WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental office sic-8021

  1. Ergonomic design for dental offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, David J; Sanders, Martha J; Turcotte, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the dental office environment influences productivity and workflow for dental clinicians. Advances in technology, and with it the range of products needed to provide services, have led to sprawl in operatory setups and the potential for awkward postures for dental clinicians during the delivery of oral health services. Although ergonomics often addresses the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders for specific populations of workers, concepts of workflow and productivity are integral to improved practice in work environments. This article provides suggestions for improving workflow and productivity for dental clinicians. The article applies ergonomic principles to dental practice issues such as equipment and supply management, office design, and workflow management. Implications for improved ergonomic processes and future research are explored.

  2. Reface, remodel, or rebuild your dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werhan, J Haden

    2010-07-01

    Upgrades to a dental practice can range from a minor facelift to all new construction. Consulting a certified public accountant is important to properly account for all the various assets that go into a new office so the tax benefits from each can be optimized. After all the dust has settled, practitioners will be able to take pride in their new dental facility and enjoy their surroundings for many years to come.

  3. Classifying Adverse Events in the Dental Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Obadan-Udoh, Enihomo; Maramaldi, Peter; Etolue, Jini; Yansane, Alfa; Stewart, Denice; White, Joel; Vaderhobli, Ram; Kent, Karla; Hebballi, Nutan B; Delattre, Veronique; Kahn, Maria; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; Ramoni, Rachel B; Walji, Muhammad F

    2017-06-30

    Dentists strive to provide safe and effective oral healthcare. However, some patients may encounter an adverse event (AE) defined as "unnecessary harm due to dental treatment." In this research, we propose and evaluate two systems for categorizing the type and severity of AEs encountered at the dental office. Several existing medical AE type and severity classification systems were reviewed and adapted for dentistry. Using data collected in previous work, two initial dental AE type and severity classification systems were developed. Eight independent reviewers performed focused chart reviews, and AEs identified were used to evaluate and modify these newly developed classifications. A total of 958 charts were independently reviewed. Among the reviewed charts, 118 prospective AEs were found and 101 (85.6%) were verified as AEs through a consensus process. At the end of the study, a final AE type classification comprising 12 categories, and an AE severity classification comprising 7 categories emerged. Pain and infection were the most common AE types representing 73% of the cases reviewed (56% and 17%, respectively) and 88% were found to cause temporary, moderate to severe harm to the patient. Adverse events found during the chart review process were successfully classified using the novel dental AE type and severity classifications. Understanding the type of AEs and their severity are important steps if we are to learn from and prevent patient harm in the dental office.

  4. Effects of early dental office visits on dental caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, Heather; Rozier, R Gary; Preisser, John S; Stearns, Sally C; Lee, Jessica Y

    2014-10-01

    We determined the association between timing of a first dentist office visit before age 5 years and dental disease in kindergarten. We used North Carolina Medicaid claims (1999-2006) linked to state oral health surveillance data to compare caries experience for kindergarten students (2005-2006) who had a visit before age 60 months (n=11,394) to derive overall exposure effects from a zero-inflated negative binomial regression model. We repeated the analysis separately for children who had preventive and tertiary visits. Children who had a visit at age 37 to 48 and 49 to 60 months had significantly less disease than children with a visit by age 24 months (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.81, 0.95; IRR=0.75; 95% CI=0.69, 0.82, respectively). Disease status did not differ between children who had a tertiary visit by age 24 months and other children. Medicaid-enrolled children in our study followed an urgent care type of utilization, and access to dental care was limited. Children at high risk for dental disease should be given priority for a preventive dental visit before age 3 years.

  5. Efficiency of Management and Marketing Strategies within The Dental Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea Valentin BUSU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on research about the management and marketing strategies within the dental office and how we can better understand its importance. One of the major problems faced by dentists today is the management of the dental office. Certainly, from the outside, individuals perceive the dentist's office as a simple medical unit in which medical staff operate. However, people living in the field face each day multiple problems of both medical and bureaucratic nature. For the dentist/manager, the dental office is perceived as a dual-purpose unit: providing oro-dental care and earning profit.

  6. Efficiency of Management and Marketing Strategies within The Dental Office

    OpenAIRE

    Oprea Valentin BUSU; Elena Cristina ANDREI

    2017-01-01

    This article is based on research about the management and marketing strategies within the dental office and how we can better understand its importance. One of the major problems faced by dentists today is the management of the dental office. Certainly, from the outside, individuals perceive the dentist's office as a simple medical unit in which medical staff operate. However, people living in the field face each day multiple problems of both medical and bureaucratic nature. For the dentist/...

  7. Noise Levels in Dental Offices and Laboratories in Hamedan, Iran

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    F. Mojarad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise pollution is one of the most important situations requiring a solution by the contemporary world. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has identified noise as one of the ten leading causes of work-related diseases and injuries.Dentists and dental auxiliaries are exposed to different noise levels while working in dental offices or laboratories. The purpose of this study was to measure the noise level made by different dental instruments in dental offices and laboratories.Materials and Methods: Measurement of the noise level was performed in 89 dental offices and nine dental laboratories. The noise levels were determined using a sound level meter; type SL-4011(Lutron ,which was placed at the operator’s ear level in dental offices and laboratories and also at two-meter distance from the technician’s ear in laboratories.Results: The maximum sound level was 85.8 dB in dental offices and 92.0 dB in laboratories.In dental clinics, the highest noise was produced by the ultrasonic-scaler (85.8 dB and the lowest noise (49.7 dB by the high-volume aspirator, whereas in the laboratory,the highest noise was caused during grinding by the stonecutter (92.0 dB and the lowest by the denture-polishing unit (41.0 dB.Conclusion: After close evaluation, we believe that the maximum noise level in dental offices, although often beneath the damaging noise level for the human ear, is very close to the limit of hearing loss (85.0 dB. However, laboratory technicians may be at risk ifthey choose not to wear ear protection (earplugs or earmuffs.

  8. Oral Sedation in the Dental Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, Francesco R; Dym, Harry; Wolf, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    This article highlights the commonly used medications used in dentistry and oral surgery. General dentists and specialists must be knowledgeable about the pharmacology of the drugs currently available along with their risks and benefits. Enteral sedation is a useful adjunct for the treatment of anxious adult and pediatric patients. When enteral sedation is used within the standards of care, the interests of the public and the dental profession are served through a cost-effective, effective service that can be widely available. Oral sedation enables dentists to provide dental care to millions of individuals who otherwise would have unmet dental needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Management of Dental Waste in Dental Offices and Clinics in Shiraz, Southern Iran

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    M Danaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental waste can be hazardous to humans and the environment. Objective: To determine the current status of dental waste management in private and public dental clinics and private dental offices in Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from February through June 2013. A stratified random sampling method was used to study 86 private offices, 14 private clinics and 10 public clinics. Types of waste studied included mercury and amalgam, lead foil packets, sharps, infectious tissues and fluids, pharmaceuticals and domestic waste materials. Compliance with established standards by the monitored dental offices and clinics and public clinics were compared. Results: 89.1% of dental offices and clinics disposed their infectious waste with domestic waste. Only 60% of centers used standard method for sharps disposal. None of the dental centers disposed their pharmaceutical waste and x-ray fixer waste by standard methods. Less than 10% of centers recycled the amalgam and lead foil pockets waste to the manufacture. Conclusion: Government agencies should establish monitoring programs for all dental offices and clinics to identify noncompliant activity and enforce recommended regulations.

  10. Lowering the Radiation Dose in Dental Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radan, Elham

    2017-04-01

    While the use of dental imaging continues to evolve into more advanced modalities such as 3-D cone beam computed tomography, in addition to conventional 2-D imaging (intraoral, panoramic and cephalometric), the public concern for radiation safety is also increasing. This article is a guide for how to reduce patients’ exposure to the minimum with proper selection criteria (as needed only if it benefits the patient) and knowledge of effective doses, exposure parameters and proper collimation.

  11. Basic principles of dental office logistics: organizing dental supplies and equipment for optimal accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoun, John

    2012-01-01

    To maximize office production, dentists should continuously perform treatment-related tasks throughout the workday. To this end, the office should logically organize and store dental instruments, disposables, materials, handpieces, and small equipment to optimize accessibility of these items at the moment when the dentist needs them. The office needs multiple copies of these items to prevent their inaccessibility during the workday due to breakdown, inventory depletion, or lack of a sterilized copy of the item when needed. Staff should know where all items are located in the office at all times to minimize the time needed to search for them. This article describes how to organize dental items in an office for optimal accessibility to the dentist during procedures.

  12. Wireless local area network for the dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar

    2004-01-01

    Dental offices are no exception to the implementation of new and advanced technology, especially if it enhances productivity. In a rapidly transforming digital world, wireless technology has a special place, as it has truly "retired the wire" and contributed to the ease and efficient access to patient data and other software-based applications for diagnosis and treatment. If the office or the clinic is networked, access to patient management software, imaging software and treatment planning tools is enhanced. Access will be further enhanced and unrestricted if the entire network is wireless. As with any new, emerging technology, there will be issues that should be kept in mind before adapting to the wireless environment. Foremost is the network security involved in the installation and use of these wireless networks. This short, technical manuscript deals with standards and choices in wireless technology currently available for implementation within a dental office. The benefits of each network security protocol available to protect patient data and boost the efficiency of a modern dental office are discussed.

  13. The radiological installation in dental office: selection and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirre, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This thesis for a PhD in dental surgery aimed at identifying and analysing different ways to optimise radiographs. In a first part, the author presents the characteristics of X rays, and dosimetric values used in dental offices. He describes the interaction of X rays with living cells by recalling the discovery of biological effects and the emergence of radiation protection, and by discussing the consequences for the patient as well as for the practician. In the next part, the author comments technological advances of devices, and means available to practicians to improve their performance. He presents X ray tubes, discusses factors which influence ray production, and selection criteria, indicates additional devices (beam application tubes, filtration, collimation), discusses the selection of the receiver (types of receivers used in intra-oral radiology, digital or silver film-based sensors), and describes the picture-taking process (radiological techniques, use of angulators and lead shielding). He finally discusses how to optimise intra-oral dental imagery through good practices which comprise optimisation, selection of apparatuses and devices, performance of the radiological act with a patient sitting in the armchair, and maintenance of a good image quality [fr

  14. Quantity and quality of solid wastes produced in dental offices of babol city

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    Abdoliman Amouei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental wastes due to having bacterial disease-causing agents and toxic chemicals are categorized in hazardous wastes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantity and composition of dental waste produced by general and specialized dental offices in babol city. Materials &Methods: From all dental offices (170 and 40 dental offices were related to general and specialized respectively in Babol city, 20 general and 5 specialized offices were randomly selected. Waste samples were collected three times a week (Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, 50 sub-groups were separated and weighted by a digital scale with accuracy of 0.01 gram. The data were presented by excel and word software in figures and tables. Results: The total wastes of general and specialized offices were 11829 and 2831.5 kg/year, respectively. The percentages of domestic-type, infectious, pharmaceutical and toxic wastes in general dental offices were 52.5%, 42.5%, 4.7% and 0.3%; and in specialized offices were 42.5%, 50%, 7% and 0.5%, respectively. Most components in a variety of dental waste included plastic, paper, plaster molds, glass and metal. Conclusion: Due to the large contents of plastic, paper, plaster molds, glass and metals in domestic- type and infectious wastes produced in the general and specialized dental offices, it is necessary to manage the wastes and their separation and recycling in source place.

  15. The microcomputer in the dental office: a new diagnostic aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Stelt, P F

    1985-06-01

    The first computer applications in the dental office were based upon standard accountancy procedures. Recently, more and more computer applications have become available to meet the specific requirements of dental practice. This implies not only business procedures, but also facilities to store patient records in the system and retrieve them easily. Another development concerns the automatic calculation of diagnostic data such as those provided in cephalometric analysis. Furthermore, growth and surgical results in the craniofacial area can be predicted by computerized extrapolation. Computers have been useful in obtaining the patient's anamnestic data objectively and for the making of decisions based on such data. Computer-aided instruction systems have been developed for undergraduate students to bridge the gap between textbook and patient interaction without the risks inherent in the latter. Radiology will undergo substantial changes as a result of the application of electronic imaging devices instead of the conventional radiographic films. Computer-assisted electronic imaging will enable image processing, image enhancement, pattern recognition and data transmission for consultation and storage purposes. Image processing techniques will increase image quality whilst still allowing low-dose systems. Standardization of software and system configuration and the development of 'user friendly' programs is the major concern for the near future.

  16. Jordanian dentists' knowledge and implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shatrat, Sabha M; Shuman, Deanne; Darby, Michele L; Jeng, Hueiwang A

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies by Jordanian dentists. Self-designed questionnaires were provided to 150 dentists working in private dental practices in the city of Amman, the capital of Jordan. Dentists' names and addresses were obtained from the Jordanian Dental Association. Overall, the level of knowledge about eco-friendly dental offices strategies was high for amalgam, radiology, paper waste, infection control and energy and water conservation. In terms of implementation, the majority of Jordanian dentists apply few eco-friendly dental offices strategies. The most frequently identified barriers to implementation of eco-friendly dental offices strategies were cost and lack of incentives from the government. Most Jordanian dental practices are not eco-friendly. A continued focus on the impact of dental practices on the environment is needed through formal and continuing dental education. Results of this study can guide policy development to encourage implementation of eco-friendly strategies. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  17. Patient doses during intra-oral radiography in dental offices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaino, Rie; Harata, Yasuo; Okano, Tomohiro; Sato, Kenji; Yosue, Takashi; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Sano, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of patient entrance dose (PED) and dose area product (DAP) at various dental offices in the Tokyo bay area and comparison of PEDs with the existing diagnostic reference levels recommended in the United Kingdom (UK). The survey included 28 dental clinics categorized by the type of intra-oral radiography used. PED was measured by placing an optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) at the tip of the cone. Exposure parameters were those used for the adult mandibular molar region in the respective clinics. The OSLD readings were calibrated using an ionizing chamber manufactured according to standards of the Japan Quality Assurance Organization. The area (A), of the X-ray beam, was calculated by exposing an X-ray film placed at the tip of the cone and measuring the exposed area. Then the DAP was calculated as the product of PED times A. The PED estimated at various dental clinics differed by a factor of 120. The mean, minimum, maximum, median and third quartile values of PEDs were 4.99, 0.18, 21.7, 3.60 and 5.76 mGy, respectively. At 60-70 kV, PEDs observed in clinics using digital imaging systems were below 2.1 mGy which was lower than that of clinics using films that were E-speed or faster. It was also observed that PEDs were directly proportional to the tube current and exposure time. The mean, minimum, maximum, median and third quartile of DAPs were 13.0, 0.45, 61.4, 9.34 and 13.4 cGy cm 2 , respectively. The DAP values showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99 with PED values. Measurement of PED and DAP using OSLD and X-ray film can play a useful role in optimization of radiation protection for patients during intra-oral radiography. This method can be conveniently applied to set up diagnostic reference levels by carrying out mass surveys in Japan. (author)

  18. Medical emergencies in the dental surgery. Part 1: Preparation of the office and basic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2015-12-01

    Medical emergencies can and do happen in the dental surgery. In the 20- to 30-year practice lifetime of the typical dentist, he/she will encounter between five and seven emergency situations. Being prepared in advance of the emergency increases the likelihood of a successful outcome. PURPOSE OF THE PAPER: To prepare members of the dental office staff to be able to promptly recognize and efficiently manage those medical emergency situations that can occur in the dental office environment. Preparation of the dental office to promptly recognize and efficiently manage medical emergencies is predicated on successful implementation of the following four steps: basic life support for ALL members of the dental office staff; creation of a dental office emergency team; activation of emergency medial services (EMS) when indicated; and basic emergency drugs and equipment. The basic emergency algorithm (P->C->A->B->D) is designed for implementation in all emergency situations. Prompt implementation of the basic emergency management protocol can significantly increase the likelihood of a successful result when medical emergencies occur in the dental office environment.

  19. Steps Towards Determining the Right Number of Dental Recruits the Navy Should Access to Meet the Projected Targets for Navy Dental Corps Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Periodontics , Oral Surgery, and Prosthodontics. 1. Overall Dental Corps The data included for the overall loss rate for the Dental Corps included...Endodontists. This may occur due to the pay disparity between military and civilian Oral Surgeons. The Dental Corps attempts to mitigate the loss ...gum disease . Periodontics is another specialty that Dental Corps officers can decide to practice. NNMC, Naval Postgraduate Dental School offers a

  20. Management and marketing for the general practice dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Earl; Bhatia, Sanjeev

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews trends in the dental marketplace. Marketing is an essential element of dentistry. Communicating treatment options with patients is one aspect of marketing. Treatment planning helps patients understand the relationships between oral health, occlusion, temporomandibular joint function, and systemic health. Through marketing, dental practice owners inform patients of ever-changing treatment modalities. Understanding treatment options allows patients to make better, informed choices. More options leads to a higher level of care and more comprehensive dental treatment. Managing a practice requires tracking its financial health. Economic statistics measure the effect of management decisions that mark the direction of a dental practice.

  1. Contribution of environmental conditions in dental offices of Antioquia to the risk of mercury contamination

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    Jairo A. Ruiz C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is a product from the project “Environmental Management of Dental Amalgam in the State of Antioquia” which was carried out by the following research groups belonging to the University of Antioquia: Science and Biomedical Technology, Precious Materials, and Pirometallurgical and Materials Researches, as well as the private company New Stetic S. A., between February 2005 and February 2007. Objective: to describe the environmental conditions in 30 big dental offices of the State of Antioquia, Colombia. Those dental offices having more than five dental chairs in the same work place were defined as “big” for the purpose of this project. Due to the fact that these dental offices represents 85% of the population of reference, the results described in this article can be consequently considered as is they were derived from a census. The description is made bearing in mind the people who are exposed to the risk of mercury contamination due to their occupation. Materials and method: an observation tool was designed in order to be applied in each dental office. It contained aspects as floor and wall characteristics, ventilation, room temperature, storing place for mercury, elements for handling amalgam scraps, and those activities which deviate from the regular dental service in the same site. Each dental office was visited by a research engineer and an advanced engineering student on a previously defined date. The researchers were trained in advance to collect the information. Results: it was found that some big dental offices have inadequate conditions in their premises for offering their services, and do not have a good handling of the environmental conditions. That’s why immediate actions are mandatory to minimize the risk of mercury contamination.

  2. A review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of allergic reactions in the dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochford, Christopher; Milles, Maano

    2011-02-01

    Since more than 50 million people in the United States have allergies, knowledge of the management of allergic reactions in the dental office is extremely important. Appropriate care may range from a simple referral to a primary care physician to lifesaving measures implemented during acute anaphylactic reactions. The authors present a basic review of the pathophysiology of allergic reactions and provide information detailing the diagnosis and management of allergic reactions that may be encountered in the dental office. Utilizing this information, the dental practitioner and ancillary staff will have a thorough understanding of allergic reactions and be prepared to successfully identify and treat these reactions.

  3. RADIATION PROTECTION – AN ISSUE OF KNOWLEDGE AND TECHNIQUE IN DENTAL OFFICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana CONSTANTINIUC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiological examination is indispensable in current dental practice. Lately, dentists have become not only the beneficiaries of radiographic investigations required for diagnosis, but also their authors, as many dental offices have been authorized to have X-ray machines and carry out radiological activity. This is why dentists who perform dental X-rays have the legal and moral obligation to possess thorough theoretical and practical knowledge about the radiological technique and also about their own and patients’ radiation protection. This study investigates to what extent medical practitioners providing dental radiology services know and apply the technical norms for work and patient protection

  4. Office-based preventive dental program and statewide trends in dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achembong, Leo N; Kranz, Ashley M; Rozier, R Gary

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a North Carolina Medicaid preventive dentistry program in primary care medical offices (Into the Mouths of Babes Program [IMBP]) on decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) of kindergarten students statewide and in schools with a large proportion of students from low-income families. An ecologic study using panel data of 920,505 kindergarten students with 11,694 school-year observations examined the effect of the IMBP on dmft scores from 1998 to 2009. Ordinary least squares regression with fixed effects determined the association between IMBP visits per child 0 to 4 years of age per county and mean dmft scores per kindergarten student per school, controlling for school-level poverty and ethnicity, county-level Medicaid enrollment, and supply of dentists and physicians. Mean dmft per kindergarten student per school increased from 1.53 in 1998 to 1.84 in 2004, then decreased to 1.59 in 2009. The mean number of IMBP visits per child 0 to 4 years of age per county increased from 0.01 in 2000 to 0.22 in 2009. A 1-unit increase in IMBP visits per county was associated with a 0.248 (95% confidence interval, -0.40 to -0.10) decrease in dmft per kindergarten student per school. For schools with more students at high risk for dental disease, a 1-unit increase in IMBP visits was associated with a 0.320 (95% confidence interval, -0.55 to -0.09) decrease in dmft. IMBP reduced dental caries among targeted vulnerable children, which helped reduce oral health disparities among preschool-aged children in North Carolina.

  5. Oral health in pregnancy: educational needs of dental professionals and office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter; Littell, Christopher T; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn

    2012-01-01

    Dental care during pregnancy is important for pregnant women and their children. Comprehensive guidelines for the provision of dental services for pregnant patients were published in 2006, but there is relatively little information about their use in actual practice. The aim of this study was to examine differences in knowledge and attitudes regarding dental care in pregnancy among dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and nonclinical office staff. A secondary aim was to identify sources of influence on attitudes and knowledge regarding the guidelines. A survey was used to collect information from 766 employees of a Dental Care Organization based in Oregon; responses from 546 were included in the analyses reported here. Statistically significant differences in knowledge were found among the professional-role groups. Dentists and hygienists consistently answered more items correctly than did other respondents. Within all professional-role groups, knowledge gaps existed and were most pronounced regarding provision of routine and emergency services. Positive perceptions of providing dental care during pregnancy were associated with higher knowledge scores (z = 4.16, P education and continuing education for all dental office personnel are needed to promote the diffusion of current evidence-based guidelines for dental care during pregnancy. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. [Rational antibiotic therapy in the dental office: Practical guidelines for decision-making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Y

    2016-04-01

    Although most dental and periodontal diseases are caused by bacteria, the usual therapy is mechanical/surgical rather than antimicrobial medications. However, sometimes antibiotic administration may be necessary in addition to or as an alternative to the surgical/mechanical treatment. Many studies have shown that the misuse of antibiotics by dentists may be mostly attributed to unnecessity or inefficient regimen, and could contribute to bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The article presents practical guidelines to the administration of antibiotics in the dental office.

  7. The preparedness of private dental offices and polyclinics for medical emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sebaei, Maisa O.; Alkayyal, Moayyad A.; Alsulimani, Abdulelah H.; Alsulaimani, Othman S.; Habib, Weam T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess preparedness for medical emergencies in private dental offices in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a survey was distributed to 70 dental offices and polyclinics in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between October 2013 and January 2014. The questionnaire gathered information on the prevention of medical emergencies, the preparedness of the office personnel, and availability of emergency drugs and equipment. Results: For prevention, 92% (n=65) of the offices reported that they obtain a thorough medical history prior to treatment; however, only 11% (n=8) obtain vital signs for each visit. Using a preparedness percent score (0 to 100), the mean level of preparedness of the office personnel in all surveyed dental offices was 55.2±20. The availability of emergency drugs was 35±35, and equipment was 19±22. Conclusion: We found a deficiency in personnel training, availability of drugs, and emergency equipment in the surveyed dental clinics. More stringent rules and regulations for emergency preparedness must be reinforced to avoid disasters in these clinics. PMID:25737177

  8. Knowledge of Medical House Officers about Dental Specialties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Some patients with oral diseases present initially to a general medical practitioner who is expected to refer the patients to the appropriate dental specialist for management. Thus they are expected to have a good knowledge of the different specialties in dentistry. This study was designed to determine the ...

  9. Communicating with parents and children in the dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Oariona

    2013-08-01

    Providing dental care for children can be challenging. Successful treatment is often dependent upon the effectiveness of the communication between the dentist, parent and patient. Effective communication should be developed by establishing rapport and trust during the initial visit. Few parents realize the disadvantage of the dentist who is introduced to a child who is anxious, afraid or resistant. They undoubtedly expect the dentist to provide care regardless of the child's reaction.

  10. Clinical implication of blood glucose monitoring in general dental offices: the Ehime Dental Diabetes Study

    OpenAIRE

    Harase, Tadahiro; Nishida, Wataru; Hamakawa, Tomohiro; Hino, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Kenji; Kobayashi, Satoru; Sako, Hirofumi; Ito, Shirou; Murakami, Hajime; Nishida, Kei; Inoue, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Masahito; Yoshizu, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined whether general dentists can contribute to the detection of patients with undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes by monitoring blood glucose in dental clinics. Research design and methods A total of 716 patients who visited clinics for dental treatment were enrolled and classified into 3 groups (mild, moderate, and severe) according to Kornman's criteria for periodontitis. The correlations between the casual blood glucose level, presence or absence of the history of diabet...

  11. Evaluation of radiation protection conditions in dental offices in Bauru City, Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capelozza, Ana Lucia Alvares.

    1988-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to evaluate the behaviour of 145 dentists, in their offices, as far as radiation protection in concerned. Every dental office was visited and the dentist filled out a form with questions regarding to radiation protection of patient, professional and dental assistant. The same visit exposure and processing conditions of intraoral films were checked and a no-screen film was exposed for late measurement of the diameter of x-ray bean. After data analysis it seems fair to conclude that exposure and processing conditions could be improved if the correct exposure and development times according to those suggested by their manufactures were employed. Another reasonable conclusion that could be drawn from the obtained data: the number of dental radiographs taken is small and so the probability of biological damage is not significant at the level of present knowledge. (author). 177 refs., 5 figs., 42 tabs

  12. Setting up a mobile dental practice within your present office structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, James P; Dimitry, Susan; Morreale, Mark; Fattore, Isabella

    2005-02-01

    Different service models have emerged in Canada and the United States to address the issue of senior citizens' lack of access to comprehensive dental care. Over the past decade, one such model, the use of mobile dental service units, has emerged as a practical strategy. This article describes a mobile unit, operated as an adjunct to the general practitioner's office and relying mainly on existing office resources, both human and capital, to deliver services at long-term care institutions. The essential components of a profitable geriatric mobile unit are described, including education, equipment, marketing research and development, and human resource management. Issues related to patient consent and operating expenditures are also discussed. Data from one practitioner's mobile dental unit, in Hamilton, Ontario, are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and profitability of this approach.

  13. Use of Digital Technology and Support Software Programs in the Private Dental Offices in Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattore-Bruno, LaDeane

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this survey research was to determine the diffusion of digital radiography, the electronic oral health record (EOHR), digital intraoral photography, and diagnosis and clinical decision-making support software into the dental offices of Nevada. A cross-sectional survey design was utilized with a random sample of 600 Nevada dentists.…

  14. Patient with Chronic Orofacial Pain in a Private Dental Office - Diagnostic Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorovic Ljubomir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic orofacial pain (COP, which means pain lasting almost always more than six months and serving no obvious purpose, very often present a quite diagnostic dilemmas. In some instances, this may especially create problem in a private dental office as various variants and manifestations of COP should be treated differently.

  15. Caring for cancer patients in the general dental office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, I.

    1989-01-01

    Modern therapeutic modalities and emphasis on early detection have made oral cancer a treatable, and in many cases, a curable disease. The role of the dentist in cancer patient management is two-fold. Early detection of oral lesions during routine dental examination has been shown to be a significant factor in cancer diagnosis. The dentist's other role comes after cancer treatment, specifically therapeutic radiation. Ionizing radiation can have permanent effects on both hard and soft tissues. Prescription and use of fluoride gel in topical applicators can aid in assuring oral health for post-cancer patients

  16. Legal dimensions of power in the dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dermyden, Sue Ann; Sperry, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Hostile workplace environments and sexual harassment depend on unequal power. It is the legal responsibility of the employer (the dentist practice owner) to protect against, investigate, and take appropriate action to prevent the abuse of power in the office. This article discusses harassment by dentists, staff members, and patient, vendors, and other third parties. Six direct steps for managing this issue are presented.

  17. Occupational exposure to sharp injuries among medical and dental house officers in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sharp injuries constitute important occupational exposure in hospital environment, and perhaps the newly graduated medical and dental students, known as House Officers, in the first twelve months of their practice, are the most vulnerable of all health workers. This study was designed to examine the nature and prevalence of occupational injuries among medical and dental house officers and factors associated with reporting these injuries. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on demography, types of exposure, and barriers to official reporting of occupational injuries. One hundred and forty-four medical and dental house officers in 3 government owned hospitals in Edo State, Nigeria participated in the study, between April and May, 2010. Descriptive and multivariable analyses were performed. Results: The overall response rate was 96%. Out of all participants, 69.4% were male; 82.6% were medical house officers. Prevalence of percutaneous injury was 56.9%; where needlestick injury constituted one-third of all injuries. Mean frequency of injury was 1.86±2.24, with medicals having more injuries (p = 0.043. The ward was the most common location for the injury and 14.8% of exposures occurred as a result of lapse in concentration. At least 77.0% did not formally report their injury and perceived low injury risk was the most common reason given (51.67%. Conclusion: This study shows that a substantial number of House Officers are exposed to occupational injuries and that the majority of them does not formally report these. Safer work environment may be achieved by implementing adequate educational programs tailored specifically to house officers, and policies encouraging exposure reporting should be developed.

  18. Assessment of genetic relationship between Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca samples isolated from a dental office

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    MV Pimenta-Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyze the genetic similarity between genomic profiles of thirteen Klebsiella oxytoca and seven Klebsiella pneumoniae samples isolated from two different collections carried out in different places of dental offices. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD technique and similarity coefficients (calculated by Sorensen-Dice and simple matching were applied to determine their genetic profile of randomic DNA sequences. The majority of the isolates of K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca presented similar coefficient values (e" 0.80. Thus, it was possible to identify that strain dissemination occurred mainly via the hands of the surgeon-dentists and, finally, to determine the genetic similarity of the strains from dental office environments.

  19. Quantifying Dental Office-Originating Adverse Events: The Dental Practice Study Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi; Walji, Muhammad; Ramoni, Rachel; Rindal, Donald B; Worley, Donald; Hebballi, Nutan; Kumar, Krishna; van Strien, Claire; Chen, Mengxia; Navat-Pelli, Shaked; Liu, Hongchun; Etolue, Jini; Yansane, Alfa; Obadan-Udoh, Enihomo; Easterday, Casey; Enstad, Chris; Kane, Sheryl; Rush, William; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2017-12-05

    Preventable medical errors in hospital settings are the third leading cause of deaths in the United States. However, less is known about harm that occurs in patients in outpatient settings, where the majority of care is delivered. We do not know the likelihood that a patient sitting in a dentist chair will experience harm. Additionally, we do not know if patients of certain race, age, sex, or socioeconomic status disproportionately experience iatrogenic harm. We initiated the Dental Practice Study (DPS) with the aim of determining the frequency and types of adverse events (AEs) that occur in dentistry on the basis of retrospective chart audit. This article discusses the 6-month pilot phase of the DPS during which we explored the feasibility and efficiency of our multistaged review process to detect AEs. At sites 1, 2, and 3, respectively, 2 reviewers abstracted 21, 11, and 23 probable AEs, respectively, from the 100 patient charts audited per site. At site 2, a third reviewer audited the same 100 charts and found only 1 additional probable AE. Of the total 56 probable AEs (from 300 charts), the expert panel confirmed 9 AE cases. This equals 3 AEs per 100 patients per year. Patients who experienced an AE tended to be male and older and to have undergone more procedures within the study year. This article presents an overview of the DPS. It describes the methods used and summarizes the results of its pilot phase. To minimize threats to dental patient safety, a starting point is to understand their basic epidemiology, both in terms of their frequency and the extent to which they affect different populations.

  20. Contemporary, emerging, and ratified wireless security standards: an update for the networked dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar

    2006-02-15

    Wireless networking is not new to contemporary dental offices around the country. Wireless routers and network cards have made access to patient records within the office handy and, thereby, saving valuable chair side time and increasing productivity. As is the case with any rapidly developing technology, wireless technology also changes with the same rate. Unless, the users of the wireless networking understand the implications of these changes and keep themselves updated periodically, the office network will become obsolete very quickly. This update of the emerging security protocols and pertaining to ratified wireless 802.11 standards will be timely for the contemporary dentist whose office is wirelessly networked. This article brings the practicing dentist up-to-date on the newer versions and standards in wireless networking that are changing at a fast pace. The introduction of newer 802.11 standards like super G, Super AG, Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO), and pre-n are changing the pace of adaptation of this technology. Like any other rapidly transforming technology, information pertaining to wireless networking should be a priority for the contemporary dentist, an eventual end-user in order to be a well-informed and techno-savvy consumer.

  1. Assessing the irradiance delivered from light-curing units in private dental offices in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghaireh, Ghada A; Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin A

    2013-08-01

    The authors conducted a study to examine the irradiance from light-curing units (LCUs) used in dental offices in Jordan. Two of the authors visited 295 private dental offices (15 percent) in Jordan and collected the following information about the LCUs: age, type (quartz-tungsten-halogen or light-emitting diode), date of last maintenance, type of maintenance, last date of use, number of times used during the day, availability of a radiometer, exposure time for each resin-based composite increment, size of light-curing tips and presence of resin-based composite on the tips. The authors used a radiometer to measure the irradiance from the LCUs. They used linear regression with stepwise correlation for the statistical analysis. The authors set the minimum acceptable irradiance at 300 milliwatts/square centimeter. The mean irradiance of the 295 LCUs examined was 361 mW/cm(2), and 136 LCUs (46.1 percent) delivered an irradiance of less than 300 mW/cm(2). The unit's age, type and presence of resin-based composite on the light-curing tips had a significant effect on the irradiance (P ≤ .001). Only 37 of the 141 quartz-tungsten-halogen units (26.2 percent) and 122 of the 154 light-emitting diode units (79.2 percent) delivered at least 300 mW/cm(2). Resin contamination on the light-curing tips had a significant effect on the irradiance delivered. The irradiance from the LCUs decreased with use. Practical Implications. The irradiance from many of the units in this study was less than 300 mW/cm(2), which may affect the quality of resin-based composite restorations. Dentists should monitor the performance of the LCUs in their offices weekly.

  2. Time and cost analysis: pediatric dental rehabilitation with general anesthesia in the office and the hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashewsky, Stephanie; Parameswaran, Ashish; Sloane, Carole; Ferguson, Fred; Epstein, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric dental patients who cannot receive dental care in the clinic due to uncooperative behavior are often referred to receive dental care under general anesthesia (GA). At Stony Brook Medicine, dental patients requiring treatment with GA receive dental care in our outpatient facility at the Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine (SDM) or in the Stony Brook University Hospital ambulatory setting (SBUH). This study investigates the time and cost for ambulatory American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class I pediatric patients receiving full-mouth dental rehabilitation using GA in these 2 locations, along with a descriptive analysis of the patients and dental services provided. In this institutional review board-approved cross-sectional retrospective study, ICD-9 codes for dental caries (521.00) were used to collect patient records between July 2009 and May 2011. Participants were limited to ASA I patients aged 36-60 months. Complete records from 96 patients were reviewed. There were significant differences in cost, total anesthesia time, and recovery room time (P average total time (anesthesia end time minus anesthesia start time) to treat a child at SBUH under GA was 222 ± 62.7 minutes, and recovery time (time of discharge minus anesthesia end time) was 157 ± 97.2 minutes; the average total cost was $7,303. At the SDM, the average total time was 175 ± 36.8 minutes, and recovery time was 25 ± 12.7 minutes; the average total cost was $414. After controlling for anesthesia time and procedures, we found that SBUH cost 13.2 times more than SDM. This study provides evidence that ASA I pediatric patients can receive full-mouth dental rehabilitation utilizing GA under the direction of dentist anesthesiologists in an office-based dental setting more quickly and at a lower cost. This is very promising for patients with the least access to care, including patients with special needs and lack of insurance.

  3. Effect of in-office bleaching agents on physical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouzis, Petros; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth A; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of dental restorative materials have a crucial effect on the longevity of restorations and moreover on the esthetic demands of patients, but they may be compromised by bleaching treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office bleaching agents on the physical properties of three composite resin restorative materials. The bleaching agents used were hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide at high concentrations. Specimens of each material were prepared, cured, and polished. Measurements of color difference, microhardness, and surface roughness were recorded before and after bleaching and data were examined statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD post-hoc test at P composite resin altered after the bleaching procedure (P composite resins tested (P > .05). The silorane-based composite resin tested showed some color alteration after bleaching procedures. The bleaching procedure did not alter the microhardness and the surface roughness of all composite resins tested.

  4. Wireless networking for the dental office: current wireless standards and security protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Arora, Sarika

    2004-11-15

    Digital radiography has gained immense popularity in dentistry today in spite of the early difficulty for the profession to embrace the technology. The transition from film to digital has been happening at a faster pace in the fields of Orthodontics, Oral Surgery, Endodontics, Periodontics, and other specialties where the radiographic images (periapical, bitewing, panoramic, cephalometric, and skull radiographs) are being acquired digitally, stored within a server locally, and eventually accessed for diagnostic purposes, along with the rest of the patient data via the patient management software (PMS). A review of the literature shows the diagnostic performance of digital radiography is at least comparable to or even better than that of conventional radiography. Similarly, other digital diagnostic tools like caries detectors, cephalometric analysis software, and digital scanners were used for many years for the diagnosis and treatment planning purposes. The introduction of wireless charged-coupled device (CCD) sensors in early 2004 (Schick Technologies, Long Island City, NY) has moved digital radiography a step further into the wireless era. As with any emerging technology, there are concerns that should be looked into before adapting to the wireless environment. Foremost is the network security involved in the installation and usage of these wireless networks. This article deals with the existing standards and choices in wireless technologies that are available for implementation within a contemporary dental office. The network security protocols that protect the patient data and boost the efficiency of modern day dental clinics are enumerated.

  5. Knowledge, Attitude, and Perceived Confidence in the Management of Medical Emergencies in the Dental Office: A Survey among the Dental Students and Interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albelaihi, Haifa Fahad; Alweneen, Athar Ibrahim; Ettish, Abeer; Alshahrani, Faleh Ali

    2017-01-01

    Many situations in the dental office can provoke medical emergencies. Lack of training and inability to overcome the medical emergencies can lead to serious consequences and legal actions. The aim of the study is to investigate and assess the knowledge, attitude, and perceived confidence of dental students and interns in the management of medical emergency. A self-administered structured questionnaire was distributed to 153 of the undergraduate dental students and interns in Qassim province. Questionnaire consisted of nineteen questions pertaining to knowledge and awareness regarding syncope, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), intravenous drugs, measuring vital signs, and handling situation of aspiration of a foreign body, bleeding, and choking. Data were analyzed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 21.0. Fifty-seven percent was the response rate received from the questionnaire. Eighty-nine percent and 30% of the participants inquired about the medical history and vital signs before dental treatment, respectively. Only 37% of participants were confident to handle any medical emergency in the dental office. Seventy percent knew the correct location of chest compression and 67% were familiar about the right compression ventilation ratio showing significant difference between academic years and interns ( P = 0.003). Females were significantly more aware about the management of bleeding after extraction than the males (65%, and 47%, respectively; P = 0.035). Thirty-five percent and 53% chose the correct management to relieve choking in responsive and unresponsive adult or child, respectively. A total of 28% of the participants reported syncope as the most common emergency situation. Participants were lacking confidence in handling medical emergencies even though the majority of them inquired the medical history. Most of them have a good knowledge regarding CPR, but regarding airway obstruction, the knowledge was not at an acceptable level

  6. Root canals and retailing. When it comes to merchandising activities in a dental office, dentists are their own worst critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, S J; Pickett, G M; Finn, D W

    1994-01-01

    As professional service providers continue to face an increasingly competitive environment, marketing becomes a more attractive prospect. One marketing activity that has emerged in recent years is the retailing of products related to one's profession directly from the office. The authors explore the retailing phenomenon from the perspective of dentists and dental patients and find that patients are less critical of the practice than dentists are themselves.

  7. The status of mixed dentition in early schoolchildren reporting to dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Fux-Zalewska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Negligence of the healthy behaviour associated with oral health, dental prevention and treatment in primary school children can be a source of serious health problems, both dental and systemic. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of selected demographic factors and reasons for visiting a dental office on the dental health of primary school children. Material and methods: The study included 210 patients aged 7–11 years, who in 2015 visited one of the dental offices in Lublin, where dental services are provided both under the contract with the National Health Fund or after payment. Dental condition was assessed by calculating dmf/DMF (decayed, missing, filled index for deciduous/permanent teeth. Results: More than three-quarters of children (77.14% visited a dentist for check-up, 20.0% – due to a toothache and 2.86% – due to the loss of filling. The average DMF number was 4.24 ± 3.47, and the average DMF index value was 1.74 ± 2.06. The highest intensity of caries in the primary teeth was found in children visiting the dentist due to toothache, lower – in those reporting for check-up visits and the lowest – due to the loss of filling. In the case of permanent dentition, the highest number of fillings was observed in children attending a check-up visit. Conclusions: High incidence of caries in primary school children confirms the insufficient health knowledge of parents/guardians on the oral health and insufficient dental prevention and treatment in both preschool and early-school children.

  8. Fabrication of an interim complete removable dental prosthesis with an in-office digital light processing three-dimensional printer: A proof-of-concept technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Pellerito, John; Morton, Dean

    2018-04-30

    This report describes a proof of concept for fabricating an interim complete removable dental prosthesis with a digital light processing 3-dimensional (3D) printer. Although an in-office 3D printer can reduce the overall production cost for an interim complete removable dental prosthesis, the process has not been validated with clinical studies. This report provided a preliminary proof of concept in developing a digital workflow for the in-office additively manufactured interim complete removable dental prosthesis. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Proximal Tibial Bone Harvesting Under Local Anesthesia Without Intravenous Sedation in the Dental Office: A Case Report

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    Chun-Ming Chen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary sinus enlargement often occurs in the maxillary posterior edentulous area and reduces the available bone height for implantation. Therefore, maxillary sinus lift and bone graft procedures are necessary to provide sufficient available bone. Autogenous bone grafting is the best base for implant osseointegration. Recently, tibial bone has been recognized as an alternative extraoral donor site. We present a case in which we used a proximal tibia bone graft for maxillary sinus augmentation under local anesthesia without sedation in the dental office. During a 4-year postoperative follow-up, gait was not disturbed and the scar on the donor site remained unremarkable.

  10. Effect of topical application of dipyrone on dental sensitivity reduction after in-office dental bleaching: A randomized, triple-blind multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Márcia; Chemin, Kaprice; Vaez, Savil Costa; Peixoto, Aline Carvalho; Rabelo, Jéssica de Freitas; Braga, Stella Sueli Lourenço; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Silva, Gisele Rodrigues da; Soares, Carlos José; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2018-05-01

    Tooth sensitivity commonly occurs during and immediately after dental bleaching. The authors conducted a trial to compare tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching after the use of either a topical dipyrone or placebo gel. A split-mouth, triple-blind, randomized, multicenter clinical trial was conducted among 120 healthy adults having teeth that were shade A2 or darker. The facial tooth surfaces of the right or left sides of the maxillary arch of each patient were randomly assigned to receive either topical dipyrone or placebo gel before 2 in-office bleaching sessions (35% hydrogen peroxide) separated by 2 weeks. Visual analog and numerical rating scales were used to record tooth sensitivity during and up to 48 hours after bleaching. Tooth color change from baseline to 1 month after bleaching was measured with shade guide and spectrophotometer measures. The primary outcome variable was absolute risk of tooth sensitivity. An intention-to-treat analysis was used to analyze data from all patients who were randomly assigned to receive the dipyrone and placebo gels. No statically significant difference was found in the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity between the dipyrone and placebo gels (83% and 90%, respectively, P = .09; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.0). A whitening effect was observed in both groups with no statistically significant difference (P > .05) between them. No adverse effects were observed. Topical use of dipyrone gel before tooth bleaching, at the levels used in this study, did not reduce the risk or intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. Topical application of dipyrone gel does not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary identification of an abused child in dental office: A case report

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    Santos J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the injuries of child abuse are many and varied, several types of injuries are common to abuse. Many of these injuries are within the scope of dentistry or easily observed by the dental professional in the course of routine dental treatment. The authors present a case of child abuse with multiple bruises. The child had been spanked in the previous night and the morning of the attendance by his mother. This case emphasized that all practitioners should be vigilant when patients present with abnormal injuries which may be the result of abuse and further investigation should be instigated.

  12. Clinical Comparison of At-Home and In-Office Dental Bleaching Procedures: A Randomized Trial of a Split-Mouth Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo Guilherme; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this split-mouth clinical study was to compare a combination of in-office and at-home dental bleaching with at-home bleaching alone. Two applications of in-office bleaching were performed, with one appointment per week, using 38% hydrogen peroxide. At-home bleaching was performed with or without in-office bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide in a custom-made tray every night for 2 weeks. The factor studied was the bleaching technique on two levels: Technique 1 (in-office bleaching combined with home bleaching) and Technique 2 (home bleaching only). The response variables were color change, dental sensitivity, morphology, and surface roughness. The maxillary right and left hemiarches of the participants were submitted to in-office placebo treatment and in-office bleaching, respectively (Phase 1), and at-home bleaching (Phase 2) treatment was performed on both hemiarches, characterizing a split-mouth design. Enamel surface changes and roughness were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and optical interferometry using epoxy replicas. No statistically significant differences were observed between the bleaching techniques for either the visual or the digital analyses. There was a significant difference in dental sensitivity when both dental bleaching techniques were used, with in-office bleaching producing the highest levels of dental sensitivity after the baseline. Microscopic analysis of the morphology and roughness of the enamel surface showed no significant changes between the bleaching techniques. The two techniques produced similar results in color change, and the combination technique produced the highest levels of sensitivity. Neither technique promoted changes in morphology or surface roughness of enamel.

  13. Photobiomodulation in the Prevention of Tooth Sensitivity Caused by In-Office Dental Bleaching. A Randomized Placebo Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calheiros, Andrea Paiva Corsetti; Moreira, Maria Stella; Gonçalves, Flávia; Aranha, Ana Cecília Correa; Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro; Steiner-Oliveira, Carolina; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Ramalho, Karen Müller

    2017-08-01

    Analyze the effect of photobiomodulation in the prevention of tooth sensitivity after in-office dental bleaching. Tooth sensitivity is a common clinical consequence of dental bleaching. Therapies for prevention of sensitivity have been investigated in literature. This study was developed as a randomized, placebo blind clinical trial. Fifty patients were selected (n = 10) and randomly divided into five groups: (1) control, (2) placebo, (3) laser before bleaching, (4) laser after bleaching, and (5) laser before and after bleaching. Irradiation was performed perpendicularly, in contact, on each tooth during 10 sec per point in two points. The first point was positioned in the middle of the tooth crown and the second in the periapical region. Photobiomodulation was applied using the following parameters: 780 nm, 40 mW, 10 J/cm 2 , 0.4 J per point. Pain was analyzed before, immediately after, and seven subsequent days after bleaching. Patients were instructed to report pain using the scale: 0 = no tooth sensitivity, 1 = gentle sensitivity, 2 = moderate sensitivity, 3 = severe sensitivity. There were no statistical differences between groups at any time (p > 0.05). More studies, with others parameters and different methods of tooth sensitivity analysis, should be performed to complement the results found. Within the limitation of the present study, the laser parameters of photobiomodulation tested in the present study were not efficient in preventing tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

  14. Medical emergencies in a dental office: inhalation and ingestion of orthodontic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, Leon; Hazan-Molina, Hagai; Aizenbud, Dror

    2011-01-01

    The authors reviewed the literature regarding inhalation and ingestion of orthodontic appliances and suggest ways to manage and prevent these events. The authors conducted literature searches of free text and Medical Subject Headings terms by using PubMed and Embase databases and selected appropriate studies. They analyzed retrieved articles according to several parameters: inhalation or ingestion event, number of cases, patient's sex and age, type of orthodontic appliance, in-office event or out-of-office event, and medical treatment. The authors found a total of 2,279 articles in their preliminary search. Eighteen reports of 24 cases from this search met all of the search criteria (that is, clinical studies, case reports or reviews limited to English, Hebrew or Arabic on any form of aspiration or inhalation of orthodontic appliances). Most cases (67 percent) involved ingested objects, and of those cases, the majority (57 percent) occurred in female patients. Most cases (85 percent) occurred outside the orthodontist's office. Seventeen patients (71 percent) had been treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance. In 60 percent of cases, the maxilla was involved. With one exception, no severe complications were reported (only seven patients were examined in a hospital emergency department), and patients were discharged uneventfully from the orthodontic office or emergency department. Orthodontists and team members should participate in medical emergency management courses that emphasize the use of guidelines in cases of inhalation or ingestion of orthodontic objects. Each orthodontist's office should develop written emergency protocols for out-of-office events and present them to patients and their parents at the start of treatment.

  15. Computerized accounting for the dental office. Using horizontal applications general ledger software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garsson, B

    1988-01-01

    Remember that computer software is designed for accrual accounting, whereas your business operates and reports income on a cash basis. The rules of tax law stipulate that professional practices may use the cash method of accounting, but if accrual accounting is ever used to report taxable income the government may not permit a switch back to cash accounting. Therefore, always consider the computer as a bookkeeper, not a substitute for a qualified accountant. (Your accountant will have readily accessible payroll and general ledger data available for analysis and tax reports, thanks to the magic of computer processing.) Accounts Payable reports are interfaced with the general ledger and are of interest for transaction detail, open invoice and cash flow analysis, and for a record of payments by vendor. Payroll reports, including check register and withholding detail are provided and interfaced with the general ledger. The use of accounting software expands the use of in-office computers to areas beyond professional billing and insurance form generation. It simplifies payroll recordkeeping; maintains payables details; integrates payables, receivables, and payroll with general ledger files; provides instantaneous information on all aspects of the business office; and creates a continuous "audit-trail" following the entering of data. The availability of packaged accounting software allows the professional business office an array of choices. The person(s) responsible for bookkeeping and accounting should choose carefully, ensuring that any system is easy to use, has been thoroughly tested, and provides at least as much control over office records as has been outlined in this article.

  16. Availability of a remote online hemodynamic monitoring system during treatment in a private dental office for medically high-risk patients

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    Shinya Yamazaki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shinya Yamazaki, Hiroyoshi Kawaai, Shigeo Sasaki, Kazuhiro Shimamura, Hiroshi Segawa, Takahiro SaitoSpecial Care Department in Dentistry, Ohu University Dental Hospital, Koriyama city, Fukushima prefecture, JapanAbstract: The importance of systemic management to prevent accidents is increasing in dentistry because co-morbid illnesses in an aging society and invasive surgical procedures are increasing. In this prefecture, a new medical system called the remote online hemodynamic monitoring system (ROHMs was started in 2001. Eight private dental offices participated in this trial. When dental practitioners feel the risk of a dental procedure, they can contact via ROHMs to this hospital. Then, the hemodynamic data (blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, SpO2, and RPP of the patient in the clinic can be transmitted here via the internet, and the images and the voice can be transmitted as well. The availability of this system was assessed in 66 patients (98 cases. The most frequent complications were hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes mellitus. Systemic management included monitoring during the dental procedure (71.4%, checking vital signs after an interview (15.3%, and monitoring under sedation (13.3%. There were 35.7% of all cases where an unscheduled procedure was necessary for the systemic management. Based on a questionnaire, the majority of the patients felt relieved and safe. This system creates a situation where a specialist is almost present during the procedure. This system will provide significant assistance for future medical cooperation for risk management.Keywords: online, high-risk patient, dental treatment, medical cooperation, medical accident, risk management

  17. Assessment of occupational exposure of dental professionals to mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil - 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v34ispec.13428

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    André Gasparetto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the occupational exposure of dental professionals to metallic mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in the city of Maringá, Brazil, samples of blood and urine were collected from 149 dental professionals (group exposed, and 51 healthy adults similar for age and gender of the exposed group (control group in September and October, 2008. Urinary mercury was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, urea and creatinine in blood and urine by UV/VIS spectrophotometry and analysis of physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the urine by reactive bands. The program ‘Statistic’ version 7.1 and the software R version 2.6.2 were used for the statistical calculations. Urinary mercury was 2.08 ± 2.11 µg g-1 creatinine in workers exposed to mercury and 0.36 ± 0.62 µg g-1 creatinine in the control group (p -1 creatinine; 11% of these professionals (n = 16 had mercury levels above the reference value (5.0 µg g-1 creatinine, whereas the maximum value found was 13 µg g-1 creatinine. The dental professionals of public primary health care in the city of Maringa was exposed to metallic mercury at levels 5.8 times higher than the non-exposed subjects.  

  18. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  19. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times.  Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite. Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5 for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45% for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control. Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms-1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05.Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001. However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05. Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites.

  20. In-office dental bleaching with light vs. without light: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maran, Bianca Medeiros; Burey, Adrieli; de Paris Matos, Thalita; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2018-03-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the following research question: Does light-activated in-office vital bleaching have a greater whitening efficacy and higher tooth sensitivity (TS) in comparison with in-office vital bleaching without light when used in adults? Only randomized clinical trials (RCTs) involving adults who had in-office bleaching with and without light activation were included. Controlled vocabulary and keywords were used in a comprehensive search for titles and abstracts in PubMed, and this search was adapted for Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, BBO, Cochrane Library, and SIGLE without restrictions in May 2016 and was updated in August 2017. IADR abstracts (1990-2016), unpublished- and ongoing-trial registries, dissertations, and theses were also searched. The risk-of-bias tool of the Cochrane Collaboration was used for quality assessment. The quality of the evidence was rated using the Grading of Recommendations: Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Through the use of the random effects model, a meta-analysis with a subgroup analysis (low and high hydrogen peroxide concentration) was conducted for color change (ΔE*, ΔSGU) as well as the risk and intensity of TS. We retrieved 6663 articles, but after removing duplicates and non-relevant articles, only 21 RCTs remained. No significant difference in ΔE*, ΔSGU, and risk and intensity of TS was observed (p > .05). For ΔE and risk of TS, the quality of the evidence was graded as moderate whereas the evidence for ΔSGU and intensity of TS was graded as very low and low, respectively. Without considering variations in the protocols, the activation of in-office bleaching gel with light does not seem to improve color change or affect tooth sensitivity, regardless of the hydrogen peroxide concentration. (PROSPERO - CRD42016037630). Although it is commercially claimed that in-office bleaching associated with light improves and accelerates color change, this

  1. The integration of diet and nutrition lifestyle management strategies into the dental office visit for diabetes risk reduction and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Maura

    2012-12-01

    The incidence of diabetes and prediabetes in the United States continues to increase. Oral health care professionals (OHCPs) play a role in diabetes screening and education. The author presents and explores diet and lifestyle management strategies OHCPs can provide to patients who have prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Modest weight loss (7 percent of body weight) and regular physical activity (150 minutes per week) are important in the prevention and treatment of prediabetes and T2DM. Following a carbohydrate-controlled diet that is limited in fat and cholesterol will help patients with T2DM achieve normoglycemia and reduce their risk of developing diabetes complications. The importance of using these strategies can be reinforced by OHCPs during office visits. OHCPs can collaborate with registered dietitians to improve the outcome of oral health through diabetes prevention, education and management. Being familiar with risk factors for T2DM and recommendations for lifestyle modification strategies to prevent T2DM may help OHCPs educate patients and refer them for appropriate treatment and therapy.

  2. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  3. Economic impact of dental hygienists on solo dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental practices that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from practices that do not? This article explores differences among dental practices that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental Practice, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in practice characteristics--such as hours spent in the practice and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.

  4. Blood Thinners and Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of contact after hours (i.e.: office or cell phone number, on-call pager), and failing that, you ... Eric Stoopler Featured in the Bulletin of Dental Education AAOM Board Member Featured in PennCurrent AAOM Featured ...

  5. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  6. Effect of Intranasal Sedation Using Ketamine and Midazolam on Behavior of 3-6 Year-Old Uncooperative Children in Dental Office: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Mehran

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of intranasal ketamine and midazolam on behavior of 3-6 year-old children during dental treatments.  Materials and Methods: In this randomized cross-over clinical trial, 17 uncooperative children requiring at least two dental treatments were selected and randomly received ketamine (0.5mg/kg or midazolam (0.2mg/kg prior to treatment. The other medication was used in the next visit. The children’s behavioral pattern was determined according to the Houpt's scale regarding sleep, movement, crying and overall behavior. Physiological parameters were also measured at different time intervals. The data were subjected to Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and two-way repeated measures ANOVA.Results: The frequency of crying decreased significantly following ketamine administration compared to midazolam (P=0.002; movement of children decreased with fewer incidence of treatment interruption (P=0.001 while their sleepiness increased (P=0.003. Despite higher success of sedation with ketamine compared to midazolam, no significant differences were found between the two regarding patients’ overall behavior (P>0.05. The patients had higher heart rate and blood pressure with ketamine; however, no significant difference was found regarding respiratory rate and oxygen saturation (P>0.05.  Conclusions: Ketamine (0.5mg/kg led to fewer movements, less crying and more sleepiness compared to midazolam (0.2mg/kg. No significant differences were found between the two drugs regarding children’s overall behavior and sedation efficiency. Both drugs demonstrated positive efficacy for sedation of children during dental treatments.Keywords: Conscious Sedation; Ketamine; Midazolam; Administration, Intranasal

  7. Exploring Dental Providers' Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N; Ye, Zhan; Acharya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR.

  8. Trabalho e formação profissional do atendente de consultório dentário e do técnico em higiene dental Work and professional qualifications of dentist office attendants and of dental hygiene technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Boen Garcia Liñan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa a formação de egressos dos cursos de atendente de consultório dentário (ACD e de técnico em higiene dental (THD, procurando compreender a importância dos cursos técnicos na melhoria do desempenho profissional, da renda individual e familiar, assim como a sua importância para uma melhor inserção no mercado de trabalho. Mostra que, apesar das deficiências assinaladas pelos egressos, a escola os qualificou adequadamente para o desempenho de suas funções. No entanto, as dificuldades por eles encontradas em termos de representação coletiva, a falta de prestígio social e a baixa credibilidade e respeito profissional que lhes consagram os cirurgiões-dentistas permanecem como problemas a serem enfrentados. A falta de legitimidade profissional que ainda os caracteriza faz com que os auxiliares da odontologia fiquem à mercê das oscilações do mercado de trabalho e das políticas de saúde. O artigo sustenta que a regulamentação dessas categorias de trabalhadores pode significar proteção técnica e ética, evitando a formação de monopólios profissionais e assegurando normas de eqüidade e justiça sociais para os profissionais da saúde bucal.This article analyzes the qualifications of dental office attendant (DOA and dental hygiene technician (DHT graduates, seeking to understand the importance technical courses have not only in improving their professional performance, individual and family incomes, but also their impact on these professionals' better placement in the work market. It shows that, despite the deficiencies these graduates mention, their schooling qualified them appropriately to perform their duties. However, the difficulties these professionals face in terms of collective representation, the lack of social prestige, and the low levels of professional credibility and respect they get from dentists remain hurdles to be faced. The lack of professional legitimacy that characterizes their work

  9. Recent trends in dental visits and private dental insurance, 1989 and 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Thomas P; Brown, L Jackson

    2003-05-01

    This article describes recent trends in dental visits and private dental insurance in the United States. This study is based on the analyses of data regarding dental visits and private dental insurance among the population 2 years of age or older from the 1989 and 1999 National Health Interview Surveys. Overall, the percentage of the population with a dental visit rose from 57.2 percent in 1989 to 64.1 percent in 1999, while the percentage with private dental insurance fell from 40.5 percent to 35.2 percent. Although a higher percentage of people with private dental insurance reported having a dental visit than did those without private dental insurance in both years, the increase from 1989 to 1999 in the percentage of those with a visit was larger among the uninsured. If this trend persists, a smaller portion of practicing dentist's clientele will be insured. This may affect demand for services, as well as front office operations.

  10. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  11. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  12. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  13. Placement, support, and retention of health professionals: national, cross-sectional findings from medical and dental community service officers in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Abigail M; Onah, Michael; Kornik, Saul; Peacocke, Julia; Reid, Stephen

    2014-02-26

    In South Africa, community service following medical training serves as a mechanism for equitable distribution of health professionals and their professional development. Community service officers are required to contribute a year towards serving in a public health facility while receiving supervision and remuneration. Although the South African community service programme has been in effect since 1998, little is known about how placement and practical support occur, or how community service may impact future retention of health professionals. National, cross-sectional data were collected from community service officers who served during 2009 using a structured self-report questionnaire. A Supervision Satisfaction Scale (SSS) was created by summing scores of five questions rated on a three-point Likert scale (orientation, clinical advising, ongoing mentorship, accessibility of clinic leadership, and handling of community service officers' concerns). Research endpoints were guided by community service programmatic goals and analysed as dichotomous outcomes. Bivariate and multivariate logistical regressions were conducted using Stata 12. The sample population comprised 685 doctors and dentists (response rate 44%). Rural placement was more likely among unmarried, male, and black practitioners. Rates of self-reported professional development were high (470 out of 539 responses; 87%). Participants with higher scores on the SSS were more likely to report professional development. Although few participants planned to continue work in rural, underserved communities (n = 171 out of 657 responses, 25%), those serving in a rural facility during the community service year had higher intentions of continuing rural work. Those reporting professional development during the community service year were twice as likely to report intentions to remain in rural, underserved communities. Despite challenges in equitable distribution of practitioners, participant satisfaction with the

  14. Dental negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C S

    2000-02-01

    Medical and dental errors and negligence are again in the spotlight in recent news report. Dead because of doctor's bad handwriting Prescribing drug overdoses Germ-infested soap pumps--infections in hospitals This articles explains dental negligence including dental duty of care and the standard of care expected of dentists in relation to the Bolam principle.

  15. Factors that Determine Child Behavior during Dental Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajrić Elmedin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review paper we wanted to summarize all the aspects which could affect the behavior of the child patients in the dental office. At the beginning, the factors that are related to the child patients are mentioned. Various segments of child psychological, cognitive, physiological and other kinds of development are discussed. Also, the reasons for dental fear and anxiety (DFA and dental behavior problems (DBP were analyzed, and how the child dental patients could cope with them. Finally, types of patients according to their behavior in the dental office were discussed. Furthermore, the influences of child patients’ parents were studied, including parenting styles, as well as factors related to dentist, dental team and the dental office. Finally, critical evaluation of administration of assets to measure the presence of DFA and DBP is provided. Every part of the text was corroborated by the results from our own and other authors’ recent bibliography data.

  16. Exploring Dental Providers’ Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N.; Ye, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. Objective The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. Methods A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Results Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). Conclusions On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR. PMID:27437058

  17. Evaluation of dental solid waste in Hamedan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabizadeh R.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Today, one of the most important environmental issues is dental solid wastes which are of great importance because of the presence of hazardous, toxic and pathogen agents. In this survey, solid waste produced in Hamedan general dental offices is evaluated. "nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive study, from 104 general dental offices in Hamedan , 10 offices were selected in simple random way. From each offices, 3 sample at the end of successive working day (Sunday, Monday and Tuesday were analyzed. Samples were manually sorted into different 74 components and measured by means of laboratory scale. Then, measured components were classified in the basis of characteristic and hazardous potential as well as material type. "nResults: Total annual waste produced in general dental offices in Hamadan is 14662.67 Kg (9315.45>95.0% Confidence Interval>20009.88. Production percentages of infectious, domestic type, chemical and pharmaceutical and toxic wastes were 51.93, 38.16, 9.47, 0.44 respectively. Main components of produced dental waste were 14 components that consist of more than 80 percents of total dental solid waste. So, waste reduction, separation and recycling plans in the offices must be concentrated on these main components. "nConclusion: In order to dental waste proper management, it is suggested that in addition to educate dentists for waste reduction, separation and recycling in the offices, each section of dental waste(toxic,chemical and pharmaceutical, infectious and domestic type wastes separately and according to related criteria should be managed.

  18. Child Dental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Foods For Healthy Teeth - Amarɨñña / አማርኛ (Amharic) MP3 Office of Oral Health Maryland Department of Health ... PDF Healthy Teeth, Healthy Kids - Amarɨñña / አማርኛ (Amharic) MP3 Maryland Dental Action Coalition Arabic (العربية) Expand Section ...

  19. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  20. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  1. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human t...

  2. An incidental diagnosis of neurocysticercosis in a dental patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh K Puttaraju

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tenia solium, a parasite causes cysticercous cellulose when affecting the central nervous system, the manifestation is called neurocysticercosis. The most common symptom in neurocysticercosis is seizure. Generally, oral diagnosticians come across cases of oral cysticercosis and it is rare to find a case of neurocysticercosis in the dental office, as it goes undetected. Sometimes, when patients experience seizure in the dental office and subsequent evaluation is performed, rarity such as this can be detected. One case of neurocysticercosis in a 27 year old unmarried female patient detected due to its presentation in the dental office is being reported here.

  3. Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices

  4. What Will Dental Practice Be Like In 2025? Will You Help Dental Hypotheses Find Answers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward F. Rossomando

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the rapid acceptance of digital dental equipment, the dental office of 2011 looks very different from that of 1900. Despite these changes, the general dentist of 2011 performs almost the same functions as in 1900 namely the restoration of decayed teeth and the replacement of those lost due to disease. In addition to changes in technology, the last few decades of the 20th century ushered in a revolution in biology leading to the development of a genomic basis of dental disease and the development of bio-based diagnostics and therapeutics. In 2011 few if any of these bio-discoveries have changed dental practice but by 2025 we expect they will. In this editorial, Dental Hypotheses asks readers to “hypothesize” on what dental practice will be like in 2025.

  5. Office Hysteroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hikmet Hassa; Basar Tekin; H. Mete Tanir; Bulent Cakmak

    2007-01-01

    Although hysteroscopy has evolved in recent years, its use in the office setting was not made practical until early 1980s with the introduction of small caliber hysteroscopes of less than 5- mm outer diameter.This innovation simplifies ambulatory uterine exploration and the office evaluation of patients with abnormal uterine bleeding. This article reviews current trends in office hysteroscopy and its areas of application in different forms of gynecological problems.

  6. Office Hysteroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet Hassa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although hysteroscopy has evolved in recent years, its use in the office setting was not made practical until early 1980s with the introduction of small caliber hysteroscopes of less than 5- mm outer diameter.This innovation simplifies ambulatory uterine exploration and the office evaluation of patients with abnormal uterine bleeding. This article reviews current trends in office hysteroscopy and its areas of application in different forms of gynecological problems.

  7. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life......, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  8. ?Hepatitis? ? Prevention and management in dental practice

    OpenAIRE

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Sharma, Varun; Kaur, Saravpreet

    2015-01-01

    Today, viral hepatitis has become a silent epidemic worldwide. It is the major cause of liver cirrhosis and liver carcinoma. In a dental office, infections can be expedited through several routes, including direct or indirect contact with blood, oral fluids, droplet splatter, aerosols, etc. The aim of the present review is to increase the awareness among dental practitioners, so as to reduce the burden of hepatitis in their community. Electronic databases like PubMed, Medline, ProQuest, etc. ...

  9. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  10. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  11. HPSA - Dental

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — California Healthcare Workforce Catalog.The data were developed by the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development's (OSHPD) Healthcare Workforce Development...

  12. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Gazal, G; Fareed, WM; Zafar, MS

    2016-01-01

    Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of f...

  13. Financial due diligence in purchasing a dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederman, Arthur S

    2008-06-01

    Purchasing a dental practice can be a minefield. The office you are looking at could be the most beautiful office with all of the newest technology. But if it is not profitable, it will be a nightmare. This article will help navigate what the dentist and his or her CPA should be looking at when reviewing the books and records, based on the author's experience of reviewing more than 400 dental practices on behalf of buyers.

  14. Evaluation of disinfecting effect of 5% sodium hypochlorite solution diluted to 2:100 along with the use of disposable covers on HBV contaminated dental office surfaces and equipments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arami S.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The efficiency of disinfecting materials and procedures in removal of contamination from dental surfaces and equipments is essential. In authors' previous study, daily use of 2:100 dilution of 5% sodium hypochlorite in water and disposable covers were recommended since HBV contamination was found on semi-critical parts of the operative dentistry department. The aim of this study was to evaluate the HBV contamination following application of the recommended procedures.Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two parts. In the first cross-sectional part, samples were collected from 17 sites of dental surfaces. In the second interventional part samples were collected from 10 sites of 9 dental and 3 sites of 2 light cure units, before and after disinfection with 5% sodium hypochlorite solution diluted to 2:100. Sterile cotton swabs moistened with sterile BSAS (Bovine Serum Albumin in Sodium Chloride solution were used for sampling. Samples were tested by PCR technique in Pasteur Institute, Iran.Results: None of the samples collected in the first part of the study showed contamination. In the second part of the study, from 96 samples taken from various parts of dental and light cure units, before and after disinfection, there was only one HBV contaminated site before disinfection which showed no contamination after disinfection.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, disinfecting procedure with 5% sodium hypochlorite solution diluted to 2:100 along with using disposable covers is effective in preventing HBV contamination.

  15. Clareamento Dental

    OpenAIRE

    Sossai, Najara; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Verdinelli, Ellen Carla; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Bassegio, Wagner; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR

    2011-01-01

    O clareamento dental já é utilizado há bastante tempo na Odontologia e atualmente é um dos tratamentos odontológicos mais solicitados para obtenção de um sorriso mais estético. Classificado em clareamento caseiro e/ou de consultório, ambas as técnicas são motivo de polêmica quanto aos seus benefícios, riscos, limitações e efeito clareador, bem como sobre qual é a melhor técnica existente para a promoção de um clareamento dental eficaz e seguro. Neste contexto, o presente estudo tem por objeti...

  16. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  17. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  18. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  19. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  20. Valuing the delivery of dental care: Heterogeneity in patients' preferences and willingness-to-pay for dental care attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Ivan; Verbič, Miroslav; Sever, Eva Klaric

    2018-02-01

    To examine the amount of heterogeneity in patients' preferences for dental care, what factors affect their preferences, and how much they would be willing to pay for improvement in specific dental care attributes. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was used to elicit patients' preferences. Three alternative dental care services that differed in the type of care provider, treatment explanation, dental staff behavior, waiting time and treatment cost were described to patients. Patients (n=265) were asked to choose their preferred alternative. The study was conducted at a public dental clinic of the School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb. Mixed logit and latent class models were used for analysis. On average, the patients would be willing to pay €45 for getting a detailed explanation of treatment over no explanation. This was the most valued attribute of dental care, followed by dental staff behavior with marginal willingness-to-pay (WTP) of €28. Dental care provided by the faculty members and private dental care were valued similarly, while student-provided care was valued €23 less. Patients also disliked longer waiting time in the office, but this was the least important attribute. Four classes of patients with distinct preferences for dental care were identified. Older and/or more educated patients tended to give relatively less importance to treatment explanation. Higher education was also associated with a higher propensity to substitute faculty dental care with the private care providers. Large heterogeneity in patients' preferences was detected. Understanding their preferences may improve the delivery of dental care. Dental care providers should pay particular attention to providing a detailed treatment explanation to their patients. Dental care for older and/or more educated patients should be more attentive to interpersonal characteristics. Faculty dental care provided by faculty members could be price competitive to private care, and student

  1. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  2. Dental Practice, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. A total of 113 OHCWs comprising students, house officers, resident doctors, dental nurses and consultants participated. Analysis was by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Data analysis included descriptive ...

  3. Ergonomic risk: social representations of dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Kelle Batista Moura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To learn the social representations of ergonomic risk prepared ​​by dental students. Methodology: This exploratory study, subsidized the Theory of Social Representations, with 64 dental students of an educational institution, by means of interviews. The data were processed in Alceste4.8 and lexical analysis done by the descending hierarchical classification. Results: In two categories: knowledge about exposure to ergonomic risk end attitude of students on preventing and treating injuries caused by repetitive motion. For students, the ergonomic risk is related to the attitude in the dental office. Conclusion: Prevention of ergonomic risk for dental students has not been incorporated as a set of necessary measures for their health and the patients, to prevent ergonomic hazards that can result in harm to the patient caused by work-related musculoskeletal disorder, which is reflected in a lower quality practice.

  4. Dental Hypotheses: Seeks to Publish Hypotheses from All Areas of Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward F. Rossomando

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting a new open access journal in a rapid growing scientific panorama is a severe challenge. However, the first issue of dental hypotheses is now history and the even skeptics can appreciate that dental hypotheses is a success - it is a journal of high quality that provides an outlet for publication of articles that encourage readers to question dental paradigms. But dental hypotheses readers might have noticed that the majority of the articles published in the first issue of dental hypotheses concern clinical dentistry. However, dental hypotheses editors recognize that there are many other areas in dentistry that present challenges and that our readers may offer suggestions for their solution. Some of these challenges relate to: dental education; digital dental technology; teledentistry and access to dental care; dental practice issues, such as, dental office design, dental office management, the slow rate of acceptance of innovative technology in the dental office; and issues related to innovation and dental entrepreneurship including intellectual property protection. Nevertheless, the dental profession faces many challenges - in many areas - and with the publication of dental hypotheses our profession has a venue for presentation of possible solutions. If you have developed a hypothesis that might help, please share it with your colleagues. As many have noted, the intellectual power of the global village in which we now live is formidable. The internet has provided the technology to bring us together and dental hypotheses has provided the venue. Please use it. New radical, speculative and non-mainstream scientific ideas are always welcome.

  5. Dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhdar, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiography must comply with the same regulations with which conventional radiography complies. Radiation doses to individual patients are low but, because of the large number of patients X-rayed, the collective dose to the population is not negligible. Care in siting and regular maintenance of the equipment will reduce doses to both staff and patients. To produce X-ray films with a good image quality using a low radiation dose requires attention to film processing; this is often a neglected area. (Author)

  6. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  7. Communication in dental medicine: importance in motivating elderly dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutariu, Mihaela Monica; Forna, Norina

    2013-01-01

    Dental services for elderly patients are characterized by a series of particularities related to the vulnerability of this age group, which is affected by various co morbidities, and the diminished physical, cognitive and financial capacities. Finding ways to keep elderly patients coming to a dental office is possible by improving the dentist-patient relationship and implicitly the quality of care by increasing the self-esteem of the elderly and their place in society, by increasing the role of oral health in the quality of life, and here we refer to the pleasure of eating, the pleasant physical aspect and normal diction. The present paper presents the psychological aspects that interfere in the communication process between the dentist and the elderly patient and the changes motivation undergoes when people are in pain. These data can sometimes change the reticent attitude of the dentist towards the elderly patient which is often considered to be a risk patient.

  8. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  9. Mail Office

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The Mail Office wishes to remind users that the CERN mail service is exclusively reserved for official CERN mail. All external official mail must be sent to the Mail Office in an unstamped envelope on which your name and Department must be clearly indicated below the official CERN address (see example) to help us to find you in the event that it cannot be delivered. If you wish to send private mail from the CERN site you must use the post offices at Meyrin (63-R-011) or Prévessin (866-R-C02). Please use "PRIORITY" envelopes only in the case of urgent mail. Any mail containing merchandise (i.e. anything other than documents) must be sent using an EDH shipping request form. INTERNAL MAIL Please remember to include the recipient’s MAILBOX number on the internal mail envelopes, either in the relevant box (new envelopes) or next to the name (old envelopes). This information, which can be found in the CERN PHONEBOOK, simplifies our t...

  10. The establishment of the Croatian Dental Crops: the front-line experience of a dentist volunteer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelaca-Bagić, S; Sipina, J; Visković, R; Cakarun, Z; Vlatković, I; Biloglav, D

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of the first dental office of the Croatian Dental Corps (CDC) in the city of Zadar represented at the same time the beginning of the CDC. This article describes the front-line experience of a dentist who volunteered to provide basic medical help, which eventually laid the groundwork for providing general dental care and establishing the first CDC dental office. The office was opened on December 16, 1991, and provided general dental care except prosthetics. Although faced with numerous problems and extremely difficult conditions, the office staff completed 1,913 initial and 1,157 control checkups and performed 4,002 services by treating 12 to 16 patients per day. The main causes for emergencies were caries (59%) and endodontic complications (28%). This variety of services in the proximity of the front line is considered extensive even for advanced medical corps of modern armies.

  11. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROSA, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; SILVA, Tiago Machado; LIMA, Giana da Silveira; SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; PIVA, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in

  12. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; Silva, Tiago Machado; Lima, Giana da Silveira; Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Piva, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in countries such as Brazil.

  13. Assessment of occupational exposure of dental professionals to mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil = Avaliação da exposição ocupacional de profissionais de odontologia ao mercúrio em unidades básicas de saúde de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Minervino de Oliveira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the occupational exposure of dental professionals to metallic mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in the city of Maringá, Brazil, samples of blood and urine were collected from 149 dental professionals (group exposed, and 51 healthy adults similar for age and gender of the exposed group (control group in September and October, 2008. Urinary mercury was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, urea and creatinine in blood and urine by UV/VIS spectrophotometry and analysis of physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the urine by reactive bands. The program ‘Statistic��� version 7.1 and the software R version 2.6.2 were used for the statistical calculations. Urinary mercury was 2.08  2.11 µg g-1 creatinine in workers exposed to mercury and 0.36  0.62 µg g-1 creatinine in the control group (p Para avaliar a exposição ocupacional dos profissionais de odontologia ao mercúrio metálico nas Unidades Básicas de Saúde (UBS de Maringá, Brasil, foram coletadas amostras de sangue e urina de 149 profissionais de odontologia (grupo exposto e de 51 adultos saudáveis similares em relação à idade e ao gênero do grupo exposto (grupo controle, no período de setembro e outubro de 2008. Foi determinado o mercúrio urinário por espectrofotometria de absorção atômica, a uréia e creatinina no sangue por espectrofotometria UV/VIS, e análise dos aspectos físicos, químicos e microbiológicos da urina por fitas reativas. Para a análise estatística foi utilizado o programa Statistic versão 7.1 e o R versão 2.6.2. O mercúrio urinário foi 2,08 ± 2,11 µg g-1 de creatinina nos profissionais expostos ao mercúrio e 0,36 ± 0,62 µg g-1 de creatinina no grupo controle (p < 0,05. Os níveis de mercúrio urinário detectados estavam abaixo do Índice Biológico Máximo Permitido estabelecido no Brasil (35 µg g-1 de creatinina, 11% destes profissionais (n=16

  14. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  15. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  16. American Dental Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CE providers and find CE courses. Commission on Dental Accreditation Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations Learn about the examinations used in licensing ...

  17. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  18. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Autumn Giving: ‘Fall’ into the Future of Dental Hygiene Support the Institute for Oral Health! Give ... best for your patients! Learn More Sidebar Menu Dental Hygiene Programs Continuing Education Career Center Annual Conference ...

  19. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  20. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  1. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  2. Office of Child Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Children & Families Office of Child Care By Office Administration for Native Americans (ANA) Administration on Children, ... about the Child Care Rule > What is the Office of Child Care (OCC)? The Office of Child ...

  3. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  4. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to

  5. Marketing Dental Services | Tuominen | Tanzania Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Dental Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Marketing Dental Services. R Tuominen. Abstract. No Abstract.

  6. Dental Radiographs Ordered by Dental Professionals: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Even in resource limited settings dental caries is still the regular indication for taking dental radiographs, and periapical views are the most frequent type of radiograph ordered. Maxillary central incisors and mandibular molars were types of teeth commonly x-rayed mainly due to the aesthetic importance of the ...

  7. Dental care as a vital service response for disaster victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Nicholas G; Finn, Emanuel; Joskow, Renée

    2007-05-01

    Hurricane Katrina's impact on the infrastructure of public health and the health care system in the affected areas was unprecedented in the United States. Many dental offices were flood-bound in New Orleans and over 60% of dental practices were partially or completely damaged in affected counties in Mississippi. Most needs assessments conducted during the initial recovery operations did not include questions about access to oral health care. However, the extent of the destruction of the health care infrastructure demonstrated the need for significant state and federal support to make dental treatment accessible to survivors and evacuees. The Katrina response is one of the few times that state and federal government agencies responded to provide dental services to victims as part of disaster response and recovery. The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences in Mississippi and the District of Columbia providing urgent dental care to disaster victims as part of a crisis response.

  8. Results of a QC program on dental radiography in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappous, George; Kolitsi, Zoi; Pallikarakis, Nikolas [Medical Physics Department, Patras University, 26 500 Patras (Greece); Arvanitakis, Gerasimos [Achaia branch of Hellenic Dental Association, Pantanasis 70-72, 262 21 (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Quality Control (QC) performed on 99 intraoral dental X-Ray units, installed in equal in number dental offices, at the Achaia prefecture, a region of south west Greece. The QC procedure includes collection of general information, radiation safety checks, beam qualitative and quantitative characteristic checks, and film processing checks, according to international established protocols. The collected data are characterised by a non-uniformity and in some cases indicate a poor performance level. The results of the study on a representative sample of dental X-Ray units helps to map the existing situation and may be useful in the reviewing and optimisation of the applied process. (authors) 10 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Results of a QC program on dental radiography in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappous, George; Kolitsi, Zoi; Pallikarakis, Nikolas; Arvanitakis, Gerasimos

    1998-01-01

    Quality Control (QC) performed on 99 intraoral dental X-Ray units, installed in equal in number dental offices, at the Achaia prefecture, a region of south west Greece. The QC procedure includes collection of general information, radiation safety checks, beam qualitative and quantitative characteristic checks, and film processing checks, according to international established protocols. The collected data are characterised by a non-uniformity and in some cases indicate a poor performance level. The results of the study on a representative sample of dental X-Ray units helps to map the existing situation and may be useful in the reviewing and optimisation of the applied process. (authors)

  10. Dental education in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Sato, Manuel; Rodiguez, Lyly; Sato, Doris; Bird, William F

    2008-09-01

    This paper provides information about Peru's dental history and dental school system, including the curriculum and dental licensure. With the increase in the number of dental schools in Peru, the number of dentists is also increasing. Until 1965, Peru had only three dental schools; currently, there are 14. Four of these dental schools are public, and ten are private. A five- or six-year dental program leads to the B.D.S. degree. After successful completion of a thesis defense or competency examination, the D.D.S. degree is awarded. The D.D.S. is mandatory for practicing dentistry in Peru. Currently, there are approximately 14,000 active dentists, with a dentist-patient ratio of approximately 1:2,000.

  11. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  12. The establishment of minority affairs offices in schools of dentistry: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Billy R

    2003-09-01

    The establishment of Minority Affairs Offices in dental schools following the American Association of Medical Colleges' model is discussed as one method of addressing the declining enrollment and compounding oral health disparities of underrepresented minorities African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans in U.S. dental schools. The pros and cons of the approach are discussed, with recommendations.

  13. Psychological stress in undergraduate dental students: baseline results from seven European dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Gerry; Blinkhorn, Andy; Freeman, Ruth; Gorter, Ronald; Hoad-Reddick, Gillian; Murtomaa, Heikki; O'Sullivan, Robin; Splieth, Christian

    2002-02-01

    To determine the degree of psychological distress, the experience of emotional exhaustion, and the extent of stress associated with course work in dental students and to compare these measurements among seven European dental schools. Multi-centred survey. Dental Schools at Amsterdam, Belfast, Cork, Greifswald, Helsinki, Liverpool and Manchester. 333 undergraduate first-year dental students. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Dental Environment Stress Questionnaire (DES), demographic variables. Questionnaire administered to all students attending first year course. Completed questionnaires sent to central office for processing. Seventy-nine percent of the sampled students responded. Over a third of the students (36%) reported significant psychological distress (morbidity) at the recommended cut-off point (>3 on GHQ). These scores were similar to those reported for medical undergraduates. Twenty-two percent recorded comparatively high scores on emotional exhaustion. A wide variation in these 2 measurements was found across schools (p'sStress levels indicated by the DES were less variable (p>0.5). Some evidence showed that contact with patients and the level of support afforded by living at home may be protective. Higher than expected levels of emotional exhaustion were found in a large sample of first-year undergraduate dental students in Europe.

  14. 77 FR 35990 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Molecular Characterization of Salivary Tumors RFA: R01 and R21...: Jayalakshmi Raman, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental...

  15. Burnout and engagement in relation with job demands and resources among dental staff in Northern Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, R.C.; Freeman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives:  To investigate the psychological health - in particular, levels of burnout and engagement, job demands, job resources, and general psychological distress - among dental staff in Northern Ireland. Methods:  Three hundred questionnaires were administered to all dental offices in the

  16. 78 FR 4478 - Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program: Application Process for Contract Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... process is being changed to be in line with the process used for the Federal Employees Health Benefits... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program: Application... Process for Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program Contract Awards. SUMMARY: The U. S...

  17. Treatment Needs and Adverse Events Related to Dental Treatment under General Anesthesia for Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with autism can be quite challenging to treat in a routine dental-office setting, especially when extensive dental treatment and disruptive behavioral issues exist. Individuals with autism may also be at higher risk for oral disease. Frequently, general anesthesia is the only method to facilitate completion of the needed dental…

  18. Proposed Guideline Revisions for Dental Sedation and General Anesthesia: Why Target the Safest Level of Sedation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Raymond A

    2016-09-01

    Recently proposed revisions to the American Dental Association's Guidelines for the Use of Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentists, aimed at improving safety in dental offices, differentiate between levels of sedation based on drug-induced changes in physiologic and behavioral states. However, the author of this op-ed is concerned the proposed revisions may have far-reaching and unintended consequences.

  19. Preparing the Future Dental Hygiene Workforce: Knowledge, Skills, and Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jacquelyn L; Maxey, Hannah L; Battani, Kathryn; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Byrd, Tammi O; Brunick, Ann

    2017-09-01

    With the health care delivery system in transition, the way in which oral health care services are delivered in 2040 will inevitably change. To achieve the aims of reduced cost, improved access, and higher quality and to advance population wellness, oral health care will likely become a more integrated part of medical care. An integrated primary care system would better meet the needs of an increasingly diverse and aging U.S. population with uneven access to health care services. By 2040, trends suggest that a smaller proportion of dental hygienists will work in traditional solo dental offices; many more will practice with multidisciplinary health care teams in large-group dental and medical practices and in a variety of non-traditional community settings. This integration will require changes in how dental hygienists are educated. To shape the skill sets, clinical judgment, and knowledge of future practitioners, current dental hygiene curricula must be reexamined, redirected, and enhanced. This article examines some of the factors that are likely to shape the future of dental hygiene practice, considers the strengths and weaknesses of current curricula, and proposes educational changes to prepare dental hygienists for practice in 2040. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  20. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    .... FDA-2008-N-0163] (formerly Docket No. 2001N-0067) RIN 0910-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam... the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II...

  1. Case based dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

  2. Percutaneous injuries among dental professionals in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Syed M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous exposure incidents facilitate transmission of bloodborne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. This study was conducted to identify the circumstances and equipment related to percutaneous injuries among dental professionals. Methods We used workers' compensation claims submitted to the Department of Labor and Industries State Fund during a 7-year period (1995 through 2001 in Washington State for this study. We used the statement submitted by the injured worker on the workers' compensation claim form to determine the circumstances surrounding the injury including the type of activity and device involved. Results Of a total of 4,695 accepted State Fund percutaneous injury claims by health care workers (HCWs, 924 (20% were submitted by dental professionals. Out of 924 percutaneous injuries reported by dental professionals 894 (97% were among dental health care workers in non-hospital settings, including dentists (66, 7%, dental hygienists (61, 18% and dental assistants (667, 75%. The majority of those reporting were females (638, 71%. Most (781, 87% of the injuries involved syringes, dental instruments (77, 9%, and suture needles (23%. A large proportion (90% of injuries occurred in offices and clinics of dentists, while remainder occurred in offices of clinics and of doctors of medicine (9%, and a few in specialty outpatient facilities (1%. Of the 894 dental health care workers with percutaneous injuries, there was evidence of HBV in 6 persons, HCV in 30 persons, HIV in 3 persons and both HBV and HVC (n = 2 exposure. Conclusion Out of hospital percutaneous injuries are a substantial risk to dental health professionals in Washington State. Improved work practices and safer devices are needed to address this risk.

  3. The 'simple' general dental anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dental anaesthesia should not be underestimated. Eddie Oosthuizen .... dental surgeon has limited training in airway management. ... primary teeth to hours for extensive dental conservation .... options after the extraction of permanent teeth ...

  4. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  5. Dental radiology for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation

  6. Eficácia da estufa de Pasteur como equipamento esterilizante em consultórios odontológicos La eficacia de la estufa de Pasteur como equipamiento esterilizante en consultorios odontológicos Efficacy of the pasteur oven as sterilization equipment in dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange do Socorro Fonseca Tavares

    2008-03-01

    termómetro accesorio para el control de la temperatura de los ciclos y la no observación de las relaciones tiempo/temperatura recomendadas para el ciclo de esterilización, por el calor seco.This study was aimed at assessing the efficacy of the use of the Pasteur oven as sterilization equipment in dental offices through biological monitoring. For this assessment were taken into account how adequately the material is loaded into the equipment; time/temperature used; and preventive maintenance of the oven. The data were collected in 101 dental offices in the Central District of Goiânia, in the State of Goiás, through observation, interviews and performance of tests with biological indicator. The results showed a lack of standardization of some of the procedures recommended by the Ministry of Health for sterilization of items in the oven, and positive results of the biological test in 46 (45.5% of the tested cycles. The intervening factors with most significance regarding sterilization problems were: absence of an accessory thermometer to control the cycles' temperature and non-observance of the time/temperature relations recommended for the sterilization cycle through dry heat.

  7. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Travis M; Xu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a result of these changes, it is possible that dental providers will abandon the practice of personally administering large amounts of

  8. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson TM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Nelson, Zheng Xu Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a

  9. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  10. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  11. Deprivation and dental health. The benefits of a child dental health campaign in relation to deprivation as estimated by the uptake of free meals at school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C; Wohlgemuth, B

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the overall effect of the 1989 Lothian dental health education campaign on 8-year-old school children's dental health knowledge and behaviour and to examine the relationship between free meals and the children's benefit from the campaign....... Altogether 874 children were randomly selected and included in the study. Sugar-free meals and drinks were provided in all primary schools throughout the campaign week. Dental officers held 30-minute information sessions with each class and encouraged teachers to continue dental health activities. Dental...... knowledge and behaviour were evaluated by interviews immediately before and after the campaign. The results showed a significant increase in knowledge about diet and dental health and a significantly higher proportion of children claimed to choose non-cariogenic foods and drinks as a result of the campaign...

  12. From production to performance: solving the positioning dilemma in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, James; Pitt, Leyland; Berthon, Pierre

    2006-09-01

    Thriving dental practices are excellent at providing a warm personal experience or are efficient, fast and cost-effective. Those that that attempt to do both end up being mediocre at just about everything. Introducing ideas from dramaturgy and service simultaneity in the services marketing literature, the authors provide a model for the conceptualization and redesign of the dental practice. Successful dental practices will be those that concentrate on low customization of activities in the back office or high customization of activities in the front office.

  13. Dental radiographic exposures in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A.F.; Oliveira, A.D.; Amaral, E.M.; Carreiro, J.V.; Galvao, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of dental intra-oral radiography was carried out in Portugal in 1989 and 1990 in hospitals, clinics and private offices. About 25% of the operational X ray units were checked. A total of 847 x 10 3 films were estimated as having been performed in 1989 corresponding to a frequency of 86 films per 10 3 inhabitants, which amounts to about 12% of all radiological examinations. The median entrance absorbed dose for a molar tooth was calculated to be 6.3 mGy but 85% of measured doses were out of acceptable dose range for good practice. Improvement of image quality and reduction of patient dose can be mainly achieved by improving the quality of film processing

  14. More Rhode Island Adults Have Dental Coverage After the Medicaid Expansion: Did More Adults Receive Dental Services? Did More Dentists Provide Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Oh, Junhie

    2017-10-02

    Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion since 2014, 68,000 more adults under age 65 years were enrolled in Rhode Island Medicaid as of December 2015, a 78% increase from 2013 enrollment. This report assesses changes in dental utilization associated with this expansion. Medicaid enrollment and dental claims for calendar years 2012-2015 were extracted from the RI Medicaid Management Information System. Among adults aged 18-64 years, annual numbers and percentages of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental service were summarized. Additionally, dental service claims were assessed by provider type (private practice or health center). Although 15,000 more adults utilized dental services by the end of 2015, the annual percentage of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental services decreased over the reporting periods, compared to pre-ACA years (2012-13: 39%, 2014: 35%, 2015: 32%). From 2012 to 2015, dental patient increases in community health centers were larger than in private dental offices (78% vs. 34%). Contrary to the Medicaid population increase, the number of dentists that submitted Medicaid claims decreased, particularly among dentists in private dental offices; the percentage of RI private dentists who provided any dental service to adult Medicaid enrollees decreased from 29% in 2012 to 21% in 2015. Implementation of Medicaid expansion has played a critical role in increasing the number of Rhode Islanders with dental coverage, particularly among low-income adults under age 65. However, policymakers must address the persistent and worsening shortage of dental providers that accept Medicaid to provide a more accessible source of oral healthcare for all Rhode Islanders. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-10.asp].

  15. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  16. A Preliminary Study of Staff Meetings as Viewed by Dental Hygienists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Anderson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Staff meetings in general dental practices represent what is be-lieved to be a key management strategy to build teams and to enhance efficiency and effec-tiveness. However, very little research has been done regarding staff meetings in dental offices. This study examined staff meetings from the viewpoint of dental hygienists who grow in unique careers in that they work largely independently of the dentist and yet typically within a dental practice while providing patient care and education. One-hundred-six dental hygienists completed a survey about staff meetings in dental offices. Key findings include: only approximately 43% of dental offices conduct morning huddles to get the day off to a smooth and organized start, 72% of dental practices conduct longer staff meetings with largely positive outcomes, including increasing practice efficiency and productivity, few practices (12% hold specific meetings only for the hygiene-department (and probably thereby miss some opportunities for practice im-provement, the most important variable by far to hygienists' job satisfaction is respect from the owner-dentist, and there exists an important and synergistic relationship among job sa-tisfaction, relationships with other staff and relationship with the owner-dentist.

  17. Tanzania Dental Association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Committee of Tanzania Dental. Association would like to Thank. [fUfNJfNJU[[j)~ for its magnanimity towards meeting the cost of this Journal ... ceps is token out of the dental kit and the tooth is removed out of its socket. The tooth is dropped into the waste bucket. The fareceps is placed in the water basin. The socket site is ...

  18. Nigerian Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... needs of dental practitioners in Nigeria, Africa and international community interested in the dental practice in the developing world. The NDJ is published biannually and accepts reports of original research, review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques related to dentistry and allied subjects ...

  19. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...

  20. Dental impressions using 3D digital scanners: virtual becomes reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Nathan S; Aaronson, Heidi B

    2008-10-01

    The technologies that have made the use of three-dimensional (3D) digital scanners an integral part of many industries for decades have been improved and refined for application to dentistry. Since the introduction of the first dental impressioning digital scanner in the 1980s, development engineers at a number of companies have enhanced the technologies and created in-office scanners that are increasingly user-friendly and able to produce precisely fitting dental restorations. These systems are capable of capturing 3D virtual images of tooth preparations, from which restorations may be fabricated directly (ie, CAD/CAM systems) or fabricated indirectly (ie, dedicated impression scanning systems for the creation of accurate master models). The use of these products is increasing rapidly around the world and presents a paradigm shift in the way in which dental impressions are made. Several of the leading 3D dental digital scanning systems are presented and discussed in this article.

  1. The Dental School Interview As a Predictor of Dental Students' OSCE Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang E; Price, Mirissa D; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the dental school admissions interview score as a noncognitive indicator of performance in predoctoral dental education, with specific attention to whether a correlation existed between the admissions interview scores and performance on the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The study population consisted of all 175 students in the Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) DMD Classes of 2012 through 2016. Data on students' gender and age on entering dental school were self-reported using their applications for admission to the HSDM DMD program. Data on students' OSCE scores for three examination sessions were collected from the Office of Dental Education. The results showed that the students' interview scores did not significantly correlate with OSCE performance on any of the three exams. Performance on the first and second OSCEs did, however, correlate with performance on the third OSCE (pinterview score. These results suggest that although the admissions interview scores can serve as an important resource in student selection, with the lack of association between interview and OSCE scores, it is possible that the communication skills required for the interview do not directly overlap with those required for OSCE success.

  2. Patients' satisfaction with dental care provided by public dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Tanzania, patient satisfaction with dental services has received only minor attention. Objective: To assess patients' satisfaction with public dental health services in Dar es Salaam. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Five public dental clinics randomly selected from a list of all the nine public dental ...

  3. Dental fluorosis and dental caries prevalence among 12 and 15 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fluoride is a double edged sword. The assessment of dental caries and fluorosis in endemic fluoride areas will facilitate in assessing the relation between fluoride concentrations in water with dental caries, dental fluorosis simultaneously. Aim: The objective of the following study is to assess the dental caries ...

  4. Awareness of dental implants among dental patients in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of awareness of dental implant in Nigerian patients and their willingness to choose dental implant as a tooth replacement option. A survey was conducted among patients presenting for dental treatment in 3 teaching hospitals and private dental clinics in 3 urban cities of ...

  5. Fermilab Education Office - FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Education Office FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions Click on the question to see the answer and the difference between the Education Office and the Lederman Science Center? The Education Office is store selling logo items and science toys. The Education Office staff works on both the 15th floor of

  6. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: an update and suggested dental care considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijoo, Javier F; Bugallo, Juan; Limeres, Jacobo; Peñarrocha, David; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Diz, Pedro

    2011-09-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a skin disease characterized by epithelial fragility that leads to blistering and erosion of the skin and mucosae. The authors conducted a literature review to provide an update on oral manifestations and dental care of patients with EB. Literature Search. The authors reviewed the dental literature on EB in relation to clinical findings and provision of dental care. They searched textbooks and three databases: MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and Embase. The authors did not impose any date or publication status restrictions. They searched all databases up to August 2010. The literature review revealed that four major groups and 32 subtypes of EB can be distinguished on the basis of the ultrastructural characteristics of skin cleavage, genetic mode of transmission and clinical phenotype. Oral manifestations differ in frequency and severity according to the disease subtype, but the most common are bullae, which leave painful ulcers on rupture, followed by scarring and tissue contraction. Although good oral health status is essential to maintaining oral function, dental treatment can induce new lesions and be hindered by the sequelae of existing lesions. Dental treatment in patients with EB requires a multidisciplinary approach. Dental procedures must be minimally traumatic, and the effectiveness of treatment is determined mainly by the patient's general health, cooperation in the dental office and at home, oral hygiene and diet.

  7. Office 365 For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Withee, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The information you need to create a virtual office that can be accessed anywhere Microsoft Office 365 is a revolutionary technology that allows individuals and companies of all sizes to create and maintain a virtual office in the cloud. Featuring familiar Office Professional applications, web apps, Exchange Online, and Lync Online, Office 365 offers business professionals added flexibility and an easy way to work on the go. This friendly guide explains the cloud, how Office 365 takes advantage of it, how to use the various components, and the many possibilities offered by Office 365. It provi

  8. Medical and dental radiological trends in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Kenji; Kihara, Takuji; Sawada, Shozo

    1978-01-01

    Yearly trends in radiologic practice in Japan were estimated on the basis of annual dampling surveys of medical and dental examinations and treatments covered by Government-Managed Health Insurance, modified by (1) the ratio of all insurance-covered medical care to that covered by this insurance, and (2) the ratio of insured plus privately purchased medical care to insured medical care alone. All radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations, x-ray films consumed, radiation treatments, and dental x-ray examinations, increased during the 10 years prior to this study. In 1970, numbers of examinations or treatments per capita were 1.2 for radiography, 0.1 for fluoroscopy, 0.06 for radiation treatments, and 0.3 for dental radiography, respectively. The dental radiography data were interpolated to Hiroshima and Nagasaki Cities and compared with those submitted by institutions in both cities in October 1970. The Reports of Annual Medical Care Survey, the Fund Office's Annual Reports, and the Annual Reports of the National Health Insurance were main sources for this estimate and provided more than 90% of the necessary information. (auth.)

  9. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Can the development of new dental caries in Danish schoolchildren be predicted from surveillance data in the School Dental Service?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Berit Anna; Foldspang, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Background:  Dental screening programmes for Danish children generally target all children, irrespective of their individual caries risk. The standard screening interval is approximately 12 months. A valid systematic screening tool based on routine information sources is however indispensable......, if more selective screening strategies should be developed to target the children at highest risk. Objective:  To estimate the precision with which Danish schoolchildren at high risk for developing dental caries within 1 year can be identified based on information from routine registers. Methods:  Based...... on data from the Danish National Board of Health's Recording System for the Danish Child Dental Services and from the Central Office of Civil Registration, 3705 schoolchildren aged 7–12 years were followed through 1994–1996. Dental health information as of 1994 and changes 1994–1995 were applied...

  11. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... produce dental materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental... materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other... Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix...

  12. Dental family stress and coping patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, R S; Sampson, V M

    1986-10-01

    This exploratory study of 28 married male dentists and their families was designed to gain an understanding about the stressors that dentists and their spouses experience, the life events and family strains they incur, the behavioral coping patterns they utilize, and their psychosocial characteristics. The study found that although stable dental families did encounter a significant number of stressors arising from both the dental practice and the family, they maintained their sense of balance through strong family coping skills and family resources. The effect of the dentist's office-related stress was directly felt in the family, especially by the spouse. Strong coping patterns resulted when dentists and spouses maintained a balance of time and responsibility, satisfaction in work and family activity, regular communication, sharing of decision making, good physical health, and the inclusion of an active exercise program within multiple demands on their time.

  13. Dental Anomalies: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jahanimoghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anomalies are usual congenital malformation that can happen either as isolated findings or as a part of a syndrome. Developmental anomalies influencing the morphology exists in both deciduous and permanent dentition and shows different forms such as gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens evaginatus (DE, enamel pearls, taurodontism or peg-shaped laterals. All These anomalies have clinical significance concerning aesthetics, malocclusion and more necessary preparing of the development of dental decays and oral diseases. Through a search in PubMed, Google, Scopus and Medline, a total of eighty original research papers during 1928-2016 were found with the keywords such as dental anomaly, syndrome, tooth and hypodontia. One hundred review titles were identified, eighty reviews were retrieved that were finally included as being relevant and of sufficient quality. In this review, dental anomalies including gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens invaginatus, DE, taurodontism, enamel pearls, fluorosis, peg-shaped laterals, dentinal dysplasia, regional odontodysplasia and hypodontia are discussed. Diagnosing dental abnormality needs a thorough evaluation of the patient, involving a medical, dental, familial and clinical history. Clinical examination and radiographic evaluation and in some of the cases, specific laboratory tests are also needed. Developmental dental anomalies require careful examination and treatment planning. Where one anomaly is present, clinicians should suspect that other anomalies may also be present. Moreover, careful clinical and radiographical examination is required. Furthermore, more complex cases need multidisciplinary planning and treatment.

  14. Biological effects and radiation protection in the dental office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcox, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    In conclusion, it is important to point out that denistry's contribution to the United States population's radiation exposure is small. Significant improvements have been made, but since dentistry is only one of the contributors to the population's total exposure to radiation, it is important that we make every effort to keep our contribution as low as is practical. Unnecessary exposure should be reduced whenever possible but this should not be used to deter the practitioner from obtaining radiographs when they are clinically indicated. It is very likely that the risk to the United States population resulting from failure to obtain adequate diagnostic information when radiographs are indicated is considerably greater than any risk resulting from their use

  15. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  16. Dental biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2017-01-01

    and cause gingival inflammation and breakdown of supporting periodontal fibers and bone and ultimately tooth loss, i.e., gingivitis, chronic or aggressive periodontitis, and around dental implants, peri-implantitis. Furthermore, bacteria from the dental biofilm may spread to other parts of the body......-fermenting bacteria causing demineralization of teeth, dental caries, which may further lead to inflammation and necrosis in the pulp and periapical region, i.e., pulpitis and periapical periodontitis. In supra- and subgingival biofilms, predominantly gram-negative, anaerobic proteolytic bacteria will colonize...

  17. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.Dental...

  18. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  19. Basic emotions evoked by eugenol odor differ according to the dental experience. A neurovegetative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, O; Alaoui-Ismaïli, O; Dittmar, A; Vernet-Maury, E

    1999-06-01

    Subjective individual experiences seem to indicate that odors may form strong connections with memories, especially those charged with emotional significance. In the dental field, this could be the case with the odorant eugenol, responsible for the typical clinging odor impregnating the dental office. The odor of eugenol could evoke memories of unpleasant dental experiences and, therefore, negative feelings such as anxiety and fear, since eugenates (cements containing eugenol) are used in potentially painful restorative dentistry. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating the emotional impact of the odor of eugenol through autonomic nervous system (ANS) analysis. The simultaneous variations of six ANS parameters (two electrodermal, two thermovascular and two cardiorespiratory), induced by the inhalation of this odorant, were recorded on volunteer subjects. Vanillin (a pleasant odorant) and propionic acid (an unpleasant one) served as controls. After the experiment, subjects were asked to rate the pleasantness versus unpleasantness of each odorant on an 11-point hedonic scale. The patterns of autonomic responses, obtained for each odorant and each subject, were transcribed into one of the six basic emotions defined by Ekman et al. (happiness, surprise, sadness, fear, anger and disgust). Results were compared between two groups of subjects divided according to their dental experience (fearful and non-fearful dental care subjects) and showed significant differences only for eugenol. This odorant was rated as pleasant by non-fearful dental subjects but unpleasant by fearful dental subjects. The evoked autonomic responses were mainly associated with positive basic emotions (happiness and surprise) in non-fearful dental subjects and with negative basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust) in fearful dental subjects. These results suggest that eugenol can be responsible for different emotional states depending on the subjects' dental experience, which seems to confirm the

  20. Occupational violence against dental professionals in southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Ezeja, E B; Ehikhamenor, E E

    2011-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of workplace violence in Oral healthcare centres against Nigerian dental professionals. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey of 175 randomly selected dental professionals working in Oral healthcare centres of University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria was conducted. The survey response rate was 78.9%. The respondents were dentists (58.0%), dental nurses (18.1%), dental technologists (12.3%), dental therapists (8.0%) and dental record officers (3.6%). The prevalence of violence in Nigerian Oral healthcare centres was 31.9%. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of violence against dentist and dental auxiliaries. Violence was often associated with long waiting time (27.3%), cancellation of appointment (13.6%), outcome of patient's treatment (11.4%), alcohol intoxication (9.1%), psychiatric patient (6.8%,) patient's bill (4.5%) and others (27.3%). Non-physical violence in form of loud shouting (50.0%) threat (22.7%), sexual harassment (6.8%) and swearing (2.3%) constituted the majority while physical violence in form of bullying and hitting constituted the remaining 18.2%. The main perpetrators of the violence were patients (54.5%) and patient's relatives/friends (18.2%). The expressed impact of violence among the respondents include fear (18.2%), impaired job performance (15.9%), psychological problems (13.6%) and off duty (9.1%). No impact was declared by 43.2% of respondents. The prevalence of workplace violence in Oral healthcare centres against dental professionals in Southern Nigeria was significant and had a substantial effect on dental professionals' well-being thus necessitating urgent attention.

  1. 76 FR 15349 - Fiscal Year 2010 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET Fiscal Year 2010 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by Department of Defense Medical Treatment Facilities; Certain Rates Regarding... recovery from tortiously liable third persons for the cost of outpatient medical, dental and cosmetic...

  2. Development of a concept for radiation patients exposure assessment during dental X-ray examinations and statistical data acquisition for the determination of a diagnostic reference value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueppers, C.; Sering, M.; Poppe, B.; Poplawski, A.; Looe, H.K.; Beyer, D.; Pfaffenberger, A.; Chofor, N.; Eenboom, F.

    2012-01-01

    The research project on the development a concept for radiation patients exposure assessment during dental X-ray examinations and statistical data acquisition for the determination of a diagnostic reference value includes the following issues: Fundamental facts: dental X-ray examination techniques, dose relevant factors and characteristics during X-ray examinations, radiation exposed organs during dental X-ray examinations, dose assessment based on phantoms. Materials and methodologies of the project: TLD measurements using the phantom, calculation of the effective dose during dental X-ray examinations, properties and settings of the reference facilities for the determination of radiation exposure, selection of dental offices, dosimetric measurements, data acquisition and statistical evaluation. Results of dosimetric examinations: results of dosimetric measurements at reference facilities, results of dosimetric measurements in dental offices. Discussion of the concept for the determination of the radiation exposure during dental X-ray examinations.

  3. Dental education in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, J M

    2003-01-01

    For a long time there has been a need to establish a dental school in Kuwait, due to the fact that the majority of dentists working in Kuwait are expatriates from various countries. An Amiri decree in 1996 made it possible, and the first dental students were admitted to the Kuwait University Faculty of Dentistry in 1998. The mission of the Faculty of Dentistry is 'to promote oral health in Kuwait through education, research and cooperation with other professional health care institutions as well as the community at large'. A 6.5-year dental curriculum was completed after 2 years of committee work and was accepted by the University Council in 2001. This curriculum incorporates current trends in medical and dental education, such as the evidence-based and community-based approaches, problem-solving methodology for outcome-based learning, and competency achieved through comprehensive patient care. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  5. Advances in dental imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E

    2001-04-01

    The number of dental radiographs taken in the UK has steadily increased over the past 20 years--recently estimating around 18 million taken in the general dental services alone, and dental radiographs now account for nearly 25% of all medical radiographic exposures. Radiographs remain our most useful diagnostic aid. Their strength is in demonstrating hard tissue pathology, which makes radiographs particularly effective in the maxillofacial region. Although well accepted in this capacity, there remain a number of limitations and drawbacks to conventional radiographs which recent developments have begun to overcome. There have been improvements in the scope and capabilities of dental imaging equipment. There has also been a continuing effort to reduce radiation-induced harm by limiting our exposure to it. This has been possible both through the introduction of new methods and protocols for reducing individual radiation exposures and by the creation of guidelines for selecting radiographs more effectively and thereby reducing the total number of radiographs taken.

  6. Glossary of Dental Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more... Coffee and Doughnuts: A Disastrous Combo for Teeth? The sugars in doughnuts have been identified as ... More print this article enlarge text Glossary of Dental Terms Oral Health Defined Amalgam silver/mercury alloy ...

  7. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Proper care of your child's teeth and gums includes brushing and rinsing daily. It ...

  8. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risks associated with tobacco, substance abuse and oral piercings. Why it's done Regular dental exams help protect ... sugary beverages Smoking Chewing tobacco Eating disorders Oral piercings Not wearing a mouthguard during contact sports The ...

  9. Nigerian Dental Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS AND CONTRIBUTORS The Nigerian Dental ... review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques ... figures and illustrations, including one copy stored in a 3.5” floppy should be sent to ...

  10. Dental Assisting Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the dental assisting program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  11. NOAA Workforce Management Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management Fellows (PMFs) Program Coordination Office - Leadership Development Program (PCO-LDP) Employee (NRAP) Presidential Management Fellows (PMFs) Program Coordination Office - Leadership Development ) NOAA Leadership Seminar (NLS) NOAA Rotational Assignment Program (NRAP) Presidential Management Fellows

  12. HUD's Local Office Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD is organized in 10 Regions. Each Region is managed by a Regional Administrator, who also oversees the Regional Office. Each Field Office within a Region is...

  13. Panoramic dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, R.H.; Kircher, D.R.; Hart, F.W.; Ciavattoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for improving the handling rate of patients in panoramic dental radiography when tube head-camera assembly of a low silhouette panoramic dental X-ray machine is rotated for a scan in one direction only. This is effected by fast return of the tube head-camera assembly with its simultaneous elevation, thus facilitating the radiographed patient's exit from the machine and the entrance of another patient. Fast speed is about twice the scanning speed. (author)

  14. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  15. Saliva and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Hannas, Angélicas Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  16. Managing dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  17. Fermilab Education Office - Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Office of Education and Public Outreach: Contacts All telephone numbers require area code Presentations for Presenters 840-3094 Office of Education and Public Outreach Spencer Pasero spasero@fnal.gov Education Office 840-3076 Fermilab Friends for Science Education General Questions Susan Dahl sdahl@fnal.gov

  18. Fermilab Education Office - Physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    on Education Server, but to take full advantage of all of this site's features, you should turn Custom Search Connect with the Fermilab Education Office! Facebook Fermilab Education Office Join these groups: Science Adventures Group Teacher Resource Center Group Twitter Fermilab Education Office For more

  19. Office Computers: Ergonomic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganus, Susannah

    1984-01-01

    Each new report of the office automation market indicates technology is overrunning the office. The impacts of this technology are described and some ways to manage and physically "soften" the change to a computer-based office environment are suggested. (Author/MLW)

  20. American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New Research AADSM Highlights Members More news... Dental Sleep Medicine: An area of dental practice that focuses on ... SomnoMed Silver Sponsors Copyright © American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

  1. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  2. Dental technology over 150 years: evolution and revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A patient entering a dental office is often greeted and then checked in through the practice management system's digital appointment book. The provider is notified by an electronic signal that is visual, audible, or both. The patient is led to the treatment area and sits in a dental chair which is adjusted to the individual's size and position for the treatment, and the light is positioned. Sometimes a radiograph is taken, local anesthetic is delivered, and a handpiece--air turbine or electric--is used for the procedure. How different is this process today from a dentist treating a patient in 1864?

  3. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  4. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazal, G; Fareed, W M; Zafar, M S

    2016-01-01

    Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003), and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine), and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine) are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  5. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gazal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003, and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine, and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  6. Dental school finances: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, W H

    1986-05-01

    Total expenditures and revenues of 58 US dental school were derived from reports of the ADA Division of Educational Measurements. These financial data were studied by type of dental school (public, state-related private, and private) and by expenditure/revenue categories. Dental schools showed little diversity in expenditures: most were directed toward instruction; few were directed toward research or continuing education. Several distinctive patterns among the three types of dental schools in revenues were observed. Two configurations emerged: public and state-related private dental schools receive more than 75% of their revenues from government and tuition, and private dental schools, more than 50%.

  7. Office 2013 simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Marmel, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    A basic introduction to learn Office 2013 quickly, easily, and in full color Office 2013 has new features and tools to master, and whether you're upgrading from an earlier version or using the Office applications for the first time, you'll appreciate this simplified approach. Offering a clear, visual style of learning, this book provides you with concise, step-by-step instructions and full-color screen shots that walk you through the applications in the Microsoft Office 2013 suite: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Publisher.Shows you how to tackle dozens of Office 2013

  8. Office 2013 for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wallace

    2013-01-01

    Office 2013 For Dummies is the key to your brand new Office! Packed with straightforward, friendly instruction, this update to one of the bestselling Office books of all time gets you thoroughly up to speed and helps you learn how to take full advantage of the new features in Office 2013. After coverage of the fundamentals, you'll discover how to spice up your Word documents, edit Excel spreadsheets and create formulas, add pizazz to your PowerPoint presentation, and much more.Helps you harness the power of all five Office 2013 applications: Word, Excel, PowerPoint,

  9. Postal audit in dental radiodiagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, L.; Kroutilikova, D.

    2001-01-01

    According to Czech laws dental intraoral X-ray machines are classified as s imple sources of ionizing radiation . Consequently , their use is licensed on condition that an adequate quality assurance program is realized. In general, the programme is based on acceptance tests, status tests and constancy tests. The particular methods are specified in the recommendation [1] published by State Office for Nuclear Safety .Both the acceptance and status tests involve in situ measurements to control parameters of the X-ray machine and the developing process. Only persons who were licensed for such handling can do these measurements. The yearly status tests are very detailed and several years ' experience showed it might be advantageous to have a simpler method additionally available for purposes of the state supervision. Such a method is supposed as a postal audit. It should be simple enough to make the operation of the state supervision more effective but it also should provide sufficient information on radiation protection of the patients. Besides it should enable to prolong the period for the status tests ultimately .As for the postal audit, a small package containing a proper dosimetric set would be sent directly to the dentist who would treat it according to instructions. This paper describes such method that was developed in the National Radiation Protection Institute (NRPI) and results of pilot study that was carried out to test the method. The described method will be a helpful tool for the operation of the state supervision in the dental radiodiagnostics. The method will be implemented into the existing system of controls from 2002. Due to its simplicity and a quite rich content of information allows to check a big amount of the dental workplaces at once. It is supposed that one half of all Czech X-ray units will be checked in this way every year performed on state costs. It means 175 audits per month approximately. In this way, the operation of the quality

  10. Patient Satisfaction in Military Dental Treatment Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-07

    the variance in regards to overall satisfaction. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dentistry, Patient Satisfaction, Military, Consumer Satisfaction, Dental... patient satisfaction in military dental treatment facilities. Dental health is extremely important for the military as dental assets are not always... customer satisfaction is an important component of military dental care. Quarterly patient satisfaction reports are generated for each dental treatment

  11. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  12. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  13. Hand hygiene amongst dental professionals in a tertiary dental clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate hand washing attitude and practices among Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in a Nigerian Tertiary Dental Clinic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in University of Benin Teaching Hospital was conducted between February ...

  14. Reasons for late seeking of dental care among dental patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons for delayed reporting for oral care were negligence (53.5%); poor dental services or visited but not treated (19.4%); financial reasons (14.8%); and dental fear (12.3%). Seventy seven percent of respondents who had toothache due to advanced dental caries were aware that the aching tooth was decayed, of which, ...

  15. Diagnostic methods for dental caries used by private dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the preference profiles of various types of diagnostic tools and methods used by private dental practitioners in Ankara for detecting dental caries. Methods: Private dental practitioners, in five districts of Ankara, were provided with questionnaires comprising demographic ...

  16. Dental Education in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Dental education in the Netherlands is reviewed in terms of dental practice, overall development, structure and functioning of a typical school of dentistry, admissions, student finances, curriculum, certification, postgraduate education, and education for related professions. (MSE)

  17. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...

  18. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  19. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  20. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Health THE BASIC FACTS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Kim, diagnosed in 1986 People with a chronic disease may neglect their general health and wellness, research shows. Dental care is no exception. A tendency to focus ...

  1. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... a sticky substance that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where ...

  2. Radiation protection in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide provides the dentist and dental support personnel with basic information on the safe use of x-rays in dental radiography. Included in this CODE are specific recommendations for eliminating unnecessary radiation exposure of both patients and staff

  3. Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appukuttan DP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deva Priya Appukuttan Department of Periodontics, Sri Ramakrishna Mission Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, India Abstract: Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The initial interaction between the dentist and the patient can reveal the presence of anxiety, fear, and phobia. In such situations, subjective evaluation by interviews and self-reporting on fear and anxiety scales and objective assessment of blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, finger temperature, and galvanic skin response can greatly enhance the diagnosis and enable categorization of these individuals as mildly, moderately, or highly anxious or dental phobics. Broadly, dental anxiety can be managed by psychotherapeutic interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of both, depending on the level of dental anxiety, patient characteristics, and clinical situations. Psychotherapeutic interventions are either behaviorally or cognitively oriented. Pharmacologically, these patients can be managed using either sedation or general anesthesia. Behavior-modification therapies aim to change unacceptable behaviors through learning, and involve muscle relaxation and relaxation breathing, along with guided imagery and physiological monitoring using biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, distraction, positive reinforcement, stop-signaling, and exposure-based treatments, such as systematic desensitization, “tell-show-do”, and modeling. Cognitive strategies aim to alter and restructure the content of negative cognitions and enhance control over the negative thoughts. Cognitive behavior therapy is a combination of behavior therapy and cognitive therapy

  4. Visualisation of dental images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion Salikin; Azuhar Ripin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Mohd Isa; Suriany Sarmid

    2005-01-01

    Since the invention and the discovery of x-rays, physicians, surgeons and life scientists have been using images to diagnose and subsequently treat diseases. X-ray is also widely used in many imaging techniques to better understand basics anatomy, physiology and biology as well as testing and analytical work in physical science. In dentistry, x-ray technique has been employed to get a panoramic view of the whole teeth of a particular patient. A panoramic dental radiograph is very useful in dentistry for diagnostic purpose, denture preparation, as well as for orthodontic. Image visualisation is an important aspect especially for the dentists to analyse and proceed with a particulate dental treatment. In this project panoramic dental image obtained by using a standard phantom is visualised by using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software. A panoramic dental x-ray machine, Cranex3, is used to get a panoramic radiograph, which is subsequently digitized, by using Vidar digitizer (Sierra Plus). The 2D digitized image is enhance and apply other visualising techniques such as surface rendering and volume rendering technique using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software as a first step in 3D visualisation. In this paper, visualising of panoramic dental radiograph by using IDL is discussed in brief. (Author)

  5. Solid Waste Production and Its Management in Dental Clinics in Gorgan, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nabizadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Waste produced in dental clinics has been the topic of investigations for many years. These waste materials have important health impacts and are hazardous to humans and the environment. Objective: To investigating solid waste production and its management in dental clinics in Gorgan, northern Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 45 of 143 public dental practices and 5 of 25 private dental practices were selected and studied. From each clinic, 3 samples were taken and analyzed at the end of successive working days (Tuesday and Wednesday. Samples were manually sorted into 50 components. The measured components were then classified on the basis of their characteristics, hazard potentials, and WHO classification. Results: The total annual amount of dental waste produced in public and private dental practices in Gorgan was 12 015.1 and 3135.0 kg, respectively. Production percentages of infectious, domestic, chemical and pharmaceutical, and toxic waste in public dental practices were 38.4%, 33.7%, 6.6%, and 0.6%, respectively. The percentages for private practices were 8.7%, 10.6%, 1.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. Conclusion: Dental waste management in Gorgan is inadequate; dental waste is not properly segregated, collected, and disposed, as demanded by the WHO. Employees in dentist offices must be trained in correct handling of waste products and the associated risks.

  6. Solid waste production and its management in dental clinics in Gorgan, northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabizadeh, R; Faraji, H; Mohammadi, A A

    2014-10-01

    Waste produced in dental clinics has been the topic of investigations for many years. These waste materials have important health impacts and are hazardous to humans and the environment. To investigating solid waste production and its management in dental clinics in Gorgan, northern Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 45 of 143 public dental practices and 5 of 25 private dental practices were selected and studied. From each clinic, 3 samples were taken and analyzed at the end of successive working days (Tuesday and Wednesday). Samples were manually sorted into 50 components. The measured components were then classified on the basis of their characteristics, hazard potentials, and WHO classification. The total annual amount of dental waste produced in public and private dental practices in Gorgan was 12 015.1 and 3135.0 kg, respectively. Production percentages of infectious, domestic, chemical and pharmaceutical, and toxic waste in public dental practices were 38.4%, 33.7%, 6.6%, and 0.6%, respectively. The percentages for private practices were 8.7%, 10.6%, 1.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. Dental waste management in Gorgan is inadequate; dental waste is not properly segregated, collected, and disposed, as demanded by the WHO. Employees in dentist offices must be trained in correct handling of waste products and the associated risks.

  7. Does dental caries affect dental development in children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamo, Brunilda; Elezi, Besiana; Kragt, Lea; Wolvius, Eppo B; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M

    2018-01-01

    Although a link between dietary changes, caries, and dental development has been observed, the literature provides little insight about this relationship. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between dental caries and dental development in a clinical sample of Albanian children and adolescents. In total, 118 children and adolescents, born between 1995 and 2004 and aged 6–15 years, were included. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Filled Teeth (dft) index and dental caries in the permanent dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Dental development during the permanent dentition was determined using the Demirjian method. Linear and ordinal regression models were applied to analyze the associations of dental caries with dental age and developmental stages of each left mandibular tooth. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition, estimated as a median dft of 2.0 (90% range, 0.0–9.1), was significantly associated with lower dental age (β = -0.21; 90% CI: -0.29, -0.12) and with delayed development of the canine, both premolars, and the second molar. Untreated dental caries (dt) was associated with lower dental age (β = -0.19; 90% CI: -0.28, -0.10). Dental caries in the permanent dentition, estimated as a median DMFT of 1.0 (90% range, 0.0–8.0), was not significantly associated with dental age (β = 0.05; 90% CI: -0.04, 0.14). However, the DMFT was associated with the advanced stages of development of both premolars and the second molar. The untreated dental caries in the deciduous dentition delays the development of permanent teeth. PMID:29659350

  8. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  9. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  10. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  11. 76 FR 14600 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... qualify for VHA dental treatment, including any claim for treatment of periodontal disease or calculus... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental conditions for treatment purposes...

  12. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  13. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... rule the proposal to amend its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental... Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of...

  14. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health.

  15. Stereoscopy in Dental Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stereoscopy can play a meaningful role in dental education. The study used an anaglyph technique in which two images were presented separately to the left and right eyes (using red/cyan filters), which, combined in the brain, give enhanced depth...... perception. A positional judgment task was performed to assess whether the use of stereoscopy would enhance depth perception among dental students at Osaka University in Japan. Subsequently, the optimum angle was evaluated to obtain maximum ability to discriminate among complex anatomical structures. Finally...... practice, they did recognize its merits for education. These results suggest that using stereoscopic images in dental education can be quite valuable as stereoscopy greatly helped these students' understanding of the spatial relationships in complex anatomical structures....

  16. Risks from dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Tamara Goularte

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the risks and consequences of exposure to dental X-ray. The methodology used was the survey of bibliographic literature on this matter. First, we tried to understand the operation and characteristics of dental X-rays. Afterwards, we tried to know about the risks that this procedure offers to workers and patients. And concluded with the consequences of such exposure. The results showed that dental x-rays only offer risks in prolonged exposure, can affect the worker or patient to pathologies such as cancer or a life-time decreased due to the stochastic effect. Therefore, radiological protection standards must be respected and practised. (author)

  17. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  19. Auxiliary office chair

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual Osés, Maite

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an auxiliary office chair, which favorably will compete with the existing chairs on the market. Evolutions of ergonomical survey in the work environment and on the configuration of offices require new products which fulfill the requirements properly. In order to achieve it a survey about office chairs has been carried out: types, characteristics, ways of usage and products on the market besides a large antropometrical study and ergonomics related to work ...

  20. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--the digital workflow from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapie, L; Lebon, N; Mawussi, B; Fron Chabouis, H; Duret, F; Attal, J-P

    2015-01-01

    As digital technology infiltrates every area of daily life, including the field of medicine, so it is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Apart from chairside practice, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental solutions can be considered a chain of digital devices and software for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use the technology often do not have the time or knowledge to understand it. A basic knowledge of the CAD/CAM digital workflow for dental restorations can help dentists to grasp the technology and purchase a CAM/CAM system that meets the needs of their office. This article provides a computer-science and mechanical-engineering approach to the CAD/CAM digital workflow to help dentists understand the technology.

  1. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Rubberloid Van R Dental Prod. Surgident Lactona Corp. Alginates Coe Alginate Coe Labs o Jeltrate L.D. Caulk Kerr Alginate Kerr/Sybron Alginate S.S. White Co...Surgident- Alginate Lactona Corp. Unijel II Unitek Corp. O Combination Agar/a ig inate Colloid 80 U.S. Shiza Corp. Dentloid Denterials, Ltd...66061 (215) 277-3800 (913) 782-2200 Shofu Dental Corp. Lactona Corp. (subsidary of 4025 Bohannon Dr. Warner-Lambert Co.) Menlo Park, CA 94025 . Academy

  2. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  3. Perceived Dentist and Dental Hygienist Task Distribution After Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Team Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  4. Perceived dentist and dental hygienist task distribution after dental and dental hygiene students' team intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J; Krijnen, Wim P; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  5. Laser welding by dental Nd:YAG device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Bertrand, Caroline; Merigo, Elisabetta; Bonanini, Mauro; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Nammour, Samir

    2009-06-01

    Welding laser was introduced in jewellery during years 70 and, just after, was successfully used also by dental technicians. Welding laser gives a great number of advantages, versus traditional welding and, for this reason, this procedure had a great diffusion in the technician laboratories and stimulated the companies to put in the market more and more evolutes appliances. Some aspects, such great dimensions, high costs and delivery system today still characterize these machines by fixed lenses, which have strictly limited its use only to technician laboratories. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the possibility, by using a fibber-delivered laser normally utilized in the dental office, to make, by dentist himself in his office, welding on different metals and to evaluate advantages and possibilities of this new technique.

  6. [Assessment of decontamination processes: cleaning, disinfection and sterilization in dental practice in Poland in the years 2011-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bozenna; Chojecka, Agnieszka; Zmuda-Baranowska, Magdalena; Kanclerski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Effective decontamination of instruments is a key element of infection control and the provision of high quality in dental care. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of decontamination procedures including cleaning, disinfection and sterilization of re-usable instruments in dental practices in Poland. The efficiency of disinfection and sterilization processes have been evaluated on the results of the questionnaires. The following information were taken into account: setting where disinfection and sterilization had been performed, preparation of dental equipment for sterilization (disinfection, washing and cleaning, packaging), the types of autoclaves and used types of sterilization cycles, routine monitoring and documentation of sterilization processes, treatment of handpieces and the frequency of surface decontamination. Data were collected from 43 dental practices (35 dental offices and 8 clinics). Disinfection and cleaning processes were performed manually in 63% of dental offices and ultrasonic baths were used in 53% of settings. Washer disinfectors were used in 23% of dental practices: in every researched clinic and in a few dental offices. All sterilization processes were performed in steam autoclaves, mainly in small steam sterilizers (81%). Dental handpieces were sterilized in 72% of practices, but only 33% of them performed sterilization in recommended cycle B. Sterilization processes were monitored with chemical indicators in 33% of practices. Biological monitoring of the processes was carried out at different intervals. Incorrect documentation of instruments and surfaces decontamination was recorded in several settings. There is still a need for improvement of decontamination processes in dental practice in Poland. Areas for improvement include: replacement of manual cleaning and disinfection processes with automatic processes, sterilization of dental handpieces after each patient, monitoring of a sterilization process with chemical and

  7. Green Dentistry: Practices and Perceived Barriers Among Dental Practitioners of Chandigarh, Panchkula, and Mohali (Tricity, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Chopra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental professionals have a responsibility to conserve natural resources and to eliminate/reduce toxic wastes from their practices that could harm human health and environment. Aim: To investigate the implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies by the dentists of tricity (Chandigarh, Panchkula, and Mohali. Materials and Methods: Self-designed questionnaires were distributed to 120 Indian Dental Association registered dentists. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulations were calculated using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0 software. Results: Most of the dentists followed eco-friendly dental practices including the alternatives to amalgam filling (98%, use of light-emitting diode bulbs (91%, unplugging electronic devices when not in use (96%, use of steam sterilization with cloth instrument wraps (93%, using reusable lab coats (89%, and using digital radiography (78.6%. The most frequently identified barriers to implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies were cost and lack of incentives from the government. Conclusion: Eco-friendly practice implementation by dentists is at its stage of infancy. There is a need for creating awareness among dentists regarding eco-friendly dental practices through formal and continuing dental education.

  8. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  9. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  10. Dental PACS development in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung

    2008-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is an image information technology system for the transmission and storage of medical images. In Korea the first full PACS was installed at Samsung Medical Center in 1994, but, the rate of distribution was very slow. The government's approval for the medical insurance reimbursement for full PACS examinations in November 1999 became the turning point. Thereafter the number of hospitals with full PACS has steeply increased. In September of this year, PACS was installed at 906 medical institutes, including most of university hospitals and general hospitals. The first full dental PACS was installed at Wonkwang University Dental Hospital in 2002. Now ten out of eleven university dental hospitals implemented full dental PACS. The current status and technological factors of dental PACS in Korean university dental hospitals and the future perspectives of dental PACS are described.

  11. [Dynamics of tooth decay prevalence in children receiving long-term preventive program in school dental facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamova, O G; Kulazhenko, T V; Gabitova, K F

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the assessment of tooth decay prevalence in clinically homogenous groups of children receiving long-term preventive program (PP) in school dental facilities. Five-years PP were introduced in clinical practice in 2 Moscow schools. Preventive treatment was performed by dental hygienist. The results show that systematic preventive treatment in school dental offices starting from elementary school allows reducing dental caries incidence 46-53% and stabilize the incidence of caries complications. It should be mentioned though that analysis of individualized outcomes proves heterogeneity of study results despite of equal conditions of PP. Potentially significant hence is early diagnostics and treatment of initial caries forms as demineralization foci, especially in children with intensive tooth decay. Optimization of pediatric dentist and dental hygienist activity in school dental facilities is the main factor of caries prevention efficiency.

  12. Use of social networking for dental hygiene program recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Rachel S

    2011-01-01

    Social networking has become a popular and effective means of communication used by students in the millennial generation. Academic admissions officers are beginning to utilize social networking methods for recruitment of students. However, the dental hygiene literature has reported little information about the use of social networking for recruitment strategies. This paper describes one institutions' process of creating and implementing a social network site for prospective and current students.

  13. Dental Hygiene Student Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynda J.; Fellows, Avis L.

    1981-01-01

    A study to determine differences between graduating and withdrawing students in the University of Minnesota Dental Hygiene program is discussed. The identification of differences may prove useful in the selection process for future classes through identification of students likely to complete their education. (MLW)

  14. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  16. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  17. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more impressions made of your mouth and remaining teeth. These impressions are used to make the crown — your realistic-looking artificial tooth. The crown can't be placed until your jawbone is strong ... and your dental specialist can choose artificial teeth that are either ...

  18. Mouth and dental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, C.; van der Waal, I.; Jackson, S.H.D.; Jansen, P.A.F.; Mangoni, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: • Introduction • Periodontal disease • Dental caries • Odontogenic infections • Alveolar osteitis • Xerostomia and hyposalivation • Candidiasis • Angular cheilitis • Denture stomatitis • Burning mouth syndrome • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis • Recurrent

  19. Dental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Resource Center Burmese (myanma bhasa) Expand Section Betel Nut - English PDF Betel Nut - myanma bhasa (Burmese) PDF Orange County North ... California Dental Association Karen (S’gaw Karen) Expand Section Betel Nut - English PDF Betel Nut - S’gaw Karen (Karen) ...

  20. Multi-office engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowle, E.S.; Hall, L.D.; Koss, P.; Saheb, E.; Setrakian, V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the viability of multi-office project engineering as has been made possible in a large part by the computer age. Brief discussions are provided on two past projects describing the authors' initial efforts at multi-office engineering, and an in-depth discussion is provided on a current Bechtel project that demonstrates their multi-office engineering capabilities. Efficiencies and cost savings associated with executing an engineering project from multiple office locations was identified as a viable and cost-effective execution approach. The paper also discusses how the need for multi-office engineering came about, what is required to succeed, and where they are going from here. Furthermore, it summarizes the benefits to their clients and to Bechtel

  1. Dental anxiety and salivary cortisol levels before urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Kazue; Penha, Sibele S; Munhoz, Carolina D; Rocha, Rodney G

    2009-12-01

    Dental anxiety is still prevalent, despite advances in treatment, and affects the utilization of health care services. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if patients with different degrees of dental anxiety and pain undergoing emergency dental care have different stress reactions as measured by salivary cortisol. Seventy three patients completed the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and described any previous dental traumatic experience. Their socio-demographic characteristics were also recorded. They also rated pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A saliva sample was collected before the procedure, and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Thirty patients were dentally anxious and forty one complained of pain. In this sample, dental anxiety was not related to gender, age, educational level and family income; however, a previous traumatic event was related to dental anxiety. There was no association between salivary cortisol concentrations and gender or dental anxiety. Patients with pain showed higher cortisol levels. When gathering patient information, the dentist should note patients' negative dental experiences in order to provide more effective, less traumatic treatment.

  2. Radiographic Assessment of Dental Maturation in Children With Dental Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Aida Carolina; Pozo, Rodrigo Del; de Cedres, Lucila Blanco

    Dental agenesis is the most common developmental anomaly in humans, frequently associated with disorders in dental development and maturation. The purpose of this study is to determine radiographic variations in dental maturation in a group of Venezuelan children with dental agenesis. 1,188 panoramic radiographs, from healthy patients ages 5 to 12 years old were studied for agenesis of permanent teeth. Dental maturation was assessed by relative eruption and dental age according to Nolla, comparing children affected with dental agenesis to a stratified control group selected from the same population, excluding children with premature loss of primary teeth in the left quadrants and unclear radiographs. Descriptive analysis, and differences between means and medians (Student t test, Kruskall-Wallis p=0.05) were performed. Medians for Nolla stages were similar between groups, with delay in tooth formation in the agenesis group for second molars (p<0.05) and maxillary lateral incisors and second premolars. Dental age was significantly underestimated for both groups, -0.89 (±0.78) for the control group and -1.20 (±0.95) for the study group. Tooth eruption was similar between groups. Dental age was significantly delayed in Venezuelan children with dental agenesis, with variable significance for tooth formation of studied teeth.

  3. An overview of dental radiology in cities of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, F.L.; Paschoal, C.M.M.; Ferreira, F.C.L.; Belinato, W.

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, the National Ordinance No. 453/1998 of the Ministry of Health regulates the operation of medical and odontological diagnostic radiology services. However, the inspection of periapical dental X-ray equipment is not carried out by some Sanitary Surveillances. This study intended to determine the suitability to the ordinance of the dental offices of Sobral-CE, Northeast of Brazil, and to compare the results with literature data for other cities of Brazil, giving a view of dental radiology of this country. It was performed tests of radiation field and image quality, and it was applied questionnaires to the professionals of Sobral-CE. For the image quality test, it was used a dental phantom and the processing of the films was performed in the clinics and at the laboratory (standard). The questionnaire assessed physical parameters that interfere on the radiation protection and on the quality of images. The results show that the ordinance is not being properly followed and that it is necessary to inspect the periapical X-ray equipments. Moreover, in general, it is observed that dental professionals should have better training on ionizing radiation and on radiation protection. (authors)

  4. Measuring quality of dental care: Caries prevention services for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Jill Boylston; Tomar, Scott L; Catalanotto, Frank A; Rudner, Nancy; Huang, I-Chan; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Shenkman, Elizabeth A; Crall, James J

    2015-08-01

    The authors conducted a study to validate the following 3 evidence-based, process-of-care quality measures focused on dental caries prevention for children with an elevated risk of experiencing caries: sealants for 6- to 9-year-olds, sealants for 10- to 14-year-olds, and topical fluoride. Using evidence-based guidelines, the Dental Quality Alliance developed measures for implementation with administrative data at the plan and program levels. To validate the measures, the authors used data from the Florida and Texas Medicaid programs and Children's Health Insurance Programs and from national commercial dental benefit plans. Data were extracted from 414 randomly selected dental office records to validate the use of administrative data to accurately calculate the measures. The authors also assessed statistically significant variations in overall measure performance. Agreement between administrative data and dental records was 95% for sealants (κ = 0.82) and 90% for topical fluoride (κ = 0.78). Sensitivity and specificity were 90.7% and 88.5% for topical fluoride and 77.8% and 98.8% for sealants, respectively. Variation in overall measure performance was greatest for topical fluoride (χ(2) = 5,887.1; P caries received at least 2 topical fluoride applications during the reporting year. Although there was greater variation in performance for sealants for 6- to 9-year-olds (range, 21.0-31.3%; χ(2) = 548.6; P caries prevention process-of-care quality measures can be implemented feasibly and validly using administrative claims data. The measures can be used to assess, monitor, and improve the proportion of children with an elevated risk of experiencing dental caries who receive evidence-based caries prevention services. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a... dental cavity or a broken tooth. (b) Classification. Class I. ...

  7. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Home › Medicaid › Benefits › Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Related Resources Learn How to Report the ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  8. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  9. Utilization of Hospital Emergency Departments for non-traumatic dental care in New Hampshire, 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ludmila; Cherala, Sai; Traore, Elizabeth; Martin, Nancy R

    2011-08-01

    Hospital Emergency Departments (ED) provide a variety of medical care, some of which is for non-urgent, chronic conditions. We describe the statewide use of hospital ED for selected non-traumatic dental conditions that occurred during 2001-2008 in New Hampshire. Using the administrative hospital discharge dataset for 2001-2007, and provisional 2008 data, we identified all visits for selected dental conditions and calculated age-adjusted rates per 10,000 New Hampshire residents by several socio-demographic characteristics. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to assess the statistical significance for trend over time. Emergency department visits for non-traumatic dental conditions increased significantly from 11,067 in 2001 to 16,238 visits in 2007 (P dental care users. The most frequent dental complains (46%) were diseases of the teeth and supporting structures, diagnostic code ICD-9-CM-525. Dental care associated ED visits have increased in New Hampshire. Individuals seeking dental treatment in ED are not receiving definitive treatment, and they misuse limited resources. Future studies need to determine the specific barriers to timely and effective dental care in dental offices. Ongoing consistent monitoring of ED use for non-traumatic dental conditions is essential.

  10. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  11. Advancing education in dental hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battrell, Ann; Lynch, Ann; Steinbach, Pam; Bessner, Sue; Snyder, Josh; Majeski, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The changing health care environment and societal imperatives indicate the need for transformative change within the dental hygiene profession to serve the emerging needs of the public. The American Dental Hygienists' Association is leading the way toward meaningful change. The American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) has as its vision the integration of dental hygienists into the health care delivery system as essential primary care providers to expand access to oral health care. This article provides data on current dental hygiene education programs and those in development. Also included is a discussion regarding how the dental hygiene profession can better serve the health and wellness needs of society by transforming the way graduates are prepared for the future. ADHA's dental hygiene survey center data, policies and a futuristic analysis plus a review of the professional literature describe the current state of dental hygiene education and the profession. A discussion of societal, health care and educational trends that creates the imperative for transformation of the dental hygiene profession is provided. Ultimately, the purpose of advancing education in dental hygiene is to achieve better oral and overall health for more people. The profession's responsibility to the public includes evaluating its own ability to provide care and taking the steps necessary to ensure its maximum effectiveness. ADHA is leading this process for dental hygienists in diverse ways. It is imperative that the dental hygiene profession understands and embraces the changing health care environment. Through open dialog and the sharing of evidence the professional path will be determined along with forward movement for the benefit of society and the dental hygiene profession. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Office 2013 digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, Walter

    2013-01-01

    This complete training package makes learning the new Office 2013 even easier! Featuring both a video training DVD and a full-color book, this training package is like having your own personal instructor guiding you through each lesson of learning Office 2013, all while you work at your own pace. The self-paced lessons allow you to discover the new features and capabilities of the new Office suite. Each lesson includes step-by-step instructions and lesson files, and provides valuable video tutorials that complement what you're learning and clearly demonstrate how to do tasks. This essential

  13. Office 2010 Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Walkenbach, John; Groh, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    The best of the best from the bestselling authors of Excel, Word, and PowerPoint Bibles !. Take your pick of applications from the Office 2010 suite and your choice of leading experts to show you how to use them. This Office 2010 Bible features the best-of-the-best content from the Excel 2010 Bible , by "Mr. Spreadsheet" John Walkenbach; the Word 2010 Bible by Microsoft MVP Herb Tyson; the PowerPoint 2010 Bible , by PowerPoint expert Faithe Wempen; and coverage of Access 2010 from Microsoft MVP Michael Alexander. If you want to quickly and effectively begin using Office 2010, start i

  14. A study of radiation exposure dose in young dental patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    1983-01-01

    In order to clarify the trend in dental radiography for young patients up to 18 years old and the accompanying radiation exposures, surveys were made at Fukuoka Dental College Hospital and thirty-five dental offices in Fukuoka city and Kitakyushu city. Each kind of radiography increased in average number with age and 16-18 group was given 4.60 times of radiography of one kind or another in the clinic of college hospital. In the dental offices, the number of radiography taken was about one-fourth that of the clinic of college hospital. Although exposure dose varies with exposure factors, distance and angle of exposure, in addition to time factor, were found to affect doses subtly. In the clinic of college hospital the average of estimated doses to organs per person per year were 105.4 mrad (25.2 mrad for 5-year-old children) in the salivary gland, 55.9 mrad (18.9 mrad for 5-year-old) in the thyroid gland, 52.1 mrad (15.0 mrad for 5-year-old) in the lens of the eye and 52.2 mrad (8.7 mrad for 5-year-old) in the sella turcica. In the dental offices, the same average of estimated doses to organs were 40.5 mrad (7.4 mrad for 5-year-old) in the salivary gland, 17.4 mrad (8.0 mrad for 5-year-old) in the thyroid gland, 12.2 mrad (6.1 mrad for 5-year-old) in the lens of eye and 13.1 mrad (1.3 mrad for 5-year-old) in the sella turcica. In all kinds of radiograpy, the estimated doses in genital glands were in μrad. In the dental offices, both the percentage of young patients to all patients and the radiographing rate were lower as compared with those in the clinic of college hospital. The estimated doses were also lower at one-half to one-fifth and those by age and by organ were found to be one-tenth or lower. (J.P.N.)

  15. Evaluation of preparedness for medical emergencies among dental practitioners in Khammam town: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Surya Chandra Varma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical emergencies can occur frequently in the dental setting. Effective management of an emergency situation in the dental office is ultimately the dentist responsibility. The assessment of preparedness of dental practitioners would help to bring about required changes in the teaching aspects of dental institutions, which would ultimately help dental graduates to improve knowledge regarding management of medical emergencies. This would also make dental offices available with required emergency drugs. Aim: To evaluate the preparedness for medical emergencies among the dental practitioners in Khammam town. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study with a sample of 301 was conducted among dental clinicians at Khammam to evaluate their knowledge regarding medical emergencies. The questionnaire consisted of nineteen questions. First nine questions are objective questions, requiring a simple yes or no reply. Next ten questions are multiple choice questions regarding Emergency Medical Services and basic life support. Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 is considered significant. Results: The results of this study showed that almost all the participants (94.02% enquired about medical and drug history, but only 67.11% of them obtained a complete health history proforma of the patient. About 83.06% record vital signs, 74.09% of members report about attending workshops on emergency training and management, and 50.5% of members were either not sure or not in a position to handle the emergency condition. Conclusion: The results of this study reflect an alarming situation of the capability of dentists to deal with medical emergencies at dental offices and make available all the emergency drugs at their offices.

  16. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2009-12-15

    Presented is the 2009 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office.

  17. Features interior design offices

    OpenAIRE

    Novikov, A. S.; National Aviation University, Ukraine

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the laws and the formation of office space inthe current conditions and investigate the application of the latest technical tools aesthetics to improve the quality of design solutions.

  18. Planning for Office Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Colin K.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines a practical approach to planning for office automation termed the "Focused Process Approach" (the "what" phase, "how" phase, "doing" phase) which is a synthesis of the problem-solving and participatory planning approaches. Thirteen references are provided. (EJS)

  19. NCEP Internal Office Notes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and its predecessors have produced internal publications, known as Office Notes, since the mid-1950's. In...

  20. Diabetes, Gum Disease, and Other Dental Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too ... What if my mouth is sore after my dental work? A sore mouth is common after dental ...

  1. Teething & Dental Hygiene for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health & Hygiene for Young Children Page Content Article ... and lead to future dental problems. Teaching Good Dental Habits The best way to protect your child's ...

  2. Ecocitizen at the office

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    At the office, I do as I would at home At the office, just as at home, we need to stay warm, have light, be equipped (with office material, furniture). We thus need energy and raw materials. This consumption is not without consequences for our environment. How to reduce our consumption? In everyday life, we already have behaviours that allow us to save energy and resources, to sort our waste. At the office it is important to act in the same way as at home, as we spend a lot of time at our workplace. How to act more responsibly at the office, to reduce the environmental impact, and how to stay motivated? Computer, printer, copy machine… or coffee machine. There are quite a few electrical appliances which are indispensable in our office. Always turned on, or almost, they are also often inactive, and it is during these phases of inactivity that two thirds of their consumption occurs. The way one uses the computer is important in order to limit its consumption. Use the sleep mode with care. A c...

  3. Milestones of dental history

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Mahant; S Vineet Agrawal; Sonali Kapoor; Isha Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Since ages, human beings suffer from the dental problems. With the journey as time elapsed the person treating the teeth changed (i.e., from barbers and monks to present dentists), equipment changed (i.e., from bow drills to airotor and laser handpieces), materials changed (i.e., from ground mastic alum/honey to tooth colored composite and ceramics). There has been drastic change in treatment planning from extraction to the conservation of teeth and from manual restoration to computerized res...

  4. Ergonomics in dental pratice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Quaresemin de Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of ergonomics is critical so that you can get a suitable working environment for professional, it is safe, healthy and comfortable. The objective was to identify whether the dental students followed the principles of ergonomics during clinical visits, evaluating, through photographs, compliance with ergonomic principles applied in dental practice, and finally identify the most affected sites by RSI / WMSDs of students enrolled in the dental clinic of the Faculdade IMED. Snapshots were made and only considered the position of the student operator, the same taken by the researcher using the mobile device. For each clinical procedure were taken two photographs in hidden angles to the student operator so that it did not change its ergonomic position to be observed. After obtaining the photos, they were evaluated and classified in scores from 0 to 3 according to the adequacy of the work placement, and then inserted into Excel and later in a database (SPSS 15.0. The following work is a cross-sectional, observational study, they were conducted in dental clinics IMED college. Among the 66 respondents, 14 were male and 52 female. It was found that 57 (86,3% reported feeling pain somewhere in the body, being the most affected sites neck (36.4%, and consecutively lower back (30.3% and higher than the back (27.3%. The results of the 63 procedures performed by the photographic shots were classified as “inadequate” in 49 procedures, “partially adequate” in 12 and “impossible to evaluate” in 2 procedures. The research results have shown a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and do not follow the ergonomic principles, emphasizing the need for more attention to ergonomics of the students.

  5. Ethical checklist for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchuse, D J; Rinchuse, D J; Deluzio, C

    1995-01-01

    A checklist for verification of unethical business practices, originally formulated by Drs. Blanchard and Peale, is adapted to dental practice. A scenario is used as a model to demonstrate the applicability of this instrument to dental practice. The instrument asks three questions in regards to an ethical dilemma: 1) Is it legal? 2) Is it fair? 3) How does it make you feel? The paper concludes the giving of gifts to general dentists by dental specialists for the referral of patients is unethical.

  6. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from dental office environments and units in Barretos, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and analysis of their susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs Isolamento de cepas de Pseudomonas aeruginosa provenientes do meio ambiente e de equipos dentarios em clinicas dentarias em Barretos, São Paulo, Brasil; analises da susceptibilidade das cepas a drogas antimicrobianas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia de Oliveira

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of opportunistic pathogens has been detected in the tubing supplying water to odontological equipment, in special in the biofilm lining of these tubes. Among these pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, is frequently found in water lines supplying dental units. In the present work, 160 samples of water, and 200 fomite samples from forty dental units were collected in the city of Barretos, State of São Paulo, Brazil and evaluated between January and July, 2005. Seventy-six P. aeruginosa strains, isolated from the dental environment (5 strains and water system (71 strains, were tested for susceptibility to six antimicrobial drugs most frequently used against P. aeruginosa infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, followed by meropenem was the predominant profile. The need for effective means of reducing the microbial burden within dental unit water lines is emphasized, and the risk of exposure and cross-infection in dental practice, in special when caused by opportunistic pathogens like P. aeruginosa, are highlighted.Uma ampla variedade de patógenos oportunistas tem sido detectadas nos tubos de alimentação de água dos equipos odontológicos, particularmente no biofilme formado na superfície do tubo. Entre os patógenos oportunistas encontrados nos tubos de água, Pseudomonas aeruginosa é reconhecida como uma das principais causadoras de infecções nosocomiais. Foram coletadas 160 amostras de água e 200 amostras de fomites em quarenta clinicas odontológicas na cidade de Barretos, São Paulo, Brasil, durante o período de Janeiro a Julho de 2005. Setenta e seis cepas de P. aeruginosa, isoladas a partir dos fomites (5 cepas e das amostras de água (71 cepas, foram analisadas quanto à susceptibilidade à seis drogas antimicrobianas freqüentemente utilizadas para o tratamento de infecções provocadas por P. aeruginosa. As principais suscetibilidades observadas foram para a

  7. Confronting shibboleths of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-10-01

    Shibboleths are common expressions presented as indisputable truths. When used in educational discussions, they reflect "motherhood and apple pie" viewpoints and tend to bring debate to a halt. Use of shibboleths may precede a desired imposition of "locksteps" in educational programming and are easily perceived as paternalistic by recipients. Nine shibboleths are presented as common beliefs of dental faculty and administrators. Evidence contradicting the veracity of the "obvious truths" is offered. The traditional "splendid isolation" of dentistry contributes to parochialism and belief in false shibboleths. Sound principles of higher and health professions education, student learning, and dental practice apply to dental education as to all health disciplines. Student passivity in dental education is not the best preparation for proficiency in dental practice. The master teacher possesses a repertoire of methodologies specific to meeting defined educational objectives. Active learning experiences bear close resemblances to professional duties and responsibilities and internally motivate future doctors of dental medicine. The difficulty in achieving curricular change leads to curricular entrenchment. Dentistry and dental education should not trade their ethical high ground for the relatively low ethical standards of the business world. Principles of professional ethics should govern relationships between dentists, whether within the dental school workplace or in practice. Suggestions are made on how to confront shibboleths in dental school settings.

  8. Children's experiences of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Annie G; Rodd, Helen D; Porritt, Jenny M; Baker, Sarah R; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Williams, Chris; Marshman, Zoe

    2017-03-01

    Dental anxiety is common among children. Although there is a wealth of research investigating childhood dental anxiety, little consideration has been given to the child's perspective. This qualitative study sought to explore with children their own experiences of dental anxiety using a cognitive behavioural therapy assessment model. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with dentally anxious children aged 11-16 years. The Five Areas model was used to inform the topic guide and analysis. Data were analysed using a framework approach. In total, 13 children were interviewed. Participants described their experiences of dental anxiety across multiple dimensions (situational factors and altered thoughts, feelings, physical symptoms, and behaviours). Participants placed considerable value on communication by dental professionals, with poor communication having a negative influence on dental anxiety and the dentist-patient relationship. This study confirms the Five Areas model as an applicable theoretical model for the assessment of childhood dental anxiety. Children provided insights about their own dental anxiety experiences that have not previously been described. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Medical emergencies in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, M H

    2009-06-01

    Serious medical emergencies are fortunately a rare occurrence in the dental practice environment; however, if an emergency situation is encountered a delay in treatment may result in potentially avoidable consequences. The risk of mortality or serious morbidity can be reduced by ensuring that basic emergency equipment and medications are in place, and that the dental team is appropriately trained in basic life support measures. This article aims to provide an overview of the basic emergency medications and equipment that should be present in dental practices, and to discuss specific responses to some of the more common adverse medical events that can present while providing dental treatment.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal dental pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Most dental pain is caused by an organic problem such as dental caries, periodontitis, pulpitis, or trauma. Diagnosis and treatment of these symptoms are relatively straightforward. However, patients often also complain of abnormal dental pain that has a non-dental origin, whose diagnosis is challenging. Such abnormal dental pain can be categorized on the basis of its cause as referred pain, neuromodulatory pain, and neuropathic pain. When it is difficult to diagnose a patient's dental pain, ...

  11. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, ?scar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Background There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Material and Methods Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and Pol...

  12. Mandatory Clinical Practice for Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty should maintain their clinical skills through regular practice, to improve their ability to relate to students through instruction, provide an additional source of income, and improve their image in the community. Institutional policies fostering and regulating faculty practice plans are suggested. (Author/MSE)

  13. Pattern of dental caries in Mulago Dental School clinic, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on dental caries among patients attending Mulago Hospital is scarce. Yet knowledge of the pattern of caries can be used to plan preventive and treatment interventions. This study describes the pattern of dental caries (in terms of age group, tooth and tooth surface and gender) among patients attending the ...

  14. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  15. Instructed officers Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This law contains instructions on the prevention of radiological and contains 4 articles Article I: describe the responsibilities of the institutions that operate within the scope of radiological protection in terms of the number of radiation protection officers and personal Supervisors who available in the practices radiation field. Article II: talking about the conditions of radiation protection officers that must be available in the main officers and working field in larg institutions and thecondition of specific requirements for large enterprises of work permits in the field of radiological work that issued by the Council. Article III: the functions and duties of officers in the prevention of radiological oversee the development of radiation protection programmes in the planning stages, construction and preparing the rules of local labour and what it lead of such tasks.Article IV: radiation protection officers powers: to modify and approve the programme of prevention and radiation safety at the company, stop any unsafe steps, amend the steps of the usage, operation of materials, devices and so on

  16. "Hepatitis" - Prevention and management in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Sharma, Varun; Kaur, Saravpreet

    2015-01-01

    Today, viral hepatitis has become a silent epidemic worldwide. It is the major cause of liver cirrhosis and liver carcinoma. In a dental office, infections can be expedited through several routes, including direct or indirect contact with blood, oral fluids, droplet splatter, aerosols, etc. The aim of the present review is to increase the awareness among dental practitioners, so as to reduce the burden of hepatitis in their community. Electronic databases like PubMed, Medline, ProQuest, etc. were searched using the keywords hepatitis, dentist, liver disease, and infection control. Manual search of various journals and books was also carried out. Only highly relevant articles from English literature were considered for the present review. The results revealed that the dentists were among the high-risk groups for hepatitis, and they have little information on the factors associated with adherence to hepatitis B vaccination. A dentist can play a major role in the prevention of hepatitis by considering each and every patient as a potential carrier of hepatitis. Proper infection control, sterilization, and prophylactic vaccination protocols should be followed in order to reduce the risk of hepatitis.

  17. Maryland residents' attitudes toward AIDS and the use of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L A; Grace, E G; Ward, M A

    1992-01-01

    This project was conducted to examine the impact of Maryland residents' attitudes about AIDS on dental services utilization. A telephone survey of 1,477 households was conducted (response rate 68.9%). Less than 7 percent of the respondents volunteered a concern about contracting AIDS in the dental office. When asked directly, approximately 35 percent stated they would change dentists if their dentist were treating AIDS patients. Respondents who were most aware of the wide-spread treatment of AIDS patients by dentists were more likely to believe their dentist was treating AIDS patients. Also, they were less likely to report that they would leave the practice of dentists with AIDS or those who treated AIDS patients. It is critical for the public to be educated properly about the continued safety of the dental office and to receive accurate information about AIDS.

  18. The strategic security officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of the strategic security officer, and the potential that it brings to the healthcare security operational environment. The author believes that training and development, along with strict hiring practices, can enable a security department to reach a new level of professionalism, proficiency and efficiency. The strategic officer for healthcare security is adapted from the "strategic corporal" concept of US Marine Corps General Charles C. Krulak which focuses on understanding the total force implications of the decisions made by the lowest level leaders within the Corps (Krulak, 1999). This article focuses on the strategic organizational implications of every security officer's decisions in the constantly changing and increasingly volatile operational environment of healthcare security.

  19. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  20. Dental technician of the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, W.; Wismeijer, D.; Hanssen, S.; Tahmaseb, A.

    2015-01-01

    The new technologies in the field of dental science have not only changed the way in which dentists run their practice but have also dramatically changed the procedures carried out in dental laboratories. Mechanical engineering, incorporated CMM, laser milling, 3D printing and 3D design in a

  1. New dental applications with LEDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, A.; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  2. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... Oral diseases qualify as a major public health concern owing to their high prevalence and incidence in all regions of the world (1). Dental caries and gingivitis are the two most common dental diseases affecting children worldwide. These two diseases are, to a large extent, the result of the presence of ...

  3. Drawing Links within Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines results of a practical drawing task given to a cohort of first year dental surgery students at Kings College Dental Institute, London. It compares and relates their success in drilling and removing caries and pulp tissue from a virtual tooth using the hapTEL virtual learning system, with each individuals' drawing skills.…

  4. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2018-04-01

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [The impact of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the introduction of dental implants can only be understood when the historical context is clarified. In the past, the main treatment carried out by dentists consisted of filling or, in unfortunate cases, removal of painful teeth. Only since the introduction of dental implants did

  6. Nuclear security officer training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    Training has become complex and precise in today's world of critical review and responsibility. Entrusted to a security officer is the success or demise of large business. In more critical environments the security officer is entrusted with the monitoring and protection of life sensitive systems and devices. The awareness of this high visibility training requirement has been addressed by a limited few. Those involved in the nuclear power industry through dedication and commitment to the American public have without a doubt become leading pioneers in demanding training excellence

  7. Trends in death associated with pediatric dental sedation and general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Helen H; Milgrom, Peter; Starks, Helene; Burke, Wylie

    2013-08-01

    Inadequate access to oral health care places children at risk of caries. Disease severity and inability to cooperate often result in treatment with general anesthesia (GA). Sedation is increasingly popular and viewed as lower risk than GA in community settings. Currently, few data are available to quantify pediatric morbidity and mortality related to dental anesthesia. Summarize dental anesthesia-related pediatric deaths described in media reports. Review of media reports in the Lexis-Nexis Academic database and a private foundation website. Dental offices, ambulatory surgery centers, and hospitals. Patients :US-based children (≤21 years old) who died subsequently receiving anesthesia for a dental procedure between 1980-2011. Most deaths occurred among 2-5 year-olds (n = 21/44), in an office setting (n = 21/44), and with a general/pediatric dentist (n = 25/44) as the anesthesia provider. In this latter group, 17 of 25 deaths were linked with a sedation anesthetic. This series of media reports likely represent only a fraction of the overall morbidity and mortality related to dental anesthesia. These data may indicate an association between mortality and pediatric dental procedures under sedation, particularly in office settings. However, these relationships are difficult to test in the absence of a database that could provide an estimate of incidence and prevalence of morbidity and mortality. With growing numbers of children receiving anesthesia for dental procedures from providers with variable training, it is imperative to be able to track anesthesia-related adverse outcomes. Creating a national database of adverse outcomes will enable future research to advance patient safety and quality. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Applied behavior analysis: behavior management of children with autism spectrum disorders in dental environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Purnima; Ikkanda, Zachary

    2011-03-01

    There are a limited number of studies addressing behavior management techniques and procedural modifications that dentists can use to treat people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The authors conducted a search of the dental and behavioral analytic literature to identify management techniques that address problem behaviors exhibited by children with ASDs in dental and other health-related environments. Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a science in which procedures are based on the principles of behavior through systematic experimentation. Clinicians have used ABA procedures successfully to modify socially significant behaviors of people with ASD. Basic behavior management techniques currently used in dentistry may not encourage people with cognitive and behavioral disabilities, such as ASD, to tolerate simple in-office dental procedures consistently. Instead, dental care providers often are required to use advanced behavior management techniques to complete simple in-office procedures such as prophylaxis, sealant placement and obtaining radiographs. ABA procedures can be integrated in the dental environment to manage problem behaviors often exhibited by children with an ASD. The authors found no evidence-based procedural modifications that address the behavioral characteristics and problematic behaviors of children with an ASD in a dental environment. Further research in this area should be conducted. Knowledge and in-depth understanding of behavioral principles is essential when a dentist is concerned with modifying behaviors. Using ABA procedures can help dentists manage problem behaviors effectively and systematically when performing routine dental treatment. Being knowledgeable about each patient's behavioral characteristics and the parents' level of involvement is important in the successful integration of the procedures and reduction of in-office time.

  9. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Advanced Dental Students' Use, Knowledge, and Beliefs Regarding Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearston, Jenni A; Shah, Krina; Cheng, Eric; Moosvi, Rizvan; Park, Su Hyun; Patel, Naiya; Spielman, Andrew I; Weitzman, Michael L

    2017-11-01

    Using cigarettes and alternative tobacco products (ATPs) is associated with negative oral health outcomes, and dental health professionals are poised to help patients quit. The aim of this study was to determine dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students' use, knowledge, and beliefs about cigarettes and ATPs, including perceptions about their education in tobacco dependence treatment and counseling experience. All 1,783 students enrolled in the dental, dental hygiene, and postdoctoral dental programs at the New York University College of Dentistry were invited to participate in the survey in 2016. A total of 708 students at least partially completed the survey, for a response rate of 39.7%. In the results, 146 of the students (20.1%) reported ever using cigarettes, while 253 (35.7%) reported ever using any ATP. Regarding tobacco use intervention, the students reported they had not received enough training on ATPs, were neutral about cigarettes, and were somewhat confident and not so confident counseling a cigarette smoker or ATP user, respectively. By their fourth year, 77.8% of the dental students reported they had counseled someone to stop smoking cigarettes, but only 40.7% had counseled someone to stop using ATPs. Overall, all groups of students reported feeling more confident and had received more education on interventions for cigarettes than for ATPs (ptobacco and did not perceive they had received enough training on intervening with patients on use of cigarettes and ATPs. These findings call for a revised tobacco education curriculum for dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students, focused on building knowledge and confidence for promoting tobacco dependence treatment.

  10. Competition and dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, J; Sørensen, R

    2000-07-01

    Dental services for adults are different from all other Norwegian health services in that they are provided by private producers (dentists) who have full freedom to establish a practice. They have had this freedom since the end of World War II. A further liberalization of the market for dental services occurred in November 1995, when the so-called normal tariff was repealed. The system changed from a fixed fee system to a deregulated fee system. In principle, the market for dental services for adults operates as a free competitive market, in which dentists must compete for a market share. The aim of this study was to study the short-term effects of competition. A comprehensive set of data on fees, practice characteristics, treatment profiles and factors that dentists take into account when determining fees was analysed. The main finding was that competition has a weak effect. No support was found for the theory that the level of fees is the result of monopolistic competition or monopoly. The results also provided some evidence against the inducement hypothesis. At this stage, it is interesting to notice that dentists do not seem to exploit the power they have to control the market. One explanation, which is consistent with the more recent literature, is that physicians' behaviour to a large extent is influenced by professional norms and caring concerns about their patients. Financial incentives are important, but these incentives are constrained by norms other than self-interest. The interpretation of the results should also take into account that the deregulation has operated for a short time and that dentists and patients may not yet have adjusted to changes in the characteristics of the market. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  12. The Embedded Counseling Model: An Application to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David Francis

    2017-01-01

    Prior research has suggested that dental students experience high rates of stress, anxiety, and mood concerns, which have been linked to poor academic performance, health concerns, and substance abuse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an embedded counseling office at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics in its first three academic semesters. Data were gathered from students attending appointments, and two inventories were used to monitor students' counseling progress and gather psychological outcomes data: the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34 (CCAPS-34) and the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). In the three semesters, 55 students attended 251 counseling appointments, with an average of 4.5 appointments per student. Their presenting psychological concerns included academic concerns, time management, test anxiety, study skills, low self-esteem, self-care, interpersonal conflicts, anxiety, depression, stress management, sexual concerns, substance abuse, eating/body image concerns, work-life balance, and financial issues. The CCAPS-34 data showed that, at initial clinical assessment, students experienced moderate levels of depression, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, academic distress, and overall psychological distress; 45 (82%) showed clinically significant symptoms on at least one CCAPS-34 subscale. The ORS data further showed that the students entered counseling experiencing high levels of psychological distress. A positive relationship was found between number of counseling appointments and increased overall functioning. These results suggest that an embedded counseling office can help dental schools meet the needs of their students.

  13. The american dental dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth.

  14. Adhesive dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, N.

    2005-01-01

    Two main classes of material are involved, the glass-ionomer cements and the composite resins. This investigation describes the way they are bonded to the tooth and highlights their differences. Glass ionomers develop a zone of interaction with the tooth as they age which ultimately gives an extremely strong bond, and results in excellent retention rates. By contrast, bonding of composite resins is more complicated and possibly less effective, though these materials have better wear resistance and better aesthetics than glass ionomers. Assessment of bond durability is difficult. This is because a dental restorative can fail by a number of mechanisms apart from de bonding: for example, through wear or fracture

  15. Microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines and effect on quality of indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadaifciler, Duygu Göksay; Cotuk, Aysin

    2014-06-01

    The microbiological quality in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) is considered to be important because patients and dental staff with suppressed immune systems are regularly exposed to water and aerosols generated from dental units (DUs). Opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas, Legionella, Candida, and Aspergillus can be present in DUWLs, while during consultations, bioaerosols can be dispersed in the air, thus resulting in effects on microbiological quality of indoor air. This present study represents microbiological air and water quality in dental offices (DOs) and also concerns the relationship between the quality of DO air and dental unit water. This study aimed to assess both the microbial quality of dental unit water and the indoor air in 20 DOs and to survey the effect on the quality of the indoor air with the existing microorganisms in dental unit water. Fourteen out of 20 (70 %) DUWLs were found to be contaminated with a high number of aerobic mesophilic heterotrophic bacteria. In terms of bacterial air contamination levels, in 90 % of DOs, a medium level (contamination was determined, while in terms of microfungal air contamination, in all DOs, a low level (contamination was determined. Potential infection or allergen agents, such as Pseudomonas, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Paecilomyces were isolated from water and air samples. This study's determination of contamination sources and evaluation of microbial load in DOs could contribute to the development of quality control methods in the future.

  16. High-Fidelity Simulation: Preparing Dental Hygiene Students for Managing Medical Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilich, Lisa A; Jackson, Sarah C; Bray, Brenda S; Willson, Megan N

    2015-09-01

    Medical emergencies can occur at any time in the dental office, so being prepared to properly manage the situation can be the difference between life and death. The entire dental team must be properly trained regarding all aspects of emergency management in the dental clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new educational approach using a high-fidelity simulator to prepare dental hygiene students for medical emergencies. This study utilized high-fidelity simulation (HFS) to evaluate the abilities of junior dental hygiene students at Eastern Washington University to handle a medical emergency in the dental hygiene clinic. Students were given a medical emergency scenario requiring them to assess the emergency and implement life-saving protocols in a simulated "real-life" situation using a high-fidelity manikin. Retrospective data were collected for four years from the classes of 2010 through 2013 (N=114). The results indicated that learning with simulation was effective in helping the students identify the medical emergency in a timely manner, implement emergency procedures correctly, locate and correctly utilize contents of the emergency kit, administer appropriate intervention/treatment for a specific patient, and provide the patient with appropriate follow-up instructions. For dental hygiene programs seeking to enhance their curricula in the area of medical emergencies, this study suggests that HFS is an effective tool to prepare students to appropriately handle medical emergencies. Faculty calibration is essential to standardize simulation.

  17. Microbiological evaluation of ultrasonic nebulization for disinfecting dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Marcio Jose; Rafael, Renata Santos; Camilotti, Veridiana; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Sicoli, Eliseu Augusto; Teixeira, Nancielli; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2013-07-01

    Disinfecting dental impressions is necessary to decrease the risk of cross-contamination in dental offices. Ultrasonic nebulization has been mentioned as a microbicidal technique that can be used to disinfect contaminated dental impressions. This study compared the microbicidal effect of 2% glutaraldehyde and 0.2% peracetic acid for the disinfection of dental impressions made with vinyl polysiloxane, using 2 disinfection methods: immersion and ultrasonic nebulization. Bactericial efficacy was examined using Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus atrophaeus as indicators. Thirty impressions were obtained and distributed randomly in 5 groups (n = 6). Group 1 was immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde immersion for 10 minutes, Group 2 was immersed in 0.2% peracetic acid for 10 minutes, Group 3 underwent ultrasonic nebulization for 10 minutes in 2% glutaraldehyde solution, Group 4 underwent ultrasonic nebulization for 10 minutes in 0.2% peracetic acid solution, and Group 5 was a control group that received no disinfectant. Both solutions experienced a 100% reduction in microorganisms following ultrasonic nebulization, as did peracetic acid following immersion; however, immersion in glutaraldehyde demonstrated lower values of reduction in B atrophaeus group, with a statistically significant difference compared with the other experimental groups.

  18. How to Protect Your Dental Practice from Unwarranted Intrusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Schmidt

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk management is the study and practice of how to avoid liti-gious perils in dental practice. All too often risk management is shunted to a minor role in the frenzy of the today’s dental schools as they strive to graduate capable dentists. A sophisticated office risk management program can boast high rewards while minimizing risks in a dental practice.The genesis of this article is hinged on fifty years of dental practice, fourteen in the specialty of pediatric dentistry and the remainder in a large general practice (34 chairs, 55 employees, ten hygienists and seeing 200 patients daily and 400 new patients monthly. A practitioner can learn many key lessons in risk management when encountering so many patients and staff.What I learned was how to avoid the pitfalls, especially those perils springing from five sources: poorly informed patients, displeased patients, patients who owe you payment, dissatisfied (usually former staff members and patients whom you have let the settlement scheme drag untowardly. This paper outlines seven specific and proven risk management strategies to minimize these perils.

  19. General dental practitioner's views on dental general anaesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, A G; King, D; Milsom, K M; Blinkhom, A S; Tickle, M

    2007-06-01

    Policy has recently changed on provision of dental general anaesthetic services in England. The aim of this study was to investigate general dental practitioners' views about dental general anaesthetics, the reduction in its availability and the impact on care of children with toothache. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and clinical case scenarios. General dental practitioners providing NHS services in the North West of England. 93 general dental practitioners were interviewed and 91 answered a clinical case scenario about the care they would provide for a 7-year-old child with multiple decayed teeth presenting with toothache. Scenario responses showed variation; 8% would immediately refer for general anaesthesia, 25% would initially prescribe antibiotics, but the majority would attempt to either restore or extract the tooth causing pain. Interview responses also demonstrated variation in care, however most dentists agree general anaesthesia has a role for nervous children but only refer as a last resort. The responses indicated an increase in inequalities, and that access to services did not match population needs, leaving some children waiting in pain. Most general dental practitioners support moving dental general anaesthesia into hospitals but some believe that it has widened health inequalities and there is also a problem associated with variation in treatment provision. Additional general anaesthetic services in some areas with high levels of tooth decay are needed and evidence based guidelines about caring for children with toothache are required.

  20. An Admissions Officer's Credentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Marilee Jones has resigned as a dean of admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology after admitting that she had misrepresented her academic degrees when first applying to work at the university in 1979. As one of the nation's most prominent admissions officers--and a leader in the movement to make the application process less…

  1. ERGONOMIC OFFICE POSITION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUMITRU Bogdan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the risks faced by people working in the office. In the next pages you will find some methods and suggestions how to prevent the appearance of occupational diseases. These suggestions can help anyone to rearrange his work place in order to make his job more pleasant and healthy.

  2. The Mindful Development Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Deb

    2012-01-01

    Delivering on a commitment to diversity in schools, colleges, and universities is a living, breathing endeavor for many members of the advancement community. While a diversity leadership agenda is set clearly from the top, advancement officers can and must play a critical role in this arena. Effective development and alumni leaders are uniquely…

  3. Office of the Ombudsman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet describes the Federal Student Aid Ombudsman, an impartial resource to help customers resolve student loan concerns when other approaches fail. The ombudsman helps resolve discrepancies in loan balances and payments, and helps customers understand interest and collection charges. The office helps resolve issues related to income tax…

  4. Users Office - Removal

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    As of 8 December 2010 and until the end of February 2011, the Users Office will move from Bldg. 60. New Location : Bldg. 510-R-033 Opening Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday : 08.30 – 12.30 Monday to Friday: 14.00 – 16.00 Closed Wednesday mornings.

  5. Office-based anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection, and consistency in nursing personnel. In the USA 17 -. 24% of all elective ambulatory surgery is ... knowledge base or personality to deal with the OBA environment. Compared with hospitals, office-based facilities currently ... disease or major cardiovascular risk factors). Intravenous access via a flexible cannula is.

  6. Financing medical office buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J W

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses financing medical office buildings. In particular, financing and ownership options from a not-for-profit health care system perspective are reviewed, including use of tax-exempt debt, taxable debt, limited partnerships, sale, and real estate investment trusts (REITs).

  7. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment.

  8. Involving Parents in Their Children's Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Donna

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that parent education is vital to good dental hygiene for the whole family. Discusses what Head Start staffers can do to ensure that children's dental needs are being met, particularly in assisting parents with taking responsibility for children's dental hygiene. Covers dental care tips for parents, questions and answers about dental…

  9. Dental photography today. Part 1: basic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaglia, A; DE Dominicis, P; Arcuri, L; Gargari, M; Ottria, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the first article in a new series on digital dental photography. Part 1 defines the aims and objectives of dental photography for examination, diagnosis and treatment planning, legal and forensic documentation, publishing, education, marketing and communication with patients, dental team members, colleagues and dental laboratory.

  10. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is a...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  12. Dental Curriculum Development in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phantumvanit, Prathip

    1996-01-01

    Since establishment of formal dental education in Southeast Asia, changes stemming from research and technology have led to dental curriculum changes. Development of the dental curriculum can be divided into three phases: disease oriented; health oriented; and community oriented. Evolution of these phases is traced in the dental curricula of Laos,…

  13. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  14. Cones for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M J [National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK)

    1977-04-01

    Dental radiographic techniques are summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of the use of both the conventional plastic pointer cone and the open-ended cylinders or divergent cones favoured both by the ICRP (Protection against Ionizing Radiation from External Sources, Oxford, Pergamon Press, 1973, ICRP Publication 15), and in the Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons against Ionizing Radiation arising from Medical and Dental Use (1972, 3rd edition, London, HMSO) are discussed. The use of the word 'should' in these recommendations to signify a desirable requirement, not an essential one, is noted. This wording is currently of interest both nationally and internationally in relation to regulations, standards and notes for guidance. The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) has been reviewing the position, and has concluded that open-ended cones have disadvantages which may sometimes outweigh their advantages. Although open-ended cones are preferable under some circumstances, the recommendation that they should be used ought not to be followed without an understanding of the issues involved. The hazards associated with the use of interchangeable cones are considered. The NRPB now proposes that the requirement for the replacement of pointer cones (for both new and existing equipment) should be withdrawn.

  15. Knowledge and performance of dental students with regard to infection control guidelines in Dental School of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ebrahimpour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentists are at risk of infectious diseases and dental offices can serve as a source of infection transmission if the infection control guidelines are not properly implemented. Adherence to infection control principles can help prevent disease transmission. This study sought to assess the level of knowledge and performance of dental students with regard to infection control principles in dental clinics of School of Dentistry, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. This study was conducted on 87 dental students. Data were collected using a 9-question questionnaire and a 16-item checklist. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 21 and descriptive statistics by calculation of mean and standard deviation (SD, t-test, Chi square test, Kruskal Wallis test and the Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Level of significance was set at P=0.05.Of subjects, 100% were wearing sterile gloves and changed them for each patient, collected and disposed wastes after examination or treatment of each patient, capped the needle after anesthetic injection and changed the dental suction tip; 94% were wearing a mask and changed it for each patient; 89% were wearing clean white coats. The level of knowledge of students was found to be moderate. Also, the performance of students with regard to infection control principles was found to be very good probably due to the rules and regulations set by the dental school departments.

  16. On dental caries and dental erosion in Swedish young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Helén

    2013-01-01

    All children in Sweden are entitled to regular, free dental care up to 20 years of age. While dental caries generally continues to decline, still there is a pronounced skewness in caries prevalence. Furthermore, the reported increase in dental erosion in young adults is cause for concern. The aim was to study the prevalence of dental caries and dental erosion in a cohort of Swedish 20 year-olds, with special reference to the influence of previous caries experience and lifestyle as well as parental, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors. The study was prospective, longitudinal and cross-sectional in design and based on registration of caries lesions, dental erosion, body adiposity status, saliva sampling, interviews, and questionnaires at 20 years of age. Data were available for the same cohort at 1, 3, 6 and 15 years of age. 499 subjects (74 percent of the original cohort) were included. Five individuals were subsequently excluded, leaving a final sample of 494. 74 percent of the subjects had initial and/or manifest caries lesions and/or restorations. The mean number of DimFS was 5.8 and the mean number of DmFS on occlusal surfaces of molars was 1.1. There was a strong relationship between caries activity at 3 and 6 years of age and approximal caries prevalence in premolars and molars at 20 years of age. Overweight/obese individuals had significantly higher caries prevalence than normal weight individuals. Parental, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors during infancy were related to approximal caries at age 20. Dental erosion was found in 75 percent of the individuals: 18 percent of these had extensive erosion. There was a significant association between caries and dental erosion. A relationship was found between dental erosion and lifestyle factors and overweight/obesity. There is a strong relationship between caries prevalence at age 20 and caries experience in early childhood. Young adults show a high prevalence of dental erosion, but the severity is

  17. Marketing the dental practice: eight steps toward success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Patrick J; Eisner, Alan B

    2006-10-01

    The authors provide a suggested framework for completing a comprehensive evaluation of practice processes and routines. Their approach focuses on improving the professional image of dentists and the methods they use to market themselves. A practice can benefit by implementing a program to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the practice and how these strengths and weaknesses affect patients' experiences. A word-of-mouth marketing campaign relies on the cultivation of opinion leaders, but opinion leaders cannot be cultivated until they have been identified. Dental practice marketing campaigns cannot be based on assumptions; they must be based on facts. Practice Implications. Improving relationships with patients will lead to increased patient retention, reduced marketing costs and greater personal satisfaction. By focusing on strengths, clinicians will improve patients' experiences in the dental office.

  18. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Sanjna; Mahadevan, R

    2015-04-01

    Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion.

  19. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion.

  20. Clinical use of dental classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    The Dental Classification system used by the uniformed services is supposed to predict the incidence of dental emergencies in the operational setting, at least on the unit level. Since most Sailors and Marines are deployed without close dental support, the sea services have adopted a policy of early treatment of class 3 dental conditions during recruit training. The other services are beginning to do the same. Recently, two factors have emerged that are affecting this early dental class 3 treatment. These factors must be considered when planning to provide early dental treatment. First, changing population and dentist provider demographics in the civilian sector are beginning to affect the class 3 treatment needs of incoming military recruits. Second, attrition from recruit training results in treatment provided to recruits who leave military service before finishing their training. Some view this as a waste of resources, others as a cost of doing business. As operational jointness increases, the three services must develop and use a single dental classification terminology, as well as unified standards and guidelines, both for better research in this area and for the readiness and well-being of our patients.

  1. Dental imaging characterization of micropigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.Y.; Choi, M.H.; Chang, J.H.; Jung, J.H.; Kim, M.E.; Lee, N.S.; Kim, J.Y.; Choi, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently the micropig has been developed as human disease model. The dental and orofacial region of micropig is similar to that of humans, so it has been used for testing implant materials and techniques. The purpose of this study is on dental image at each age using radiography and computed tomography. Total twenty-two male micropigs, two or three animals of each 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months old, were given radiographic examinations. After general anesthesia, extra- and intra-oral radiographic technique and computed tomographic scans were performed to assess the dental characterization of micropigs. The total deciduous dental formula comprised 28 teeth and was depicted as Di 3/3, Dc 1/1, Dp 3/3. The total permanent dental formula comprised 44 teeth and was depicted as I 3/3, C 1/1, P 4/4, M 3/3. Hypodontia of the first premolars was common in the micropig. The permanent teeth erupted from 3 to 24 month after birth. The sequence of eruption of the permanent teeth was M1, P1, I3, C, M2, I1 + P3 + P4, P2, I2, M3. Dental imaging enables visualization of the unerupted teeth and gives more information about the development of the teeth. The growth pattern of the teeth obtained through radiographic and computed tomographic examination provides basic data in the micropig as animal model for dental research

  2. Low-dose Dental-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, A.; Imhof, H.; Homolka, P.; Fuerhauser, R.; Freudenthaler, J.; Watzek, G.

    2000-01-01

    Dental-CT is a relatively new, increasingly used investigation technique in dental radiology. Several authors have stated that the indication for Dental-CT has to be chosen on a strict basis, due to high dose values. This article describes the technique of performing dental-CT and calculates the effective dose based on published data and own measurements as well as the dose reduction potential to achieve an optimized protocol for Dental-CT investigations. (orig.) [de

  3. Current State of Dental Education: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J

    2017-08-01

    This executive summary for Section 1 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century" project provides a composite picture of information from 12 background articles on the current state of dental education in the United States. The summary includes the following topics: the current status of the dental curriculum, the implications of student debt and dental school finances, the expansion of enrollment, student diversity, pre- and postdoctoral education, safety net status of dental school clinics, and trends in faculty.

  4. Interventions for tobacco cessation in the dental setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Alan B; Ebbert, Jon

    2012-06-13

    Tobacco use has significant adverse effects on oral health. Oral health professionals in the dental office or community setting have a unique opportunity to increase tobacco abstinence rates among tobacco users. This review assesses the effectiveness of interventions for tobacco cessation delivered by oral health professionals and offered to cigarette smokers and smokeless tobacco users in the dental office or community setting. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1966-November 2011), EMBASE (1988-November 2011), CINAHL (1982-November 2011), Healthstar (1975-November 2011), ERIC (1967-November 2011), PsycINFO (1984-November 2011), National Technical Information Service database (NTIS, 1964-November 2011), Dissertation Abstracts Online (1861-November 2011), Database of Abstract of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE, 1995-November 2011), and Web of Science (1993-November 2011). We included randomized and pseudo-randomized clinical trials assessing tobacco cessation interventions conducted by oral health professionals in the dental office or community setting with at least six months of follow-up. Two authors independently reviewed abstracts for potential inclusion and abstracted data from included trials. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. The primary outcome was abstinence from smoking or all tobacco use (for users of smokeless tobacco) at the longest follow-up, using the strictest definition of abstinence reported. The effect was summarised as an odds ratio, with correction for clustering where appropriate. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I² statistic and where appropriate a pooled effect was estimated using an inverse variance fixed-effect model. Fourteen clinical trials met the criteria for inclusion in this review. Included studies assessed the efficacy of interventions in the dental office or in a community school or college setting. Six studies evaluated the effectiveness of interventions among

  5. The Users Office turns 20

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    20 years ago, in the summer of 1989, an office was created to assist the thousands of users who come to CERN each year, working over the broad range of projects and collaborations. Chris Onions (right), head of the Users’ Office, with Bryan Pattison (left), the Office’s founder.Before the inception of the Users Office, it was common for users to spend at least an entire day moving from office to office in search of necessary documentation and information in order to make their stay official. "Though the Office has undergone various changes throughout its lifetime, it has persisted in being a welcoming bridge to facilitate the installation of visitors coming from all over the world", says Chris Onions, head of the Users Office. This September, the Office will celebrate its 20-year anniversary with a drink offered to representatives of the User community, the CERN management and staff members from the services with whom the Office is involved. &...

  6. Dental implants in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  7. Advances in dental public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R D

    2001-07-01

    Dental public health has been defined as 'the science and art of preventing oral diseases, promoting oral health and improving the quality of life through the organised efforts of society'. Dental practitioners most often have the oral health of individual patients as their primary focus but the aim of public health is to benefit populations. Early developments in dental public health were concerned largely with demonstrating levels of disease and with treatment services. With greater appreciation of the nature of oral health and disease, and of their determinants has come recognition of the need for wider public health action if the effects of prevention and oral health promotion are to be maximized.

  8. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide...... provides prognoses for teeth with traumatic injuries based on the Copenhagen trauma database: http://www.dentaltraumaguide.org The database includes 2191 traumatized permanent teeth from 1282 patients that were treated at the dental trauma unit at the University Hospital in Copenhagen (Denmark...

  9. Bioinspired design of dental multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M; Wang, R; Thompson, V; Rekow, D; Soboyejo, W O

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the use of bioinspired functionally graded structures in the design of dental multi-layers that are more resistant to sub-surface crack nucleation. Unlike existing dental crown restorations that give rise to high stress concentration, the functionally graded layers (between crown materials and the joins that attach them to dentin) are shown to promote significant reductions in stress and improvements in the critical crack size. Special inspiration is drawn from the low stress concentrations associated with the graded distributions in the dentin-enamel-junction (DEJ). The implications of such functionally graded structures are also discussed for the design of dental restorations.

  10. Entrepreneurship in continuing dental education: a dental school perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Vincent N

    2005-01-01

    The definition of continuing dental education is presented, along with its benefits to the profession. The preeminence of dental schools in providing lifelong learning opportunities and freedom from commercial involvement that existed even twenty years ago has changed. Less than a quarter of CE takes place in school, and the focus there is increasingly on material with deep scientific background and hands-on learning. The newest innovations and those with the greatest commercial potential are taught elsewhere. Proposed changes in the ADA CERP standards would take on a "purist" approach that could place dental schools at a severe disadvantage while allowing "for profit" institutes to flourish and thus further undermine the role dental schools can play in providing quality professional development experiences.

  11. Dental anxiety among patients visiting a University Dental Centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Dental Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. An audit of dental prescriptions between clinics and dental laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C A

    2011-08-12

    To discover the quality of written instructions from dentists to dental technicians and the nature of non-compliant prescriptions. An audit of laboratory prescription compliance was conducted within an NHS Trust Dental Teaching Hospital to determine the level of communication between dentists and dental technicians. One hundred and fifty prescriptions were audited from dental undergraduates and qualified dentists throughout the different departments. A total of two-thirds of prescriptions were considered non-compliant and failed to meet relevant ethical and legal guidelines. This problem was seen throughout all departments and at all professional levels. A breakdown in communication between dentists and technicians through the use of prescriptions is evident even within a close working environment.

  13. Complex layered dental restorations: Are they recognizable and do they survive extreme conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Alistair S; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has shown that restorative dental materials can be recognized by microscopy and elemental analysis (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence; SEM/EDS and XRF) and that this is possible even in extreme conditions, such as cremation. These analytical methods and databases of dental materials properties have proven useful in DVI (disaster victim identification) of a commercial plane crash in 2009, and in a number of other victim identification cases. Dental materials appear on the market with ever expanding frequency. With their advent, newer methods of restoration have been proposed and adopted in the dental office. Methods might include placing multiple layers of dental materials, where they have different properties including adhesion, viscosity, or working time. These different dental materials include filled adhesives, flowable resins, glass ionomer cements, composite resins, liners and sealants. With possible combinations of different materials in these restorations, the forensic odontologist is now confronted with a new difficulty; how to recognize each individual material. The question might be posed if it is even possible to perform this task. Furthermore, an odontologist might be called upon to identify a victim under difficult circumstances, such as when presented with fragmented or incinerated remains. In these circumstances the ability to identify specific dental materials could assist in the identification of the deceased. Key to use of this information is whether these new materials and methods are detailed in the dental chart. Visual or radiographic inspection may not reveal the presence of a restoration, let alone the possible complex nature of that restoration. This study demonstrates another scientific method in forensic dental identification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Views of Dental Providers on Primary Care Coordination at Chairside: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Mary E.; Birenz, Shirley; Gomes, Danni; Golembeski, Cynthia A.; Greenblatt, Ariel Port; Shelley, Donna; Russell, Stefanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a need for research to facilitate the widespread implementation, dissemination, and sustained utilization of evidence-based primary care screening, monitoring, and care coordination guidelines, thereby increasing the impact of dental hygienists’ actions on patients’ oral and general health. The aims of this formative study are to: (1) explore dental hygienists’ and dentists’ perspectives regarding the integration of primary care activities into routine dental care; and (2) assess the needs of dental hygienists and dentists regarding primary care coordination activities and use of information technology to obtain clinical information at chairside. Methods This qualitative study recruited ten hygienists and six dentists from ten New York City area dental offices with diverse patient mixes and volumes. A New York University faculty hygienist conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews, which were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of multilevel coding based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, resulting in emergent themes with accompanying categories. Results The dental hygienists and dentists interviewed as part of this study fail to use evidence-based guidelines to screen their patients for primary care sensitive conditions. Overwhelmingly, dental providers believe that tobacco use and poor diet contribute to oral disease, and report using electronic devices at chairside to obtain web-based health information. Conclusion Dental hygienists are well positioned to help facilitate greater integration of oral and general health care. Challenges include lack of evidence-based knowledge, coordination between dental hygienists and dentists, and systems-level support, with opportunities for improvement based upon a theory-driven framework. PMID:27340183

  15. Office hysteroscopy and adenomyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinas, Carlos Roger; Campo, Rudi

    2006-08-01

    Adenomyosis, the heterotopic presence of endometrial glands and stroma within the myometrium, has traditionally been diagnosed by the pathologist in hysterectomy specimens. However, the recent development of high-quality non-invasive techniques such as transvaginal sonography (TVS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hysteroscopy has renewed interest in diagnosing adenomyosis in the office prior to any treatment. Hysteroscopy offers the advantage of direct visualization of the uterine cavity, and since nowadays it is performed in the office, it can be offered as a first-line diagnostic tool for evaluation of uterine abnormalities in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding and/or infertility. The available data clearly indicate that high-quality mini-hysteroscopes, saline as a distension medium, and atraumatic insertion technique are essential for the success of office hysteroscopy. The procedure is indicated in any situation in which an intrauterine anomaly is suspected; it is immediately preceded by a physical exam and a TVS to evaluate uterine characteristics, and it is followed by a second TVS to take advantage of the intracavitary fluid for a contrast image of the uterus. Although diagnostic hysteroscopy does not provide pathognomonic signs for adenomyosis, some evidence suggests that irregular endometrium with endometrial defects, altered vascularization, and cystic haemorrhagic lesion are possibly associated with the entity. In addition to the direct visualization of the uterine cavity, the hysteroscopic approach offers the possibility of obtaining endometrial/myometrial biopsies under visual control. Since they can be performed in the office, the combination of TVS, fluid hysteroscopy and contrast sonography is therefore a powerful screening tool for detecting endometrial and myometrial abnormalities in association with adenomyosis.

  16. Officer Accessions Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-31

    officers select their own BOLC-B dates completely divorced of their unit assignment and that unit’s ARFORGEN cycle. We reschedule all FY10 cohort LTs...for BOLC-B based upon unit priority based upon number of days until LAD. Rescheduling all FY10 cohort LTs for BOLC-B based upon unit priority...with specialty branches (doctors, lawyers, nurses , chaplains, etc) which have minimal representation in BCT-level units.  DCs are not generally

  17. Office software Individual coaching

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    If one or several particular topics cause you sleepless nights, you can get the help of our trainer who will come to your workplace for a multiple of 1-hour slots . All fields in which our trainer can help are detailed in the course description in our training catalogue (Microsoft Office software, Adobe applications, i-applications etc.). Please discover these new courses in our catalogue! Tel. 74924

  18. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and red...

  19. Dental Mold: A Novel Formulation to Treat Common Dental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Soma; Roy, Gopa; Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2009-01-01

    Oral administration of antibiotics to treat dental problems mostly yields slow actions due to slow onset and hepatic “first-pass.” Again, commonly used dental paints are generally washed out by saliva within few hours of application. To overcome the challenges, polymeric molds to be placed on an affected tooth (during carries and gum problems) were prepared and evaluated in vitro for sustained drug release for prolonged local action. Here, amoxicillin trihydrate and lidocaine hydrochloride we...

  20. Development of a concept for radiation patients exposure assessment during dental X-ray examinations and statistical data acquisition for the determination of a diagnostic reference value; Erarbeitung eines Konzepts zur Ermittlung der Strahlenexposition von Patienten bei zahnmedizinischen Roentgenuntersuchungen und Erhebung von statistischen Daten zur Erstellung diagnostischer Referenzwerten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueppers, C.; Sering, M. [Oekoinstitut Freiburg e.V., Freiburg (Germany); Poppe, B.; Poplawski, A.; Looe, H.K.; Beyer, D.; Pfaffenberger, A.; Chofor, N.; Eenboom, F. [Pius Hospital, Oldenburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    The research project on the development a concept for radiation patients exposure assessment during dental X-ray examinations and statistical data acquisition for the determination of a diagnostic reference value includes the following issues: Fundamental facts: dental X-ray examination techniques, dose relevant factors and characteristics during X-ray examinations, radiation exposed organs during dental X-ray examinations, dose assessment based on phantoms. Materials and methodologies of the project: TLD measurements using the phantom, calculation of the effective dose during dental X-ray examinations, properties and settings of the reference facilities for the determination of radiation exposure, selection of dental offices, dosimetric measurements, data acquisition and statistical evaluation. Results of dosimetric examinations: results of dosimetric measurements at reference facilities, results of dosimetric measurements in dental offices. Discussion of the concept for the determination of the radiation exposure during dental X-ray examinations.

  1. MAIL OFFICE Outgoing mail

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The Mail Office once again wishes to remind users that the Organisation's mail service is exclusively reserved for official mail._\tAll outgoing official mail must arrive at the Mail Office unfranked and with the sender's name and Division clearly marked under the Organsation's address (see example below).Private mail must be taken to the Post Offices at Meyrin (63-R-011) or Prévessin (866-R-C02)._\tPlease only use 'PRIORITY' envelopes for mail requiring priority handling. Internal mail_\tPlease do not forget to indicate your correspondent's 'MAILBOX' number on the internal mail envelopes either in the specific box provided (new envelopes) or next to his or her name (old envelopes). This will facilitate and accelerate the handling of your mail. Mailbox numbers can be found on: Macintosh\tin the 'Mailbox' field in 'VIPER'PC\tin the 'Mailbox' field of 'Phone book'Web: http://www.cern.ch/CERN/Phone.htmlin the 'MailBox' fieldonce you have selected your correspondent's name...

  2. Magnetic resonance tomography and dental radiology (Dental-MRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, A.; Wien Univ.; Solar, P.; Ertl, L.; Nasel, C.; Homolka, P.; Youssefzadeh, S.; Schick, S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the usefulness of Dental-MRT for imaging of anatomic and pathologic conditions of the mandible and maxilla. Methods: Seven healthy volunteers, 5 patients with pulpitis, 9 patients with dentigerous cysts, 5 patients after tooth transplantation and 12 patients with atrophic mandibles were evaluated. Studies of the jaws using axial T1- and T2-weighted gradient echo and spin echo sequences in 2D and 3D technique have been to performed. The acquired images were reconstructed with a standard dental software package on a workstation as panoramic and cross sectional views of the mandible or maxilla. Results: The entire maxilla and mandibula, teeth, dental pulp and the content of the mandibular canal were well depicted. Patients with inflammatory disease of the pulp chamber demonstrate bone marrow edema in the periapical region. Dentigerous cysts and their relation to the surrounding structures are clearly shown. After contrast media application marked enhancement of the dental pulp can be found. Conclusion: Dental-MRT provides a valuable tool for visualization and detection of dental diseases. (orig.) [de

  3. Dental responsibility loadings and the relative value of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, D N; Ju, X; Brennan, D S

    2017-09-01

    To estimate responsibility loadings for a comprehensive list of dental services, providing a standardized unit of clinical work effort. Dentists (n = 2500) randomly sampled from the Australian Dental Association membership (2011) were randomly assigned to one of 25 panels. Panels were surveyed by questionnaires eliciting responsibility loadings for eight common dental services (core items) and approximately 12 other items unique to that questionnaire. In total, loadings were elicited for 299 items listed in the Australian Dental Schedule 9th Edition. Data were weighted to reflect the age and sex distribution of the workforce. To assess reliability, regression models assessed differences in core item loadings by panel assignment. Estimated loadings were described by reporting the median and mean. Response rate was 37%. Panel composition did not vary by practitioner characteristics. Core item loadings did not vary by panel assignment. Oral surgery and endodontic service areas had the highest proportion (91%) of services with median loadings ≥1.5, followed by prosthodontics (78%), periodontics (76%), orthodontics (63%), restorative (62%) and diagnostic services (31%). Preventive services had median loadings ≤1.25. Dental responsibility loadings estimated by this study can be applied in the development of relative value scales. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  5. CT in dental osseointegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, D.

    1992-01-01

    Computerised tomography (CT) plays a key role in the pre-surgical evaluation of the alveolar process for titanium dental implants. The successful replacement of lost teeth by tissue integrated tooth root implants is a major advance in clinical dentistry. The paper will discuss briefly the history of osseointegration and how CT is now involved in helping the edentulous patient. CT is considered as a quick and convenient method of obtaining excellent anatomical information about the maxilla. Conventional tomography is difficult to obtain and does not provide valuable cross-sectional images. Exact height and width calculations can be made as well as screening out patients with advanced bone resorption. 3 refs. 6 figs

  6. Improving access for Medicaid-insured children: focus on front-office personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, M; Riedy, C A; Milgrom, P

    1999-03-01

    Access to dental services for low-income children is limited. Front-office personnel play a role regarding dentists' participation in the Medicaid program. Subjects (N = 24) represented general dental offices in Spokane County, Wash., and included participants and nonparticipants in the Access to Baby and Child Dentistry, or ABCD, program, a dental society/community program aimed at expanding dental services provided to Medicaid-insured children. The authors stratified the participants according to the number of claims their practices submitted to Medicaid for ABCD children: non-ABCD, low-ABCD and high-ABCD. Five two-hour focus group sessions were conducted to determine participants' beliefs about, attitudes toward and experiences in serving this population. The authors' data analysis consisted of a comprehensive content review of participants' responses from transcripted audiotapes. They synthesized frequently mentioned concepts and ideas into relevant themes. The major factors affecting practices' participation in Medicaid were office policy on seeing Medicaid-insured patients; staff members' personal connection to Medicaid-insured patients; staff members' attitudes about Medicaid-insured patients; and staff members' perceptions of Medicaid-insured patients' barriers to care. The data suggest that factors affecting dentists' participation in the Medicaid program are more complex than the often-stated dissatisfactions with low reimbursement fees and hassles with paperwork. Efforts to increase dentist participation in serving Medicaid-insured patients will continue to be relatively ineffective until many of the concerns raised by this study's subjects are better understood and addressed.

  7. Dental therapeutic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zeenat; Jain, Nilu; Jain, Gaurav K; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahuja, Alka; Khar, Roop K; Ahmad, Farhan J

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of periodontal diseases as amenable to local antibiotherapy has resulted in a paradigmatic shift in treatment modalities of dental afflictions. Moreover the presence of antimicrobial resistance, surfacing of untoward reactions owing to systemic consumption of antibiotics has further advocated the use of local delivery of physiologically active substances into the periodontal pocket. While antimicrobials polymerized into acrylic strips, incorporated into biodegradable collagen and hollow permeable cellulose acetate fibers, multiparticulate systems, bio-absorbable dental materials, biodegradable gels/ointments, injectables, mucoadhesive microcapsules and nanospheres will be more amenable for direct placement into the periodontal pockets the lozenges, buccoadhesive tablets, discs or gels could be effectively used to mitigate the overall gingival inflammation. Whilst effecting controlled local delivery of a few milligram of an antibacterial agent within the gingival crevicular fluid for a longer period of time, maintaining therapeutic concentrations such delivery devices will circumvent all adverse effects to non- oral sites. Since the pioneering efforts of Goodson and Lindhe in 1989, delivery at gingival and subgingival sites has witnessed a considerable progress. The interest in locally active systems is evident from the patents being filed and granted. The present article shall dwell in reviewing the recent approaches being proffered in the field. Patents as by Shefer, et al. US patent, 6589562 dealing with multicomponent biodegradable bioadhesive controlled release system for oral care products, Lee, et al. 2001, US patent 6193994, encompassing a locally administrable, biodegradable and sustained-release pharmaceutical composition for periodontitis and process for preparation thereof and method of treating periodontal disease as suggested by Basara in 2004via US patent 6830757, shall be the types of intellectual property reviewed and presented in

  8. Annual Report 2008 -- Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2008-12-22

    It is with great pleasure that I present to you the 2008 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office. Also included are some financial comparisons with other DOE Laboratories and a glossary of commonly used acronyms.

  9. Effects of office innovation on office workers' health and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Eline M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of an innovative office concept (e.g. open-plan, flexible workplaces and a paperless office concept) on health and productivity among office workers was evaluated with questionnaires of 138 workers at baseline and 6 and 15 months afterwards. Work-related fatigue, general health,

  10. Dental Fear and Delayed Dental Care in Appalachia-West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R Constance

    2015-08-01

    The people of Appalachia-West Virginia are culturally unique and are known to have oral health disparities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental fear in relation to delayed dental care as a factor influencing oral health behaviors within this culture. A cross sectional study design was used. Participants were urgent care patients in a university dental clinic. The sample included 140 adults over age 18 years. The Dental Fear Survey was used to determine dental fear level. Self-report of delayed dental care was provided by the participants. The Dental Fear Survey was dichotomized at score 33, with higher scores indicating dental fear. The prevalence of dental fear was 47.1% (n=66). There was a significant association of dental fear and dental delay. The unadjusted odds ratio was 2.87 (95% CI: 1.17, 7.04; p=0.021). The adjusted odds ratio was 3.83 (95%CI: 1.14, 12.82; p=0.030), controlling for tobacco use, perceived oral health status, pain, and last dental visit. A difference in dental delay between men and women was not present in this sample. The only significant variable in delayed dental care was dental fear. In Appalachia-West Virginia, there remains a high level of dental fear, despite advances in dental care, techniques, and procedures. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  11. The Phenomenon of Dental Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle...... of dental fear (see fig. 1). The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists (see table 1 for examples). The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2......) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has...

  12. Musculoskeletal dysfunction in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakim A. Larbi and Dmitry Ye. Suyetenkov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights the comparative statistics of musculoskeletal system deseases depending on a type of dental method. The practical recommendations on prevention of diseases of joints, ligaments and spine were done.

  13. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi SS Toor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008 focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company.

  14. ARUSHA SCHOOL DENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS. 1. Pain due to ... increased intake of sweets and sweet snacks, ... to restrain production, import and marketing of modern sweets ... STRATEGY .... water we drink and bathe In. They are always ready to heip us or ...

  15. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed.

  16. Population-centered Risk- and Evidence-based Dental Interprofessional Care Team (PREDICT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Milgrom, Peter; Shirtcliff, R Michael; Bailit, Howard L; Huebner, Colleen E; Conrad, Douglas; Ludwig, Sharity; Mitchell, Melissa; Dysert, Jeanne; Allen, Gary; Scott, JoAnna; Mancl, Lloyd

    2015-06-20

    To improve the oral health of low-income children, innovations in dental delivery systems are needed, including community-based care, the use of expanded duty auxiliary dental personnel, capitation payments, and global budgets. This paper describes the protocol for PREDICT (Population-centered Risk- and Evidence-based Dental Interprofessional Care Team), an evaluation project to test the effectiveness of new delivery and payment systems for improving dental care and oral health. This is a parallel-group cluster randomized controlled trial. Fourteen rural Oregon counties with a publicly insured (Medicaid) population of 82,000 children (0 to 21 years old) and pregnant women served by a managed dental care organization are randomized into test and control counties. In the test intervention (PREDICT), allied dental personnel provide screening and preventive services in community settings and case managers serve as patient navigators to arrange referrals of children who need dentist services. The delivery system intervention is paired with a compensation system for high performance (pay-for-performance) with efficient performance monitoring. PREDICT focuses on the following: 1) identifying eligible children and gaining caregiver consent for services in community settings (for example, schools); 2) providing risk-based preventive and caries stabilization services efficiently at these settings; 3) providing curative care in dental clinics; and 4) incentivizing local delivery teams to meet performance benchmarks. In the control intervention, care is delivered in dental offices without performance incentives. The primary outcome is the prevalence of untreated dental caries. Other outcomes are related to process, structure and cost. Data are collected through patient and staff surveys, clinical examinations, and the review of health and administrative records. If effective, PREDICT is expected to substantially reduce disparities in dental care and oral health. PREDICT can be

  17. Factors affecting dental service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Ravangard, Ramin; Baldacchino, Donia

    2015-01-01

    Measuring dental clinic service quality is the first and most important factor in improving care. The quality provided plays an important role in patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors affecting dental service quality from the patients' viewpoint. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study was conducted in a dental clinic in Tehran between January and June 2014. A sample of 385 patients was selected from two work shifts using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. The data were collected, a self-administered questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study, based on the Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model of service quality which consisted of two parts: the patients' demographic characteristics and a 30-item questionnaire to measure the five dimensions of the service quality. The collected data were analysed using SPSS 21.0 and Amos 18.0 through some descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, as well as analytical methods, including confirmatory factor. Results showed that the correlation coefficients for all dimensions were higher than 0.5. In this model, assurance (regression weight=0.99) and tangibility (regression weight=0.86) had, respectively, the highest and lowest effects on dental service quality. The Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model is suitable to measure quality in dental services. The variables related to dental services quality have been made according to the model. This is a pioneering study that uses Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model and CFA in a dental setting. This study provides useful insights and guidance for dental service quality assurance.

  18. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enam...

  19. LED Technology for Dental Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Ou, Yiyu; Soerensen, L. H.

    LEDs have a large potential in many dental and oral applications. Areas such as photo polymerization, fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for LED based diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......LEDs have a large potential in many dental and oral applications. Areas such as photo polymerization, fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for LED based diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  20. Soft skills and dental education

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, M. A. G.; Abu Kasim, N. H.; Naimie, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses ...

  1. Virtuelt skrivebord med open office

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard

    2009-01-01

    SDUs erfaringer med projektet Port 22: en virtuel platform med Open Office som kontorpakke til studerende.......SDUs erfaringer med projektet Port 22: en virtuel platform med Open Office som kontorpakke til studerende....

  2. Office of Disability Employment Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Facebook Twitter RSS Email Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) Menu About ODEP ... LABOR DEPARTMENT Español A to Z Index Agencies Office of Inspector General Leadership Team Contact Us Subscribe ...

  3. The Office of Airline Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Office of Airline Information (OAI) mandate is to collect, validate, compile and disseminate data on airline traffic, performance, finances, and fares. Each quarter, BTS Office of Airline Information (OAI) processes more than 3,800 filings sub...

  4. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Graduate Students' and Faculty Perspectives on Dental Hygienists' Professional Role and the Potential Contribution of a Peer Teaching Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Martha J; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    The changing role of dental hygienists deserves dental and dental hygiene educators' attention. The first aim of this survey study was to assess University of Michigan dental, dental hygiene, and graduate students' and faculty members' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles; their attitudes and behaviors related to clinical interactions between dental and dental hygiene students; and perceived benefits of engaging dental hygiene students as peer teachers for dental students. The second aim was to assess whether one group of dental students' experiences with dental hygiene student peer teaching affected their perceptions of the dental hygiene profession. Survey respondents were 57 dental hygiene students in all three years of the program (response rate 60% to 100%); 476 dental students in all four years (response rate 56% to 100%); 28 dental and dental hygiene graduate students (response rate 28%); and 67 dental and dental hygiene faculty members (response rate 56%). Compared to the other groups, dental students reported the lowest average number of services dental hygienists can provide (p≤0.001) and the lowest average number of patient groups for which dental hygienists can provide periodontal care (ppeer teaching (ppeer teaching. After experiencing dental hygiene student peer teaching, the dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles, attitudes about clinical interactions with dental hygienists, and perceived benefits of dental hygiene student peer teachers improved and were more positive than the responses of their peers with no peer teaching experiences. These results suggest that dental hygiene student peer teaching may improve dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles and attitudes about intraprofessional care.

  5. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  6. Catalog of Completed Health Care and Dental Care Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Army Oral lie ith jaintenanc, AD A0()’ )’rtjr, ur, on 1x--ntal Itealth Status of Army lersonnel Jun 79 Current Dental Officer Practice and Uti ...HCSD Report No. 80-001B) Sep 80 Decentralized Inpatient Pharmacy Service Study AD) A)OU’,()’, (Job Satisfaction Between Pharmacists Perfotm irj Patient...Care Activities and Pharmacists Perfotrninq Dispensary or Supervisory Flinctions): Part C (HCSD Report No. 80-001C) Jun 30 Non-Poductive Factor

  7. Ergonomics in the office environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Theodore K.

    1993-01-01

    Perhaps the four most popular 'ergonomic' office culprits are: (1) the computer or visual display terminal (VDT); (2) the office chair; (3) the workstation; and (4) other automated equipment such as the facsimile machine, photocopier, etc. Among the ergonomics issues in the office environment are visual fatigue, musculoskeletal disorders, and radiation/electromagnetic (VLF,ELF) field exposure from VDT's. We address each of these in turn and then review some regulatory considerations regarding such stressors in the office and general industrial environment.

  8. [Social medicine and dental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünfeld, B

    1976-03-01

    Some socio-medical aspects of preventive and curative dental care. Preventive and early curative dental care is considered as an integral part of general health behavior in the individual. Different variables possibly determining such behavior are discussed. Demographic factors as age, sex, place of residence, as well as family and educational background, income and vocation seem to be of importance. A dental health delivery system free of charge to everyone in the age group 6-18, eventually up to 21 years has been available for several years in Norway. We assume that this has had a great impact upon the motivations for a positive atitude towards preventive care, particularly since economic barriers have been reduced simultaneously with shift in the popular value aspects of having good dental health status. Plans for a future incorporation of dental care into a total national health service, comprising the entire population, in order to make the delivery system feasible for everyone, will probably stimulate a still wider interest and motivation for preventive and early dental care.

  9. Is the Office Hour Obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Susan

    2013-01-01

    A colleague can't make a coffee date at a time the author proposes because it would conflict with his office hour. No student has actually made an appointment with him during the hour, but he is committed to being in his office as promised in case someone drops by. The author's reaction to her colleague's faithfulness to his posted office hour…

  10. Fermilab Education Office: Science Adventures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Education Office: Science Adventures Adventure Catalog Search for Adventures Calendar Class Facebook Group. Contact: Science Adventures Registrar, Education Office Fermilab, MS 777, P.O. Box 500 it again." Opportunities for Instructors The Education Office has openings for instructors who

  11. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-204-1600, Dental Health Associates, Paoli, Pennsylvania. [Nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, M.S.

    1985-06-01

    Area air and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for nitrous oxide at Dental Health Associates, Paoli, Pennsylvania on August 2, 1984. The evaluation was requested by a dental assistant because of general concern about the extent of nitrous oxide exposure, especially since the office was not equipped with a waste-anesthetic gas-scavenging system. The author recommends installing a waste anesthetic gas scavenging system with a dedicated exhaust. The nitrous oxide delivery and mixing system should be checked for leaks monthly and work practices for handling nitrous oxide should be improved.

  12. Office software Individual coaching

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    If one or several particular topics cause you sleepless nights, you can get help from our trainer who will come to your workplace for a multiple of 1-hour slots . All fields in which our trainer can help are detailed in the course description in our training catalogue (Microsoft Office software, Adobe applications, i-applications etc.) Discover these new courses in our catalogue! http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 Technical Training Service Technical.Training@cern.ch Tel 74924

  13. Office lighting systems: Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagnino, U. (ENEL, Milan (Italy))

    1990-09-01

    Relative to office lighting systems, in particular, those making use of tubular fluorescent lamps, currently available on the international market, this paper tries to develop lighting system, design optimization criteria. The comparative assessment of the various design possibilities considers operating cost, energy consumption, and occupational comfort/safety aspects such as lighting level uniformity and equilibrium, reduction of glare and reflection, natural/artificial lighting balance, programmed switching, computerized control systems for multi-use requirements in large areas, programmed maintenance for greater efficiency and reliability.

  14. Dental pain and dental treatment of young children attending the general dental service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsom, K M; Tickle, M; Blinkhorn, A S

    2002-03-09

    The objective was to examine the relationship between dental pain (and its sequelae), and the extent of restorative care provided for primary molars, amongst children who regularly attend a general dental practitioner. A retrospective review of the clinical case notes of 677 children with caries who attended 50 general dental practitioners on a regular basis. Analyses were performed at the subject level. Logistic regression models were fitted for the dependent variables whether or not pain, a dental extraction for pain or sepsis and a course of antibiotics was recorded, after taking into account the proportion of carious teeth that were restored, the total number of carious teeth, the age caries was first recorded, gender and the clustering of the subjects within dental practices. Almost half of the children in the study (48%) were recorded as having at least one episode of pain. Total decay experience in the primary molars was a significant predictor of pain, extraction due to pain or sepsis and prescription of antibiotics. There was no significant association between the proportion of carious teeth restored and each of the three dependent variables. For those children who regularly attend their general dental practitioner and who have decay in their primary molars, dental pain is a common finding. Total decay experience in primary molars is the principal predictor of pain, extraction due to pain and the need for antibiotics, whilst the level of restorative care in the primary dentition is less important. In order to reduce the incidence of dental pain in young children, effective methods of preventing caries at the individual and public health levels need to be expanded.

  15. Organisational aspects of dental practices: do dental students think like patients or like general dental practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, R E; Brands, W G; Bronkhorst, E M; Welie, J V M; Truin, G J

    2013-02-01

    In view of transparency in health care, the widespread desire for more patient-centred care, and in an attempt to facilitate educational programmes that effectively respond to these changes, two research questions are formulated: (i) How do dental students rate the importance of various organisational aspects of dental practices compared with dental patients and general dental practitioners (GDPs), and what prescripts, defined as specific operational responsibilities of GDPs in these matters, do dental students propose? and (ii) In doing so, do students resemble patients or GDPs? In two survey studies, dental students (n = 198), patients (n = 3127) and GDPs (n = 303) were asked to rate by questionnaire the importance of 41 organisational aspects of a general dental practice and proposed specific operational responsibilities ('prescripts'). Seven of 41 aspects were rated as important by the majority of the students. Although in a different rank order, three aspects were predominantly selected by all three groups: continuing education, accessibility by telephone and Dutch-speaking GDP. For most aspects, significant differences were found between the prescripts proposed by students and those proposed by patients, and few differences were found between students and GDPs. The findings do not permit the general conclusion that the views of dental students resemble those of patients or GPDs. Looking at the overall rank order, the three respondent groups showed a great resemblance although significant differences were found for specific aspects. With regard to the proposed prescripts, students showed realistic views and the majority wants to participate in continuing education and work with protocols and guidelines. In this, they tend to resemble GDPs more than they resemble patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Association between Childhood Dental Experiences and Dental Fear among Dental, Psychology and Mathematics Undergraduates in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júnia M. Serra-Negra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between childhood dental experiences and dental fear in adulthood among dentistry, psychology and mathematics undergraduate students. A cross-sectional study of 1,256 students from the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, was performed. Students responded to the Brazilian version of the Dental Fear Survey (DFS and a questionnaire regarding previous dental experiences. Both the DFS and the questionnaire were self-administered. Association was tested using descriptive, bivariate and multivariate linear regression analysis, with a 5% significance level. Dentistry undergraduates reported lower scores than psychology (p < 0.001 and mathematics undergraduates (p < 0.05 for all three dimensions of the DFS. Negative dental experiences in childhood was associated with dimensions of Avoidance (B = 2.70, p < 0.001, Physiological arousal (B = 1.42, p < 0.001 and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 3.44, p < 0.001. The reason for first visit to dentist was associated with dimensions of Physiological arousal (B = 0.76, p < 0.01 and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 1.29, p < 0.01. Dentists should be encouraged to evaluate the dental fear of their patients before treatment. The DFS has been found to be an effective instrument for this purpose.

  17. Mastering VBA for Office 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to the language used to customize Microsoft Office. Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access. This complete guide shows both IT professionals and novice developers how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for specific business needs.: Office 2010 is the leading productivity suite, and the VBA language enables customizations of all the Office programs; this complete guide gives both novice and experience

  18. Teach yourself visually Office 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Marmel, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Learn the new Microsoft Office suite the easy, visual way Microsoft Office 2013 is a power-packed suite of office productivity tools including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, and Publisher. This easy-to-use visual guide covers the basics of all six programs, with step-by-step instructions and full-color screen shots showing what you should see at each step. You'll also learn about using Office Internet and graphics tools, while the additional examples and advice scattered through the book give you tips on maximizing the Office suite. If you learn best when you can see how

  19. 76 FR 5391 - Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science Policy, Office of the Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science Policy, Office of the Director Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB), February...

  20. An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Rachlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

    1980-01-01

    To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology

  1. State-sponsored dental terrorism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, M

    2017-11-24

    Has the state's manipulation of the NHS dental contract systems deliberately, or accidentally, had corrupting effects on the behaviours of some members of the dental profession? If the answer is 'possibly' or 'probably', then obvious questions that follow include, 'was this done deliberately' and if so, 'why'? Could this have been done for largely altruistic reasons, or was it done to achieve government control for minimum cost? Might this have been undertaken for political, financial or ideological reasons - regardless of any adverse longer term consequences for some patients or for some dental professionals? Might it have been done to take greater control of the dental profession on the grounds that all professions are a conspiracy against the laity, as the mildly paranoid George Bernard Shaw once alleged? Is it possible that some of this manipulation might have been done to help to disempower yet another profession, allegedly to 'modernise it', but perhaps to enslave it for its own reasons? Was this just another example of some statist politicians wanting to interfere in all aspects of UK society, regardless of their lack of specific understanding, or any proven expertise, in many areas? Could the state's manipulation of contracts and processes be regarded as an abuse of power by a virtual monopoly, which has been used to control a largely altruistic profession by imposing corrupting NHS dental contract systems with the most recent one involving 'units of dental activity' (UDAs)? Perhaps it was really about some politicians wanting ever more power, control or money - their usual drivers - with the dental and medical professions accidentally becoming casualties?

  2. Health promotion and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Marisa; Jardim, Juliana Jobim; Alves, Luana Severo

    2010-01-01

    The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene), among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene) should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  3. Health promotion and dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Maltz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene, among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  4. Dental Education in Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L. Eubanks

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is among the most prevalent canine dis-eases affecting over 75% of dogs. Strengthening of the human-animal bond and the increasing education of the aver-age pet owner, have fostered a heightened awareness of periodontal care in dogs and cats. Industry support has further assisted the small animal veterinarian in providing quality dental treatments and prevention. As recently as the 1990’s, veterinary curriculums contained little or no dental training. That trend is changing as nearly every one of the 28 US Colleges of Veterinary Medicine offers some level of small animal dentistry during the four-year curriculum. Primary areas of focus are on client education, the treatment of periodontal disease, dental prophylaxis, dental radiology, endodontics, exodontics and pain control. Students receive instruction in dental anatomy during their di-dactic curriculum and later experience clinical cases. Graduate DVMs can attend a variety of continuing education courses and even choose to specialize in veterinary dentistry in both small animals and horses. Through the efforts of organizations such as the American Veterinary Dental So-ciety, The American Veterinary Dental College and The Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, many veterinarians have been able to advance their skills in dentistry and improve animal welfare. Increasing ex-pectations of the pet-owning public coupled with the recent advancements of training opportunities available for vete-rinary students, graduate DVMs and certified veterinary technicians make veterinary dentistry an emerging practice-builder among the most successful small animal hospitals.

  5. How the marketing research affects the improvement in the dental doctor-patient relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronela Iuliana GEANGU

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The relation between provider and customer in the services area, mainly medical, represents a fundamental desideratum. This type of relation derives from a two-way involvement of both parts at the entire marketing mix level. The base of new marketing strategies that imply effective relation models can only be built by setting out an ample time related investigation process of the mechanisms pertaining to the customer’s perception of the quality and the coordinates of the relationship with the provider. The article aims to investigate the mechanism leading to customer retention in the case of dental offices, both from the perspective of customers and providers. The authors conducted an in-depth interview-type qualitative research, which identified and pointed out the extent to which the marketing activity, as seen from the perspective of specific principles and scientific methodology, is implemented in the dental offices in Bucharest. The research was also focused on the perception of specialists, dental office/clinics managers or owners regarding the concept of customer retention, elements which could lead to keeping customers, and the image of the ideal office from the perspective of services adjusted to consumers.

  6. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  7. THERMOVISION IN DENTAL ALLERGOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to optimize the thermal imaging method for evaluation of skin patch test reactions in dental clinical allergology. A total of 30 patients without a history of allergic diseases were included in the study - 12 men and 18 women, age 21 - 32 years. Skin patch testing was performed with a set of 20 standardized allergens. The thermographic investigations were performed with the FlirT620 infrared camera with a temperature resolution of 0,06°C. Thermograms were analysed using the Flir Reporter Professional software 2013. The statistical analysis of the results revealed an average correlation between the clinical evaluation of the results according to the cheme of ICDRG and the thermal image diagnostic (rphi = 0.538, p = 0.001. Absolute matching of clinical and thermal image results was observed only for the negative ones. For the clinically positive skin patch results matching with thermal image method was observed in 60.7% of the cases. Optimization of thermal imaging as a method for evaluation of skin patch test results could serve as a safe, accurate and non-invasive method, especially to distinguish weak (+, doubtful and irritant reactions, although not standardized criteria to distinguish these reactions have been elaborated yet. Crucial factor for the accurate interpretation of results is the precise diagnosing performed by well-trained physicians in this area, with clinical relevance, to minimize the role of subjective factors.

  8. Utilization of dental health services by Danish adolescents attending private or public dental health care systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Petersen, Poul Erik; Bastholm, Annelise

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the study were: 1) to describe the choice of dental care system among 16-year-olds, 2) to describe the utilization of dental services among 16-17-year-olds enrolled in either public or private dental care systems, and to compare the dental services provided by the alternative...

  9. The etiology of childhood dental fear: The role of dental and conditioning experiences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berge, M.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relative importance of invasive treatment experiences in the acquisition of dental fear in children. For this purpose, the complete dental history of 401 children (aged 5-10 years) was studied. The level of dental fear in these children was assessed using the Dental

  10. 78 FR 2647 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    .... FDA-2012-N-0677] Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant AGENCY: Food...) is proposing to reclassify the blade- form endosseous dental implant, a preamendments class III... proposing to revise the classification of blade-form endosseous dental implants. DATES: Submit either...

  11. A scientific forecast on dental research output within the next 20 years using exponential smoothing algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Kolahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To report a scientific forecast of the number of published dental articles in the next 20 years. Materials and Methods: On October 12, 2016, to find all dental articles, PubMed was searched via the query “1800/1/1”[PDAT]: “2015/12/31”[PDAT] AND jsubsetd [text]. Relevant limitations were applied to find dental clinical trials, review articles, and free full-text dental articles. Consequently, all PubMed records were exported to a CSV file. To forecast the future dental research output using existing time-based data, the Exponential Triple Smoothing algorithm was used, which is an advanced machine learning algorithm. Data were analyzed by Microsoft Office Excel 2016. Results: Seventy-five (1940–2015 years of human attempts to publish dental articles were explored and 572490 records were found, from which 27244 (4.75% articles were free full-text, 19238 (3.36% were clinical trials, and 31853 (5.56% were reviews. Researchers will publish 19195 dental articles in 2036, among which 917 (4.77% articles will be clinical trials, 1474 (7.67% will be review articles, and 5482 (28.55% will be free full-text articles. Conclusion: Changes may be because of the quantity of research funds. The number of all types of dental articles will increase with an acceptable rate over the next 20 years. Of more interest, the number of free full-text articles will grow more rapidly than other article types.

  12. Dental anxiety reduction and dental attendance after treatment in a dental fear clinic: A follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartman, I.H.A.; de Jongh, A.; Makkes, P.C.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess treatment outcome in terms of dental anxiety reduction at a post-treatment assessment and dental anxiety reduction and dental attendance one year later. Furthermore, it was determined to what extent psychopathological characteristics were related to

  13. Curriculum Guidelines for Clinical Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for clinical dental hygiene include definitions, notes on the interrelationship of courses, an overview of course objectives, and suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific objectives, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  14. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    DENTAL CARE EVERY DAY A Caregiver’s Guide U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Contents Getting Started ................................................................................ 2 Three ...

  15. Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digestive System & How it Works Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Celiac disease manifestations ... affecting any organ or body system. One manifestation—dental enamel defects—can help dentists and other health ...

  16. FastStats: Oral and Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Oral and Dental Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... States, 2016, table 60 [PDF – 9.8 MB] Dental visits Percent of children aged 2-17 years ...

  17. A concise overview of dental implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrewaju Abdurrazaq Taiwo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of osseointegrated dental implants has resulted in several applications in diverse clinical settings. Hence, has contributed to the suitable replacement of missing teeth and the realization of an optimal facial appearance. This paper describes the benefits, applications, contraindications, and complications of dental implants in contemporary dental practice. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was undertaken in PUBMED without time restriction for appropriate English papers on dental implants based on a series of keywords in different combinations. Results: Fifty-eight acceptable, relevant articles were selected for review. The review identified the various components of dental implants, classification, and brands. It also looked at osseointegration and factors promoting and inimical to it. It also explored primary and secondary stability; and patients' selection for a dental implant. Complications of dental implants were also highlighted. Conclusion: With over 95% success rate, dental implants remain the gold standard for achieving aesthetic and functional oral rehabilitation.

  18. Chronic Cutaneous Draining Sinus of Dental Origin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endodontics, JSS Dental College and Hospital, Mysore, Karnataka, India. Abstract ... Keywords: Dental fistula, Localized drug delivery, Root canal treatment. Access this article ... combination of intra-canal irrigants was selected. Hypochlorite.

  19. Development of dental anxiety in schoolchildren

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Fernanda C.; Lima, Rodrigo A.; de Barros, Mauro V.G.

    2017-01-01

    's health-related behaviours. Additionally, the children's dental caries experience was clinically evaluated to obtain information about DMFT/dmft (decayed, filled and missing teeth) indices. Using the Dental Anxiety Question, children whose parents responded “yes” to the prompt “Is he/she very afraid...... used medication chronically had a 2.1 times greater likelihood of having high dental anxiety. Furthermore, children whose parents reported high dental anxiety had a 2.6 times greater likelihood of having high dental anxiety themselves. A one-unit increase in a child's dmft score increased the risk...... of high dental anxiety by 1.1 times at follow-up. Conclusion: After two years, the incidence of high dental anxiety was 15.0%. Poor oral health, unstable general health and parents with high dental anxiety were factors that were associated with this type of anxiety in schoolchildren. It is important...

  20. Statistical modeling of dental unit water bacterial test kit performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mark E; Harte, Jennifer A; Stone, Mark E; O'Connor, Karen H; Coen, Michael L; Cullum, Malford E

    2007-01-01

    While it is important to monitor dental water quality, it is unclear whether in-office test kits provide bacterial counts comparable to the gold standard method (R2A). Studies were conducted on specimens with known bacterial concentrations, and from dental units, to evaluate test kit accuracy across a range of bacterial types and loads. Colony forming units (CFU) were counted for samples from each source, using R2A and two types of test kits, and conformity to Poisson distribution expectations was evaluated. Poisson regression was used to test for effects of source and device, and to estimate rate ratios for kits relative to R2A. For all devices, distributions were Poisson for low CFU/mL when only beige-pigmented bacteria were considered. For higher counts, R2A remained Poisson, but kits exhibited over-dispersion. Both kits undercounted relative to R2A, but the degree of undercounting was reasonably stable. Kits did not grow pink-pigmented bacteria from dental-unit water identified as Methylobacterium rhodesianum. Only one of the test kits provided results with adequate reliability at higher bacterial concentrations. Undercount bias could be estimated for this device and used to adjust test kit results. Insensitivity to methylobacteria spp. is problematic.

  1. Configuration Control Office

    CERN Multimedia

    Beltramello, O

    In order to enable Technical Coordination to manage the detector configuration and to be aware of all changes in this configuration, a baseline of the envelopes has been created in April 2001. Fifteen system and multi-system envelope drawings have been approved and baselined. An EDMS file is associated with each approved envelope, which provides a list of the current known unsolved conflicts related to the envelope and a list of remaining drawing inconsistencies to be corrected. The envelope status with the associated drawings and EDMS file can be found on the web at this adress: http://atlasinfo.cern.ch/Atlas/TCOORD/Activities/Installation/Configuration/ Any modification in the baseline has to be requested via the Engineering Change Requests. The procedure can be found under: http://atlasinfo.cern.ch/Atlas/TCOORD/Activities/TcOffice/Quality/ECR/ TC will review all the systems envelopes in the near future and manage conflict resolution with the collaboration of the systems.

  2. Badge Office Process Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haurykiewicz, John Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dinehart, Timothy Grant [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Robert Young [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-12

    The purpose of this process analysis was to analyze the Badge Offices’ current processes from a systems perspective and consider ways of pursuing objectives set forth by SEC-PS, namely increased customer flow (throughput) and reduced customer wait times. Information for the analysis was gathered for the project primarily through Badge Office Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and in-person observation of prevailing processes. Using the information gathered, a process simulation model was constructed to represent current operations and allow assessment of potential process changes relative to factors mentioned previously. The overall purpose of the analysis was to provide SEC-PS management with information and recommendations to serve as a basis for additional focused study and areas for potential process improvements in the future.

  3. INEL Sample Management Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Sample Management Office (SMO) was formed as part of the EG ampersand G Idaho Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) in June, 1990. Since then, the SMO has been recognized and sought out by other prime contractors and programs at the INEL. Since December 1991, the DOE-ID Division Directors for the Environmental Restoration Division and Waste Management Division supported the expansion of the INEL ERP SMO into the INEL site wide SMO. The INEL SMO serves as a point of contact for multiple environmental analytical chemistry and laboratory issues (e.g., capacity, capability). The SMO chemists work with project managers during planning to help develop data quality objectives, select appropriate analytical methods, identify special analytical services needs, identify a source for the services, and ensure that requirements for sampling and analysis (e.g., preservations, sample volumes) are clear and technically accurate. The SMO chemists also prepare work scope statements for the laboratories performing the analyses

  4. Physician offices marketing: assessing patients' views of office visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Dennis; Chandra, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Physician offices often lack the sense of incorporating appropriate strategies to make their facilities as marketer of their services. The patient experience at a physician's office not only incorporates the care they receive from the physician but also the other non-healthcare related aspects, such as the behavior of non-health professionals as well as the appearance of the facility itself. This paper is based on a primary research conducted to assess what patients assess from a physician office visit.

  5. The office based CHIVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passariello F

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fausto Passariello,1 Stefano Ermini,2 Massimo Cappelli,3 Roberto Delfrate,4 Claude Franceschi5 1Centro Diagnostico Aquarius, Napoli, Italy; 2Private Practice, Grassina, Italy; 3Private Practice, Firenze, Italy; 4Casa di Cure Figlie di Maria, Cremona, Italy; 5Hospital St Joseph, Service d'Explorations Vasculaires, Paris, France Abstract: The cure Conservatrice Hémodynamique de l'Insuffisance Veineuse en Ambulatoire (CHIVA can be office based (OB. The OB-CHIVA protocol is aimed at transferring CHIVA procedures to specialists rooms. The protocol will check the feasibility of OB-CHIVA, data pertaining to recurrence, and will offer the opportunity to study saphenous femoral junction (SFJ stump evolution, the role of the washing vessels and the arch recanalization rate, and gather new data about the effect of the length of the treated saphenous vein. A simplified diagnostic procedure will allow an essential ultrasound examination of the venous net while a schematic and easily readable algorithm guides therapeutic choices. The Riobamba draining crossotomy (RDC tactic is composed of a set of OB procedures. While some of these procedures are, at the moment, only proposals, others are already applied. Devices generally used in ablative procedures such as Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER, radio frequency, steam, and mechanical devices are used in this context to serve to conservative interventions for CHIVA. New techniques have also been proposed for devalvulation and tributary disconnection. Detailed follow-up is necessary in order to determine the effects of therapy and possible disease evolution. Finally, information is added about the informed consent and the ethical considerations of OB-CHIVA research. Keywords: CHIVA, office based procedures, LASER, RF, steam

  6. Research in a dental practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardal, Oystein

    2004-09-01

    There is a shortage of research from dental practice. The aim of this article is to stimulate more interest in dental research. This is done by explaining the basic principles of doing research in a dental practice setting. Examples are taken from the author's own practice. Emphasis is placed on the following points: how to develop and research ideas; factors specific to dental practice; how articles and journals are rated; making a protocol for the study; examiners' reliability and statistical analysis.

  7. Nutrition and Experimental Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    田村, 俊吉; タムラ, シュンキチ; Shunkichi, TAMURA

    1983-01-01

    Nutrition is an effective factor for the inhibition of the development of dental caries. The constitution of diet has a strong bearing on the development of dental caries. However the theoretical background regarding the development of dental caries has not been sastifactorily established. Experimentally, we have clarified the relation of nutrition and dental caries in rats. Experimental animals used in this study were Wistar strain Albino rats (closed colony, Tamura, 1950). Young rats of 21 ...

  8. Perception of Dental Professionals towards Biostatistics

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Manu; Gupta, Mudit; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Biostatistics is becoming an integral part of dental sciences. Awareness regarding the subject is not thoroughly assessed in the field of dentistry. So the study was conducted to assess dental professionals' knowledge, attitude, and perception toward biostatistics at an academic dental institution. An anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among all the faculty and postgraduate students of two dental colleges in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh. The responses were assessed on 5-...

  9. Premature dental eruption: report of case.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    2011-08-05

    This case report reviews the variability of dental eruption and the possible sequelae. Dental eruption of the permanent teeth in cleft palate children may be variable, with delayed eruption the most common phenomenon. A case of premature dental eruption of a maxillary left first premolar is demonstrated, however, in a five-year-old male. This localized premature dental eruption anomaly was attributed to early extraction of the primary dentition, due to caries.

  10. Stress and burnout among Swiss dental residents

    OpenAIRE

    Divaris, Kimon; Lai, Caroline S; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Stress and burnout have been well-documented in graduate medical and undergraduate dental education, but studies among dental graduate students and residents are sparse. The purpose of this investigation was to examine perceived stressors and three dimensions of burnout among dental residents enrolled in the University of Bern, Switzerland. Thirty-six residents enrolled in five specialty programmes were administered the Graduate Dental Environment Stress (GDES30) questionnaire and the Maslach...

  11. United States Army Officer Professional Development: Black Officers' Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Craig

    1997-01-01

    .... Even so, they have not fared statistically as well as their majority contemporaries. These statistics pose interesting questions about black officer professional development and career progress...

  12. Dental Environmental Noise Evaluation and Health Risk Model Construction to Dental Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Kuen Wai; Wong, Hai Ming; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2017-01-01

    Occupational noise is unavoidably produced from dental equipment, building facilities, and human voices in the dental environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of occupational noise exposure on the dental professionals’ health condition. The psychoacoustics approach noise exposure assessment followed by the health risk assessment was carried on at the paediatric dentistry clinic and the dental laboratory in the Prince Philip Dental Hospital of Hong Kong. The A-weigh...

  13. Dental Workforce Availability and Dental Services Utilization in Appalachia: A Geospatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Wiener, R. Constance

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is considerable variation in dental services utilization across Appalachian counties, and a plausible explanation is that individuals in some geographical areas do not utilize dental care due to dental workforce shortage. We conducted an ecological study on dental workforce availability and dental services utilization in Appalachia. Methods We derived county-level (n = 364) data on demographic, socio-economic characteristics and dental services utilization in Appalachia from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) using person-level data. We obtained county-level dental workforce availability and physician-to-population ratio estimates from Area Health Resource File, and linked them to the county-level BRFSS data. The dependent variable was the proportion using dental services within the last year in each county (ranging from 16.6% to 91.0%). We described the association between dental workforce availability and dental services utilization using ordinary least squares regression and spatial regression techniques. Spatial analyses consisted of bivariate Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) and geographically weighted regression (GWR). Results Bivariate LISA showed that counties in the central and southern Appalachian regions had significant (p dental workforce availability, low percent dental services utilization). GWR revealed considerable local variations in the association between dental utilization and dental workforce availability. In the multivariate GWR models, 8.5% (t-statistics >1.96) and 13.45% (t-statistics >1.96) of counties showed positive and statistically significant relationships between the dental services utilization and workforce availability of dentists and dental hygienists, respectively. Conclusions Dental workforce availability was associated with dental services utilization in the Appalachian region; however, this association was not statistically significant in all counties. The findings suggest

  14. Dental Anomalies and Dental Age Assessment in Treated Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Khojastepour, L; Zareifar, S; Ebrahimi, M

    2014-01-01

    Background This cross sectional study was performed to evaluate dental ages and incidence of dental anomalies in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods and materials A total of 25 ALL patient who passed at least 2 years of chemotherapy and 25 healthy sex and age matched children were evaluated. Dental age as well as dental anomalies in shape, size, number, and structure was recorded based on their panoramic radiographies which were taken for dental purposes. Results ...

  15. 49 CFR 800.25 - Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of Highway Safety, Office of Marine Safety... Offices of Aviation, Railroad, Highway, Marine, and Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety, the authority... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation...

  16. Nigerian Dental Technology Students and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study of dental technology students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology. Enugu, Nigeria ... HIV-infected individuals is also known to be achieved through the provision of ... to care for HIV-infected patients among this group of dental professionals ..... Table 7: Willingness to care versus training needs on care.

  17. First-Aid Algorithms in Dental Avulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginska, Joanna; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Almost one fourth of traumatic dental injuries occur at schools or in their surroundings. Prevalence of tooth avulsion varies from 0.5% to 16% of all cases of dental trauma. Children with dental avulsion may seek help from school nurses so they should be able to provide first-aid treatment. However, many studies showed that the general level of…

  18. A Cognitive Task Analysis for Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; Beemsterboer, Phyllis L.; Johnson, Lynn A.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Steinberg, Linda S.; Breyer, F. Jay

    2000-01-01

    As part of the development of a scoring algorithm for a simulation-based dental hygiene initial licensure examination, this effort conducted a task analysis of the dental hygiene domain. Broad classes of behaviors that distinguish along the dental hygiene expert-novice continuum were identified and applied to the design of nine paper-based cases…

  19. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-01-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities. PMID:24082719

  20. Dental anxiety: Investigative and management techniques often ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Information on the pattern of dental anxiety management in Nigeria is currently not available. Aim: The study was designed to determine the awareness and frequency of application of dental anxiety assessment questionnaires as well as the current pattern in the management of dental anxiety in Nigeria.

  1. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Procedure‑related and patient‑related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants to a major extent. Hence, we aimed to evaluate and analyze various systemic factors in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: Fifty‑one patients were included in the study, in which a total of 110 dental ...

  2. Dental erosion: prevalence, incidence, and distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, D.H.J.; Amaechi, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erosion is one of the most common dental diseases and it is a growing problem. Numerous epidemiological studies have investigated the prevalence of dental erosion. For these studies different cross sections of the population are investigated. Large differences were found between countries,

  3. Caries detection in dental radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Caries, or the decay of teeth are difficult to automatically detect in dental radiographs because of the small area of the image that is occupied by the decay. Images of dental radiographs has distinct regions of homogeneous gray levels, and therefore naturally lead to a segmentation based automatic caries detection algorithm. This paper describes a method for caries detection based on a multiclass, area independent thresholding and segmenting scheme. This multiclass thresholding algorithm is an extension of the uniform error threshold, an area independent, distribution free thresholding method used for images of only two classes of objects. The authors first consider the problem of caries detection and the image features that characterize the presence of caries. Next, the uniform error threshold is reviewed, and the general multiclass uniform error threshold algorithm is presented. This algorithm is used to automatically detect caries in dental radiographs

  4. Improving osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; Meirelles, Luiz

    2010-03-01

    In the beginning of implantology, the procedures adopted for treating patients were performed in two surgical phases with an interval of 3-6 months. Nowadays, it is possible to insert and load a dental implant in the same surgical procedure. This change is due to several factors, such as improvement of surgical technique, modifications of the implant design, increased quality of implant manufacturing, development of the surgical instruments' quality, careful patient screening and adequate treatment of the implant surface. The clinical results show that adequate treatment of surfaces is crucial for reducing healing time and treating at-risk patients. The surface properties of dental implants can be significantly improved at the manufacturing stage, affecting cells' activity during the healing phase that will ultimately determine the host tissue response, a fundamental requirement for clinical success. This review focuses on different types of dental implant surfaces and the influence of surface characteristics on osseointegration.

  5. Dental worm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Fiorino, Sirio

    2016-12-01

    During human evolution, the period in which groups of humans stopped harvesting fruits and seeds growing wild and introduced the cultivation of cereals as well as the domestication of animals represents a very important event. This circumstance had a considerable impact on human pathocenosis, increasing the risk of infectious diseases of animal origin. The aim of this review was to summarise the archaeological and palaeo-pathological evidence in the literature concerning this topic. Starting from early prehistory (about 1.5 million years ago) up to the historical period, several authors have described the changes in human habits and the consequent changes in food supply, leading to the transition from a protein- to a carbohydrate-rich diet across a broad interval of time. This led to additional problems for human health. The increased accumulation of carbohydrate debris in the odonto-stomatological apparatus, without the appropriate use of hygiene in the oral cavity, increased the risk of infectious disease involving the mouth. Therefore, since the Neolithic period there has been a higher risk of tooth caries, abscesses, deep infection of the teeth roots, reaching also the mandibular and maxillary bone. Several hypotheses have been proposed by the distinct civilizations, which have alternated in the different ages, to explain the cause of these human health problems, including the idea that a "dental worm" could be involved in this process, such as in the Sumerian period. We describe and discuss further modifications of this theory, developed in Egypt, Assyria, Babylon, China, Greece, in Etruscan cities and in Rome in ancient times as well as in the Middle Ages, and the evolution of scientific thought on this topic in the past 300 years. In addition, the results of some palaeo-pathological studies, which were performed on human remains, such as the maxillary bone and teeth, mainly in different geographical areas in Italy, are examined and reported.

  6. Creation of a scholars program in dental leadership (SPDL) for dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S; Green, Thomas G; Polverini, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    There is a great need for leaders in the dental profession. As technological advances make our world smaller and our lives faster and more complex, we as a profession face challenges and opportunities that are evolving. Many of the changes in the scope and mode of practice will require new and different approaches. Meeting these challenges will require changes in how we as dental professionals do business; interact with our patients, other stakeholders, and health care providers; and educate our future colleagues. The purposeful incorporation of leadership education into dental and dental hygiene curricula represents an important departure from existing paradigms-but will help prepare our students to address these challenges. This article provides an overview of the development of a Scholars Program in Dental Leadership (SPDL) at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Our aim for the program is to create a learning environment that fosters leadership development, so that students are prepared and motivated to assume leadership positions in the profession and their communities.

  7. Low-dose dental CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustemeyer, P.; Eich, H.T.; John-Mikolajewski, V.; Mueller, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The intention of this study was to reduce patient dose during dental CT in the planning for osseointegrated implants. Methods and Materials: Dental CTs were performed with a spiral CT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens) and a dental software package. Use of the usual dental CT technique (120 kVp; 165 mA, 1 s rotation time, 165 mAs; pitch factor 1) was compared with a new protocol (120 kVp; 50 mA; 0.7 s rotation time; 35 mAs; pitch factor 2) which delivered the best image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose, as tested in a preceding study. Image quality was analysed using a human anatomic head preparation. Four radiologists analysed the images independently. A Wilcoxon rank pair-test was used for statistic evaluation. The doses to the thyroid gland, the active bone marrow, the salivary glands, and the eye lens were determined in a tissue-equivalent phantom (Alderson-Rando Phantom) with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters at the appropriate locations. Results: By mAs reduction from 165 to 35 and using a pitch factor of 2, the radiation dose could be reduced by a factor of nine (max.) (e.g., the bone marrow dose could be reduced from 23.6 mSv to 2.9 mSv, eye lens from 0.5 mSv to 0.3 mSv, thyroid gland from 2.5 mSv to 0.5 mSv, parotid glands from 2.3 mSv to 0.4 mSv). The dose reduction did not lead to an actual loss of image quality or diagnostic information. Conclusion: A considerable dose reduction without loss of diagnostic information is achievable in dental CT. Dosereducing examination protocols like the one presented may further expand the use of preoperative dental CT. (orig.) [de

  8. Becoming an Officer of Consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    ndupress .ndu.edu   issue 44, 1st quarter 2007  /  JFQ        6 Becoming an officer of Consequence m uch of the literature about military history...commander become officers of consequence because their commanders value their judgment and seek their counsel when making difficult choices...COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Becoming an Officer of Consequence 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  9. AGE AND REASONS OF THE FIRST DENTAL VISIT OF CHILDREN IN LEBANON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Maha H; Eden, Ece; El Osta, Nada

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry have recommended that the child's first dental visit should be during the child's first year of life for dental disease prevention and to decrease the invasive restorative interventions. In Lebanon, no study has been conducted to determine the age and the reasons of the first dental visit of children and who requested the first dental screening. To assess at what age occurred the first dental visit in a group of Lebanese children visiting a private pediatric dental clinic and to explore the reasons for their first dental consultation. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted. During a five-year period, all children visiting the pediatric clinic were invited to participate in the study. Parents were asked about the general health status of their child, the use of antibiotics before the age of 2 years. Parents were also requested to give the dental reasons for their initial visit to a pedodontist. Two hundred and twenty children (mean age 4.24 ± 1.35 years) visited the pedodontic care office for the first time and were included in the study. All participants had visited a pediatrician before the age of 1 year. Fifty-seven (25.9%) children were referred by a dentist and 163 (74.1%) came with their parents without referral. All participants had at least one reason for the first consultation; the most common were the presence of decayed teeth (50.9%) and a dental pain perception (29.5%). All participants had visited a pediatrician at an earlier age but none was referred to a pedodontist by a pediatrician for check-up or prevention. Children came upon the decision of their parents. A dental problem was the major reason which triggered the first visit. Therefore, pediatricians in Lebanon need to keep themselves updated on recommendations regarding children oral health and be encouraged to play an important role in prompting oral health and first dental visits.

  10. Uranium determination in dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, I.; Gamboa, I.; Espinosa, G.; Moreno, A.

    1984-01-01

    There are many reports of high uranium concentration in dental ceramics, so they require to be controlled. The SSNTD is an optional method to determine the uranium concentration. In this work the analysis of several commercial dental ceramics used regularly in Mexico by dentists is presented. The chemical and electrochemical processes are used and the optimal conditions for high sensitivity are determined. CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) was used as detector. The preliminary results show some materials with high uranium concentrations. Next step will be the analysis of equivalent dose and the effects in the public health. (author)

  11. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Biryukova, T.; Sukhinina, A.; Vdovin, Yu

    2010-11-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 - 645 nm and 340 - 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy.

  12. Radiological protection in dental practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Intended to be complementary to the more comprehensive document, ''Code of Practice for the protection of persons against ionizing radiations arising from medical and dental use'' (CIS 74-423), the purpose of this booklet is to give dentists some basic information on the safe use of X-rays. Contents: why protection from X-rays; responsibility for radiation protection; protection during a dental examination; ensuring a safe installation; sources of further information. Appendices: maximum permissible doses; useful addresses; summary of relevant recommendations from the Code of Practice; notes on film processing.

  13. Radiation protection in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jozani, F.; Parnianpour, H.

    1976-08-01

    In considering the special provisions required in dental radiography, investigations were conducted in Iran. Radiation dose levels in dental radiography were found to be high. Patient exposure from intraoral radiographic examination was calculated, using 50kV X-ray. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were fastened to the nasion, eyes, lip, philtrum, thyroid, gonads and to the right and left of the supra-orbital, infra-orbital temporomandibular joints of live patients. The highest exposure value was for the lower lip. Recommendations concerning educational training and protection of staff and patients were included

  14. Battlefield Electromagnetic Environments Office (BEEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Battlefield Electromagnetic Environments Office (BEEO) develops, maintains, and operates the Army Materiel Command (AMC) databases for spectrum management, per...

  15. Drivers Advancing Oral Health in a Large Group Dental Practice Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kristen; Gibson, Stephanie; White, Joel M

    2016-06-01

    Three change drivers are being implemented to high standards of patient centric and evidence-based oral health care within the context of a large multispecialty dental group practice organization based on the commitment of the dental hygienist chief operating officer and her team. A recent environmental scan elucidated 6 change drivers that can impact the provision of oral health care. Practitioners who can embrace and maximize aspects of these change drivers will move dentistry forward and create future opportunities. This article explains how 3 of these change drivers are being applied in a privately held, accountable risk-bearing entity that provides individualized treatment programs for more than 417,000 members. To facilitate integration of the conceptual changes related to the drivers, a multi-institutional, multidisciplinary, highly functioning collaborative work group was formed. The document Dental Hygiene at a Crossroads for Change(1) inspired the first author, a dental hygienist in a unique position as chief operating officer of a large group practice, to pursue evidence-based organizational change and to impact the quality of patient care. This was accomplished by implementing technological advances including dental diagnosis terminology in the electronic health record, clinical decision support, standardized treatment guidelines, quality metrics, and patient engagement to improve oral health outcomes at the patient and population levels. The systems and processes used to implement 3 change drivers into a large multi-practice dental setting is presented to inform and inspire others to implement change drivers with the potential for advancing oral health. Technology implementing best practices and improving patient engagement are excellent drivers to advance oral health and are an effective use of oral health care dollars. Improved oral health can be leveraged through technological advances to improve clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc

  16. Diagnostic Methods for Dental Caries Used by Private Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... methods used for diagnosis and treatment of dental caries can exhibit considerable differences. Oral health markedly contributes to the maintenance of general health and ..... may be attributed to the deterioration of eye function with the advanced ... meticulous visual examination of a dry tooth and the lack.

  17. The National Institute of Dental Research Clinical Dental Staff Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Bruce J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program in one of the National Institutes of Health offers clinical training fellowships as a means of training potential dental school faculty by providing both unique clinical skills and high-quality research experience. The program was developed in response to a perceived need for change in academic dentistry. (MSE)

  18. Oral Health, Dental Insurance and Dental Service use in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Preety; Chen, Gang; Harris, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    This study uses data from the 2004-2006 Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health and a simultaneous equation framework to investigate the interrelationships between dental health, private dental insurance and the use of dental services. The results show that insurance participation is influenced by social and demographic factors, health and health behaviours. In turn, these factors affect the use of dental services, both directly and through insurance participation. Our findings confirm that affordability is a major barrier to visiting the dentist for oral health maintenance and treatment. Our results suggest that having supplementary insurance is associated with some 56 percentage points higher probability of seeing the dentist in the general population. For those who did not have private insurance cover, we predict that conditional on them facing the same insurance conditions, on average, having insurance would increase their visits to the dentist by 43 percentage points. The uninsured in the survey have lower income, worse oral health and lower rates of preventive and treatment visits. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Office Space: How Will Technology Affect the Education Office Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, C. William

    2009-01-01

    The office environment 10 years from now will be different from the one today. More office personnel will be organized around processes rather than functions. More work activities will be done by teams rather than individuals, and those teams will change over time, as will the nature of the work projects and the people who constitute the team. The…

  20. Dental lesions and restorative treatment in molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghiu Irina-Maria

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article review specific clinical issues of the molar teeth, as well as the therapeutic approach of their pathology. The dental pathology we face in the group of molars is related to: dental caries, dental trauma (crown and crown-root fractures, dental wear phenomena. The therapeutic approach of the molar teeth is represented by: restoration of the loss of hard dental tissues; endodontic treatments of pulpal and periapical complications; surgical treatment. The restorative treatments in molars are: direct restorations, with or without supplementary anchorage for obturations; inlay, onlay; prosthetic crown.

  1. Stakeholder Relations Office

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Scientists, politicians, the public, school children, our neighbours, you. All of these groups of people have a stake in CERN, and all are important to us.   The list of stakeholders in an organisation as large and complex as CERN is a long and ever lengthening one. Each group has its own specific interests and needs in terms of what kind of information it requires from CERN and how we should engage. It’s important, therefore, for us to ensure that we’re communicating optimally with everyone we care about and who cares about us. This is something that CERN has always taken seriously. The CERN Courier, for example, was first published in 1959 and we had a pro-active public information office right from the start. Today, our stakeholder relations are spread between several groups and teams, reflecting the nature of CERN today. But while we’re already doing a good job, I think we can do better by exploiting the synergies between these teams, and that’s wh...

  2. Integrated Budget Office Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Douglas A.; Blakeley, Chris; Chapman, Gerry; Robertson, Bill; Horton, Allison; Besser, Thomas; McCarthy, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    The Integrated Budget Office Toolbox (IBOT) combines budgeting, resource allocation, organizational funding, and reporting features in an automated, integrated tool that provides data from a single source for Johnson Space Center (JSC) personnel. Using a common interface, concurrent users can utilize the data without compromising its integrity. IBOT tracks planning changes and updates throughout the year using both phasing and POP-related (program-operating-plan-related) budget information for the current year, and up to six years out. Separating lump-sum funds received from HQ (Headquarters) into separate labor, travel, procurement, Center G&A (general & administrative), and servicepool categories, IBOT creates a script that significantly reduces manual input time. IBOT also manages the movement of travel and procurement funds down to the organizational level and, using its integrated funds management feature, helps better track funding at lower levels. Third-party software is used to create integrated reports in IBOT that can be generated for plans, actuals, funds received, and other combinations of data that are currently maintained in the centralized format. Based on Microsoft SQL, IBOT incorporates generic budget processes, is transportable, and is economical to deploy and support.

  3. Dental hygiene work in a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, H S; Morgado, I; Assunção, V; Bernardo, M F; Leroux, B; Martin, M D; DeRouen, T A; Leitão, J

    2008-08-01

    Dental hygiene activities were developed as part of a randomized clinical trial designed to assess the safety of low-level mercury exposure from dental amalgam restorations. Along with dental-hygiene clinical work, a community programme was implemented after investigators noticed the poor oral hygiene habits of participants, and the need for urgent action to minimize oral health problems in the study population. Clinical and community activity goal was to promote oral health and prevent new disease. Community activities involved participants and their fellow students and were aimed at providing education on oral health in a school environment. Dental hygienists developed clinical work with prophylaxis, sealants application and topical fluoride and implemented the community programme with in-class sessions on oral health themes. Twice a month fluoride mouthrinses and bi-annual tooth brushing instructional activity took place. Participation at dental-hygiene activities, sealed teeth with no need of restoration and dental-plaque-index were measures used to evaluate success of the programme for the participants. Improvement in dental hygiene is shown by the decrease in dental plaque index scores (P dental hygiene activities. Teachers became aware of the problem and included oral-health in school curricula. Dental hygiene activities have shown to be helpful to promote dental hygiene, promote oral health and to provide school-age children with education on habits that will be important for their future good health.

  4. The virtual dental home: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jay W; Nash, David A; Mathu-Muju, Kavita R

    2017-09-01

    The Virtual Dental Home is a concept of the Pacific Center for Special Care of the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. It is designed to improve access to dental care for underserved populations, specifically children and institutionalized adults. This article describes the development and implementation of the Virtual Dental Home, subsequently critiquing the concept. The criteria for a dental home are not met by the program. It is the equivalent of a traditional public oral health prevention and screening program, with the additional dimension of allowing dental hygienists and assistants to place interim glass ionomer restorations in dental cavities. The critique questions the need to insert a "cloud" dentist into the process. The routine utilization of radiographs is also challenged. The VDH not only lacks the attributes of a dental home, it has not been shown to be as efficient and effective as traditional programs staffed by dental hygienists and dental therapists. The article concludes by describing how programs utilizing dental therapists could address the deficiencies of the Virtual Dental Home, effectively improving access to oral health care for underserved populations. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  5. Dental Age Difference in Children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Puneet; Yu, Qingzhao; Zhu, Han; Townsend, Janice A

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in dental development are associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or ADHD medications. This retrospective chart review evaluated the dental age of 128 patients between 6 and 16 years of age using the Demirjian method from the following two groups a) children with ADHD b) unaffected children. The ADHD group was further stratified into four groups according to the medication type. The impact of ADHD on dental age difference (the difference between dental age and chronologic age) was analyzed using T-test and the association between medication type and dental age difference was analyzed through one way ANOVA. The mean difference between estimated dental age and chronologic age (dental age difference) for all subjects was 0.80 years. There was no significant dental age difference in subjects with ADHD and the control group (0.78±1.28vs. 0.84 ±1.09 years respectively; P=0.75) and there was no significant difference in dental age difference and type of medication (P=0.84). No significant difference was found between children with ADHD and unaffected children with respect to dental age difference. No significant differences were found in dental age difference in the four medication groups.

  6. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellows, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats

  7. Reconstruction of pseudo three-dimensional dental image from dental panoramic radiograph and tooth surface shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, Masataka; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Oshiro, Osamu; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kagiyama, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Masakazu; Takada, Kenji; Azuma, Hiroko

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional volume data set is useful for diagnosis in dental treatments. However, to obtain three-dimensional images of a dental arch in general dental clinics is difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional dental images from a dental panoramic radiograph and a tooth surface shape which can be obtained from three dimensional shape measurement of a dental impression. The proposed method finds an appropriate curved surface on which the dental panoramic radiograph is mapped by comparing a virtual panoramic image made from a tooth surface shape to a real panoramic radiograph. The developed pseudo three-dimensional dental images give clear impression of patient's dental condition. (author)

  8. Taxonomy for competency-based dental curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Neira, Roberto J; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this article is to propose a classification of dental competencies. Interest in dental competencies has grown consistently during the last three decades. However, the dental education literature suggests that the term "competency" is understood and used differently by dental schools around the world. The taxonomic classification of dental competencies we propose follows a systematic approach starting at the highest level of complexity, i.e., the professional profile the teaching institution envisions for its graduates, and following in a decreasing degree of complexity to competency function, task, step, movement, and moment. This taxonomy has proved to be useful for more than thirty years in the Dental School of the Peruvian University Cayetano Heredia. Graduates of this school are successful practitioners, teachers, and researchers in Peru and other countries. The classification proposed here should clarify terms, facilitate curriculum design and learning assessment, stimulate further discussion on the matter, and facilitate communication among the dental education establishment.

  9. Dental stories for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Ian W; Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; McKinney, Christy M; Scott, JoAnna M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate caregivers' preference regarding dental stories to prepare children with autism for dental visits. Caregivers of children with autism were allowed use of dental stories available via different media (paper, tablet computer, computer) and image types (comics or drawings, photographs, video). Caregivers completed pre- and postintervention surveys. Fisher's exact tests were used to determine associations between predictive factors and preferences. Forty initial and 16 follow-up surveys were completed. Subjects were primarily male (85%). Mean child age was 6.7 years. Nine (64%) caregivers found the dental story useful for themselves and their child. Two (14%) caregivers found the aid only helpful for themselves. Preferred media type was associated with language understanding (p = .038) and home media preference (p = .002). Practitioners should consider using dental stories to help prepare families and children for dental visits. Individual preferences for dental stories vary; using prior history can aid in selection. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Disparities in unmet dental need and dental care received by pregnant women in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Garcia, A Isabel; Adams, Amy B; Cheng, Diana

    2014-09-01

    To examine prenatal dental care needs, utilization and oral health counseling among Maryland women who delivered a live infant during 2001-2003 and identify the factors associated with having a dental visit and having an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System is an ongoing population based surveillance system that collects information of women's attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to model dental visits and unmet dental need using predictor variables for Maryland 2001-2003 births. Less than half of all women reported having a dental visit and receiving oral health advice during pregnancy. Twenty-five percent of women reported a need for dental care, of which 33 % did not receive dental care despite their perceived need. Multivariate modeling revealed that racial minorities, women who were not married and those with annual income dental visit. Women who were not married, had low annual income, were older than 40 years of age, had an unintended pregnancy and received prenatal care later than desired were most likely to have an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Despite reported needs and existing recommendations to include oral health as a component of prenatal care, less than half of pregnant women have a dental visit during their pregnancy. One-third of women with a dental problem did not have a dental visit highlighting the unmet need for dental care during pregnancy.

  11. Dental Fear and Avoidance in Treatment Seekers at a Large, Urban Dental Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Richard E; Slep, Amy M Smith; White-Ajmani, Mandi; Bulling, Lisanne; Zickgraf, Hana F; Franklin, Martin E; Wolff, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and correlates of dental fear have been studied in representative population studies, but not in patients presenting for dental treatment. We hypothesized that dental fear among patients presenting at a large, urban college of dentistry would be similar to that of the population (e.g. 11% high dental fear, 17% to 35% moderate or higher fear) and that fear would be associated with avoidance of routine dental care, increased use of urgent dental care and poor oral health. Participants were 1070 consecutive patients at a large, urban dental care center. All patients completed a clinical interview, including demographics, medical history, dental history and presenting concerns, and behavioral health history. Patients were also asked to rate their dental anxiety/fear on a 1 (none) to 10 (high) scale. Over 20% of patients reported elevated anxiety/fear, of which 12.30% reported moderate and 8.75% high fear. Severity of dental anxiety/fear was strongly related to the likelihood of avoiding dental services in the past and related to myriad presenting problems. As hypothesized, the prevalence of moderate or higher fear in dental patients was considerable and closely matched that found in general population surveys. Thus, the 'dental home' is an ideal location to treat clinically significant dental anxiety/fear.

  12. Compendium of Dental Residents’ Research Projects and Literature Reviews for 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    the cutting effectiveness of one brand of rotary dental diamond cutting instruments was measured. Four groups of ten diamond burs were sterilized by...Brooks Air Force Base, TX 732?S-5301 Sa. NAME OF FUNDING/SPONSORING 8b OFFICE SYMBOL 9 PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION USAF...Deriodontics (9846), Prosthodontics (9856), Orthodontics (9866), and Endodontics (9886). The authors submitted their reports during 1989, in partial

  13. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraete Willy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3- concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-. Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO, nitrous oxide (N2O, and dinitrogen (N2 using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, D.; Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined.

  16. [Radiodiagnostic methods for dental anomalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovoĭ, S K; Serova, N S; Ivanova, D V

    2012-01-01

    To determine the capacities of radiologic studies in the examination of patients with dental anomalies. One hundred and twenty patients with dental anomalies were examined. Conventional X-ray and high-technology radiology techniques (multislice spiral computed tomography (MSSCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)) were used. Orthopantomography is the most common method for radiologic examination of patients with dental anomalies. However, X-ray procedures do not provide complete information on the position and status of an abnormal tooth, which is required to define further patient management tactics. While planning the management, MSSCT and CBCT were performed in 56 (46.7%) and 64 (53.3%) patients, respectively. In addition, 72 (60.0%) patients in whom orthodontic treatment had been recommended at the first stage underwent MSSCT or CBCT following 7 months. CBCT showed that 4 (3.3%) patients had dental ankylosis previously undiagnosed by MSSCT. The high-technology radiology techniques could assess the position of a tooth in relation to its important anatomic structures and identify the comorbidity that keeps from being treated. MSSCT and CBCT can make in full measure the topical diagnosis of abnormal teeth and hence choose an optimal algorithm for comprehensive treatment of patients.

  17. Dental occlusion and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J Caitlin; Hannah, Andrew; Nagar, Nathan

    2017-10-27

    Data sourcesMedline, Scopus and Google Scholar.Study selectionTwo reviewers selected studies independently. English language clinical studies assessing the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and features of dental occlusion were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudy quality was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and a narrative synthesis was presented.ResultsIn all 25 studies (17 case-control, eight comparative) were included. Overall there was a high variability between occlusal features and TMD diagnosis. Findings were consistent with a lack of clinically relevant association between TMD and dental occlusion. Only two studies were associated with TMD in the majority (≥50%) of single variable analyses in patient populations. Only mediotrusive interferences are associated with TMD in the majority of multiple variable analyses.ConclusionsThe findings support the absence of a disease-specific association, there is no ground to hypothesise a major role for dental occlusion in the pathophysiology of TMDs. Dental clinicians are thus encouraged to move forward and abandon the old-fashioned gnathological paradig.

  18. Radiation dose in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohnen, M.; Kemper, J.; Moedder, U.; Moebes, O.; Pawelzik, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology. (orig.)

  19. Dental approach to craniofacial syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2012-01-01

    is essential for insight into craniofacial syndromes. The dentition, thus, becomes central in diagnostics and evaluation of the pathogenesis. Developmental fields can explore and advance the concept of dental approaches to craniofacial syndromes. Discussion. As deviations in teeth persist and do not reorganize...

  20. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  1. Dental Hygienists Licensed in Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia. Health Manpower Project.

    Beginning with a statement on the profession of dental hygiene and the two types of professional preparation available in the field, the pilot study then presents a two-part summary of its findings and an explanation of the methodology employed. Part I of the main portion of the report concerns employment characteristics (status, age, residence,…

  2. [The future of dental amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a comment on 'The enigma of dental amalgam' by Carl Leinfelder published in 2004 in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. In that paper a warning is stated against a too abrupt change from amalgam towards resin composite, because this will bring a lot of clinical problems

  3. [Dental implant restoration abutment selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Shi; Hao, Zeng

    2017-04-01

    An increasing number of implant restoration abutment types are produced with the rapid development of dental implantology. Although various abutments can meet different clinical demands, the selection of the appropriate abutment is both difficult and confusing. This article aims to help clinicians select the appropriate abutment by describing abutment design, types, and selection criteria.

  4. Room design in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achalli, Sonika

    2013-01-01

    Radiography and radiographic examination of the patient form most valuable diagnostic tool in providing comprehensive dental care. The safe and effective use of the X-ray equipment is important for the protection of the patient, other members of the public and all members of the dental team. For patients, the risk that is associated with exposure to X-rays must always be weighed against the clinical benefit of an accurate diagnosis. The risks associated with the exposure to the X-rays during the radiographic examination of the patient must be minimised by meticulously adhering to good practice and thus carefully managing the use of dental radiological procedures. The dentist or the personnel who is the license holder for the X-ray equipment is ultimately responsible for the radiation safety at the workplace. One important method in limiting the possible risk of radiation exposure at workplace is the correct design of an X-ray room. This paper is aimed at discussing the guidelines and recommendations on X-ray room designs in dental radiology in order to facilitate radiation control and safe working conditions for radiation workers as well as the public. (author)

  5. Ideas for Office Occupations Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Ruby; And Others

    Prepared by South Carolina office occupations teachers, this booklet contains ideas for effective and motivating teaching methods in office occupations courses on the secondary school level. Besides ideas generally applicable, suggestions are included for teaching the following specific subjects: (1) accounting, (2) recordkeeping, (3) cooperative…

  6. The PR Officer's Survival Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrum, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    A former corporate public relations (PR) professional shares strategies for communicating and cooperating with the chief executive officer, and particularly for coping with differences in perceptions of the public relations officer's role. Basic attributes of a successful PR professional are outlined: good communication skills, an analytical…

  7. Why Black Officers Still Fail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    that ROTC programs were being staffed with lower performing and less qualified officers to educate young black officers. He based this conclusion on...come to mutually supporting conclusions. In a 2008 USAWC Strategy Research Project, while exploring the effects of ethnocentrism and its affect on

  8. The New Planned Giving Officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Ronald R.; Quynn, Katelyn L.

    1994-01-01

    A planned giving officer is seen as an asset to college/university development for technical expertise, credibility, and connections. Attorneys, certified public accountants, bank trust officers, financial planners, investment advisers, life insurance agents, and real estate brokers may be qualified but probably also need training. (MSE)

  9. 75 FR 63753 - Family Offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... interpreted the term, because, among the variety of services provided, family offices are in the business of...: Private Wealth Management in the Family Context, Wharton Global Family Alliance (Apr. 1, 2008), available..., management, and employment structures and arrangements employed by family offices.'' \\14\\ We have taken this...

  10. Richland Operations Office technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Office of Technology Development to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Richland Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance cleanup and waste management efforts

  11. Richland Operations Office technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Office of Technology Development to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Richland Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance cleanup and waste management efforts.

  12. What set's the officer apart?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.M.; Moelker, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Officer Corps constitutes the backbone of the military. Privates and NCOs come and go. Political leaders are replaced. But the officer corps, the military profession per se, endures. The focus of this paper is how the military profession is maintained by military academies. A profession is

  13. The business of dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Widyanti Sriyono

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization including General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS and Asia Fair Trade Agreement (AFTA are a new free trade system. In globalization era, there will be an intense and free competition in looking for jobs throughout the world. This new system will affect the health services system in which health services tend to follow an industrial model. Meaning that dentistry or dental health services tend to be part of a business system, and this system has caused controversy among the community and the profession itself. The results of the discussion revealed that professional and business of dentistry is compatible and complementary. The tendency of increasing number of legal form of practice (group and a professional corporation and the worldwide advertisement of these practices supported the premise that delivering dental practice tends to follow the industrial model. Dentists should not only more focus on achieving financial success in running the business of practice but profession should have the most concern for the people who seek their services. Delivering quality of dental care depends on the high skill of the dentist and on the satisfactory income for the survival of the practice in the long run, and this make the practice will be viewed by the public and profession as being appropriate and of high quality. Facing the globalization, besides possessing high clinical skill, dentists must have a firm understanding of management concepts and apply them in their practice. In conclusion: The profession and the business of dentistry are compatible and complementary. The delivery of the dental services tends to follow the industrial model, which is a current reality. Dentist should concern more on the delivering high quality of dental services, not only focus on the business of the practice, although the satisfactory income is important for the survival growth of the practice in the long run. It is suggested for dentists to follow as

  14. Athena Community Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Núnez, S.; Barcons, X.; Barret, D.; Bozzo, E.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M. T.; Gómez, S.; Monterde, M. P.; Rau, A.

    2017-03-01

    The Athena Community Office (ACO) has been established by ESA's Athena Science Study Team (ASST) in order to obtain support in performing its tasks assigned by ESA, and most specially in the ASST role as "focal point for the interests of the broad scientific community". The ACO is led by the Instituto de Física de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), and its activities are funded by CSIC and UC. Further ACO contributors are the University of Geneva, MPE and IRAP. In this poster, we present ACO to the Spanish Astronomical Community, informing about its main responsibilities, which are: assist the ASST in organising and collecting support from the Athena Working Groups and Topical Panels; organise and maintain the documentation generated by the Athena Working Groups and Topical Panels; manage the Working Group and Topical Panel membership lists; assist the ASST in promoting Athena science capabilities in the research world, through conferences and workshops; keep a record of all papers and presentations related to Athena; support the production of ASST documents; produce and distribute regularly an Athena Newsletter, informing the community about all mission and science developments; create and maintain the Athena Community web portal; maintain an active communication activity; promote, organise and support Athena science-related public outreach, in coordination with ESA and other agencies involved when appropriate; and, design, produce materials and provide pointers to available materials produced by other parties. In summary, ACO is meant to become a focal point to facilitate the scientific exchange between the Athena activities and the scientific community at large, and to disseminate the Athena science objectives to the general public.

  15. Salivary biomarkers for dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Jiang, Shan; Koh, David; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen

    2016-02-01

    As a highly prevalent multifactorial disease, dental caries afflicts a large proportion of the world's population. As teeth are constantly bathed in saliva, the constituents and properties of this oral fluid play an essential role in the occurrence and progression of dental caries. Various inorganic (water and electrolytes) and organic (proteins and peptides) components may protect teeth from dental caries. This occurs via several functions, such as clearance of food debris and sugar, aggregation and elimination of microorganisms, buffering actions to neutralize acid, maintaining supersaturation with respect to tooth mineral, participation in formation of the acquired pellicle and antimicrobial defense. Modest evidence is available on the associations between dental caries and several salivary parameters, including flow rate, buffering capacity and abundance of mutans streptococci. Despite some controversial findings, the main body of the literature supports an elevated caries prevalence and/or incidence among people with a pathologically low saliva flow rate, compromised buffering capacity and early colonization or high titer of mutans streptococci in saliva. The evidence remains weak and/or inconsistent on the association between dental caries and other saliva parameters, such as other possible cariogenic species (Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus sanguis group, Streptococcus salivarius, Actinomyces spp. and Candida albicans), diversity of saliva microbiomes, inorganic and organic constituents (electrolytes, immunoglobulins, other proteins and peptides) and some functional properties (sugar clearance rate, etc.). The complex interactions between salivary components and functions suggest that saliva has to be considered in its entirety to account for its total effects on teeth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Medicaid Adult Dental Benefits Increase Use Of Dental Care, But Impact Of Expansion On Dental Services Use Was Mixed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Damiano, Peter; Sabik, Lindsay

    2017-04-01

    Dental coverage for adult enrollees is an optional benefit under Medicaid. Thirty-one states and the District of Columbia have expanded eligibility for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Millions of low-income adults have gained health care coverage and, in states offering dental benefits, oral health coverage as well. Using data for 2010 and 2014 from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the impact of Medicaid adult dental coverage and eligibility expansions on low-income adults' use of dental care. We found that low-income adults in states that provided dental benefits beyond emergency-only coverage were more likely to have had a dental visit in the past year, compared to low-income adults in states without such benefits. Among states that provided dental benefits and expanded their Medicaid program, regression-based estimates suggest that childless adults had a significant increase (1.8 percentage points) in the likelihood of having had a dental visit, while parents had a significant decline (8.1 percentage points). One possible explanation for the disparity is that after expansion, newly enrolled childless adults might have exhausted the limited dental provider capacity that was available to parents before expansion. Additional policy-level efforts may be needed to expand the dental care delivery system's capacity. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Uptake and accumulation of mercury from dental amalgam in the common goldfish, Carassius auratus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure of fish to concentrations of dental amalgam typically found in waste discharge leads to mercury accumulation in tissues. - In this study, the bioavailability and accumulation of mercury from external environmental exposure to mixed, cured, milled, sieved and proportioned dental amalgam was examined in the common goldfish, Carassius auratus. Fish were exposed to dental amalgam (particle size range from <0.10 to 3.15 mm) in order to represent the particle size and distribution of that found within the typical dental office wastewater discharge stream. Experimental amalgam water loadings were 0 g/l, 0.5 g/l and 1 g/l in glass aquaria at 15 deg. C for 28 days. Fish tissues were sampled at 5 min and 28 days of exposure, and the liver, brain, muscle and whole body analyzed for total mercury using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. Mercury was found in several tissues examined and generally increased with exposure to higher amounts of dental amalgam. The highest levels were found in the whole body (17.68±5.73 μg/g) followed by the liver (0.80±0.16 μg/g) and muscle (0.47±0.16 μg/g). The lowest concentrations were seen in the brain (0.28±0.19 μg/g). Compared to controls, concentrations in the whole body, muscle and liver in fish exposed for 28 days to the highest concentration of amalgam were 200-, 233-, and 40-fold higher, respectively. This study shows that mercury from an environmental exposure to representative samples of dental amalgam typically found within the dental wastewater discharge stream is bioavailable to fish and may accumulate in internal tissues

  18. INVESTIGATION THE FITTING ACCURACY OF CAST AND SLM CO-CR DENTAL BRIDGES USING CAD SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsanka Dikova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to investigate the fitting accuracy of Co-Cr dental bridges, manufactured by three technologies, with the newly developed method using CAD software. The four-part dental bridges of Co-Cr alloys were produced by conventional casting of wax models, casting with 3D printed patterns and selective laser melting. The marginal and internal fit of dental bridges was studied out by two methods – silicone replica test and CAD software. As the silicone replica test characterizes with comparatively low accuracy, a new methodology for investigating the fitting accuracy of dental bridges was developed based on the SolidWorks CAD software. The newly developed method allows the study of the marginal and internal adaptation in unlimited directions and high accuracy. Investigation the marginal fit and internal adaptation of Co-Cr four-part dental bridges by the two methods show that the technological process strongly influences the fitting accuracy of dental restorations. The fitting accuracy of the bridges, cast with 3D printed patterns, is the highest, followed by the SLM and conventionally cast bridges. The marginal fit of the three groups of bridges is in the clinically acceptable range. The internal gap values vary in different regions – it is highest on the occlusal surfaces, followed by that in the marginal and axial areas. The higher fitting accuracy of the bridges, manufactured by casting with 3D printed patterns and SLM, compared to the conventionally cast bridges is a good precondition for their successful implementation in the dental offices and laboratories.

  19. Child′s dental fear: Cause related factors and the influence of audiovisual modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthi Mungara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Delivery of effective dental treatment to a child patient requires thorough knowledge to recognize dental fear and its management by the application of behavioral management techniques. Children′s Fear Survey Schedule - Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS helps in identification of specific stimuli which provoke fear in children with regard to dental situation. Audiovisual modeling can be successfully used in pediatric dental practice. Aim: To assess the degree of fear provoked by various stimuli in the dental office and to evaluate the effect of audiovisual modeling on dental fear of children using CFSS-DS. Materials and Methods: Ninety children were divided equally into experimental (group I and control (group II groups and were assessed in two visits for their degree of fear and the effect of audiovisual modeling, with the help of CFSS-DS. Results: The most fear-provoking stimulus for children was injection and the least was to open the mouth and having somebody look at them. There was no statistically significant difference in the overall mean CFSS-DS scores between the two groups during the initial session (P > 0.05. However, in the final session, a statistically significant difference was observed in the overall mean fear scores between the groups (P < 0.01. Significant improvement was seen in group I, while no significant change was noted in case of group II. Conclusion: Audiovisual modeling resulted in a significant reduction of overall fear as well as specific fear in relation to most of the items. A significant reduction of fear toward dentists, doctors in general, injections, being looked at, the sight, sounds, and act of the dentist drilling, and having the nurse clean their teeth was observed.

  20. Uptake and accumulation of mercury from dental amalgam in the common goldfish, Carassius auratus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.J

    2003-03-01

    Exposure of fish to concentrations of dental amalgam typically found in waste discharge leads to mercury accumulation in tissues. - In this study, the bioavailability and accumulation of mercury from external environmental exposure to mixed, cured, milled, sieved and proportioned dental amalgam was examined in the common goldfish, Carassius auratus. Fish were exposed to dental amalgam (particle size range from <0.10 to 3.15 mm) in order to represent the particle size and distribution of that found within the typical dental office wastewater discharge stream. Experimental amalgam water loadings were 0 g/l, 0.5 g/l and 1 g/l in glass aquaria at 15 deg. C for 28 days. Fish tissues were sampled at 5 min and 28 days of exposure, and the liver, brain, muscle and whole body analyzed for total mercury using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. Mercury was found in several tissues examined and generally increased with exposure to higher amounts of dental amalgam. The highest levels were found in the whole body (17.68{+-}5.73 {mu}g/g) followed by the liver (0.80{+-}0.16 {mu}g/g) and muscle (0.47{+-}0.16 {mu}g/g). The lowest concentrations were seen in the brain (0.28{+-}0.19 {mu}g/g). Compared to controls, concentrations in the whole body, muscle and liver in fish exposed for 28 days to the highest concentration of amalgam were 200-, 233-, and 40-fold higher, respectively. This study shows that mercury from an environmental exposure to representative samples of dental amalgam typically found within the dental wastewater discharge stream is bioavailable to fish and may accumulate in internal tissues.