one of three dental treatment categories, appropriate anticoagulation therapy can be rendered to each patient according to his or her needs. Low-risk procedures require no change in anticoagulation medication. For moderate-risk procedures, withdrawal of anticoagulation medication 2 days before the procedure and verified with the PT the day of the procedure is indicated. For high-risk dental procedures, using a heparin protocol should be strongly considered. In all instances of dental treatment, the oral tissues should be treated atraumatically using local hemostatic measures for control of hemorrhage. Treating medically compromised patients who are on a variety of medications is becoming more common in dentistry today. Understanding the underlying disease and the appropriate protocol for treatment of anticoagulated patients reduces the risk of thromboembolism and hemorrhagic complications.

  15. Discontinued dental attendance among elderly people in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönbeck-Linden, Ingela; Hägglin, Catharina; Petersson, Anita; Linander, Per O.; Gahnberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our objective was to study the loss of dental attendance and a possible age trend among patients aged ≥65 years in Sweden. Regular dental check-ups are considered to be an important factor in maintaining oral health. Approximately 80% of the adult population in Sweden are enrolled in a regular check-up system; however, dental practitioners often find that older patients attend fewer check-ups. Old people may naturally lose contact with dental services as they move to special housing or die. In this systematic study, these factors were investigated and used as exclusion criteria. Materials and Methods: Data were collected for all patients (n = 4759) aged 65 or older from the electronic journal system in 3 large public dental clinics in 3 communities. Their dental records for the years 2004–2009 were studied longitudinally by 1 person at each clinic; 1111 patients were excluded (patients died during study period, wanted emergency care only, obtained special dental care allowance, moved from the community or moved to special housing, or left the clinic for another caregiver). The statistical analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21 (IBM). Results: Of the 3648 patients (1690 men and 1958 women) included in the study, 13% lost contact with their dental service over the course of the study (10% of those were aged 65–79 and 21% ≥80). The decrease in regular dental contact had a statistically significant association with increasing age (P < 0.001). Conclusion: A considerable number of older people living independently or with moderate supportive care in their own homes lost contact with dental service despite enrolment in a recall system. PMID:27382538

  16. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinct dental, skeletal and developmental abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Guelmann, Marcio; Barak, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    A case of a 9-year-old child with hereditary gingival fibromatosis, supernumerary tooth, chest deformities, auricular cartilage deformation, joint laxity and undescended testes is described. The exact mode of inheritance is unclear; a new mutation pattern is possible. These features resemble but differ from the previously reported Laband syndrome. The dental treatment consisted of surgical removal of the fibrous tissue and conservative restorative treatment under general anesthesia. The dental practitioner should be alert for developmental abnormalities such as supernumerary teeth and delayed tooth eruption. A comprehensive medical history and physical systemic evaluation is essential to rule out other systemic abnormalities. Genetic consultation is mandatory for future family planing.

  17. What about the dentist-patient relationship in dental tourism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Adelaide; Delbon, Paola; Laffranchi, Laura; Paganelli, Corrado

    2014-03-01

    Dental tourism is patients travelling across international borders with the intention of receiving dental care. It is a growing phenomenon that raises many ethical issues, particularly regarding the dentist-patient relationship. We discuss various issues related to this phenomenon, including patient autonomy over practitioner choice, patient safety, continuity of care, informed consent and doctor-patient communication, among other factors. In particular, patients partaking in medical tourism should be informed of its potential problems and the importance of proper planning and post-treatment care to guarantee high-quality treatment outcomes.

  18. Availability of dental services for patients with blood-borne viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellock, D J; Carlin, E M

    2002-08-01

    Dental practitioners were surveyed, using a self-completed postal questionnaire, to assess their attitudes to managing patients with blood-borne viruses (BBV) and to identify dental services available for such patients in North Nottinghamshire. Questionnaires were completed by 79 (65.3%) of the 121 practitioners from 43 (82.7%) of the 52 study practices. Previous BBV experience was reported by 44 (55.7%), 31 (39.2%), 20 (25.3%) respondents for hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), HIV, respectively. Over two-thirds would maintain existing patients with subsequently diagnosed BBV on their lists, approximately one-third would accept new BBV patients. Risk factors for BBV of homo/bisexuality and injecting drug use were not asked by 71 (89.9%) and 49 (62.0%) practitioners, respectively. Universal precautions were employed by 67 (84.8%) practitioners regardless of the patient's status and by seven practitioners for known BBV patients. The advice of the General Dental Council, British Dental Association, and the use of universal precautions are discussed.

  19. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  20. [Dental records and responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, W.G.

    2006-01-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist i

  1. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  2. Dental Assistant, Advanced. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    a jaw fracture, leukemia, dental caries, and periodontal disease. Dental diabetes mellitus , rheumatic fever, allergies, car- disease can be prevented...Dentistry ........................ 4-1 5. Oral Surgery, Endodontics, and Periodontics ................ 5-1 6. Prosthodontics...Diagnosis Periodontics Medical clinics may have branch clinics subor- Operative Dentistry Preventive Dentistry dinate to them. Although dental

  3. Autoclave performance and practitioner knowledge of autoclave use: a survey of selected UK practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J; Coulter, W A; Cheung, S W; Palenik, C J

    1998-04-01

    It is essential that the dental surgery autoclave be tested regularly to ensure that it is operating at a temperature and pressure that will kill all microorganisms. The aims of this study were to investigate the knowledge of general dental practitioners on aspects of autoclave use, to examine their autoclaving routines, and to test the effectiveness of the sterilization cycle of their practice's autoclave. A 35-question questionnaire was distributed to 840 dental practitioners in the United Kingdom. They were also sent three spore test ampules with details of their function and instructions on their use. The practitioners were asked to use the spore test ampules in their own practice's autoclave and to return these for testing. Four hundred one questionnaires and associated spore test ampules were returned for analysis, a 47.7% response rate. Eight practice autoclaves (2.0%) failed to sterilize the spores. These practices were offered a retest following counseling. A total of 77.8% of respondents had received formal training in infection control. Of the 71.3% of respondents who stated that they check the performance of their autoclave routinely, 31.5% use a chemical strip every cycle, 17.5% use it once per day, and 30.4% use it once per week. However, only five respondents (1.2%) use a spore test; two of these respondents use it every cycle, one once per day, and two once per week. Further education of practitioners may be necessary to enhance their awareness of the need for routine checking of autoclave effectiveness.

  4. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wotman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction.Keywords: dental practice, dental practice core activities, direct observation of dental practice, Dental Davis Observation Code, dentist, hygienist patient behaviors

  5. Barriers to dental care for children with special needs: General dentists' perception in Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adyanthaya, Amith; Sreelakshmi, Natta; Ismail, Sajeela; Raheema, Marium

    2017-01-01

    Special children are among the underserved dental patient groups around the globe. Oral health care for disabled children remain an unmet challenge. One out of two persons with a significant disability cannot find a professional resource to provide appropriate dental care. Identification of barriers can be the first step in addressing the deficiencies in dental care for such patients. To investigate the perception of dental practitioners in Kerala, India regarding the hurdles faced by them in providing dental care to Special Needs Children including the challenges faced by them. 149 dental professionals were interviewed through a questionnaire for their perceived barriers to provide oral health care for children with special needs. The data was obtained and Chi-square test, Pearson correlation coefficient and logistic regression model were assessed using the SPSS version 20.0. All analyses were performed using a level of 0.05 for statistical significance. Greatest barriers as perceived by the practitioners were their level of training and lack of motivation of caretakers. Significant association was found between experience of the dentist with the frequency with which they reported seeing children with special needs (pConclusion: Findings from this study provide a valid picture of barriers to access for children with special needs within general dental private practice system. Recommendations for amendment of undergraduate dental curriculum is made in order to equip future graduates to deal with this group of children better.

  6. Barriers to dental care for children with special needs: General dentists' perception in Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amith Adyanthaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Special children are among the underserved dental patient groups around the globe. Oral health care for disabled children remain an unmet challenge. One out of two persons with a significant disability cannot find a professional resource to provide appropriate dental care. Identification of barriers can be the first step in addressing the deficiencies in dental care for such patients. Aim: To investigate the perception of dental practitioners in Kerala, India regarding the hurdles faced by them in providing dental care to Special Needs Children including the challenges faced by them. Materials and Method: 149 dental professionals were interviewed through a questionnaire for their perceived barriers to provide oral health care for children with special needs. Statistical analysis: The data was obtained and Chi-square test, Pearson correlation coefficient and logistic regression model were assessed using the SPSS version 20.0. All analyses were performed using a level of 0.05 for statistical significance. Results: Greatest barriers as perceived by the practitioners were their level of training and lack of motivation of caretakers. Significant association was found between experience of the dentist with the frequency with which they reported seeing children with special needs (p< 0.05. Conclusion: Findings from this study provide a valid picture of barriers to access for children with special needs within general dental private practice system. Recommendations for amendment of undergraduate dental curriculum is made in order to equip future graduates to deal with this group of children better.

  7. Development of fibre-optic confocal microscopy for detection and diagnosis of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, C; Poland, S; Girkin, J M; Hall, A F; Whitters, C J

    2007-01-01

    We report on the development of a fibre-optics-based confocal imaging system for the detection and potential diagnosis of early dental caries. A novel optical instrument, capable of recording axial profiles through caries lesions using single-mode optical fibres, has been developed. The practical study illustrates that miniature confocal devices based around single-mode optical fibres may provide additional diagnostic information for the general dental practitioner.

  8. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Wotman; Demko, Catherine A.; Kristin Victoroff; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio denta...

  9. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    OpenAIRE

    Wotman, Stephen; Demko, Catherine A.; Victoroff, Kristin; Sudano, Joseph J; Lalumandier, James A

    2010-01-01

    This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral catego...

  10. How experienced practitioners gain knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    An evolution in nursing in the United Kingdom in the 1970s from rule-bound toward holistic, autonomous practice engendered an examination of nursing's body of knowledge and how it is incorporated into practice. This article describes Barbara Carper's (1978) Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing (empiric, ethical, aesthetic, and personal knowledge), and links it to three major worldviews of the way in which knowledge is sought (positivism, naturalism, and critical social theory). Carper's model was used in the United Kingdom as the basis for a curriculum of structured reflective practice using workshops, journaling, and clinical supervision. An example from a practitioner's diary demonstrates how Carper's model informs reflection on an interaction with a patient with newly diagnosed cancer.

  11. Group supervision for general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galina Nielsen, Helena; Sofie Davidsen, Annette; Dalsted, Rikke;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Group supervision is a sparsely researched method for professional development in general practice. The aim of this study was to explore general practitioners' (GPs') experiences of the benefits of group supervision for improving the treatment of mental disorders. METHODS: One long...... considered important prerequisites for disclosing and discussing professional problems. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that participation in a supervision group can be beneficial for maintaining and developing GPs' skills in dealing with patients with mental health problems. Group supervision......-established supervision group was studied closely for six months by observing the group sessions, and by interviewing GPs and their supervisors, individually and collectively. The interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: The GPs found...

  12. Practitioner Perspectives on Foundational Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Juliano, Chrissie; Castrucci, Brian C.; Beitsch, Leslie M.; Dilley, Abby; Nelson, Rachel; Kaiman, Sherry; Sprague, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: National efforts are underway to classify a minimum set of public health services that all jurisdictions throughout the United States should provide regardless of location. Such a set of basic programs would be supported by crosscutting services, known as the “foundational capabilities” (FCs). These FCs are assessment services, preparedness and disaster response, policy development, communications, community partnership, and organizational support activities. Objective: To ascertain familiarity with the term and concept of FCs and gather related perspectives from state and local public health practitioners. Design: In fall 2013, we interviewed 50 leaders from state and local health departments. We asked about familiarity with the term “foundational capabilities,” as well as the broader concept of FCs. We attempted to triangulate the utility of the FC concept by asking respondents about priority programs and services, about perceived unique contributions made by public health, and about prevalence and funding for the FCs. Setting: Telephone-based interviews. Participants: Fifty leaders of state and local health departments. Main Outcome Measures: Practitioner familiarity with and perspectives on the FCs, information about current funding streams for public health, and the likelihood of creating nationwide FCs that would be recognized and accepted by all jurisdictions. Results: Slightly more than half of the leaders interviewed said that they were familiar with the concept of FCs. In most cases, health departments had all of the capabilities to some degree, although operationalization varied. Few indicated that current funding levels were sufficient to support implementing a minimum level of FCs nationally. Conclusions: Respondents were not able to articulate the current or optimal levels of services for the various capabilities, nor the costs associated with them. Further research is needed to understand the role of FCs as part of the foundational

  13. Dental Trauma Guide: a source of evidence-based treatment guidelines for dental trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno

    2012-10-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often combined, the result is that more than 100 trauma scenarios exist, when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios has a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnosis and treatment, it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.DentalTraumaGuide.org. It is the aspiration that the use of this Guide may lead the practitioner to offer an evidence-based diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Mercury exposure in the work place and human health: dental amalgam use in dentistry at dental teaching institutions and private dental clinics in selected cities of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Mahmood A; Nawaz, Sadaf; Ali, Saeed Waqar

    2016-03-01

    During the past two decades, mercury has come under increasing scrutiny with regard to its safety both in the general population and in occupationally exposed groups. It's a growing issue of global concern because of its adverse environmental and health impacts. Very few investigations on mercury amalgam use in the dentistry sector have been carried out in South Asia and there is little data reported on mercury contamination of indoor/outdoor air at dental sites. According to an earlier SDPI study, reported in 2013, alarmingly high mercury levels were observed in air (indoor as well as outdoor) at 11 of the 34 visited dental sites (17 dental teaching institutions, 7 general hospitals & 10 dental clinics) in five main cities of Pakistan. 88% of the sites indicated indoor mercury levels in air above the USA EPA reference level of 300 ng/m3. According to our study, carried out at 38 dental teaching institutions in 12 main cities (in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces) of Pakistan, respondents were of the opinion that the currently offered BDS curriculum does not effectively guide outgoing dental professionals and does not provide them adequate knowledge and training about mercury/mercury amalgam and other mercury related human health and mercury waste issues. 90% of respondents supported the review and revision of the present dental curriculum offered at dental teaching institutions in the country, at the earliest. A study has also been conducted to assess the status of mercury amalgam use in private dental clinics in Gilgit, Hunza, Peshawar, Rawalpindi and Islamabad. More than 90 private dental clinics were visited and dental professionals/private clinics in-charge were interviewed during June-July, 2015. The focus areas of the study were Hg amalgam toxicity, its waste management practices and safety measures practiced among the dental practitioners. In the light of the findings described and discussed in this brief report, to safeguard public health and

  15. Ethics on the dental treatment of patients with mental disability: results of a Netherlands - Belgium survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Luc; Adler, Naomi; Blom-Reukers, Helen; Elhorst, Jan H; Kraaijenhagen-Oostinga, Annelies; Vanobbergen, Jacques

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluates several ethical dilemmas of by dental practitioners treating persons with mental disabilities (PMD) by dentists in the Netherlands and Belgium. Ethical dental care for PMD is a hot topic. Worldwide different treatment strategies are used in the dental treatment of this patient group. In addition, cultural aspect seems to play an important role in the choices made. The latter can explain the difficulty in creating European and worldwide guidelines on this issue. A questionnaire was sent to dental practitioners interested in treating PMD persons both in the Netherlands and in Belgium including questions on the use of behaviour management techniques, use and attitude towards sedation and physical fixation and the cooperation with other health care personal. Behaviour management techniques and sedation are frequently used. Dentist of the Netherlands and Belgium in general reject the restraint of PMD persons. However, limited use of manual restraint in accordance with the carers and the close surrounding of the patient seems to be accepted. Dental practitioners are sometimes confronted with an emotional dilemma in treating PMD and the majority feels that it is a continuous challenge to obtain optimal result of the dental treatment.

  16. Prosthodontics as a specialty private practice: net income of private practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kent D; Pfeifer, David L

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use data from a survey of prosthodontists in the US to examine average net earnings of prosthodontists in private practice. A survey of 2500 prosthodontists in the US was used to estimate the net earnings of practicing prosthodontists. The national average net earnings of prosthodontists in private practice was estimated along with average earnings for subgroups of prosthodontists. Estimates for private practitioners by age, gender, size of practice, full-time/part-time status, practice ownership, and by type of treatment procedures rendered by the practitioner were also included. Average earnings for prosthodontists in private practice on a primary or secondary basis were estimated to be $215,300 and for prosthodontists who own or share in the ownership of a private practice, $233,920. Reported earnings estimates ranged from $96,160 for non-owners of a private practice and $103,350 for part-time private practitioners to $233,920 for practice owners and $275,170 for prosthodontists in practice with two prosthodontists. The average earnings of prosthodontists who are practice owners were estimated to be 35% higher than the corresponding general practitioners. Average net earnings are often used to examine the current economic health of a profession. The average net earnings of prosthodontists in private practice exceed the average net income reported by the American Dental Association for all dentists and all general practitioners and they are competitive with earnings among all specialty groups. This evaluation of the net earnings of prosthodontists shows that prosthodontics offers a competitive career opportunity for the general dentist with a personal desire to pursue advanced dental education in a specialty as a profession. Copyright (c) 2006 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. What I wish I'd learned at dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, G R; Lynch, C D; Chadwick, B L; Santini, A; Wilson, N H F

    2016-08-26

    Background Much concern appears to exist as to the scope and content of contemporary dental school programmes, with the oft-cited criticism being made that dental graduates are 'no longer as good as they used to be'.Aim The aim of this project was to survey the views of dentists - both new graduates and more established practitioners - on aspects of their own dental school training they felt had been deficient as well as commenting on what aspects of dental school education they would like to see improved/enhanced in current times.Methods An invitation to complete an Internet-based questionnaire was emailed to the Fellows and Members of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK). Topics in the questionnaire included the respondent's own dental education history, how well they felt their dental school training had covered certain clinical and non-clinical topics; and their opinions on areas they felt should be included in contemporary dental school programmes.Results Six hundred and forty-nine responses were received from 3,348 emailed invitations (response rate = 19.4%). Sixty-one percent (395) of respondents were qualified for 10 years or more. Among clinical skills and techniques, a majority of respondents reported they felt they had not had sufficient teaching/training in dental school in surgical endodontics (76%), conscious sedation (72%), root surface debridement (71%), fixed orthodontic appliances (68%), porcelain veneers (63%), implants (56%) and posterior composites (53%). If designing a new dental school programme, the most common topics respondents would seek to include/increase were business and practice management (21%), communication skills (including patient management and leadership skills) (10%), and increased clinical time and experience (8%).Conclusions The findings of this project are of interest and relevance to those working with student dentists and young dental practitioners. A greater emphasis is needed on the teaching of certain non

  18. Promoting the Priorities of Practitioner Research Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    One of the aims of the Library and Information Science Research Coalition is to promote library and information science practitioner research. Successfully meeting this aim should result in greater use of the existing knowledge base and the creation of new knowledge on Library and Information Science (LIS) practice. LIS practitioner engagement in…

  19. PR Educators and Practitioners Identify Professional Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallot, Lynne M.; Cameron, Glen; Weaver-Lariscy, Ruth-Ann

    1998-01-01

    Surveys public relations educators nationwide. Finds (1) little consensus about professional standards in public relations among educators and practitioners; and (2) both educators and practitioners held their peers in comparatively low esteem. Offers 10 recommendations to reorient and reemphasize the content of courses. (RS)

  20. Scholar-Practitioner Leadership: A Conceptual Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scholar-practitioner leader operates reflexively in the boundaries between theory and practice, striving to create exemplars of democracy and social justice within schools while simultaneously meeting modern accountability demands. This article outlines a theoretical underpinning for scholar practitioner leadership and provides means of…

  1. Healthcare Practitioners' Personal and Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A.; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them…

  2. Healthcare Practitioners' Personal and Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A.; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them…

  3. Teaching Qualitative Research to Practitioner-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2012-01-01

    Practitioner-researchers are well-positioned to apply qualitative methods to the study of significant problems of educational practice. However, while learning the skills of qualitative inquiry, practitioners may be compelled by forces outside of qualitative research classrooms to think quantitatively. In this article, the author considers two…

  4. Roles of social impact assessment practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Cecilia H.M., E-mail: ceciliawonghm@gmail.com; Ho, Wing-chung, E-mail: wingcho@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-01-15

    The effectiveness of social impact assessment (SIA) hinges largely on the capabilities and ethics of the practitioners, yet few studies have dedicated to discuss the expectations for these professionals. Recognising this knowledge gap, we employed the systemic review approach to construct a framework of roles of SIA practitioners from literature. Our conceptual framework encompasses eleven roles, namely project manager of SIA, practitioner of SIA methodologies, social researcher, social strategy developer, social impact management consultant, community developer, visionary, public involvement specialist, coordinator, SIA researcher, and educator. Although these roles have been stratified into three overarching categories, the project, community and SIA development, they are indeed interrelated and should be examined together. The significance of this study is threefold. First, it pioneers the study of the roles of SIA practitioners in a focused and systematic manner. Second, it informs practitioners of the expectations of them thereby fostering professionalism. Third, it prepares the public for SIAs by elucidating the functions and values of the assessment. - Highlights: • We adopt systematic review to construct a framework of roles of social impact assessment (SIA) practitioners from literature. • We use three overarching categorises to stratify the eleven roles we proposed. • This work is a novel attempt to study the work as a SIA practitioner and build a foundation for further exploration. • The framework informs practitioners of the expectations on them thus reinforcing professionalism. • The framework also prepares the public for SIAs by elucidating the functions and values of the assessment.

  5. Teaching Qualitative Research to Practitioner-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2012-01-01

    Practitioner-researchers are well-positioned to apply qualitative methods to the study of significant problems of educational practice. However, while learning the skills of qualitative inquiry, practitioners may be compelled by forces outside of qualitative research classrooms to think quantitatively. In this article, the author considers two…

  6. Professionalism in Nursing Behaviors of Nurse Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Donna; Miller, Barbara K.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 502 nurse practitioners found that more than half had written research proposals or participated in research projects recently; nearly 50% wrote their own job descriptions; 93% belonged to the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners; and maintaining certification was the motivation for some professional behaviors. (Contains 29…

  7. A Practitioner View toward Engaged Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, J. Kevin; Jones, Jennifer E.; Kensler, Michael; Polok, Nina; Rianoshek, Richard; Simpson, Jennifer Lyn; Shockley-Zalabak, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    The stories of four practitioners are presented regarding their involvement with the Aspen conference and their reflections on the essays in this forum. Their stories suggest that the ability for academics and practitioners to co-create engaged scholarship depends on articulating common values and interests, creating a shared language that allows…

  8. The Critical Pragmatist as Scholar-Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    The intention of this article is to firmly build a case for the fit of a "new scholarship" known as scholar-practitioner as a leadership perspective grounded by the philosophical and theoretical tenets of critical pragmatism. Using post-formal thought as an approach to establish the fit of scholar-practitioner as a reform initiative and leadership…

  9. The Impact of Virtual Reality Distraction on Pain and Anxiety during Dental Treatment in 4-6 Year-Old Children: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Erfanparast, Leila; Sohrabi, Azin; Ghertasi Oskouei, Sina; Naghili, Armaghan

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Dental practitioners have numerous methods to control anxiety and pain in children, and distracting the child appears to be the most common technique used for behavior management during dental procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of using virtual reality eyeglasses on severity of pain and anxiety during dental procedures in pediatric patients. Materials and methods This study included 120 healthy children aged 4-6 years. Children with no p...

  10. Dental caries vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from carious lesions of which S. mutans , Lactobacillus acidophilus , and Actinomyces viscosus are the main pathogenic species involved in the initiation and development of dental caries. In India, surveys done on school children showed caries prevalence of approximately 58%. Surveys among the U.S. population showed an incidence of 45.3% in children and 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries. Huge amounts of money and time are spent in treating dental caries. Hence, the prevention and control of dental caries is the main aim of public health, eventually the ultimate objective of public health is the elimination of the disease itself. Recently, dental caries vaccines have been developed for the prevention of dental caries. These dental caries vaccines are still in the early stages.

  11. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries.

  12. An Overview of Dental Adhesive Systems and the Dynamic Tooth-Adhesive Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedran-Russo, Ana; Leme-Kraus, Ariene A; Vidal, Cristina M P; Teixeira, Erica C

    2017-10-01

    From the conception of resin-enamel adhesion to today's contemporary dental adhesive systems, clinicians are no longer afraid of exploring the many advantages brought by adhesive restorative concepts. To maximize the performance of adhesive-based restorative procedures, practitioners must be familiar with the mechanism of adhesion, clinical indications, proper handling, the inherent limitations of the materials and the biological challenges. This review provides an overview of the current status of restorative dental adhesives, their mechanism of adhesion, mechanisms of degradation of dental adhesive interfaces, how to maximize performance, and future trends in adhesive dentistry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [The general practitioner and insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, L; Bruwier, G; De Bock, I; Poirrier, R

    2006-01-01

    A complaint of insomnia has to be analysed, and differentiated from hypochondria and, overall, from hypersomnia. Once confirmed and assessed as acute or chronic, it is often considered a disorder of hyperarousal, that is an imbalance between a central nervous system activating and a central nervous system inhibiting system with subcontinuous overflow from the former. An acute insomnia is less than one month of duration. As a disease, insomnia has to be categorized as a secondary or a primary disorder. Thereafter, it remains to assess the extent of social, psychological and economical interactions. These factors intervene as consequences or perpetuating factors. The capacity to assess the whole situation is really the great strength of the general practitioner who, more than anybody else, is on home ground. Laboratory findings and specialist examination come only as supporting evidence for causal links. A polysomnography realized in a sleep disorder center provides data reinforcing or correcting the diagnosis. From a sound assessment of the disease, the treatment has to be deduced by following a rigorous reasoning, devoid of guilty feelings as they are suggested to patients by mass-media talking, as well as freed from fashionable non medical practices. Today, we know that chronic insomnia is a disease with potential severe consequences and that it does not heal spontaneously.

  14. Posterior partially edentulous jaws, planning a rehabilitation with dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Emily V F; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Goiato, Marcelo C

    2015-01-16

    To discuss important characteristics of the use of dental implants in posterior quadrants and the rehabilitation planning. An electronic search of English articles was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1990 up to the period of March 2014. The key terms were dental implants and posterior jaws, dental implants/treatment planning and posterior maxilla, and dental implants/treatment planning and posterior mandible. No exclusion criteria were used for the initial search. Clinical trials, randomized and non randomized studies, classical and comparative studies, multicenter studies, in vitro and in vivo studies, case reports, longitudinal studies and reviews of the literature were included in this review. One hundred and fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria of treatment planning of dental implants in posterior jaw and were read in their entirety. The selected articles were categorized with respect to their context on space for restoration, anatomic considerations (bone quantity and density), radiographic techniques, implant selection (number, position, diameter and surface), tilted and pterygoid implants, short implants, occlusal considerations, and success rates of implants placed in the posterior region. The results derived from the review process were described under several different topic headings to give readers a clear overview of the literature. In general, it was observed that the use of dental implants in posterior region requires a careful treatment plan. It is important that the practitioner has knowledge about the theme to evaluate the treatment parameters. The use of implants to restore the posterior arch presents many challenges and requires a detailed treatment planning.

  15. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, A; Dowling, A; Renehan, J; Clarke, D; Malone, J F

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James's Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future.

  16. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, A

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97\\/43\\/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James\\'s Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future.

  17. Opinions of Romanian Dental Students Toward Tobacco Use Interventions in the Dental Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, A L; Ibric, S; Ibric-Cioranu, V

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess smoking habits as well as attitudes toward smoking cessation counseling among Romanian dental students in order to build an evidence base for further undergraduate curriculum development. A 38-item self-administered questionnaire was delivered to first to sixth dental students enrolled at the University "Lucian Blaga" Sibiu. The questionnaire covered sociodemographics, smoking habits, knowledge concerning health effects, attitudes, and confidence toward smoking cessation counseling. Smoking was reported by 37 % of participants and was more prevalent among clinical (48.98 %) than preclinical (29.58 %) and basic science students (35.93 %). Students' knowledge that tobacco affects general and oral/dental health and knowledge of dental students regarding the smoking and alcohol behavior taken during medical history varied according to academic year and smoking status, but not according to gender. Only 51.1 % of all students agreed or strongly agreed that they were adequately trained to provide tobacco cessation education. 58.6 %, respectively 52.9 %, strongly agreed that is part of their role as a dentist to assist their patients to stop smoking and to prevent patients from starting to use tobacco products, while only 35.8 % believed that smoking cessation counseling provided by a dentist can be effective in helping patients stop smoking. The main determinants of student's attitudes toward smoking cessation counseling were academic year, clinical experience in the dental settings, and knowledge of smoking adverse effects. Dental school should offer adequate training in tobacco dependence and available continuing education in tobacco intervention in aim to encourage oral health care practitioners to have up-to-date information in aim to play their role effectively in the overall smoking cessation and prevention activities.

  18. Addressing children's oral health in the new millennium: trends in the dental workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Elizabeth; Mouradian, Wendy E

    2009-01-01

    Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General (SGROH) and National Call to Action to Promote Oral Health outlined the need to increase the diversity, capacity, and flexibility of the dental workforce to reduce oral health disparities. This paper provides an update on dental workforce trends since the SGROH in the context of children's oral health needs. Major challenges remain to ensure a workforce that is adequate to address the needs of all children. The dentist-to-population ratio is declining while shortages of dentists continue in rural and underserved communities. The diversity of the dental workforce has only improved slightly, and the the diversity of the pediatric population has increased substantially. More pediatric dentists have been trained, and dental educational programs are preparing students for practice in underserved areas, but the impact of these efforts on underserved children is uncertain. Other workforce developments with the potential to improve children's oral health include enhanced training in children's oral health for general dentists, expanded scope of practice for allied dental health professionals, new dental practitioners including the dental health aid therapist, and increased engagement of pediatricians and other medical practitioners in children's oral health. The evidence for increasing caries experience in young children points to the need for continued efforts to bolster the oral health workforce. However, workforce strategies alone will not be sufficient to change this situation. Requisite policy changes, educational efforts, and strong partnerships with communities will be needed to effect substantive changes in children's oral health.

  19. Exotic encounters with dental implants: managing complications with unidentified systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, N; Janda, M Schittek

    2012-06-01

    As the application of dental implants increases worldwide, so is the number of technical and biological complications that general dental practitioners will be called to manage, while maintaining implant patients. In addition, the greater patient mobility encountered today combined with a growing trend of 'dental implant tourism' will very often result in situations where the dentist is requested to deal with complications in implants placed elsewhere and which sometimes might be of an 'exotic' system one cannot directly recognize. Such a situation can pose significant challenges to even experienced clinicians. The challenges are not only in the scientific field, but often include professional and ethical implications. This case report will discuss strategies for the management of implant complications in cases of unidentified implant systems. Critical factors in such situations would be the clinician's experience and special training, the correct radiographic technique, as well as access to the appropriate tools and devices.

  20. Developing cultural competence and social responsibility in preclinical dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W

    2004-04-01

    Dental student development of cultural competence and social responsibility is recognized by educators as an important element in the overall shaping of minds and attitudes of modem dental practitioners. Yet training modalities to achieve these competencies are not clearly defined, and outcome measurements are elusive. This article shows an effective method to meet these desired outcomes. Sixty-one freshmen (class of 2005) participated in forty hours of nondental community service, and reflective journals were completed by the end of second year. Competency outcomes were measured by selecting key words and phrases found in the individual journals. Key phrases were related to compassion, righteousness, propriety, and wisdom. Also, phrases had to be accompanied by written indications of direct program causation. The combination of active-learning (based upon service learning models) in public health settings outside of the dental realm, accompanied by reflective journaling, enhanced cultural understanding and community spirit in the majority of students.

  1. New antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs. Considerations for dental patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Harold V; Quek, Samuel Y P; Subramanian, Gayathri; Abbas, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A recent occurrence in dental practice is the noting of new "blood thinners" when the clinician is reviewing a patient's medical history and medications. "Doc, I take Pradaxa or Effient or Xarelto" etc. After many years of the widespread use of aspirin and Coumadin there has appeared a new generation of medications focused on reducing thromboembolic events in patients at risk. This trend has been driven by a need for drugs providing better drug efficacy based on patient biologic processing of the medications and the frequency and cost factors associated with the monitoring the degree of anticoagulation. Guidelines for assessing bleeding risk and managing patients on these new medications in dental practice are not yet defined and are empirically based on medical practitioner experience. This paper will review these new medications and will discuss current considerations for dental patient care. (Note that not all new antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications will be reviewed in this paper.)

  2. Evidence-based Update of Pediatric Dental Restorative Procedures: Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V; Hsu, K L; Coll, J A; Ginsberg, E; Ball, B M; Chhibber, S; Johnson, M; Kim, M; Modaresi, N; Tinanoff, N

    2015-01-01

    The science of dental materials and restorative care in children and adolescent is constantly evolving, and the ongoing search for ideal restorative materials has led to plethora of research. To provide an evidence base to assist dental practitioners choose appropriate restorative care for children and adolescents. This evidence-based review appraises this literature, primarily between the years 1995-2013, for efficacy of dental amalgam, composites, glass ionomer cements, compomers, preformed metal crowns and anterior esthetic restorations. The assessment of evidence for each dental material was based on a strong evidence, evidence in favor, expert opinion, and evidence against by consensus of the authors. There is varying level of evidence for the use of restorative materials like amalgam, composites, glass ionomers, resin-modified glass-ionomers, compomers, stainless steel crowns and anterior crowns for both primary and permanent teeth. A substantial amount data is available on restorative materials used in pediatric dentistry; however, there exists substantial evidence from systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials and clinicians need to examine and understand the available literature evidence carefully to aid them in clinical decision making.

  3. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... the prevalence of dental caries and gingivitis among. 12-year-old children .... chemical, bacterial and mechanical irritation from dental plaque and ..... We thank the School of Dental Sciences and Colgate. Palmolive for part ...

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES The impaired practitioner- scope of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acknowledged fiduciary relationship has a clear responsibility to assure the public, and all patients, that its practitioners and institutions are trustworthy. ... practitioner and the treating one, as well as the reversal of roles from practitioner to ...

  5. Comparison of clinical practice education in dental hygiene schools in eight countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inukai, Junko; Sakurai, Miwa; Nakagaki, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The profession of dental hygienist is one of the few in which the primary function of the practitioner is to prevent oral disease and to promote the well-being of patients. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical training conditions in schools of dental hygiene in eight...... countries (the USA, Canada, the UK, Sweden, Denmark, Thailand, South Korea and Japan). METHODS: In 2006, we sent out a questionnaire in which we asked dental hygiene schools about how they educate dental hygiene students. RESULTS: The techniques taught to students in schools in Western industrialised...... are trained to perform local anaesthesia and to fill and extract deciduous teeth although the country does not have a specific qualification system. CONCLUSIONS: The contents of clinical training and education in schools of dental hygiene differ greatly among countries....

  6. Reflections on practitioner-researcher collaborative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Morran, Keith

    2010-04-01

    We offer comments regarding two articles in this issue, one titled "Bridging the Practitioner-Scientist Gap in Group Psychotherapy Research" and a complementary article providing the results of a survey, entitled "A Survey of Canadian Group Psychotherapist Association Members' Perceptions of Psychotherapy Research." We also make several recommendations for collaborative research between practitioners and scientists, such as the inclusion of clinicians on the research team, practice research networks, and improved approaches to communicating clinically relevant research findings. Also discussed are reflections and recommendations from the authors' experience as scientist-practitioners.

  7. Infection prevention and control practitioners: improving engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    Every healthcare worker plays a vital part in minimising the risk of cross infection. Infection prevention and control (IPC) practitioners have the skills and competencies to assist organisations in improving engagement among staff and play a vital part in achieving this. IPC practitioners have skills in clinical practice, education, research and leadership, and these skills ensure high-quality care for patients and support strategies for engaging staff. This article highlights how IPC practitioners' skills and competencies are required for preventing infection and improving staff engagement. Engaged staff generate positive outcomes for both patients and staff, which is a welcome result for all healthcare organisations.

  8. Evaluating Qualitative Research for Social Work Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A. Lietz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of social work expects practitioners remain well informed regarding research advances in their respective areas. Research studies conducted through the lens of qualitative inquiry provide important contributions to the social work knowledge base. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide practitioners some orientation regarding qualitative research methods and to highlight potential strategies researchers may use to enhance the trustworthiness and quality of their research. Specifically, the concept of trustworthiness is defined in the context of qualitative inquiry and questions social work practitioners can ask when evaluating the quality and applicability of a qualitative research study are provided.

  9. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  10. Dental erosion, summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  11. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...... dental pain, they expect that the dentist starts treatment at once and that the treatment should provide pain relief. In this situation many patients are fragile, anxious and nervous. If the dentist is able to manage emergency treatment of acute dental pain this will build confidence and trust between...

  12. Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  13. Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Oshida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities.

  14. [Midazolam sedation in the general dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertens, J; Abraham-Inpijn, L; Meuwissen, P J

    1994-03-01

    The general dental practitioner is occasionally confronted with patients who, on the basis of psychological--and often somatic--criteria, are difficult to treat. Medicinal sedation in combination with anxiety reduction may be deemed appropriate for such patients. In the Netherlands inhalation sedation by means of a combination of oxygen and nitrous oxide is generally used. The limitations and disadvantages of this method have directed attention towards sedation by means of midazolam, a quick-acting benzodiazepine. In view of the complications which may accompany the administration of midazolam, the general practitioner working alone or in a group practice is advised against using midazolam sedation. Such use should be reserved for a dentist working in a hospital setting, who is able to consult with a physician regarding the advisability of administering midazolam. Even then, the safety of the patient requires that the practitioners have a proper insight into the physical state of the patient, work according to a protocol and in accordance with clearly defined responsibilities, and provide adequate accommodation during and after treatment.

  15. Effect of aromatherapy on dental patient anxiety: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental anxiety is a common and potentially distressing problem, both for the patients and for dental practitioners. It is considered to be the main barrier and affects the working lives of dental professional potentially compromising their performance. Aim: To know the effect of aromatherapy in the reduction of dental anxiety and to compare the anxiety levels of dental patients with the control group. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial design was used. Of 40 dental clinics in Khammam town, 10 dental clinics were selected by simple random sampling method. A total of 100 patients attending the dental clinic for the first time were included in the study. Ambient odor of lavender was maintained with a candle warmer. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, smoking status, Modified dental anxiety scale (Humphries et al. in 1995, was given to the patients when they were waiting in the waiting room. Student's t-test and ANOVA test were used for data analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Considerable decrease in anxiety scores in 3 age groups was observed. A statistically significant (P = 0.002 decrease with age in mean anxiety score. A significant difference in anxiety scores of lavender group, a significant decrease of anxiety scores with an increase of age. Conclusion: Lavender decreased the current anxiety scores of patients effectively.

  16. Teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice for dental hygienists: an innovative oral health workforce model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfelt, Fred F

    2011-06-01

    The 2010 U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) calls for training programs to develop mid-level dental health care providers to work in areas with underserved populations. In 2004, legislation was passed in Arizona allowing qualified dental hygienists to enter into an affiliated practice relationship with a dentist to provide oral health care services for underserved populations without general or direct supervision in public health settings. In response, the Northern Arizona University (NAU) Dental Hygiene Department developed a teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice dental hygiene model that places a dental hygienist in the role of the mid-level practitioner as part of a digitally linked oral health care team. Utilizing current technologies, affiliated practice dental hygienists can digitally acquire and transmit diagnostic data to a distant dentist for triage, diagnosis, and patient referral in addition to providing preventive services permitted within the dental hygiene scope of practice. This article provides information about the PPACA and the Arizona affiliated practice dental hygiene model, defines teledentistry, identifies the digital equipment used in NAU's teledentistry model, give an overview of NAU's teledentistry training, describes NAU's first teledentistry clinical experience, presents statistical analyses and evaluation of NAU students' ability to acquire diagnostically efficacious digital data from remote locations, and summarizes details of remote applications of teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice dental hygiene workforce model successes.

  17. Knowledge and attitudes of dental interns in Karnataka state, India, regarding implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sohini; Gowda, Triveni M; Kumar, Tarun A B; Mehta, Dhoom S

    2013-10-01

    Implant treatment today is highly reliable as a valid restorative option for missing teeth. As more patients worldwide opt for implant treatment, it is now imperative for dental practitioners to have sound information about dental implants so they can help patients make informed decisions. This study sought to define the knowledge and attitudes regarding dental implants of dental interns in the state of Karnataka, India, and to evaluate the dental implant curriculum structure at the undergraduate level. A survey was conducted of dental interns (students in their fifth, clinical year of undergraduate study) in seven of the forty-five academic dental institutions in this state. The questionnaire consisted of fifteen questions that assessed the respondents' level of knowledge and source of information regarding implants. A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed, and 417 interns responded for a response rate of 83.4 percent. In the results, 73.3 percent reported they were not provided sufficient information about implants in their undergraduate curriculum, and 95.7 percent of them wanted more. Also, 63.5 percent of the respondents believed that high costs could limit the use of dental implants as a tooth replacement modality in India. This study concludes that revision in the undergraduate dental curricula at these schools is needed to better prepare students for practicing implant dentistry.

  18. Evaluation of dental and bone age in iron-deficient anemic children of South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Haridas, Harish; Hunsigi, Prahlad; Farooq, Umar; Erugula, Sridhar R.; Ealla, Kranti K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Dental and bone age is very essential for the dental practitioner in planning treatments and is an extra source of information for the pediatrician, orthopedician, and endocrinologist. There are few published data regarding collation between dental age, bone age, and chronological age in iron-deficiency anemic children. This study has been undertaken to evaluate and compare dental age, bone age, and chronological age in children with iron-deficiency anemia. Materials and Methods: One hundred iron-deficiency anemic children were selected in the age group of 8–14 years. Chronological age of the child was recorded by asking birth date from parents or checking school records. Dental age was calculated by Demirjians method and bone age was evaluated using Bjork, Grave, and Brown's method. Unpaired student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient were the two statistical tests applied to compare dental, bone, and chronological age. Results: Dental and bone age was significantly lower (P < 0.001) compared to chronological age. The correlation between the three ages was positive in both sexes. Conclusion: Dental and bone age retardation was a significant feature in our sample of 100 iron-deficient anemic children. Bone age and dental age are valuable parameters in assessing the overall growth of the child. Further studies are required to corroborate our findings. PMID:27891309

  19. The Public Health Practitioner of the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Paul Campbell; Brownson, Ross C

    2017-08-01

    The requisite capacities and capabilities of the public health practitioner of the future are being driven by multiple forces of change, including public health agency accreditation, climate change, health in all policies, social media and informatics, demographic transitions, globalized travel, and the repercussions of the Affordable Care Act. We describe five critical capacities and capabilities that public health practitioners can build on to successfully prepare for and respond to these forces of change: systems thinking and systems methods, communication capacities, an entrepreneurial orientation, transformational ethics, and policy analysis and response. Equipping the public health practitioner with the requisite capabilities and capacities will require new content and methods for those in public health academia, as well as a recommitment to lifelong learning on the part of the practitioner, within an increasingly uncertain and polarized political environment.

  20. BETWEEN ADVERTISING PRACTITIONERS AND ACADEMICS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Finally, though the reviewer‟s claim about the nature of academic–practitioner relations may be limited ..... It seems that intermediaries (media planners, consultancies, research services and products .... India: Prentice Hall. Thorson, E. (2006).

  1. Employment and salary characteristics of nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B; Sweeting, S; Davis, B

    1989-09-01

    Nurse practitioners provide high-quality, cost-effective care to health care consumers, yet they continue to experience low economic compensation and salary compression. The nursing literature is limited with respect to data regarding salaries, benefits and trends in compensation for nurse practitioners. In order to provide baseline data for nurse practitioners to use in negotiating compensation benefits and packages, 459 certified nurse practitioners in North Carolina were surveyed regarding demographic and employment characteristics and job satisfaction. Of the 83 percent who responded, nearly two-thirds earned less than $30,000 per year. Benefits and salary adjustment for certification are reported, and techniques for compensation negotiation are discussed. Although information obtained is specific to North Carolina, geographic similarities may be apparent.

  2. services in nigeria: perception of general practitioners

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Departments of *Radiology and **General Medical Practice. ... Aim: To determine General Practitioners' perceptions of factors influencing patient's access to ... Health insurance and subsidized services as well as training of personnel are ...

  3. Professional Orientation of Colorado PR Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimore, Dan L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Findings indicate that a majority of public relations practitioners are highly educated, have professional media backgrounds as part of their professional experience, and are paid better than newspaper personnel in Colorado. (RB)

  4. Demand for general practitioner and internist services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzick, D S

    1978-01-01

    Demand equations for general-practitioner and internist visits were estimated from 1970 CHAS-NORC survey data on health-service utilization and expenditure. Because a large proportion of respondents reported zero visits, observations were grouped according to cross-classified independent variables and regression analyses were performed using group means as data. The results showed significant differences between demand equations for general-practitioner visits and those for internist visits. Of potential importance was an apparent substitution of internists for general practitioners as ability to pay (income or insurance coverage) increased. Own-price elasticities were low for both general practitioners and internists but were even lower for the latter (0.1 to 0.02) than the former (0.2 to 0.3). The demand for services of the two specialties also differed with respect to disability days, age, sex, residence, and race. PMID:738894

  5. Existentially Oriented Training for Mental Health Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Carl

    1976-01-01

    The author presents an overview of the role of existentialism in the training of counselors and mental health practitioners. Exercises and skill development techniques are also presented for existentially oriented training of psychotherapists, using a workshop format. (HLM)

  6. Diving dentistry: a review of the dental implications of scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Y; Drucker, S

    2011-09-01

    In light of the overwhelming popularity of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, general dental practitioners should be prepared to address complications arising as a result of diving and to provide patients with accurate information. The aim of this article was to introduce the concepts of diving medicine and dentistry to the dentist, and to supply the dental practitioner with some diagnostic tools as well as treatment guidelines. The literature was reviewed to address diving barotrauma (pressure-induced injury related to an air space) to the head, face and oral regions, as well as scuba mouthpiece-related oral conditions. The relevant conditions for dentists who treat divers include diving-associated headache (migraine, tension-type headache), barosinusitis and barotitis-media (sinus and middle ear barotrauma, respectively), neuropathy, trigeminal (CN V) or facial (CN VII) nerve baroparesis (pressure-induced palsy), dental barotrauma (barometric-related tooth injury), barodontalgia (barometric-related dental pain), mouthpiece-associated herpes infection, pharyngeal gag reflex and temporomandibular joint disorder (dysfunction). For each condition, a theoretical description is followed by practical recommendations for the dental practitioner for the prevention and management of the condition.

  7. Observation, Assisting, Apprenticeship: Cycles of Visual and Kinesthetic Learning in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Jeremy A.; Clark, Matthew D.; Lee, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Dentists are self-selected for visual and kinesthetic learning preferences. Watching another practitioner perform treatment can be incredibly didactic, both before and after learning the procedure. This missing part of dental education has the capacity to play a tremendous role in dental education for all levels of practitioner. Dental students in their clinical years begin to realize the meaning of dentistry as a practice, a set of skills that are never perfected. Abundant evidence demonstrates that cycling between observation and practice enhances procedural learning and retention, yet this mechanism is vastly underused in dental education. Collaborative treatment paradigms, wherein the able student assists a more experienced practitioner, can create mentorship. Learning potentially esoteric information or subtle nuances of clinical acumen is facilitated by the contextual framework of the clinical environment and is strengthened by emotional attachments through interpersonal interactions. In this article, we explore the evidence surrounding mentorship and clinical observation both before and after students are given the responsibilities of patient care, which together recapitulate clinical apprenticeship. Finally, we present examples of how apprenticeship can be brought back to dental education, including evaluation of a clinical assisting program that we implemented and explanation of a hypothetical faculty-student practice partnership model. PMID:19648563

  8. University Teaching of entrepreneurship: a practitioner's analysis

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Owen

    2012-01-01

    This is a practitioner doctorate aimed at both Universities about to introduce Entrepreneurship as a subject and practitioners who may be turning to teaching what they know building on their business experience. In this Portfolio the transition from Entrepreneur to Lecturer in Entrepreneurship is explored and several approaches were used to support the transition. A Professional Development Memoir offers a review of the life of an entrepreneur through the lens of Meaning Making Systems in ord...

  9. Promoting visibility for the nurse practitioner role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, M W

    1988-03-01

    In promoting greater public awareness of nurse practitioners' contributions to health care, two major strategies may be used. Creating broad-based visibility through the use of the basic media and marketing strategies, and utilizing individual client encounters to educate clients about the NP role are both effective. NPs should assume the initiative in seeking out opportunities to create positive images for the nurse practitioner.

  10. Evaluating Qualitative Research for Social Work Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The field of social work expects practitioners remain well informed regarding research advances in their respective areas. Research studies conducted through the lens of qualitative inquiry provide important contributions to the social work knowledge base. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide practitioners some orientation regarding qualitative research methods and to highlight potential strategies researchers may use to enhance the trustworthiness and quality of their research. Speci...

  11. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  12. The efficacy of screening for common dental diseases by hygiene-therapists: a diagnostic test accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, R; Glenny, A; Walsh, T; Tickle, M; Worthington, H; Ashley, J; Brocklehurst, P

    2015-03-01

    Regularly attending adult patients are increasingly asymptomatic and not in need of treatment when attending for their routine dental examinations. As oral health improves further, using the general dental practitioner to undertake the "checkup" on regular "low-risk" patients represents a substantial and potentially unnecessary cost for state-funded systems. Given recent regulatory changes in the United Kingdom, it is now theoretically possible to delegate a range of tasks to hygiene-therapists. This has the potential to release the general dental practitioner's time and increase the capacity to care. The aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic test accuracy of hygiene-therapists when screening for dental caries and periodontal disease in regularly attending asymptomatic adults who attend for their checkup. A visual screen by hygiene-therapists acted as the index test, and the general dental practitioner acted as the reference standard. Consenting asymptomatic adult patients, who were regularly attending patients at 10 practices across the Northwest of England, entered the study. Both sets of clinicians made an assessment of dental caries and periodontal disease. The primary outcomes measured were the sensitivity and specificity values for dental caries and periodontal disease. In total, 1899 patients were screened. The summary point for sensitivity of dental care professionals when screening for caries and periodontal disease was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.87) and 0.89 (0.86 to 0.92), respectively. The summary point for specificity of dental care professionals when screening for caries and periodontal disease was 0.87 (0.78 to 0.92) and 0.75 (0.66 to 0.82), respectively. The results suggest that hygiene-therapists could be used to screen for dental caries and periodontal disease. This has important ramifications for service design in public-funded health systems.

  13. The psychological attitude of patients toward health practitioners in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Ayoub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients often complain about their doctor′s attitude toward them. They describe the interaction that they have with some doctors as quick, cold, discourteous, or hardhearted. Although this does not apply to all Lebanese doctors, it does apply to some. Aims: The purpose of this study was to (1 examine the general perception of satisfaction, trust, and openness that Lebanese patients hold toward the work, office, personal, and social characteristics of their doctors - physician or dentist; and (2 identify the aspects on which a Lebanese health practitioner should focus to improve his/her practice. Materials and Methods: A convenient sample of 450 individuals from an area housing nine hospitals and hundreds of private clinics in Greater Beirut were surveyed regarding the qualities of their health practitioners. They were asked to complete a nine-page, 85-item, anonymous, and voluntary questionnaire that dealt with the medical and dental practice in Lebanon. Participants were older than 18 years and mentally competent. None was physicians, dentists, or nurses. The questionnaire was open-ended and initially pretested and piloted among a random sample. Results: Four hundred-fifteen (92% individuals responded. Participants were from different ages, genders, geographical areas, educational backgrounds, and professions. The doctor traits most preferred by the Lebanese public were found to be: Empathy (90%, professionalism (87%, miscellaneous traits (86%, and academics (81%. Conclusion: The results support the conventional wisdom that the idealized perception of a doctor as a care-giving, compassionate, knowledgeable, well-appearing, and healthy role model still holds true within the Lebanese community.

  14. [The nurturing and development of nurse practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man-Hsi; Lin, Wen-Ling

    2007-12-01

    The role of nurse practitioner has been established because of a shortage of doctors. In May 2007, the first cohort of 582 nurse practitioners were licensed in Taiwan. The post of nurse practitioner in Taiwan is formally moving towards systematization and the most urgent matters in that regard are the sorting out of contentious issues and the establishment of clear job descriptions. Competence in critical thinking and problem-based learning is important and has to be improved with practice. The application of teaching assessment tools such as direct observation procedural skills (DOPS), objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), miniclinical evaluation exercises (Mini-CEX), and 360 degree assessments may contribute to the improvement of nurse practitioners' skills in conducting research, appraising evidence-based nursing literature, and developing teaching strategies and advanced systems by making policy clear, evaluating, auditing and monitoring the clinical competence of nurse practitioners, and incorporating essential findings into hospitals' evaluations of such staff, enabling them all the better to perform their role functions. Obviously, nursing accreditation is necessary in improving the intervention quality of nurse practitioner.

  15. Sharing MedlinePlus®/MEDLINE for Information Literacy Education (SMILE): A Dental Public Health Information Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Julie K.; Levy, Linda S.; Cogdill, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    The SMILE project represented a partnership among the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries, the Gateway Clinic in Laredo, and the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. The project focused on improving dental practitioners' access to reliable information resources and integrating the best evidence into public health dental practice. Through its training program, SMILE cultivated a set of “power information users” among the dentists, dental hygienists, and community health workers (promotores) who provide public health preventive care and oral health education. The dental public health practitioners gained information literacy skills and increased their knowledge about reliable sites such as blogs, PubMed®, and MedlinePlus®. This project fostered opportunities for expanded partnerships with public health personnel. PMID:22040242

  16. Sharing MedlinePlus®/MEDLINE® for information literacy education (SMILE): a dental public health information project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Julie K; Levy, Linda S; Cogdill, Keith W

    2011-01-01

    The SMILE project represented a partnership among the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries, the Gateway Clinic in Laredo, and the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. The project focused on improving dental practitioners' access to reliable information resources and integrating the best evidence into public health dental practice. Through its training program, SMILE cultivated a set of "power information users" among the dentists, dental hygienists, and community health workers (promotores) who provided public health preventive care and oral health education. The dental public health practitioners gained information literacy skills and increased their knowledge about reliable sites such as blogs, PubMed®, and MedlinePlus®. This project fostered opportunities for expanded partnerships with public health personnel.

  17. Dental fraud: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Max H

    2003-01-01

    A manager of a dental benefits program defines fraud and abuse in the dental context. Such practices may cost as much as four billion dollars annually and have a damaging effect on the trust the profession places in the profession and on the way dentists relate to each other.

  18. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  19. [Dental practice and AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, S

    1991-01-01

    In Thailand nowadays AIDS is not completely under control. This is evident from reports which show an increasing number of HIV-positive patients. Since an unknown number of HIV-infected persons who are either undiagnosed or asymptomatic come to get dental service, fears of getting infected with HIV have been developed among dental professionals. This article summarizes a number of past studies and reports on HIV transmission in dental work and discusses the possibility of AIDS infection and dental occupational risk. It also urges dental professionals to take effective safety precaution against the infection. This is for their own and their patients' well-being and hopefully for Thailand's success in controlling AIDS.

  20. Selection criteria for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Faculty of General Dental Practitioners (UK) has a declared commitment to 'improving the standards of patient care'. By the provision of standards and guidelines it aims to help the profession to achieve this goal. Standards and guidelines are simply tools a dentist may use to improve treatment planning and care outcomes. The Self-Assessment Manual and Standards, SAMS, first published in 1991, is now well known to the profession and has become a frequently quoted source in clinical audit and quality assurance initiatives. Since its publication the scientific methodology of systematic reviews of the literature has progressed dramatically and this book is based on these developments. Evidence-based care is well established in medicine and dentistry and these selection criteria and guidelines follow these established protocols by basing advice on the available scientific evidence wherever possible. This book's purpose is a practical one, it is not intended to be limiting or restrictive but to be useful in the decision-making process. This is the first in a series of standards documents from the FGDP(UK) which are based on reviews of the scientific literature and employ the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) methodology for guideline production. They are not constraints but an aid to effective treatment planning and patient care.

  1. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth"…

  3. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix Corporation, Including On-Site Leased...

  4. An Inter- and Intraprofessional Education Program in Which Dental Hygiene Students Instruct Medical and Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Hiromi; Kondo, Keiko; Ohara, Yuki; Yasuda, Masayo; Kishimoto, Natsuki; Sunaga, Masayo; Endo, Keiko; Arakawa, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Shinada, Kayoko

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate an inter- and intraprofessional education program with a peer support joint practice in which dental hygiene students teach medical and dental students about oral health care for older people requiring long-term care. In 2015 at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 22 dental hygiene students in their third year at the School of Oral Health Care Sciences (OH3), 110 students in their third year at the School of Medicine (M3), and 52 students in their third year at the School of Dentistry (D3) participated in this program. The OH3 students practiced with a whole-body-type simulator to learn oral health care for older people and then taught the methods to the M3 and D3 students according to their self-designed teaching plan. All M3 and D3 students experienced being both practitioner and patient. The number of respondents and response rates on the questionnaires after the training were 22 (100%), 102 (92.7%), and 52 (100%) for the OH3, M3, and D3 students, respectively. Self-assessment by the OH3 students indicated that they could supervise other students sufficiently (77-86%), and 91% of them found the preclinical practice with the simulator efficient for the peer support joint practice. Almost all the M3 and D3 students reported that they gained understanding of the methods (99%), significance (100%), and important points of oral health care for older people (97%) in addition to the jobs and roles of dental hygienists (93%) because of this program. The M3 students understood the methods and significance of oral health care more deeply than did the D3 students (p<0.05). This study found that an interprofessional program with a peer support joint practice to cultivate practical clinical ability aided in increasing understanding and cooperation between medicine and dentistry.

  5. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  6. Practitioner Reflections on Engineering Students' Engagement with e-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Rosemary L.; Richardson, Jennifer C.; Banky, George P.; Coller, Brianno D.; Jaksa, Mark B.; Lindsay, Euan D.; Maier, Holger R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of student engagement with e-learning, using practitioner reflection as a lens. Five e-learning practitioners each provided a case study from their teaching, which was the focus of practitioners' reflective accounts. Each of the practitioners had used e-learning as a way of promoting both learning and…

  7. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Della Bona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different substrates, which has offered a great challenge to dental zirconia research and development. This study characterizes zirconia as a dental biomaterial, presenting the current consensus and challenges to its dental applications.

  8. Evidence-based practice and the professionalization of dental hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobban, Sandra J

    2004-11-01

    The application of knowledge is fundamental to human problem solving. In health disciplines, knowledge utilization commonly manifests through evidence-based decision making in practice. The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of the evidence-based practice (EBP) movement in health professions in general, and dental hygiene in particular, and to examine its relationship to the professionalization agenda of dental hygiene in Canada. EBP means integrating practitioner expertise with the best available external evidence from research. Proponents of EBP believe that it holds promise for reducing a research-practice gap by encouraging clinicians to seek current research results. Both the Canadian and American Dental Hygienists Associations support practice based on current research evidence, yet recent studies show variation in practice. Professionalization refers to the developmental stages through which an organized occupation passes as it develops traits that characterize it as a profession. The status conferred by professionalization privileges a group to make and monitor its own decisions relative to practice. Dental hygiene's success in acquiring attributes of a profession suggests that transformation to a profession is occurring. This paper compares the assumptions and challenges of both movements, and argues the need for a principal focus on the development of a culture of evidence-based dental hygiene practice.

  9. Straightforward Case of Dental Implant in General Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji P. Tjikman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant has become a fast developing and dynamic field in dental practice. It is acknowledged as a predictable treatment modality with high clinical success rates. Conventional fixed prostheses are no longer considered to be the first choice of treatment for replacing a missing tooth. Despite the increasing number of patients requesting dental implant treatments, there are only some clinicians who are offering implant therapy in their daily practice. The International team for Implantology described a straightforward case as a simple case such as implant placements in adquate soft and hard tissue conditions and single-tooth restorations in a non-aesthetic zone. A review of the current literature discussed the implementation of implant dentistry in universities worldwide into their curriculum for both undergraduate and postgraduate programs in general dentistry. The European consensus in implant dentistry education concluded that it is desirable to include the surgical technique for implant placement for straightforward cases into the dental curriculum. The levels and limitations to which the various aspects of implant dentistry and related skills are taught to be determined by the academic community. This review aimed at promoting awareness amongst dental practitioners and institutions in Indonesia of the shifting treatment paradigm in the maangement of a missing tooth. Hence clinicians will be able to include implant dentistry in the treatment planning of their patients and also undertake a significant part in the execution of such treatments.

  10. Are there guidelines for reporting clinical research findings in oral lectures and seminars in dental meetings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, C M

    2013-03-01

    Dental meetings are one of the most important resources for disseminating knowledge to dental practitioners. Therefore, the information provided in such meetings should be as unbiased as possible. This paper assessed whether major general dentistry and periodontology/implant dentistry meetings have guidelines for reporting scientific evidence in oral lectures and seminars. The homepages of seven dental meetings (EUROPERIO, AAP, EAO, AO, IADR, ADA, and FDI) were assessed to check for guidelines for presenting scientific data in oral lectures and seminars, according to defined criteria. Only three of these dental meetings reported information for presentations on their homepages, although these guidelines were related to technical issues rather than recommendations for the presentation of scientific data. The present paper suggests guidelines for reporting scientific evidence in oral lectures and seminars in dental meetings to improve the current standards of reporting. High standards of reporting may provide less biased information, which is necessary for dental practitioners and clinicians to make accurate judgements on the efficacy/effectiveness of therapies.

  11. Scholarship, Students, and Practitioners: Bringing Scholarship into the Expectations of Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Increased attention is being given to bridging the gap separating thanatology researchers and practitioners. College undergraduates studying to be human service professionals represent a cohort with a significant stake in bridging this gap. Inculcating in college students expectations as well as expertise to use research as practitioners not only…

  12. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline "Dizziness"; reaction from a general practitioner's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline entitled 'Dizziness' concerns a complaint experienced by many people, yet it provides few scientific data to support the recommendations. The standard does, however, provide the general practitioner with some concrete advice: the diagnos

  13. General Practitioner Knowledge Levels About Circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Cankorkmaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was carried out to investigate knowledge levels of general practitioners and their thoughts about circumcision in Middle Anatolia.Materials and Methods: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out with 247 general practitioners working in Sivas. A questionnaire was prepared by the authors using previous reports. Questionnaires were sent to subjects by post. One hundred and seventy eight general practitioners (57 women, 121 men responded and were included in the study. For statistical analysis, Chi-square test was used and p<0.05 value was accepted as significant.Results: 42.1% of subjects believed that circumcision should be performed between 2 and 6 years of age. 2.2% of subjects declared that circumcision could be done at home and 7.3% believed that the location of the operation is not important. 9.6% of subjects believed that the person who performs the circumcision does not have to be a doctor. 21.3% of subjects believed that circumcision could be performed without anesthesia during the newborn period because of undeveloped pain sensation. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that general practitioners, who are the most easily accessible health staff for information about health, do not have updated information about the way to perform circumcision and its necessity. Therefore, it is concluded that education programs about circumcision for general practitioners must be continued and updated.

  14. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  15. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  16. Feline dental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P; Williams, C A

    1986-09-01

    Periodontal disease and chronic gingivitis/stomatitis are the most common feline dental diseases. With routine dental care and increased emphasis on home oral hygiene, these diseases can be controlled. Cats can be seen with a number of other dental disorders, and improved treatment methods such as restorations of early subgingival resorptive lesions, endodontic therapy, and orthodontic therapy can be performed successfully. More study and research are necessary about the gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and subgingival resorptive lesions so that improved prevention and treatment recommendations can be made.

  17. A simplified model for biomedical waste management in dental practices - A pilot project at Thane, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om N Baghele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of biomedical waste (BMW is generated in dental practices, which can be hazardous to the environment as well as to those who come in contact with the materials, if not dealt with appropriately. Most of the rules world-wide are not specific for dental BMW management and hinder easy understanding by dental practitioners. Because of lack of clear-cut guidelines either from Dental Council of India or Government of India or Indian Dental Association (IDA on disposal of dental wastes, this article is designed to explore and review on these issues and formulate a simplified scheme. The guidelines by the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board from the directives of The Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India through BMW (Management and Handling Rules, 1998, (BMW-MH-98, similar guidelines being followed elsewhere in the world, the local BMW disposal company′s rules and the IDA′s Clinic Standardization Program guidelines. We developed and implemented a simplified waste segregation protocol for practicing dentists and dental hospitals. A methodological dental waste segregation protocol was required considering its disposal and ill-effects on health and the environment. The simplified scheme provided a good model to be followed in developing countries like India. The scheme improved understanding among dentists because of its self-explanatory nature.

  18. Thinking forensics: Cognitive science for forensic practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Gary; Towler, Alice; Growns, Bethany; Ribeiro, Gianni; Found, Bryan; White, David; Ballantyne, Kaye; Searston, Rachel A; Thompson, Matthew B; Tangen, Jason M; Kemp, Richard I; Martire, Kristy

    2017-03-01

    Human factors and their implications for forensic science have attracted increasing levels of interest across criminal justice communities in recent years. Initial interest centred on cognitive biases, but has since expanded such that knowledge from psychology and cognitive science is slowly infiltrating forensic practices more broadly. This article highlights a series of important findings and insights of relevance to forensic practitioners. These include research on human perception, memory, context information, expertise, decision-making, communication, experience, verification, confidence, and feedback. The aim of this article is to sensitise forensic practitioners (and lawyers and judges) to a range of potentially significant issues, and encourage them to engage with research in these domains so that they may adapt procedures to improve performance, mitigate risks and reduce errors. Doing so will reduce the divide between forensic practitioners and research scientists as well as improve the value and utility of forensic science evidence.

  19. COMMITMENT OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS ON PROPHYLAXIS ACCORDING TO THE PATIENT’S OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Peycheva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The vicious cycle of underestimating promotion and prevention of health care by all involved – patients, medical and dental general practitioners (GP continues. According to the health regulation, GPs should inform their patients about the mandatory annual check-ups. GPs are obliged to put in a visible place in their medical office information about all mandatory check-ups for patients under 18 years old – when they are and what they should include. The aim is to study patients’ opinion regarding the role of medical and dental general practitioners in prophylaxis. Material and Methods: A questionnaire was prepared, for the purposes of the study. The methods utilised were a direct individual anonymous questionnaire, statistical – descriptive, analytical (hi – square. The answers were examined and statistically processed according to age, gender and education level of the participants. Results: 1. According to the questionnaires, almost 90 % of patients do not receive equate information about their oral and medical condition. 2. Only 1/5 of GPs inform their patients about the mandatory annual check –ups, immunisations and procedures related to the patient's age. Conclusion: Strict control of the activities of GPs and sanctions for non- regular patients are needed.

  20. Health care innovation: Working with General Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of innovations for clinical practice warrants active engagement of clinicians in the research process. This requires attention to factors that serve as incentive to participate. The explanation for the success of factors that encourage practitioners to participate in research can be found in sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction with clinical practice. It is also important to consider intrinsic incentives such as common and troublesome clinical presentations that are related to workload or unsatisfactory clinical encounters. This review will consider each of these factors and suggest ways in which clinicians, especially general practitioners, may be invited to assist on research projects.

  1. Advance directives: role of nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenk, J S

    1997-07-01

    Advance directives are documents that guide end of life decisions. Although advance directives are a fairly recent phenomenon in health care, they are grounded in both legal and ethical principles. Studies show few people have completed advance directives. Persons do not tend to complete advance directives for various reasons. Lack of knowledge has been identified, as well as belief that physicians should initiate the discussion and that the topic is appropriate only for the elderly or those in poor health. Many nurse practitioners practice in primary care settings, which are ideal for discussions about advance directives. Nurse practitioners possess the opportunities and skills to discuss advance directives with their patients.

  2. Changes to a CA Programme - Practitioners' Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Wheeler

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the perceptions of practitioners of the new directions taken by NZICA with respect to its academic and professional programme requirements to obtain CA Institute membership. The “future viability of any professional body is dependent on continuously attracting new members, ideally the best and the brightest new tertiary graduates”, and this is “undoubtedly the case for New Zealand’s professional accounting body, the New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants (NZICA” (Malthus & Fowler 2009, p. 26. In this study, the concurrent triangulation approach to mixed methods described by Creswell (2009 was used to collect data. This approach enabled the results of the two quantitative and qualitative databases to be integrated and compared. It was found that accounting practitioners felt the changes made by NZICA may devalue the brand, while the reduction in liberal papers would result in a narrower degree. Overall, accounting practitioners agreed that three to four years of tertiary accounting education was adequate, a broader four-year course would result in a better-rounded graduates. The reduction in the length of the tertiary programme caused concern that future graduates would be less mature. Accounting practitioners also felt that the changes would harm the credibility of NZICA internationally. However, some accounting practitioners did welcome the fact that the NZICA membership requirements will be more aligned with Institute of Chartered Accountants Australia. Accounting practitioners felt that the new technical modules would offer more flexibility. They believed that the four technical modules should repeat the material taught at university, as long as a balance was maintained between technical and practical skills. They also believed that the changes would result in an increased onus on the employer. Additionally, accounting practitioners agreed that on-the-job training should not replace a tertiary

  3. Cyberbullying: implications for the psychiatric nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Lindsey M; Hubbard, Grace B

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform and educate psychiatric nurse practitioners about the pervasiveness of the rapidly increasing problem of cyberbullying. As more children and adolescents obtain access to the Internet, mobile devices, and social networking sites, the exposure to bullying in the virtual format increases. Cyberbullying is a growing public health concern and can affect mental health and school performance. Cyberbullying often results in a range of psychiatric symptoms and has been linked to suicide attempts and completions. The psychiatric nurse practitioner is uniquely prepared to provide a range of interventions for patients, families, and communities who have experienced cyberbullying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Practitioners' Tools in Analysing Financial Markets Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Nicolau

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In a chaotic and confusing place as world of investing is, the practitioners, who operate onmarkets every day, have continuously searched to forecast properly the market movements. Moreminded to financial speculations, practitioners analyse financial markets looking for potentialweaknesses of the Efficient Market Hypothesis, and most of the times their methods are criticized byacademics. This article intends to present the traditional tools used by traders and brokers in analysingfinancial markets, emphasizing on critical opinions and scientific works published on this argumentby now.

  5. Management of dental patients with seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Robert B; Sullivan, Steven M

    2006-10-01

    Dental practitioners from time to time must treat patients with epilepsy or similar seizure disorders. This article describes the various classification for epilepsy, explains how such disorders are evaluated and diagnosed, discusses management methods, and addresses related issues for special populations, such as pregnant women and elderly. In addition, the article offers information about what special steps dentists should take in treating such epileptic patients and others vulnerable to seizures and in preparing offices and staff for the possibility that a patient will have a seizure in the office. In general, a patient with severe, poorly controlled epilepsy should be treated in a hospital. Otherwise, a well-controlled patient should easily be treated in the office.

  6. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  7. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  8. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    York: Plenum Pub Co, 1975:635. V ".. PROPERTIES OF DENTAL MATERIALS--WOOLSEY 11 14. Ringle RD, Webber RL, Anusavice KJ, Fairhurst CW. Thermal... Anusavice et al (8) have demonstrated in silver-palladium metals, the presence of surface nodules created by internal oxidation of tin during the...683-689. 7. Ringle RD, Webber RL, Anusavice KJ, Fairhurst CW. Thermal expansion contraction behavior of dental porcelain-alloy systems. J Dent Res

  9. Are advertisements in dental journals supported by an appropriate evidence-base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnutt, Ivor G; Hardy, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Dental professionals are constantly exposed to advertisements in the dental literature. These promote products, either for use in the operatory or to recommend to patients. In an era of evidence-based practice, what references are provided to support claims made by the advertisers? This study aimed to determine if advertisements in four major dental journals, whose target audience is general dental practitioners, were supported by an appropriate evidence-base, readily accessible to readers. The 2010 printed volumes of the Australian Dental Journal, British Dental Journal, Dental Update and the Journal of the American Dental Association were hand searched to identify advertisements which made a claim of clinical benefit or superiority to competing products. Advertisements were categorized according to type of product being promoted and the availability, nature and number of any supporting references was recorded. Repeated advertisements were analyzed only once. A total of 390 advertisements were identified and 369 made a claim of benefit or superiority. When the 222 duplicates of the same advertisement were removed, 147 unique advertisements remained. Of these: 54 (37%) were advertisements related to dental devices for in-surgery use; 44 (30%) for dental materials, and 27 (18%) for dentifrices/medicaments. 113 (76.9%) advertisements offered no evidential support for claims made. Of the 34 advertisements that provided evidential support, only 20 provided a complete reference that could readily be sourced by an interested reader: 15 articles in refereed journals; 5 data on file; 3 in-house studies and combinations thereof. Four references were not accessible due to incomplete referencing. Two advertisements provided evidence that was not relevant to the product being advertised. The majority of advertisements in the dental literature do not provide an adequate evidence-base, readily available to readers, to support the claims being made. If evidence-based practice is

  10. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  11. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  12. The teaching of all-ceramic restorations in Scandinavian dental schools: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, A; Mjör, I A; Frazier, K B

    1996-06-01

    The study was designed to survey the curricular requirements, types of clinical experience, and materials/ techniques used in teaching programs for all-ceramic restorations in Scandinavian dental schools. All 13 dental schools responded. Ten offered some clinical experience to pre-doctoral students, but only one required one all-ceramic restoration. The departments of fixed prosthodontics had the main teaching responsibility. All-ceramic crowns were taught at 9, veneers at 7, and inlays/onlays at 10 dental schools. A wide range of different teaching concepts, materials, and views on indications and contraindications was reported. It appears as if all-ceramic restorations are regarded as experimental by the teaching institutions, although the dental industry and some practitioners strongly recommend these types of restorations.

  13. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  14. Integrated Communications and Practitioners' Perceived Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Patricia B.; Miller, Debra A.

    1993-01-01

    Finds little or no difference in the interest of small market advertising and public relations practitioners in professional courses. Lends support to the idea of a common curriculum (an Integrated Marketing Communications program) to fulfill the educational needs of both groups. (SR)

  15. Twice Exceptionality from a Practitioner's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omdal, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The new definition of twice exceptionality by the National Twice-Exceptional Community of Practice (2e CoP) is a tool that will facilitate communication and collaboration for practitioners in the regular classroom, gifted education specialists, administrators, and professors. In this article, the author shares his experiences in several of these…

  16. Learning to Lead: A Practitioner Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Maddy

    2014-01-01

    This reflective essay presents a personal account of experiences and models that have shaped the development of the author as a leader in tertiary education. It is presented from the perspective of a practitioner whose career has led her through academic and administrative roles in Australian and UK institutions into her current position as…

  17. Informal and formal learning of general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, Nadia Roos; Dekker, Anne R. J.; van der Velden, Alike W.; de Groot, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of formal learning from a web-based training and informal (workplace) learning afterwards on the behaviour of general practitioners (GPs) with respect to prescription of antibiotics. Design/methodology/approach To obtain insight in

  18. Bullying Prevention for Public Health Practitioners

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-19

    This podcast discusses bullying as a public health problem, and provides information and resources for public health practitioners.  Created: 1/19/2012 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 1/19/2012.

  19. Prescribing behavior of general practitioners : Competition matters!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumans, C.B.C.

    Background General Practitioners (GP) have limited means to compete. As quality is hard to observe by patients, GPs have incentives to signal quality by using instruments patients perceive as quality. Objectives I investigate whether GPs prescribe more units when confronted with more competition. As

  20. Informal and Formal Learning of General Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaan, Nadia Roos; Dekker, Anne R. J.; van der Velden, Alike W.; de Groot, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of formal learning from a web-based training and informal (workplace) learning afterwards on the behaviour of general practitioners (GPs) with respect to prescription of antibiotics. Design/methodology/approach: To obtain insight in various learning processes, semi-structured…

  1. Learning to Lead: A Practitioner Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Maddy

    2014-01-01

    This reflective essay presents a personal account of experiences and models that have shaped the development of the author as a leader in tertiary education. It is presented from the perspective of a practitioner whose career has led her through academic and administrative roles in Australian and UK institutions into her current position as…

  2. Grammar-Based Teaching: A Practitioner's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Betty

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the role of grammar in second language instruction from the point of view of a longtime practitioner. It outlines the basic methods and assumptions underlying Grammar-Based Teaching (GBT), which the author sees as an effective, ever-evolving, and widespread pedagogical practice. The article discusses the importance of…

  3. Adlerian Counseling: A Practitioner's Approach. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Thomas J.

    Written with the practitioner in mind, this overview of the theory and practice of Alfred Adler's Individual Psychology explains the dimensions and uses of natural and logical consequences--the twin bases of Adlerian/Individual Psychology. The text takes a practical approach to the topic, and covers a variety of settings (school, home, community,…

  4. Violence against General Practitioners in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Berna; Kartal, Mehtap; Midik, Ozlem; Buyukakkus, Alper

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to determine the violence against general practitioners (GPs) through their suggestions on its cause and prevention. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study based on self-administered questionnaire answered by a convenience study population consisting of 522 GPs between November and December 2006. Of the participating GPs, 82.8%…

  5. General practitioners and their learning styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A P; Bolden, K J

    1989-05-01

    Continuing medical education sessions are often poorly attended by general practitioners. One reason may be that these traditionally consist of lectures by hospital consultants with a strong theoretical bias which may have little relevance to the learning needs of general practitioners. To compare the learning styles of teachers and learners in general practice, learning style questionnaires were administered to 50 hospital clinical tutors, 78 general practitioner trainers, 63 trainees and 47 non-trainer principals. The questionnaire covered four different learning preferences: activist, reflector, theorist and pragmatist. The findings showed that the learning styles of hospital tutors and general practitioner trainers were statistically significantly different to those of non-trainer principals and trainees. The tutors and trainers scored much higher on theorist styles and to a lesser extent on reflector and pragmatist styles. There were no significant differences on activist scores. Since teachers tend to teach in their preferred learning style, which may not match the style of the recipients, these findings have implications for continuing medical education in general practice. These implications are discussed.

  6. Adlerian Counseling: A Practitioner's Approach. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Thomas J.

    Written with the practitioner in mind, this overview of the theory and practice of Alfred Adler's Individual Psychology explains the dimensions and uses of natural and logical consequences--the twin bases of Adlerian/Individual Psychology. The text takes a practical approach to the topic, and covers a variety of settings (school, home, community,…

  7. Information risk management a practitioner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, David

    2014-01-01

    Information risk management (IRM) is about identifying, assessing and prioritising risks to keep information secure and available. This accessible book provides practical guidance to the principles and development of a strategic approach to an IRM programme. The only textbook for the BCS Practitioner Certificate in Information Risk Management.

  8. 77 FR 9137 - National Practitioner Data Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... liability in a civil action for entities reporting information as required by section 1921 (so long as such... reporting licensure and certification actions taken against a health care practitioner or entity by a State... entity to carry out the reporting activities of Sec. 60.12 due to a Board's failure to comply with...

  9. Informal and formal learning of general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, Nadia Roos; Dekker, Anne R. J.; van der Velden, Alike W.; de Groot, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of formal learning from a web-based training and informal (workplace) learning afterwards on the behaviour of general practitioners (GPs) with respect to prescription of antibiotics. Design/methodology/approach To obtain insight in var

  10. ICCMS™ Guide for Practitioners and Educators

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel B. Pitts, Amid I. Ismail, Stefania Martignon, Kim Ekstrand, Gail V. A. Douglas, Christopher Longbottom

    2014-01-01

    A Guide for Educators and Practitioners on the International Caries Classification and Management System. The International Caries Classification and Management System (ICCMS™) is a comprehensive set of clinical protocols that address all diagnostic, preventive and restorative decisions necessary to preserve tooth structure and restore only when indicated.

  11. The Use of Electronic Medical Records To Facilitate Identification of Patients Presenting With Oro-facial Complaints To The General Medical Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Sze Seng

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe University of ManchesterSzeSeng ChanMaster of Philosophy in Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryThe Use of Electronic Medical Records to Facilitate Identification of Patients Presenting With Oro-facial Complaints To The General Medical PractitionersJanuary 2014Aims : To study the pattern of attendance of patients who present to General Medical Practitioners (GMPs) with oro-facial or/and dental complaints. Data Source : All the Primary Medical Cares (PMCs) in the North West e-health data...

  12. Management of patients with facial paralysis in the dental office: A brief review of the literature and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, Aranka; Cristea, Alexandru; Tărmure, Viorica; Trombitaș, Veronica E; Câmpian, Radu S; Albu, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    In the dental office, the dentist may have to examine patients with facial asymmetry and functional disorders caused by facial paralysis (FP). Following clinical examination, it is important for the dental practitioner to establish whether FP was caused by injury to the facial nerve, and to focus on the site of the lesion and potential risk factors. The risks of dental treatment in a patient with FP should also be assessed. Through dental or surgical procedures, the dentist may cause transient or permanent FP. Interdisciplinary collaboration is required for the confirmation of diagnosis and etiology, and for the complex treatment of FP. This article aims to examine the role of the dentist within the multidisciplinary medical team and to present two cases with transient FP following intraoral anesthesia in the dental office.

  13. Assessment of pathology instruction in U.S. Dental hygiene educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Barbara B; Lazar, Ann A; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2015-04-01

    To assess the instruction of pathology content in entry-level and advanced practitioner dental hygiene educational programs and the program directors' perceptions whether their graduates are adequately prepared to meet the increasingly complex medical and oral health needs of the public. A 28-question survey of instructional content and perceptions was developed and distributed using Qualtrics® software to the 340 directors of entry-level and advanced practitioner dental hygiene programs in the US. Respondents rated their level of agreement to a series of statements regarding their perceptions of graduates' preparation to perform particular dental hygiene services associated with pathology. Descriptive statistics for all 28 categorical survey questions were calculated and presented as the frequency (percentage). Of the 340 directors surveyed, 130 (38%) responded. Most entry-level respondents (53%) agreed or strongly agreed (29%) that their graduates were adequately prepared to meet the complex medical and oral health needs of the public, while all respondents of advanced practitioner programs strongly agreed. More respondents strongly agreed to statements related to clinical instruction than to didactic courses. While 64% of respondents agreed that their graduates were prepared to practice unsupervised, if it were legally allowed, 21% were ambivalent. The extent of pathology instruction in entry-level programs varied, but most used traditional formats of instruction, educational resources and assessments of educational outcomes. Advanced practitioner programs emphasized histological and clinical examination of oral lesions and patient case studies. Strengthening pathology instruction would ensure that future generations of dental hygienists would be adequately prepared to treat medically compromised patients. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  14. Lecturer practitioners in six professions: combining cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Pat; Mathers, Nigel J

    2004-07-01

    Whilst research has been undertaken in relation to the lecturer practitioner role in nursing, there have been no cross-professional studies. There is an explicit political agenda in the United Kingdom on interprofessional education and enhancing the status of those who provide practice-based teaching. This paper reports a study to investigate the commonalities and differences between lecturer practitioners across professions and to generate hypotheses about the role, which follows different models of practice in the different professions. An exploratory research design was adopted, using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of lecturer practitioners from six professions (architecture, clinical psychology, law, medicine, nursing and social work). A grounded theory approach was used. All lecturer practitioners perceived a clear dichotomy between their professional practice role and their university role. All used similar strategies to adapt to and deal with combining two very differently perceived cultures. There were striking similarities in response to the consequences of serving "two masters" in the areas of time management and role identity/definition. The role not only bridges theory and practice, but has to operate within very different organizational cultures. Further research is needed to test the generalizability of the findings. Relevance to clinical practice. This investigation aims to inform higher education and health service policy on lecturer practitioners, and also provide support for those undertaking this challenging role. The study poses challenging questions for policymakers in the current climate of interprofessional learning, which need to be addressed if future initiatives in this area are to be successful.

  15. Changes in admission rates for spreading odontogenic infection resulting from changes in government policy about the dental schedule and remunerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Richard; Bhandari, Rishi; Bridle, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The government changed the system of payment to general dental practitioners on 1 April 2005 from a fee/item to a banding system. The figures collected have shown that there has been a 62% increase in the number of patients who require admission for surgical treatment of spreading odontogenic infections compared with the 3-year period before this date.

  16. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  17. DENTAL HOT-COLD SENSITIVITY AND TRAUMATIC DENTAL INJURIES

    OpenAIRE

    Traebert, Jefferson; Martins,Luiz Gustavo Teixeira; Traebert, Eliane Silva de Azevedo; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Although several studies have indicated negative impacts of traumatic dental injuries on children’s quality of life, virtually none of them have explored the possible association between them and the occurrence and dental hot-cold sensitivity. The aim of this study was to study the possible association of hot-cold dental sensitivity and history of traumatic dental injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving a representative sample of 11- to 14-year-old schoolchildre...

  18. Dental caries, parents educational level, family income and dental service attendance among children in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianetti, S; Lombardo, G; Lupatelli, E; Rossi, G; Abraha, I; Pagano, S; Paglia, L

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether socioeconomic determinants, such as parents' educational level, family income and dental service attendance by children, are associated with the presence of caries among an Italian population of children. An observational retrospective study was carried out in a population of children aged 4-14 years who visited the Paediatric Dentistry Department of the University of Perugia, Italy. Children were stratified according to familial socioeconomic level (father's and mother's educational level, family income) and dental service attendance of children. Age- and sex- adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated by means of multivariate logistic regression models. A sample of 231 children (mean age 8.1 yrs, SD 2.6; 127 males, 104 females) was recruited. One hundred and sixty three (70.46%) children in the study had caries. Caries presence in children was higher in children where the mothers' educational level was lower (OR =6.1; 95% CI = 3.1 to 12.7), in children where the fathers' educational level was lower (OR =2.9; 95% CI =1.6 to 5.5) and in children with lower family income (OR = 9.9; 95% 95% CI = 5.1 to 20.1). No statistically significant difference were observed in terms of caries presence between the children who were visited at least once by a dentist and children who were not previously seen by a dental practitioner (OR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.4 to 1.6). Socioeconomic level was an important predictor of caries presence among children. Both low income and low parental educational level were related to an increased presence of caries, whereas previous dental visits experience did not affect caries presence in children.

  19. Case report: unusual dental morphology in a child with ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, K

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Anomalies of dental anatomy are common in the ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. These anomalies, when found in combination with dental caries, can pose a restorative challenge for the paediatric dentist. Modification of traditional techniques and approaches may help the practitioner provide a successful treatment outcome. CASE REPORT: A 3 years and 11 months old girl with a diagnosis of ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasiacleft lip\\/palate (AEC) syndrome was referred for treatment to a specialist paediatric dental service. Her abnormal dental anatomy, hypodontia and dental caries formed a triad of challenges for the team. Under general anaesthesia, her dentition was restored using a combination of restorative approaches and techniques, including the placement of both composite resin and preformed metal crown restorations. FOLLOW-UP: At 18-month followup, the family had successfully implemented good home care and dietary practices, and the local dental service had instituted a preventive programme consisting of regular examination, advice and fluoride varnish placement. The restorations remained intact and no further caries was detected. At 24-month follow-up, the first permanent molars were partially erupted, and displayed unusually deep fissures. There was also a degree of ectopic eruption of the first permanent molars, and possibly of one of the maxillary permanent incisors. CONCLUSION: Dental care for children with AEC syndrome is optimised by early intervention, good home care and regular professional review. Dental care providers should be aware of the possibility of complex dental anatomy, and bear this in mind should it become necessary to formulate a restorative treatment plan.

  20. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  1. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  2. Work-related Musculoskeletal Pain among Different Dental Specialists in United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Natheer H; Khatib, Hiba El; Rajoub, Lin; El-Sayed, Mariem; Naji, Rawand; Youssef, Reem; Kawas, Sausan Al

    2016-08-01

    Dentists are at a very high risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal pain. The present study aimed at studying the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among different dental specialists in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and correlating the region of pain with the type of clinical work done by the specialists. A sample of more than 100 dentists was chosen randomly from different emirates in UAE. An interview questionnaire was administered regarding the number of years of experience and the presence, region, duration, and type of musculoskeletal pain they experienced. Musculoskeletal pain is experienced by 83.3% of periodontists, 80% of conservative dentists, 77.8% of endodon-tists, 72.7% of orthodontists, 70% of oral surgeons, 63.6% of prosthodontists, 63% of general dental practitioners, and 50% of pedodontists. The results have also indicated that the region of experienced musculoskeletal pain does vary according to the specialty. From those dentists who experience work-related musculoskeletal pain, 80% of conservative dentists experience pain in neck and shoulders, 66.7% of periodontists, and 54.5% of orthodontists experience pain in the lower back region. More than 50% of endodontists experience pain in the neck and shoulders regions, and 39% of general dental practitioners who experience pain in the neck region. Preventive measures need to be taken to decrease the risk of dentists and dental specialists developing work-related musculoskeletal pain. The prevalence and distribution of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among registered general dental practitioners and dental specialists in UAE was not clearly documented. The study results indicated that the region that experienced musculoskeletal pain does vary according to the specialty.

  3. Early detection of dental caries using photoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Witte, R.; Koh, I.; Ashkenazi, S.; O'Donnell, M.

    2006-02-01

    For decades, visual, tactile and radiographic examinations have been the standard for diagnosing caries. Nonetheless, the extent of variation in the diagnosis of dental caries is substantial among dental practitioners using these traditional techniques. Therefore, a more reliable standard for detecting incipient caries would be desirable. Using photoacoustics, near-infrared (NIR) optical contrast between sound and carious dental tissues can be relatively easily and accurately detected at ultrasound resolution. In this paper, a pulsed laser (Nd:YAG, Quanta-Ray) was used to probe extracted human molars at different disease stages determined from periapical radiographs. Both fundamental (1064nm) and first harmonic (532nm) pulses (15ns pulse length, 100mJ at fundamental and 9mJ at first harmonic , 10Hz pulse repetition rate) were used to illuminate the occlusal surface of tooth samples placed in a water tank. The photoacoustic signal was recorded with an unfocused wideband single-element piezoelectric transducer (centered at 12 MHz, bandwidth 15 MHz) positioned at small angle (less than 30 degrees) to the laser beam close to the occlusal surface. At the fundamental wavelength, total photoacoustic energy increases from normal to incipient stage disease by as much as a factor of 10. Differences between photoacoustic energy at the fundamental and first harmonic wavelength further indicate spectral absorption changes of the underlying structure with disease progression. Using a focused laser beam, an extracted molar with suspected incipient caries was scanned along the occulusal surface to help localize the caries inside enamel and dentin. The significantly increasing photoacoustic signal at a specific scan line both at fundamental and first harmonic indicates the local development of the incipient caries. The photoacoustic results compare well with visual inspection after layer by layer dissection. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of detecting incipient

  4. The impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible: a before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, A M; Ferrero, A; Brunton, P; Goodwin, M; Horner, K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible, using a "before-after" study design. Eight dental practitioners, who regularly place dental implants in independent dental practice in the North West of England, were presented with realistic simulations of four edentulous cases. The practitioners were asked to assess case difficulty, select implants and then drill osteotomies in preparation for dental implants in the lower canine regions to support a complete overdenture. In the "before" part of the study, a panoramic and a trans-symphyseal view were available. In the "after" part of the study, a CBCT image was added. Perception of case difficulty, implant selection and the incidence of perforations or "near miss perforations" of the lingual cortical plate were recorded. Two cases were regarded as "regular" and two as "challenging". In challenging cases, the availability of CBCT led practitioners to select narrower implants and to assess cases as more difficult. In the challenging cases only, there were fewer perforations of the lingual cortical plate after the availability of CBCT, but this difference was not statistically significant. There were no perforations in the regular cases either before or after the availability of CBCT. Perception of case difficulty and implant selection are of importance only if they change the outcome for the patient. This study provided weak evidence that CBCT is helpful in avoiding perforations in challenging cases. The availability of CBCT had no impact in regular cases.

  5. RECENT ADVANCES IN DETECTION AND DIAGNOSIS OF DENTAL CARIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries , a progressive bacterial damage to teeth , is one of the most commondiseases that affects 95% of the population and is still a major cause of tooth loss.Recent years have seen an increase in research activity surrounding diagnostic methods , particularly in the assessment of early caries lesions. The use of technologi es as adjunct to clinical visual examination for caries diagnosis will facilitate preventive care in dentistry to lower treatment cost as well as reduce the cost and time for testing potential anticaries agents. This article describes the various technolog ies available to aid the dental practitioners in detecting and diagnosis ofdental caries at the earliest stage of its formation , assessing the activities of the detected carious lesion , and quantitatively or qualitatively monitoring of the lesion over time .

  6. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  7. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  8. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...

  9. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where plaque builds up. ...

  10. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Health THE BASIC FACTS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Kim, diagnosed in 1986 People with a chronic disease may neglect their general health and wellness, research shows. Dental care is no exception. A tendency to focus ...

  11. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  12. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... purposes. This amendment clarifies that principles governing determinations by VA's Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of establishing eligibility for dental treatment by VA's Veterans Health Administration (VHA), apply only when VHA requests...

  13. Motivational interviewing in general dental practice: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, E J; Vascott, D; Hocking, A; Nield, H

    2016-12-16

    Objectives The objective of this study was to systematically review the evidence regarding the use of motivational interviewing in the context of general dental practice, in order that practitioners can decide whether it might be an important skill to develop within their practices.Data sources The results reported in this study form part of a larger systematic review which sought to identify whether oral health promotion within dental practice is effective and how its effects can be optimised. Here, we focus on the papers describing motivational interviewing in dental practice published since 1994. The systematic review included searches of 20 online resources (including Ovid Medline and Embase).Data selection Papers which were not about oral health promotion and did not apply the behavioural and psychological theories, which underpin motivational interviewing, were excluded.Data synthesis This review included eight papers all of which were considered to be of robust quality, in terms of their research methods and seven of which were considered to offer externally valid findings. Five described randomised controlled trials and all of these RCTs demonstrated that interventions including motivational interviewing had a positive effect on oral health and health behaviour.Conclusions This review shows that the motivational interviewing technique, which is based on the concept of autonomy support, has potential for helping patients with poor oral health. Training in motivational interviewing for dental personnel could be a very useful addition to the skill set of practitioners and dental teams.

  14. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  15. Degradability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-09-01

    The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as a result of abrasion and dissolution. The chemical durability of dental ceramics is excellent. With the exception of the excessive exposure to acidulated fluoride, ammonium bifluoride, or hydrofluoric acid, there is little risk of surface degradation of virtually all current dental ceramics. Extensive exposure to acidulated fluoride is a possible problem for individuals with head and/or neck cancer who have received large doses of radiation. Such fluoride treatment is necessary to minimize tooth demineralization when saliva flow rates have been reduced because of radiation exposure to salivary glands. Porcelain surface stains are also lost occasionally when abraded by prophylaxis pastes and/or acidulated fluoride. In each case, the solutes are usually not ingested. Further research that uses standardized testing procedures is needed on the chemical durability of dental ceramics. Accelerated durability tests are desirable to minimize the time required for such measurements. The influence of chemical durability on surface roughness and the subsequent effect of roughness on wear of the ceramic restorations as well as of opposing structures should also be explored on a standardized basis.

  16. Theory analysis of the Dental Hygiene Human Needs Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, L; Bowen, D M

    2016-11-09

    Theories provide a structural knowing about concept relationships, practice intricacies, and intuitions and thus shape the distinct body of the profession. Capturing ways of knowing and being is essential to any professions' practice, education and research. This process defines the phenomenon of the profession - its existence or experience. Theory evaluation is a systematic criterion-based assessment of a specific theory. This study presents a theory analysis of the Dental Hygiene Human Needs Conceptual Model (DH HNCM). Using the Walker and Avant Theory Analysis, a seven-step process, the DH HNCM, was analysed and evaluated for its meaningfulness and contribution to dental hygiene. The steps include the following: (i) investigate the origins; (ii) examine relationships of the theory's concepts; (iii) assess the logic of the theory's structure; (iv) consider the usefulness to practice; (v) judge the generalizability; (vi) evaluate the parsimony; and (vii) appraise the testability of the theory. Human needs theory in nursing and Maslow's Hierarchy of Need Theory prompted this theory's development. The DH HNCM depicts four concepts based on the paradigm concepts of the profession: client, health/oral health, environment and dental hygiene actions, and includes validated eleven human needs that evolved overtime to eight. It is logical, simplistic, allows scientific predictions and testing, and provides a unique lens for the dental hygiene practitioner. With this model, dental hygienists have entered practice, knowing they enable clients to meet their human needs. For the DH HNCM, theory analysis affirmed that the model is reasonable and insightful and adds to the dental hygiene professions' epistemology and ontology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Renewing professionalism in dental education: overcoming the market environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2007-02-01

    The most important mission of dental education is development of student professionalism. It is only within the context of professionalism that specialized knowledge and technical expertise find meaning. Altruism, integrity, caring, community focus, and commitment to excellence are attributes of professionalism. Its backbone is the obligation of service to people before service to self--a social contract. Professionalism can and should be acquired by targeted interventions, not as an assumed by-product of dental education. Top-down, rule-based professionalism is contrasted with its experience-based, mentor-mediated, socially driven counterpart. Moral principles are inherent in professional development and the professional way of life. Unfortunately, American society, including higher education, glorifies a market mentality centered on expansion and profit. Through formal and hidden curricula, dental schools send mixed messages to students about the importance of professionalism. Institutional consensus on professionalism should be developed among faculty, administration, and students through passionate advocacy and careful analysis of dentistry's moral convictions. The consensus message should communicate to stakeholders that morality and ethics "really count." Maximum student exposure to faculty exemplars, substantial service-learning experiences, and portfolio use are likely to enhance professionalism, which should be measured for every student, every semester, along with faculty and institutional assessment. Research reveals a significant relationship between levels of student moral reasoning and measures of clinical performance and shows that moral reasoning ability can be enhanced in dental students. Valid and reliable surveys exist to assess student moral reasoning. Documented student unprofessional behavior is a predictor of future state professional board disciplinary action against practitioners, along with low admissions test scores and course failures in

  18. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Della Bona; Oscar E. Pecho; Rodrigo Alessandretti

    2015-01-01

    Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different subs...

  19. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Della Bona; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rodrigo Alessandretti

    2015-01-01

    Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different subs...

  20. Trainees' perceptions of practitioner competence during patient transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Lawrence; Dubrowski, Adam; So, Steph; Kistner, Nicole; Carnahan, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Technical and communicative skills are both important features for one's perception of practitioner competence. This research examines how trainees' perceptions of practitioner competence change as they view health care practitioners who vary in their technical and communicative skill proficiencies. Occupational therapy students watched standardized encounters of a practitioner performing a patient transfer in combinations of low and high technical and communicative proficiency and then reported their perceptions of practitioner competence. The reports indicate that technical and communicative skills have independently identifiable impacts on the perceptions of practitioner competency, but technical proficiency has a special impact on the students' perceptions of practitioner communicative competence. The results are discussed with respect to the way in which students may evaluate their own competence on the basis of either technical or communicative skill. The issue of how this may lead trainees to dedicate their independent learning efforts to an incomplete set of features needed for the development of practitioner competency is raised.

  1. 37 CFR 10.31 - Communications concerning a practitioner's services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... practitioner's services. (a) No practitioner shall with respect to any prospective business before the Office... threaten any prospective applicant or other person having immediate or prospective business before the...

  2. The untreated dental caries in primary teeth: would it be problems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udijanto Tedjosasongko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries still remain as the most prevalent oral health disease in children. Many efforts have been done to prevent dental caries in children, but unfortunately there are dental practitioners who still have false mindset and prefer not to treat the dental caries case in primary teeth with the most common reasons are because it will be replaced with the permanent teeth. There are many negative effect will occur if the dental caries treatments in primary teeth are neglected.This topic would review the effects of untreated dental caries in children based on research reports.Severely decayed teeth have an important impact on children’s general health, nutrition, growth and body weight by causing discomfort, pain, sleeping problems, learning disorders and absence from school.  Untreated caries may affect seriously the quality of children’s life because of pain and discomfort, which could lead to acute and chronic infections, oral mucosal conditions and altered eating and sleeping habits. Furthermore, untreated caries in primary teeth can have a lasting detrimental impact on the permanent dentition by causing high caries risk or developmental defects of the permanent successor tooth. Moreover it has been reported that children at each higher level of caries had significantly lower height and weight outcomes than those with lower caries levels. The untreated dental caries in primary teeth would lead the children to poor growth and health which lowering the their quality of life.

  3. The role of automated external defibrillators in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Barry C; Fantuzzo, Joseph J; Votta, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Dental practices are seeing an increasing number of elderly and medically compromised patients, making it likely that staff will be called upon to respond to medical emergencies in the office, including cardiac arrest. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests account for nearly half of all cardiovascular deaths in the United States. In adult cardiac arrest victims, the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac arrest is ventricular dysrhythmia, either ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation. The survival rate for sufferers of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests is a dismal 1% to 5% to hospital discharge. A majority of people who survive to discharge sustain significant morbidity. Untreated ventricular fibrillation degenerates into asystole, which is often refractory to resuscitative efforts and represents a terminal event. The development and availability of the automated external defibrillator (AED) represents a promising advance in the pre-hospital early defibrillation of victims of sudden cardiac arrest in a variety of settings, often remote from hospitals or EMS personnel. Given the medically compromised segment of the population treated in many dental practices today, it is imperative that dental practitioners and allied health providers become trained in the recognition and prompt initiation of emergency care, including basic life support with early defibrillation. The AED is becoming more accessible, with increasingly widespread availability, training in its use and relative ease of operation, making the goal of increased survival one in which dental health professionals can play a part.

  4. Concordance between Responses to Questionnaire Scenarios and Actual Treatment to Repair or Replace Dental Restorations in the National Dental PBRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Tim J.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the agreement between treatment recommended during hypothetical clinical scenarios and actual treatment provided in comparable clinical circumstances. Methods A total of 193 practitioners in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network participated in both a questionnaire and a clinical study. The questionnaire included three hypothetical scenarios about treatment of existing restorations. Clinicians then participated in a clinical study about repair or replacement of existing restorations. We quantified the overall concordance between their questionnaire responses and what they did in actual clinical treatment. Results Practitioners who recommended repair (instead of replacement) of more scenario restorations also had higher repair percentages in clinical practice. Additionally, for each of the three hypothetical scenario restorations, practitioners who recommended repair had higher repair percentages in clinical practice. Conclusions The questionnaire scenarios were a valid measure of clinicians’ tendency to repair or replace restorations in actual clinical practice. Clinical implications Although there was substantial variation in practitioners’ tendency to repair or replace restorations, responses to questionnaire scenarios by individual practitioners were concordant with what they did in actual clinical practice. PMID:25998565

  5. Prevalence of dental fear and its causes using three measurement scales among children in New Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwar, Anju Singh; Goswami, Mridula

    2017-01-01

    There is a great need for identifying fearful children, who often present problems in patient management, thus affecting the quality of dental care rendered to them. This study is unique in the way that dental fear was assessed through three fear scales as research has suggested the use of more than one scale because each scale has its own restrictions and is open to criticism. The aim of this study was to evaluate dental fear and anxiety (DFA) among children aged 3-14 years using three fear measurement scales. The study was conducted on children (3-14 years) who visited the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry at Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. The DFA levels were measured using three fear measurement scales, i.e., facial image scale (FIS), dental fear scale (DFS), and children's fear survey schedule-dental subscale (CFSS-DS). The dental behavior was estimated using the Frankl's behavior rating scale (FBRS). The prevalence of dental fear according to FIS was 14.3%, according to DFS was 22.6%, and according to CFSS-DS was 7.4%. In assessment of the behavior of children in the clinics through FBRS, it was observed that he maximum number of respondents (69.8%) showed Frankl's Rating 3 i.e. positive. In the DFS and CFSS-DS, the factor which caused most fear was "feeling the needle injected" and "injections," respectively. Assessment of dental fear is an extremely useful tool for the dental practitioner, who can use it to customize the behavioral treatment and management for child patients.

  6. Prevalence of dental fear and its causes using three measurement scales among children in New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Singh Rajwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a great need for identifying fearful children, who often present problems in patient management, thus affecting the quality of dental care rendered to them. This study is unique in the way that dental fear was assessed through three fear scales as research has suggested the use of more than one scale because each scale has its own restrictions and is open to criticism. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate dental fear and anxiety (DFA among children aged 3–14 years using three fear measurement scales. Methods: The study was conducted on children (3–14 years who visited the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry at Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. The DFA levels were measured using three fear measurement scales, i.e., facial image scale (FIS, dental fear scale (DFS, and children's fear survey schedule-dental subscale (CFSS-DS. The dental behavior was estimated using the Frankl's behavior rating scale (FBRS. Results: The prevalence of dental fear according to FIS was 14.3%, according to DFS was 22.6%, and according to CFSS-DS was 7.4%. In assessment of the behavior of children in the clinics through FBRS, it was observed that he maximum number of respondents (69.8% showed Frankl's Rating 3 i.e. positive. In the DFS and CFSS-DS, the factor which caused most fear was “feeling the needle injected” and “injections,” respectively. Conclusion: Assessment of dental fear is an extremely useful tool for the dental practitioner, who can use it to customize the behavioral treatment and management for child patients.

  7. Primary identification of an abused child in dental office: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the injuries of child abuse are many and varied, several types of injuries are common to abuse. Many of these injuries are within the scope of dentistry or easily observed by the dental professional in the course of routine dental treatment. The authors present a case of child abuse with multiple bruises. The child had been spanked in the previous night and the morning of the attendance by his mother. This case emphasized that all practitioners should be vigilant when patients present with abnormal injuries which may be the result of abuse and further investigation should be instigated.

  8. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bertoli, Elizangela; Medynski, Denielle C; Khalaf, Mohd W

    2015-01-01

    Nerve trauma caused by dental implant placement is associated with altered sensation and chronic pain. Complete or partial loss of sensation is often reported by patients who have experienced nerve trauma during implant surgery. Some patients report persistent pain and neurosurgery disturbance long after the normal healing time has passed. In addition, neuropathic pain is reported after implant surgery. Practitioners who place dental implants must be familiar with the differential diagnosis, prevention, and management of neuropathic pain. This article provides insights into the prevention and management of neurosensory deficits and chronic persistent neuropathic pain and considerations for patient referral.

  9. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    faculty.• Provide resident and faculty training in cultural and linguistic competency.• Develop and conduct a collaborative inter professional education project with a Pediatric Medicine department, a nursing school, and other health professions' education programs.• Provide faculty and residents with financial support to pursue a master's degree in public health; and • Provide support and assistance for dental practitioners desiring to explore a transition into the educational environment.

  10. A closer look at diagnosis in clinical dental practice: part 5. Emerging technologies for caries detection and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Iain A; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2004-09-01

    Parts 5 and 6 of this series examine innovations in diagnostic and management procedures and assess their potential to become everyday tools of the dental clinician. This paper examines some of the diagnostic tools supporting a philosophical shift in mainstream dental practice from concern with extensively decayed teeth to a focus on detecting incipient demineralized tissues. With the latter approach, the incipient carious process can be reversed by promoting enamel remineralization and thus eliminating the need for restorative intervention. Numerous methods and devices have been developed to detect, diagnose and monitor such lesions, and several have been produced in versions that may appeal to dental practitioners. This paper considers 3 of these methods and devices: the DIAGNODent laser device, quantitative light-induced fluorescence and the Digital Imaging Fiber-Optic Transillumination device. Each technique is illustrated, the research on its effectiveness is assessed to determine usefulness to the practitioner, and the comparative advantages of the 3 adjunct tools are discussed.

  11. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  12. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  13. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  14. Dental operatory design and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M

    1993-08-01

    Improving and expanding the dental services of a practice can involve purchasing new equipment and even modifying or expanding the physical plant. Operatory design is important to the efficiency with which dental procedures can be performed. Equipment purchases to outfit the dental operatory should be made based on the specific needs and functions of a practice.

  15. Dental amalgam: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations.

  16. Stereoscopy in Dental Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stereoscopy can play a meaningful role in dental education. The study used an anaglyph technique in which two images were presented separately to the left and right eyes (using red/cyan filters), which, combined in the brain, give enhanced depth...... perception. A positional judgment task was performed to assess whether the use of stereoscopy would enhance depth perception among dental students at Osaka University in Japan. Subsequently, the optimum angle was evaluated to obtain maximum ability to discriminate among complex anatomical structures. Finally...... practice, they did recognize its merits for education. These results suggest that using stereoscopic images in dental education can be quite valuable as stereoscopy greatly helped these students' understanding of the spatial relationships in complex anatomical structures....

  17. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Dental Implant Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  19. Orthodontic Implants: Concepts for the Orthodontic Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; de Oliveira Ruellas, Antônio Carlos; Fernandes, Daniel Jogaib

    2012-01-01

    Orthodontic implants have become a reliable method in orthodontic practice for providing temporary additional anchorage. These devices are useful to control skeletal anchorage in less compliant patients or in cases where absolute anchorage is necessary. There are a great number of advantages in this new approach which include easy insertion, decreased patient discomfort, low price, immediate loading, reduced diameter, versatility in the forces to be used, ease of cleaning, and ease of removal. However, a proper management of the screws by the practitioner is necessary in order to increase the success rate of the technique. The purpose of this paper is to update practitioners on the current concepts of orthodontic implants and orthodontic mechanics. PMID:23209470

  20. Cognitive dissonance experienced by nurse practitioner faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B; Hawkins, Joellen W; Weiss, Josie A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate the concept of cognitive dissonance as experienced and reported by nurse practitioner (NP) faculty members. Responses from NP faculty members to an online survey about their experiences with cognitive dissonance. The respondents detailed their experiences with cognitive dissonance, citing differences between expectations for which they are rewarded and those for which they are paid. Expecting all faculty members to excel in practice, research, teaching, and service may create unrealistic workloads for NP faculty members. Examining expectations and considering creation of a clinical track for faculty who practice may be options administrators of NP programs might explore. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Anabolic steroids: implications for the nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D J; Shaw, E B

    1985-12-01

    Anabolic steroids are being used by athletes in a wide variety of sports in efforts to enhance their athletic performances. Steroid abuse is complex to evaluate due to the highly emotional subject matter and the limitations in researching anabolic steroids. This article has been written to heighten the practitioner's awareness of the problem of "sports doping" with anabolic steroids. It will provide practical information on possible consequences of steroid use and outline essential information to obtain through the history, physical exam and laboratory studies. Intervention strategies based on the three levels of prevention are described. With awareness of the problem of sports doping and knowledge of how to deal with it in primary care, the nurse practitioner can enhance the health care provided to aspiring athletes, athletes and retired athletes.

  2. Decreasing barriers for nurse practitioner social entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Dayle B; Monsivais, Diane

    2014-10-01

    To describe difficulties associated with the business-related aspects of practice in role transition of rural nurse practitioners (NPs), and to give practice implications. This focused ethnographic study derived data from semi-structured interviews. Participants provided information about rural NP practice ownership and barriers. The sample consisted of 24 rural NPs living throughout the United States. The majority were 51-60 years of age (45%) and females (93%) who had been in rural practice for 1 to over 20 years. NP social entrepreneurs experience difficulties related to scope of practice, business skills, and role conflict. To decrease barriers for NP clinic ownership and management, NPs need to receive education related to financing a rural practice, legal/regulatory practices, strategic planning, leadership, and clinic management. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Unsupervised Tensor Mining for Big Data Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexakis, Evangelos E; Faloutsos, Christos

    2016-09-01

    Multiaspect data are ubiquitous in modern Big Data applications. For instance, different aspects of a social network are the different types of communication between people, the time stamp of each interaction, and the location associated to each individual. How can we jointly model all those aspects and leverage the additional information that they introduce to our analysis? Tensors, which are multidimensional extensions of matrices, are a principled and mathematically sound way of modeling such multiaspect data. In this article, our goal is to popularize tensors and tensor decompositions to Big Data practitioners by demonstrating their effectiveness, outlining challenges that pertain to their application in Big Data scenarios, and presenting our recent work that tackles those challenges. We view this work as a step toward a fully automated, unsupervised tensor mining tool that can be easily and broadly adopted by practitioners in academia and industry.

  4. [Hyperkalemia - what the general practitioner must know].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Aurelia; Hüsler, Carina; Binet, Isabelle

    2015-03-25

    Hyperkalemia can be a challenge for the general practitioner as it can prove to be benign as well as life-threatening. From a diagnostic point of view, four possibilities have to be differenciated: a pre-analytical cause, potassium release through cell lysis, a potassium shift, a reduced renal excretion of potassium. The first differential diagnosis can often be carried out by a thorough medical history, in particular the medication intake. Also, the first clinical and laboratory investigations can take place at the general practitioner's clinic. If the hyperkalemia proves to be a true hyperkalemia or cannot be explained by poly-medication and known diseases of the patient, not yet identified renal, endocrine or cardiac diseases should be searched for. If a serious condition is identified as the cause of hyperkalemia the patient should be referred to a specialized clinic.

  5. Orthodontic Implants: Concepts for the Orthodontic Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Nelson Elias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic implants have become a reliable method in orthodontic practice for providing temporary additional anchorage. These devices are useful to control skeletal anchorage in less compliant patients or in cases where absolute anchorage is necessary. There are a great number of advantages in this new approach which include easy insertion, decreased patient discomfort, low price, immediate loading, reduced diameter, versatility in the forces to be used, ease of cleaning, and ease of removal. However, a proper management of the screws by the practitioner is necessary in order to increase the success rate of the technique. The purpose of this paper is to update practitioners on the current concepts of orthodontic implants and orthodontic mechanics.

  6. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  7. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  8. INTERNET MARKETING BUDGET ALLOCATION: FROM PRACTITIONER'S PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    LAN ZHAO; JISHAN ZHU

    2010-01-01

    Consider a firm promotes its products through several Internet media with a fixed Internet marketing budget and models the budget allocation decisions as a competitive game, in which each firm formulates its own optimization model that is influenced by the competitors' moves as well. One challenge to the application of such model in practice is how to deal with asymmetric information. In this paper, we discuss several issues that are often asked by the practitioners that are related to dealin...

  9. The Philosophical Practitioner and the Curriculum Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews contemporary debates about tourism and hospitality education to conceptualise a curriculum space framework that can be used to facilitate understanding and decision making. The chapter is conceptual and makes two key contributions: it draws together diverse discourses about...... the balance between higher order knowledge in liberal education and skills-based vocational education required by industry; and it builds upon the Philosophic Practitioner Education to conceptualise a curriculum space that is socially constructed, dynamic and flexible. The proposed framework incorporates...

  10. Non-technical skills for scrub practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Guy

    2012-12-01

    The non-technical skills of situational awareness and the formation of effective interpersonal relationships are essential to enhance surgical outcomes. However, most scrub practitioners demonstrate only tacit awareness of these skills and develop such qualities on an informal basis. Application of non-technical skills may be assessed formally, using a structured framework, to transform normative behaviour and to strengthen barriers against the latent threats that may result from fallible humans working in inadequate organisational systems.

  11. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal... FROM PREPARATION PURSUANT TO AN UNSUSPENDED AND UNREVOKED LICENSE § 107.1 Veterinary practitioners and...)(1) Products prepared by a veterinary practitioner (veterinarian) solely for administration...

  12. The Nature of Learning at Forest School: Practitioners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frances

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates forest school practitioners perceptions of learning at forest school to identify the topics covered, the learning styles, and the philosophies underpinning its delivery, based on interviews with experienced forest school practitioners. Practitioners identified the focus of learning at forest school as social development:…

  13. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  14. Downsizings, Mergers, and Acquisitions: Perspectives of Human Resource Development Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, LaVerne; Roth, Gene

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to provide perspectives of HR practitioners based on their experiences with mergers, acquisitions, and/or downsizings. Design/methodology/approach: This qualitative study utilized interviews with 13 HR practitioners. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Findings: HR practitioners were not involved in…

  15. Downsizings, Mergers, and Acquisitions: Perspectives of Human Resource Development Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, LaVerne; Roth, Gene

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to provide perspectives of HR practitioners based on their experiences with mergers, acquisitions, and/or downsizings. Design/methodology/approach: This qualitative study utilized interviews with 13 HR practitioners. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Findings: HR practitioners were not involved in…

  16. The Nature of Learning at Forest School: Practitioners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frances

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates forest school practitioners perceptions of learning at forest school to identify the topics covered, the learning styles, and the philosophies underpinning its delivery, based on interviews with experienced forest school practitioners. Practitioners identified the focus of learning at forest school as social development:…

  17. An audit of the quality of referral letters received by the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Justin

    2010-10-01

    One hundred consecutive referral letters, sent by dental practitioners to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital, were audited in terms of quality. The audit was based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) recommendations of 1998. The audit demonstrated that in general referral letters required modification and did not give the clinician the required information. This paper sets out the results of the audit and suggests a template that should be used for future referrals.

  18. An audit of the quality of referral letters received by the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Justin

    2010-11-01

    One hundred consecutive referral letters, sent by dental practitioners to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital, were audited in terms of quality. The audit was based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) recommendations of 1998. The audit demonstrated that in general referral letters required modification and did not give the clinician the required information. This paper sets out the results of the audit and suggests a template that should be used for future referrals.

  19. Practice management skills for the nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, S; Hawley, L J; Pollock, S; Varnell, G

    2001-01-01

    The faculties of three schools of nursing involved in a collaborative family nurse practitioner (FNP) program designed a study to address issues involved in preparing the nurse practitioner for the challenges of practice management in the clinical environment. The purposes of the study were to (1) identify business concepts necessary to successfully manage a primary care practice; (2) determine which of these concepts should be incorporated into an FNP curriculum; and (3) clarify information to be taught regarding each identified concept. Fifty-four business concepts related to primary care were identified from a literature review. A survey was then developed to assess the extent to which the identified concepts were necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice. Seven experts and five FNP faculty responded to the survey. The Content Validity Index (CVI) defined by Lynn (1986) was applied and 20 concepts necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice were identified. A focus group that included nurse practitioners (both faculty and nonfaculty) from the three collaborative sites connected by interactive telecommunications determined that all 20 of the identified concepts should be included in an FNP curriculum. Additionally, the focus group clarified relevant information to be taught regarding each identified concept.

  20. Screening for Diabetes in a Dental School Clinic to Assess Interprofessional Communication Between Physicians and Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biethman, Rick Ken; Pandarakalam, Cyril; Garcia, M Nathalia; Whitener, Sara; Hildebolt, Charles F

    2017-09-01

    If a dental student diagnoses a patient in a dental school clinic as being at high risk of prediabetes or diabetes, the patient should be referred to his or her physician for further diagnostic evaluation, and the physician should send back the evaluation results so that the dental team can optimize treatment and health care choices if the diagnosis is confirmed. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate physicians' responses to written and oral requests for information regarding follow-up diabetes testing. A secondary aim was to evaluate patients' compliance with recommendations to seek medical care after being determined to be at high risk of prediabetes or diabetes in the dental clinic. Based on at least one positive risk factor for diabetes, 74 patients in one U.S. dental school's clinic were screened by third- and fourth-year dental students for prediabetes or diabetes and underwent point of care HbA1C (glycalated hemoglobin) blood tests between June 2014 and June 2015. Patients with an HbA1C value of 5.7% or above were referred to their physicians for follow-up testing. The physician was mailed the patient's HIPAA release and a request for updates to the student regarding the patient's diabetes status. If the physician did not provide the requested information, a dental student telephoned him or her to obtain the patient's diabetes status. Of the 74 patients, 34 (46%) tested positive with HbA1C tests and were referred to their physicians. Of those 34 referred patients, 20 (59%) saw their physicians for additional evaluations within six months of referral. None of the 20 physicians responded to the written requests for information on additional diabetes testing. After one or two telephone requests, all 20 physicians provided the test results. This study found that most of the patients (59%) followed their dental practitioner's advice to seek follow-up care with their physician, supporting the value of conducting these tests in a dental clinic. However, the