WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental luting cement

  1. [Haemotoxicity of dental luting cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, A; Welker, D

    1989-06-01

    A glass ionomer luting cement (AquaCem) shows a relatively low haemolytic activity in comparison with two zinc phosphate cements. Especially the initial irritation by this cement is smaller. Although it is possible that AquaCem particularly, in unfavourable cases, may damage the pulpa dentin system; this is due to the slowly decrease of the haemolytic activity with increasing of the probes. We found that Adhesor showed in dependence of the batches a varying quality.

  2. Antibacterial potential of contemporary dental luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugela, Povilas; Oziunas, Rimantas; Zekonis, Gediminas

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were to evaluate the antibacterial activities of different types of dental luting cements and to compare antibacterial action during and after setting. Agar diffusion testing was used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of seven types of dental luting cements (glass ionomer cements (GICs), resin modified GICs, resin composite, zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide non-eugenol, zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate cements) on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. Instantly mixed zinc phosphate cements showed the strongest antibacterial activity in contrast to the non-eugenol, eugenol and resin cements that did not show any antibacterial effects. Non-hardened glass ionomer, resin modified and zinc polycarboxylate cements exhibited moderate antibacterial action. Hardened cements showed weaker antibacterial activities, than those ones applied right after mixing.

  3. Antimicrobial Effects of Dental Luting Glass Ionomer Cements on Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To reduce secondary caries, glass ionomer luting cements are often used for cementing of indirect restorations. This is because of their well-known antimicrobial potential through the release of fluoride ions. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of five dental luting cements which were based on glass ionomer cement technology. Methods. Five different glass ionomer based luting cements were tested for their antimicrobial effects on Streptococcu...

  4. Biocompatibility Evaluation of Dental Luting Cements Using Cytokine Released from Human Oral Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sung Kwon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental luting cements are commonly used in dentistry for cementation of prosthetic restoration. Many previous studies focused on the measurement of the cell viability as the method of cytotoxicity evaluation during biocompatibility study for the material. In this study, the biocompatibility of various dental luting cements were evaluated using the new method of cytokine release measurement in order to better simulate inflammatory reactions in animal or clinical model using two different oral cells; immortalized human gingival fibroblast and immortalized human oral keratinocytes. Cells were exposed to extractions of various commercially available dental luting cements for different durations. Cytokines of IL-1α and IL-8 were measured from the supernatants of the cells and the results were then compared to the conventional MTT viability test. The result from the conventional cell viability study showed a relatively simple and straight forward indication that only one of the dental luting cements tested in this study was cytotoxic with increasing duration of exposure for both cells. Meanwhile, the result from the cytokine measurement study was much more complex at the time point they were measured, type of cells used for the study and the type of cytokines measured, all of which influenced the interpretation of the results. Hence, the better understanding of the cytokine release would be required for the application in biocompatibility evaluation.

  5. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A bioactive dental luting cement--its retentive properties and 3-year clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Steven R; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Appleby, David C; Boston, Daniel; Lööf, Jesper

    2013-02-01

    A clinical validation study was conducted to determine the performance of a new bioactive dental cement (Ceramir C&B, Doxa Dental AB) for permanent cementation. The cement is a new formulation class, which is a hybrid material comprised of calcium aluminate and glass-ionomer components. A total of 38 crowns and bridges were cemented in 17 patients; 31 of the abutment teeth were vital and seven were non-vital. Six restorations were bridges with a total of 14 abutment teeth (12 vital/ two non-vital). One fixed splint comprising two abutment teeth was also included. Preparation parameters were recorded, as well as cement characteristics such as working time, setting time, seating characteristics, and ease of cement removal. Baseline data were recorded for the handling of the cement, gingival inflammation, and pre-cementation sensitivity. Post-cementation parameters included post-cementation sensitivity, gingival tissue reaction, marginal integrity, and discoloration. All patients were seen for recall examinations at 30 days and 6 months. Fifteen of 17 subjects and 13 of 17 patients were also available for subsequent comprehensive 1- and 2-year recall examination, and 13 patients were available for a 3-year recall examination. Restorations available for the 3-year recall examination included 14 single-unit full-coverage crown restorations, four three-unit bridges comprising eight abutments, and one two-unit splint. Three-year recall data yielded no loss of retention, no secondary caries, no marginal discolorations, and no subjective sensitivity. All restorations rated excellent for marginal integrity. Average visual analogue scale (VAS) score for tooth sensitivity decreased from 7.63 mm at baseline to 0.44 mm at 6-month recall, 0.20 mm at 1-year recall, and 0.00 mm at 2- and 3-year recall. Average gingival index (GI) score for gingival inflammation decreased from 0.56 at baseline to 0.11 at 6-month recall, 0.16 at 1-year recall, 0.21 at 2-year recall, and 0.07 at 3

  7. An immunohistochemical evaluation of cell adhesion molecules in human dental pulp after tooth preparation and application of temporary luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Bora; Atilla, Pergin; Cakar, Nur; Hasanreisoglu, Ufuk

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if temporary luting cements used with provisional restorations alter the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in human dental pulp. Twenty-five healthy human premolars and third molars scheduled to be extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly assigned to 5 experimental groups. Group 1 included untreated teeth as negative control. In groups 2-5, provisional crowns were cemented to the prepared teeth with either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cement and extracted 24 or 48 h after the treatment. Expression ratio and staining intensity of CAMs, including E-selectin, P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), was investigated in the pulp samples. The assessment of immunohistochemical reactions was performed by 2 independent observers using a semiquantitative scale. Significant reductions were recorded in the expression ratio and/or the staining intensity of E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 in samples removed 48 h after treatment with eugenol-containing cement compared with intact teeth. This reduction was significant only for ICAM-1 for 48-h eugenol-free samples. Moreover, the eugenol-free cement group indicated considerably higher E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 expression compared with the eugenol-containing group (P dental pulp.

  8. An Investigation of Dental Luting Cement Solubility as a Function of the Marginal Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    but would prevent the effects of abrasion. The dentures were placed in the patient’s mouth. After six months the sample holder was removed from the...noted that when the effects of abrasion are added, the rates of cement dissolution would not be expected to follow Fick’s First Law of Diffusion. The...dissolved, stated that even the best fitting crowns have a cement line which would eventually dissolve and lead to the failure of the restoration

  9. Adhesive luting of all-ceramic restorations--the impact of cementation variables and short-term water storage on the strength of a feldspathic dental ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the impact of resin cement luting variables and short-term water storage on the strength of an adhesively luted all-ceramic restorative material. An understanding of the strengthening mechanisms will result in optimisation of operative techniques and materials selection criteria.

  10. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Methods. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium diox

  11. Eugenol-based temporary luting cement possesses antioxidative properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antioxidants protect against reactive oxygen species and expose beneficial anti-inflammatory activity when in contact with biological tissues. Dental materials that are used as temporary luting on fixed dental restorations are often in contact with injured gingival tissue, hence they should contain anti-inflammatory characteristics that are essential after prosthetic procedures preceding cementation of final restauration. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effect through the oxidation inhibition (OI of mixed dental cement for temporary luting or their liquid component. Methods. Eight study groups were prepared each by ten samples: 1 ex tempore preparation of zinc-oxide eugenol paste (Kariofil Z Galenika, Serbia, 2 Viko Temp paste (Galenika, Serbia, 3 Temp Bond NE paste (Kerr, Germany, 4 ScutaBond (ESPE, Germany, 5 Cp-CAP paste (Germany, Lege Artis and oil component of 6 Kariofil Z, 7 Viko Temp and 8 Cp-CAP. The samples were subjected to spectrophotometer to measure OI 2,2’-azino-di-(3-ethyl-benzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS using Randox kit, United Kingdom. The control samples were pure ascorbic acid (1% w/v. Results. High values of OI exposed materials (groups 1, 5, 6, 7, 8 with content of eugenol (or its derivates in the range of 100-88.8% were statistically more significant than the values of non-eugenol substances (groups 2, 3, 4 with the range of 8.2-43.5%. Conclusion. Eugenol containing temporary fixation materials show significant antioxidative properties and therefore they may be used in those clinical situations where surrounding gingival tissue is injured during restorative procedure. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45005

  12. Tooth sensitivity associated with the use of luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, H O

    1995-01-01

    Luting Cements are still a source of frustration to the dentist. None of the cements currently available satisfies everyone, including the patient. The problems encountered when trying to obtain adhesion to a wet substance such as dentin are well-known (Christensen, 1994). The cause of postcementation sensitivity continues to a perplexing problem.

  13. Cytotoxicity of commonly used luting cements -An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpaite-Vanagiene, Rita; Bukelskiene, Virginija; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Puriene, Alina; Baltriukiene, Daiva; Rutkunas, Vygandas

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to 1) evaluate the cytotoxicity of luting cements: Hoffmann's Zinc Phosphate (Hoffmann's ZP), GC Fuji Plus Resin Modified Glass Ionomer (Fuji Plus RMGI) and 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem Resin Cement (RelyX Unicem RC) and 2) test if pre-washing reduces the cements' cytotoxicity. In vitro human gingival fibroblast (HGF) culture model was chosen. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT test, the cell viability -by staining the cells with AO/EB dye mixture. The means±SD of Cell Survival Ratio (CSR%) were compared among different cement types under two testing conditions, with or without cement pre-washing. The CSR%s were compared by ANOVA and linear multiple regression (LMR). Hoffmann's ZPC was less cytotoxic, while Fuji Plus RMGIC and RelyX Unicem RC were more cytotoxic (ANOVA, ptype of cement and cement pre-washing jointly explained 90% of cell survival (LMR, p<0.001, adjusted squared R=0.889). The commonly used luting cements such as Hoffmann's ZP, Fuji Plus RMGI and RelyX Unicem RC may have a cytotoxic potential.

  14. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cytotoxicity evaluation of luting resin cements on bovine dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs) by real-time cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan Malkoç, Meral; Demir, Necla; Şengün, Abdulkadir; Bozkurt, Şerife Buket; Hakki, Sema Sezen

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of resin cements on dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs), Bifix QM (BQM), Choice 2(C2), RelyX U200(RU200), Maxcem Elite(ME), and Multilink Automix(MA) were tested. The materials were incubated in DMEM for 72 h. A real-time cell analyzer was used to evaluate cell survival. The statistical analyses used were one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests. BQM, RU200, and ME demonstrated a significant decrease in the bDPCs' index at 24 and 72 h (p≤0.001). These materials were found to be the most toxic resin cements, as compared to the control and other tested materials (C2 and MA). However, C2 and MA showed a better survival rate, compared to BQM, RU200, and ME, and had lower cell index than the control group. The cytotoxic effects of resin cements on pulpa should be evaluated during the selection of proper cements.

  16. Influence of core-finishing intervals on tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Andrea Lopes Iglesias

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The core finishing of cast posts-and-cores after luting is routine in dental practice. However, the effects of the vibrations produced by the rotary cutting instruments over the luting cements are not well-documented. This study evaluated the influence of the time intervals that elapsed between the cementation and the core-finishing procedures on the tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement. Forty-eight bovine incisor roots were selected, endodontically treated, and divided into four groups (n = 12: GA, control (without finishing; GB, GC, and GD, subjected to finishing at 20 minutes, 60 minutes, and 24 hours after cementation, respectively. Root canals were molded, and the resin patterns were cast in copper-aluminum alloy. Cast posts-and-cores were luted with zinc phosphate cement, and the core-finishing procedures were applied according to the groups. The tensile tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min for all groups, 24 hours after the core-finishing procedures. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. No significant differences were observed in the tensile strengths between the control and experimental groups, regardless of the time interval that elapsed between the luting and finishing steps. Within the limitations of the present study, it was demonstrated that the core-finishing procedures and time intervals that elapsed after luting did not appear to affect the retention of cast posts-and-cores when zinc phosphate cement was used.

  17. Influence of core-finishing intervals on tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Michele Andrea Lopes; Mesquita, Gabriela Campos; Pereira, Analice Giovani; Dantas, Lucas Costa de Medeiros; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Soares, Carlos José; Mota, Adérito Soares da

    2012-01-01

    The core finishing of cast posts-and-cores after luting is routine in dental practice. However, the effects of the vibrations produced by the rotary cutting instruments over the luting cements are not well-documented. This study evaluated the influence of the time intervals that elapsed between the cementation and the core-finishing procedures on the tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement. Forty-eight bovine incisor roots were selected, endodontically treated, and divided into four groups (n = 12): GA, control (without finishing); GB, GC, and GD, subjected to finishing at 20 minutes, 60 minutes, and 24 hours after cementation, respectively. Root canals were molded, and the resin patterns were cast in copper-aluminum alloy. Cast posts-and-cores were luted with zinc phosphate cement, and the core-finishing procedures were applied according to the groups. The tensile tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min for all groups, 24 hours after the core-finishing procedures. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the tensile strengths between the control and experimental groups, regardless of the time interval that elapsed between the luting and finishing steps. Within the limitations of the present study, it was demonstrated that the core-finishing procedures and time intervals that elapsed after luting did not appear to affect the retention of cast posts-and-cores when zinc phosphate cement was used.

  18. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations.

  19. Color difference of composite resins after cementation with different shades of resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Karakaya, Izgen; Aktore, Huseyin

    2017-07-26

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color difference of nanohybrid and ormocer-based composite resins with different thicknesses when 4 different shades of resin luting cement were used. 56 disc specimens of each composite resin (Aelite aesthetic enamel, Ceram-X mono) with 0.5 and 1 mm thicknesses were fabricated. Baseline color measurements were performed using a clinical spectrophotometer. The specimens of each thicknesses of each resin were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the shades of resin luting cement (white/A1, yellow/universal/A3, transparent and white opaque) (n = 7). Mixed resin cement was applied onto the resin specimens using a Teflon mold in 0.1 mm thickness. Color measurements of cemented composite resin specimens were repeated and color difference (∆E) between baseline and after cementation measurements was calculated. ANOVA and Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis. The opaque shade had significantly increased ∆E values as compared to the other shades (p resins in terms of ∆E values. The shade of resin cement and the type of the resin affected the final color; however, the thickness of composite resin had no influence on the final color of restoration. Selecting the shade of resin luting cement before cementation of indirect composite laminate restoration is important to achieve final color match.

  20. Silver nanoparticles in resin luting cements: Antibacterial and physiochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Francine-Couto-Lima; Alves, Denise-Ramos-Silveira; Estrela, Cyntia-Rodrigues-Araújo; Estrela, Carlos; Carrião, Marcus-Santos; Bakuzis, Andris-Figueiroa; Lopes, Lawrence-Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Background Silver has a long history of use in medicine as an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent. Silver nanoparticles (NAg) offer the possibility to control the formation oral biofilms through the use of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive, and delivery abilities. This study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect of resin luting cements with and without NAg, and their influence on color, sorption and solubility. Material and Methods NAg were incorporated to two dual-cured resin cements (RelyX ARC (RA) color A1 and RelyX U200 (RU) color A2) in two concentrations (0.05% and 0.07%, in weight), obtaining six experimental groups. Disc specimens (1x6mm) were obtained to verify the antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans in BHI broth after immersion for 1min, 5min, 1h, 6h, and 24h (n=3), through optical density readings. Specimens were evaluated for color changes after addition of NAg with a spectrophotometer (n=10). Sorption and solubility tests were also performed, considering storage in water or 75% ethanol for 28 days (n=5), according to ISO 4049:2010. Data were subjected to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Tukey (p=0.05). Results The optical density of the culture broths indicated bacterial growth, with and without NAg. NAg produced significant color change on the resin cements, especially in RA. Solubility values were very low for all groups, while sorption values raised with NAg. The cements with NAg did not show antibacterial activity against S. mutans. They also showed perceptible color change and higher sorption than the materials without NAg. Conclusions The resin luting cements with NAg addition did not show antibacterial activity against SS. mutans. They also showed perceptible color change and higher sorption than the materials without NAg. Key words:Silver, resin cements, products with antimicrobial action, solubility, color perception tests. PMID:27703610

  1. Why the carioprotective potential of luting cements crucial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohilla M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Space maintainers make good oral hygiene difficult, modify the oral environment, and increase the chances of enamel demineralization. Demineralization can be prevented or reduced by improving patient oral hygiene or by using topical fluorides. However these methods depend on patient compliance and, therefore, are not very reliable. Thus, caries prevention in banding might be enhanced by using fluoride-releasing cements. The aim of the study was to comparatively evaluate the carioprotective potential of various luting media used for band cementation in permanent as well as deciduous molars. In this study, 100 molars were taken, which were banded and stored in artificial saliva for 1 month after which the teeth were debanded. An area of 2 x 2 mm was spared and the teeth were coated with nail varnish. The coated teeth were dipped in artificial caries solution in one month followed by 1-day immersion in methylene blue dye, after which the samples were sectioned through the window. The depth of dye penetration was measured and the results were statistically analyzed. Minimum dye penetration was observed with glass ionomer, which could be due to the fluoride release from the cement, whereas the control group showed the maximum, probably due to direct contact with the artificial caries solution.

  2. Fracture load of implant-supported zirconia all-ceramic crowns luted with various cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yoo, Jeong-Min; Park, Sang-Won; Yang, Hong-So

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the fracture load and failure types of implant-supported zirconia all-ceramic crowns cemented with various luting agents. The ceramic frameworks were fabricated from a presintered yttria-stabilized zirconium dioxide block using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing technology, and were then veneered with feldspathic porcelain. Three luting agents were used. Composite resin cement (1,560.78 +/- 39.43 N) showed the highest mean fracture load, followed by acrylic/urethane cement (1,116.20 +/- 77.32 N) and zinc oxide eugenol cement (741.21 +/- 41.95 N) (P < .05). The types of failure varied between groups.

  3. Diametral tensile strength and film thickness of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cabrini Carmello

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The need to develop new dental luting agents in order to improve the success of treatments has greatly motivated research. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametral tensile strength (DTS and film thickness (FT of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil (COP with or without addition of different quantities of filler (calcium carbonate - CaCO3. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty specimens were manufactured (DTS N=40; FT N=40 and divided into 4 groups: Pure COP; COP 10%; COP 50% and zinc phosphate (control. The cements were mixed according to the manufacturers' recommendations and submitted to the tests. The DTS test was performed in the MTS 810 testing machine (10 KN, 0.5 mm/min. For FT test, the cements were sandwiched between two glass plates (2 cm² and a load of 15 kg was applied vertically on the top of the specimen for 10 min. The data were analyzed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. RESULTS: The values of DTS (MPa were: Pure COP- 10.94±1.30; COP 10%- 30.06±0.64; COP 50%- 29.87±0.27; zinc phosphate- 4.88±0.96. The values of FT (µm were: Pure COP- 31.09±3.16; COP 10%- 17.05±4.83; COP 50%- 13.03±4.83; Zinc Phosphate- 20.00±0.12. One-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the groups (DTS - p=1.01E-40; FT - p=2.4E-10. CONCLUSION: The experimental dental luting agent with 50% of filler showed the best diametral tensile strength and film thickness.

  4. Retentive strength of luting cements for stainless steel crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Kondae, Sapna; Gupta, Kamal Kishore

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the retentive strength of three luting cements. A total of forty five freshly extracted human primary molars were used in this study. The teeth were prepared to receive stainless steel crowns. They were then randomly divided into three groups, of fifteen teeth each, so as to receive the three different luting cements: conventional glass ionomer resin modified glass ionomer and adhesive resin. The teeth were then stored in artificial saliva for twenty four hours. The retentive strength of the crowns was determined by using a specially designed Instron Universal Testing Machine (Model 1011). The data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA to evaluate retentive strength for each cement and Tukey test for pair wise comparison. It was concluded that retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement was significantly higher than that of the conventional glass ionomer cement.

  5. Evaluation of Calcium Fluoroaluminosilicate Based Glass Ionomer Luting Cements Processed Both by Conventional and Microwave Assisted Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja Upadhya P.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium fluoroaluminosilicate glasses (CAS are used in the formulation of glass ionomer cements for dental applications. However, the cements obtained from CAS glasses were found to be radiolucent. In this study, the influence of substituting Zn, Sr and Mg for Ca of CAS glasses was investigated with respect to the structure and setting characteristics, mechanical properties, and radiopacity of cements designed for luting applications. Three glass compositions based on substitution of Zn, Sr and Mg for Ca at 1:1 molar ratio was synthesized. They were coded as the G 021 (Ca: Zn, G 022 (Ca: Sr, G 023 (Ca: Mg. G 021 and G 022 glasses were processed by conventional melt quench route, whereas G 023 was processed by microwave melt–quench route. Each glass was then mixed with Fuji Type I GIC liquid in order to evaluate the properties of novel cements at different powder/liquid ratios. X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy analysis confirmed the structure of the processed glasses. The average particle size of the processed glass powders was within specification limits for luting applications (<15 μm. The substitution of Zn, Sr and Mg for Ca at 1:1 molar ratio increased the reactivity of the respective glasses. This has been reflected in their respective setting characteristics and mechanical properties. The optimal combination of setting time, strength and radiopacity for the cements examined here was shown by G 022 cements. The microwave melting can be utilized for processing ionomer glasses as it did not alter the structure and properties of G 023 cement.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Siddharam M; Kamble, Vikas B; Desai, Raviraj G; Arabbi, Kashinath C; Prakash, Ved

    2015-08-01

    The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 37(0)c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of pstrength of the luting cements (pcore materials (pstrength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Shear bond strength of RMGIC luting cement was significantly higher than traditional GIC luting cement for all core buildup materials except, for silver amalgam core buildup material. RMGIC core material showed highest shear bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI Silver Reinforced, GI and

  7. Evaluation of Compressive Strength and Sorption/Solubility of Four Luting Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavangar MS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Statement of Problem: Compressive strength (CS and sorption/solubility of the luting cements are two associated factors. Searching a correlation between sorption/solubility and compressive strength of various luting cements is required. Objectives: To measure the water sorption/solubility, and compressive strength of three resin-based and one conventional glass ionomer (CGI luting cement after 1 and 24 h of immersion in distilled water and to determine if there is any correlation between those properties found. Materials and Methods: Four luting cements were investigated. For each material, 10 disc shaped specimens were prepared for measuring the sorption/solubility. The specimens were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions, and the sorption/solubility were measured in accordance with the ISO 4049’s. For testing the compression strength, for each material 16 cylindrical specimens were prepared by insertion of cements into a stainless steel split mould. The specimens were cured, divided into groups of 8, and then stored in distilled water at (37 ± 1°C for 1 and 24 h. The test was performed using the universal testing machine, the maximum load was recorded and CS was calculated. The data were analysed using SPSS software version 18. One-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey’s test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were performed. Results: G-CEM had the highest mean CS (153.60± 25.15 and CGI luting had the lowest CS (21.36±5.37 (p 0.05. The lowest mean sorption/solubility value was for RelyXTM U200 and Panavia F, and the highest for CGI luting (all p < 0.001. Conclusions: The compressive strength of all cements did not necessarily increase after 24 h and varied depending on the materials. There was a strong reverse correlation between sorption and CS values after both 1 and 24 h immersion. It may be practical for clinician to use those cements with the less sorption / solubility and more stable compression strength over

  8. COMPARISON OF BOND STRENGTH OF COMMERCIALLY PURE TITANIUM AND NICKEL CHROMIUM ALLOY WITH THREE DIFFERENT LUTING CEMENTS: AN IN-VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Metal ceramic fixed dental prosthesis remains widely used for oral rehabilitation. The type of alloy used to fabricate the metal substructure of the crown also affects its retention. The aim of this study is to compare the bond strength of commercially pure titanium and nickel chromium plates cemented with three different cements and to comparatively evaluate the bond strength of each luting cement. METHODS Specimens of each metal were divided into three groups, which received one of the following luting techniques: Group 1 (CPTi and Group 2 (NiCr with resin cement; Group 3 (CPTi and Group 4 (NiCr with Glass Ionomer Cement; Group 5 (CPTi and Group 6 (NiCr with Zinc phosphate cement. The bonded specimens were submitted for the bond strength tests conducted with a Universal Testing Machine with a shear mode under a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Debonded specimens were examined under electron microscope. RESULT The results indicate that Group 1 and 2 have significantly higher values than Group 3, 4, 5 and 6. Also, Group 3 and 4 have significantly higher values when compared to Group 5 and 6. Whereas, there was no significant difference between Group 1 and 2, Group 3 and 4 as well as Group 5 and 6. The scanning electron microscope illustrated the different modes of fracture that occurred at the metal cement interface. Resin cement showed predominantly cohesive failure. Glass ionomer cement showed a mixed mode of both cohesive and adhesive fracture and Zinc phosphate cement also showed mixed mode of fracture with predominantly adhesive failure. CONCLUSIONS Resin cements showed the most superior bond with both commercially pure titanium and nickel chromium metal. Zinc phosphate cement showed the lowest bond strength with both the metals. There was no significant difference observed between the cement bond with different metals.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  10. Correlation between margin fit and microleakage in complete crowns cemented with three luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Orlato Rossetti

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Microleakage can be related to margin misfit. Also, traditional microleakage techniques are time-consuming. This study evaluated the existence of correlation between in vitro margin fit and a new microleakage technique for complete crowns cemented with 3 different luting agents. Thirty human premolars were prepared for full-coverage crowns with a convergence angle of 6 degrees, chamfer margin of 1.2 mm circumferentially, and occlusal reduction of 1.5 mm. Ni-Cr cast crowns were cemented with either zinc phosphate (ZP (S.S. White, resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI (Rely X Luting Cement or a resin-based luting agent (RC (Enforce. Margin fit (seating discrepancy and margin gap was evaluated according to criteria in the literature under microscope with 0.001 mm accuracy. After thermal cycling, crowns were longitudinally sectioned and microleakage scores at tooth-cement interface were obtained and recorded at ×100 magnification. Margin fit parameters were compared with the one-way ANOVA test and microleakage scores with Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests (alpha=0.05. Correlation between margin fit and microleakage was analyzed with the Spearman's test (alpha=0.05. Seating discrepancy and marginal gap values ranged from 81.82 µm to 137.22 µm (p=0.117, and from 75.42 µm to 78.49 µm (p=0.940, respectively. Marginal microleakage scores were ZP=3.02, RMGI=0.35 and RC=0.12 (p0.05. Conclusion: Margin fit parameters and microleakage showed no strong correlations; cast crowns cemented with RMGI and RC had lower microleakage scores than ZP cement.

  11. Antibacterial force of the luting-type of glass ionomer cement toward Lactobacillus species and Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Warna Aju Fatmawati

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Rigid restoration is attached within oral cavity using adhesive cement layer. The hardening adhesive cement fills and tights the rough tooth surface with reciprocal opposing restorations. The luting type of glass ionomer cement was mostly used in the clinic for crown cementation as well as poured restoration. We can be taken a problem how strong is antibacterial effect of the luting type of glass ionomer cement to Lactobacillus species and Streptococcus Mutans. The purpose of the research was to know the antibacterial force of the luting-type of glass ionomer cement toward Lactobacillus species and Streptococcus mutans. This research was a laboratory experiment. The samples of the research were divided into two groups, treated-group (Fuji and Shofu and controlled-group. The numbers of samples in each group consisted of 7 pieces. Taking 0,5 ml of artificial saliva in which the sample of the luting-type of glass ionomer cement (5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick had been immersed and storing it into Petri dish containing warm MRSA and 0,1 ml Lactobacillus sp. using poured technique. The mixture was subsequently incubated, and the colony was counted on the observation of 1st day, 7th day, and 14th day. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and LSD. The result of the research showed that the greatest mean value of the bacterial colony presented in the controlled-group and the smallest was in the group of Shofu. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference (p < 0.05. The released fluoride from glass ionomer cement occurred in the damaging phase caused by polyacrylate that released H+ ion from carboxyl group (COOH. The fluoride influenced the growth of bacteria by decelerating the activity of gycolytic enolase enzyme. The luting-type of glass ionomer cement had antibacterial force toward Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus sp. The luting-type of glass ionomer cement of Shofu possessed greater antibacterial force than Fuji and controlledgroup.

  12. Ceramic inlay movement during polymerization of resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J A; Munksgaard, E C

    1995-06-01

    In cavities with no support for inlays, polymerization contraction of the resin cement may move the ceramic inlay axially. The purpose of this study was to determine the velocity and extent of such movement. Cylindrical ceramic inlays were placed in dentin cavities filled with one of four commercially available resin composite cements. An initial standardized 200-microns-thick cement film was created. The movement of the ceramic inlay during polymerization of one of the resin cements was measured by a dial gauge. The velocity of the inlay movement decreased exponentially with time and with a velocity constant of 0.09 min-1. The majority of the movement occurred within the first 12 min after photopolymerization and probably continued for several days, reaching an estimated value of 5.8 microns. After 1-2 d of water storage, 1-2-microns contraction gaps at the cavity floors were observed microscopically for every cement used. It is concluded that in cavities without support for the inlay, about 2/3 of the resin cement contraction results in movement of the inlay and about 1/3 results in formation of gaps at the cavity floors.

  13. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion.

  14. Post cementation sensitivity evaluation of glass Ionomer, zinc phosphate and resin modified glass Ionomer luting cements under class II inlays: An in vivo comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to compare the patient-perceived post-cementation sensitivity of class II metal restorations preoperatively, immediately after cementation, one week after cementation and one month after cementation with (1 Glass Ionomer luting cement (2 Zinc Phosphate cement and (3 Resin-modified Glass Ionomer luting cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, irrespective of sex, in the age group of 15-50 years were selected and the teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 20 each. Twenty inlay cast restorations were cemented with three different luting cements. The criteria adapted to measure tooth sensitivity in the present study were objective examination for sensitivity.(1 Cold water test (2 Compressed air test and (3 Biting pressure test. Results: The patients with restorations cemented with Resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity when compared with Glass Ionomer and zinc phosphate cement at all different intervals of time evaluated by different tests. Conclusion: The patients with restorations cemented with resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity.

  15. Correlation between Microleakage and Absolute Marginal Discrepancy in Zirconia Crowns Cemented with Four Resin Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Martínez-Rus; Guillermo, Pradíes

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate microleakage and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) and to assess correlation between AMD and microleakage with four resin luting cements. Material and Methods. 20 extracted human third molars were prepared for full-coverage crowns. 20 zirconia copings were made (LAVA, 3M ESPE) and cemented. Specimens were randomly allocated for each used type of cement into 4 groups, RelyX® (Rx), Multilink® (Mk), PANAVIA 2.1® (P), and Maxcem® (Mx) and immersed in 10% safranin for 72 hours. 20x magnification lenses were used to observe microleakage areas (μm2) and images software was used to measure AMD areas (μm). Discrepancy and microleakage between the cements were compared with one-way ANOVA test with confidence interval of 95%. Results. Rx Group showed microleakage has lowest value and AMD has highest value. P Group showed microleakage has the highest value and Mk Group presented AMD has lowest value. There were no significative differences between the cements. There were no linear correlations between microleakage and AMD; however a complex regression statistical model obtained allowed formulating an association between both variables (microleakage = AMD0,896). Conclusions. No significative differences were found among 4 types of cements. No linear correlations between AMD and microleakage were found. Clinical Significance. AMD is not easily related to microleakage. Characteristics of cements are fundamental to decreasing of microleakage values. PMID:27721830

  16. Correlation between Microleakage and Absolute Marginal Discrepancy in Zirconia Crowns Cemented with Four Resin Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Coronel Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate microleakage and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD and to assess correlation between AMD and microleakage with four resin luting cements. Material and Methods. 20 extracted human third molars were prepared for full-coverage crowns. 20 zirconia copings were made (LAVA, 3M ESPE and cemented. Specimens were randomly allocated for each used type of cement into 4 groups, RelyX® (Rx, Multilink® (Mk, PANAVIA 2.1® (P, and Maxcem® (Mx and immersed in 10% safranin for 72 hours. 20x magnification lenses were used to observe microleakage areas (μm2 and images software was used to measure AMD areas (μm. Discrepancy and microleakage between the cements were compared with one-way ANOVA test with confidence interval of 95%. Results. Rx Group showed microleakage has lowest value and AMD has highest value. P Group showed microleakage has the highest value and Mk Group presented AMD has lowest value. There were no significative differences between the cements. There were no linear correlations between microleakage and AMD; however a complex regression statistical model obtained allowed formulating an association between both variables (microleakage = AMD0,896. Conclusions. No significative differences were found among 4 types of cements. No linear correlations between AMD and microleakage were found. Clinical Significance. AMD is not easily related to microleakage. Characteristics of cements are fundamental to decreasing of microleakage values.

  17. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p strengths after thermocycling were not remarkable as compared with the corresponding prethermal cycling groups (p > 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p strength, whereas the specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.6 +/- 0.4 MPa) showed the lowest. After thermocycling, the bond strength values of specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.1 +/- 0.1 MPa) and Super-Bond C&B (1.7 +/- 0.4 MPa) decreased; however, this was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling was also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Variolink II and Panavia F systems showed higher shear bond strength values than Chemiace II and

  18. Effect of axial groove and resin luting cements on the retention of complete cast metal crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The design of the tooth preparation and the cementing medium are important consid-erations in the retention of crowns and fixed partial dentures. The purpose of this invitro study was to determine the effect of axial groove on the retention of complete cast metal crowns using two resin luting cements. Methods: Forty freshly extracted intact human molar teeth were prepared in their long axis to receive complete cast metal crowns. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (one control and one study group. An axial groove of uniform size and shape was made on the prepared teeth under the study group. Axial surface area of prepared teeth specimens was measured. Complete cast metal crowns were fabricated for each specimen. Specimens of each group were divided into subgroups of 10 samples and were cemented with two resin luting cements, RelyX Unicem® and Calibra®, re-spectively. The cemented crowns were loaded in tension using a Universal Instron testing machine. The maximal tensile strength was recorded. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05. Results: No significant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 5.76±0.392 MPa and study (mean: 5.93±0.751 MPa groups cemented with RelyX Unicem. No sig-nificant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 4.92±0.641 MPa and study (mean: 5.15 ±0.478 MPa groups cemented with Calibra. However, significant dif-ference in the tensile stress values was found between the two resin cements in the control and study groups. Conclusion: Axial groove placed in tooth preparations for resin bonded complete cast metal crowns had no statistically significant effect on retention. The use of (RelyX Unicem® yielded greater reten-tion values when compared to Calibra®.

  19. Effect of 2% chlorhexidine on dentin microtensile bond strengths and nanoleakage of luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraishi, N; Yiu, C K Y; King, N M; Tay, F R

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pre-treatment by chlorhexidine on the microtensile bond strength (mTBS) of resin cements and nanoleakage at the resin-dentine interfaces. Cylindrical composite blocks were luted to human dentine using resin cements (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE: ARC; Panavia F, Kuraray Medical Inc.: PF; RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE: UN) with/without pre-treatment by 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CAVITY CLEANSER, Bisco, Inc., Schaumburg, IL, USA). CAVITY CLEANSER was applied on the acid etched dentine for 60s in the ARC group, and on smear layer-covered dentine in the PF and UN groups. After storage in water for 24h, the bonded teeth were sectioned into 1mm thick slabs and further into 0.9mm x 0.9mm beams. After immersion in water or ammoniacal silver nitrate for 24h, the beams were stressed to failure in tension. The fractured surfaces were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) using backscattered electron mode. The silver-stained slabs were used to examine nanoleakage within the bonded interface by FE-SEM. The resin cement and chlorhexidine treatment had significant effects (p<0.0001) on mTBS; while the storage media had no significant effect (p=0.435). The mTBS of ARC was significantly higher than the other cements. Chlorhexidine reduced mTBS and produced pronounced nanoleakage when PF and UC were luted to dentine. Pre-treatment with chlorhexidine affected the integrity of dentine bonding with PF and UC, while there was no adverse effect on coupling of ARC.

  20. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  1. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  2. 四种修复粘接材料的体外细胞毒性研究%Cytotoxicity of four kinds of dental cements in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖丹; 张振庭

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the cytotoxic effect of 4 kinds of dental luting agents-zinc phosphate cement,glass ionomer cement ( FujiIl) , resin modified glassionomer cement ( RelyXTM Luting), resin composite cement ( Super-Bond C&B) on primary human pulp cells in vitro. Methods Normal human dental pulp was collected and cultured by tissue explant methods. The eluates of the dental cements were prepared. MTT method was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of dental materials. Results The cytotoxicity of dental cements exhibited as following; zinc phosphate cement < glass ionomer cement (Fujil) < resin composite cement(Super-Bond C&B) < resin modified glassionomer cement (RelyX Luting). The difference was statistically significant (P < 0. 05). Conclusion Zinc phosphate cement, glass ionomer cement (Fujil) ,resin composite cement(Super-Bond C&B) is mildly cytotoxic,and resin modified glassionomer cement (RelyXTM Luting) moderately cytotoxic.%目的 比较4种修复粘接材料—聚羧酸锌水门汀、玻璃离子水门汀( FujiI)、树脂改性玻璃离子水门汀( RelyXTM Luting)、树脂类粘接剂(Super-Bond C&B)对人牙髓细胞的生物学作用.方法 原代培养人牙髓细胞,同时制备各材料样品,浸入α-MEM培养基制取材料浸提液.分别将各材料的浸提液与第4代人牙髓细胞共同培养,以MTF法评价材料的细胞毒性.结果 人牙髓细胞在4种修复粘接材料浸提液作用下,细胞相对增值率(RGR)与对照组相比均有显著性差异(P<0.05).在相同浸提液浓度组,细胞毒性由低到高排序均为:聚羧酸锌水门汀<FujiⅠ<Super-Bond C&B< RelyXTM Luting.结论 聚羧酸锌水门汀、玻璃离子水门汀(Fujil)、树脂类粘接剂(SuperBond C&B)具有轻度细胞毒性.树脂改性玻璃离子水门汀(RelyXTM Luting)具有中度细胞毒性.

  3. Adhesion of composite luting cement to Er:YAG-laser-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Teresa C D; de Freitas, Patricia M; Navarro, Ricardo S; Eduardo, Carlos de P; Mori, Matsuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    Although some studies claim to the increase of composite resin adhesion to Er:YAG-laser-treated dentin, there are still no reports on the adhesion of composite resin cements to the irradiated surface. This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength (TBS) of a composite resin cement to dentin treated with the Er:YAG laser. Sixty human dentin samples were divided into four groups (n = 15): G1 (Control)-no treatment; G2-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 2 Hz, with water cooling, non-contact (19 J/cm(2)); G3-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 10 Hz, 50/10 fiber, contact, without water cooling (40 J/cm(2)); G4-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 10 Hz, 50/10 fiber, contact, with water cooling (40 J/cm(2)). After the surface treatment, each sample was submitted to bonding procedures. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests revealed no statistical significant difference on TBS values for groups G1 (13.73 +/- 3.05 MPa), G2 (12.60 +/- 2.09 MPa) and G4 (11.17 +/- 4.04 MPa). G4 was not statistically different from G3 (8.64 +/- 2.06 MPa). Er:YAG laser irradiation with different settings can constitute an alternative tool to the use of composite resin-luting cements.

  4. The effect of preparation height and taper on cement lute stress: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, P H; Wakefieldt, A J; O'Doherty, D M; Rees, J S

    2006-12-01

    Three dimensional finite element models of an upper second premolar and molar with full veneer gold crown preparations were developed from extracted samples. The cement lute width was kept constant at 40 microm, but the height and preparation taper were varied. For both models the preparation height was either 1.5 mm (short preparation) or 3 mm (long preparation). The preparation taper was either 10 degree or 30 degree, giving a total of eight models. Each model was loaded with a 10 N horizontal load, a 10 N vertical load or a 10 N load distributed across the occlusal surface. The maximum shear stress and the maximum Von Mises' stress in the cement lute of each model were recorded. For the premolar, the maximum shear stresses ranged from 0.3-5.43 MPa and the maximum Von Mises' stress ranged from 1.44-14.98 MPa. For the molar, the maximum shear stresses ranged from 0.15-5.22 MPa and the maximum Von Mises' stress ranged from 0.3 7-15.02 MPa. The stress fields were consistently higher in the premolar with a 30 degree preparation taper compared to the 10 degree taper. The attainment of a cavity taper of 100 is still important to minimise stress in the cement lute and is particularly important in teeth with a lower preparation surface area such as a premolar

  5. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  6. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? – Properties, Limitations and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lohbauer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical properties, such as low fracture strength, toughness and wear, limit their extensive use in dentistry as a filling material in stress-bearing applications. In the posterior dental region, glass ionomer cements are mostly used as a temporary filling material. The requirement to strengthen those cements has lead to an ever increasing research effort into reinforcement or strengthening concepts.

  7. In vitro evaluation of microleakage of various types of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Vesna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Microleakage is defined as the clinically undetectable seepage of oral fluids containing bacteria and debris between cement layer and tooth restoration. Objective. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different dental cements (zinc-phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass-ionomer and resin cement on microleakage in different ceramic crown systems (metal ceramic crown, metal ceramic crown with a porcelain margin, Empress 2 and In Ceram all-ceramic crowns fixed on extracted human teeth. Methods. One hundred and sixty intact human premolars were randomized to four groups of forty teeth each, according to the different ceramic crown systems. They were prepared in a standardized manner for metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns. Crowns were made following a standard laboratory technique, and each group of crowns were divided into four groups according to the different cement agents and cemented on their respective abutments. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, placed in methylene blue solutions, embedded in resin blocks and vertically cut in the bucco-oral and meso-distal direction. The microleakage in the area of tooth-cement interface was defined as linear penetration of methylene blue and was determined with a microscope to assign microleakage scores using a five-point scale. Results. A significant association was found between a cement type and degree of microleakage (p=0.001. No statistically significant differences were found among the different ceramic crown systems luted with the same dental cement. The smallest degree of microleakage was observed in specimens luted with resin cement (X=1.73, followed by glass-ionomer cement (X=2.45 and polycarboxylate cement (X=3.20. The greatest degree of microleakage was detected in the crowns fixed with zincphosphate cement (X=3.33. Conclusion. The investigated dental cements revealed different sealing abilities. The use of resin cement resulted in the percentage of 0

  8. Tensile bond strength of resin luting cement to glass infiltrated porous aluminium oxide cores (In-Ceram).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidor, F; Stokholm, R; Ravnholt, G

    1995-09-01

    The effect of various methods of surface treatment of glass infiltrated aluminium oxide (In-Ceram) on tensile bond strength was evaluated. Test specimens were formed as bars. After surface treatment of the flat ends, two bars were bonded together with either a dual curing resin (Twinlook) or a chemical curing resin with a phosphate monomer (Panavia Ex). After cementation the specimens were stored in humid conditions for 1 week and then thermocycled 1,000 times between 15 degrees C and 60 degrees C. The highest median tensile bond strengths were obtained with the Silicoater MD-method without the Opaquer and Twinlook as luting agent (23.9 MPa) or with sandblasting with 250 micrometers Al2O3 particles and Panavia Ex as luting agent (22.0 MPa).

  9. The effect of curing light and chemical catalyst on the degree of conversion of two dual cured resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different curing lights and chemical catalysts on the degree of conversion of resin luting cements. A total of 60 disk-shaped specimens of RelyX ARC or Panavia F of diameter 5 mm and thickness 0.5 mm were prepared and the respective chemical catalyst (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus or ED Primer) was added. The specimens were light-cured using different curing units (an argon ion laser, an LED or a quartz-tungsten-halogen light) through shade A2 composite disks of diameter 10 mm and thickness 2 mm. After 24 h of dry storage at 37°C, the degree of conversion of the resin luting cements was measured by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. For statistical analysis, ANOVA and the Tukey test were used, with p ≤ 0.05. Panavia F when used without catalyst and cured using the LED or the argon ion laser showed degree of conversion values significantly lower than RelyX ARC, with and without catalyst, and cured with any of the light sources. Therefore, the degree of conversion of Panavia F with ED Primer cured with the quartz-tungsten-halogen light was significantly different from that of RelyX ARC regardless of the use of the chemical catalyst and light curing source. In conclusion, RelyX ARC can be cured satisfactorily with the argon ion laser, LED or quartz-tungsten-halogen light with or without a chemical catalyst. To obtain a satisfactory degree of conversion, Panavia F luting cement should be used with ED Primer and cured with halogen light.

  10. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Menezes de MENDONÇA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives: To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein, used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin, after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods: Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10 according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal and R (resin- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5 were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results: Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231. Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001 and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007. Conclusion: The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the

  11. A Review of Luting Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis H. Pameijer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the availability of a large number of luting agents (dental cements proper selection can be a daunting task and is usually based on a practitioner’s reliance on experience and preference and less on in depth knowledge of materials that are used for the restoration and luting agent properties. This review aims at presenting an overview of current cements and discusses physical properties, biocompatibility and other properties that make a particular cement the preferred choice depending on the clinical indication. Tables are provided that outline the different properties of the generic classification of cements. It should be noted that no recommendations are made to use a particular commercial cement for a hypothetical clinical situation. The choice is solely the responsibility of the practitioner. The appendix is intended as a guide for the practitioner towards a recommended choice under commonly encountered clinical scenarios. Again, no commercial brands are recommended although the author recognizes that some have better properties than others. Please note that this flowchart strictly presents the author’s opinion and is based on research, clinical experience and the literature.

  12. Survey of United States dental schools on cementation protocols for implant crown restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarica, Diane Yoshinobu; Alvarado, Veronica M; Truong, Samantha T

    2010-02-01

    With conflicting results in the literature and various manufacturer recommendations, it is not known what cementation protocols are currently being used for implant restorations in US dental schools. The purpose of this survey was to determine what dental cementation protocols are taught and recommended by 62 US dental schools and postgraduate programs. From February to September 2008, 96 questionnaires consisting of 8 questions were sent to the chairperson or director of restorative departments, advanced prosthodontics programs, and implant programs. The questionnaire asked recipients which implant manufacturers provided the products used at their dental schools. Additionally, recipients were queried as to the choice of material and techniques for abutment and restoration preparations prior to definitive cementation. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. A total of 68 (71%) surveys were returned, and 52 (84%) of the 62 predoctoral and postgraduate programs were represented. After deleting duplicate responses, 31 surveys were returned from restorative department chairpersons, 29 from advanced prosthodontic program directors, and 2 from implant program directors. Frequency of responses to each question was tabulated, and results are presented in 3 sections. For all 3 types of programs, Nobel Biocare was reported to be the most widely used implant system, followed by Biomet 3i, Straumann, Astra Tech, and Zimmer Dental systems. The most commonly used technique prior to definitive cementation is to airborne-particle abrade the intaglio surface of the restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer is the most frequently used luting agent for cementing implant restorations. The 5 most commonly used materials to fill screw access openings are cotton pellets, composite resin, rubber-based material, gutta-percha, and light-polymerized provisional composite resin. Most predoctoral and postgraduate programs teach students to fill the screw access opening completely to

  13. Nanoleakage of fiber posts luted with different adhesive strategies and the effect of chlorhexidine on the interface of dentin and self-adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Araujo, Cintia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lucia Trazzi; de Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the nanoleakage of fiber posts luted using different adhesive strategies and to investigate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) on nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interfaces of self-adhesive cements. The self-adhesive and etch-and-rinse adhesive groups tested demonstrated similar results with regard to nanoleakage. Pretreatment with CHX promoted an adequate seal at the resin-dentin interface for self-adhesive cements.

  14. Immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of different luting resin cements to different regional dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdelraheem Mohamed; Hamouda, Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazy, Mohamed Hamed; Abo-Madina, Manal Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We sought to evaluate immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of Panavia F2.0 and Multilink Sprint resin cement to superficial, deep and cervical dentin. Thirty-six freshly extracted non-carious human molars were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to expose three different dentin regions including superficial dentin (1 mm below the dentine-enamel junction), deep dentin (1 mm above the highest pulp horn) and cervical dentin (0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and 0.5 mm below the dentine-enamel junction). Resin cements were applied on dentin surfaces and composite blocks were luted under constant seating pressure. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to time intervals. Specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of 1 mm(2) in diameter and subjected to microtensile bond strength testing at a cross head speed of 1 mm/min. Both resin cements showed higher micro-tensile bond strength to superficial dentin than that to deep or cervical dentin (P Micro-tensile bond strengths of Panavia F2.0 were higher than those of Multilink Sprint at different dentin regions (P micro-tensile bond strengths were higher than those of delayed micro-tensile bond strengths for both resin cements (P micro-tensile bond strengths to different dentin regions.

  15. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement.

  16. Effect of surface treatments of laboratory-fabricated composites on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos José; Giannini, Marcelo; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares de; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on composite resin on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement. Two laboratory composites for indirect restorations, Solidex and Targis, and a conventional composite, Filtek Z250, were tested. Forty-eight composite resin blocks (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm) were incrementally manufactured, which were randomly divided into six groups, according to the surface treatments: 1- control, 600-grit SiC paper (C); 2- silane priming (SI); 3- sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 for 10s (SA); 4- etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (HF); 5- HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Composite blocks submitted to similar surface treatments were bonded together with the resin adhesive Single Bond and Rely X luting composite. A 500-g load was applied for 5 minutes and the samples were light-cured for 40s. The bonded blocks were serially sectioned into 3 slabs with 0.9mm of thickness perpendicularly to the bonded interface (n = 12). Slabs were trimmed to a dumbbell shape and tested in tension at 0.5mm/min. For all composites tested, the application of a silane primer after sandblasting provided the highest bond strength means.

  17. Adhesion of indirect MOD resin composite inlays luted with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, T; Abe, T; Ito, Y; Pilecki, P; Wilson, R F; Watson, T F; Foxton, R M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of loading on the bond strength to dentin and microleakage of MOD indirect composite restorations bonded with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements with or without acid etching of the proximal enamel margins. Class II MOD cavities were prepared in 48 molar teeth into dentin and divided into three groups of 16 teeth. Impressions were taken and indirect composite inlays fabricated (Estenia C & B). The enamel margins of the proximal boxes of half the specimens were phosphoric acid etched, and the inlays were cemented with one of three cements (Panavia F 2.0, SA Cement, or Rely X Unicem). After luting, eight teeth in each cement group were mechanically loaded at 2.5 cycles/s for 250,000 cycles. Unloaded teeth acted as controls. Teeth were stored in Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours, sectioned buccolingually at the proximal boxes to examine microleakage using confocal microscopy, and further sectioned for μTBS testing of the resin-dentin interface. Analysis of variance was performed to assess the effect of loading and acid etching on microleakage and bond strength. Acid etching had no effect on microleakage. No significant difference in the dentin bond strengths between the three cements existed after loading. Panavia F 2.0 exhibited a significant reduction in bond strength. With regard to microleakage at the proximal boxes, loading had no effect on dye penetration at the cavity floor. However, at the axial walls, loading had a significant deleterious effect on Panavia F 2.0. No difference in microleakage existed between the three cements at both sites before and after loading. In conclusion, the two tested self-adhesive cements exhibited similar bond strengths before and after loading to the self-etching resin cement. Loading reduced dentin bond strengths and increased microleakage at the resin-dentin interface. However, acid etching of the enamel margins had no significant effect on microleakage in the approximal regions of

  18. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ergun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED light-curing units (LCUs have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time and 40 s (100% exposure time. After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x10(4 per well and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. RESULTS: Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively. For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical

  19. Marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of 2 zirconia crown systems luted with glass ionomer and MDP-based cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Isil; Turker, Begum; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and phosphate monomer-containing resin cement (MDP-RC) under 2 zirconia crown systems (Cercon and DC-Zirkon). Forty human premolars were prepared for all-ceramic zirconia crowns with a 1 mm circumferential finish line and a 1.5 mm occlusal reduction. The crowns (n = 10 per group) from each zirconia system were randomly divided into 2 groups and cemented either with GIC (Vivaglass CEM) or MDP-RC (Panavia F 2.0) cement. The cemented crowns were thermocycled 5000 times (5°-55°C). The crowns were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye solution for 24 hours and sectioned buccolingually and mesiodistally. Specimens were examined under optical microscope (100X). Data were analyzed using Student t-test and chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Mean marginal gap values for Cercon (85 ± 11.4 μm) were significantly higher than for DC-Zircon (75.3 ± 13.2 μm) (P = 0.018). The mean cement thickness values of GIC (81.7 ± 13.9 μm) and MDP-RC (78.5 ± 12.5 μm) were not significantly different (P = 0.447). Microleakage scores did not demonstrate significant difference between GIC (P = 0.385) and MDP-RC (P = 0.631) under Cercon or DC-Zircon. Considering the cement thickness values and microleakage scores obtained, both zirconia crown systems could be cemented in combination with either GIC or MDP-RC.

  20. Effects of the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on mechanical properties of luting and lining glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Bagheri, Hossein; Rangrazi, Abdolrasoul; Mojtaba Zebarjad, Seyed

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into glass ionomer cements (GICs) has attracted interest due to its remineralization of teeth and its antibacterial effects. However, it should be investigated to ensure that the incorporation of CPP-ACP does not have significant adverse effects on its mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the addition of CPP-ACP on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC. The first step was to synthesize the CPP-ACP. Then the CPP-ACP at concentrations of 1%, 1.56% and 2% of CPP-ACP was added into a luting and lining GIC. GIC without CPP-ACP was used as a control group. The results revealed that the incorporation of CPP-ACP up to 1.56%(w/w) increased the flexural strength (29%), diametral tensile strength (36%) and microhardness (18%), followed by a reduction in these mechanical properties at 2%(w/w) CPP-ACP. The wear rate was significantly decreased (23%) in 1.56%(w/w) concentration of CPP-ACP and it was increased in 2%(w/w). Accordingly, the addition of 1.56%(w/w) CPP-ACP into luting and lining GIC had no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC and could be used in clinical practice.

  1. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  2. Effect of Preparation Taper, Height and Marginal Design Under Varying Occlusal Loading Conditions on Cement Lute Stress: A Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Siddhi; Amarnath, Gowdagere Shamanna; Muddugangadhar, Byrasandra Channapa; Sharma, Ashish; Choudhary, Suchismita

    2014-12-01

    To assess the effect of preparation taper, height and margin design under different loading conditions on cement lute stress. A 3-D FE model of an upper second premolar and molar was developed from CT scan of human skull using software programmes (MIMICS, Hypermesh and ANSYS). 10° and 30° taper, 3 and 5 mm preparation height and shoulder and chamfer finish lines were used. Type 1 Glass ionomer cement with 24 μm lute width was taken and the model was loaded under 100 N horizontal point load, vertical point load distributed axial load. The maximum shear stress and Von Mises stress within the cement lute were recorded. The maximum shear stresses ranged from 1.70 to 3.93 MPa (horizontal point loading), 0.66 to 3.04 MPa (vertical point loading), 0.38 to 0.87 MPa (distributed loading). The maximum Von Mises stresses ranged from 3.39 to 10.62 MPa (horizontal point loading), 1.93 to 8.58 MPa (vertical point loading) and 1.49 to 3.57 MPa (distributed loading). The combination of 10° taper and 5 mm height had the lowest stress field while the combination of 30° taper and 5 mm height had the highest stress field. Distributed axial loading shows least stress, better stress homogenization and gives a favorable prognosis for the fixed prostheses. Smaller preparation taper of 10° is biomechanically more acceptable than a 30° taper. It is desirable to decrease taper as height increases. The chamfer margin design is associated with greater local cement stresses toward the margins that could place the cement at greater risk for microfracture and failure.

  3. 口腔黏结材料与临床黏结过程%The dental cement and cementation technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 王冬英

    2009-01-01

    黏结是固定修复的最后环节,黏结材料的选择和黏结过程的完成对固定修复体的使用寿命有很大的影响.临床医生应合理地选择黏结材料,精细地完成黏结过程.达到最佳的修复效果.%The final step of fixed prosthodontics is ce-mentation. The clinical durability of fixed prosthodontics de-pends on the luting cements and cementation. Dentists should choose luting cements reasonably and do cementation careful-ly, make the fixed prosthodontics expectation as long as possi-ble.

  4. Effect of tightening torque on the marginal adaptation of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Jalil; Dashti, Hossin; Karamad, Reza; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    The final position of the abutment changes with the amount of tightening torque. This could eventually lead to loss of passivity and marginal misfit of prostheses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different tightening torques on the marginal adaptation of 3-unit cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Two implants (Straumann) were inserted in an acrylic block so that one of the implants was placed vertically and the other at a 15° vertical angle. A straight abutment and a 15° angulated abutment were connected to the vertically and obliquely installed implants, respectively, so that the two abutments were parallel. Then, 10 cement-retained FDPs were waxed and cast. Abutments were tightened with 10, 20, and 35 Ncm torques, respectively. Following each tightening torque, FDPs were luted on respective abutments with temporary cement. The marginal adaptation of the retainers was evaluated using stereomicroscope. FDPs were then removed from the abutments and were sectioned at the connector sites. The retainers were luted again on their respective abutments. Luting procedures and marginal adaptation measurement were repeated. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and least significant difference tests (α = 0.05). After cutting the FDP connectors, the independent samples t-test was used to compare misfit values (α = 0.05). Following 10, 20, and 35 Ncm tightening torques, the marginal discrepancy of the retainers of FDPs significantly increased (P 0.05). The marginal gap values of angulated abutment retainers (ANRs) were significantly higher than those of the straight abutment after cutting the connectors (P = 0.026). Within the limitations of this study, the marginal misfit of cement-retained FDPs increased continuously when the tightening torque increased. After cutting the connectors, the marginal misfit of the ANRs was higher than those of the straight abutment retainers.

  5. Does dental zinc phosphate cement really shrink in clinical applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Hai-Yang

    2009-08-01

    Crowns are cemented onto abutments with adhesives; and zinc phosphate cement is a routine permanent luting agent, which is believed to secure crowns to abutments by non-adhesive micro-mechanical interlocking. Because it has been proven, and the public widely accepts, that zinc phosphate cement forms no chemical bonds with either the crown or the tooth tissue; it is impossible for the cement to attain adequate retention force if it contracts in volume. Assuming that the cement contracts in volume after setting, the prosthesis tends to loose and is doomed to be hampered by fretting damage when it functions during the masticatory cycle; thus the prognosis for the prosthesis is questionable. However, zinc phosphate is popular because of its brilliant clinical record. This paradox between theory and practice indicates that something might be wrong with the standing theory. The most possible problem with previous studies is that their samples' dimensions differ from those that are used clinically, which causes the studies' results, which claim that the cement shrinks, to deviate from clinical results. The real rationale must be that the zinc phosphate cement tends to expand in volume, and thus mechanically fasten the crown to the abutment.

  6. Intracoronal sealing ability of two dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John D; Pashley, David H; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman; Kimbrough, W Frank; Pereira, Patricia N

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of sealing the coronal 2-mm of the root canals versus covering the entire pulpal floor with one of two dental-resin cements (Principle or C&B Metabond). Sixty-two molars with the occlusal half of the crowns and the apical half of the roots removed were used. Each canal was enlarged by using a #3 Gates Glidden bur and obturated with unsealed gutta-percha cones. The teeth were randomly assigned to four groups, each containing 15 teeth, plus a negative and a positive control. In group 1, 2 mm of Principle were placed over the entire pulpal floor. In group 2, Principle was placed 2 mm into each canal orifice. Groups 3 and 4 were the same as groups 1 and 2, except C&B Metabond cement was used. After the cement set, the gutta-percha was removed and the integrity of the seal was tested by fluid filtration at a pressure of 20 cm H2O at 1 h and at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. The data were analyzed by a three-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls tests at alpha = 0.05. The controls behaved as expected. Results showed that there were no statistically significant differences among the materials used or the location (p > 0.05), but there was a significant difference with respect to time. Principle leaked significantly more than C&B Metabond at 1 h (p < 0.05), but the seal became tighter over time. C&B Metabond leaked less early (p < 0.05) but increased in leakage at 4 weeks. Both materials sealed well over the 4-week study. Principle was easier to use, and sealing the entire pulpal floor was easier than sealing only the canal orifice.

  7. The effects of different shades of resin luting cement on the color of ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Mohammed Q; Aljurais, Rana M; Alshaafi, Maan M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the effects of different shades of light-polymerized resin cement on the color of two different thicknesses (0.5 mm and 0.7 mm) of three different ceramic materials (Esthetic, e.max, and ZirPress). A spectrophotometer (Color Eye 7000A - CIE (L*a*b*) was used to measure the color of specimens on the control substrate without cement, and then on (Translucent, White Opaque, B0.5, A1, and A3 of RelyX™ Veneer cement). The mean values of color difference (ΔE) were higher for Esthetic, followed by ZirPress, with the lowest values for e.max. The mean values of ΔE decreased when the thickness of ceramic increased from 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm. It was observed that the White Opaque had significantly increased ΔE values when compared with (TR, B0.5, A1, and A3), whereas no significant difference between B0.5 and TR, and between B0.5 and A3.

  8. Development of fluorapatite cement for dental enamel defects repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Wang, Jiecheng; Shan, Wenpeng; Liu, Xiaochen; Ma, Jian; Liu, Changsheng; Fang, Jing; Wei, Shicheng

    2011-06-01

    In order to restore the badly carious lesion of human dental enamel, a crystalline paste of fluoride substituted apatite cement was synthesized by using the mixture of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP), dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and ammonium fluoride. The apatite cement paste could be directly filled into the enamel defects (cavities) to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the hardened cement was fluorapatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)F(2), FA] with calcium to phosphorus atom molar ratio (Ca/P) of 1.67 and Ca/F ratio of 5. The solubility of FA cement in Tris-HCl solution (pH = 5) was slightly lower than the natural enamel, indicating the FA cement was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solutions. The FA cement was tightly combined with the enamel surface, and there was no obvious difference of the hardness between the FA cement and natural enamel. The extracts of FA cement caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. In addition, the results showed that the FA cement had good mechanical strength, hydrophilicity, and anti-bacterial adhesion properties. The study suggested that using FA cement was simple and promising approach to effectively and conveniently restore enamel defects.

  9. Investigation of Antioxidant Capacity of Several Luting Cements Processes by HPMC Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Dragan V

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free radicals (FR occur in oral cavity where lot of food was transferred to through entire life under specific saliva conditions. Many enzymes, microorganism, alcohol beverages, nicotine and other harmful or indifferent substances when in contact to oral tissues might provoke oxidation process under specific condition creating FRʼs. The similar role might have various dental materials.

  10. A comparison study on the flexural strength and compressive strength of four resin-modified luting glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Xuehui; Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in flexural strength and compressive strength between four resin-modified luting glass ionomer cements that are commonly used in clinics. Furthermore, this study investigates the influence of curing mode on the flexural strength and compressive strength of dual-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Initially, flexural strength and compressive strength test specimens were prepared for RL, NR, GCP, and GCC. The RL group and NR group were cured by the light-curing mode and chemical-curing mode. Five specimens were prepared for each test group, and the flexural strength and compressive strength of each were measured. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA with SPSS 13.0. Furthermore, the fracture morphology of the flexural specimens was observed by SEM. The result of the mean flexural strength of each group is as follows: the NR light-cured group > NR chemically-cured group > GCP > RL light-cured group > GCC > RL chemically-cured group. More specifically, the flexural strength of the NR light-cured group ((42.903±4.242) MPa) is significantly higher (P NR chemically-cured group > NR light-cured group > GCC > RL light-cured group > RL chemically-cured group. Although the compressive strengths of the NR and GCP groups are higher than those of the GCC and RL groups, there are no significant differences (P>0.05) between NR and GCP, and no significant differences between GCC and RL. Furthermore, there are no significant differences (P>0.05) between the two curing modes on NR and RL. From the present study, it can be concluded that NR has superior flexural strength and compressive strength compared to the other three materials. Additionally, the curing mode can affect the flexural strength of dual-cured RMGIC because with the light-curing mode, the flexural strength is higher than with the chemical-curing mode. Therefore, light curing is an essential procedure when using dual-cured RMGIC in clinics.

  11. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Devi Parameswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding. In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has

  12. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer.

  13. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  14. Influence of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of pressed ceramic luted to dentin with self-etch resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A-D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  15. A castor oil-containing dental luting agent: effects of cyclic loading and storage time on flexural strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derceli, Juliana Dos Reis; Fais, Laiza Maria Grassi; Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Favorable results in the use of castor oil polyurethane (COP) as pulp capping, membrane material, sealer, mouthwash and in bone repair, associated with the fact that Ricinus communis is not derived from petroleum and it is abundant in Brazil, encourage researches in the development of luting agents. Objectives This study compared the flexural strength (FS) of a castor oil-containing dental luting agent with a weight percentage of 10% (wt%) of calcium carbonate (COP10) with RelyX ARC (RX) after mechanical cycling (MC) and distilled water storage. Material and Methods Sixty-four specimens (25x2x2 mm) were fabricated and divided into two groups, COP10 and RX (control). Each group was divided into 4 subgroups (n=8) according to the storage time, 24 hours (24 h) or 60 days (60 d), and the performance (MC+FS) or not (only FS) of the mechanical cycling test. The FS (10 kN; 0.5 mm/min) and MC tests (10,000 cycles, 5 Hz, 0.5 mm/min) were carried out using an MTS-810 machine. The data were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Results The obtained FS (MPa) values were: COP10 24h- 19.04±2.41; COP10 60d- 17.92±3.54; RX 24h- 75.19±3.43; RX 60d- 88.77±6.89. All the RX specimens submitted to MC fractured, while the values for COP10 after MC were as follows: COP10 24h- 17.90±1.87 and COP10 60d- 18.60±1.60. Conclusions A castor oil-containing dental luting agent with a weight percentage of 10% (wt%) of calcium carbonate is resistant to mechanical cycling without decreases in flexural strength. However, mean COP10 showed only about 25% of the RelyX ARC mean flexural strength.

  16. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  17. Development of dental resin luting agents based on Bis-EMA4: bond strength evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of incorporating Bis-EMA4 monomer into experimental Bis-GMA/TEGDMA-based resin luting agents on the bond strength to dentin. Seven mixtures were prepared with the following ratios (wt% of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA/Bis-EMA4: 50/50/0, 50/30/20, 50/10/40, 50/0/50, 30/10/60, 10/10/80 and 0/0/100. Camphorquinone (0.4 wt%, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (0.8 wt% and hydroquinone (0.2 wt% were dissolved in each mixture, which was loaded with silanated strontium glass fillers to a constant content of 60 wt%. Bond strength was evaluated by microshear testing (n = 10 on bovine dentin. Data were submitted to Analysis of Variance (p<0.05. Modes of failure were classified under magnification (200×. Bond strength means (MPa, respective to each agent, were: 19.4, 19.8, 20.0, 19.1, 16.8, 18.7 and 17.8. No significant differences were detected among groups. Mixed failures were generally predominant for all materials. In conclusion, the addition of Bis-EMA4 presented no significant influence on the bond strength of the experimental resin luting agents to dentin.

  18. In vivo characterization of polymer based dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiyanti P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In vivo studies investigating the characterization of dental cements have been demonstrated. As few in vitro studies on this cement system have been performed. Previous researches in dental material has been standardized dental cement which fulfilled the physical and mechanical characteristic such as shear strength but were on in vitro condition, the animal model and clinical study of dental cement from laboratory has not been done yet. This research examined physical and mechanical characteristic in vivo using rabbit by making the caries (class III in anterior teeth especially in mesial or distal incisive, fulfilled the cavity by dental cement and analyzed the compressive strength, tensile strength, and microstructure using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Purpose: This study is aimed to describe the in vivo characterization of dental cements based on polymer (zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer cement and zinc oxide eugenol. Methods: First, preparation was done on animal model’s teeth (6 rabbits, male, 5 months old. The cavity was made which involved the dentin. Then the cavity was filled with dental cement. After the filling procedure, the animal model should be kept until 21 days and than the compressive test, tensile test and microstructure was characterized. Compressive test and tensile test was analyzed using samples from extracted tooth and was measured with autograph. The microstructure test was measured using SEM. Results: The best compressive strength value was belongs to zinc phosphate cement which was 101.888 Mpa and the best tensile strength value was belongs to glass ionomer cement which was 6.555 Mpa. Conclusion: In conclusion, comparing with 3 others type of dental cements which are zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cement, zinc oxide eugenol cement has the worst for both physical and mechanical properties.Latar belakang: Studi in vivo meneliti karakterisasi secara in vivo dari

  19. Influence of eugenol on the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts cemented with different types of resin luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Erhan; Çetin, Ali Riza; Capar, İsmail Davut; Tunçdemir, Ali Riza; Aydinbelge, Hale Ari

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of eugenol on the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts cemented with different types of resin luting agents. Seventy-two extracted maxillary single-rooted canine teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 36 teeth. Group 1, the control group, was filled with gutta-percha only (i.e., did not receive eugenol), whereas group 2 was filled with a eugenol-containing sealer. All root canals were filled and each group was divided into three subgroups. The posts in each subgroup were cemented with the following materials: subgroup 1 with a 2-step self-etching adhesive system (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V + Panavia F); subgroup 2 with a 1-step self-etching adhesive (Panavia F); and subgroup 3 with a self-adhesive (Clearfil SA Cement). Dislodgement resistance was measured using a universal testing machine. All data were subjected to ANOVA using a factorial design and Tukey test (α = 0.05). The use of the eugenol-containing sealer significantly reduced the push-out bond strength of the fiber post (P eugenol-containing sealer (P eugenol than were the other evaluated groups when the fiber post was cemented in the canals filled with the eugenol-containing sealer.

  20. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict;

    2015-01-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength...... brings insights into the material's durability, also demonstrating the need and opening the possibility for further research in these dental cements....

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Dental Cements Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Beyth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are commonly used for cementing full cast crown restorations. Regrettably, although the dental cements fill the gap between the tooth and the crown, bacterial microleakage may occur, resulting in secondary caries. As microleakage cannot be completely prevented, GICs possessing antibacterial properties are in demand. In the present study the antibacterial activity of insoluble, cross-linked quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI nanoparticles incorporated at 1% w/w in two clinically available GICs were studied. The antibacterial activity was tested against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei using the direct contact test (DCT and the agar diffusion test (ADT. Using the direct contact test, antibacterial activity (<0.05 was found in both tested GICs with incorporated QPEI nanoparticles, the effect lasting for at least one month. However, the ADT showed no inhibition halo in the test bacteria, indicating that the antimicrobial nanoparticles do not diffuse into the agar. The results show that the incorporation of QPEI nanoparticles in glass ionomer cements has a long-lasting antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei. Changing the antibacterial properties of glass ionomer cements by incorporating QPEI antibacterial nanoparticles may prolong the clinical performance of dental crowns.

  2. 不同粘接材料与牙本质粘接界面的元素分布分析%Element diffusions of interface between different luting cements and dentin layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 刘旭; 邢文忠

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze interface between luting cements and conformation of the dentin layer elements using the Energy Diffraction Spectrum (EDS) and compare the combining mode of different luting cements and dentin layer.Methods Eight extracted intact molars were selected and prepared regularly,and the contour of the prepared teeth was of the relatively consistent height.The casting metal full crowns were made and cemented to the abutment teeth using 8 kinds of luting cements according to the manufacturer' s instructions.The specimens were stored at (23 ± 1) ℃ and 100% relative humidity for 30 days and then were cut along the long axis of teeth,and the luting interfaces were examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and EDS.Results E 1 ement diffusions were detected in the luting interface between dentin and glass ionomer cement materials,especially GC Fuji I.Resin tags and hybrid layers were observed for resin cement materials and the interface texture was compact.Conclusion There were differences in texture compact and continuity of the luting interface among different luting cements.The luting interface of resin cements were more compact than others,element of penetration was active for glass ionomer mateials.%目的 通过能谱仪分析粘接材料与牙本质层界面间的元素分布,比较不同粘接材料与牙本质层的结合方式.方法 选用8颗离体下颌第一磨牙进行常规牙体预备,预备后基牙外形保持相对一致的高度.常规制作镍铬合金金属全冠.使用不同类型(玻璃离子、聚羧酸锌、树脂类)的8种粘接材料,按照厂家的要求进行粘接,试样保存于(23±1)℃,100%相对湿度的环境中,30d后用慢速锯将试样纵向切开,运用能谱分析仪观察粘接界面的形貌和元素分布,对粘接材料与牙本质的粘接界面进行线扫描和元素定量分析,观测元素质量分数的变化.结果 玻璃离子类粘接材料的元素分布在牙本质和粘接材料之间

  3. Comparison of Film Thickness of Two Commercial Brands of Glass lonomer Cement and One Dual-cured Composite: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Rajat R; Singh, Rishav; Barua, Pranamee; Hajira, Nausheen; Gupta, Naveen; Thakkar, Rohit R

    2017-08-01

    The present study is undertaken to examine the film thickness of three most commonly used luting cements and to determine their usage as a luting agent. This study was carried out strictly according to the guidelines of American Dental Association (ADS) specification no. 8. Two glass slabs of 5 cm in length and 2 cm in width were used. One glass slab was kept over the other glass slab and the space between the two glass slabs was measured using metallurgical microscope at the power of 10*. Two brands of glass ionomer cement (GIC) and one dual-cured resin cement were used in this study. The test cement is sandwiched between two glass slabs. A static load of 15 kg was applied using universal testing machine on the glass slabs for 1 hour and the space present between the two glass slabs was measured using metallurgical microscope at the power of 10*. Greatest film thickness was found in group III (Paracore) followed by group II (micron) and lowest in group I (GC luting and lining cement). All the tested samples can be used for luting purposes. Greatest film thickness was observed in Paracore followed by micron and lowest in GC luting and lining cement. This suggests that the 25 to 27°C is ideal for mixing of the cement when used for luting consistency. The cement with film thickness more than 30 urn should never be used for luting purposes. The dentist should choose the luting cement with utmost care noting the film thickness and bond strength of the cement. The cement with low exothermic heat production and good bond strength should be encouraged.

  4. Vertical misfit of laser-sintered and vacuum-cast implant-supported crown copings luted with definitive and temporary luting agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José F.; Albaladejo, Alberto; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Montero, Javier; Suárez-García, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the vertical discrepancy of implant-supported crown structures constructed with vacuum-casting and Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technologies, and luted with different cement types. Study Design. Crown copings were fabricated using: (1) direct metal laser sintered Co-Cr (LS); (2) vacuum-cast Co-Cr (CC); and (3) vacuum-cast Ti (CT). Frameworks were luted onto machined implant abutments under constant seating pressure. Each alloy group was randomly divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10 each) according to the cement system utilized: Subgroup 1 (KC) used resin-modified glass-ionomer Ketac Cem Plus; Subgroup 2 (PF) used Panavia F 2.0 dual-cure resin cement; Subgroup 3 (RXU) used RelyX Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive dual-cure resin cement; Subgroup 4 (PIC) used acrylic/urethane-based temporary Premier Implant Cement; and Subgroup 5 (DT) used acrylic/urethane-based temporary DentoTemp cement. Vertical misfit was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run to investigate the effect of alloy/fabrication technique, and cement type on vertical misfit. The statistical significance was set at α = 0.05. Results. The alloy/manufacturing technique and the luting cement affected the vertical discrepancy (p < 0.001). For each cement type, LS samples exhibited the best fit (p < 0.01) whereas CC and CT frames were statistically similar. Within each alloy group, PF and RXU provided comparably greater discrepancies than KC, PIC, and DT, which showed no differences. Conclusions. Laser sintering may be an alternative to vacuum-casting of base metals to obtain passive-fitting implant-supported crown copings. The best marginal adaptation corresponded to laser sintered structures luted with glass-ionomer KC, or temporary PIC or DT cements. The highest discrepancies were recorded for Co-Cr and Ti cast frameworks bonded with PF or RXU resinous agents. All groups were within the clinically

  5. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of Zirconia (Y-TZP) posts with various dental cements

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Hyeongsoon; Ko, Hyunjung; Kim, Miri

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Endodontically treated teeth with insufficient tooth structure are often restored with esthetic restorations. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and biological effects of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) blocks in combination with several dental cements. Materials and Methods Pairs of zirconia cylinders with medium alone or cemented with three types of dental cement including RelyX U200 (3M ESPE), FujiCEM 2 (GC), and Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) were incubated in medium f...

  6. Immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of different luting resin cements to different regional dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Abdelraheem Mohamed; Hamouda, Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazy, Mohamed Hamed; Abo-Madina, Manal Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    We sought to evaluate immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of Panavia F2.0 and Multilink Sprint resin cement to superficial, deep and cervical dentin. Thirty-six freshly extracted non-carious human molars were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to expose three different dentin regions including superficial dentin (1 mm below the dentine-enamel junction), deep dentin (1 mm above the highest pulp horn) and cervical dentin (0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and 0.5 mm bel...

  7. Fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns: The importance of the compressive strength of the dental cements used.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Monolithic zirconia crowns have not been used for a very long period in dentistry even though zirconia with veneering porcelain, as crown and bridge material has been used for several years with great clinical success. Several different luting materials have been purposed for zirconia but concerning monolithic zirconia the knowledge of the influence of the cement seem to be limited. The aim of the study was to investigate three different cements (one phosphate, one self adhesive a...

  8. Effect of provisional luting agents on polyvinyl siloxane impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R H; Cook, G S; Moon, M G

    1996-04-01

    Eugenol-containing cements have been traditionally selected for seating provisional restorations, but incomplete polymerization of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials has been attributed to these cements. This study clinically evaluated the inhibitory effect on polymerization of a specific polyvinyl siloxane impression material with five luting agents used for provisional restorations. Three of these luting agents contained eugenol, whereas two interim cements did not contain eugenol. A total of 60 human posterior teeth were prepared for complete crowns, fitted for provisional crowns, and cemented with interim luting agents. After 2.5 weeks the provisional crowns were removed, the cement on tooth preparations was removed with an explorer, and impressions were made. The results revealed that none of the luting agents in this investigation had an inhibitory effect on polymerization of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

  9. Effect of Ceramic Thickness and Luting Agent Shade on the Color Masking Ability of Laminate Veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Zubeda; Chheda, Pratik; Shruthi, C S; Sonika, Radhika

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of the study was to recognize the effect of ceramic thickness and luting agent on the extent to which the restoration masks color variations that may be present in the underlying dental structure. Two pressable ceramics were used: Lithium disilicate reinforced (IPS e.max- Ivoclar Vivadent) and Leucite reinforced (Cergo- Dentsply). Fifteen ceramic discs were manufactured from each ceramic and divided into three groups, according to the thickness (0.5, 1, 1.5 mm). To simulate the color of a dark underlying dental structure, background discs, color C3, with 20 mm diameter, were made using resin composite. The ceramic discs with varying thicknesses were seated on the dark background of the resin composite with either resinous opaque cement or resinous cement. The color parameters were determined by the CIE Lab system of colors using a spectrophotometer and color differences (ΔE) were calculated. The results were then statistically analyzed, using ANOVA test and Tukey HSD test. The ΔE values of both ceramic systems were affected by both the luting agent and the ceramic thickness (P veneers, higher values in the color parameters were obtained for both ceramic materials. The color masking ability of ceramics used for laminate veneers is significantly affected by the thickness of the ceramic and the shade of the luting agent used.

  10. 不同表面处理和不同粘结剂对氧化锆粘结强度的影响%Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cements to zirconia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘振海; 张振庭; 高卫民; 郑东翔; 温颖; 刘亦然

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨不同表面处理和不同粘结剂对氧化锆粘结强度的影响.方法 将氧化锆分别制成直径为12.0mm和4.0mm的瓷片,各120个,分别随机分成12组.粘结剂选用磷酸锌粘结剂、聚羧酸锌粘结剂、Bifix QM和Super-Bond C&B.对氧化锆的表面分别进行不处理、喷砂、硅烷化、先喷砂后硅烷化处理.用上述4种粘结剂将4.0mm瓷片粘结在12.0mm瓷片上,置于37℃蒸馏水中保存24h后,进行剪切粘结强度测试.结果 粘结剂相同时,不同表面处理时的粘结强度有显著统计学差异(P<0.01),由小到大依次为不处理<喷砂<硅烷化<先喷砂后硅烷化处理;表面处理相同时,不同粘结剂之间的粘结强度有显著统计学差异(P<0.01),由小到大依次为磷酸锌粘结剂<聚羧酸锌粘结剂<Bifix QM<Super-Bond C&B.结论 粘结剂相同时,表面处理提高了粘结强度.Super-Bond C&B的粘结强度比较理想.使用Super-Bond C&B时,喷砂后硅烷化处理是一种比较理想的表面处理方法.%Objective To investigate the effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cements to zirconia. Methods A total of 120 big discs( 12. 0 mm in diameter) and 120 small discs(4. 0mm in diameter) of zirconia were randomly divided into 12 groups,with each group including 10 big and 10 small discs. Four luting agents were chosen, zinc phosphate cement, zinc polyacrylate cement, Bifix QM, Super-Bond C&B. The surface of ZrO2 was treated differently, not treated,sandblasted,silica-coating or sandblasted followed by silica-coating. The small discs were cemented to the big discs by use of the four luting agents,and then put into the distill water at 37℃ for 24 h. Results The bond strength was significantly different with different treatment and the same luting agent (P < 0.01), from low to high: not treated, sandblasted, silica-coating or sandblasted followed by silica-coating. With the same treatment and different luting agent

  11. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  12. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of Zirconia (Y-TZP posts with various dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeongsoon Shin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Endodontically treated teeth with insufficient tooth structure are often restored with esthetic restorations. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and biological effects of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP blocks in combination with several dental cements. Materials and Methods Pairs of zirconia cylinders with medium alone or cemented with three types of dental cement including RelyX U200 (3M ESPE, FujiCEM 2 (GC, and Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray were incubated in medium for 14 days. The cytotoxicity of each supernatant was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays on L929 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 mRNA were evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and IL-6 protein was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The MTT assays showed that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were more susceptible to dental cements than L929 fibroblasts. The resin based dental cements increased IL-6 expression in L929 cells, but reduced IL-6 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusions Zirconia alone or blocks cemented with dental cement showed acceptable biocompatibilities. The results showed resin-modified glass-ionomer based cement less produced inflammatory cytokines than other self-adhesive resin-based cements. Furthermore, osteoblasts were more susceptible than fibroblasts to the biological effects of dental cement.

  13. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Ana R.; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict; Momsen, Niels C. R.; Okhrimenko, Denis V.; Telling, Mark T. F.; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Strobl, Markus; Seydel, Tilo; Manke, Ingo; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-03-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutrons and X-rays have been used to investigate the highly complex pore structure, as well as to assess the hydrogen mobility within these cements. Our findings suggest that the lower mechanical strength in glass ionomer cements results not only from the presence of pores, but also from the increased hydrogen mobility within the material. The relationship between microstructure, hydrogen mobility and strength brings insights into the material's durability, also demonstrating the need and opening the possibility for further research in these dental cements.

  14. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  15. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict;

    2015-01-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to sur...

  16. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goro Nishigawa

    Full Text Available Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials.We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength.For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group.Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials.

  17. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  18. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  19. Tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with different cements Resistência à tração de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Bonfante

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Proper selection of the luting agent is fundamental to avoid failure due to lack of retention in post-retained crowns. The objective of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength and failure mode of glass fiber posts luted with different cements. Glass fiber posts were luted in 40 mandibular premolars, divided into 4 groups (n = 10: Group 1 - resin-modified glass ionomer RelyX Luting; Group 2 - resin-modified glass ionomer Fuji Plus; Group 3 - resin cement RelyX ARC; Group 4 - resin cement Enforce. Specimens were assessed by tensile strength testing and light microscopy analysis for observation of failure mode. The tensile bond strength values of each group were compared by ANOVA and Tukey test. The significance level was set at 5%. The failure modes were described as percentages. The following tensile strength values were obtained: Group 1 - 247.6 N; Group 2 - 256.7 N; Group 3 - 502.1 N; Group 4 - 477.3 N. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups 1 and 2 or between Groups 3 and 4, yet the resin cements presented significantly higher tensile bond strength values than those presented by the glass ionomer cements. Group 1 displayed 70% of cohesive failures, whereas Groups 2, 3 and 4 exhibited 70% to 80% of adhesive failures at the dentin-cement interface. We concluded that resin cements and glass ionomer cements are able to provide clinically sufficient retention of glass fiber posts, and that glass ionomer cements may be especially indicated when the application of adhesive techniques is difficult.A seleção adequada do agente cimentante é essencial para evitar falhas por perda de retenção em coroas retidas por núcleos. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a resistência à tração e o tipo de falha de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais. Cimentaram-se pinos de fibra de vidro em 40 pré-molares inferiores, divididos em 4 grupos (n = 10: Grupo 1 - ionômero de vidro modificado

  20. Radiographic appearance of commonly used cements in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pette, Gregory A; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Norkin, Frederic J

    2013-01-01

    Cement-retained restorations allow for a conventional fixed partial denture approach to restoring dental implants. However, inadequate removal of excess cement at the time of cementation may introduce a severe complication: cement-induced peri-implantitis. Radiopaque cements are more easily detected on radiographs and should improve the recognition of extravasated cement at the time of insertion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of commercially available cements in vitro. Eighteen different cements commonly used for luting restorations to implants were tested at both 0.5- and 1.0-mm thicknesses. The cements examined were zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide, zinc polycarboxylate, zinc phosphate, resin-reinforced glass ionomer, urethane resin, resin, and composite resin. Two samples of each cement thickness underwent standardized radiography next to an aluminum step wedge as a reference. The mean grayscale value of each of the nine 1-mm steps in the step wedge were used as reference values and compared to each of the cement samples. Temp Bond Clear (resin), IMProv (urethane resin), Premier Implant Cement (resin), and Temrex NE (resin) were not radiographically detectable at either sample thickness. Cements containing zinc were the most detectable upon radiographic analysis. There are significant differences in the radiopacity of many commonly used cements. Since cementinduced peri-implantitis can lead to late implant failure, cements that can be visualized radiographically may reduce the incidence of this problem.

  1. Contact deformation and cracking of zirconia/cement/foundation dental multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Xinrui [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: xniu@princeton.edu; Yang Yong; Soboyejo, Wole [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2008-06-25

    The paper presents the results of combined experimental, analytical and computational studies of contact-induced deformation and cracking in zirconia/cement/foundation dental multilayers, where cement and foundation layers are commercially used dental adhesive and restoratives. Hertzian contact tests were performed on the multilayers. A novel technique, dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) was used to examine the crack/microstructure interactions in the dental multilayer structures. The FIB/SEM images show sub-surface inter/intragranular cracking modes that have not been reported before. The critical loads corresponding to onset of sub-surface radial cracking were found to exhibit a strong dependence on the monotonic loading rates. A rate-dependent environmentally assisted slow crack growth (RDEASGG) model was used to predict the loading rate dependence of the critical loads. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of durable dental multilayers.

  2. 3种粘接材料与氧化锆陶瓷粘接抗剪切强度的比较%Comparison of shear bond strength among three luting cements with Zirconia Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟瑾; 赵莉; 王晓东; 赵克

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究3种粘接材料与氧化锆陶瓷材料的初期及耐久粘接抗剪切强度.方法 将预烧结氧化锆陶瓷片试件喷砂后分为3组,每组20个,分别采用玻璃离子水门汀(GIC组)、Panavia F 2.0树脂粘接剂(PF组)、Clearfil SA Luting树脂粘接剂(SAC组)与核树脂块粘接,每组随机选取10个试件进行冷热循环实验(10 000次,5 ~ 55℃),用计算机控制万能材料试验机测定其粘接抗剪切强度.结果 未经冷热循环处理的GIC组、PF组、SAC组试件的粘接抗剪切强度值分别为(21.98±1.78) MPa、(30.26±1.73) MPa、(28.63±2.02) MPa,GIC组试件的粘接抗剪切强度低于其他两组(P<0.01),PF组与SAC组的试件相比差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);而冷热循环后,GIC组、PF组、SAC组试件的粘接抗剪切强度值分别为(10.72±2.03) MPa、(28.50±1.54) MPa、(27.02±1.79) MPa,GIC组试件经冷热循环后,其粘接抗剪切强度值明显下降(P<0.05),而其他两组试件经冷热循环后其粘接抗剪切强度值无明显改变(P>0.05).结论 使用玻璃离子可获得较好的初期粘接抗剪切强度,但耐久粘接强度欠佳;含磷酸酯单体的树脂粘接剂可使氧化锆陶瓷获得良好的初期粘接抗剪切强度及耐久粘接抗剪切强度;自粘接型树脂粘接剂操作简便,粘接抗剪切强度与自酸蚀型树脂粘接剂相当,且粘接效果持久.%Objective To study the shear bond strength of three kinds of luting cement materials with Zirconia Ceramics restorations.Methods Blocks of sintered Zirconia Ceramics were cut and randomly divided into three groups with 20 slices in each.After being treated with sandblasting,they were bonded to the surface of cured core-resin using three kinds of luting cements respectively,glass ionomer cement (group GIC),Panavia F 2.0 (group PF),Clearfil SA Luting (group SAC).Half of the discs in each group were performed thermal cycling (10 000 cycles between 5 and 55℃) test.The shear

  3. Static and dynamic failure load of fiber-reinforced composite and particulate filler composite cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; van Dalen, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement and luting cement on the static failure load (SFL) and dynamic failure load (DFL) of simulated two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). Materials and Methods: Forty-six particulate

  4. Sensitivity of catalyst/base ratio on curing of resin luting agents: polymerization exotherm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, J A; Shen, C; Anusavice, K J

    1994-09-01

    Currently, the proposed test of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) for measuring working and setting times of resin luting agents is based on measurement of times to reach specified stages on the polymerization exotherm. The objective of this study was to use this test to investigate the influence of variations in the mass ratios of catalyst paste to base paste on the working and setting times of three dual-cured dental resin luting agents. The materials used were Dicor Light Activated Cement (Dentsply International Inc.), Palfique Inlay Resin Cement (Tokuyama Soda Co.), and Vivadent Dual Cement (Vivadent). Fifteen specimens of each material were tested for working time by spatulating mass ratios from 0.7 to 1.3 for 30s at 23 degrees C and recording the time from beginning of spatulation to the time at which a temperature increase occurs. Ten specimens of each material were tested for setting time by spatulating in a similar manner at 37 degrees C and recording the time at which the temperature reaches a maximum value. The data were fitted to the relation, In t = In A + Bm, where t is the time in seconds, m is the mass ratio, and A and B are regression coefficients. The results suggest that working and setting times of the specimens were independent of variations in mass ratio. A comparison among the materials was made by using a multiple linear regression with the relation, In t = In C + Dm + E gamma + Fm gamma, where gamma is a dummy variable to help distinguish between materials, and C, D, E, and F are regression coefficients. The results suggest that differences in materials influence the working time but not the setting time. These results infer that variations in mass ratio (+/- 20%) often observed in the clinical setting should not have a significant influence on the working and setting times of resin luting agents.

  5. Monitoring the stress build-up in dental cements: a novel optical characterization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, Heidi; Tabak, M.; Bartholomees, F.; de Wilde, Willy P.; Veretennicoff, Irina P.; Thienpont, Hugo

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that during the curing of dental cements, polymerization shrinkage induces unacceptable stresses, which can result into cracks and an over-sensitivity of the teeth. We demonstrate that polarimetric optical fiber sensors can be used to characterize this shrinkage quantitatively. To determine the time evolution and the amount of shrinkage we embed a highly birefringent optical fiber in the dental cement and analyze the change in optical polarization at its output. This change is a measure for the dynamic stress-build up. We also demonstrate the repeatability of our characterization method for these cements. Moreover we given indications that this technique allows for in- vivo monitoring of the stress build-up dynamics between dentine and porcelain facings. This may bring durable all-ceramic restorations closer to reality. In this paper we present the principle of this original optical fiber sensor, its practical implementation and the experimental results we obtained for this application.

  6. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Barbosa Ramos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-eSPe and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray used for cementing fiberreinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a no light activation; b light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. RESULTS: Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. CONCLUSIONS: The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent.

  7. Engineering properties and performance of dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C A; Orr, J F

    2005-07-01

    Dental crowns are used to replace damaged natural crowns of teeth and are fixed to prepared teeth with luting cements, which should provide an adhesive bond to the tooth structure giving reliable retention and minimal microleakage. Mechanical testing of crowns in vitro gives failure load distributions that are well described by Weibull models, comparing probabilities of survival and reliability. Fatigue testing of crowns is time consuming, but regression analysis to interpolate functions through data points quoting probability limits or applying Weibull analysis is achievable. A complementary approach is to conduct materials tests with appropriate interfacial geometries. Luting cements are used in thin layers of 40-150 microm. Contraction during polymerization is restrained by adhesion to substrates, allowing little relaxation of stresses. Conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements create thin zones of interaction with dentine and fail cohesively. The chevron notch short rod technique has been used to measure fracture toughness and rank cements. A development of this method, using chevron notch short bar specimens, permitted fracture toughness to be determined for luting cement--dentine substrate interfaces. Representative fracture experiments need to be developed to apply mixed mode conditions. The basic challenge to predict long-term performance from short-term laboratory tests remains.

  8. The impact of endodontic irrigating solutions on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Pelegrine, Rina Andrea; Silveira, Cláudia Fernandes de Magalhães; Bueno, Vanessa Castro Pestana da Silveira; Alves, Vanessa de Oliveira; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Pereira, Gisele Damiana da Silveira; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2016-01-01

    Resin-based restorative materials, widely used to cement posts, may be influenced by irrigants used during endodontic chemical-mechanical preparation. This study evaluated the impact of endodontic irrigating solutions and adhesive cement systems on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin. Ninety-six bovine incisors were divided into 12 groups (4 irrigants × 3 resin cements; n = 8). Prepared canals were irrigated with saline solution, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine gel, and posts were cemented with RelyX ARC, Panavia F, or RelyX U100. The bond strength was evaluated by means of the push-out test, and results were subjected to analysis of variance. The mean bond strength observed for the combination of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and RelyX U100 cement was significantly lower (8.82 MPa) than the values found for the other groups (P < 0.05). The other combinations of irrigating solution and resin cement had no adverse effect on the bond strength of the glass fiber posts to dentin.

  9. Three-dimensional culture of dental pulp stem cells in direct contact to tricalcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widbiller, M; Lindner, S R; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G; Galler, K M

    2016-03-01

    Calcium silicate cements are biocompatible dental materials applicable in contact with vital tissue. The novel tricalcium silicate cement Biodentine™ offers properties superior to commonly used mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Objective of this study was to evaluate its cytocompatibility and ability to induce differentiation and mineralization in three-dimensional cultures of dental pulp stem cells after direct contact with the material. Test materials included a new tricalcium silicate (Biodentine™, Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France), MTA (ProRoot® MTA, DENSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialities, Johnson City, TN, USA), glass ionomer (Ketac™ Molar Aplicap™, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), human dentin disks and polystyrene. Magnetic activated cell sorting for to the surface antigen STRO-1 was performed to gain a fraction enriched with mesenchymal stem cells. Samples were allowed to set and dental pulp stem cells in collagen carriers were placed on top. Scanning electron microscopy of tricalcium silicate cement surfaces with and without cells was conducted. Cell viability was measured for 14 days by MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity was evaluated (days 3, 7, and 14) and expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, DSPP, and RUNX2) was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis for cell viability and alkaline phosphatase data was performed to compare different materials as well as time points (Mann-Whitney U test, α = 0.05). Cell viability was highest on tricalcium silicate cement, followed by MTA. Viability on glass ionomer cement and dentin disks was significantly lower. Alkaline phosphatase activity was lower in cells on new tricalcium silicate cement compared to MTA, whereas expression patterns of marker genes were alike. Increased cell viability and similar levels of mineralization-associated gene expression in three-dimensional cell cultures on the novel tricalcium silicate cement and mineral

  10. Translucent quartz-fiber post luted in vivo with self-curing composite cement: case report and microscopic examination at a two-year clinical follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallari, Adriano; Rovatti, Laura; Dallari, Beatrice; Mason, Pier Nicola; Suh, Byoung In

    2006-06-01

    A maxillary central incisor with mild periodontitis and extensive loss of coronal tooth structure was endodontically treated and restored with a translucent quartz-fiber post and a composite core. Treatment was completed with the cementation of full-ceramic crowns on teeth 11 and 21. Informed consent was obtained from the patient. Due to the extent of the periodontal disease, tooth 11 was extracted two years later. With the patient's consent, the tooth was used for research. The tooth was sectioned at 11 levels perpendicularly to the long axis and investigated by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The visual examination showed perfect adhesion between the various interfaces (restoration-dentin-post) at both the coronal and root levels. The adhesion between the post and dentin appeared to be free of gaps, and even where the composite cement showed a nonhomogeneous thickness, voids were not apparent. The tooth under examination allowed the authors to check the effectiveness of the adhesion and the integrity of the hybrid layer after exposure to the oral cavity for two years. The results of this investigation show that there were no gaps between the adhesive resin and dentin and no hydrolysis of the adhesive bond. This case suggests that it is possible to obtain good results in the short term from the cementation of quartz-fiber posts with composite resin cements.

  11. Assessment of the tensile strength of hexagonal abutments using different cementing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Wahl

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the uniaxial tensile strength after thermal cycling in replicas of CeraOne®abutments (abutment and coping sets, using four types of cements (n = 10. A zinc phosphate cement (Fosfato de Zinco®/ SSW, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX®luting / 3M-ESPE, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE®/ SSW and a zinc oxide cement without eugenol (TempBond NE®/ KERR were used. After cementation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycles (1,000 cycles, 5ºC ± 2º to 55ºC ± 2º for thirty seconds in each bath. Next, the samples were submitted to the tensile test in a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min. The data were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (p < 0.05, and statistically significant difference was found among the cements. The highest tensile strength mean value found was for zinc phosphate cement (33.6 kgf followed by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (20.5 kgf, zinc oxide-eugenol cement (8.4 kgf and the temporary cement (3.1 kgf. Therefore, it was found that the permanent cements presented higher tensile strength, and the temporary cement could be used in situations requiring reversibility and the removal of cemented dental implant-supported prostheses.

  12. Deformation of a dental ceramic following adhesive cementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced changes imparted in a \\'dentin-bonded-crown\\' material during sintering, annealing, pre-cementation surface modification, and resin coating have been visualized by profilometry. The hypothesis tested was that operative techniques modify the stressing pattern throughout the material thickness. We polished the upper surfaces of 10 ceramic discs to remove surface imperfections before using a contact profilometer (40-nm resolution) to measure the \\'flatness\\'. Discs were re-profiled after annealing and after alumina particle air-abrasion and resin-coating of the \\'fit\\' surface. Polished surfaces were convex, with a mean deflection of 8.4 + or - 1.5 microm. Mean deflection was significantly reduced (P = 0.029) following alumina particle air-abrasion and increased (P < 0.001) on resin-coating. Polishing induced a tensile stress state, resulting in surface convexity. Alumina particle air-abrasion reduced the relative tensile stress state of the contralateral polished surface. Resin-polymerization generated compression within the resin-ceramic \\'hybrid layer\\' and tension in the polished surface and is likely to contribute to the strengthening of ceramics by resin-based cements.

  13. Influence of irrigation protocols on the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive luting agent 24 hours after endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jessica Ferraz Carvalho; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Humel, Maria Malerba Colombi; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. Fifty-six bovine incisor roots were endodontically prepared and separated into 7 groups (n = 8) according to irrigation protocols: group 1, sterile saline (control); group 2, chlorhexidine (CHX) gel 2% and saline; group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) 5.25% and saline; group 4, CHX and saline (final irrigation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA] 17%); group 5, NaOCl and saline (final irrigation with EDTA); group 6, CHX and saline (final irrigation with NaOCl and EDTA); and group 7, NaOCl (final irrigation with CHX and EDTA). No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the different irrigation protocols did not influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement, which presented similar behaviors at the 3 root depths studied.

  14. Zinc polycarboxylate dental cement for the controlled release of an active organic substance: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Naseem; Edwards, Mark; Nicholson, John W

    2010-04-01

    The potential of employing zinc polycarboxylate dental cement as a controlled release material has been studied. Benzalkonium chloride was used as the active ingredient, and incorporated at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3% by mass within the cement. At these levels, there was no observable effect on the speed of setting. Release was followed using an ion-selective electrode to determine changes in chloride ion concentration with time. This technique showed that the additive was released when the cured cement was placed in water, with release occurring by a diffusion mechanism for the first 3 h, but continuing beyond that for up to 1 week. Diffusion coefficients were in the range 5.62 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 1% concentration) to 10.90 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 3% concentration). Up to 3% of the total loading of benzalkonium chloride was released from the zinc polycarboxylate after a week, which is similar to that found in previous studies with glass-ionomer cement. It is concluded that zinc polycarboxylate cement is capable of acting as a useful material for the controlled release of active organic compounds.

  15. Comparison of shear bond strength between zirconia ceramics and three resin luting cements%氧化锆陶瓷与三种树脂粘接剂粘接剪切强度比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金明; 陈利民; 高平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the bondig strength of zirconia ceramics with three kinds of luting cement materials.Methods Blocks of sintered zirconia ceranucs were cut and randomly divided into three groups with 32 slices in each.After being treated with sandbLasting, they were bonded with three kinds of luting cements respectively.After preserved in 37℃ distilled water for 24 hours and 30 days, the shear bonding strength of these specimens was tesred and the data were analyzed with SAS9.12 software package and the bond sections were observed under scanning electron microscope.Results Two - way ANOVA revealed that the group of PanaviaTMF could attain the best shear bonding strength: (31.36 ±3.49) MPa (after 24 hours) and (29.52 ± 3.44) MPa ( after 1 month).Superbond C & B had the high initial shear bond strength ( 31.85 ± 3.61) MPa ( after 24 hours) but low long - term bond strength (21.32±2.58)MPa (after 1month).The one - step self erosion adhesive RelyX Unicem was proved to have the lowest initial bond strength ( 13.29 ± 3.05) MPa ( after 24 hours) , but the strength could last longer.Conclusion Resin luting cement containing phosphate monomer ( MDP) can provide zirconia ceramics a strong and long - lasting bonding.The cement without inorganic filler can get good bonding strength too, but cant last long.%目的 探讨适合牙科氧化锆陶瓷的粘接材料.方法 将烧结后的氧化锆陶瓷片分为3组,每组32片,分别采用三种自酸蚀粘接剂RelyX Unicem、PanaviaTM F、Superbond C & B与喷砂后的氧化锆陶瓷片粘接,水浴24h和水浴30d后,测试其粘接剪切强度.数据用SAS9.12软件进行统计学分析,粘接断面用扫描电镜观察.结果 PanaviaTM F树脂粘接材料粘接强度最好,分别为(31.36±3.49)MPa(水浴24h)、(29.52±3.44)MPa(水浴30d).Superbond C & B能够取得较好的初期粘接强度(31.85 ±3.61)MPa(水浴24h),但水浴30d后明显下降至(21.32 ±2.58)MPa,P<0.05.RelyX Unicem的初期(水浴24h

  16. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-11-01

    Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers' instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P ceramic restorations, clinicians should try to minimize marginal gaps in order to reduce restoration failure. In situations where there are doubts about perfect marginal adaptation, the use of Fuji Plus cement may be helpful.

  17. Cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of cements based on calcium silicate and of dental formocresol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyunjung; Jeong, Youngdan; Kim, Miri

    2017-03-01

    Increasing interest is being paid to the toxicities of dental materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of endodontic compounds to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) reproductive cells. Cultured CHO-K1 cells were treated with dental formocresol, two types of calcium hydroxide paste, and two types of mineral trioxide aggregate cement for 24h. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was performed on each culture, and the micronucleus frequency was determined by performing a micronucleus assay. Alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay were used to detect DNA damage. Out of the five materials tested, only dental formocresol significantly increased DNA damage. The mineral trioxide aggregate cements based on calcium silicate were not found to be potentially genotoxic. The data suggest that dental formocresol should not be recommended for use in vital pulp therapy on young teeth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Heat transfer properties and thermal cure of glass-ionomer dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavic, Lidia; Gorseta, Kristina; Glavina, Domagoj; Czarnecka, Beata; Nicholson, John W

    2015-10-01

    Under clinical conditions, conventional glass-ionomer dental cements can be cured by application of heat from dental cure lamps, which causes acceleration in the setting. In order for this to be successful, such heat must be able to spread sufficiently through the cement to enhance cure, but not transmit heat so effectively that the underlying dental pulp of the tooth is damaged. The current study was aimed at measuring heat transfer properties of modern restorative glass-ionomers to determine the extent to which they meet these twin requirements. Three commercial glass ionomer cements (Ionofil Molar, Ketac Molar and Equia™ Fill) were used in association with three different light emitting diode cure lamps designed for clinical use. In addition, for each cement, one set of specimens was allowed to cure without application of a lamp. Temperature changes were measured at three different depths (2, 3 and 4 mm) after cure times of 20, 40 and 60 s. The difference among the tested groups was evaluated by ANOVA (P heat irradiation, but much greater temperature increases when exposed to the cure lamp. However, temperature rises did not exceed 12.9 °C. Application of the cure lamp led to the establishment of a temperature gradient throughout each specimen. Differences were typically significant (P heating effect. Because the thermal conductivity of glass-ionomers is low, temperature rises at 4 mm depths were much lower than at 2 mm. At no time did the temperature rise sufficiently to cause concern about potential damage to the pulp.

  19. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying-Fang; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-09-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials.

  20. LUTE telescope structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthven, Gregory

    1993-01-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (LUTE) Telescope Structural Design Study was to investigate the feasibility of designing an ultralightweight 1-m aperture system within optical performance requirements and mass budget constraints. This study uses the results from our previous studies on LUTE as a basis for further developing the LUTE structural architecture. After summarizing our results in Section 2, Section 3 begins with the overall logic we used to determine which telescope 'structural form' should be adopted for further analysis and weight estimates. Specific telescope component analysis showing calculated fundamental frequencies and how they compare with our derived requirements are included. 'First-order' component stress analyses to ensure telescope optical and structural component (i.e. mirrors & main bulkhead) weights are realistic are presented. Layouts of both the primary and tertiary mirrors showing dimensions that are consistent with both our weight and frequency calculations also form part of Section 3. Section 4 presents our calculated values for the predicted thermally induced primary-to-secondary mirror despace motion due to the large temperature range over which LUTE must operate. Two different telescope design approaches (one which utilizes fused quartz metering rods and one which assumes the entire telescope is fabricated from beryllium) are considered in this analysis. We bound the secondary mirror focus mechanism range (in despace) based on these two telescope configurations. In Section 5 we show our overall design of the UVTA (Ultraviolet Telescope Assembly) via an 'exploded view' of the sub-system. The 'exploded view' is annotated to help aid in the understanding of each sub-assembly. We also include a two view layout of the UVTA from which telescope and telescope component dimensions can be measured. We conclude our study with a set of recommendations not only with respect to the LUTE structural architecture

  1. Assessment of the tensile strength of hexagonal abutments using different cementing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Carlos; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Brito, Rui Barbosa; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Smanio, Henrique

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the uniaxial tensile strength after thermal cycling in replicas of CeraOne abutments (abutment and coping sets), using four types of cements (n = 10). A zinc phosphate cement (Fosfato de Zinco/ SSW), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX luting / 3M-ESPE), a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE/ SSW) and a zinc oxide cement without eugenol (TempBond NE/ KERR) were used. After cementation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycles (1,000 cycles, 5 degrees C +/- 2 degrees to 55 degrees C +/- 2 degrees) for thirty seconds in each bath. Next, the samples were submitted to the tensile test in a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (p zinc phosphate cement (33.6 kgf) followed by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (20.5 kgf), zinc oxide-eugenol cement (8.4 kgf) and the temporary cement (3.1 kgf). Therefore, it was found that the permanent cements presented higher tensile strength, and the temporary cement could be used in situations requiring reversibility and the removal of cemented dental implant-supported prostheses.

  2. To what extent does the longevity of fixed dental prostheses depend on the function of the cement? Working Group 4 materials : cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2007-01-01

    Aims/Background: The objective of this review was to define the impact of cementation mode on the longevity of different types of single tooth restorations and fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Methods: Literature search by PubMed as the major database was used utilizing the terms namely, adhesive tech

  3. To what extent does the longevity of fixed dental prostheses depend on the function of the cement? Working Group 4 materials : cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Aims/Background: The objective of this review was to define the impact of cementation mode on the longevity of different types of single tooth restorations and fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Methods: Literature search by PubMed as the major database was used utilizing the terms namely, adhesive

  4. The Effect of Molar Preparation Axial Height on Retention of Adhesively-luted CAD/CAM Ceramic Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Retention of Adhesively -luted CAD/CAM Ceramic Crowns 7. Intended publication/meeting: International Association of Dental Research Annual Meeting...Postgraduate Dental School The Effect of Molar Preparation Axial Height on Retention of Adhesively -luted CAD/CAM Ceramic Crowns Robert E...Capt (Dr.) Robert Wake 2. Academic Title: AEGD Dental Resident 3. School/Department/Center: AF Postgraduate Dental School, Keesler AFB. MS 4 . Phone

  5. Optical fiber sensors and their application in monitoring stress build-up in dental resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Fernandez Fernandez, A.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.

    2005-09-01

    The field of optical fiber sensing is highly diverse and this diversity is perceived as a great advantage over more conventional sensors in that an optical sensor can be tailored to measure any of a myriad of physical parameters. In this paper we present a niche application for optical fiber sensors in the domain of biophotonics, namely the monitoring of stress build-up during the curing process of dental resin cements. We discuss the origin of this stress build-up and the problems it can cause when treating patients. Optical fiber sensors aim at excelling in two kind of applications: firstly to perform quality control on batch produced dental cements and measure their total material shrinkage, secondly to monitor the hardening of the cement during in-vivo measurements resulting in the dynamic measurement of the shrinkage and to control the stress in a facing based restoration. We therefore investigated two types of optical fiber sensors as alternatives to conventional measurement techniques; namely polarimetric optical fiber sensors and fiber Bragg gratings written in polarization maintaining fibers. After discussing the results obtained with both optical fiber sensors, we will conclude with a critical assessment of the suitability of the two proposed sensing configurations for multi-parameter stress monitoring.

  6. Development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for orthopedic and dental applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Komath; H K Varma

    2003-06-01

    A study on the development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for orthopedic and dental applications is presented. The paper describes its characteristic properties including results of bio- compatibility studies. A conventional two-component calcium phosphate cement formulation (having a powder part containing dry mixture of acidic and basic calcium phosphate particles and a liquid part containing phosphate solution) is modified with a biocompatible gelling agent, to induce flow properties and cohesion. The quantity of the gelling agent is optimized to get a viscous paste, which is smoothly injectable through an 18-gauge needle, with clinically relevant setting parameters. The new formulation has a setting time of 20 min and a compressive strength of 11 MPa. The X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and energy dispersive electron microprobe analyses showed the phase to be hydroxyapatite, the basic bone mineral. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a porous structure with particle sizes of a few micrometers. The cement did not show any appreciable dimensional or thermal change during setting. The injectability is estimated by extruding through needle and the cohesive property is assessed by water contact method. The cement passed the in vitro biocompatibility screening (cytotoxicity and haemolysis) tests.

  7. Laser treatment of dental ceramic/cement layers: transmitted energy, temperature effects and surface characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, Olena; Franzen, René; Gutknecht, Norbert; Wolfart, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the behaviour of different dental materials under laser irradiation. We have used e.max Ceram, e.max ZirCAD, and e.max Press dental ceramics and glass ionomer cement Ketac Cem in the present study. The dental ceramics were prepared in the form of samples with thickness of 0.5-2 mm. We used two lasers [solid-state laser (Er:YAG, Fidelis III+, Fotona) and an 810- nm diode laser (FOX, A.R.C)] for the transillumination of ceramic samples. It has been shown that the laser energy transmitted through the ceramic material decreases to 30-40% of the original values along with an increase in the thickness of the irradiated sample. Pigmented ceramic samples show more laser energy loss compared to the samples containing no pigment. We investigated the temperature evolution in composite sandwiched ceramic/cement samples under laser treatment. The increase in the irradiation time and laser power led to a temperature increase of up to 80 °C. The surfaces of irradiated ceramic samples were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate changes in chemical composition, such as a decrease in the C signal, accompanied by a strong increase in the Zr peak for the Er:YAG laser, while the 810-nm diode laser showed no change in the ratio of elements on the surface.

  8. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Carolina; Buono Vicente; Mota Joao Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm) of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B) to composite resin (InTen-S) blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok). Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydroflu...

  9. Does inhibition of proteolytic activity improve adhesive luting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, Anne-Katrin; De Munck, Jan; Geurtsen, Werner; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-04-01

    Endogenous enzymes may be involved in the biodegradation of adhesive restoration-tooth interfaces. Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been suggested to retard the bond-degradation process. Limited data are available on whether composite cements may also benefit from MMP inhibitors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of two MMP inhibitors--chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and galardin--on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of two self-adhesive composite cements to dentin. Ceramic specimens were cemented to bur-cut dentin surfaces using the self-adhesive composite cements RelyX Unicem 2 (3M ESPE) or Clearfil SA (Kuraray), or the etch-and-rinse composite cement Nexus 3 (Kerr) that served as the control. The surfaces were left untreated or were pretreated with MMP inhibitors (2% CHX or 0.2 mM galardin). The μTBS was determined 'immediately' and upon ageing (water storage for 6 months). Statistical analysis revealed a significant effect of the factors 'composite cement' and 'storage', as well as all interactions, but no effect of the MMP inhibitors. After 6 months of ageing, the μTBS decreased for all cements, except for the multistep etch-and-rinse luting composite when it was applied without MMP inhibitors. The MMP inhibitors could not prevent the decrease in μTBS upon ageing and therefore do not improve the luting durability of the composite cements tested.

  10. Dental glass ionomer cement reinforced by cellulose microfibers and cellulose nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rafael M. [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Pereira, Fabiano V., E-mail: fabianovp@ufmg.br [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, UFMG, Belo Horizonte CEP: 31270-901, MG (Brazil); Mota, Felipe A.P. [Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Watanabe, Evandro [Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, USP, Ribeirão Preto CEP: 14040-904, SP (Brazil); Soares, Suelleng M.C.S. [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Santos, Maria Helena [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate if the addition of cellulose microfibers (CmF) or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) would improve the mechanical properties of a commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). Different amounts of CmF and CNC were previously prepared and then added to reinforce the GIC matrix while it was being manipulated. Test specimens with various concentrations of CmF or CNC in their total masses were fabricated and submitted to mechanical tests (to evaluate their compressive and diametral tensile strength, modulus, surface microhardness and wear resistance) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The incorporation of CmF in the GIC matrix did not greatly improve the mechanical properties of GIC. However, the addition of a small amount of CNC in the GIC led to significant improvements in all of the mechanical properties evaluated: compressive strength (increased up to 110% compared with the control group), elastic modulus increased by 161%, diametral tensile strength increased by 53%, and the mass loss decreased from 10.95 to 3.87%. Because the composites presented a considerable increase in mechanical properties, the modification of the conventional GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material. - Highlights: • Cellulose microfibers (CmF) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were prepared. • The CmF and CNC were incorporated in commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). • Small amount of CNC improved significantly all the mechanical properties evaluated. • Modified GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material.

  11. Changes on degree of conversion of dual-cure luting light-cured with blue LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandéca, M. C.; El-Mowafy, O.; Saade, E. G.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-05-01

    The indirect adhesive procedures constitute recently a substantial portion of contemporary esthetic restorative treatments. The resin cements have been used to bond tooth substrate and restorative materials. Due to recently introduction of the self-bonding resin luting cement based on a new monomer, filler and initiation technology has become important to study the degree of conversion of these new materials. In the present work the polymerization reaction and the filler content of dual-cured dental resin cements were studied by means of infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry (TG). Twenty specimens were made in a metallic mold (8 mm diameter × 1 mm thick) from each of 2 cements, Panavia® F2.0 (Kuraray) and RelyX™ Unicem Applicap (3M/ESPE). Each specimen was cured with blue LED with power density of 500 mW/cm2 for 30 s. Immediately after curing, 24 and 48 h, and 7 days DC was determined. For each time interval 5 specimens were pulverized, pressed with KBr and analyzed with FT-IR. The TG measurements were performed in Netzsch TG 209 under oxygen atmosphere and heating rate of 10°C/min from 25 to 700°C. A two-way ANOVA showed DC (%) mean values statistically significance differences between two cements ( p 0.05). The Relx-Y™ Unicem mean values were significantly higher than Panavia® F 2.0. The degree of conversion means values increasing with the storage time and the filler content showed similar for both resin cements.

  12. Potential synergistic effects of a mixture of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cement and Bacillus subtilis in dental caries treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Shunya

    2017-03-24

    Bacillus subtilis is nonpathogenic in humans and produces a number of useful substances and, therefore, this bacterium is used in probiotic therapy. There have been trials of B. subtilis for patients with periodontitis, but not for patients with caries. Similarly, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cement has been widely used for endodontic treatment, but there are few reports of its use for caries. Therefore, examinations were performed regarding the benefits of addition of B. subtilis to MTA cement for treatment of dental caries. Indirect pulp capping with a mixture of MTA cement and B. subtilis spore powder is effective for avoiding pulpectomy or tooth extraction in such cases (personal communication). This study was planned to examine the scientific basis of this clinical finding, with examination of possible synergistic effects of MTA cement and B. subtilis. From these experiments, the following five results were obtained: (1) B. subtilis did not proliferate in liquid-culture media at pH ≥10. (2) B. subtilis proliferated when mixed with MTA cement. (3) There was no significant difference in proliferation of B. subtilis under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. (4) B. subtilis exhibited antibacterial effects on Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus casei. (5) MTA cement exhibited antibacterial effects on S. aureus and Streptococcus mutans, but not on B. subtilis. These results support the hypothesis that a combination of B subtilis and MTA cement is likely to be clinically useful for treatment of dental caries.

  13. Changes in degree of conversion and microhardness of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong Li; Kim, Young Kyung; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2010-01-01

    There are few studies available on the post-light activation or post-mix polymerization of dental resin cements as a function of time. This in vitro study evaluated the successive changes in the degree of conversion (DC) and microhardness during polymerization of six commercial resin cements (light-cured [Choice 2, RelyX Veneer], chemical-cured [Multilink, C&B Cement] and dual-cured [Calibra, RelyX ARC]) within the first 24 hours and up to seven days. Resin specimens were prepared for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness testing to determine the DC and Vickers hardness (VH), respectively. The light-cured materials or mixed pastes of the dual-cured materials were irradiated with a light-curing unit (Elipar TriLight) through a precured composite overlay for 40 seconds. The FTIR spectra and microhardness readings were taken at specified times: 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes; 24 hours and after two days and seven days. According to the FTIR study, most of the curing reaction of Choice 2 and RelyX Veneer occurred within 10 and 30 minutes, respectively. Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra exhibited gradual increases in the DC up to 24 hours, with no further statistically significant increase (p > 0.05). RelyX ARC attained a DC value within five minutes, similar to that at seven days (p > 0.05). Choice 2 and RelyXARC showed gradual increases in the VH, up to 15 minutes, with no further significant change over the remaining observation time (p > 0.05). For RelyX Veneer, Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra, there were no significant increases in the VH value after 24 hours (p > 0.05). The light-cured materials produced significantly higher DC values than the chemical-cured materials (p < 0.05). The DC values of the two dual-cured resin cements were significantly different from each other (p < 0.001). The results suggest that the significant polymerization reaction was finished within 24 hours post-mix or post-light activation for all resin

  14. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ying-Fang [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung [Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yang, Jaw-Ji, E-mail: jjyang@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • The higher the Si in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • Si20-doped in TCP improved cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. • The Si ion stimulated collagen secreted from cells. • The Si released from substrate can promote osteogenic and angiogenic.

  15. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  16. Guitars and Lutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Caldersmith, Graham

    Lute-type instruments have a long history. Various types of necked chordophones were in use in ancient Egyptian, Hittite, Greek, Roman, Turkish, Chinese, and other cultures. In the ninth century, Moors brought the oud (or ud) to Spain. In the fifteenth century, the vihuela became popular in Spain and Portugal. About the same time guitars with four double-strings became popular, and Italy became the center of the guitar world.

  17. Effect of Different Luting Agents on the Retention of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mobilio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available No studies are available that evaluate the retention of disilicate crowns according to different cementation procedures. The purpose of this study was to measure the retention of lithium disilicate crowns cemented using two different cementation systems. Twenty extracted mandibular premolars were prepared. Anatomic crowns were waxed and hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. Teeth were divided into two groups (n = 10: (1 self-curing luting composite and (2 glass-ionomer cement (GIC. After cementation, the crowns were embedded in acrylic resin block with a screw base. Each specimen was pulled along the path of insertion in Universal Testing Machine. Failure load in Newtons (N and failure mode were recorded for each specimen. Failure mode was classified as decementation or fracture. Failure load data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Failure modes were compared using Pearson’s Chi-square test. Mean failure load was 306.6(±193.8 N for composite group and 94.7(±48.2 N for GIC group (p = 0.004. Disilicate crown cemented with luting composite most often failed by fracture; otherwise, crown cemented with glass-ionomer cement most often failed by decementation (p = 0.02. Disilicate full crown cemented with luting composite showed higher failure load compared with conventional cementation with glass-ionomer cement.

  18. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement-gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadhasivam, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jung-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan,Taiwan (China); Savitha, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Pin [School of Dentistry and Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Feng-Huei, E-mail: double@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    The study describes the sol-gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)-gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC-gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC-gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC-gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new dental retrograde filling material PSC-gypsum was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PSC-gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15-35 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa{center_dot}s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  19. Nanohydroxyapatite Silicate-Based Cement Improves the Primary Stability of Dental Implants: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Khorshidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Insufficient cortical bone volume when placing implants can lead to lack of primary stability. The use of cement as a bone fill material in bone defects around dental implant could result in better clinical outcome. HA has shown excellent biological properties in implant dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of nanohydroxyapatite powder (Nano-HA in combination with accelerated Portland cement (APC on implant primary stability in surgically created circumferential bone defects in a bovine rib in vitro model. Materials and Methods. Sixteen bovine rib bones and thirty-six implants of same type and size (4 mm × 10 mm were used. Implants were divided into six groups: no circumferential bone defect, defect and no grafting, bone chips grafting, Nano-HA grafting, APC grafting, and Nano-HA mixed to APC grafting (Nano-HA-APC. Circumferential defects around the implants were prepared. The implant stability quotient (ISQ values were measured before and after the grafting. Results. APC exhibited the highest ISQ values. A significant increase of ISQ values following the grafting of Nano-HA-APC (18.08±5.82 and APC alone (9.50±4.12 was achieved. Increase of ISQ values after 72 hours was 24.16±5.01 and 17.58±4.89, respectively. Nano-HA grafting alone exhibited the least rise in ISQ values. Conclusions. Nanohydroxyapatite silicate-based cement could improve the primary stability of dental implants in circumferential bone defect around implants.

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-04-08

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. RESULTS Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect.

  1. Novel Dental Cement to Combat Biofilms and Reduce Acids for Orthodontic Applications to Avoid Enamel Demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatments often lead to biofilm buildup and white spot lesions due to enamel demineralization. The objectives of this study were to develop a novel bioactive orthodontic cement to prevent white spot lesions, and to determine the effects of cement compositions on biofilm growth and acid production. 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC, nanoparticles of silver (NAg, and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM were incorporated into a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI. Enamel shear bond strength (SBS was determined. Protein adsorption was determined using a micro bicinchoninic acid method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU and lactic acid production. Incorporating 3% of MPC, 1.5% of DMAHDM, and 0.1% of NAg into RMGI, and immersing in distilled water at 37 °C for 30 days, did not decrease the SBS, compared to control (p > 0.1. RMGI with 3% MPC + 1.5% DMAHDM + 0.1% NAg had protein amount that was 1/10 that of control. RMGI with triple agents (MPC + DMAHDM + NAg had much stronger antibacterial property than using a single agent or double agents (p < 0.05. Biofilm CFU on RMGI with triple agents was reduced by more than 3 orders of magnitude, compared to commercial control. Biofilm metabolic activity and acid production were also greatly reduced. In conclusion, adding MPC + DMAHDM + NAg in RMGI substantially inhibited biofilm viability and acid production, without compromising the orthodontic bracket bond strength to enamel. The novel bioactive cement is promising for orthodontic applications to hinder biofilms and plaque buildup and enamel demineralization.

  2. Where and how are Brazilian dental students using Glass lonomer Cement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sousa Azevedo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass Ionomer Cements (GICs have a wide range of uses in Dentistry, and the manipulation technique used can influence the results obtained. This study aimed at assessing the knowledge held by Dental School students from a city in Southern Brazil regarding the use of GIC, and the clinical technique chosen for its use and its applications. A structured questionnaire was applied to 60 advanced dental students. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the quantitative data. All students had already used the material. Regarding the purpose for which the material was used, all students (100% had used it as a dental cavity liner, 83.3% had used it as a temporary restorative material after endodontic treatment, and 73.3% had used it as a permanent restoration in primary teeth. Regarding the clinical technique used, 86.7% said that they insert the material while it still has a shiny surface, 33% said that they finish and polish the restoration in a following session, and only 28.3% said that they apply a surface protection immediately after the restoration is placed. Although students generally seem to be acquainted with the fundamental knowledge and main techniques involved in GIC use, they occasionally fail to follow all the technical steps required during clinical application, which may affect treatment outcome. Therefore, professors should stress that all the clinical procedures required during GIC application must be followed strictly to improve the performance of this material.

  3. In vivo disintegration of four different luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemalmaz, Deniz; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Latta, Mark; Kuybulu, Ferah; Alcan, Toros

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the disintegration of luting agents. An intraoral sample holder was made having four holes of 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth. The holder was soldered onto the buccal surface of an orthodontic band, which was cemented to the first upper molar in 12 patients, average age 26 years. The holes were filled with a zinc phosphate (Phosphate Kulzer), a glass ionomer (Ketac Cem), a resin-modified-glass ionomer (Fuji Plus), and a resin cement (Calibra). Impressions were made at baseline, and 6, 12, and 18 months from which epoxy replicas were made, which were scanned with an optical scanner. Total volume loss was calculated. The rank order of mean volume loss was as follows: Phosphate cement > Ketac Cem = Fuji Plus = Calibra. Cement type and time had statistically significant effects on volume loss of cements (P contradiction to previous laboratory results.

  4. Survival and failure modes: platform-switching for internal and external hexagon cemented fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, Rodolfo B; Machado, Lucas S; Hirata, Ronaldo; Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the probability of survival (reliability) of platform-switched fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) cemented on different implant-abutment connection designs. Eighty-four-three-unit FDPs (molar pontic) were cemented on abutments connected to two implants of external or internal hexagon connection. Four groups (n = 21 each) were established: external hexagon connection and regular platform (ERC); external hexagon connection and switched platform (ESC); internal hexagon and regular platform (IRC); and internal hexagon and switched platform (ISC). Prostheses were subjected to step-stress accelerated life testing in water. Weibull curves and probability of survival for a mission of 100,000 cycles at 400 N (two-sided 90% CI) were calculated. The beta values of 0.22, 0.48, 0.50, and 1.25 for groups ERC, ESC, IRC, and ISC, respectively, indicated a limited role of fatigue in damage accumulation, except for group ISC. Survival decreased for both platform-switched groups (ESC: 74%, and ISC: 59%) compared with the regular matching platform counterparts (ERC: 95%, and IRC: 98%). Characteristic strength was higher only for ERC compared with ESC, but not different between internal connections. Failures chiefly involved the abutment screw. Platform switching decreased the probability of survival of FDPs on both external and internal connections. The absence in loss of characteristic strength observed in internal hexagon connections favor their use compared with platform-switched external hexagon connections. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  5. Vertical misfit of laser-sintered and vacuum-cast implant-supported crown copings luted with definitive and temporary luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-de-Oyagüe, Raquel; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José-Francisco; Albaladejo, Alberto; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Montero, Javier; Suárez-García, Maria-Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the vertical discrepancy of implant-supported crown structures constructed with vacuum-casting and Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technologies, and luted with different cement types. Crown copings were fabricated using: (1) direct metal laser sintered Co-Cr (LS); (2) vacuum-cast Co-Cr (CC); and (3) vacuum-cast Ti (CT). Frameworks were luted onto machined implant abutments under constant seating pressure. Each alloy group was randomly divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10 each) according to the cement system utilized: Subgroup 1 (KC) used resin-modified glass-ionomer Ketac Cem Plus; Subgroup 2 (PF) used Panavia F 2.0 dual-cure resin cement; Subgroup 3 (RXU) used RelyX Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive dual-cure resin cement; Subgroup 4 (PIC) used acrylic/urethane-based temporary Premier Implant Cement; and Subgroup 5 (DT) used acrylic/urethane-based temporary DentoTemp cement. Vertical misfit was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run to investigate the effect of alloy/fabrication technique, and cement type on vertical misfit. The statistical significance was set at α = 0.05. The alloy/manufacturing technique and the luting cement affected the vertical discrepancy (p Laser sintering may be an alternative to vacuum-casting of base metals to obtain passive-fitting implant-supported crown copings. The best marginal adaptation corresponded to laser sintered structures luted with glass-ionomer KC, or temporary PIC or DT cements. The highest discrepancies were recorded for Co-Cr and Ti cast frameworks bonded with PF or RXU resinous agents. All groups were within the clinically acceptable misfit range.

  6. Dental glass ionomer cement reinforced by cellulose microfibers and cellulose nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael M; Pereira, Fabiano V; Mota, Felipe A P; Watanabe, Evandro; Soares, Suelleng M C S; Santos, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate if the addition of cellulose microfibers (CmF) or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) would improve the mechanical properties of a commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). Different amounts of CmF and CNC were previously prepared and then added to reinforce the GIC matrix while it was being manipulated. Test specimens with various concentrations of CmF or CNC in their total masses were fabricated and submitted to mechanical tests (to evaluate their compressive and diametral tensile strength,modulus, surface microhardness and wear resistance) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The incorporation of CmF in the GIC matrix did not greatly improve the mechanical properties of GIC. However, the addition of a small amount of CNC in the GIC led to significant improvements in all of the mechanical properties evaluated: compressive strength (increased up to 110% compared with the control group), elastic modulus increased by 161%, diametral tensile strength increased by 53%, and the mass loss decreased from 10.95 to 3.87%. Because the composites presented a considerable increase in mechanical properties, the modification of the conventional GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material.

  7. Cytotoxic effects of glass ionomer cements on human dental pulp stem cells correlate with fluoride release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjevac, Tatjana; Milovanovic, Marija; Volarevic, Vladislav; Lukic, Miodrag L; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Markovic, Dejan; Zdravkovic, Nebojsa; Tesic, Zivoslav; Lukic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are commonly used as restorative materials. Responses to GICs differ among cell types and it is therefore of importance to thoroughly investigate the influence of these restorative materials on pulp stem cells that are potential source for dental tissue regeneration. Eight biomaterials were tested: Fuji I, Fuji II, Fuji VIII, Fuji IX, Fuji Plus, Fuji Triage, Vitrebond and Composit. We compared their cytotoxic activity on human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and correlated this activity with the content of Fluoride, Aluminium and Strontium ions in their eluates. Elution samples of biomaterials were prepared in sterile tissue culture medium and the medium was tested for toxicity by an assay of cell survival/proliferation (MTT test) and apoptosis (Annexin V FITC Detection Kit). Concentrations of Fluoride, Aluminium and Strontium ions were tested by appropriate methods in the same eluates. Cell survival ranged between 79.62% (Fuji Triage) to 1.5% (Fuji Plus) and most dead DPSCs were in the stage of late apoptosis. Fluoride release correlated with cytotoxicity of GICs, while Aluminium and Strontium ions, present in significant amount in eluates of tested GICs did not. Fuji Plus, Vitrebond and Fuji VIII, which released fluoride in higher quantities than other GICs, were highly toxic to human DPSCs. Opposite, low levels of released fluoride correlated to low cytotoxic effect of Composit, Fuji I and Fuji Triage.

  8. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  9. Preparation and evaluation of a high-strength biocompatible glass-ionomer cement for improved dental restoratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, D; Zhao, J; Park, J; Chu, T M [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Yang, Y; Zhang, J T [Department of Phamacology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: dxie@iupui.edu

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a high-strength light-cured glass-ionomer cement (LCGIC). The polymer in the cement was composed of the 6-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), which was synthesized using atom-transfer radical polymerization. The polymer was used to formulate with water and Fuji II LC filler to form LCGIC. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. Commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as control. The results show that the 6-arm PAA polymer exhibited a lower viscosity in water as compared to its linear counterpart that was synthesized via conventional free-radical polymerization. This new LCGIC system was 48% in CS, 77% in diametral tensile strength, 95% in flexural strength and 59% in fracture toughness higher but 93.6% in shrinkage lower than Fuji II LC. An increasing polymer content significantly increased CS, whereas an increasing glass filler content increased neither yield strength nor ultimate CS except for modulus. During aging, the experimental cement showed a significant and continuous increase in yield strength, modulus and ultimate CS, but Fuji II LC only showed a significant increase in strength within 24 h. The experimental cement was very biocompatible in vivo to bone and showed little in vitro cytotoxicity. It appears that this novel LCGIC cement will be a better dental restorative because it demonstrated significantly improved mechanical strengths and better in vitro and in vivo biocompatibilities as compared to the current commercial LCGIC system.

  10. Effect of adhesive luting on the fracture resistance of zirconia compared to that of composite resin and lithium disilicate glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Myung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive luting on the fracture resistance of zirconia compared to that of a composite resin and a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Materials and Methods The specimens (dimension: 2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm) of the composite resin, lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) were prepared. These were then divided into nine groups: three non-luting groups, three non-adhesive luting groups, and three adhesive luting groups, for each restorative material. In the non-luting groups, specimens were placed on the bovine tooth without any luting agents. In the non-adhesive luting groups, only zinc phosphate cement was used for luting the specimen to the bovine tooth. In the adhesive luting groups, specimens were pretreated, and the adhesive luting procedure was performed using a self-adhesive resin cement. For all the groups, a flexural test was performed using universal testing machine, in which the fracture resistance was measured by recording the force at which the specimen was fractured. Results The fracture resistance after adhesive luting increased by approximately 29% in the case of the composite resin, 26% in the case of the lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and only 2% in the case of Y-TZP as compared to non-adhesive luting. Conclusions The fracture resistance of Y-TZP did not increased significantly after adhesive luting as compared to that of the composite resin and the lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

  11. Push-out stress for fibre posts luted using different adhesive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Annalisa; Marchesi, Giulio; Cadenaro, Milena; Mazzotti, Giovanni; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Ferrari, Marco; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2009-08-01

    The influence of thermocycling on the bond strength of fibre posts cemented with different luting approaches was investigated. A total of 84 human incisors were selected for the study. Sixty teeth were assigned to one of the following adhesive/cement combinations for push-out bond-strength evaluation: group 1, XP Bond/CoreXFlow + DT Light-Post; group 2, Panavia F 2.0 + Tech 21; or group 3, RelyX Unicem + RelyX. Bonded specimens were cut into 1-mm-thick slabs and either thermocycled (40,000 cycles) or stored in artificial saliva (control specimens) before push-out bond-strength testing. Additional specimens were processed for quantitative interfacial nanoleakage analysis. Thermocycling decreased the bond strength in specimens of groups 2 and 3, but did not affect the specimens from group 1. No difference was observed among luting approaches in control specimens. Thermocycling resulted in increased silver nitrate deposition (i.e. interfacial nanoleakage) in all groups. Within the limitations of the study, the use of an etch-and-rinse adhesive in combination with a dual-cure cement to lute fiber posts is the most stable luting procedure if compared with a self-etch resin-based cement or a self-adhesive cement, as assayed by thermocycling of the bonded specimens.

  12. Synthesis of Ag doped calcium phosphate particles and their antibacterial effect as additives in dental glass ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Developing dental restorations with enhanced antibacterial properties has been a constant quest for materials scientists. The aim of this study was to synthesize silver doped calcium phosphate particles and use them to improve antibacterial properties of conventional glass ionomer cement. The Ag doped monetite (Ag-DCPA) and hydroxyapatite (Ag-HA) were synthesized by precipitation method and characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy...

  13. Gene Expression Profiling and Molecular Signaling of Dental Pulp Cells in Response to Tricalcium Silicate Cements: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinam, Elanagai; Rajasekharan, Sivaprakash; Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Martens, Luc; De Coster, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Signaling molecules and responding dental pulp stem cells are the 2 main control keys of dentin regeneration/dentinogenesis. The aim of this study was to present a systematic review investigating the gene expression of various dental pulp cells in response to different variants of tricalcium silicate cements. A systematic search of the literature was performed by 2 independent reviewers followed by article selection and data extraction. Studies analyzing all sorts of dental pulp cells (DPCs) and any variant of tricalcium silicate cement either as the experimental or as the control group were included. A total of 39 articles were included in the review. Among the included studies, ProRoot MTA (Dentsply, Tulsa Dental, OK) was the most commonly used tricalcium silicate cement variant. The extracellular signal regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway was the most commonly activated pathway to be identified, and similarly, dentin sialophosphoprotein osteocalcin dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, type I collagen, and Runx2 were the most commonly expressed genes in that order of frequency. Biodentine (Septodont Ltd, Saint Maur des Faussés, France), Bioaggregate (Innovative Bioceramix, Vancouver, BC, Canada), and mineral trioxide aggregate stimulate the osteogenic/odontogenic capacity of DPCs by proliferation, angiogenesis, and biomineralization through the activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase ½, nuclear factor E2 related factor 2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase, p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and fibroblast growth factor receptor pathways. When DPCs are placed into direct contact with tricalcium silicate cements, they show higher levels of gene activation, which in turn could translate into more effective pulpal repair and faster and more predictable formation of reparative dentin. Copyright © 2015 American

  14. In Vivo Disintegration of Four Different Luting Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Gemalmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the disintegration of luting agents. An intraoral sample holder was made having four holes of 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth. The holder was soldered onto the buccal surface of an orthodontic band, which was cemented to the first upper molar in 12 patients, average age 26 years. The holes were filled with a zinc phosphate (Phosphate Kulzer, a glass ionomer (Ketac Cem, a resin-modified-glass ionomer (Fuji Plus, and a resin cement (Calibra. Impressions were made at baseline, and 6, 12, and 18 months from which epoxy replicas were made, which were scanned with an optical scanner. Total volume loss was calculated. The rank order of mean volume loss was as follows: Phosphate cement > Ketac Cem = Fuji Plus = Calibra. Cement type and time had statistically significant effects on volume loss of cements (P<0.001. Under in vivo conditions, zinc phosphate cement disintegrated the most, whereas no significant difference was observed for glass ionomer and resin-based cements. As intraoral conditions are considerably less aggressive than experimental laboratory conditions, the erosion behavior of glass ionomer cement was found to be similar to the resin-based cements in contradiction to previous laboratory results.

  15. Polimerización de un cemento de composite a través de restauraciones de cerómero utilizando lámparas halógenas y LEDs Polymerization of dual-cure resin luting cements through laboratory-processed-resins: LED versus halogen lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Grau Grullón

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evaluó la influencia del grosor de una restauración indirecta de cerómero, el tipo de lámpara fotoactivadora y el tiempo de almacenamiento en la dureza Vickers de un cemento de composite. Dos lámparas de diodos (Optilight CL [CL] y Ultra-Lume 5 [UL] fueron comparadas con la lámpara halógena (Optilux 401 [OH]. Fueron confeccionados especímenes en cerómero con un diámetro de 5 mm y una espesura de 1 y 2 mm, los cuales fueron interpuestos entre la luz y la matriz metálica de 5 mm de ancho y 0,5 mm de grosor que contenía el cemento de composite. Los 45 cuerpos de prueba fueron divididos en 9 grupos: G1: exposición directa de luz DLE/OH; G2: 1 mm/OH; G3: 2 mm/OH; G4: DLE/CL; G5: 1 mm/CL; G6: 2 mm/CL; G7: DLE/UL; G8: 1 mm/UL y G9: 2 mm/UL. La fotoactivación fue realizada durante 60 segundos. La dureza Vickers (50 g/30s fue medida en la superficie tope de todos los especímenes luego de 24 horas y 180 días de almacenamiento. La lámpara fotoactivadora y el grosor del cerómero fueron estadísticamente significativas (pThis study evaluated the influence of indirect composite resin thickness, the storage time and light-curing units on the Vickers hardness of a dual-cure resin luting cement. Two light-emitting diodes lights (Optilight CL [CL] and UltraLume5 [UL] were compared with a quartz tungsten halogen unit (Optilux 401 [OH]. Laboratory-processed composite specimens with a diameter of 5mm and thickness of 1 and 2 mm were constructed to be interposed between the light guide and the metal matrix (5mm wide and 0.5 mm deep with the resin luting cement. Then, 45 dual-cure resin luting specimens were divided in nine groups: G1: direct light exposure DLE/OH; G2: 1 mm/OH; G3: 2 mm/OH; G4: DLE/CL; G5: 1 mm/CL; G6: 2 mm/CL; G7: DLE/UL; G8: 1 mm/UL and G9: 2 mm/UL. The light curing was performed for 60 seconds. The Vickers hardness (50g/30s was measured at the top surface of all specimens, either after 24 hours or 180 days. The Light

  16. Effect of the crown design and interface lute parameters on the stress-state of a machined crown-tooth system: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrbaf, Shirin; vanNoort, Richard; Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Ghassemieh, Elaheh; Martin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    The effect of preparation design and the physical properties of the interface lute on the restored machined ceramic crown-tooth complex are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to determine, by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) the effect of the tooth preparation design and the elastic modulus of the cement on the stress state of the cemented machined ceramic crown-tooth complex. The three-dimensional structure of human premolar teeth, restored with adhesively cemented machined ceramic crowns, was digitized with a micro-CT scanner. An accurate, high resolution, digital replica model of a restored tooth was created. Two preparation designs, with different occlusal morphologies, were modeled with cements of 3 different elastic moduli. Interactive medical image processing software (mimics and professional CAD modeling software) was used to create sophisticated digital models that included the supporting structures; periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The generated models were imported into an FEA software program (hypermesh version 10.0, Altair Engineering Inc.) with all degrees of freedom constrained at the outer surface of the supporting cortical bone of the crown-tooth complex. Five different elastic moduli values were given to the adhesive cement interface 1.8GPa, 4GPa, 8GPa, 18.3GPa and 40GPa; the four lower values are representative of currently used cementing lutes and 40GPa is set as an extreme high value. The stress distribution under simulated applied loads was determined. The preparation design demonstrated an effect on the stress state of the restored tooth system. The cement elastic modulus affected the stress state in the cement and dentin structures but not in the crown, the pulp, the periodontal ligament or the cancellous and cortical bone. The results of this study suggest that both the choice of the preparation design and the cement elastic modulus can affect the stress state within the restored crown

  17. The bacterial adhesion on and the cytotoxicity of various dental cements used for implant-supported fixed restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Cornelia; Schäfer, Lina; Felthaus, Oliver; Allerdings, Juri; Hahnel, Sebastian; Behr, Michael; Bürgers, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial adhesion on and cytotoxicity of eight luting agents used for implant-supported restorations were investigated. Surface roughness (Ra), surface free energy (SFE) values and three-dimensional images by atomic-force microscopy of circular specimens were determined. Bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus epidermidis were incubated at 37°C for 2 h. Adhering bacteria were examined with fluorescence dye CytoX-Violet, stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and visualized by fluorescence-microscopy. Cytotoxicity-testing was done with WST-1-tests (water soluble tetrazolium). No significant differences, neither with regard to Ra nor regarding SFE were determined. Adherence of S. sanguinis was less on titanium, TempBondNE and TempBond. TempBond, TempBondNE, RelyX Unicem and Implantlink Semi Classic presented low amounts of S. epidermidis. WST-testing showed high cytotoxic potential of Harvard, Aqualox, TempBondNE and TempBond. No combination of low adherent bacteria with low cytotoxicity was found. From a biological in-vitro perspective, none of the cements may be recommended for implant-supported restorations.

  18. Adhesion of adhesive resin cements to dental zirconia ceramic and human dentin

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the long-term bond strengths of adhesive resin cements to zirconia ceramic and human dentin were evaluated, and resin-ceramic and resin-dentin bonding mechanisms were investigated. In chapter 3, the influence of surface pre-treatment on the bonding durability of three resin cements (Super-Bond C&B resin cement : SB, Clearfil™ Esthetic cement: CEC, Chemiace II: CH) to zirconia ceramic was studied. Most importantly, the influence of chemical reactions of functional monomers in...

  19. Adhesion strategy and early bond strengths of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of coinitiator solutions and self-adhesive resin cement on the early retention of glass-fiber posts. Cylindrical glass-fiber posts were luted into 40 incisor roots with different adhesion strategies (n = 10: SB2, Single Bond 2 + conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC; AP, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP activator + primer + ARC; APC, SBMP activator + primer + catalyst + ARC; and UNI, self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem. Pull-out bond strength results at 10 min after cementation showed APC > UNI > SB2 = AP (P < 0.05. The adhesion strategy significantly affected early bonding to root canals.

  20. Evaluation of Bond Strength and Quality of Fiber Posts Cemented With Two Cements in Asymmetric Dental Root Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Ramezani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective:Debonding is one of the most common causes of failures in post fibers used in the root canalat interface of dentin-fiberpost. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the interface of the fibers post in the root canal with appropriate and inappropriate compliance with CBCT and its push-out bond strength with two types of resin cement used in the mandibular premolars. Materials and Methods:Forty (40Mandibular Premolarteeth which were extracted were useddue to theorthodontic problems. After endodontic, the teeth were randomly classified into two groups including teeth with post space in compliance with the fiber post and a group of posts space wider than fiber post. Thereafter,each group wassub-divided into two groups according to the used cement: panaviaF2.0 (Kuraray Medical Inc., Osaka, Japan, Rebilda DC(Voco, and Germany and finally, four groups were created [P.a:canal with appropriate adaptation + panavia F2.0, P.in:canal with inappropriate adaptation + panavia F2.0, R.a:canal with appropriate adaptation + Rebilda DC, R.in:canal with inappropriate adaptation + Rebilda DC]. Data analysis was carried out using ANOVA, Post hoc Tukey test, Chisquare test (p <0.05. Results: The bond strength was significantly affected by the analyzed root area (p-value = 0.03 and there was a significant difference between two canals with appropriate and inappropriate compliance with the same type of cement (p-value = 0.05. In addition, the bond strength was not affected by cement type (p-value = 0.67 and the area of the voids was higher in P.in groups. Nevertheless, in R.a group, no void was observed. Conclusion: The bond strength was affected by the post space but it was not affected by cementation techniques. As a result of this, applicator of Rebilda cement reduces the voids in the root canal with appropriate compliance

  1. Curing depth of a resin-modified glass ionomer and two resin-based luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigemori, Ricardo Massao; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre M S

    2005-01-01

    The degree of conversion of resin-based luting agents used for retention of prefabricated posts has been questioned due to the difficulty of light penetration into the resin-filled root canal. This study evaluated the depth of cure of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Rely X--3M ESPE) and two resin-based luting agents (Rely X ARC--3M ESPE and Enforce-Dentsply). Twenty-four 14x2x2mm3 specimens were prepared in a Teflon split mold with the three luting agents (n=8). After preparation, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in a dark box for 24 hours prior to microhardness testing. Measurements of Knoop hardness were performed at three different depths: superficial, medium and deep thirds. The results (KHN) were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey test (0.05), which showed that resin-based luting agents presented the highest Knoop hardness values within the superficial third. Within the medium third, there were no significant differences among luting materials. However, within the deep third, Rely X presented the highest values. KHN values of resin-based luting agents decreased remarkably as depth increased.

  2. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area.

  3. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  4. Variation of the ultrasonic response of a dental implant embedded in tricalcium silicate-based cement under cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayron, Romain; Karasinski, Patrick; Mathieu, Vincent; Michel, Adrien; Loriot, Domitille; Richard, Gilles; Lambert, Gregory; Haiat, Guillaume

    2013-04-05

    The use of tricalcium silicate-based cement (TSBC) as bone substitute material for implant stabilization is promising. However, its mechanical behavior under fatigue loading in presence of a dental implant was not reported so far because of the difficulty of measuring TSBC properties around a dental implant in a nondestructive manner. The aim of this study is to investigate the evolution of the 10 MHz ultrasonic response of a dental implant embedded in TSBC versus fatigue time. Seven implants were embedded in TSBC following the same experimental protocol used in clinical situations. One implant was left without any mechanical solicitation after its insertion in TSBC. The ultrasonic response of all implants was measured during 24 h using a dedicated device deriving from previous studies. An indicator I based on the temporal variation of the signal amplitude was derived and its variation as a function of fatigue time was determined. The results show no significant variation of I as a function of time without mechanical solicitation, while the indicator significantly increases (pBiodentine-implant interface, which induces an increase of the impedance gap at the implant surface. The results are promising because they show the potentiality of ultrasonic methods to (i) investigate the material properties around a dental implant and (ii) optimize the conception of bone substitute materials in the context of dental implant surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis of a proline-modified acrylic acid copolymer in supercritical CO2 for glass-ionomer dental cement applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Roohpour, Nima; Darr, Jawwad A; Rehman, Ihtesham U

    2009-06-01

    Supercritical (sc-) fluids (such as sc-CO(2)) represent interesting media for the synthesis of polymers in dental and biomedical applications. Sc-CO(2) has several advantages for polymerization reactions in comparison to conventional organic solvents. It has several advantages in comparison to conventional polymerization solvents, such as enhanced kinetics, being less harmful to the environment and simplified solvent removal process. In our previous work, we synthesized poly(acrylic acid-co-itaconic acid-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PAA-IA-NVP) terpolymers in a supercritical CO(2)/methanol mixture for applications in glass-ionomer dental cements. In this study, proline-containing acrylic acid copolymers were synthesized, in a supercritical CO(2) mixture or in water. Subsequently, the synthesized polymers were used in commercially available glass-ionomer cement formulations (Fuji IX commercial GIC). Mechanical strength (compressive strength (CS), diametral tensile strength (DTS) and biaxial flexural strength (BFS)) and handling properties (working and setting time) of the resulting modified cements were evaluated. It was found that the polymerization reaction in an sc-CO(2)/methanol mixture was significantly faster than the corresponding polymerization reaction in water and the purification procedures were simpler for the former. Furthermore, glass-ionomer cement samples made from the terpolymer prepared in sc-CO(2)/methanol exhibited higher CS and DTS and comparable BFS compared to the same polymer synthesized in water. The working properties of glass-ionomer formulations made in sc-CO(2)/methanol were comparable and better than the values of those for polymers synthesized in water.

  6. Retention Strength after Compressive Cyclic Loading of Five Luting Agents Used in Implant-Supported Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Alvarez-Arenal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the retention strength of five cement types commonly used in implant-retained fixed partial dentures, before and after compressive cyclic loading. In five solid abutments screwed to 5 implant analogs, 50 metal Cr-Ni alloy copings were cemented with five luting agents: resin-modified glass ionomer (RmGI, resin composite (RC, glass ionomer (GI, resin urethane-based (RUB, and compomer cement (CC. Two tensile tests were conducted with a universal testing machine, one after the first luting of the copings and the other after 100,000 cycles of 100 N loading at 0.72 Hz. The one way ANOVA test was applied for the statistical analysis using the post hoc Tukey test when required. Before and after applying the compressive load, RmGI and RC cement types showed the greatest retention strength. After compressive loading, RUB cement showed the highest percentage loss of retention (64.45%. GI cement recorded the lowest retention strength (50.35 N and the resin composite cement recorded the highest (352.02 N. The type of cement influences the retention loss. The clinician should give preference to lower retention strength cement (RUB, CC, and GI if he envisages any complications and a high retention strength one (RmGI, RC for a specific clinical situation.

  7. A comparison of the marginal vertical discrepancies of zirconium and metal ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses before and after cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Esther; Suárez, Maria J; Serrano, Benjamin; Lozano, Jose F L

    2009-12-01

    Marginal discrepancies of zirconia posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) fabricated using various systems have been assessed to determine the quality of the restorations and facilitate clinical use; however, studies are limited and results are ambiguous because of the sample sizes and measurement methods. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare changes in marginal fit of posterior fixed dental prostheses of 3 zirconia systems manufactured using CAD/CAM technology and metal ceramic posterior fixed dental protheses fabricated with the conventional lost-wax technique, before and after cementation. Forty standardized master steel dies with 2 abutments simulating first mandibular premolars were fabricated to receive a posterior 3-unit FDP (from first molar to first premolar) and divided into 4 groups (n=10): Lava All-Ceramic System, Procera Bridge Zirconia, VITA In-Ceram 2000 YZ, and metal ceramic (control group). All FDPs were prepared for an internal space of 50 microm. The external marginal gap of the restorations was investigated by measuring 30 points in the middle of the buccal and lingual surfaces; therefore, 60 measurements per abutment were recorded. Measurements were made with an image analysis program on the master steel model before and after conventional cementation with a glass ionomer agent (Ketac Cem Easymix). The data obtained were statistically analyzed using 1-way ANOVA, Duncan's multiple range post hoc test, and Student's paired t test (alpha=.05). No significant differences in the vertical marginal fit before and after cementation were recorded for the analyzed groups. The marginal discrepancy of Procera abutments before and after cementation (9 +/-10 microm and 12 +/-9 microm, respectively) was less than that of the other groups. Significant differences (P=.001) were observed in marginal adaptation between Procera Bridge Zirconia and the other groups. The results of this study showed that cementation did not cause a significant

  8. Micro push-out bond strengths of 2 fiber post types luted using different adhesive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ugur; Mumcu, Emre; Topcu, Fulya Toksoy; Yildiz, Esra; Yamanel, Kivanc; Akyol, Mesut

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strengths of carbon and glass fiber posts adhesively luted with Panavia F 2.0 and RelyX Unicem luting cements, as well as a modified application procedure using RelyX Unicem cement in combination with a single-bottle total-etch adhesive in 3 segments of teeth. Sixty single-rooted human maxillary central incisors and canines were sectioned below the cementoenamel junction, and the roots were endodontically treated. The roots were divided into 2 fiber-post groups, and then divided into 3 subgroups of 10 specimens each to test different luting strategies. Bonded specimens were cut (1-mm-thick sections) and push-out tests were performed (crosshead-speed, 0.5 mm/min). Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope at original magnification ×40. Micro push-out bond strengths were significantly affected by the type of luting agent and the type of post (P push-out bond strength values of glass fiber posts were significantly higher than that of carbon fiber posts (P push-out bond strengths were measured for Panavia F 2.0 and RelyX Unicem cements. These values were significantly higher than that of modified application procedure in the medium section for both glass- and carbon-fiber posts, and in the apical root sections only for glass-fiber post (P < .05). In each region, the modified application procedure showed the lowest bond strength values. Adhesive failure between dentin and cement was the most frequent type of failure. In all root segments, the glass fiber post provided significantly increased post retention compared with the carbon fiber post, regardless of the luting strategy used. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Retention of implant-supported zirconium oxide ceramic restorations using different luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Savabi, Omid; Shahtoosi, Mojtaba

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the retention value of implant-supported zirconium oxide ceramic copings using different luting agents. Twenty ITI solid abutments of 5.5 mm height and ITI implant analogs were mounted vertically into autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Ninety zirconium oxide copings (Cercon, Degudent) with a loop on the occlusal portion were made. All samples were airborne particle abraded with 110 μm Al₂O₃ and luted using different types of luting agents: resin cements (Clearfil SA, Panavia F2.0, Fuji Plus), conventional cements (Fleck's, Poly F, Fuji I), and temporary cements (Temp Bond, GC free eugenol, TempSpan) with a load of 5 Kg. (N = 10) All copings were incubated at 37°C for 24 h and conditioned in artificial saliva for 1 week, and thermal cycled for 5000 cycles 5-55°C with a 30-s dwell time. The dislodging force of the copings along the long axis of the implant-abutment complex was recorded using universal testing machine with 5 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis (α = 0.05) and Mann-Whitney tests with Bonferroni step down correction (α = 0.001). There was significant difference between the mean rank retention values of different luting agents (P ceramic restorations, over ITI solid abutments may be influenced by the type of cement. The application of an MDP-containing resin and resin-modified glass ionomer luting agents increase the retentive value of implant-supported zirconium oxide restorations. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Uses of sodium fluoride varnish in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C H; Lo, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Fluoride varnish is developed to prolong the contact time between fluoride and tooth surface, so that the tooth becomes more resistant to caries attack. The active ingredient of fluoride varnish is usually 5% sodium fluoride, (22,600 ppm fluoride). Studies have found that fairly insoluble globules of calcium fluoride-like material formed on the tooth surface after topical fluoride application. These globules act as a reservoir of fluoride in the mouth for a prolonged period of time. Systematic reviews corroborate evidence for the efficacy of fluoride varnish in the prevention of dental caries. Sodium fluoride varnish is used to prevent caries development, arrest early enamel and even soft dentine caries through promotion of remineralization of carious tooth substance. It is also used to treat tooth hypersensitivity. Some use it as a provisional luting agent by itself or combined with other provisional luting agents for cementing provisional crowns. Fluoride varnish has recently gained much attention in dentistry because it is quick and easy to apply. It sets rapidly on teeth, and gagging and swallowing is unusual. Side-effects or complications of its use are rare. Studies show that fluoride varnish is safe for young children and the risk of dental fluorosis is minimal. The simplicity of its application makes it very suitable and practical for use in dental clinics and outreach dental services, especially in young children and in other special needs groups.

  11. Evaluation of the onset of failure under mechanical and thermal stresses on luting agent for metal-ceramic and metal crowns by finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Agnihotri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term clinical failures of cemented prosthesis depend, to a large extent, on the integrity of the luting agent. The causative factors that lead to microfracture and, hence, failure of the luting agents are the stresses acting inside the oral cavity. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between stresses in the tooth and the failure potential of the luting agent. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis was performed on the mandibular second premolar. The behavior of zinc-phosphate and glass-ionomer were studied under different crowns (metal-ceramic and metal crown and loading conditions (mechanical force of 450 N acting vertically over the occlusal surface, thermal loads of 60° and 0°C. It was observed from the study that failure threshold of the luting agent was influenced both by the elastic modulus of the luting agent and by the type of the crown.

  12. The Effect of Luting Agents and Ceramic Thickness on the Color Variation of Different Ceramics against a Chromatic Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo Cubas, Gloria Beatriz; Camacho, Guilherme Brião; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of various ceramic thicknesses and luting agents on color variation in five ceramic systems. Fifteen disc-shaped ceramic specimens (11 mm diameter; shade A3) were fabricated with each of the six veneering ceramics tested, with 1, 1.5, or 2 mm thickness (n=5). Resin composite discs (Z-250, shade C4) were used as bases to simulate a chromatic background. The cementation of the veneers was carried out with an opaque resin-based cement (Enforce, shade C4), a resin-based cement (Enforce, shade A3), or without cement (C4, control group). Color differences (ΔE*) were determined using a colorimeter. Three-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data, followed by a Tukey post-hoc test (α=.05). The L*a*b* values of the ceramic systems were affected by both the luting agent and the ceramic thickness (Pceramics tested, regardless of the thickness (Pceramics and were independent of the luting agent used. The association of 2-mm thickness with opaque cement presented the strongest masking ability of a dark colored background when compared to a non- opaque luting agent and the other thicknesses tested.

  13. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  14. Comparative evaluation of bond strengths of different core materials with various luting agents used for cast crown restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayakar, Ramesh P; Patil, Narendra P; Lekha, K

    2012-09-01

    The coronal cast restoration continues to be used commonly to restore mutilated, endodontically treated teeth. The tensile bond strength of luting cements is of critical importance as many of failures are at the core and the crown interface. An invitro study with aim to evaluate and compare bond strengths of luting cements between different core materials and cast crowns. A total of 45 extracted identical mandibular second premolars were endodontically treated and divided into 3 groups of 15 each. Specimens in first group were restored with cast post and core (Group C), and specimens in second group were restored with stainless steel parapost and composite core material (Group B) and specimens in third group were restored with stainless steel parapost and glass ionomer core build (Group G). Standardized crown preparation was done for all the specimens to receive cast crowns. Each group was further divided into 3 subgroups and were cemented using 3 different luting cements namely, resin cement, polycarboxylate cement, glass ionomer cement (Type I). The samples of each subgroup (n = 5) were subjected to tensile testing using Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min till the dislodgement of crown from the core surface was observed. The bond strengths were significantly different according one way ANOVA (F-150.76 and p < 0.0000). The results of the study showed that the specimens cemented with resin cement in cast core, composite core and glass ionomer core exhibited significantly higher bond strengths as compared to specimens cemented with glass ionomer and polycarboxylate cement. Composite resin core and resin cement combinations were superior to all other cement and core combinations tested.

  15. Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrayer, R. O.; Frazier, J.; Nein, M.

    1993-09-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-m aperture telescope for imaging the stellar ultraviolet spectrum from the lunar surface. The aspects of Lute's educational value and the information it can provide on designing for the long-term exposure to the lunar environment are important considerations. This paper briefly summarizes the status of the phase A study by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) LUTE Task Team. The primary focus will be a discussion of the merits of LUTE as a small and relatively inexpensive project that benefits a wide spectrum of interests and could be operating on the lunar surface by the turn of the century.

  16. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-na; Watson, Devon; Thames, Kyle; Primus, Carolyn M.; Bergeron, Brian E.; Jiao, Kai; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Cutler, Christopher W.; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2015-01-01

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA) after different aging periods. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using assays that examined plasma membrane integrity, leakage of cytosolic enzyme, caspase-3 activity for early apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity and intracellular DNA content. Results of the six assays indicated that both Quick-Set2 and WMTA were initially cytotoxic to hDPSCs after setting for 24 h, with Quick-Set2 being comparatively less cytotoxic than WMTA at this stage. After two aging cycles, the cytotoxicity profiles of the two hydraulic cements were not significantly different and were much less cytotoxic than the positive control (zinc oxide–eugenol cement). Based on these results, it is envisaged that any potential beneficial effect of the discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on osteogenesis by differentiated hDPSCs is more likely to be revealed after outward diffusion and removal of its cytotoxic components. PMID:26617338

  17. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-na; Watson, Devon; Thames, Kyle; Primus, Carolyn M; Bergeron, Brian E; Jiao, Kai; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A; Cutler, Christopher W; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2015-11-30

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA) after different aging periods. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using assays that examined plasma membrane integrity, leakage of cytosolic enzyme, caspase-3 activity for early apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity and intracellular DNA content. Results of the six assays indicated that both Quick-Set2 and WMTA were initially cytotoxic to hDPSCs after setting for 24 h, with Quick-Set2 being comparatively less cytotoxic than WMTA at this stage. After two aging cycles, the cytotoxicity profiles of the two hydraulic cements were not significantly different and were much less cytotoxic than the positive control (zinc oxide-eugenol cement). Based on these results, it is envisaged that any potential beneficial effect of the discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on osteogenesis by differentiated hDPSCs is more likely to be revealed after outward diffusion and removal of its cytotoxic components.

  18. Effect of glass and polyacid preparations on the strength of glass ionomer cements for dental applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruporn Monmaturapoj

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs, widely used as restorative materials in dentistry, are principally composed of fluoroaluminosilicateglass powder combined with a water-soluble polyacid. The investigation of new glass compositions and polyacid components are very important to improve the mechanical properties of these cements. The objective of this work was to prepare glass ionomers and polyacids for the use as GICs. The effects of spherical bodies, Al2O3:SiO2 ratios, replacing CaO by SrO, and ZrO2 adding in glass powder in combination with the variation of acidic copolymer concentration on the compressive strength were investigated and discussed.

  19. From natural products to polymeric derivatives of "eugenol": a new approach for preparation of dental composites and orthopedic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Luis; Vazquez, Blanca; Parra, Juan; López Bravo, Antonio; Deb, Sanjukta; San Roman, Julio

    2006-10-01

    Polymers with eugenol moieties covalently bonded to the macromolecular chains were synthesized for potential application in orthopedic and dental cements. First, eugenol was functionalized with polymerizable groups. The synthetic methods employed afforded two different methacrylic derivatives, where the acrylic and eugenol moieties were either directly bonded, eugenyl methacrylate (EgMA), or separated through an oxyethylene group, ethoxyeugenyl methacrylate (EEgMA). A typical Fisher esterification reaction was used for the synthesis of EgMA and EEgMA, affording the desired monomers in 80% yields. Polymerization of each of the novel monomers, at low conversion, provided soluble polymers consisting of hydrocarbon macromolecules with pendant eugenol moieties. At high conversions only cross-linked polymers were obtained, attributed to participation of the allylic double bonds in the polymerization reaction. In addition, copolymers of each eugenol derivative with ethyl methacrylate (EMA) were prepared at low conversion, with the copolymerization reaction studied by assuming the terminal model and the reactivity ratios determined according to linear and nonlinear methods. The values obtained were r(EgMA) = 1.48, r(EMA) = 0.55 and r(EEgMA) = 1.22, r(EMA) = 0.42. High molecular weight polymers and copolymers were obtained at low conversion. Analysis of thermal properties revealed a T(g) of 95 degrees C for PEgMA and of 20 degrees C for PEEgMA and an increase in the thermal stability for the eugenol derivatives polymers and copolymers with respect to that of PEMA. Water sorption of the copolymers was found to decrease with the eugenol derivative content. Both monomers EgMA and EEgMA showed antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans, producing inhibition halos of 7 and 21 mm, respectively. Finally, cell culture studies revealed that the copolymers did not leach any toxic eluants and showed good cellular proliferation with respect to PEMA. This study thus indicates

  20. Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE), phase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrayer, Robert O.

    1994-04-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-meter telescope for imaging from the lunar surface the ultraviolet spectrum between 1,000 and 3,500 angstroms. There have been several endorsements of the scientific value of a LUTE. In addition to the scientific value of LUTE, its educational value and the information it can provide on the design of operating hardware for long-term exposure in the lunar environment are important considerations. This report provides the results of the LUTE phase A activity begun at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in early 1992. It describes the objective of LUTE (science, engineering, and education), a feasible reference design concept that has evolved, and the subsystem trades that were accomplished during the phase A.

  1. Effect of luting media on the compressive strengths of two types of all-ceramic crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, J T; Rowland, W; Shillingburg, H T; Duncanson, M G

    1993-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of selected luting media on the compressive strength of two types of all-ceramic crown. Tooth preparation was standardized; each preparation had a shoulder width of approximately 1.2 mm, and all internal preparation angles were rounded. Hi-Ceram and Dicor all-ceramic crowns were fabricated and cemented into the preparations with zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer, or composite resin cement. Coronal compressive fracture strengths were determined, using a set of unrestored teeth as a control. There were no statistically significant differences among the mean compressive strengths of the three luting media, and there was no statistically significant difference between the mean compressive strength of Dicor and that of the natural tooth control.

  2. Qualitative evaluation of the adesive interface between lithium disilicate, luting composite and natural tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Mobilio, Nicola; Fasiol, Alberto; Catapano, Santo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this work was to qualitatively evaluate the interface between tooth, luting composite and lithium disilicate surface using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An extracted restoration-free human molar was stored in physiological solution until it was embedded in an autopolimerysing acrylic resin. A standard preparation for overlay was completed and after preparation an anatomic overlay was waxed on the tooth and then hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. After cementation the...

  3. Influence of inorganic filler content on the radiopacity of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura; Moldovan, Marioara; Prejmerean, Cristina; Nica, Luminita

    2012-01-01

    Digital radiography was used to measure the radiopacity of 18 resin cements to determine the influence of inorganic filler content on radiopacity. Four disk specimens (n=4) of each light-curing cement were digitally radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge using an intraoral sensor (XIOS Plus, Sirona, Germany), and their mean gray value measured. Percentage of filler by weight was determined using an analytical combustion furnace. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). All materials were more radiopaque than dentin and 12 materials were more radiopaque than enamel. Filler percentage ranged between 17.36 to 53.56 vol% and radiopacity between 1.02 to 3.40 mm Al. There were no statistically significant differences in inorganic filler percentage and radiopacity among the different shades of the same material (p>0.05), but the highest radiopacity was measured for the material which contained a higher percentage of filler.

  4. Review paper: Role of aluminum in glass-ionomer dental cements and its biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, John W; Czarnecka, Beata

    2009-11-01

    The role of aluminum in glass-ionomers and resin-modified glass-ionomers for dentistry is reviewed. Aluminum is included in the glass component of these materials in the form of Al(2)O(3) to confer basicity on the glass and enable the glass to take part in the acid-base setting reactions. Results of studies of these reactions by FTIR and magic-angle spinning (MAS)-NMR spectroscopy are reported and the role of aluminum is discussed in detail. Aluminum has been shown to be present in the glasses in predominantly 4-coordination, as well as 5- and 6-coordination, and during setting a proportion of this is converted to 6-coordinate species within the matrix of the cement. Despite this, mature cements may contain detectable amounts of both 4- and 5-coordinate aluminum. Aluminum has been found to be leached from glass-ionomer cements, with greater amounts being released under acidic conditions. It may be associated with fluoride, with which it is known to complex strongly. Aluminum that enters the body via the gastro-intestinal tract is mainly excreted, and only about 1% ingested aluminum crosses the gut wall. Calculation shows that, if a glass-ionomer filling dissolved completely over 5 years, it would add only an extra 0.5% of the recommended maximum intake of aluminum to an adult patient. This leads to the conclusion that the release of aluminum from either type of glass-ionomer cement in the mouth poses a negligible health hazard.

  5. Effect of surface treatments of laboratory-fabricated composites on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement Efeito dos tratamentos de superfície de resinas compostas de laboratório na resistência a microtração de um agente de fixação resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos José Soares

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on composite resin on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement. Two laboratory composites for indirect restorations, Solidex and Targis, and a conventional composite, Filtek Z250, were tested. Forty-eight composite resin blocks (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm were incrementally manufactured, which were randomly divided into six groups, according to the surface treatments: 1- control, 600-grit SiC paper (C; 2- silane priming (SI; 3- sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 for 10s (SA; 4- etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (HF; 5- HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Composite blocks submitted to similar surface treatments were bonded together with the resin adhesive Single Bond and Rely X luting composite. A 500-g load was applied for 5 minutes and the samples were light-cured for 40s. The bonded blocks were serially sectioned into 3 slabs with 0.9mm of thickness perpendicularly to the bonded interface (n = 12. Slabs were trimmed to a dumbbell shape and tested in tension at 0.5mm/min. For all composites tested, the application of a silane primer after sandblasting provided the highest bond strength means.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a influência de diferentes tratamentos de superfície na resistência de união de resinas compostas a um agente de fixação resinoso. Dois compósitos de laboratório, Solidex e Targis, e um compósito convencional, Filtek Z250, foram testados. Quarenta e oito blocos de resina composta (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm foram confeccionados através da técnica incremental, para cada compósito testado, e foram aleatoriamente divididos em 6 grupos. Os blocos foram submetidos a seis tratamentos de superfície: 1 - Controle, Lixa 600-SiC (C; 2 - Silanização (SI; 3 - Jateamento com Al2O3 50µm por 10 segundos (SA; 4 - Condicionamento com ácido fluorídrico por 60 segundos (HF; 5 - HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Blocos submetidos ao mesmo tratamento foram

  6. Indirect composite restorations luted with two different procedures: A ten years follow up clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Alessandro; Vano, Michele; Derchi, Giacomo; Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate posterior indirect composite resin restoration ten years after placement luted with two different procedures. Study Design: In 23 patients 22 inlays/onlays (Group A) were luted using a dual-cured resin composite cement and 26 inlays/onlays (Group B) were luted using a light cured resin composite for a total of 48 Class I and Class II indirect composite resin inlays and onlays. The restorations were evaluated at 2 time points: 1) one week after placement (baseline evaluation) and 2) ten years after placement using the modified USPHS criteria. The Mann-Whitney and the Wilcoxon tests were used to examine the difference between the results of the baseline and 10 years evaluation for each criteria. Results: Numerical but not statistically significant differences were noted on any of the recorded clinical parameters (p>0.05) between the inlay/onlays of Group A and Group B. 91% and 94 % of Group A and B respectively were rated as clinically acceptable in all the evaluated criteria ten years after clinical function. Conclusions: Within the limits of the study the results showed after ten years of function a comparable clinical performance of indirect composite resin inlays/onlays placed with a light cure or dual cure luting procedures. Key words:Light curing composite, dual curing composite, indirect composite restoration, inlays/onlays, clinical trial. PMID:25810842

  7. Influence of Different Types of Resin Luting Agents on Color Stability of Ceramic Laminate Veneers Subjected to Accelerated Artificial Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Silami,Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Tonani,Rafaella; Alandia-Román,Carla Cecilia; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated aging (AAA) on the color stability of resin cements for bonding ceramic laminate veneers of different thicknesses. The occlusal surfaces of 80 healthy human molars were flattened. Ceramic laminate veneers (IPS e-max Ceram) of two thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm) were bonded with three types of luting agents: light-cured, conventional dual and self-adhesive dual cement. Teeth without restorations and cement samples (0.5 mm...

  8. Hard tissue deposition in dental pulp canal by {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Toda, T. [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Endodontics; Mandai, Y. [Bio-Chemical Lab. of Nitta Gelatin Inc., Yao (Japan); Oonishi, H. [Osaka Minami National Hospital, Kawachi (Japan). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Canal closure by hard tissue proliferation in the pulp canal and/or apical foramen is the most ideal healing after pulp removal. Generally, Ca(OH){sub 2} may induce secondary dentine or dentine-bridge on the amputated pulp surface. However, Ca(OH){sub 2} shows strong alkalinity and may cause severe inflammatory responses in the residual pulp. Moreover, completely formed dentine-bridge at the orifice will disturb further treatment of residual pulp because of the difficulty in localizing the pathway. The purpose of this study was to see hard tissue induction using newly developed {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate cement and to recognize the morphological difference of hard tissue from that of Ca(OH){sub 2}. (orig.)

  9. Tissue response to experimental dental cements prepared from a modified powder glass composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Juliana Maria Capelozza; Bertolini, Marcio José; Padovani, Gislaine Cristina; de Oliveira, Maria Rita Brancini; Zaghete, Maria Aparecida; de Oliveira Júnior, Osmir Batista; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2012-01-01

    The present work seeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of experimental glass ionomer cements (GIC) prepared from niobium-calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass powder and two commercial GICs. The GICs were implanted into the subcutaneous connective tissue of sixty rats. The rats were sacrificed during four varying time periods: 7, 15, 30, and 60 days and histopathological examinations were then performed. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate any significant differences between the materials. Additionally, multiple comparisons of the mean rank were also carried out using the Dunn test (p<0.05). No significant differences were observed that one GIC was superior to the other. The tissue response for all of the GICs tested was similar in all the periods examined.

  10. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of dental adhesives and glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Elisa; Ferrari, Marco; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2010-02-01

    Adhesives and lining/base materials should relieve the stresses concentrated at the tooth/restoration interface. The study aimed at comparing the mechanical properties of eight adhesives and six glass-ionomer cements (GICs). The adhesives were applied on dentin disks, whereas 2 mm x 3 mm x 2 mm GICs specimens were prepared in a teflon mold. Vicker's hardness (VH), elastic modulus (E), creep (Cr) and elastic work (We/Wtot) were measured with a micro hardness indenter. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to compare the mechanical properties within each materials' type and among the materials' classes. Enamel and dentin were used as references. Significant differences were detected within each materials' type and among the materials' classes and enamel and dentin. GICs were superior to adhesives in VH and E and showed a VH similar to dentin. GICs presented mechanical properties more similar to enamel and dentin than adhesives.

  11. Effect of endodontic sealer and resin luting strategies on pull-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo J; Bueno, Vanessa C P S; Dias, Carlos T S; Paulillo, Luís A M S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of eugenol-containing endodontic sealers and luting strategy on the pull-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to dentin. Sixty-four bovine incisors were randomly assigned into two groups of 32 specimens each for obturation procedure with gutta-percha only, or with Pulp Canal Sealer EWT Subsequently, the roots were prepared for the fiber post Reforpost and all specimens of each endodontic sealing procedure were allocated to four groups (n = 8), according to the strategies for post cementation: A) Single Bond 2 and RelyX ARC; B) All Bond 2 and C&B cement; C) All Bond 2 and RelyX ARC; D) Single Bond 2 and C&B Cement. The posts were cemented immediately after the endodontic treatment. The pull-out test was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine (EMIC). Data (Kgf) were submitted to a two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p < or = 0.05). The eugenol-based sealer did not influence the pull-out bond strength of fiber posts regardless of the luting strategy. RelyX ARC showed higher bond strength than C&B Cement when used with Single Bond 2 adhesive system, when the eugenol-based sealer was present. All Bond 2, when associated to all cements studied, promoted similar bond strength, regardless of the eugenol-containing endodontic sealer In conclusion, eugenol-containing sealer did not influence the pull-out bond strength values of the resin luting systems for glass fiber post cementation. The bond system and resin cement association from the same manufacturer had similar bond strength values for dentin.

  12. Shear bond strengths of self-adhesive luting resins fixing dentine to different restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congxiao; Degrange, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the bond strengths of three self-adhesive resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem and Multilink Sprint) fixing dentine to four different restorative substrates (Ni-Cr alloy, E-Max glass-ceramic, Y-TZP Zirconia and Adoro micro-filled composite) and to compare their performances with those of two conventional dual-cured luting cements (Variolink II + Total-etch Excite DSC and Multilink Automix + Self-etching Primer A + B). Cylindric specimens (5 x 5 mm) were prepared with the four restorative materials for bonding to human dentine. Three surface treatments were performed depending on the restorative material: (i) Al2O3 50 microm sandblasting (Ni-Cr, Adoro), (ii) #800 SiC polishing (Zirconia, E-Max), (iii) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching (E-Max). Twenty-five groups (n = 10) were designed according to luting cements, restorative materials and surface pre-treatments. In some experimental groups, Variolink II and Multilink Automix were coupled with, respectively, a silane primer (Monobond S) and an alloy/zirconia primer (Multilink A/Z primer). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then loaded in shear until failure. Variolink II and Multilink Automix showed the highest bond strengths, regardless of the restorative substrate, when used with dentine bonding systems and primers, while the weakest bonds were with Maxcem. The bond strength recorded with the two other self-adhesive cements depended on the nature of the restorative substrate. Increasing retention at the interfaces (i.e., HF ceramic etching) and using specific primers significantly improves the bond strength of luted restorative materials to dentine.

  13. Morphologic assessment of dental surface/ glass ionomer cement interface: influence of Er:YAG laser pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Aparecida Milori Corona

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to assess the surface and the substrate/glass ionomer cement (GIC interface after Er:YAG laser irradiation by means of scanning electron microcopy. Material and methods: Thirty human third molars were selected and had their roots removed. Crowns were sectioned to obtain discs that were randomly assigned to three groups according to the surface pretreatment: 40% polyacrylic acid (control; Er:YAG laser irradiation (80mJ/2Hz or Er:YAG laser followed by 40% polyacrylic acid. Two discs of each group were put aside to the surface analysis and the others were bisected. One half received Ketac-Fil and the other received Fuji II LC. Specimens were prepared for SEM and were analyzed under different magnifications. Results: Er:YAG laser group showed no adhesive interface for both enamel and dentin, but strongly damaged the interface build-up for dentin/Fuji II LC. The application of laser irradiation followed by the polyacrylic acid exhibited gaps and irregularities for both substrates. Conclusion: Er:YAG laser irradiation combined or not with 40% polyacrylic acid produced a surface unfavorable for GIC interaction, especially for the resin-modified ones.

  14. Comparison of retention of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cements containing stannous fluoride and sodium fluoride-an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachin, Bhuvana

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of stannous fluoride (SnF2) and sodium fluoride (NaF) to luting cements on the retention of provisional crowns. Provisional crowns were fabricated using methyl methacrylate and bis-acryl composite resin for 32 chamfer prepared molars. For control group A, crowns were cemented with Freegenol and RelyX Temp NE non-eugenol cements. For test group B, crowns were cemented using the above cements with the addition of SnF2. For test group C, crowns were cemented using the above cements with the addition of NaF. The specimens were thermocycled and retention test was conducted after 7 days. The addition of SnF2 significantly increased the retentive strength of both the cements in the range of 27-48 %, whereas addition of NaF decreased the retentive strength of both the cements in the range of 14-23 %. SnF2 can be mixed with non-eugenol luting cements to improve the retention of both methyl methacrylate and bis-acryl composite crowns. The different effects of NaF and SnF2 on retention indicate that it may be useful to have two different types of provisional luting cements for short-term and long-term cementation, as appropriate.

  15. Correlation between the degree of conversion and the elution of leachable components from dental resin-based cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOSOVKA OBRADOVIĆ-DJURIČIĆ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the possible correlation between the degree of conversion (DC and the amount of substances eluted from three commercial cured resin-based cements. The DC of the various resin-based cements was measured by Raman spectroscopy, while the quantity of unreacted monomers released from the cement matrix (triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, TEGDMA, urethane dimethacrylate, UDMA, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, HEMA and bisphenol A was determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. The obtained results, after multiple statistical evaluation (one way ANOVA, LSD post hoc test, showed no significant differences in the DC values between the resin cements. On the contrary, the results of the HPLC analysis depicted statistically significant differences between the three materials with respect to the amount of leached monomers. In addition, no correlation between the DC and the amount of eluted substances from the tested cured composite cements was found.

  16. Glass Ionomer Cements with Improved Bioactive and Antibacterial Properties

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Dental restorative cements are placed in a harsh oral environment where they are subjected to thermal shock, chemical degradation, and repeating masticatory force. The ideal restorative dental cements should have superior mechanical properties, chemical stability, aesthetic, good handling properties, biocompatibility, antibacterial properties, and preferably bioactivity. This thesis presents research on dental restorative cements with enhanced properties. The overall aim was to increase the b...

  17. Film Thickness and Flow Properties of Resin-Based Cements at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri R.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: For a luting agent to allow complete seating of prosthetic restorations, it must obtain an appropriate flow rate maintaining a minimum film thickness. The performance of recently introduced luting agents in this regard has not been evaluated. Purpose: To measure and compare the film thickness and flow properties of seven resin-containing luting cements at different temperatures (37°C, 25°C and10°C. Material and Methods: Specimens were prepared from five resin luting cements; seT (SDI, Panavia F (Kuraray, Varioloink II (Ivoclar, Maxcem (Kerr, Nexus2 (Kerr and two resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements (RM-GICs; GC Fuji Plus (GC Corporation, and RelyX Luting 2 (3 M/ESPE. The film thickness and flow rate of each cement (n=15 was determined using the test described in ISO at three different temperatures. Results: There was a linear correlation between film thickness and flow rate for most of the materials. Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials while the effect of temperature on film thickness was material dependent. At 37°C, all products revealed a film thickness of less than 25µm except for GC Fuji Plus. At 25°C, all cements pro-duced a film thickness of less than 27 µm except for seT. At 10°C, apart from seT and Rely X Luting 2, the remaining cements showed a film thickness smaller than 20 µm.Conclusion: Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials, however. the film thickness did not exceed 35 µm in either condition, in spite of the lowest film thickness being demonstrated at the lowest temperature.

  18. Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE). Phase A final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrayer, R. O.

    1994-04-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-meter telescope for imaging from the lunar surface the ultraviolet spectrum 1,000 and 3,500 Å. This report provides the results of the LUTE phase A activity begun at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in early 1992. It describes the objective of LUTE (science, engineering, and education), a feasible reference design concept that has evolved, and the subsystem trades that were accomplished during the phase A.

  19. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Marleen; Valjakova, Emilija Bajraktarova; De Munck, Jan; Mishevska, Cece Bajraktarova; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC paper; 2. sandblasting with 30-μm Al2O3; 3. tribochemical silica coating (CoJet). Subsequent chemical surface treatments involved either no further treatment (control), HF acid etching (HF), silanization (S, or HF acid etching followed by silanization (HF+S). Two specimens with the same surface treatment were bonded together using two dual-curing luting composites: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (self-etching) or Panavia SA Cement (self-adhesive). After 1 week of water storage, the microtensile bond strength of the sectioned microspecimens was measured and the failure mode was evaluated. The bonding performance of the six CAD/CAM materials was significantly influenced by surface treatment (linear mixed models, p CAD (p = 0.0115), and Lava Ultimate (p CAD/CAM materials: Vita Mark II and IPS Empress CAD: S, HF+S; Celtra Duo: HF, HF+S; IPS e.max CAD: HF+S; Vita Enamic: HF+S, S. For Lava Ultimate, the highest bond strengths were obtained with HF, S, HF+S. Failure analysis showed a relation between bond strength and failure type: more mixed failures were observed with higher bond strengths. Mainly adhesive failures were noticed if no further surface treatment was done. The percentage of adhesive failures was higher for CAD/CAM materials with higher flexural strength (Celtra Duo, IPS e.max CAD, and Lava Ultimate). The bond strength of luting composites to novel CAD/CAM materials is influenced by surface treatment. For each luting composite, an adhesive cementation protocol can be specified in order to obtain the highest bond to the

  20. Influence of dentin pretreatment with synthetic hydroxyapatite application on the bond strength of fiber posts luted with 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate-containing luting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Nicola; Bergantin, Emanuele; Tempesta, Riccardo; Turco, Gianluca; Breschi, Lorenzo; Farina, Elena; Pasqualini, Damiano; Berutti, Elio

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was evaluate the effect of application of synthetic hydroxyapatite on fiber post bond strength to radicular dentine. Forty, single-root teeth were endodontically treated and an 8 mm post space was prepared. Specimens were randomly placed in four groups (n = 10 in each) and treated using the following fiber post luting procedures: group 1, 17% EDTA + Panavia SA; group 2, 17% EDTA + Teethmate Desensitizer + Panavia SA; group 3, All-Bond Universal + Duo-Link Universal; and group 4, All-Bond Universal + Teethmate Desensitizer + Duo-Link Universal. Fiber posts were luted in the post space and light-cured for 120 s using a light-emitting diode (LED) lamp. After 7 d of storage at 37°C, the teeth were cut into 1-mm-thick slices, which were subjected to a push-out test until failure using a universal testing machine. Two specimens per group were prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis. An energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy detector was used for elemental analysis of the specimen surface. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way anova. The fiber post bond strength was statistically significantly increased after the application of Teethmate Desensitizer to post space walls, either with a 10-MDP-containing self-adhesive cement or with a universal adhesive. Scanning electron microscopy and EDAX analysis showed that Teethmate Desensitizer created a calcium phosphate precipitate over post space dentinal tubules, which significantly improved the bond strength of the fiber post luted with 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP)-containing adhesive systems.

  1. Influence of Different Types of Resin Luting Agents on Color Stability of Ceramic Laminate Veneers Subjected to Accelerated Artificial Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silami, Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Tonani, Rafaella; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated aging (AAA) on the color stability of resin cements for bonding ceramic laminate veneers of different thicknesses. The occlusal surfaces of 80 healthy human molars were flattened. Ceramic laminate veneers (IPS e-max Ceram) of two thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm) were bonded with three types of luting agents: light-cured, conventional dual and self-adhesive dual cement. Teeth without restorations and cement samples (0.5 mm) were used as control. After initial color evaluations, the samples were subjected to AAA for 580 h. After this, new color readouts were made, and the color stability (ΔE) and luminosity (ΔL) data were analyzed. The greatest color changes (pveneers were fixed with light-cured cement and the lowest when 1.0 mm veneers were fixed with conventional dual cement. There was no influence of the restoration thickness when the self-adhesive dual cement was used. When veneers were compared with the control groups, it was verified that the cement samples presented the greatest alterations (pcements. The changes in self-adhesive cement do not depend on restoration thickness.

  2. The role of integrin αv in proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp cell response to calcium silicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Jr; Hsu, Hsin-I; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Wu, Buor-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-11-01

    It has been proved that integrin αv activity is related to cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and organ development. However, the biological functions of integrin αv in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on silicate-based materials have not been explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of integrin αv in the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs cultured with the effect of calcium silicate (CS) cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cement. In this study, hDPCs were cultured on CS and TCP materials, and we evaluated fibronectin (FN) secretion and integrin αv expression during the cell attachment stage. After small interfering RNA transfection targeting integrin αv, the proliferation and odontogenesis differentiation behavior of hDPCs were analyzed. The results indicate that CS releases Si ion-increased FN secretion and adsorption, which promote cell attachment more effectively than TCP. The CS cement facilitates FN and αv subintegrin expression. However, the FN adsorption and integrin expression of TCP are similar to that observed in the control dish. Integrin αv small interfering RNA inhibited odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs with the decreased formation of mineralized nodules on CS. It also down-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of odontogenesis and the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein protein. These results establish composition-dependent differences in integrin binding and its effectiveness as a mechanism regulating cellular responses to biomaterial surface. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Choosing the Right Dental Material and Making Sense of the Options: Evidence and Clinical Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zaid; Eliyas, Shiyana; Vere, Joseph William

    2015-09-01

    Decision-making is a fundamental aspect of clinical dentistry. Advances in technology and trends towards more conservative technologies have broadened the options available to patients and dentists, increasing the range of choices and opportunities to restore teeth. With such a broad range of dental materials, there are a number of factors to consider in making an appropriate choice. We present several decision-making dilemmas. Namely; how to restore worn lower anterior teeth, what to consider when replacing crowns, materials to consider when providing cuspal protection for posterior teeth, and finally the issues to consider when selecting a luting cement. The evidence supporting different clinical choices is considered in a discussion of the various dilemmas faced.

  4. Influence of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Actions on the Properties of Aqueous Nanoparticle Dispersions Used as Tempering Liquids for Dental Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Belous, N. Kh.; Rodtsevich, S. P.; Goncharik, S. V.; Chubrik, N. N.; Koshevar, V. D.; Lopat‧ko, K. G.; Aftandilyants, E. G.; Veklich, A. N.; Boretskii, V. F.; Orlovich, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The authors have studied the physicochemical properties of aqueous dispersions containing carbon, silver, and iron nanoparticles which were produced by elastic-spark synthesis under the conditions of subaqueous spark discharge, and also the influence of preliminary acoustic and high-frequency electromagnetic action on them and the change in the functional indices of the glass-ionomer cement tempered by these dispersions.

  5. Effect of tightening torque on the marginal adaptation of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ghanbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the marginal misfit of cement-retained FDPs increased continuously when the tightening torque increased. After cutting the connectors, the marginal misfit of the ANRs was higher than those of the straight abutment retainers.

  6. The Effects of Exposure Time on the Surface Microhardness of Three Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus C. Bandéca

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the exposure time of light-curing of the polymers used for cementation on microhardness test in different storage times. The polymers (specifically called resin cements were RelyX ARC, RelyX U100, and SET. Five specimens of each group were prepared and photo-polymerized with exposure times of 20 s and 180 s, using a LED polymerization unit with wavelength of 440 ~ 480 nm and light output was consistently 1,500 mW/cm2. The Vickers hardness test was performed in a MMT-3 Microhardness Tester. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. The values of RelyX ARC showed statistically significant difference to groups with light exposure when considering only chemical cure (p < 0.05. The groups with light exposure (20 s and 180 s showed no significant difference between them (p > 0.05. The RelyX U100 cured only chemically showed statistically significant difference between 48 h and 7 days (p < 0.05. The SET resin cement showed no significant difference to groups without light exposure for all storage times (p > 0.05. The values of hardening of the dual-cured resin cements improved after setting by light and chemical activation demonstrating the importance of light curing.

  7. In Memoriam Dr Lute Bos (1928-2010)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday July 6, 2010 we were shocked by the news that that day our former colleague Lute Bos had died unexpectedly at the age of 82. Lute was a world-famous plant virologist. From the start of his career in 1957 until his retirement from the Institute for Plant Protection (IPO-DLO) in Wageningen in

  8. Micromechanical properties of veneer luting resins after curing through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Elif; Hickel, Reinhard; Bolay, Sükran; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of light-cured luting resin after curing under the ceramic restoration in comparison to dual-cured luting resin, by evaluating the micromechanical properties. Two hundred seventy thin luting composite films of ca. 170 μm in thickness were prepared by using two light-cured luting resins (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent; RelyX Veneer, 3M ESPE) and a dual-cured luting resin (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent). The composites were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10, 20, and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent; IPS Empress® CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0, 0.75, and 2 mm). Forty-five groups were included, each containing six thin films. The samples were stored after curing for 24 h at 37°C by maintaining moisture conditions with distilled water. Micromechanical properties of the composites were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). For each sample, ten indentations were made, thus totalizing 60 measurements per group. Micromechanical properties of the luting resins were statistically analyzed (SPSS 17.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the luting resins (p mechanical properties compared to the light-cured luting resins. The effect of luting resin type on the micromechanical properties of the luting resins was higher than the effect of curing time, ceramic type and ceramic thickness respectively (*The values of reference without ceramics for 30 s curing time).

  9. Transmission of Er:YAG laser through different dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Tugrul; Tuncel, Ilkin; Usumez, Aslihan; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser transmission ratio through different dental ceramics with different thicknesses. Laser debonding procedure of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations is based on the transmission of laser energy through the ceramic and the ablation of resin cement, because of the transmitted laser energy. Five different dental ceramics were evaluated in this study: sintered zirconium-oxide core ceramic, monolithic zirconium-oxide ceramic, feldspathic ceramic, leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, and lithium disilicate-reinforced glass ceramic. Two ceramic discs with different thicknesses (0.5 and 1 mm) were fabricated for each group. Ceramic discs were placed between the sensor membrane of the laser power meter and the tip of the contact handpiece of an Er:YAG laser device with the aid of a custom- made acrylic holder. The transmission ratio of Er:YAG laser energy (500 mJ, 2 Hz, 1 W, 1000 μs) through different ceramic discs was measured with the power meter. Ten measurements were made for each group and the results were analyzed with two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) tests. The highest transmission ratio was determined for lithium disilicate-reinforced ceramic with 0.5 mm thickness (88%) and the lowest was determined for feldspathic ceramic with 1 mm thickness (44%). The differences among the different ceramics and between the different thicknesses were significant (pCeramic type and thickness should be taken into consideration to adjust the laser irradiation parameters during laser debonding of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations.

  10. The teaching of all-ceramic restorations in North American dental schools: materials and techniques employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, K B; Mjör, I A

    1997-01-01

    North American dental schools were surveyed to determine the types of clinical experiences and the extent of material use that predoctoral students encounter with restorative procedures that employ all-ceramic materials. The results were based on an overall response rate of 80% from the 64 surveyed schools. The majority (96%) of the 51 schools responding to the survey did offer an opportunity to become experienced with all-ceramic restorations. The selection of bases and liners for all-ceramic restorations included dentin adhesive agents, glass ionomer materials, and calcium hydroxide products, by a ratio of 5:4:1, respectively. The most commonly used impression material types were addition silicone and polyether. One or both of these materials were used by every school. Dicor glass ceramic and alumina core ceramic were the most commonly used materials by the responding schools for veneers, onlays, and crowns. Dicor glass ceramic and CAD/CAM ceramic were most commonly used for inlays. Crowns were made of more different all-ceramic material types than the other restoration classes. Fabrication of all-ceramic restorations was primarily by commercial laboratories and school technicians. Students have hands-on experience in the fabrication of all-ceramic restorations in 6% of the responding schools. Luting agents for all-ceramic restorations include dual-cured resin, in 96% of the responding schools, light-cured resin, 43%, and glass ionomer cement, 33%. Zinc phosphate, chemical-cured composite, and polycarboxylate were used by less than one fourth of the respondents. Only resin-based composite materials were used to lute ceramic veneers. Rubber dam was applied primarily during luting procedures involving all-ceramic inlays and onlays. Crowns and veneers were isolated by this method in less than 30% of the responding schools. Finishing procedures with all-ceramic restorations were accomplished with three or more instruments by 89% of the schools.

  11. Veneered zirconia inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses: 10-Year results from a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathmann, Friederike; Bömicke, Wolfgang; Rammelsberg, Peter; Ohlmann, Brigitte

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 10-year clinical performance of zirconia-based inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (IRFDP). For replacement of a molar in 27 patients, 30 IRFDP were luted by use of different cements, Panavia F (Kuraray Europe GmbH) or Multilink Automix (Ivoclar Vivadent GmbH), with use of inlay/inlay, inlay/full-crown, or inlay/partial-crown retainers for anchorage. Frameworks were milled from yttria-stabilized zirconia (IPS e.maxZirCAD; Ivoclar Vivadent GmbH) and fully veneered with pressable ceramic (IPS e.max ZirPress; Ivoclar Vivadent GmbH). Before luting, the IRFDP were silica-coated (Rocatec; 3M Espe) and silanized (Monobond S; Ivoclar Vivadent GmbH). Complications (for example, chipping or delamination of the veneering ceramic, debonding, secondary caries, endodontic treatment, and abutment tooth fracture) and failure were reported, by use of standardized report forms, 2 weeks, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 10 years after cementation. Statistical analysis included Kaplan-Meier survival and success (complication-free survival) and Cox regression analysis (α=0.05 for all). During the 10-year observation period, the complications most often observed were chipping of the veneer and debonding. Twenty-five restorations failed and one participant dropped out. Cumulative 10-year survival and success were 12.1% and 0%, respectively. The design of the retainer, use of a dental dam, choice of cement, and location in the dental arch had no statistically significant effect on the occurrence of complications. Use of fully veneered zirconia-based IRFDP with this technique cannot be recommended. A large incidence of complications and poor survival were observed for fully veneered zirconia-based IRFDP, revealing an urgent need for further design improvements for this type of restoration. This, again, emphasizes the need for testing of new restoration designs in clinical trials before implementation in general dental practice. Copyright © 2017

  12. Influence of the temperature on the cement disintegration in cement-retained implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vindasiute, Egle; Puisys, Algirdas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Svediene, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the average disintegration temperature of three dental cements used for the cementation of the implant-supported prostheses. One hundred and twenty metal frameworks were fabricated and cemented on the prosthetic abutments with different dental cements. After heat treatment in the dental furnace, the samples were set for the separation to test the integration of the cement. Results have shown that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RGIC) exhibited the lowest disintegration temperature (pcement (ZPC) and dual cure resin cement (RC) (p>0.05). Average separation temperatures: RGIC - 306 ± 23 °C, RC - 363 ± 71 °C, it could not be calculated for the ZPC due to the eight unseparated specimens. Within the limitations of the study, it could be concluded that RGIC cement disintegrates at the lowest temperature and ZPC is not prone to break down after exposure to temperature.

  13. Dental pulp response to collagen and pulpotec cement as pulpotomy agents in primary dentition: A histological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranitha Kakarla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As the search for a better biocompatible medicament is on, aim of the present study was to evaluate the pulpal response to collagen particles impregnated in antibiotics (Biofil TM -AB and new commercially available cement (Pulpotec that can be used as pulpal medicament. Materials and Methods: Total sample of 40 teeth from 20 children in the age group of 7-10 years which are noncarious having bilateral retained primary teeth were enrolled for the study. Nine teeth each were treated with collagen particles (group I and Pulpotec cement (group II, and the remaining samples were discarded due to various reasons. Both groups were randomly subdivided into three teeth each that were extracted after 7, 15, and 30 days intervals and examined histologically. Results: Moderate to severe inflammatory cells with newly formed blood vessels and disorganized odontoblastic cell layer was observed in group I after all three intervals with dentinal bridge formation in two specimens. On contrary, none of the specimens in group II showed any signs of inflammation, but there was a discontinuity in the odontoblastic layer lining along the dentin walls. Conclusion: Both materials were proven to be promising alternatives as pulp medicaments. However, collagen was found to be a better material.

  14. Qualitative evaluation of the adesive interface between lithium disilicate, luting composite and natural tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobilio, Nicola; Fasiol, Alberto; Catapano, Santo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this work was to qualitatively evaluate the interface between tooth, luting composite and lithium disilicate surface using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An extracted restoration-free human molar was stored in physiological solution until it was embedded in an autopolimerysing acrylic resin. A standard preparation for overlay was completed and after preparation an anatomic overlay was waxed on the tooth and then hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. After cementation the sample was dissected and the section was analysed using an Automatic Micromet (Remet s.a.s) and the section was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM evaluation of the tooth showed the three layers seamlessly; by increasing the enlargement the interface did not change.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanoparticles and Nanocomposite of ZnO and MgO by Sonochemical Method and their Application for Zinc Polycarboxylate Dental Cement Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the synthesis of nanoparticles of ZnO and MgO and ZnO/MgO nanocomposite by the sonochemical method. At first, nanoparticles were synthesized by the reaction of Zn(CHCOO32 and Mg(CHCOO32 with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP and constant frequency ultrasonic waves (sonochemical method. Then, ZnO/MgO nanocomposite was prepared through reaction of magnesium acetate with TMAH in the presence of ZnO nanoparticles and PVP as structure director using ultrasonic assisted method. After filtration, the synthesized solution was obtained containing magnesium hydroxide in the presence of ZnO nanoparticles. It was calcinated at the temperature of 550 ºC, so that ZnO/MgO nanocomposite could be produced. The effects of different parameters on particle size and morphology of final ZnO and MgO powders and ZnO/MgO nanocomposite were optimized by ‘‘one at a time’’ method. Under optimum conditions, spongy shaped, uniformed and homogeneous nanostructured zinc oxide and magnesium oxide powders were obtained with particle sizes of 25–50 and 30-60 nm, respectively. ZnO/MgO nanocomposite was also obtained with more spongy morphology and particle size about 65 nm. Both synthesized ZnO and MgO nanoparticles and ZnO/MgO nanocomposite were successfully applied to the preparation of zinc polycarboxylate dental cement.

  16. Effects of curing mode of resin cements on the bond strength of a titanium post: An intraradicular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Reza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare push-out bond strength between self-cured and dual-cured resin cement using a titanium post. Background: Dual-cured resin cements have been found to be less polymerized in the absence of light; thus the bond strength of cements would be compromised due to the absence of light with a metallic post. Materials and Methods: Ten extracted teeth were prepared for cement titanium PARAPOST, of five specimens each, with Panavia F [dual-cured (PF] and Rely×Luting 2 [self-cured resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement (RL]; the push-out bond strength (PBS at three different levels of the sectioned roots was measured. The failure modes were observed and the significance of the differences in bond strength of the two types of cement at each level and at different levels of the same type was analyzed with non-parametric tests. Results: The push-out bond strength of the RL group was greater at all the three levels; with significant differences at the coronal and middle levels (P<0.05. No significant differences in PBS at different levels of the same group were observed. Cement material around the post was obvious in the PF group. The failure mode was mostly adhesive between the post and resin cement in the RL group. Conclusion: Bond strength was greater with self-cured, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, using titanium post.

  17. Effect of post length and type of luting agent on the dislodging time of metallic prefabricated posts by using ultrasonic vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi Dastgurdi, Maziar; Khabiri, Masud; Khademi, Abbasali; Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Hosseini Dastnaei, Peimaneh

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the times needed to dislodge prefabricated titanium posts of different luting lengths with various cements. Eighty-one intact extracted, single-canal human teeth were selected and endodontically treated. Specimens were randomly divided into 9 groups, which were arranged according to the post space length (5, 7, and 9 mm) and cement type (zinc phosphate, glass ionomer, and resin cement). Titanium posts were cemented into the post spaces, and after 1 week of storage they were subjected to ultrasonic vibration. The dislodging times were recorded and analyzed by using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (P ultrasonic device. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. LUTE primary mirror materials and design study report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthven, Greg

    1993-02-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) Primary Mirror Materials and Design Study is to investigate the feasibility of the LUTE telescope primary mirror. A systematic approach to accomplish this key goal was taken by first understanding the optical, thermal, and structural requirements and then deriving the critical primary mirror-level requirements for ground testing, launch, and lunar operations. After summarizing the results in those requirements which drove the selection of material and the design for the primary mirror are discussed. Most important of these are the optical design which was assumed to be the MSFC baseline (i.e. 3 mirror optical system), telescope wavefront error (WFE) allocations, the telescope weight budget, and the LUTE operational temperature ranges. Mechanical load levels, reflectance and microroughness issues, and options for the LUTE metering structure were discussed and an outline for the LUTE telescope sub-system design specification was initiated. The primary mirror analysis and results are presented. The six material substrate candidates are discussed and four distinct mirror geometries which are considered are shown. With these materials and configurations together with varying the location of the mirror support points, a total of 42 possible primary mirror designs resulted. The polishability of each substrate candidate was investigated and a usage history of 0.5 meter and larger precision cryogenic mirrors (the operational low end LUTE temperature of 60 K is the reason we feel a survey of cryogenic mirrors is appropriate) that were flown or tested are presented.

  19. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  20. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Grace; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  1. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace DE SOUZA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractResin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  2. Influence of glazed zirconia on dual-cure luting agent bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, T A; Borges, G A; Borges, L H; Platt, J A; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2012-01-01

    The current study evaluated the influence of a novel surface treatment that uses a low-fusing porcelain glaze for promoting a bond between zirconia-based ceramic and a dual-cure resin luting agent. Bond strengths were compared with those from airborne particle abrasion, hydrofluoric acid etching, and silanization-treated surfaces. Twenty-four yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Cercon Smart Ceramics, Degudent, Hanau, Germany) discs were fabricated and received eight surface treatments: group 1: 110 μm aluminum oxide air-borne particle abrasion; group 2: 110 μm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion and silane; group 3: 50 μm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion; group 4: 50 pm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion and silane; group 5: glaze and hydrofluoric acid;group 6: glaze, hydrofluoric acid, and silane;group 7: glaze and 50 pm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion; and group 8: glaze,50 pm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion and silane. After treatment, Enforce resin cement (Dentsply, Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) was used to fill an iris cut from microbore Tygontubing that was put on the ceramic surface to create 30 cylinders of resin cement in each treatment group (n=30). Micro shear bond test-ing was performed at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. One-way analysis of variance, and multiple comparisons were made using Tukey's test (phydrofluoric acid showed bond strength values statistically superior to groups that utilized conventional airborne particle abrasion treatments with 50 or 110 pm aluminum oxide (phydrofluoric acid showed bond strength values statistically superior to remaining groups (p<0.001). Treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces with a glaze of low-fusing porcelain significantly increased the bond strength of a dual-cure resin luting agent to the ceramic surface.

  3. Cement Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China aims to streamline the crowded cement industry Policymakers are looking to build a concrete wall around the cement-making industry as they seek to solidify the fluid cement market and cut excessive production.

  4. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity6 and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  5. Adhesion to zirconia used for dental restorations: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Bernasconi, Mira

    2015-02-01

    Currently, no consensus exists regarding the best adhesion protocol for zirconia used in dentistry; this is important particularly for restorations where mechanical retention is deficient. This systematic review analyzed the adhesion potential of resin-based and glass-ionomer luting cements to zirconia and aimed to highlight the possible dominant factors affecting the bond strength results to this substrate. Original scientific papers on adhesion to zirconia published in the MEDLINE (PubMed) database between 01/01/1995 and 01/06/2011 were included in this systematic review. The following MeSH terms, search terms, and their combinations were used: "Dental bonding", "Zirconium", "Zirconia", "Y-TZP", "Y-TZP ceramic", "Materials Testing/methods", "Test", "Cement", and "Resin bonding". Two reviewers performed screening and data abstraction. Descriptive statistics were performed and the frequencies of the studied parameters, means, standard deviations, confidence intervals (95% CI; uncorrected and corrected), median values, and interquartile ranges (IQR) were calculated for the bond strength data reported for different factor levels: surface conditioning methods (control, physicochemical, physical, chemical), cements (bis-GMA-, MDP-, and 4-META-based resin cements, self-adhesive cements, glass ionomer), aging with and without thermocycling (TC), and test methods (macroshear, microshear, macrotensile, and microtensile). The final search provided 177 titles with abstracts. Further abstract screening yielded 72 articles, out of which 54 were found potentially appropriate to be included. After full text evaluation, 2 of these were eliminated. The selection process resulted in the final sample of 52 studies. In total, 169 different surface conditioning methods, mainly combinations of air-abrasion protocols and adhesive promoters (primers or silanes), were investigated. Altogether, the use of 5 types of cements and 4 testing methods was reported. While 26 studies were

  6. Estudio in vitro de la resistencia a la tracción de postes de fibra de vidrio cementados con cuatro agentes cementantes In vitro study of push-out resistance of glass-fiber posts cemented with four luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jara Vidal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La causa más frecuente de fracaso de los pernos de fibra es el desprendimiento, debido a una falla de la adhesión en la interface dentina/agente cementante. Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio in vitro fue medir y comparar la resistencia a la tracción necesaria para producir la dislocación de postes de fibra de vidrio cementados con 4 agentes cementantes. Materiales y métodos: Las coronas de 40 caninos sanos, fueron seccionadas transversalmente a nivel del techo cameral. Tras realizar el tratamiento endodóntico, los especímenes fueron mantenidos a 80% de humedad, a 37º C por 72 horas. Aleatoriamente se distribuyeron en 4 grupos (n =10. Cada grupo recibió un poste de fibra de vidrio cementados con: Panavia F 2.0, Unicem, Fuji plus, Variolink. La cementación fue según indicaciones del fabricante y bajo presión digital, posteriormente se aplicó una carga estandarizada de 5 kilos por 5 minutos. Se efectuó una prueba de tracción utilizando una máquina de prueba universal con velocidad de 0,5 mm/min hasta el descementado. A los datos se aplicó un diseño de Análisis de Varianza, ANOVA una Vía y el test de Tukey (pIntroduction: The most frequent cause of the glass-fiber post failure was push-out due to a failure in the adhesion dentin/agent cement interface. Purpose. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the dislocation resistance of glass-fiber post cemented by 4 different cement agents. Material and methods. Forty extracted canine were transversal sectioned at roof pulp level (n=10. Each group received fiber posts were randomly cemented using cement Panavia F 2.0, Unicem, Fuji plus, Variolink. Each sample was loaded in tension in an Instrom universal testing machine. The maximum force required to dislodge each post was recorded. Data were subjected to 1-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. (p<0.05. Results. The determination coefficient (R² of the model was 80%. The one-way ANOVA disclosed

  7. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashibhushan, KK; Poornima, P; Reddy, VV Subba

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Materials and methods Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth preparation for SSC was performed by single operator. The crowns were then luted with either RelyX U200 or SmartCem2 or RelyX Luting 2 cement. Retentive strength was tested using Instron universal testing machine. The retentive strength values were recorded and calculated by the formula: Load/Area. Statistical analysis One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple comparisons followed by post hoc Tukey’s test for groupwise comparisons. Unpaired t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. Results RelyX U200 showed significantly higher retentive strength than rest of the two cements (p 0.05). Conclusion The retentive strength of dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements was better than RMGIC, and RelyX U200 significantly improved crown retention when compared with SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2. How to cite this article Pathak S, Shashibhushan KK, Poornima P, Reddy VVS. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):197-200. PMID:27843249

  8. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    LIN, JIE; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coat...

  9. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  10. Immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements and retention of glass-fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and post holes of 9 mm in depth were prepared. Fiber posts were luted using one of two SARCs, BisCem(r (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, USA or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE, Saint Paul, USA, or a regular (etch-and-rinse resin cement (AllCem; FGM, Joinvile, Brazil. Photoactivation was performed immediately, or at 5 or 10 min after cementation. Root/post specimens were transversely sectioned 7 days after luting into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' method (α = 0.05. Immediate photoactivation resulted in the highest bond strength for Unicem. BisCem(r demonstrated higher bond strength values when photoactivated after a 10-min delay. Immediate photoactivation yielded the lowest bond strengths for AllCem, although no differences in bond strength were observed between photoactivation delayed by 5 and 10 min. In conclusion, the moment of resin cement photoactivation may affect the intraradicular retention of fiber posts, depending upon the resin cement used for luting.

  11. Lunar-Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) integrated program plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Janice F.; Forrest, Larry

    1993-07-01

    A detailed Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) program plan representing major decisions and tasks leading to those decisions for program execution are presented. The purpose of this task was to develop an integrated plan of project activities for the LUTE project, and to display the plan as an integrated network that shows the project activities, all critical interfaces, and schedules. The integrated network will provide the project manager with a frame work for strategic planning and risk management throughout the life of the project.

  12. Effect of acid etching on the bond strength of a new self-adhesive resin cement Clearfil SA Luting to enamel and dentin%酸蚀处理对新型自粘接树脂水门汀Clearfil SA Luting粘接性能影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙建伟; 赵三军; 沈丽娟; 黄鹂; 陈吉华

    2010-01-01

    目的:评价酸蚀处理对自粘结树脂水门汀Clearfil SA Luting与牙釉质和牙本质粘结强度的影响.方法:选取新鲜拔除的无龋坏人第三磨牙36个,制备近、远中牙釉质粘结面和颊侧牙本质粘结面,随机分为3组(n=12),分别选用Clearfil SA Luting(SAC)、磷酸酸蚀配合Clearfil SA Luting进行粘结,测试两种处理方式对SAC与牙釉质、牙本质粘结强度的影响,同时与对照组Panavia F(PF)的粘接结果进行对照,并通过扫描电镜观察粘结界面.结果:牙釉质粘结强度测试结果显示,磷酸酸蚀配合SAC组(39.64±6.24)MPa显著高于未酸蚀组SAC(27.25±7.03)MPa组与对照组PF(22.92±7.13)MPa(P0.05).牙本质粘结强度测试结果显示,SAC未酸蚀组(10.09±3.26)MPa与PF对照组(14.23±6.39)MPa之间无显著性差异(P>0.05),但均显著高于SAC配合磷酸酸蚀组(1.13±1.12)MPa(P<0.05).结论:酸蚀处理可以显著提高自粘结树脂水门汀SAC与牙釉质粘结强度,但却降低了其与牙本质粘结效果.

  13. Fracture resistance of premolars restored with inlay and onlay ceramic restorations and luted with two different agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas, Gloria Beatriz de Azevedo; Habekost, Luciano; Camacho, Guilherme Brião; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of human maxillary premolars restored with 2 ceramic systems (Vitadur Alpha and In Ceram) comparing 3 preparation designs and 2 luting agents. Seventy sound teeth were prepared to receive ceramic restorations (Vitadur Alpha; n=14) as follows: (1) control, sound premolars, with no preparation, (2) inlays, (3) partial onlays (palatal cuspid coverage), (4) total onlays (both cuspids coverage), and (5) total onlays with an In Ceram core. The ceramic restorations were cemented using Enforce or RelyX ARC (half restorations with each cement), placed into the cavity and held under pressure, except for the control group. The teeth were subjected to compressive axial loading at 0.5 mm min⁻¹ using a 9 mm steel ball until fracture. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test (α=.05). There was a significant difference between cements and among preparation designs (P.05). Partial and total onlays did not statistically differ and showed the weakest performance. The use of an In Ceram core did not produce higher fracture resistance. Within the limitations of this study, the cements tested had different mechanical properties, while cuspid coverage did not result in improved fracture resistance of the restored teeth. Copyright © 2010 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Marginal discoloration of all-ceramic restorations cemented adhesively versus nonadhesively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Haralampos P; Papathanasiou, Ioannis; Doukantzi, Maria; Koidis, Petros

    2012-11-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review to correlate the clinical incidence of marginal discoloration of all-ceramic restorations with the mode of cementation (adhesive versus nonadhesive). The authors conducted a literature search by using electronic databases, relevant references, database citations and journal hand searches for clinical studies of marginal discoloration of all-ceramic restorations with a mean follow-up time of at least five years. The search period spanned January 1990 through February 2011. The authors reported and compared summary estimates and five-year event rates. The authors selected 16 studies for final analysis from an initial yield of 346 articles. The mean observation time ranged between five and 10 years. The majority of studies used adhesive luting procedures for definitive cementation. In only one study did investigators report regarding the incidence of marginal discoloration of both adhesively and nonadhesively cemented all-ceramic restorations, and the difference between the luting types in terms of discoloration was not statistically significant (P = .5). The results of this systematic review showed that there is a lack of studies with findings regarding marginal discoloration rates of nonadhesively luted all-ceramic restorations. Unacceptable marginal discoloration rates of adhesively luted all-ceramic prostheses were relatively low even at 10 years of service.

  15. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  16. SEM analysis of microstructure of adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Eiji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the microstructure of the adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with a self-etching primer by SEM in order to clarify the adhesive efficiencies of four self-etch type resin cement systems, Bistite II (BII), Linkmax (LM), Panavia F2.0 (PF), and ResiCem (RC) to dentin. The fluidity and inorganic filler content of these cements were also determined to examine their influences on the adhesion. A hybrid layer with 0.5-1.5 µm thickness and many resin tags could be confirmed clearly at the interface between BII cement and dentin, but was not observed distinctly for the other resin cements. It was suggested that the hybrid layer and resin tags might contribute to the high adhesive efficiency for BII. As the fluidity of cement had been adjusted to be suitable for luting in all cements, it did not significantly influence the adhesive efficiency of cement.

  17. The influence of cervical finish line, internal relief, and cement type on the cervical adaptation of metal crowns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Buso, Leondardo; Oezcan, Mutlu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the cervical adaptation of metal crowns under several conditions, namely (1) variations in the cervical finish line of the preparation, (2) application of internal relief inside the crowns, and (3) cementation using different luting materials.

  18. The influence of cervical finish line, internal relief, and cement type on the cervical adaptation of metal crowns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Buso, Leondardo; Oezcan, Mutlu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the cervical adaptation of metal crowns under several conditions, namely (1) variations in the cervical finish line of the preparation, (2) application of internal relief inside the crowns, and (3) cementation using different luting materials.

  19. Morphological analysis of glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber posts and bonding to self or dual-cured resin luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloísio Oro Spazzin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology of glass (GF, carbon (CF and glass/carbon (G/CF fiber posts and their bond strength to self or dual-cured resin luting agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Morphological analysis of each post type was conducted under scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Bond strength was evaluated by microtensile test after bisecting the posts and re-bonding the two halves with the luting agents. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. Failure modes were evaluated under optical microscopy and SEM. RESULTS: GF presented wider fibers and higher amount of matrix than CF, and G/CF presented carbon fibers surrounded by glass fibers, and both involved by matrix. For CF and GF, the dual-cured material presented significantly higher (p0.05, but higher than that of G/CF (p0.05 were detected, irrespective of the post type. For GF and G/CF, all failures were considered mixed, while a predominance of adhesive failures was detected for CF. CONCLUSION: The bonding between fiber posts and luting agents was affected by the type of fibers and polymerization mode of the cement. When no surface treatment of the post is performed, the bonding between glass fiber post and dual-cured agent seems to be more reliable.

  20. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  1. Dental ceramics and the molar crown testing ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van P. Thompson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available All ceramic crowns are highly esthetic restorations and their popularity has risen with the demand for life-like and cosmetic dentistry. Recent ceramic research has concentrated on developing a fundamental understanding of ceramic damage modes as influenced by microstructure. Dental investigations have elucidated three damage modes for ceramic layers in the 0.5-2 mm thickness using point contacts that duplicate tooth cuspal radii; classic Hertzian cone cracking, yield (pseudo-plastic behavior, and flexural cracking. Constitutive equations based upon materials properties have been developed that predict the damage modes operational for a given ceramic and thickness. Ceramic thickness or thickness of the stiff supporting core in layer crowns is critical in flexural cracking as well as the flaw state of the inner aspect of the crown. The elastic module of the supporting structure and of the luting cement and its thickness play a role in flexural fracture. Clinical studies of ceramics extending over 16 years are compared to the above relationships and predictions. Recommendations for clinical practice are made based upon the above.

  2. Glass ionomer restorative cement systems: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Joel H; Croll, Theodore P

    2015-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements have been used in pediatric restorative dentistry for more than two decades. Their usefulness in clinical dentistry is preferential to other materials because of fluoride release from the glass component, biocompatibility, chemical adhesion to dentin and enamel, coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of tooth structure, and versatility. The purpose of this paper was to review the uses of glass ionomer materials in pediatric dentistry, specifically as pit and fissure sealants, dentin and enamel replacement repair materials, and luting cements, and for use in glass ionomer/resin-based composite stratification tooth restoration (the sandwich technique). This article can also be used as a guide to research and clinical references regarding specific aspects of the glass ionomer systems and how they are used for young patients.

  3. Influence of marginal fit and cement types on microleakage of all-ceramic crown systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Yüksel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both marginal fit and cementing with different luting agents on the microleakage of all-ceramic crown systems. Thirty-six extracted upper central incisors were prepared for full-coverage crowns and were divided into three groups. Group 1: CAD/CAM-fabricated ZrO2, Group 2: Heat-pressed lithium-disilicate, and Group 3: Cast Cr-Co copings as the control group. Copings were made following standard techniques, and groups were assigned cementation with either self-adhesive resin cement (A or glass-ionomer luting cement (B. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, immersed in basic fuchsin solution, sectioned mesiodistally and buccolingually. The surface of each section was digitally photographed under a stereomicroscope. Microleakage was scored using a five-point scale, and the marginal gap was measured using image analysis software. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests (α: 0.05. The marginal discrepancy of each group was 82.7 ± 7 µm, 92.6 ± 4 µm and 96.5 ± 7 µm respectively. Group 1 showed significantly smaller gaps than Group 3 (P = 0.042. Self-adhesive resin cement (A showed a lower level of microleakage than glass-ionomer luting cement (B in all groups (P = 0.029. Microleakage scores of '0' were 83% for 1A, 50% for 1B, 50% for 2A, 16% for 2B, 33% for 3A and none for 3B. Marginal discrepancy and cement type both had significant effects on microleakage. Lower levels of microleakage were recorded with self-adhesive resin cement, while CAD/CAM-fabricated ZrO2 copings showed smaller marginal discrepancy and less microleakage in comparison to cast Cr-Co.

  4. Waiting Time for Coronal Preparation and the Influence of Different Cements on Tensile Strength of Metal Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilione Kruschewsky Costa Sousa Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the effect of post-cementation waiting time for core preparation of cemented cast posts and cores had on retention in the root canal, using two different luting materials. Sixty extracted human canines were sectioned 16 mm from the root apex. After cast nickel-chromium metal posts and cores were fabricated and luted with zinc phosphate (ZP cement or resin cement (RC, the specimens were divided into 3 groups (n = 10 according to the waiting time for core preparation: no preparation (control, 15 minutes, or 1 week after the core cementation. At the appropriate time, the specimens were subjected to a tensile load test (0.5 mm/min until failure. Two-way ANOVA (time versus cement and the Tukey tests (P < 0.05 showed significantly higher (P < 0.05 tensile strength values for the ZP cement groups than for the RC groups. Core preparation and post-cementation waiting time for core recontouring did not influence the retention strength. ZP was the best material for intraradicular metal post cementation.

  5. LUTE - A UV strip search of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T.

    1993-09-01

    The moon is a superb gravity-gradient stabilized satellite from which to accomplish a wide variety of astrophysical observations. We discuss the LUTE Project which proposes to place on the lunar surface a simple, stationary telescope which uses the moon as a stable platform from which to accomplish a large area, high angular resolution survey of the Universe in the vacuum ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The basic observational principle involves use of CCD detectors continuously operated in the 'time-delay and integrate' (TDI) readout mode. Data, which are returned directly to Earth, can be used to address a very large set of astrophysical problems ranging from solar system to cosmological investigations. We discuss the astrophysical problems which can be addressed in the course of this survey. To ensure data integrity, astrophysical lunar mission design must incorporate precise in situ monitoring of the environment. The global LUTE mission design will be described.

  6. Differentiation inducement of calcium phosphate / calcium silicate / bismutite cement to dental pulp cells in vitro%新型复合盖髓材料对人牙髓细胞分化的体外诱导效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晴昳; 陈芳萍; 刘昌胜; 孙皎

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of new calcium phosphate/calcium silicate/bismutite (CPCSBi) cement on differentiation of human dental pulp cells.Methods Dissoluble dentin matrix components (DDMCs) were extracted from powdered sound,human dentine samples by either CPCSBi saturated solution,Ca(OH)2 saturated solution,or 10% EDTA,over a 14-day period.The effects of DDMCs extracts on dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP),osteocalcin (OCN) and TGF-β 1 gene expression in the dental pulp cells were analysed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR following 24 h of exposure.Results All the DDMCs extracts induced DSPP,OCN and TGF-β 1 gene expression in dental pulp cells.While the DDMCs extracted from dentin powder by CPCSBi demonstrated highest inducing effect on expression of DSPP and OCN in human pulp cells.Conclusion These results suggest that CPCSBi plays an important role in the differentiation of dental pulp cells to odontoblast like cells.%目的 研究新型盖髓材料磷酸钙/硅酸钙/泡铋矿复合水门汀(Calcium phosphate-calcium silicate-bismuth compound cement,CPCSBi)诱导牙髓细胞分化的作用.方法 分别采用CPCSBi、氢氧化钙(CH)饱和溶液和10%EDTA溶液,从人牙本质粉末中提取可溶性牙本质基质(DDMCs),通过半定量RT-PCR方法,分析不同材料所提取DDMCs对人牙髓细胞的涎磷蛋白(DSPP)、骨钙素(OCN)、转化生长因子-β1(TGF-β1)基因表达的影响.结果 不同材料提取的DDMCs都能提高体外培养人牙髓细胞DSPP、OCN和TGF-β1基因的表达,其中以CPCSBi溶液提取DDMCs的促进作用最明显.结论 CPCSBi对牙髓细胞分化具有促进作用.

  7. The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE): Enabling technology for an early lunar surface payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nein, M. E.; Hilchey, J. D.

    1995-02-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-m aperture, fixed declination, optical telescope to be operated on the surface of the Moon. This autonomous science payload will provide an unprecedented ultraviolet stellar survey even before manned lunar missions are resumed. This paper very briefly summarizes the LUTE concept analyzed by the LUTE Task Team of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Scientific capabilities and the Reference Design Concept are identified, and the expected system characteristics are summarized. Technologies which will be required to enable the early development, deployment, and operation of the LUTE are identified, and the principle goals and approaches for their advancement are described.

  8. LUTE SUITES AMSTERDAM,情感发生器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    灵感加灵感“堆积”起来的仅有七栋套房的卢特(LUTE SUITES)酒店是幻想型的设计酒店和餐厅的结合体,它将设计和烹饪推向了一个通常不会与荷兰的“穷乡僻壤”联系起来的新高度。

  9. Restoration of non-carious cervical lesions with ceramic inlays: A possible model for clinical testing of adhesive cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Staninec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many luting cements coming to market which claim to be adhesive, but there is no clinical protocol currently for testing these claims. There is a standardized protocol for testing direct restorations bonded to dentin and it is used extensively. Case Report: We describe a clinical procedure for restoring a non-carious cervical lesion (NCCL with a ceramic inlay using Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM technology and an adhesive resin cement.The procedure was straightforward and the result was good at one month. Discussion: NCCL′s can be restored with CAD-CAM technology in one appointment. This technique can be used to clinically test adhesion of luting cements to dentin, similarly to the current standard for direct restorations.

  10. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes, Caroline; Cardoso, Mayra; Melo, Renata Marques de; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm) were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath). A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT) No treatment (control); (SP) Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC) Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC) Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO) Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8) and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS), while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath) and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007) and thermocycling (p=0.000). Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement.

  11. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to different treated indirect composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M Victoria; Ceballos, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-adhesive and a total-etch resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites. Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm(2) were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α = 0.05). A significant influence of the resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-adhesive resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

  12. Effect of Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... changes in the crystalline structure of dental hard tissues. Keywords: Bond strength, irradiation, self-adhesive luting cement. Effect of Irradiation on the ..... Self-adhesive resin cements: A literature review. J Adhes Dent. 2008 ...

  13. Bonding strength of resin cement to silicate glass ceramics for dental CAD/CAM systems is enhanced by combination treatment of the bonding surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakura, Yusuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Fujishima, Akihiro; Kunii, Jun; Miyazaki, Takashi; Kawawa, Tadaharu

    2007-09-01

    To increase the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated, leucite-reinforced glass ceramics with a resin cement, the effects of the following were investigated: surface modification by tribochemical (TBC) treatment, followed by combined application of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer. Bond strength was evaluated by a shear bond test. It was found that a silane coupling agent was useful for all the surfaces, particularly for the TBC-treated surface. This was because of the presence of a silica layer on the modified surface. The combination of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer on the TBC surface allowed marked improvement in bonding, whereby the bonding endured 20,000 cycles of thermal cycling. Therefore, TBC treatment in combination with a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer substantially increased the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated glass ceramics with resin cement, if the treatment conditions were appropriate.

  14. Uso das técnicas de infravermelho e de ressonância magnética nuclear na caracterização da reação ácido-base de um cimento odontológico experimental Use of infrared and magnetic nuclear resonance techniques in the characterization of the acid-base reaction of an experimental dental cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio José Bertolini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are products of the acid-base setting reaction between an finely fluoro-alumino silicate glass powder and poly(acrylic acid in aqueous solution. The sol gel method is an adequate route of preparation of the glasses used to obtain the GICs. The objective of this paper was to compare two powders: a commercial and an experimental and to investigate the structural changes during hardening of the cements by FTIR and Al MAS NMR. These analyses showed that the experimental glass powder reacted with organic acid to form the GICs and it is a promising material to manufacture dental cements.

  15. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  16. [Morphological and failure mode study of different fiber posts luted with different adhesive systems to root dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Jin-Le; Hao, Liang

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the correlation of morphological characteristics and failure modes of two types of glass-fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement and etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Thirty-six intact single-rooted premolars were collected and removed the crown. After root canal therapy, teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group A: Self-adhesive with POPO fiber post. Group B: Etch-and-rinse with POPO fiber posts. Group C: Self-adhesive with Para Post. Group D: Etch-and-rinse with Para Post. Each root was sectioned into six 1 mm-thick serial slices and a push-out test was performed. The dentin-cement-post adhesive interface of each specimen and failure modes after fracture were evaluated by stereomicroscope observation. Interface morphology observe indicated that voids present in group B (64.2%) and D (66.7%) were significantly higher than group A (5.8%) and C (13.7%) (P adhesive interface were discrepant with failure modes in different root region. There were interaction between adhesive systems and fiber posts.

  17. Microbial analysis of biofilms on cement surfaces: An investigation in cement-associated peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Obst, Ursula

    2014-09-05

    The cementation of implant-supported restorations always poses the risk of excess cement retained in the peri-implant sulcus despite careful clinical control. Excess cement can become the basis of colonization by oral microorganisms. As a result of the biofilm formation peri-mucositis or peri-implantitis may develop. Complications were observed in the routine prosthetic restoration of implants when a methacrylate-based cement was used. These developed a few weeks after cementation of the suprastructure and caused bleeding on probing as well as suppuration from the peri-implant tissue. In the revision therapy, excess cement in the peri-implant sulcus was found in many cases. This excess cement was sampled from ten patients and investigated for biofilm formation. For this purpose, the cement samples were collected and analyzed for bacterial in situ colonization by 16S rDNA-based methods. In laboratory experiments, the methacrylate-based cement and two other dental cements were then investigated for their proneness to form biofilm. The results of the in situ and in vitro investigations revealed a strong tendency towards bacterial invasion of the methacrylate-based cement by opportunistic species and pathogens.

  18. 牙科粘结剂对人中性粒细胞的影响%Comparison of the effects of three dental cements on polymorph nuclear neutrophils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁四维; 吴凤鸣

    2012-01-01

    Objective; To evaluate the capacity of of three cements on polymorph nuclear neutrophils. Methods; The bottom of 24-well plates were coved by glass ionomer cement,zinc polycarboxylate cement,and light-cured resin cement respectively. Polymorph nuclear neutrophils(PMNs)were isolated from blood collected from healthy volunteer donors. PMNs were co-incubated with or without cement for 4 hours. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PMNs. Concentration of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in supernatant fluid was detected by ELISA. Results; The early apoptosis and necrosis rate of the control group is significantly lower,while the survival rate is significantly higher than that of cement groups. For the glass ionomer group has the highest survival rate PMNs is and the lowest rates of the early apoptosis and the necrosis. For the glass iron group,the ROS level of PMNs demonstrates a significantly increase. The concentrations of IL-8 of the cement groups are significantly higher than that of the control group,and the glass ionomer cement group has the highest level,while the zinc polycarboxylate cement group has the lowest. Conclusion; The glass ionomer displays characteristics of relative excellent antibacterial activities and lower inflammatory activation.%目的:研究3种固定修复用粘结剂对人中性粒细胞(polymorph nuclear neutrophils,PMNs)相关活性以及致炎性等方面的影响.方法:在24孔板底部铺上玻璃离子水门汀、聚羧酸锌水门汀、光固化树脂水门汀,采集健康成人志愿者静脉血分离提纯PMNs,将PMNs与3种粘结剂接触培养4h后,检测细胞的早期凋亡率、坏死率以及存活率的变化,产生的活性氧簇(reactiveoxygen species,ROS)以及分泌白介素(IL)-8的量.结果:3组粘结剂的早期凋亡率、坏死率和存活率两两比较,差异有统计学意义(P< 0.05),其中聚羧酸锌水门汀组早期凋亡率、坏死率最高,存活率最低;玻璃

  19. Fractal dimension analysis of aluminum oxide particle for sandblasting dental use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Y; Munoz, C A; Winkler, M M; Hashem, A; Itoh, M

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum oxide particles are commonly used as a sandblasting media, particularly in dentistry, for multiple purposes including divesting the casting investment materials and increasing effective surface area for enhancing the mechanical retention strengths of succeedingly applied fired porcelain or luting cements. Usually fine aluminum oxide particles are recycled within the sandblasting machine. Ceramics such as aluminum oxides are brittle, therefore, some portions of recycling aluminum oxide particles might be brittle fractured. If fractured sandblasting particles are involved in the recycling media, it might result in irregularity metallic materials surface as well as the recycling sandblasting media itself be contaminated. Hence, it is necessary from both clinical and practical reasons to monitor the particle conditions in terms of size/shape and effectiveness of sandblasting, so that sandblasting dental prostheses can be fabricated in optimum and acceptable conditions. In the present study, the effect of recycling aluminum oxide particles on the surface texture of metallic materials was evaluated by Fractal Dimension Analysis (FDA). Every week the alumina powder was sampled and analyzed for weight fraction and contaminants. Surface texture of sandblasted standard samples was also characterized by FDA. Results indicate very little change in particle size, while the fractal dimension increased. Fractal dimension analysis showed that the aluminum oxide particle as a sandblasting media should be replaced after 30 or 40 min of total accumulated operation time.

  20. Abrasive wear of two glass ionomer cements after simulated toothbrushing

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia Furtado Antunes de Freitas; Leandro Jum Imai; César Antunes de Freitas; Eduardo Carlos Bianchi; Carina Thaís de Almeida; Ismar Eduardo Martins Filho

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and objective: Glass ionomer cement, which was first introduced in Dentistry in 1972, presents good qualities such as aesthetics, fluoride release and adhesion to dental tissues. Because of its preventive characteristics regarding to dental caries, glass ionomer cement has been used for Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART), as reported by Frencken and Holmgren [6], meeting the principles announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) for application to large population groups...

  1. A new atraumatic method of removing fractured palatal root using endodontic H-files luted with resin modified glass ionomercement: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Sadesh Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of using endodontic H-files luted with Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC in removing fractured palatal root. Materials and Methods: This study consists of 30 patients, of which 16 were males and 14 were females with a mean age of 36 years. In which, 19 were maxillary first molar and 11 were maxillary second molar. In that, 18 were fractured at the level of apical 1/3 rd and 12 were at the level of apical 2/3 rd . All cases were first tried with endodontic H-files, within few attempts, it was wedged tightly in the remaining pulp chamber with one or two clockwise direction and using sudden jerk with a downward pull the remnant part was removed. The cases, which fail to deliver after several attempts were taken up for study. After sufficient isolation with a rubber dam and the socket was dried using sterile gauze, under good lighting and vision again the same file was introduced, which was now luted with RMGIC, after 5 min of setting time, the same attempt using sudden jerk with a downward pull was given. Results: In those 30 cases, 20 cases were removed in the first few attempts using endodontic H-files. The 10 cases (7 cases were apical 2/3 rd and 3 cases were of apical 1/3 rd , which fails to come out were tried using endodontic H-files luted with RMGIC, in which 9 cases were successfully removed (90% and 1 case of apical 1/3 rd was again failed to come out. Conclusion: Even though, the number of cases were too small to come to a definitive conclusion, the encouraging result (90% and technically easy, this is a novel method of removing fractured palatal root atraumatically and devoid of any complication.

  2. Tensile bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to microabraded and silica-coated or tin-plated high noble ceramic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, J M; Davis, R D; Overton, J D

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of alloy surface microabrasion, silica coating, or microabrasion plus tin plating on the tensile bond strengths between a resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cement and a high-noble alloy. Bond strength between the microabraded alloy specimens and conventional glass-ionomer cement or resin cement were included for comparison. One hundred twenty uniform size, disk-shaped specimens were cast in a noble metal alloy and divided into 6 groups (n = 10 pairs/group). The metal surfaces of the specimens in each group were treated and cemented as follows. Group 1: No surface treatment (as cast, control), cemented with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 2: Microabrasion with 50-microm aluminum oxide particles, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 3: A laboratory microabrasion and silica coating system, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 4: Microabrasion and tin-plating, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 5: Microabrasion only, conventional glass-ionomer cement. Group 6: Microabrasion and tin-plating, conventional resin cement. The uniaxial tensile bond strength for each specimen pair was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine (Instron Corp, Canton, MA). Results were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (alpha = 0.05) and a Tukey post-hoc analysis. Mean bond strength: Group 1: 3.6 (+/- 1.5) MPa. Group 2: 4.2 (+/-0.5) MPa. Group 3: 6.7 (+/- 0.9) MPa. Group 4: 10.6 (+/- 1.8) MPa. Group 5: 1.1 (+/- 0.4) MPa. Group 6: 14.6 (+/- 2.3) MPa. Group 6 was significantly stronger than Group 4. The bond strength of specimens cemented with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 4) was significantly stronger than all other groups except the resin cement with microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 6). Microabraded and tin-plated alloy specimens luted with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement resulted in the greatest mean tensile strengths

  3. Bond strength of adhesively luted ceramic discs to different core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozogullari, Nalan; Inan, Ozgur; Usumez, Aslihan

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strengths of resin, glass-ionomer, and ceramic-based core materials to all ceramic discs. Five core materials (Core max, Sankin; Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray; Empress Cosmo, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Photocore, Kuraray; Dyract Extra, Dentsply) were prepared as discs 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height according to the manufacturer's instructions. Ten disc specimens per group were prepared, and dentin served as the control. All resin specimens were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, with one surface facing up. All ceramic discs (IPS Empress I, Ivoclar-Vivadent) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height were prepared and bonded to core specimens with a dual-curing luting resin cement (Variolink II, Vivadent). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured after 24 h using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (alpha = 0.05). Shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the core material used (p strength value while Empress Cosmo provided the lowest (p Core-Max (p > 0.05). And also there were no statistically significant differences between Dyract Extra and the control group (p > 0.05). In vitro shear bond strengths of ceramic discs bonded to resin-based core materials showed higher bond strength values than ceramic-based core material.

  4. Correlation between the strength of glass ionomer cements and their bond strength to bovine teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Yasushi; Kuramochi, Ken-ichi; Harashima, Atsushi; Honda, Muneaki; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Yamaga, Taniichiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the possible correlation between the strength of glass ionomers and their adhesive strength to bovine teeth. The shear bond strengths of three different brands of glass ionomer mixed at four different P/L ratios to bovine teeth were measured 24 hours after the cement specimens were prepared. The correlation between shear bond strength and mechanical strength reported in our previous study was also examined. No significant (p > 0.05) increases in the bond strength to bovine teeth were found in any of the cements when the mixing ratio increased. The present study showed no significant (p > 0.05) correlation between mechanical strength of cement and its bond strength to bovine teeth. Rather than trying to increase the strength of the cement, it would be more effective to enhance the adhesive bond strength through procedures such as surface conditioning or cleaning of the tooth structure when glass ionomers are used as luting agents.

  5. Evaluation and comparison of the effect of different surface preparations on bond strength of glass ionomer cement with nickel-chrome metal-ceramic alloy: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasti, Kalpana; Jagadeesh, H G; Patil, Narendra P

    2011-03-01

    Retention of fixed partial dentures is mostly dependent upon the bond between metal and cement as well as cement and tooth structure. However, most of the time clinical failure of bond has been observed at metal and cement interface. The treatment of metal surface, prior to luting, plays a crucial role in bonding cement with the metal. This study is conducted to evaluate and compare the effect of different surface preparations on the bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement with nickel-chromium metal ceramic alloy. Fifty caries-free extracted molar teeth were made flat until the dentin of the occlusal surface was exposed. After fabrication of the wax patterns and subsequent castings, the castings were subjected to porcelain firing cycles. The nickel-chromium metal ceramic alloy discs were also divided into five groups and subjected to various surface treatments: (1) Unsandblasted (U), (2) sandblasted (S), (3) sandblasted and treated with 10% aqueous solution of KMnO4 (SK), (4) unsandblasted and roughened with diamond abrasive points (UD) and (5) unsandblasted and roughened with diamond abrasive points and treated with 10% aqueous solution of KMnO(4) (UDK). After surface treatments, the castings were cemented using Fuji PLUS encapsulated resin-modified glass ionomer cement. The obtained values of all the groups were subjected to statistical analysis for Tensile and Shear bond strength. Different surface treatments of the metal affects the bond strength values of resin-modified glass ionomer cement when used as luting agent.

  6. Influence of curing time, overlay material and thickness on three light-curing composites used for luting indirect composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; Carluccio, Fabio; Vitalone, Laura Merla; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    To assess the microhardness of three resin composites employed in the adhesive luting of indirect composite restorations and examine the influence of the overlay material and thickness as well as the curing time on polymerization rate. Three commercially available resin composites were selected: Enamel Plus HRI (Micerium) (ENA), Saremco ELS (Saremco Dental) (SAR), Esthet-X HD (Dentsply/DeTrey) (EST-X). Post-polymerized cylinders of 6 different thicknesses were produced and used as overlays: 2 mm, 3 mm, 3.5 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm. Two-mm-thick disks were produced and employed as underlays. A standardized amount of composite paste was placed between the underlay and the overlay surfaces which were maintained at a fixed distance of 0.5 mm. Light curing of the luting composite layer was performed through the overlays for 40, 80, or 120 s. For each specimen, the composite to be cured, the cured overlay, and the underlay were made out of the same batch of resin composite. All specimens were assigned to three experimental groups on the basis of the resin composite used, and to subgroups on the basis of the overlay thickness and the curing time, resulting in 54 experimental subgroups (n = 5). Forty-five additional specimens, 15 for each material under investigation, were produced and subjected to 40, 80, or 120 s of light curing using a microscope glass as an overlay; they were assigned to 9 control subgroups (n = 5). Three Vicker's hardness (VH) indentations were performed on each specimen. Means and standard deviations were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using 3-way ANOVA. Within the same material, VH values lower than 55% of control were not considered acceptable. The used material, the overlay thickness, and the curing time significantly influenced VH values. In the ENA group, acceptable hardness values were achieved with 3.5-mm or thinner overlays after 120 or 80 s curing time (VH 41.75 and 39.32, respectively), and with 2-mm overlays after 40 s (VH 54

  7. Comparison of a SiO(2)-CaO-ZnO-SrO glass polyalkenoate cement to commercial dental materials: glass structure and physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, A W; Coughlan, A; Laffir, F R; Towler, M R

    2013-02-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) have previously been considered for orthopedic applications. A Zn-GPC (BT 101) was compared to commercial GPCs (Fuji IX and Ketac Molar) which have a setting chemistry analogous to BT 101. Handling properties (working, T (w) and setting, T (s) times) for BT 101 were shorter than the commercial GPCs. BT 101 also had a higher setting exotherm (S (x) -34 °C) than the commercial GPCs (29 °C). The maximum strengths for BT 101, Fuji IX, and Ketac Molar were 75, 238, and 216 MPa (compressive, σ (c)), and 34, 54, and 62 MPa (biaxial flexural strengths, σ (f)), respectively. The strengths of BT 101 are more suitable for spinal applications than commercial GPCs.

  8. Surface morphological changes on the human dental enamel and cement after the Er:YAG laser irradiation at different incidence angles; Avaliacao morfologica das superficies do esmalte e do cimento dental apos a irradiacao do laser de Er:YAG em diferentes angulacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tannous, Jose Trancoso

    2001-07-01

    This is a morphological analysis study through SEM of the differences of the laser tissue interaction as a function of the laser beam irradiation angle, under different parameters of energy. Fourteen freshly extracted molars stored in a 0,9% sodium chloride solution were divided in seven pairs and were irradiated with 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 mJ per pulse, respectively. Each sample received three enamel irradiations and three cement irradiations, either in the punctual or in the contact mode, one near to the other, with respectively 30, 45 and 90 inclinations degrees of dental surface-laser-beam incidence. Four Er:YAG pulses (2,94 {mu}m, 7-20 Hz, 0,1-1 J energy/pulse - Opus 20 - Opus Dent) with water cooling system (0,4 ml/s) were applied. After the laser irradiation the specimens were analysed through scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results were analysed by SEM micrographs showing a great difference on the laser tissue interaction characteristics as a function of the irradiation angle of the laser beam. All the observations led to conclude that, considering the laser parameters used, the incidence angle variation is a very important parameter regarding the desired morphological effects. This represents an extremely relevant detail on the technical description of the Er:YAG laser irradiation protocols on dental tissues. (author)

  9. Galileo's Lute and the Law of Falling Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mark

    2008-05-01

    Galileo's Lute and the Law of Falling Bodies is an excerpt from Galileo 1610. Galileo 1610 is a dramatic, musical and intellectual odyssey back to the life and times of Galileo Galilei, the famous 17th century Italian scientist and philosopher. It commemorates the 400th anniversary of Galileo's discoveries with his telescope in 1610. Dressed in authentic Renaissance attire as Galileo, the author-- a cantorial soloist and amateur astronomer-- tells the fascinating story of "The Father of Modern Science,” drawing from the actual correspondence and writings of Galileo, as well as those of his many biographers. Through his dialogue with the audience on a wide range of discoveries and opinions, "Galileo” shares his wisdom and his life experiences with pathos, wit and humor, lacing his narration with entertaining lute songs from the late Renaissance period, some of which were actually composed by Galileo's father, Vincenzo. Bridging the past to the present, the author breathes life into "Galileo” as he once again frolics and struggles among us. In bringing forth some of life's great issues, we learn something about our own inquisitive nature, as well as that of science and music. The author has appeared as Galileo for over a decade on radio, at community theatres and libraries, public schools, colleges and universities throughout the country. He has performed for civic organizations, astronomy association conventions, marketing and outreach programs as well as private events and parties. Galileo 1610 is suitable for a variety of educational and entertainment programs, for both children and adults. All presentations are tailored to fit the interest, experience and size of the audience.

  10. Cementation of Glass-Ceramic Posterior Restorations: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carline R. G. van den Breemer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this comprehensive review is to systematically organize the current knowledge regarding the cementation of glass-ceramic materials and restorations, with an additional focus on the benefits of Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS. Materials and Methods. An extensive literature search concerning the cementation of single-unit glass-ceramic posterior restorations was conducted in the databases of MEDLINE (Pubmed, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE. To be considered for inclusion, in vitro and in vivo studies should compare different cementation regimes involving a “glass-ceramic/cement/human tooth” complex. Results and Conclusions. 88 studies were included in total. The in vitro data were organized according to the following topics: (microshear and (microtensile bond strength, fracture strength, and marginal gap and integrity. For in vivo studies survival and quality of survival were considered. In vitro studies showed that adhesive systems (3-step, etch-and-rinse result in the best (microshear bond strength values compared to self-adhesive and self-etch systems when luting glass-ceramic substrates to human dentin. The highest fracture strength is obtained with adhesive cements in particular. No marked clinical preference for one specific procedure could be demonstrated on the basis of the reviewed literature. The possible merits of IDS are most convincingly illustrated by the favorable microtensile bond strengths. No clinical studies regarding IDS were found.

  11. Cementation of Glass-Ceramic Posterior Restorations: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Breemer, Carline R. G.; Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Cune, Marco S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive review is to systematically organize the current knowledge regarding the cementation of glass-ceramic materials and restorations, with an additional focus on the benefits of Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS). Materials and Methods. An extensive literature search concerning the cementation of single-unit glass-ceramic posterior restorations was conducted in the databases of MEDLINE (Pubmed), CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), and EMBASE. To be considered for inclusion, in vitro and in vivo studies should compare different cementation regimes involving a “glass-ceramic/cement/human tooth” complex. Results and Conclusions. 88 studies were included in total. The in vitro data were organized according to the following topics: (micro)shear and (micro)tensile bond strength, fracture strength, and marginal gap and integrity. For in vivo studies survival and quality of survival were considered. In vitro studies showed that adhesive systems (3-step, etch-and-rinse) result in the best (micro)shear bond strength values compared to self-adhesive and self-etch systems when luting glass-ceramic substrates to human dentin. The highest fracture strength is obtained with adhesive cements in particular. No marked clinical preference for one specific procedure could be demonstrated on the basis of the reviewed literature. The possible merits of IDS are most convincingly illustrated by the favorable microtensile bond strengths. No clinical studies regarding IDS were found. PMID:26557651

  12. Leucite-reinforced glass ceramic inlays after six years: wear of luting composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, N; Frankenberger, R

    2000-01-01

    Wear of luting composites is still an unsolved problem with adhesive inlays. However, only limited clinical research has been conducted regarding this phenomenon. This study evaluated the substance loss within the luting gap over a six-year period in vivo. In the course of a controlled prospective clinical study, 16 patients received 39 Class-II IPS Empress inlays. Variolink Low (Vivadent; n = 18) was used as conventional low-viscosity luting composite, the hybrid-type restorative resin composite Tetric (n = 21; Vivadent) was applied according to the ultrasonic insertion technique. The restorations were clinically assessed after 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 72 months and replicas were made. The contact-free occlusal areas of the replicas were scanned by use of a computer-controlled profilometer (Perthen S3P), the analysis of the data was computed using a newly developed software (Xpert for Windows 95) and statistically analyzed with non-parametric tests. After six months all restorations exhibited marginal ditching. The percentage of detectable luting gap abrasion increased between each recall appointment (32% after six months, 48% after 12 months, 46% after 24 months, 55% after 36 months, 59% after 48 months and 65% after 72 months). Except for the 48-months results, no significant difference between the materials used for luting was evident (p > 0.05). Between the width and the depth of the luting space a linear regression was computed. The quantitative evaluation clearly demonstrated that hopes of relevantly reduced wear of luting composites were not confirmed when using the higher filled luting material.

  13. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  14. Effect of elasticity on stress distribution in CAD/CAM dental crowns: Glass ceramic vs. polymer-matrix composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuanyuan; Griggs, Jason A

    2015-06-01

    Further investigations are required to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of newly developed polymer-matrix composite (PMC) blocks for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elasticity on the stress distribution in dental crowns made of glass-ceramic and PMC materials using finite element (FE) analysis. Elastic constants of two materials were determined by ultrasonic pulse velocity using an acoustic thickness gauge. Three-dimensional solid models of a full-coverage dental crown on a first mandibular molar were generated based on X-ray micro-CT scanning images. A variety of load case-material property combinations were simulated and conducted using FE analysis. The first principal stress distribution in the crown and luting agent was plotted and analyzed. The glass-ceramic crown had stress concentrations on the occlusal surface surrounding the area of loading and the cemented surface underneath the area of loading, while the PMC crown had only stress concentration on the occlusal surface. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown in all load cases, but this difference was not substantial when the loading had a lateral component. Eccentric loading did not substantially increase the maximum stress in the prosthesis. Both materials are resistant to fracture with physiological occlusal load. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown, but the effect of a lateral loading component was more pronounced for a PMC crown than for a glass-ceramic crown. Knowledge of the stress distribution in dental crowns with low modulus of elasticity will aid clinicians in planning treatments that include such restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of resin luting agents and 1% NaOCl on the marginal fit of indirect composite restorations in primary teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    BORGES, Ana Flávia Sanches; SIMONATO, Luciana Estevam; PASCON, Fernanda Miori; KANTOWITZ, Kamila Rosamiglia; RONTANI, Regina Maria Puppin

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to provide information regarding the marginal adaptation of composite resin onlays in primary teeth previously treated with 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (pulp irrigant) using two different resin luting agents. Material and Methods Forty extracted sound primary molars had their crowns prepared in a standardized machine and were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10): G1 (1% NaOCl irrigation+EnForce); G2 (EnForce); G3 (1% NaOCl irrigation+Rely X); G4 (Rely X). The onlays were made with Z250 composite resin on plaster models. After luting, the tooth/restoration set was stored in 100% relative humidity at 37ºC for 24 h and finished with Soflex discs. Caries Detector solution was applied at the tooth/restoration interface for 5 s. The specimens were washed and four digital photos of each tooth were then taken. The extents of the gaps were measured with Image Tool 3.0 software. The percentage data were submitted to a Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). The Relative Risk test analyzed the chance of a gap presence correlated to each group. Results There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) among the groups. The relative risk test revealed that some groups were more apt to have a presence of gaps than others. Conclusion Neither the 1% NaOCl treatment nor the resin luting agents caused any alterations in the dental substrate that could have influenced the marginal adaptation of composite onlays in primary teeth. PMID:21986649

  16. Effects of resin luting agents and 1% NaOCl on the marginal fit of indirect composite restorations in primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Sanches Borges

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to provide information regarding the marginal adaptation of composite resin onlays in primary teeth previously treated with 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl (pulp irrigant using two different resin luting agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty extracted sound primary molars had their crowns prepared in a standardized machine and were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10: G1 (1% NaOCl irrigation+EnForce; G2 (EnForce; G3 (1% NaOCl irrigation+Rely X; G4 (Rely X. The onlays were made with Z250 composite resin on plaster models. After luting, the tooth/restoration set was stored in 100% relative humidity at 37ºC for 24 h and finished with Soflex discs. Caries Detector solution was applied at the tooth/restoration interface for 5 s. The specimens were washed and four digital photos of each tooth were then taken. The extents of the gaps were measured with Image Tool 3.0 software. The percentage data were submitted to a Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05. The Relative Risk test analyzed the chance of a gap presence correlated to each group. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05 among the groups. The relative risk test revealed that some groups were more apt to have a presence of gaps than others. CONCLUSION: Neither the 1% NaOCl treatment nor the resin luting agents caused any alterations in the dental substrate that could have influenced the marginal adaptation of composite onlays in primary teeth.

  17. Variation in the thickness of the composite lute with an indirect composite inlay system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyaratnam, M; Wilson, M A; Wilson, N H; Watts, D C

    1990-11-01

    The findings of an initial investigation of variations in the thickness of the composite lute around inlays of a fine particle hybrid, light- and secondary-cured indirect composite resin inlay system are reported. The lute thickness varied between 10 microns and 90 microns, and was found to be thinnest and most uniform in the region of occlusal cavosurface margins. Although the marginal adaptation of the inlays investigated was generally considered to be satisfactory, sections of the lute were found to exhibit porosity and to contain a number of voids. It is concluded that whilst the lute thickness and marginal adaptation of composite bonded inlays of the type investigated may be found to be acceptable, further work is desirable to investigate ways to limit porosity and voids in lutes and to form and finish the cavomarginal elements of tooth-coloured inlays in such a way that the limiting layer of luting material may be better protected from the rigors of function in the oral environment.

  18. Characterization of the calcium-fluoroaluminosilicate glass prepared by a non-hydrolytic sol-gel route for future dental application as glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Cestari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements are widely employed in dentistry due to their physical, biological and mainly anti-caries properties. Glass ionomers consist of an aluminosilicate glass matrix modified with other elements, and they contain large quantities of fluorine. In this study, we report on the preparation of calcium-fluoroaluminosilicate glasses by a nonhydrolytic sol-gel route as an alternative approach to obtaining alumina-silica matrices. The glass powders were prepared via the non-hydrolytic sol-gel method, by mixing AlCl3, SiCl4, CaF2, AlF3, NaF, and AlPO4. The powders were studied by thermal analysis (TG/DTA/DSC, photoluminescence (PL, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR27Al-29Si, and X ray diffraction (XRD. TG/DTA/DSC analyses revealed a constant mass loss due to structural changes during the heating process, which was confirmed by NMR and PL. A stable aluminosilicate matrix with potential future application as a glass ionomer base was obtained.

  19. Comparison of a SiO₂-CaO-ZnO-SrO glass polyalkenoate cement to commercial dental materials: ion release, biocompatibility and antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, A W; Coughlan, A; Hall, M M; German, M J; Towler, M R

    2013-09-01

    Ion Release and biocompatibility of a CaO-SrO-ZnO-SiO₂ (BT 101) based glass polyalkenoate cement (GPC) was compared against commercial GPCs, Fuji IX and Ketac Molar. The radiopacity (R) was similar for each material, 2.0-2.8. Ion release was evaluated on each material over 1, 7, 30 and 90 days. BT 101 release included Ca (23 mg/L), Sr (23 mg/L) Zn (13 mg/L), Si (203 mg/L). Fuji IX release includes Ca (0.7 mg/L), Al (3 mg/L) Si (26 mg/L), Na (60 mg/L) and P (0.5 mg/L) while Ketac Molar release includes Ca (1 mg/L), Al (0.6 mg/L) Si (23 mg/L), Na (76 mg/L) and P (0.7 mg/L). Simulated body fluid trials revealed CaP surface precipitation on BT 101. No evidence of precipitation was found on Fuji IX or Ketac Molar. Cytotoxicity testing found similar cell viability values for each material (~60 %, P = 1.000). Antibacterial testing determined a reduced CFU count with BT 101 (2.5 × 10³) when compared to the control bacteria (2.4 × 10⁴), Fuji IX (1.5 × 10⁴) and Ketac Molar (1.2 × 10⁴).

  20. Physical properties and cytotoxicity comparison of experimental gypsum-based biomaterials with two current dental cement materials on L929 fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafsiyah Mahshim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate physical properties and cytotoxicity of pure gypsum-based (pure-GYP and experimental gypsum-based biomaterials mixed with polyacrylic acid (Gyp-PA. The results were compared with calcium hydroxide (CH and glass ionomer cement (GIC for application as base/liner materials. Materials and Methods: Vicat′s needle was used to measure the setting time and solubility (% was determined by percentage of weight loss of the materials following immersion in distilled water. For cytotoxicity test, eluates of different concentrations of materials were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 mouse fibroblast cultures and incubated for 3 days. Cellular viability was assessed using Dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium bromide test to determine the cytotoxicity level. Statistical significance was determined by one-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc test ( P Gyp-PA > CH = GIC. The pure-Gyp was found as the least cytotoxic materials at different concentrations. At 100 mg/mL dilutions of materials in growth medium highest cytotoxicity was observed with CH group. Conclusion: Cytotoxic effect was not observed with pure-Gyp; application of this novel biomaterial on deeper dentin/an exposed pulp and possibility of gradual replacement of this biodegradable material by dentin like structure would be highly promising.

  1. Fiber post cementation strategies: effect of mechanical cycling on push-out bond strength and cement polymerization stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Amaral, Marina; Boaro, Leticia Cristina; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of mechanical cycling and cementation strategies on the push-out bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the polymerization stresses produced using three resin cements. Eighty bovine mandibular teeth were sectioned to a length of 16 mm, prepared to 12 mm, and embedded in self-curing acrylic resin. The specimens were then distributed into 8 groups (n = 10): Gr1 - Scotchbond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC; Gr2 - Scotchbond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC + mechanical cycling; Gr3 - AdheSE + Multilink Automix; Gr4 - AdheSE + Multilink Automix + mechanical cycling; Gr5 - phosphoric acid + RelyX U100 (self-adhesive cement); Gr6 - phosphoric acid+ RelyX U100 + mechanical cycling; Gr7 - RelyX U100; Gr8 - RelyX U100 + mechanical cycling. The values obtained from the push-out bond strength test were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05), while the values obtained from the polymerization stress test were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Mechanical cycling did not affect the bond strength values (p = 0.236), while cementation strategies affected the push-out bond strength (p push-out bond strength values. The polymerization stress results were affected by the factor "cement" (p = 0.0104): the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 exhibited the lowest values, RelyX ARC resulted in the highest values, while Multilink Automix presented values statistically similar to the other two cements. The self-adhesive cement appears to be a good alternative for luting fiber posts due to the high push-out bond strengths and lower polymerization stress values.

  2. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Anterior Two-Unit Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Keulemans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different framework materials on biomechanical behaviour of anterior two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs. A three-dimensional finite element model of a two-unit cantilever RBFDP replacing a maxillary lateral incisor was created. Five framework materials were evaluated: direct fibre-reinforced composite (FRC-Z250, indirect fibre-reinforced composite (FRC-ES, gold alloy (M, glass ceramic (GC, and zirconia (ZI. Finite element analysis was performed and stress distribution was evaluated. A similar stress pattern, with stress concentrations in the connector area, was observed in RBFDPs for all materials. Maximal principal stress showed a decreasing order: ZI > M > GC > FRC-ES > FRC-Z250. The maximum displacement of RBFDPs was higher for FRC-Z250 and FRC-ES than for M, GC, and ZI. FE analysis depicted differences in location of the maximum stress at the luting cement interface between materials. For FRC-Z250 and FRC-ES, the maximum stress was located in the upper part of the proximal area of the retainer, whereas, for M, GC, and ZI, the maximum stress was located at the cervical outline of the retainer. The present study revealed differences in biomechanical behaviour between all RBFDPs. The general observation was that a RBFDP made of FRC provided a more favourable stress distribution.

  3. Effect of light emission on polymerization of luting resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Indirect esthetic restorations have recently gained popularity, and choosing suitable cement is"nan important concern in this regard. A wide variety of resin cements with different curing models:"n(chemical, light, dual, have been introduced to the profession, and among them the dual systems are"nclaimed to be able to continue polymerization after stopping the light. In order to study and compare the"npolymerization process of different curing systems, this research was performed."nThe present study measured the degree of conversion (DC of three types of resin cements: a self cured,"na light cured and a dual cured cement. The samples were prepared as follows:"n1-The self cured samples were made according to the manufacturer."n2-The light cured samples were exposed to the curing light for 60 seconds, through a 2 mm thick wafer"nof porcelain."n3- The dual cured samples were divided into 2 groups. The first was lighted similar to the light cured"nsamples, and the second did not receive any light."nThe degree of polymerization was measured by FTIR at time levels of 5, 10,20,30,45,60 minutes and 24"nhours post mixing. The infrared spectrum of the samples were recorded and degree of conversion were"ndetermined. The results demonstrated an increase in mean DC of all groups at post mixing time, but this"nwas significant only in the lighted dual cured cement (PO.05. The light cure resin showed high DC at"nthe base line time (5min. At the end of 60 minutes, the self cure resin had the most DC. The unlighted"ndual cement had a very low DC and didn't improve in polymerization during the post mixing controls."nThe lighted dual cement had a significant improve in curing at post mixing times, and it was"nsignificantly different from unlighted dual cement. So the dual cure cement needs to receive sufficient"nlight energy to initiate the curing process and the chemical component of this cement could not improve"nthe DC completely."nAfter 24 hours migration

  4. Lunar cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  5. Dental Wings CAD/CAM system precision: an internal and marginal fit sperimental analisys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, G; Gloria, F; Schiavetti, R; Ottria, L; Barlattani, A

    2009-07-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM.: The CAD-CAM technology has been developed to design and manufacture prosthetic structures with constant quality characteristics; in fact procedures are codified, manageable and repeatable. PURPOSE.: The purpose of this in vitro study is to evaluate the internal and marginal gap of zirconia casts made with a new CAD-CAM systematic that use Dental Wings laser scanner and Yenamak milling machine. MATERIAL AND METHODS.: 6 analogs of solid abutments of Straumann implants were used, fixed in plexiglass bases. The samples were scanned by Dental Wings laser; the file obtained by scanning of each probe was sent to the Yenamak D40 milling machine, then the casts were sintered in Protherm furnace. Then 6 samples were cemented with resin luting agent capsules (Relyx Unicem, 3M ESPE). The samples were incorporated in transparent epoxy resin. After resin hardening, the cylinders obtained were cut with a microtomes. These slices thus obtained were then polished with a Polisher sander with alumina dust decreasing grain. Each section was observed and photographed in reflected light with the aid of an optic microscope type, first at low magnification and then at higher magnification. RESULTS.: The overall average fitting of copings on the abutments was 32,87 μ. No differences were found in marginal fit on buccal and lingual sides, it was easily predictable because of the standard form of the used stumps. The recorded values for the marginal fit were lower than those of axial walls. The accuracy of adaptation was always achieved within the limits of clinical acceptability. CONCLUSIONS.: Within the limitations of this study, the system evaluated represents a valuable alternative to conventional prosthetic rehabilitation techniques.

  6. Infiltração marginal de agentes cimentantes em coroas metálicas fundidas Marginal microleakage of cast metal crowns luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomie Nakakuki de CAMPOS

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Um dos principais objetivos do cimento, que fixa a restauração protética ao dente, é o selamento da fenda existente entre os mesmos. Para avaliar a infiltração marginal, foram feitos preparos cavitários padronizados, em 20 dentes naturais extraídos. As coroas totais foram fundidas em NiCr, sendo 10 cimentadas com cimento de fosfato de zinco e 10 com cimento resinoso Panavia 21. As amostras foram submetidas à ciclagem térmica e em seguida foram colocadas em solução de azul de metileno a 0,5%. Após o seccionamento vestíbulo-lingual, os corpos-de-prova foram examinados com lupa de aumento. Houve diferença significante entre os dois cimentos testados, sendo que 100% das amostras cimentadas com cimento de fosfato de zinco apresentaram infiltração atingindo dentina e polpa e 100% das amostras cimentadas com Panavia 21 não sofreram qualquer tipo de infiltração. Conclui-se que: o cimento resinoso Panavia 21 apresentou melhores resultados, quanto ao grau de infiltração, quando comparado com o cimento de fosfato de zinco, na cimentação de coroas metálicas fundidas em NiCr.One of the main goals of the luting agent, which bonds the cast restoration to the prepared tooth, is to seal the gap between them. Standardized preparations were made on 20 extracted teeth in order to evaluate microleakage. The crowns were made in NiCr, and in one group of 10 crowns zinc phosphate was used as the luting agent; in the other 10, Panavia 21 was used. The samples were thermocycled and then put into methylene blue solution (0.5%. After buccolingual sectioning of the cemented crowns, the samples were examined with a magnifier. There was a significant difference between the two groups: 100% of the zinc phosphate cemented crowns presented microleakage reaching the dentin and the pulp and 100% of the samples with Panavia 21 did not suffer any microleakage. So, as to the marginal microleakage with cast metal crowns in NiCr, the Panavia 21 luting agent

  7. Influence of chlorhexidine on dentin adhesive interface micromorphology and nanoleakage expression of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Menezes, Murilo De Sousa; Barreto, Bruno De Castro Ferreira; Naves, Lucas Zago; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2013-08-01

    This study focused on adhesive interface morphologic characterization and nanoleakage expression of resin cements bonded to human dentin pretreated with 1% chlorhexidine (CHX). Thirty-two non-carious human third molars were ground flat to expose superficial dentin. Resin composite blocks were luted to the exposed dentin using one conventional (RelyX ARC) and one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100), with/without CHX pretreatment. Four groups (n = 8) were obtained: control groups (ARC and U100); experimental groups (ARC/CHX and U100/CHX) were pretreated with 1% CHX prior to the luting process. After storage in water for 24 h, the bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 × 0.9 mm(2) sticks producing a minimum of 12 sticks per tooth. Four sticks from each tooth were prepared for hybrid layer evaluation by scanning electron microscope analysis. The remaining sticks were immersed in silver nitrate for 24 h for either nanoleakage evaluation along the bonded interfaces or after rupture. Nanoleakage samples were carbon coated and examined using backscattered electron mode. Well-established hybrid layers were observed in the groups luted with RelyX ARC. Nanoleakage evaluation revealed increase nanoleakage in groups treated with CHX for both resin cements. Group U100/CHX exhibited the most pronouncing nanoleakage expression along with porous zones adjacent to the CHX pretreated dentin. The results suggest a possible incompatibility between CHX and RelyX U100 that raises the concern that the use of CHX with self-adhesive cements may adversely affect resin-dentin bond.

  8. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  9. Comparative analysis of the biological effects of the endodontic bioactive cements MTA-Angelus, MTA Repair HP and NeoMTA Plus on human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Catalá, C J; Collado-González, M; García-Bernal, D; Oñate-Sánchez, R E; Forner, L; Llena, C; Lozano, A; Castelo-Baz, P; Moraleda, J M; Rodríguez-Lozano, F J

    2017-09-11

    To evaluate the biological effects in vitro of MTA-Angelus (MTA-Ang; Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil), MTA Repair HP (MTA-HP; Angelus) and NeoMTA Plus (NeoMTA-P; Avalon Biomed Inc, Bradenton, FL, USA) on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Cell viability and cell migration assays were performed using eluates of each material. To evaluate cell morphology and cell attachment to the different materials, hDPSCs were directly seeded onto the material surfaces and analysed by immunocytofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The chemical composition of the materials was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), and eluates were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis was performed with the analysis of variance and Bonferroni or Tukey post-test (α MTA-Ang, MTA-HP and NeoMTA-P displayed a significant increase in cell viability greater than that obtained using complete medium alone (control) (*P MTA-Ang, MTA-HP and NeoMTA-P that were similar to levels obtained in the control group. In addition, stretched cytoskeletal F-actin fibres were detected in the cells treated with the three material extracts. SEM studies revealed a high degree of cell proliferation and attachment on all three materials. EDX analysis demonstrated similar weight percentages of C, O and Ca in all three materials, whilst other elements such as Al, Si and S were also found. MTA-Ang, MTA-HP and NeoMTA-P were associated with biological effects on hDPSCs in terms of cell proliferation, morphology, migration and attachment. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cements and adhesives for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A; Pegoraro, Thiago A; Dias, Renata A; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2011-04-01

    Dental cements are designed to retain restorations, prefabricated or cast posts and cores, and appliances in a stable, and long-lasting position in the oral environment. Resin-based cements were developed to overcome drawbacks of nonresinous materials, including low strength, high solubility, and opacity. Successful cementation of esthetic restorations depends on appropriate treatment to the tooth substrate and intaglio surface of the restoration, which in turn, depends on the ceramic characteristics. A reliable resin cementation procedure can only be achieved if the operator is aware of the mechanisms involved to perform the cementation and material properties. This article addresses current knowledge of resin cementation concepts, exploring the bonding mechanisms that influence long-term clinical success of all-ceramic systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  12. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  13. Evaluation of adhesive and compressive strength of glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramashanker; Singh, Raghuwar D; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Km; Tripathi, Shuchi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess, compare and evaluate the adhesive strength and compressive strength of different brands of glass ionomer cements to a ceramometal alloy. (A) Glass ionomer cements: GC Fuji II (GC Corporation, Tokyo), Chem Flex (Dentsply DeTrey, Germany), Glass ionomer FX (Shofu-11, Japan), MR dental (MR dental suppliers Pvt Ltd, England). (B) Ceramometal alloy (Ni-Cr: Wiron 99; Bego, Bremen, Germany). (C) Cold cure acrylic resin. (E) Temperature cum humidity control chamber. (F) Instron Universal Testing Machine. Four different types of Glass ionomer cements were used in the study. From each type of the Glass ionomer cements, 15 specimens for each were made to evaluate the compressive strength and adhesive strength, respectively. The 15 specimens were further divided into three subgroups of five specimens. For compressive strength, specimens were tested at 2, 4 and 12 h by using Instron Universal Testing Machine. To evaluate the adhesive strength, specimens were surface treated with diamond bur, silicone carbide bur and sandblasting and tested under Instron Universal Testing Machine. It was concluded from the study that the compressive strength as well as the adhesive bond strength of MR dental glass ionomer cement with a ceramometal alloy was found to be maximum compare to other glass ionomer cements. Sandblasting surface treatment of ceramometal alloy was found to be comparatively more effective for adhesive bond strength between alloy and glass ionomer cement.

  14. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  15. Xenopus BTBD6 and its Drosophila homologue lute are required for neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Frédéric J; Moers, Virginie; Yan, Jiekun; Souopgui, Jacob; Quan, Xiao-Jiang; De Geest, Natalie; Kricha, Sadia; Hassan, Bassem A; Bellefroid, Eric J

    2008-11-01

    BBP proteins constitute a subclass of CUL3 interacting BTB proteins whose in vivo function remains unknown. Here, we show that the Xenopus BBP gene BTBD6 and the single Drosophila homologue of mammalian BBP genes lute are strongly expressed in the developing nervous system. In Xenopus, BTBD6 expression responds positively to proneural and negatively to neurogenic gene overexpression. Knockdown of BTBD6 in Xenopus or loss of Drosophila lute result in embryos with strong defects in late neuronal markers and strongly reduced and disorganized axons while early neural development is unaffected. XBTBD6 knockdown in Xenopus also affects muscle development. Together, these data indicate that BTBD6/lute is required for proper embryogenesis and plays an essential evolutionary conserved role during neuronal development.

  16. Cementing all-ceramic restorations: recommendations for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Marcos A; Bergeron, Cathia; Diaz-Arnold, Ana

    2011-04-01

    Several all-ceramic restorative systems of various compositions, properties and indications are available to the dental practitioner. Because of the large number of systems, the dental team faces questions and decisions when choosing the appropriate system and the appropriate means of cementation. The authors present a brief overview of the cementation options for various types of all-ceramic restorations. In this article, they discuss the cementation of current all-ceramic restorations and make clinical recommendations tailored to each type of ceramic. The clinician must have a good understanding of the ceramic type to determine whether a restoration should be cemented adhesively or nonadhesively. Other variables, such as isolation and preparation design, also influence the cementation choice. Various ceramic types demand different surface treatments before cementation. Choosing and applying the appropriate surface treatment and cementation procedure will contribute to long-lasting restorations. The literature is lacking in clinical trial results that validate current in vitro data regarding cementation of all-ceramic restorations.

  17. Uso da luteína em dietas para cães

    OpenAIRE

    Alarça, Lais Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Resumo: Carotenóides são pigmentos naturais que proporcionam efeitos benéficos específicos ao organismo, como melhora da resposta imune e saúde intestinal. Dentre estes, a luteína vem chamando atenção pelos seus efeitos imunomoduladores, atuando principalmente sobre os linfócitos T do sangue. Em cães, pesquisas comprovaram que estes animais podem absorver a luteína da dieta. Devido à alta relação entre a nutrição e a imunidade, foi conduzido um experimento objetivando avaliar a digestibilidad...

  18. Characterization of dental cement obtained from a glass prepared by the polymeric precursor method; Caracterizacao de cimento odontologico obtido a partir de um vidro preparado pelo metodo dos precursores polimericos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Marcio Jose; Zaghete, Maria Aparecida; Gimenes, Rossano; Paiva-Santos, Carlos de Oliveira [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: marciobert@yahoo.com.br; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia

    2005-09-15

    Glass ionomer cements are glass and polymer composite materials. These materials currently find use in dentistry. The purpose of this work is to obtain glass powders based on the composition 4.5SiO{sub 2} - 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 2CaO to be used in dentistry. The powders were prepared by a chemical route at 700 deg C. The properties of glass ionomer cements obtained from powders prepared at 700 deg C were studied. Diametral tensile strength and microhardness were evaluated for the experimental glass ionomer cements and a commercial material. It was concluded that the properties of experimental cements were similar to those of the commercial ones. (author)

  19. Glass-ionomer Cements in Restorative Dentistry: A Critical Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhaiza, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Glass-ionomer cements (GICs) are mainstream restorative materials that are bioactive and have a wide range of uses, such as lining, bonding, sealing, luting or restoring a tooth. Although the major characteristics of GICs for the wider applications in dentistry are adhesion to tooth structure, fluoride releasing capacity and tooth-colored restorations, the sensitivity to moisture, inherent opacity, long-term wear and strength are not as adequate as desired. They have undergone remarkable changes in their composition, such as the addition of metallic ions or resin components to their composition, which contributed to improve their physical properties and diversified their use as a restorative material of great clinical applicability. The light-cured polymer reinforced materials appear to have substantial benefits, while retaining the advantages of fluoride release and adhesion. Further research should be directed towards improving the properties, such as strength and esthetics without altering its inherent qualities, such as adhesion and fluoride releasing capabilities.

  20. Self-adhesive resin cements - chemistry, properties and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Stansbury, J W; Burke, F J T

    2011-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements were introduced to dentistry within the past decade but have gained rapidly in popularity with more than a dozen commercial brands now available. This review article explores their chemical composition and its effect on the setting reaction and adhesion to various substrates, their physical and biological properties that may help to predict their ultimate performance and their clinical performance to date and handling characteristics. The result of this review of self-adhesive resin cements would suggest that these materials may be expected to show similar clinical performance as other resin-based and non-resin based dental cements. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Lute Bos draagt nog altijd bij aan de virologie’ : fonds laat ecologische virologie herrijzen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, van der R.A.A.; Branderhorst, A.

    2014-01-01

    Met ecologische kennis van plantenvirussen in de tuin- en akkerbouw zijn opbrengstverliezen te voorkomen. René van der Vlugt gaat het onderzoek en onderwijs in dit vakgebied nieuw leven inblazen. Dat is mogelijk dankzij een legaat van de Wageningse plantenviroloog Lute Bos.

  2. Sandblasting and tin-plating-surface treatments to improve bonding with resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, A D

    1993-05-01

    The superior cementation strengths of the adhesive resin cements can now be used in the dental surgery for posts, crowns and bridges and for intra-oral repairs to fractured porcelain fused to metal crowns or bridges, thanks to the availability of miniature sandblasters and portable tin-platers. The author describes the techniques involved.

  3. Influencia del tiempo de tratamiento de superficie con ácido fluorhídrico de la porcelana VITA VM 13 en la resistencia de unión a cemento de resina frente a fuerzas de tracción: Estudio in vitro Influence of surface treatment time with hydrofluoric acid of VITA VM13 porcelain on tensile bond strength to a luting resin cement: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JP Guzmán Thoms

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Los procedimientos restauradores indirectos son comunes en la clínica diaria actual. Se debe tener cuidado especial en la cementación, pues la gran mayoría de los fracasos ocurren en la interfase diente/restauración. Por esto es indispensable un adecuado tratamiento de superficie de la restauración para lograr una adhesión óptima a la superficie dentaria. Materiales y Métodos: Treinta cilindros de porcelana VITA VM 13 con dimensiones de 5 mm de altura y 7 mm de diámetro fueron separadas aleatoriamente en 3 grupos (n=10 de acuerdo con los tratamientos recibidos. Grupo I (control - sin acondicionamiento superficial; Grupo II - grabado con ácido fluorhídrico al 9.6% por 1 minuto; Grupo III - grabado con ácido fluorhídrico al 9.6% por 2 minutos. Estas fueron probadas en cuanto a su resistencia de unión a la tracción en una máquina universal para pruebas (INSTRON modelo 4411, 3M. Los valores, expresados en MPa, fueron analizados estadísticamente a un nivel de significación del 5%, usando el Análisis de la Varianza (ANOVA de un factor. Resultados: En relación con la prueba de resistencia de unión a la tracción, se encontraron los siguientes valores medios para cada grupo: Grupo I (control - x=3.35 MPa; Grupo II - x=4.64 MPa; Grupo III - x=3.80 MPa. Conclusiones: Según los resultados obtenidos, se puede concluir que el tratamiento de superficie con ácido fluorhídrico durante 1 minuto, promueve microrretenciones que aumentan significativamente los valores de resistencia a la tracción, que puede traducirse en un beneficio clínico mayor.Aim: Indirect restorative procedures are common in the current daily practice. Special care must be taken in the cement, as the vast majority of failures occurs at the interface tooth /restoration. Therefore a proper surface treatment of the restoration is essential to achieve optimum adhesion to the tooth surface. Materials and Methods: Thirty porcelain cylinders VITA VM 13 with

  4. Dental Implant Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  5. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite. PMID:26855700

  6. [Attaching single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreulen, C.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A single- or multi-unit fixed dental prosthesis can be attached to the abutment teeth through mechanical retention and gap sealing or by adhesion. For sealing the gap, water-soluble cements are appropriate, such as zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, and (resin-modified) glasionomer cement. Attachment

  7. [Attaching single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreulen, C.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A single- or multi-unit fixed dental prosthesis can be attached to the abutment teeth through mechanical retention and gap sealing or by adhesion. For sealing the gap, water-soluble cements are appropriate, such as zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, and (resin-modified) glasionomer cement. Attachment

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  9. Radiopacity of portland cement associated with different radiopacifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antonio; de Oliveira El Kadre, Guâniara D'arc; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Guerreiro Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru Filho, Mário; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of Portland cement associated with the following radiopacifying agents: bismuth oxide, zinc oxide, lead oxide, bismuth subnitrate, bismuth carbonate, barium sulfate, iodoform, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide. A ratio of 20% radiopacifier and 80% white Portland cement by weight was used for analysis. Pure Portland cement and dentin served as controls. Cement/radiopacifier and dentin disc-shaped specimens were fabricated, and radiopacity testing was performed according to the ISO 6876/2001 standard for dental root sealing materials. Using Insight occlusal films, the specimens were radiographed near to a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 2 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized and radiopacity compared with the aluminum stepwedge using Digora software (Orion Corporation Soredex, Helsinki, Finland). The radiographic density data were converted into mmAl and analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test (alpha = 0.05). The radiopacity of pure Portland cement was significantly lower (p oxide and Portland cement/lead oxide presented the highest radiopacity values and differed significantly from the other materials (p oxide presented the lowest radiopacity values of all mixtures (p < 0.05). All tested substances presented higher radiopacity than that of dentin and may potentially be added to the Portland cement as radiopacifying agents. However, the possible interference of the radiopacifiers with the setting chemistry, biocompatibility, and physical properties of the Portland cement should be further investigated before any clinical recommendation can be done.

  10. Micro-shear bond strength of resin cement to dentin after application of desensitizing toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Goktas, Baris; Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of three desensitizing toothpastes on bonding of resin cements to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of 72 maxillary third molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and then divided into three groups according to three desensitizing toothpastes used: Sensodyne Rapid Relief (GlaxoSmithKline, SmithKline Beecham Ltd., Slough, UK), Signal Sensitive Expert (Unilever Sanayi ve Ticaret Türk A.Ş., Ümraniye, İstanbul, Turkey) and Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (Colgate Palmolive, New York, NY). Following bonding of the resin cement (Clearfil™ SA Cement, Kuraray Co, Osaka, Japan) to dentin, the specimens were light cured for 40 s with a LED (Elipar S10, 3M Espe, St. Paul, MN). The strength measurements were accomplished with a micro-shear testing machine (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL) at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). ANOVA revealed that the application of desensitizing toothpastes had significant effects on bond strength of the resin cement tested to dentin (p < 0.05). Mixed failures were observed in all of the groups. The use of a desensitizing toothpaste before cementation might alter the bond strength of adhesively luted restorations.

  11. The influence of cervical finish line, internal relief, and cement type on the cervical adaptation of metal crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Buso, Leonardo; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the cervical adaptation of metal crowns under several conditions, namely (1) variations in the cervical finish line of the preparation, (2) application of internal relief inside the crowns, and (3) cementation using different luting materials. One hundred eighty stainless-steel master dies were prepared simulating full crown preparations: 60 in chamfer (CH), 60 in 135-degree shoulder (OB), and 60 in rounded shoulder (OR). The finish lines were machined at approximate dimensions of a molar tooth preparation (height: 5.5 mm; cervical diameter: 8 mm; occlusal diameter: 6.4 mm; taper degree: 6; and cervical finish line width: 0.8 mm). One hundred eighty corresponding copings with the same finish lines were fabricated. A 30-Microm internal relief was machined 0.5 mm above the cervical finish line in 90 of these copings. The fit of the die and the coping was measured from all specimens (L0) prior to cementation using an optical microscope. After manipulation of the 3 types of cements (zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer, and resin cement), the coping was luted on the corresponding standard master die under 5-kgf loading for 4 minutes. Vertical discrepancy was again measured (L1), and the difference between L1 and L0 indicated the cervical adaptation. Significant influence of the finish line, cement type, and internal relief was observed on the cervical adaptation (P finish line resulted in the best cervical adaptation of the metal crowns regardless of the cement type either with or without internal relief (36.6 +/- 3 to 100.8 +/- 4 Microm) (3-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test, a = .05). The use of glass-ionomer cement resulted in the least cervical discrepancy (36.6 +/- 3 to 115 +/- 4 Microm) than those of other cements (45.2 +/- 4 to 130.3 +/- 2 Microm) in all conditions. The best cervical adaptation was achieved with the chamfer type of finish line. The internal relief improved the marginal adaptation significantly, and

  12. Fast Algorithm for In situ transcription of musical signals : Case of lute music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lhoussine Bahatti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate transcription method of a musical signal. It consists of extracting the musical information from the temporal evolution of the generated signal by the instrument. Each note (primary will mainly be represented by a finite set of basic attributes (pitch, partial, energy, duration,. To do so, we begin by extracting each note by selecting the beginning of its appearance (onset detection, then proceeding by segmenting the signal, in order to delimit each note, which is to be identified later by determining its remaining features. The proposed method is an extension of the well known spectral based method. It is specially designed for oriental music which is characterized by its richness in tone that can be extended to tone. It aims to detect and isolate notes from a real audio signal recorded from an Oriental lute in an ordinary environment, then exploits the constraints of the lutes sound to improve the performance of the proposed transcriber. This method also includes, preprocessing and post processing based mainly on the surrounding noise, and echo. Subsequently, we present an interpretation of the results and rigorous assessment of the method through modeling the lute string motion.

  13. 不同粘接剂及表面处理对氧化锆的粘接强度的影响%Effects of luting cement and surface conditioning on bond strength of luting cements to zirconia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘振海; 徐小川; 高卫民; 张振庭

    2016-01-01

    目的:评价不同粘接剂及表面处理方法对氧化锆陶瓷与粘接剂的粘接强度的影响.方法:将较大氧化锆瓷片和较小氧化锆瓷片派对,随机分成12组,每组10对.粘接剂选用Ketac Cem Easymix、Rely X luting、Bifix QM和Panavia F,对氧化锆的表面分别喷砂、硅烷化或喷砂联合硅烷化处理,并进行剪切粘接强度测试.结果:在使用Ketac Cem Easymix和Rely X luting时,喷砂提高了粘接强度(P<0.01).在使用Bifix QM和Panavia F时,喷砂、硅烷化或喷砂联合硅烷化处理提高了粘接强度(P<0.01).表面处理相同时,Panavia F与氧化锆的粘接强度高于其它粘接剂(P<0.01).结论:使用Panavia F联合喷砂加硅烷化处理的粘接强度最高.

  14. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Domb, Ivor

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  15. Cytotoxicity evaluation of a new fast set highly viscous conventional glass ionomer cement with L929 fibroblast cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Mohamed Aly Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions : This new fast set highly viscous conventional GIC showed low cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblast cells, and it can be suggested as a substitute for dental cements exhibiting a long setting time.

  16. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  17. The Influence of Implant Abutment Surface Roughness and the Type of Cement on Retention of Implant Supported Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. Sushender; Reddy, C. Rajaneesh; Pithani, Padmaja; R, Santosh Kumar; Kulkarni, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide relative data on the retentive characters of the commonly used cements on different implant abutment surfaces. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 implant abutments were divided into 2 groups. Ten implants were unaltered and ten were air borne particle abraded with 50μ aluminium oxide. Three luting agents (Tempbond, IRM and ImProv) were used to secure the crowns to abutments. All the crowns were removed from the abutment with an Instron machine at 0.5mm per minute and tensile bond strengths were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Anova, Paired t-test and Post-Hoc tests. Results: IRM showed the highest mean tensile strength among the three cements when used with treated and untreated implant abutment surfaces. Change in the abutment surface roughness had no effect on the mean tensile bond strength of TempBond and IRM cements, whereas ImProv cement showed reduced tensile strength with sandblasted surface. Conclusion: When increased retention is required IRM cement with either sandblasted or milled surface could be used and when retrievability is required cements of choice could be either TempBond or ImProv. PMID:25954694

  18. Influence of ceramic thickness on mechanical properties and polymer structure of dual-cured resin luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Yoshida, Keiichi; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the influence of ceramic thickness on the mechanical properties and polymer structure (degree conversion and cross-linking density) of three dual-cured resin luting agents. Three dual-cured resin luting agents [Linkmax HV (GC), Nexus 2 (Kerr), and Variolink IIHV (Ivoclar-Vivadent)] were polymerized with or without 800 mW/cm2 irradiation through 0-3-mm-thick GN-I (GC) machinable ceramic. Bar-shape specimens were subjected to three-point bending to determine flexural strength (FS) and elastic modulus (EM) after dry storage at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Knoop hardness was measured on the irradiated surface of disk-shaped specimens before (KHN1) and after (KHN2) storage of 100% ethanol solution at 37 degrees C for 24 h. KHN1 and KHN2 were estimated as indirect indicators of degree of conversion (DC) and cross-linking density, respectively. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test for each luting agent, and four mechanical properties were subjected to regression analysis. For three resin luting agents with dual-cured mode, FS, EM, KHN1, and KHN2 decreased with the increase of ceramic thickness. FS except for Nexus 2 and EM for three resin luting agents had a positive linear relationship with both KHN1 and KHN2. The variables tested behaved differently. When the ceramic thickness increased, the chemical cured components of dual-cured resin luting agents did not produce significant compensation for all variables. Mechanical properties and polymer structure of dual-cured resin luting agents was dependent on the intensity of light irradiation.

  19. [A new hydroxyapatite cement for craniofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistner, H; Reuther, J; Reinhart, E; Kübler, N; Priessnitz, B

    1998-05-01

    A new stoechiometric mixture of 27% dicalcium-phosphate (DCPA) and 73% tetra-calcium-phosphate (TTCP) can be prepared with water intraoperatively to a paste that subsequently sets to a structurally stabile implant composed of hydroxyapatite (HA). Primary setting time is about 20 min; pH during setting ranges from 6.5 to 8.5. There is no relevant curing heat or expansion or contraction. Compressive strength is about 50 MPa, tensile strength about 8 MPa. Over a period of about 4 h in physiological milieu, the cement converts to hydroxyapatite. This product is no longer redissolvable in normal body fluid. This cement can be used for non-load-bearing applications especially in craniofacial bone surgery. Cranial defects due to tumour or trauma as well as deficits in the facial skeleton may be reconstructed using this new biomaterial. In nine of ten patients we used the hydroxyapatite cement successfully for reconstructions in the craniofacial area. Fluid control of the operation field and implant site is extremely important and sometimes difficult to achieve. Further applications could be all non-load-bearing augmentations such as filling of blocked paranasal sinuses, of dentoalveolar cysts and defects following dental apectomy or fixation of implanted hearing-aid electrodes. The perspectives for the hydroxyapatite cement include its application as a carrier for osteogenic protein preparations, especially because of its isothermic reaction and intrinsic osteoconductive characteristics.

  20. [New hydroxylapatite cement for craniofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistner, H; Reuther, J; Reinhart, E; Kübler, N; Priessnitz, B

    1998-05-01

    A new stoechiometric mixture of 27% dicalcium-phosphate (DCPA) and 73% tetra-calcium-phosphate (TTCP) can be prepared with water intraoperatively to a paste that subsequently sets to a structurally stabile implant composed of hydroxyapatite (HA). Primary setting time is about 20 min; pH during setting ranges from 6.5 to 8.5. There is no relevant curing heat or expansion or contraction. Compressive strength is about 50 MPa, tensile strength about 8 MPa. Over a period of about 4 h in physiological milieu, the cement converts to hydroxyapatite. This product is no longer redissolvable in normal body fluid. This cement can be used for non-load-bearing applications especially in craniofacial bone surgery. Cranial defects due to tumour or trauma as well as deficits in the facial skeleton may be reconstructed using this new biomaterial. In nine of ten patients we used the hydroxyapatite cement successfully for reconstructions in the craniofacial area. Fluid control of the operation field and implant site is extremely important and sometimes difficult to achieve. Further applications could be all non-load-bearing augmentations such as filling of blocked paranasal sinuses, of dentoalveolar cysts and defects following dental apectomy or fixation of implanted hearing-aid electrodes. The perspectives for the hydroxyapatite cement include its application as a carrier for osteogenic protein preparations, especially because of its isothermic reaction and intrinsic osteoconductive characteristics.

  1. Dental ceramics: a current review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2014-03-01

    Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed.

  2. The effect of retentive groove, sandblasting and cement type on the retentive strength of stainless steel crowns in primary second molars - An in vitro comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Veerabadhran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This in vitro study was conducted to find out the effect of retentive groove, sand blasting and cement type on the retentive strength of stainless steel crowns in primary second molars. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two extracted intact human maxillary and mandibular primary second molars were embedded in aluminum blocks utilizing autopolymerising acrylic resin. After tooth preparation, the 3M stainless steel crown was adjusted to the prepared tooth. Then weldable buccal tubes were welded on the buccal and lingual surfaces of each crown as an attachment for the testing machine. A full factorial design matrix for four factors (retentive groove placement on the tooth, cement type, sandblasting and primary second molar at two levels each was developed and the study was conducted as dictated by the matrix. The lower and upper limits for each factor were without and with retentive groove placement on the tooth, GIC and RMGIC, without and with sandblasting of crown, maxillary and mandibular second primary molar. For those teeth for which the design matrix dictated groove placement, the retentive groove was placed on the middle third of the buccal surface of the tooth horizontally and for those crowns for which sandblasting of the crowns are to be done, sandblasting was done with aluminium oxide with a particle size of 250 mm. The crowns were luted with either GIC or RMGIC, as dictated by the design matrix. Then the retentive strength of each sample was evaluated by means of an universal testing machine. The obtained data was analyzed using ANOVA for statistical analysis of the data and ′t′- tests for pairwise comparison. Results: The mean retentive strength in kg/cm 2 stainless steel crowns luted with RMGIC was 19.361 and the mean retentive strength of stainless steel crowns luted with GIC was 15.964 kg/cm 2 with a mean difference of 3.397 kg/cm 2 and was statistically significant. The mean retentive strength in kg/cm 2 of stainless steel

  3. Doxycycline sustained release from brushite cements for the treatment of periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesús; Bettini, Ruggero; Ruggera, Francesca; Rueda, Carmen; López-Ponce, Manuel; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique

    2008-06-01

    Doxycycline (DOXY) is a wide spectrum antibiotic used in the treatment of dental, periodontal, and bone infections. Brushite cements are calcium phosphate biomaterials especially interesting for bone regeneration processes. In this work, we describe the preparation of a brushite cement containing DOXY and the drug release from the cement. DOXY solutions were mixed with the cement powder and after a 50% burst release in the first 12 h, a slow and controlled release was achieved over 3.5 days. The release of DOXY hyclate was controlled by both, diffusion and Ca(2+) interaction. Formation of DOXY-Ca(2+) chelates was detected in the cement structure using solid state fluorescence. The brushite cement loaded with DOXY hyclate had antibacterial activity against periodontal pathogens: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Bacteroides frosthytus. This new biomaterial may be helpful for the treatment of periodontal diseases. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  5. Evaluation of fit of cement-retained implant-supported 3-unit structures fabricated with direct metal laser sintering and vacuum casting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José Francisco; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Suárez-García, María Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the vertical discrepancy of implant-fixed 3-unit structures. Frameworks were constructed with laser-sintered Co-Cr, and vacuum-cast Co-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, and Pd-Au. Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion using resin-modified glass-ionomer, self-adhesive, and acrylic/urethane-based cements (n = 12 each). Discrepancies were SEM analyzed. Three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P Laser-sintered structures achieved the best fit per cement tested. Within each alloy group, resin-modified glass-ionomer and acrylic/urethane-based cements produced comparably lower discrepancies than the self-adhesive agent. The abutment position did not yield significant differences. All misfit values could be considered clinically acceptable.

  6. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05).

  7. Radiopacity of Dental Materials: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekkan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature on the radiopacity of dental materials in order to emphasize its importance. Evidence Acquisition English-language literature was investigated using manual and electronic searches for the terms “radiopacity,” “dental material,” “cement,” “composite,” “ceramic,” “endodontic root canal sealer,” “bone graft,” and “acrylic resin” in the databases of Medline, google scholar, and Scopus up to April 2016. Seventy-nine selected publications, including review articles, original articles, and books, were evaluated. Results The radiopacity of different dental materials may be lower or higher than that of the replaced tissue depending on the restorative material used. The research revealed that highly-radiopaque materials should not be used in dental restorations, except as bone graft and endodontic root canal filling materials. For most of the dental restorative materials, moderate radiopacity within the range of the replaced dental tissue is recommended. However, the lower radiopacity of polymer-based restorative or prosthetic dental materials is still a significant clinical problem. Conclusions The author recommends using highly-radiopaque materials whenever possible for treatment of bone defects and root canals. For dental materials that replace clinical crowns, the radiopacity should be within the range of that of the replaced tooth structure (dentin or enamel. The radiopacity of dental cements should be much higher than that of the enamel in order to facilitate detection of the thin cement remnants.

  8. Digital data acquisition for a CAD/CAM-fabricated titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations for an implant-supported fixed complete dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Metz, Michael J; Pollini, Adrien; Ntounis, Athanasios; Morton, Dean

    2014-12-01

    This dental technique report describes a digital workflow with digital data acquisition at the implant level, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabricated, tissue-colored, anodized titanium framework, individually luted zirconium oxide restorations, and autopolymerizing injection-molded acrylic resin to fabricate an implant-supported, metal-ceramic-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis in an edentulous mandible. The 1-step computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabrication of titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations can provide a cost-effective alternative to the conventional metal-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis.

  9. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Pestana Passos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured, light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED, and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling. All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h and sectioned (n = 10: G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. The bond strength values (MPa were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH. There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  10. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  11. Mechanical and fracture behavior of calcium phosphate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, Victoria Chou

    Apatite-based calcium phosphate cements are currently employed to a limited extent in the biomedical and dental fields. They present significant potential for a much broader range of applications, particularly as a bone mineral substitute for fracture fixation. Specifically, hydroxyapatite (HA) is known for its biocompatibility and non-immunogenicity, attributed to its similarity to the mineral phase of natural bone. The advantages of a cement-based HA include injectability, greater resorbability and osteoconductivity compared to sintered HA, and an isothermal cement-forming reaction that avoids necrosis during cement setting. Although apatite cements demonstrate good compressive strength, tensile properties are very weak compared to natural bone. Applications involving normal weight-bearing require better structural integrity than apatite cements currently provide. A more thorough understanding of fracture behavior can elucidate failure mechanisms and is essential for the design of targeted strengthening methods. This study investigated a hydroxyapatite cement using a fracture mechanics approach, focusing on subcritical crack growth properties. Subcritical crack growth can lead to much lower load-bearing ability than critical strength values predict. Experiments show that HA cement is susceptible to crack growth under both cyclic fatigue-crack growth and stress corrosion cracking conditions, but only environmental, not mechanical, mechanisms contribute to crack extension. This appears to be the first evidence ever presented of stress corrosion crack growth behavior in calcium phosphate cements. Stress corrosion cracking was examined for a range of environmental conditions. Variations in pH have surprisingly little effect. Behavior in water at elevated temperature (50°C) is altered compared to water at ambient temperature (22°C), but only for crack-growth velocities below 10-7 m/s. However, fracture resistance of dried HA cement in air increases significantly

  12. Cement and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  13. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Roots Restored with Fiber Posts Using Different Resin Cements- An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irodi, Sujatha; Mehta, Deepak; Subramanya, Shankar; Govindaraju, Vinay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The influence of the remaining coronal tooth structure along with intra-radicular esthetic posts increases fracture resistance of fractured teeth especially in the anterior region. The advent of resin based luting cements improves the adhesion of fiber posts. Aim To evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots restored with fiber posts using different resin cements – Calibra (etch and rinse), PermaFlo® DC (self-etch primer) and SmartCem2 (self-adhesive). Materials and Methods Extracted human maxillary central incisors having similar dimensions were decoronated at the Cemento-Enamel Junction (CEJ) to create 16mm long specimens and endodontically treated. A total of 45 teeth were divided into three groups with 15 teeth each for cementation of easy fiber posts (size1, 0.8mm diameter). Post spaces were prepared to a depth of 10mm. Group 1 – Caulk 34% phosphoric acid gel, dual cure adhesive Prime and Bond NT followed by luting of post with Calibra cement. Group 2 – Ultra – etch then Primer A and Primer B, and PermaFlo® DC was used to cement the post. Group 3 – SmartCem2 [1:1 ratio] was used to cement the post. The excess lengths of posts were seared and teeth were mounted on acrylic blocks and loaded under compressive force to the long axis of the tooth which increased in periodic pattern of 1mm/min. The value of the force at which each root section gets fractured was noted. The data were statistically analysed using ANOVA and Tukey’s Test. Results The mean fracture load (and SD) were as follows Group 1 – 762.400 (251.490); Group 2 – 662.933 (206.709); Group 3 – 657.800 (57.372). No statistically significant differences were seen among all three Groups, p-value (0.228). Conclusion Posts cemented using self -adhesive resin cement SmartCem2 have highest fracture resistance and bonding efficacy of self-adhesive technique showed reliably better results but was comparable to total–etch and self–etch techniques.

  14. POZZOLAN AND CEMENTS WITH POZZOLAN

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan KAPLAN; Hanifi BİNİCİ

    1995-01-01

    Cement, one of the basic material of construction engineering, has an important place in view of strength and cost of structures. Cement consumption is increasing parallel to development of building construction sector. For cement producers, minimal cost is desired by using new and economical material sources. On the other hand, the controllers and contractors need cheaper, safer and higher strength materials. From this respect cement industry tends to use cement with pozzolan. In Türkiye, ce...

  15. Avaliação in vitro da atividade antibacteriana de um cimento odontológico à base de óleo-resina de Copaifera multijuga Hayne In vitro assessment of antibacterial activity of a dental cement constituted of a Copaifera multijuga Hayne oil-resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Regina Felizardo Vasconcelos

    2008-12-01

    hydroxide and on the anti-septic action of zinc oxide, it was proposed to formulate a dental cement obtained through the association of ZnO, Ca(OH2 and Copaifera multijuga Hayne oil-resin and assess its antibacterial activity through the test of dilution in aqueous medium against the standard of Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175 and S. sanguinis (ATCC 15300. In this assay, the following experimental groups were utilized: the cement containing ZnO, Ca(OH2 and copaiba oil-resin (G1 and each one of the constituents individually, ZnO (G2, Ca(OH2 (G3 and copaiba oil-resin (G4. All the analyzed groups showed antibacterial activity, G4 showed the best results and G1 showed itself to be a promising cement for application in dentristy.

  16. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC ...

  17. Comparison of Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Ariadent and Harvard Polycarboxylate Cement and Vitremer Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadian Khoshemehr Leila

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luting agents are used to attach indirect restoration into or on the tooth. Poor mechanical properties of cement may be a cause of fracture of this layer and lead to caries and restoration removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic modulus and compressive strength of Ariadent (A Poly and Harvard polycarboxylate (H Poly cements and Vitremer resin modified glass ionomer (RGl.Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 15 specimens were prepared form each experimental cement in Laboratory of Tehran Oil Refining Company. The cylindrical specimens were compressed in Instron machine after 24 hours. Elastic modulus and compressive strength were calculated from stress/strain curve of each specimen. One way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis and P values<0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: The mean elastic modulus and mean compressive strength were 2.2 GPa and 87.8MPa in H poly, 2.4 GPa and 56.5 MPa in A Poly, and 0.8GPa and 105.6 MPa in RGI, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that compressive strength and elastic modulus of both polycarboxylate cements were significantly different from hybrid ionomer (P<0.05, but the difference between elastic modulus of two types of polycarboxilate cements was not statistically significant. Compressive strength of two polycarboxilate cements were significantly different (P<0.05. Conclusion: An ideal lutting agent must have the best mechanical properties. Between the tested luttins RGl cement had the lowest elastic modulus and the highest compressive strength, but the A poly cement had the highest elastic modulus and the lowest compressive strength. Therefore none of them was the best.

  18. An in vitro study on the retentive strength of orthodontic bands cemented with CPP-ACP-containing GIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Bagheri, Hossein; Rangrazi, Abdolrasoul; Mojtaba Zebarjad, Seyed

    2016-12-01

    Caries and white spot lesions around orthodontic bands are well known occurrences in fixed orthodontic treatment. There are several methods to overcome these problems. One of these includes modification of the band cement with remineralizing agents such as casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP). However, it should be evaluated that the cement modification has no significant negative effects on the retentive strength of the cemented orthodontic bands. In a continuation of our previous studies on the effects of the addition of CPP-ACP on the mechanical properties of luting and lining glass ionomer cement (GIC), this study aimed to investigate the retentive strength of orthodontic bands cemented with CPP-ACP containing GIC. Sixty extracted human pre molars teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and randomly divided into two groups of 30 specimens. In group 1, bands were cemented to the tooth with a GIC. In group 2, CPP-ACP (1.56% w/w) was added to the GIC before cementation. The retentive strength of each groups was determined with a universal testing machine. Further, the amount of cement remaining on the tooth surface was evaluated under a stereomicroscope, and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) score was determined. Results of this study showed that there were no significant differences between the groups in retentive strength and ARI score. In conclusion, modification of GIC with 1.56% w/w CPP-ACP had no negative effects on the retentive strength of the bands so can be used during fixed orthodontic treatment.

  19. Benefits and drawbacks of zinc in glass ionomer bone cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G [Unit of Dental Physical Sciences, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Gentleman, Eileen; Stevens, Molly M [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Farrar, David F, E-mail: d.brauer@qmul.ac.uk [Smith and Nephew Research Centre, York Science Park, Heslington YO10 5DF (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements (GPCs) based on poly(acrylic acid) and fluoro-alumino-silicate glasses are successfully used in a variety of orthopaedic and dental applications; however, they release small amounts of aluminium, which is a neurotoxin and inhibits bone mineralization in vivo. Therefore there has been significant interest in developing aluminium-free glasses containing zinc for forming GPCs because zinc can play a similar structural role in the glass, allowing for glass degradation and subsequent cement setting, and is reported to have beneficial effects on bone formation. We created zinc-containing GPCs and characterized their mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Zinc-containing cements showed adhesion to bone close to 1 MPa, which was significantly greater than that of zinc-free cements (<0.05 MPa) and other currently approved biological adhesives. However, zinc-containing cements produced significantly lower metabolic activity in mouse osteoblasts exposed to cell culture medium conditioned with the cements than controls. Results show that although low levels of zinc may be beneficial to cells, zinc concentrations of 400 {mu}M Zn{sup 2+} or more resulted in cell death. In summary, we demonstrate that while zinc-containing GPCs possess excellent mechanical properties, they fail basic biocompatibility tests, produce an acute cytotoxic response in vitro, which may preclude their use in vivo.

  20. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María-Victoria; Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-02-01

    No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (pcomposite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite.

  1. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  2. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  3. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips ... offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants ...

  4. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Dental Assistants PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary What They ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Dental Assistants Do About this section Assistants prepare and ...

  5. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  6. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  7. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  8. Influence of fatigue testing and cementation mode on the load-bearing capability of bovine incisors restored with crowns and FRC posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Frank P; Schmitt, Thomas; Rupf, Stefan; Pospiech, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of fatigue and cementation mode on the fracture behaviour of endodontically treated bovine incisors restored with fiber-reinforced-composite (FRC) posts and crowns. Forty-eight endodontically treated incisors were restored with FRC posts, composite build-ups, and cast crowns. In 16 teeth, each of the posts were cemented conventionally with KetacCem (3M Espe) or adhesively with Panavia F (Kuraray) or RelyXUniCem (3M Espe). One-half of the specimens in each group were subjected to thermal cycling with 10,000 cycles at 5-55°C and mechanical aging, loading the specimens in 1,200,000 cycles with 50 N. Fracture resistance was determined by loading the specimens until fracture at an angle of 45°. The loading test showed that cementation mode and fatigue testing had an influence on the load bearing capability. Before fatigue testing no statistically significant differences between the different cementation modes could be detected. After fatigue testing, conventionally cemented FRC posts lead to statistically significant higher fracture loads compared to adhesively luted posts. Most specimens fractured in a favourable way, independent from the type of cementation.

  9. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Smita; Musani, Iqbal; Dugal, Ramandeep; Habbu, Nitin; Madanshetty, Pallavi; Virani, Danish

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the micro tensile bond strength of two metal bonding resin cements to sandblasted cobalt chromium alloy. Materials & Methods: Eight, Cobalt chromium alloy blocks of dimensions 10x5x5 mm were cast, finished and polished. One of the faces of each alloy block measuring 5x5mm was sandblasted with 50 μm grit alumina particles. The alloy blocks were then cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner for 1 min and then air dried with an air stream. The Sandblasted surfaces of the two alloy blocks were bonded together with 2 different metal bonding resin systems (Panavia F Kuraray and DTK Kleber – Bredent). The samples were divided into 2 groups (n=4). Group 1- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with Panavia cement. Group 2- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with DTK Kleber-Bredent cement. The bonded samples were cut with a diamond saw to prepare Microtensile bars of approximately 1mm x 1mm x 6mm. Thirty bars from each group were randomly separated into 2 subgroups (n=15) and left for 3hrs (baseline) as per manufacturer's instructions while the other group was aged for 24hrs in 370C water, prior to loading to failure under tension at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were determined by means of stereomicroscopy (sm). Statistical analysis was performed through one way – ANOVA. Results: Significant variation in micro-tensile bond strength was observed between the two metal bonding resin systems. Conclusion: DTK showed higher mean bond strength values than Panavia F cement both at baseline and after aging. How to cite this article: Musani S, Musani I, Dugal R, Habbu N, Madanshetty P, Virani D. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):73-8. PMID:24324308

  10. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien; Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0-10mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of radiant heat on the surface hardness of glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, M J

    1994-12-01

    The use of heat to improve mechanical properties of materials is a widely accepted phenomenon. It has been studied in dentistry with a view to improving the properties of resin composite. Dental cements may benefit by the application of heat, in particular with regard to their early surface properties. This study was carried out to examine the effect of the application of radiant heat to the surface hardness of one type of glass polyalkenoate cement. It was found that raising the temperature of the surface of the cement to a maximum of 60 degrees C significantly improved the early surface hardness of the material. The application of a high level of heat also improved the surface hardness of the cement after 24 h compared to cement which had not been heat treated. The use of heat would appear to accelerate the matrix-forming reaction of the material and although further work is necessary this technique may have clinical application.

  12. Quality improvement of photopolimerizable-cement root canal obturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupato Conrado, Luis A.; Frois, Iris M.; Amaro Zangaro, Renato; Munin, Egberto; Kuranaga, Carlos; Dias da Silva, Marcos; do Carmo de Andrade Nono, Maria; Cerquiera Rezende, Mirabel

    2003-06-01

    The sealing cements commonly used for endodontic applications are of the type cured through chemical reactions. During the polymerization process, mechanical contractions are not uncommon, leading to a non-perfect sealing. Photopolymerizable cements usually presents superior performance as compared to those chemically activated. However, difficulties in carrying the light to difficult-to-reach regions like the dental apex preclude those material of being accepted in the dental office routine. This work reports on a novel technique which allow the light curing of photopolymerizable cements in endodontic applications. A special light guide had been developed to allow the curing light to reach and polymerize the sealing cement in the apex region. The technique was tested by using single-root human teeth with normal canal morphology. The Ultradent EndoREZ root canal sealer and a resin-based photopolymerizable filler specially developed for the current application had been used. The cone-shaped light guide was introduced into treated canals filled with the photopolymerizable material, up to the apical region. Light from an argon laser was launched onto the light guide for polymerization. All test samples were immersed in methylene-blue solution for microleakage testing. All samples treated with the self-polymerizable material presented dye penetration to some extent. No sample within the group which had the filling material polymerized by using the light guide presented dye penetration through the canal wall.

  13. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  14. The effect of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of different resin cements to enamel and dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsü, Saadet Sağlam

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Cementation failures of restorations are frequently observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of initial and repeated bonding on the bond strengths of different resin cements to enamel and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety human maxillary central incisors were bisected longitudinally. The 180 tooth halves were divided into 2 groups (n = 90) for enamel and dentin bonding. The enamel and dentin groups were further divided into 3 groups (n = 30) for different resin cement types. Composite resin (Filtek Ultimate) cylinders (3 × 3 mm) were prepared and luted to enamel and dentin using Variolink II (Group V), RelyX ARC (Group R), or Panavia F 2.0 (Group P) resin cement. After 24 hours, initial shear bond strengths of the resin cements to enamel and dentin were measured. Using new cylinders, the specimens were de-bonded and re-bonded twice to measure the first and the second bond strengths to enamel and dentin. Failure modes and bonding interfaces were examined. Data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel were similar for all the groups. The first (15.3 ± 2.2 MPa) and second (10.4 ± 2.2 MPa) bond strengths to dentin were significantly higher in Group V (P<.0001). Second bond strengths of dentin groups were significantly lower than initial and first bond strengths to dentin (P<.0001). CONCLUSION All resin cements have similar initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel. Variolink II has the highest first and second bond strength to dentin. Bond strength to dentin decreases after the first re-bonding for all resin cements. PMID:28243393

  15. Micromorphology of resin/dentin interfaces using 4th and 5th generation dual-curing adhesive/cement systems: a confocal laser scanning microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrais, Cesar A G; Miyake, Katsuia; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Pashley, David H; Giannini, Marcelo

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated the differential composition of resin/dentin interfaces of indirect restorations created by the application of 4th and 5th generation dual-curing luting systems (bonding agents/resin cements), when each material was either light cured or allowed to self-cure. Occlusal flat dentin surfaces of 60 human third molars were assigned into 12 groups (n = 5) according to curing mode and dual-curing cementing system: 4th generation All Bond2 (AB2)/Duolink (Bisco) and 5th generation (B1) Bond1/Lute-it (Pentron). Fluorescein-labeled dextran (FDx) was mixed with the bonding agents, while rhodamine-labeled dextran (RhDx) was incorporated into resin cements and Pre-Bond resin from AB2. Resin cements were applied to 2-mm-thick, precured resin composite disks (Z250, 3M ESPE), which were fixed to dentin surfaces containing adhesive resin in either cured (light cured; LC) or uncured (self-cured; SC) states. The restored teeth were light activated (XL3000, 3M ESPE) according to the manufacturers' instructions (LRC) or allowed to self-cure (SRC), were stored for 24 h, and then vertically, serially sectioned into l-mm-thick slabs, which were analyzed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescent additives indicated where individual components of the bonding/cement systems were located. Additional specimens were prepared and analyzed using a conventional scanning electron microscope. AB2/LC and B1/LC exhibited nonuniform primer/adhesive layer thickness. AB2/SC showed adhesive resin penetration within the primed dentin, and resin cement penetration at the entrance of the dentin tubules. B1/SC/LRC demonstrated resin cement penetration within the hybrid layer and into the dentin tubules. More resin cement penetration was observed in B1/SC/SRC groups than in its LRC equivalent. The morphological features and component interactions among materials at resin/dentin interfaces are related to the activation modes of the primer/adhesive layer and of the resin cement

  16. Comparative study of the radiopacity of resin cements used in aesthetic dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterde-Hernández, Manuel; Cabanillas-Casabella, Cristina; Pallares-Sabater, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the radiopacity of 6 modern resin cements with that of human enamel and dentine using the Digora digital radiography system, to verify whether they meet the requirements of ANSI/ADA specification no. 27/1993 and the ISO 4049/2000 standard and assess whether their radiopacity is influenced by the thickness of the cement employed. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three 3-thickness samples (0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm) were fabricated for each material. The individual cement samples were radiographed on the CCD sensor next to the aluminium wedge and the tooth samples. Five radiographs were made of each sample and therefore five readings of radiographic density were taken for each thickness of the materials. The radiopacity was measured in pixels using Digora 2.6 software. The calibration curve obtained from the mean values of each step of the wedge made it possible to obtain the equivalent in mm of aluminium for each mm of the luting material. RESULTS With the exception of Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0, all the cements studied were more radiopaque than enamel and dentin (P<.05) and complied with the ISO and ANSI/ADA requirements (P<.001). The radiopacity of all the cements examined depended on their thickness: the thicker the material, the greater its radiopacity. CONCLUSION All materials except Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0 yielded radiopacity values that complied with the recommendations of the ISO and ANSI/ADA. Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0 showed less radiopacity than enamel and dentin. PMID:27350854

  17. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  18. 玻璃离子水门汀、光固化复合树脂、流动树脂修复牙体浅型楔状缺损的疗效性%Curative Effect of Glass Sonomer Cement, Light-Cured Composite Resin and Flowable Resin in the Dental Repair of Wedge-Shaped Defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文进

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare the clinical efficacy of glass sonomer cement, light-cured composite resin and flowable resin in the dental repair of wedge-shaped defect.Method:90 patients with wedge-shaped defect in our dental clinic were selected from January 2010 to May 2014 and they were randomly divided into three groups, 30 cases in each group. Group A was given glass sonomer cement, group B adopted light-cured composite resin and group C was given the flowable resin. After 1 year of follow-up visits, the success rate of dental repair, loss rate of materials, incidence rate of irritation symptom of dental pulp and incidence rate of secondary caries of three groups were compared.Result: In 1 year, group A had 6 cases with loss of materials,group B had 4 cases and group C had 1 case,the loss rate of materials of group A was significantly higher than that of group C, the difference was statistically significant(P0.05).The incidence rate of irritation symptom of dental pulp of three groups was respectively 10.0%,40.0% and 3.3%,compared group A and C, the difference was not statistically significant(P>0.05)The rate of Group B was significantly higher than that of Group A and Group B, the difference was statistically significant(P0.05).Compared 3 months and 1 weeks after repair, the periodontal index of group B and group C were significantly reduced, the differences were statistically significant (P0.05).Conclusion:The flowable resin is featured as great adhesion, less irritation, ability of filling in the tooth edge, reduction of permeability and fewer damages for periodontal tissues. It has a high success rate of dental repair. It can be promoted and applied in clinical treatment.%目的:对玻璃离子水门汀、光固化复合树脂、流动树脂三种材料修复牙体浅型楔状缺损的临床疗效进行对比,并做出评价。方法:选取2010年1月-2014年5月本院口腔科门诊收治的牙体浅型楔状缺损患者90例为研究对象,将患者

  19. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  20. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  1. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  2. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  3. Modulating Hippocampal Plasticity with In Vivo Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-17

    incision. A c-clamp was then placed on the skull. C&B Metabond Adhesive Luting Cement (Parkell) was then applied to bond the electrode to skull. Acrylic... dental cement (Sigma) was then applied to fill space between electrode and clamp to secure electrode in place. Incisions were then closed around

  4. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  5. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  6. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  7. The Microleakage of Polycarboxylate, Glass Ionomer and Zinc Phosphate Cements for Stainless Steel Crowns of Pulpotomized Primary Molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahkameh Mirkarimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microleakage in Stainless Steel Crowns (SSC margins leads to seepage of oral fluids and bacteria and it is one of the reasons for treatments failures. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of zinc phosphate, glass Ionomer and polycarboxylate cements on microleakage of stainless steel crowns for primary pulpotomized molar teeth. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted primary molar teeth were randomly divided in to three groups (n=20. Stainless steel crowns were fitted for each tooth after pulpotomy procedures. Crowns were luted with a zinc phosphate, glass ionomer or polycarboxylate cement. All specimens were stored in 100% humidity at 37o C for 1 hour and termocycled 500 times (5ºC to 55ºC with a 30 seconds dwell time and then immersed in 0.5% basic fuschin solution for 24 hours. The specimens were sectioned buccolingually and each section was evaluated for microleakage under a stereomicroscope.Results: In zinc phosphate group 45% of spicemens and in glass ionomer group there was 5% of spicemens showed leakage extending on to occlusal aspect and in polycarboxylate group none of the spicemens had this situation. According to the kruskal wallis test in all groups there were significant differences in microleakage (p< 0.001.Conclusion: The use of zinc phosphate cement resulted in the highest percentage of microleakage. The microleakage of SSCs cemented with polycarboxylate and glass ionomer were similar.

  8. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liu; Hong Liu; Yue-Tong Qian; Song Zhu; Su-Qian Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested:(i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts:DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (a50.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts.

  9. Chemistry of glass-ionomer cements: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, J W

    1998-03-01

    Studies of the setting of glass-ionomer cements have been carried out for over twenty years, and there is now a considerable body of information concerning the steps that lead to the conversion of a freshly mixed cement paste into a solid, durable dental restorative. This paper reviews these studies, paying particular attention to more recent work. The conclusion is that glass-ionomers consist of interpenetrating networks of inorganic and organic components forming a matrix in which particles of unreacted glass are embedded. However, there remain uncertainties over aspects of the setting chemistry, for example over the role of (+)-tartaric acid in the setting reaction, and over the nature of the fluoride species which form during the reaction. The chemistry of resin-modified glass-ionomers is also discussed and shown to be more complex than that of the simple cements. The presence of the resin component slows down the ionic cure reaction of the conventional cement, and leads to both a significant exotherm and a set material capable of absorbing water reversibly. The paper concludes that the microstructure of the set cement depends completely on chemical composition and the kinetics of the setting process, and that an understanding of the setting chemistry of these materials is thus important for optimal clinical use.

  10. Salivary contamination and post-cured resin/resin lute bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, A N; Pereira, B P

    1994-01-01

    A previous study has shown that sandblasting and silane priming a post-cured inlay resin gave a secure bond to dual-cure luting resin. To determine the influence of salivary contamination 4 additional groups of 15 post-cured resin discs were mounted in acrylic cylinders, their faces sandblasted with 50 microns alumina and silane primed. Surface treatments with saliva (sa), air/water spray (a/w), phosphoric acid gel (pa), and silane (si) followed in the order listed: A) control, no further treatment; B) sa, a/w; C) sa, a/w, si; D) sa, a/w, pa a/w; E) sa, a/w, pa, a/w, si. A 3.9 mm diameter column of dual-cure resin lute was then bonded to the dry stored in water surfaces. Specimens were stored in water for 2 weeks after which the dual-cure resin columns were sheared off the post-cured resin discs. Shear bond strengths were A) 19.2 +/- 3.7, B) 17.4 +/- 3.9, C) 16.7 +/- 3.1, D) 15.6 +/- 3.5, E) 15.4 +/- 2.3 MPa. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple Range Procedure showed groups D and E to be significantly lower than the uncontaminated control group A (p < 0.05). There were 2 adhesive failures in group B and all others were cohesive within the post-cured resin discs. This implies that air/water alone after salivary contamination is an unreliable cleansing method. The low shear bond values for Groups D and E may have been related to inadequate clearance of the phosphoric acid gel. It was concluded that salivary contamination adversely affected the quality of the bonds studied and decontamination using phosphoric acid gel resulted in significantly reduced shear bond strengths.

  11. Similar Marginal Precision of Zirconia- and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Maj Høygaard; Bahrami, Golnosh; Schropp, Lars

    Similar Marginal Precision of Zirconia- and Metal-Ceramic Posterior Fixed Dental Prostheses Objective: An increased gap between restoration and prepared tooth causes more luting material to be exposed to the oral environment resulting in increased deterioration, leading to bacterial accumulation...... which can cause marginal periodontitis and secondary caries. The purpose of this randomized clinical study was to compare the marginal precision of CAD/CAM Zirconia-ceramic (ZC) and cast gold alloy metal-ceramic (MC) posterior fixed dental prostheses. Methods: As part of an ongoing randomized controlled...... clinical trial, 34 patients were randomized into two groups to receive a 3-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) replacing a second premolar or a first molar. 17 ZC FDPs (BeCe CAD Zirkon, BEGO with Vita VM9, VITA ) and 17 MC FDPs (Bio PontoStar, BEGO with Vita VM13, VITA). All FDPs were made in accordance...

  12. Similar Marginal Precision of Zirconia- and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Maj Høygaard; Bahrami, Golnosh; Schropp, Lars

    clinical trial, 34 patients were randomized into two groups to receive a 3-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) replacing a second premolar or a first molar. 17 ZC FDPs (BeCe CAD Zirkon, BEGO with Vita VM9, VITA ) and 17 MC FDPs (Bio PontoStar, BEGO with Vita VM13, VITA). All FDPs were made in accordance......Similar Marginal Precision of Zirconia- and Metal-Ceramic Posterior Fixed Dental Prostheses Objective: An increased gap between restoration and prepared tooth causes more luting material to be exposed to the oral environment resulting in increased deterioration, leading to bacterial accumulation...... which can cause marginal periodontitis and secondary caries. The purpose of this randomized clinical study was to compare the marginal precision of CAD/CAM Zirconia-ceramic (ZC) and cast gold alloy metal-ceramic (MC) posterior fixed dental prostheses. Methods: As part of an ongoing randomized controlled...

  13. Osteotransductive bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Boltong, M G; Khairoun, I; Ginebra, M P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPBCs) are osteotransductive, i.e. after implantation in bone they are transformed into new bone tissue. Furthermore, due to the fact that they are mouldable, their osteointegration is immediate. Their chemistry has been established previously. Some CPBCs contain amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and set by a sol-gel transition. The others are crystalline and can give as the reaction product dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), carbonated apatite (CA) or hydroxyapatite (HA). Mixed-type gypsum-DCPD cements are also described. In vivo rates of osteotransduction vary as follows: gypsum-DCPD > DCPD > CDHA approximately CA > HA. The osteotransduction of CDHA-type cements may be increased by adding dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP) and/or CaCO3 to the cement powder. CPBCs can be used for healing of bone defects, bone augmentation and bone reconstruction. Incorporation of drugs like antibiotics and bone morphogenetic protein is envisaged. Load-bearing applications are allowed for CHDA-type, CA-type and HA-type CPBCs as they have a higher compressive strength than human trabecular bone (10 MPa).

  14. Microscopic analysis of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and pulp protection with mineral trioxide aggregate and white Portland cement Análise microscópica da polpa dental de cães após pulpotomia e proteção pulpar com agregado de trióxido mineral e cimento Portland branco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Menezes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering previous studies on the similarity between the chemical composition of the mineral trioxide aggregate and the Portland cement, the purpose of this study was to investigate the pulp response of dog's teeth after pulpotomy and direct pulp protection with MTA Angelus and white Portland cement. Thirty eight pulp remnants were protected with these materials. One hundred and twenty days after treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens removed and prepared for histological analysis. Both materials demonstrated the same results when used as pulp capping materials, inducing hard tissue bridge formation and maintaining pulp vitality in all specimens. The MTA Angelus and the white Portland cement showed to be effective as pulp protection materials following pulpotomy.Considerando estudos anteriores sobre a similaridade entre a composição química do agregado de trióxido mineral e o cimento Portland, o objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a resposta pulpar de dentes de cães após pulpotomia e proteção pulpar direta com MTA Angelus e cimento Portland branco. Trinta e oito remanescentes pulpares foram recobertos com esses materiais. Cento e vinte dias após o tratamento, os animais foram sacrificados e os espécimes removidos e preparados para análise histológica. Ambos os materiais demonstraram os mesmos resultados quando utilizados como materiais de capeamento pulpar, induzindo a formação de ponte de tecido mineralizado e mantendo a vitalidade pulpar em todos os espécimes. Ambos matérias se mostraram efetivos como protetores pulpares após pulpotomia em dentes de cães.

  15. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Jie [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang Jiecheng; Liu Xiaochen [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ma Jian [Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Liu Changsheng [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Fang Jing, E-mail: biomater2006@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei Shicheng, E-mail: nic7505@263.net [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  16. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Wang, Jiecheng; Liu, Xiaochen; Ma, Jian; Liu, Changsheng; Fang, Jing; Wei, Shicheng

    2011-06-01

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H 3PO 4) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  17. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect

  18. 表面硅涂层改性对氧化锆陶瓷与树脂水门汀粘结强度的影响%Effects of surface modification on bonding strength between dental zirconia ceramics and resin cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐春华; 耿建平

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of surface modification with different thickness and concentrations on the bonding strength between dental zirconia ceramics and resin cement. Methods Silica coating was prepared in colloidal silica sol in thickness of 100 nm,200 nm,300 nm and in concentrations of 20% ,30% ,40% on dental zirconia ceramics,defined as group A to I respectively. Totally 81 discs were fabricated and randomly divided into nine groups(n =9) respectively after polish and sandblast. Each ceramic block was bonded to light curing composite resin. All samples were stored in distilled water at 37 ℃ for 24 h before they were taken to measure the shear bonding strength of the resin cement to the ceramic surface. Results The shear bonding strength form A to I was 3. 09 ±0.20,3.27 ±0.22,3. 30 ±0. 38,3.17 ±0. 25 ,5. 35 ±0.39,4.09 ±0. 29,3. 16 ±0. 29,3. 24 ±0. 23,(4.01 ±0. 28)MPa respectively. There were significant differences among silica coatings in different thickness (P<0.05) ,and significant differences among silica coatings in different concentrations ( P < 0. 05). There was interaction between thickness and concentration of the silica coatings ( P <0.05). Silica coating in 30% and 200nm had the highest shear bonding strength. Conclusions 30% and 200 nm silicon coating is more appropriate for the dental zirconia ceramics, which can obviously improve the shear bonding strength between the zirconia ceramics and resin cement.%目的 研究不同浓度和不同厚度硅涂层对Lava氧化锆陶瓷与树脂水门汀粘结强度的影响.方法 制作Lava氧化锆长方体状陶瓷试样共81件(10mm×10mm×3 mm),按20%、30%、40%3种硅涂层浓度及100、200、300 nm 3种硅涂层厚度分为9组(A~I,n=9)对氧化锆陶瓷粘结面进行处理,然后将每组试样与Panavia F树脂水门汀粘结,万能材料实验机测试剪切粘结强度,对结果进行统计分析.结果 A组到I组各组剪切粘结强度值分别为3.09 ±0.20、3.27

  19. Dental Hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  20. Porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a three-liquid silane bonding agent and a dual-activated luting composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Hideo; Aida, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Yumi; Tanoue, Naomi

    2006-12-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication and bonding of porcelain laminate veneer restorations in a patient with anterior open spaces. Laminate veneer restorations made of feldspathic porcelain were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed under tap water, ultrasonically cleaned with methanol, and primed with a chemically activated three-liquid silane bonding agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond). The enamel surfaces were etched with 40% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water, and primed with a two-liquid bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) that contained a hydrophobic phosphate (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate; MDP). The restorations were bonded with a dual-activated luting composite (Clapearl DC). The veneers have been functioning satisfactorily for an observation period of one year. Combined use of the Clearfil bonding agents and Clapearl DC luting composite is an alternative to conventional materials for seating porcelain laminate veneer restorations, although the system is inapplicable to dentin bonding.

  1. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  2. POZZOLAN AND CEMENTS WITH POZZOLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KAPLAN

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Cement, one of the basic material of construction engineering, has an important place in view of strength and cost of structures. Cement consumption is increasing parallel to development of building construction sector. For cement producers, minimal cost is desired by using new and economical material sources. On the other hand, the controllers and contractors need cheaper, safer and higher strength materials. From this respect cement industry tends to use cement with pozzolan. In Türkiye, cement with pozzolan is produced by adding the pozzolan, which has a large reservoir in the country, in cement in sertain amount. However this type of cement is consumed in the construction sector, sortage of scientific investigation and speculative news on the subject.are worried the users and producers. In this paper, prior to an experimental study on the cements having pozzolan additive, historical development of pozzolan, reservoir of Turkiye, and comparison with portland cement is carried out. Advantages and disadvantages of pozzolan are also discussed in some points.

  3. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements.

  4. Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasti, Sahabi; Sattari, Mandana; Romoozi, Elham; Akbar-Zadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used in restorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and may affect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a large surface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontic treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus) versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvard) using rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro. In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internal diameter 5-mm, height 2-mm) were made and divided into three groups. Each group was filled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, Panavia F2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequently cultured in 6-well plates of 5×10(5) cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_ 1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay, the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure. Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significant difference (HSD) Tukey tests. This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the different time intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals. After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweek intervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showed that cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (pcytotoxicity increased significantly in the Rely X Plus group with time (pcytotoxicity with time. Although this study has limitations

  5. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  7. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  8. Advances in Glass Ionomer Cements

    OpenAIRE

    KAYA, Dt. Tuğba; TİRALİ, Yard. Doç. Dr. Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there have been a number of innovations and developments with respect to glass ionomer cements and their applications in clinical dentistry. This article considers some of the recent outstanding studies regarding the field of glass ionomer cement applications, adhesion and setting mechanisms, types, advantage and disadvantages among themselves and also to enhance the physical and antibacterial properties under the title of 'Advances in Glass Ionomer Cements'. As their biologic...

  9. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement.

  10. Comparison of shear bond strength of different glass ionomer cements%不同剂型玻璃离子水门汀对牙本质粘结剪切强度的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔恺

    2012-01-01

    目的:比较不同剂型玻璃离子水门汀对牙本质粘结剪切强度,为临床使用提供参考.方法:临床收集新鲜拔除的磨牙30个,用慢速精密齿科片切机切取颊面浅层牙本质薄片(片厚2 mm),自凝塑料包埋,仅暴露颊侧浅层面作为粘结面,流水冲洗4 s,无油气体吹干,于每个试件的粘结面上固定一直径4 mm,高2 mm成型管.然后将30个试件随机分为3组(每组10个),分别使用RelyXTM Luting Cement(粉液剂型)、GC Fuji PLUS(粉液剂型)和GC Fuji CEM(双糊剂型)3种玻璃离子水门汀进行充填,制作粘结试件后,试件置于盛有人工唾液的容器中37℃24 h,用万能测试机测定每个试件的粘结剪切强度.结果:3种玻璃离子水门汀的粘结剪切强度由底到高分别为:RelyXTM Luting Cement(粉液剂型)(6.163±1.177)MPa、GC Fuji PLUS(粉液剂型)(8.004±0.962) MPa、GC Fuji CEM(双糊剂型)(10.31±0.893) MPa,三者间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:双糊剂型玻璃离子水门汀抗粘结剪切强度明显高于两种粉液剂型玻璃离子水门汀,是临床修复治疗的良好选择.%AIM: To compare the shear bond strength of different glass ionomer cements. METHODS;Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were divided randomly into 3 groups. The bonding surfaces were rinsed with tap water and dried with non-oil gas, then they were bonded with RelyXTM Luting Cement, GC Fuji PLUS and GC Fuji CEM respectively. The shear bond strength was tested after 24 hours. RESULTS: The shear bond strength was (6. 163 + 1. 177)Mpa, (8.004 ±0.962) Mpa and( 10. 31 ±0.893)Mpain RelyXTM Luting Cement, GC Fuji PLUS and GC Fuji CEM groups,respectively. There was statistically significant difference between group GC Fuji PLUS and GC Fuji CEM (P<0.05). There was statistically significant difference between group RelyXTM Luting Cement and GC Fuji CEM (P <0.05). CONCLUSION: The paste-paste style cement is the best choice for filling and adhesion because of its

  11. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  12. Preparation, physical-chemical characterization, and cytocompatibility of polymeric calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashaba, Rania M; Moussa, Mervet; Koch, Christopher; Jurgensen, Arthur R; Missimer, David M; Rutherford, Ronny L; Chutkan, Norman B; Borke, James L

    2011-01-01

    Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control). Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5-12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications.

  13. Increase of the final setting time of brushite cements by using chondroitin 4-sulfate and silica gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi-Mariño, F; Mastio, J; Rueda, C; Blanco, L; López-Cabarcos, E

    2007-06-01

    Chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S) is a bioactive glycosaminoglycan with inductive properties in bone and tissue regeneration. Dicalcium phosphate dehydrate cements (known as brushite) are biocompatible and resorbable materials used in bone and dental surgery. In this study we analyzed the effect of C4S on the setting of a calcium phosphate cement and the properties of the resulting material. Brushite based cement powder was synthesised by mixing monocalcium phosphate with beta-tricalcium phosphate and sodium pyrophosphate. When the concentration of C4S, in the liquid added to the cement powder, was between 1 and 8% the cement final setting time increases. Furthermore, the cement diametral tensile strength remains unaffected when solutions with concentrations of C4S below 5% were used, but decreases at higher C4S concentrations. Calorimetric analysis showed that the cements prepared with C4S alone and in combination with silica gel have a greater content of hydrated water. We concluded from our study that the addition of small amounts of C4S increases the cement setting time without affecting its diametral tensile strength and at the same time improves the cement's hydrophilicity.

  14. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  15. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0–10 mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. - Highlights: • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hDPCs. • Promoted proliferation of hDPCs on hinokitiol-modified CS. • The hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility. • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hPDLs.

  16. Phosphate based oil well cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  17. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  18. Bioactive glass-ionomer cement with potential therapeutic function to dentin capping mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Zhao, Jun; Weng, Yiming; Park, Jong-Gu; Jiang, Hui; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a novel bioactive resin-modified glass-ionomer cement system with therapeutic function to dentin capping mineralization. In the system, the newly synthesized star-shape poly(acrylic acid) was formulated with water, Fuji II LC filler, and bioactive glass S53P4 to form resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. The commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as a control. All the specimens were conditioned in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 degrees C prior to testing. The effect of aging in SBF on CS and microhardness of the cements was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the in vitro dentin surface changes caused by the incorporation of bioactive glass. The results show that the system not only provided strengths comparable to original commercial Fuji II LC cement but also allowed the cement to help mineralize the dentin in the presence of SBF. It appears that this bioactive glass-ionomer cement system has direct therapeutic impact on dental restorations that require root surface fillings.

  19. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem KiLiC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05. Conclusions Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination.

  20. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    KİLİC, Kerem; ARSLAN, Soley; DEMETOGLU, Goknil Alkan; ZARARSIZ, Gokmen; KESİM, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods: Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results: There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05). Conclusions: Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination. PMID:23559118

  1. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  2. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  3. Hardness of resin cement cured under different thickness of lithium disilicate-based ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuan; WANG Fu

    2011-01-01

    Background The lithium disilicate-based ceramic is a newly developed all-ceramic material,which is lithium disilicate-based and could be used for fabricating almost all kinds of restorations.The extent of light attenuation by ceramic material was material-dependent.Ceramic materials with different crystal composition or crystalline content would exhibit distinct light-absorbing characteristics.The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of ceramic thickness and light-curing time on the polymerization of a dual-curing resin luting material with a lithium disilicate-based ceramic.Methods A lithium disilicate-based ceramic was used in this study.The light attenuation caused by ceramic with different thickness was determined using a spectral radiometer.The commercial dual-cured resin cement was light-cured directly or through ceramic discs with different thickness (1,2 and 3 mm,respectively) for different times (10,20,30,40,50 and 60 seconds,respectively).The polymerization efficiency of resin cement was expressed in terms as Vickers hardness (VHN) measured after 24 hours storage.Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD tests were used to determine differences.Results Intensity of polymerizing light transmitted through ceramic discs was reduced from 584 mW/cm2 to about 216 mW/cm2,80 mW/cm2 and 52 mW/cm2 at thicknesses of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,respectively.Resin cement specimens self-cured alone showed significantly lower hardness values.When resin cement was light-cured through ceramic discs with a thickness of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,no further increasing in hardness values was observed when light-curing time was more than 30 seconds,40 seconds and 60 seconds,respectively.Conclusions Within the limitation of the present study,ceramic thickness and light-curing time had remarkable influence on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cement.When resin cement is light-cured beneath a lithium disilicate ceramic with different thickness,prolonging light

  4. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Misra; Renu Mathur

    2007-06-01

    The scope of magnesium oxychloride (MOC) cement in concrete works has been evaluated. MOC cement concrete compositions of varying strengths having good placing and finishing characteristics were prepared and investigated for their compressive and flexural strengths, -values, abrasion resistance etc. The durability of MOC concrete compositions against extreme environmental conditions viz. heating–cooling, freezing–thawing, wetting–drying and penetration and deposition of salts etc were investigated. The results reveal that MOC concrete has high compressive strength associated with high flexural strength and the ratio of compressive to flexural strength varies between 6 and 8. The elastic moduli of the compositions studied are found to be 23–85 GPa and the abrasion losses between 0.11 and 0.20%. While alternate heating–cooling cycles have no adverse effect on MOC concrete, it can be made durable against freezing–thawing and the excessive exposure to water and salt attack by replacing 10% magnesium chloride solution by magnesium sulphate solution of the same concentration.

  5. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Luiz de Oliveira ROSA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed, Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States. Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers, synthetic resins (681 papers, dental cements (440 papers, dental alloys (392 papers and dental adhesives (361 papers. The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents, followed by dental implants (8 patents and composite resins (7 patents. Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development

  6. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROSA, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; SILVA, Tiago Machado; LIMA, Giana da Silveira; SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; PIVA, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in

  7. Cemented total hip arthroplasty with Boneloc bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, D C; Hoard, D B; Porretta, C A

    2001-01-01

    Boneloc cement (WK-345, Biomet Inc, Warsaw, Ind) attempted to improve cement characteristics by reducing exotherm during polymerization, lowering residual monomer and solubility, raising molecular weight, and lowering airborne monomer and aromatic amines. To study the efficacy of this cement, a selected group of 20 patients were prospectively enrolled and followed up after hip arthroplasty. All components were cemented. During the enrollment period, approximately 70 other hip arthroplasties were performed. Clinical evaluation was based on the Harris hip score. Radiographic evaluation was based on assessment of position of the components, subsidence, and/or presence of radiolucencies. Patients had follow-up for an average of 42 months (11 to 58 months); 1 was lost to follow-up. Of these, 7 (35%) had failure at last follow-up. Despite its initial promise, Boneloc cement had an unacceptably high failure rate over a relatively short follow-up period and is not recommended for use. Despite the longevity and odor toxicity problems with conventional bone cement, new cement technologies must be approached with caution.

  8. The Effect of Various Finish Line Configurations on the Marginal Seal and Occlusal Discrepancy of Cast Full Crowns After Cementation - An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemane, Vaishali; Akulwar, Ravikumar Suryakanth; Meshram, Suresh

    2015-08-01

    The marginal fit of crowns is of clinical importance. It is found that marginal and occlusal discrepancies are commonly increased following cementation. The resistance of cementing materials is a factor that prevents cast restorations from being correctly seated. Different finish lines behave differently in facilitating the escape of the cement. When the escape path of the cement decreases, the crown fails to seat further. This study was planned with an aim to evaluate the effect of various finish lines on the marginal seal and occlusal seat of full crown preparations. Six stainless steel metal dies were machined to simulate molar crown preparations. The diameter was 10 mm and height was 6mm. The occlusal surface was kept flat and a small circular dimple was machined for reorientation of the wax pattern and metal copings, margins of various designs were machined accurately. The margins prepared were Group A- 90(0)C shoulder, Group B- Rounded shoulder, Group C- 45 degree sloped shoulder, Group D- Chamfer, Group E- Long chamfer, Group F- Feather edge. Full cast metal crowns of base metal alloy were fabricated over the metal dies. Zinc phosphate luting cement was used for the cementation. After twenty four hours, the cemented crown and die assembly were embedded in clear acrylic resin so as to hold the assembly together while sectioning. Twenty four hours later, all the samples were sectioned sagitally. The sectioned halves were focused under a stereomicroscope and the cement spaces were measured to the nearest micron. The cement thickness was measured at two points on the occlusal surface and one at each margin. Significant differences were observed in the occlusal seat and marginal seal of all the finish line configurations. The rounded shoulder had the best occlusal seat, followed by 90(0)C shoulder. The occlusal seat and marginal seal afforded by the shoulder finish lines were similar whereas there was a vast difference in the seating and sealing of long chamfer

  9. Grout cement. ; Grout cement to fill ground/grout cement to fill cracks. Chunyuyo cement. ; Jiban chunyuyo cement /hibiware chunyuyo cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okaue, H. (Nittetsu Cement Co. Ltd., Hokkaido (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    Ground grout cement is grouted into the ground under high pressure in high water ratio (100 to 1000%) in the form of milk differing from concrete in terms of the water-cement ratio. The grouted milk is governed by characteristics of the cement the milk itself possesses, resulting in variable grouting modes, which are divided in fracture grouting, permeation grouting and boundary grouting. Their applications include cutting off of water in dams, ground reinforcement, prevention of water gushing in tunnel excavation, natural ground reinforcement, improvement of sandy soil and prevention of its collapse, and stabilization of ground for urban civil engineering works such as subway, water supply and sewerage constructions. Grout cement to fill cracks in concrete structures is so grouted into cracks that the slurry fills up contiguous cracks to a certain level and goes upward while pushing out air or water existing in the cracks. The slurry filled into the cracks solidifies and hardens while being absorbed into the concrete, and finally integrates with the concrete. The grout cement is used to rework such concrete structures as dams, tunnels, and bridge bases. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    , exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental......Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  11. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  12. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  13. Retention of long-term interim restorations with sodium fluoride enriched interim cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strash, Carolyn

    Purpose: Interim fixed dental prostheses, or "provisional restorations", are fabricated to restore teeth when definitive prostheses are made indirectly. Patients undergoing extensive prosthodontic treatment frequently require provisionalization for several months or years. The ideal interim cement would retain the restoration for as long as needed and still allow for ease of removal. It would also avoid recurrent caries by preventing demineralization of tooth structure. This study aims to determine if adding sodium fluoride varnish to interim cement may assist in the retention of interim restorations. Materials and methods: stainless steel dies representing a crown preparation were fabricated. Provisional crowns were milled for the dies using CAD/CAM technology. Crowns were provisionally cemented onto the dies using TempBond NE and NexTemp provisional cements as well as a mixture of TempBond NE and Duraphat fluoride varnish. Samples were stored for 24h then tested or thermocycled for 2500 or 5000 cycles before being tested. Retentive strength of each cement was recorded using a universal testing machine. Results: TempBond NE and NexTemp cements performed similarly when tested after 24h. The addition of Duraphat significantly decreased the retention when added to TempBond NE. NexTemp cement had high variability in retention over all tested time periods. Thermocycling for 2500 and 5000 cycles significantly decreased the retention of all cements. Conclusions: The addition of Duraphat fluoride varnish significantly decreased the retention of TempBond NE and is therefore not recommended for clinical use. Thermocycling significantly reduced the retention of TempBond NE and NexTemp. This may suggest that use of these cements for three months, as simulated in this study, is not recommended.

  14. 不同粘接剂对金属烤瓷冠边缘微渗漏影响的研究%A comparative study of marginal microleakage using different cements in porcelain-fused-to-metal crown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜明欣; 黄克强; 李志刚; 高秀秋; 李春山

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the marginal microleakage of porcelain-fused-to-metal crown truing four different cement. Methods Sixteen porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns were built and randomly divided into 4 group, luted onto standard prepared human forward molars using four different cements (glass ianomer cement, resin-modified giass ionomer cement, PanaviaF, Super-Bond C&B adhesive luting system). After temperature cycling test, all the crowns were then submerged in 2% fuchsin for 24 h. The marginal microlenkage at tooth cement interfaces was observed uaing light stereomicroscopy and evaluated in clarification index. The marginal microleakage grade of 4 groups were analyzed by SPSS 13.0. Results The PanaviaF demonstrated the least marginal microleakage, Super-Bond C&B adhesive luting system, resin-medified glass ionomer cement showed an intermediate level of marginal microleakage, glass ionomet cement was aasociated with severe marginal microleakage (total, X2=157.60, P<0.01; among the different groupa,P<0.05). Conclusion Adhesive resin luting system which is the first selection in clinical is better than glass ionomer cement and is good at porcelain-fused-to-metal crown.%目的 评价4种不同粘接剂在金属烤瓷冠修复中的微渗漏情况.方法 制作16个金属烤瓷冠,随机分成4组,分别采用玻璃离子黏固剂、树脂加强玻璃离子黏固剂、PanaviaF粘接剂和super-Bond C&B粘接剂黏固于前磨牙,经温度循环试验后,将样本浸入2%品红溶液中24 h,用体视显微镜观察牙-黏固剂界面边缘微渗漏状况,并进行分级评估.采SPSS 13.0软件对4组的微渗漏程度进行统计分析.结果 PanaviaF粘接剂微渗漏最小,其次是Super-Bond C&B粘接剂和树脂加强玻璃离子黏固剂,玻璃离子黏固剂微渗漏最大(总体比较X2=157.60,P<0.01;组间两两比较均为P<0.05).结论 树脂类粘接系统抗边缘微渗漏性能优于玻璃离子类黏固剂,适于黏固金属烤瓷全冠修复,是临床首选粘接材料.

  15. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  16. Joy, sorrow and love complaints in the Cervantine sonorous imagery: the guitar, the lute and the vihuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Labrador López de Azcona

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of music in Cervantes’ works has, beyond the characterization of the different situations in which it appears, an important significance: that of the musical instruments and of their particular sonority. In the case of the guitar, all of its appearances in Cervantes’ works are presented here, as well as the context that the instrument evokes, very different from that of the lute and vihuela. Music and musical instruments with very clear roles and qualities, both of which reflect the differences between popular culture and that of the elites.

  17. Cements containing by-product gypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensted, J. [University of Greenwich, London (United Kingdom). School of Biological and Chemical Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Chemical by-product gypsum can readily replace natural gypsum in Portland cements and in blended cements like Portland pfa cement and Portland blast furnace cement without technical detriment in many instances. Indeed, sometimes the technical performance of the cement can be enhanced. The hydration chemistry is often changed, in that where there is at least some retardation of setting, more AFT phase (ettringite) is formed during early hydration at the expense of calcium silicate hydrates. By-product gypsum can also replace natural gypsum in speciality products like calcium aluminate cement-Portland cement mixes for producing quick setting cements and in calcium sulphoaluminate-type expansive cements. However, by-products gypsum have proved to be less successful for utilization in API Classes of oilwell cements, because of the greater difficulty in obtaining batch-to-batch consistency in properties like thickening time and slurry rheology. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Influence of Incorporating Fluoroapatite Nanobioceramic on the Compressive Strength and Bioactivity of Glass Ionomer Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaghani M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: In order to increase the performance of glass ionomer cement, it is reinforced with metal powders, short fibers, bioceramics and other materials. Fluoroapatite(Ca10(PO46F2 is found in dental enamel and is usually used in dental materials due to its good chemical and physical properties. Objectives: In this study, the effects of the addition of synthesized fluoroapatite nanoceramic on the compressive strength and bioactivity of glass ionomer cement were investigated. Materials and Methods: The synthesized fluoroapatite nanoceramic particles (~ 70 nm were incorporated into as-prepared glass ionomer powder and were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Moreover, the compressive strength values of the modified glass ionomer cements with 0, 1, 3 and 5 wt% of fluoroapatite were evaluated. Results: Results showed that glass ionomer cement containing 3 wt%fluoroapatite nanoparticles exhibited the highest compressive strength (102.6± 4 compared to the other groups, including control group. Furthermore, FTIR and SEM investigations indicated that after soaking the glass ionomer cement- 3 wt% fluoroapatite composite in the simulated body fluid solution, the intensity of O-H, P-O and C-O absorption bands increased as a result of the formation of apatite layer on the surface of the sample, and the rather flat and homogeneous surface of the cement became more porous and inhomogeneous. Conclusions: Addition of synthesized nano-fluoroapatite to as-prepared glass ionomer cement enhanced the compressive strength as well as nucleation of the calcium phosphate layer on the surface of the composite. This makes it a good candidate for dentistry and orthopedic applications.

  19. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    This research evaluates the ... The paper details results of API specification tests and the physical ... Keywords: Compressive strength, Free fluid, Portland cement, Rheology, Thickening time ..... Geothermal Well Cementing” Proceedings of.

  20. Endocrine disruptors and dental materials: health implications associated with their use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho Antonio Jorge Molinário

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes international historical trends in the use of different types of materials in dental practice. The author describes the chemical properties of their ingredients and the potential and observed adverse effects in patients and dental technicians resulting from clinical or occupational exposure to various metals like beryllium, used to produce metal alloys. The growing use of various products (resin cements, ionomer cements, aesthetic restorative materials, resins, endodontal cements, and others based on the compound bisphenol-A, whose chemical structure is similar to that of estrogen. Considering the demographic and contemporary work force characteristics of those involved in dental practice in the Brazil, the study highlights the possible effect of the use of these materials in both male and female patients and all age strata, as well as in health professionals with occupational exposure to products containing bisphenol-A.

  1. Endocrine disruptors and dental materials: health implications associated with their use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Jorge Molinário Coelho

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes international historical trends in the use of different types of materials in dental practice. The author describes the chemical properties of their ingredients and the potential and observed adverse effects in patients and dental technicians resulting from clinical or occupational exposure to various metals like beryllium, used to produce metal alloys. The growing use of various products (resin cements, ionomer cements, aesthetic restorative materials, resins, endodontal cements, and others based on the compound bisphenol-A, whose chemical structure is similar to that of estrogen. Considering the demographic and contemporary work force characteristics of those involved in dental practice in the Brazil, the study highlights the possible effect of the use of these materials in both male and female patients and all age strata, as well as in health professionals with occupational exposure to products containing bisphenol-A.

  2. Compartive study of microleakage by using four types of luting agents in glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramic%4种粘接剂粘接氧化铝渗透陶瓷基底冠的边缘微渗漏研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱程辉; 钟群; 李国强

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究不同粘接剂对氧化铝渗透陶瓷基底冠微渗漏的影响.方法 选择40个离体磨牙,常规制作氧化铝渗透陶瓷基底冠,随机分为玻璃离子、树脂加强型玻璃离子、树脂粘接剂和自粘接树脂组.在进行微渗漏实验前对样本进行冷热循环.采用染料渗入法测定冠边缘微渗漏情况,进行统计分析.结果 4种粘接剂粘接氧化铝渗透陶瓷基底冠的边缘微渗漏不同,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),65%的基底冠发生了微渗漏.结论 树脂粘接剂边缘微渗漏少,是粘接氧化铝渗透陶瓷基底冠的理想材料.%Objective To observe and compare the microleakage of glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramic using four types of luting agents.Methods Forty healthy non-carious human molars were selected and randomly assigned to 4groups,10 in each.The glass ionomer, resin-modified glass ionomer, adhesive resin and RelyX Unicem were used for bonding.All specimens were stored in water at 37℃ for 24 hours, then the specimens were subjected to thermocycling 500 times ranging from 5℃ to 55℃.Ten specimens in each group were evaluated by dye penetration.The microleakage was examined with light microscope.Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 10.0 software package.Results The same kind of glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramic treated with different luting agents demonstrated significantly different degree of microleakage ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusions RelyX Unicem and RelyX ARC were the superior anti-mic-roleakage luting cement, and it is the ideal material for the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramic.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Selected Physicochemical Properties of Pozzolan Portland and MTA-Based Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Villa, Ricardo Dalla; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of pozzolan Portland cement were compared to ProRoot MTA and MTA BIO. To test the pH, the samples were immersed in distilled water for different periods of time. After the pH analysis, the sample was retained in the plastic recipient, and the electrical conductivity of the solution was measured. The solubility and radiopacity properties were evaluated according to specification 57 of the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA). The statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at a 5% level of significance. Pozzolan Portland cement exhibited pH and electrical conductivity mean values similar to those of the MTA-based cements. The solubilities of all tested materials were in accordance with the ANSI/ADA standards. Only the MTA-based cements met the ANSI/ADA recommendations for radiopacity. It might be concluded that the pH and electrical conductivity of pozzolan Portland cement are similar to and comparable to those of MTA-based cements.

  4. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals.

  5. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  6. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  7. Dental Training Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  8. Portland cement-blast furnace slag blends in oilwell cementing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, D.T.; DiLullo, G.; Hibbeler, J. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of blast furnace slag cementing technologies. have been expanded to include Portland cement/blast furnace slag blends. Mixtures of Portland cement and blast furnace slag, while having a long history of use in the construction industry, have not been used extensively in oilwell cementing applications. Test results indicate that blending blast furnace slag with Portland cement produces a high quality well cementing material. Presented are the design guidelines and laboratory test data relative to mixtures of blast furnace slag and Portland cements. Case histories delineating the use of blast furnace slag - Portland cement blends infield applications are also included.

  9. 4种玻璃离子水门汀对ITI基台与金属内冠之间粘接力的比较研究%A comparative study on adhesive force of cast crown copings cemented to ITI abutments using four glass ionomer cements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程耀; 傅柏平

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究4种玻璃离子类水门汀对ITI种植系统标准颈粘接固位基台和金属内冠之间的粘接力。方法将10只金属内冠与10只I T I标准颈粘接固位基台分别使用以下4种水门汀进行交叉粘固:A组为玻璃离子水门汀(日本);B组为树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(美国);C组为暂时粘固用玻璃离子水门汀(日本);D组为玻璃离子水门汀(德国);粘固后测试并记录样本粘接力(N),同时观察并记录粘固界面的断裂模式,最后,对粘接力进行统计学处理。所有内冠和基台经清洗后重复使用。结果4种水门汀的粘接力及由大至小的排列顺序为C组(183.6±29.4) N>D组(153.4±36.2) N>B组(144.4±41.1) N>A组(109.9±25.7)N,其中C组的粘接力最高,A组的粘接力最低,A组显著低于其它3种水门汀(PD(153.4±36.2N)>B(144.4±41.1N)>A (109.9±25.7N). Group C produced the highest adhesive force, while group A exhibited the lowest adhesive force, significantly lower than other three luting cements(P<0.05). The fracture surface observation shows that group A and D fractured at the interface of cement and abutments, while group B and C exhibited as“mixed fracture”mode. Conclusion Both conventional glass ionomer cement and resin-modified glass ionomer cements possessed the clinically acceptable adhesive forces, while the provisional glass ionomer luting cements was not suitable for the provisional cementation of implant crowns due to the too high adhesive force.

  10. Utilization of Dental General Anaesthesia for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Zarina Abdul; Musa, Normaizura; Noor, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd

    2008-01-01

    Dental treatment under general anaesthesia may be needed for some children and adolescents due to medical or behaviour problem. The objective of the study is to identify the type of treatment that has been carried out under GA in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). A retrospective record review study from hospital records of dental patients (under 18 years old) receiving dental treatment under GA from 2003 until 2007 were retrieved from the database. Information such as the reason for GA, and the type of treatment provided was recorded in data sheet. The data were analyzed using SPSS 12.0.1 for Windows. It was checked and verified for errors. A total of 349 cases were treated of which 43.6% had medical problems. Patients were mostly diagnosed to have rampant caries (77.1%) and some of them have behavioural problems (34.4%). Treatment pattern in deciduous dentition revealed more extraction (97.8%) as compared to restoration (75.7%) whereas in permanent dentition more restoration was done (24.3%) as compared to extraction (2.2%). Majority of the restorations were done using Glass Ionomer Cements (47.5%). Biopsy (4.3%) contributed mainly to the surgery (24.1%) done during GA. General anesthesia is necessary when dental disease is interfering with health and general well-being of patient and it can facilitated dental treatment allowing dentists to benefit from improved treatment conditions and provide a higher quality of care. PMID:22570587

  11. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  12. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  13. Early resin luting material damage around a circular fiber post in a root canal treated premolar by using micro-computerized tomographic and finite element sub-modeling analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Hao; Lin, Chun-Li

    2015-11-01

    This study utilizes micro-computerized tomographic (micro-CT) and finite element (FE) sub-modeling analyses to investigate the micro-mechanical behavior associated with voids/bubbles stress behavior at the luting material layer to understand the early damage in a root canal treated premolar. 3-dimensional finite element (FE) models of a macro-root canal treated premolar and two sub-models at the luting material layer to provide the void/bubble distribution and dimensions were constructed from micro-CT images and simulated to receive axial and lateral forces. The boundary conditions for the sub-models were determined from the macro-premolar model results and applied in sub-modeling analysis. The first principal stresses for the dentin, luting material layer and post in macro-premolar model and for luting material void/bubble in sub-models were recorded. The simulated results revealed that the macro-premolar model dramatically underestimated the luting material stress because the voids/bubbles at the adhesive layer cannot be captured due to coarse mesh and high stress gradient and the variations between sub- and macro-models ranging from 2.65 to 4.5 folds under lateral load at the mapping location. Stress concentrations were found at the edge of the voids/bubbles and values over 20 MPa in sub-modeling analysis immediately caused the luting material failure/micro-crack. This study establishes that micro-CT and FE sub-modeling techniques can be used to simulate the stress pattern at the micro-scale luting material layer in a root canal treated premolar, suggesting that attention must be paid to resin luting material initial failure/debonding when large voids/bubbles are generated during luting procedures.

  14. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes and Oral Health > Diabetes: Dental Tips Diabetes: Dental Tips Main Content Diabetes can cause serious problems ... FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, ...

  15. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they're most treatable. When to have a dental exam Various factors might determine how frequently your ... wisdom teeth (third molars) at the appropriate age. Dental X-ray A dental X-ray (radiograph) allows ...

  16. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share with Women Dental Care in Pregnancy Why is dental care in pregnancy important? During pregnancy, you are more likely to have problems ... There are 2 major reasons women can have dental problems during pregnancy: Pregnancy gingivitis— During pregnancy, changes ...

  17. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  18. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device...: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Bone Cement.”...

  20. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cementation of Loose Sand Particles based on Bio-cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Hui; QIAN Chunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Loose sand particles could be cemented to sandstone by bio-cement (microbial induced magnesium carbonate). The bio-sandstone was firstly prepared, and then the compressive strength and the porosity of the sandstone cemented by microbial induced magnesium carbonate were tested to characterize the cementation effectiveness. In addition, the formed mineral composition and the microstructure of bio-sandstone were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The experimental results show that the feasibility of binding loose sand particles using microbial induced magnesium carbonate precipitation is available and the acquired compressive strength of bio-sandstone can be excellent at certain ages. Moreover, the compressive strength and the porosity could be improved with the increase of microbial induced magnesium carbonate content. XRD results indicate that the morphology of magnesium carbonate induced by microbe appears as needles and SEM results show that the cementation of loose sand particles to sandstone mainly relies on the microbial induced formation of magnesium carbonate precipitation around individual particles and at particle-particle contacts.

  2. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  3. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  4. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  5. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  6. Comparative Analysis of Selected Physicochemical Properties of Pozzolan Portland and MTA-Based Cements

    OpenAIRE

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Villa, Ricardo Dalla; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of pozzolan Portland cement were compared to ProRoot MTA and MTA BIO. To test the pH, the samples were immersed in distilled water for different periods of time. After the pH analysis, the sample was retained in the plastic recipient, and the electrical conductivity of the solution was measured. The solubility and radiopacity properties were evaluated according to specification 57 of the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA). Th...

  7. Research gaps identified during systematic reviews of clinical trials: glass-ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    Mickenautsch Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To report the results of an audit concerning research gaps in clinical trials that were accepted for appraisal in authored and published systematic reviews regarding the application of glass-ionomer cements (GIC) in dental practice Methods Information concerning research gaps in trial precision was extracted, following a framework that included classification of the research gap reasons: ‘imprecision of information (results)’, ‘biased information’, ‘inconsistency or unknow...

  8. Novel tricalcium silicate/magnesium phosphate composite bone cement having high compressive strength, in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjuan; Zhai, Dong; Huan, Zhiguang; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Although inorganic bone cements such as calcium phosphate cements have been widely applied in orthopaedic and dental fields because of their self-setting ability, development of high-strength bone cement with bioactivity and biodegradability remains a major challenge. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prepare a tricalcium silicate/magnesium phosphate (C3S/MPC) composite bone cement, which is intended to combine the excellent bioactivity of C3S with remarkable self-setting properties and mechanical strength of MPC. The self-setting and mechanical properties, in vitro induction of apatite formation and degradation behaviour, and cytocompatibility of the composite cements were investigated. Our results showed that the C3S/MPC composite cement with an optimal composition had compressive strength up to 87 MPa, which was significantly higher than C3S (25 MPa) and MPC (64 MPa). The setting time could be adjusted between 3 min and 29 min with the variation of compositions. The hydraulic reaction products of the C3S/MPC composite cement were composed of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) derived from the hydration of C3S and gel-like amorphous substance. The C3S/MPC composite cements could induce apatite mineralization on its surface in SBF solution and degraded gradually in Tris-HCl solution. Besides, the composite cements showed good cytocompatibility and stimulatory effect on the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. Our results indicated that the C3S/MPC composite bone cement might be a new promising high-strength inorganic bioactive material which may hold the potential for bone repair in load-bearing site.

  9. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Student Resources National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Transforming Dental Hygiene Education Advocacy Practice Issues Direct Access Scope ...

  10. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOVAIS, Veridiana Resende; RAPOSO, Luís Henrique Araújo; de MIRANDA, Rafael Resende; LOPES, Camila de Carvalho Almança; SIMAMOTO, Paulo Cézar; SOARES, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick. PMID:28198977

  11. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Resende NOVAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer. The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst and light-activation mode (base paste only. For degree of conversion (DC (n=5, a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Caries Risk in Enamel Adjacent to Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Carvalhaes FRAGA

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the anticariogenic potential of conventionalglass ionomer cements for different clinical applications [type I(cementation, type II (restoration and type III (lining] under highlycariogenic conditions using in vitro pH cycling.Method: Forty dental surfaces were selected and assigned tofour groups. In each group, the corresponding material was appliedaccording to its clinical indication: Vidrion C for cementation ofindirect restorations, Vidrion R and Concept composite resin (controlgroup for direct restorations, and Vidrion F as a cavity liner. Artificialenamel carious lesions adjacent to the materials were induced bya 14-day pH cycling dynamic model. The dental surfaces wereevaluated by previously designated examiners, who assignedvalues according to the presence and severity of carious lesions.Results: Statistical analysis using odds ratio showed statisticallysignificant difference among the groups. Mann-Whitney Ucomparative test indicated that the control group (composite resindiffered significantly from the other groups (p<0.05, presentingthe most severe cariogenic activity. Vidrion R presented the greatestcariostatic capacity (p<0.05.Conclusion: Vidrion R restorative glass ionomer cement exhibitedthe best cariostatic properties, followed by Vidrion C and Vidrion F,whose cariostatic potential was similar to each other.

  13. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  14. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  15. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function

    OpenAIRE

    Øilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne Dybdahl; Ulsund, Amanda Hembre; Gjerdet,Nils Roar

    2014-01-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based res...

  16. 玻璃离子和流体树脂修复楔状缺损的疗效比较%Comparation of the Clinical Effects of Glass Ionomer Cement and Flowable Composite Resin on the Restoration of Dental Wedge-Shaped Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆佳萍; 赵守亮; 徐培成

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨玻璃离子和流体树脂用于楔状缺损的修复的临床效果.方法:选择105例中型楔状缺损患者(376颗患牙),楔状缺损深度大于1 mm且小于2 mm、仅出现牙本质过敏症状、无牙髓炎症状.将患者左右两侧同名牙采用自身对照法随机分为玻璃离子衬垫组(A组)和流体树脂衬垫组(B组),A组以玻璃离子和复合树脂充填;B组以流体树脂和复合树脂充填.采用Ryge和USPHS评价标准,比较术后1周、1个月、1年、3年的敏感发生率及充填体脱落率.结果:失访18例70牙,复查87例306牙,复查率为81.4%.A组楔状缺损充填修复后1周、1个月的术后敏感发生率分别为18.3 %(28/153)、9.2%(14/153),B组分别为35.9 %(55/153)、28.1%(43/153),差异均有统计学意义(P均<0.01);修复后1年和3年2组术后敏感发生率差异无统计学意义.A组患牙术后1年、3年充填体脱落率分别为9.8 %(15/153)、11.8 %(18/153),B组分别为2.6%(4/153)、3.3 %(5/153),差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05和0.01);修复后1周、1个月差异均无统计学意义.结论:采用玻璃离子和流体树脂作为夹层技术中的衬垫材料修复楔状缺损,对于预防术后敏感和降低充填体脱落率均有理想的疗效.但是玻璃离子作为衬垫材料在预防术后敏感方面要优于流体树脂,而流体树脂作为衬垫材料在修复体固位力方面则优于玻璃离子.%Objective:To compare the clinical effects of glass ionomer cement(GIC) and flowable composite resin(FCR) on the restoration of dental wedge-shaped defects as liners.Methods:A total of 376 teeth from 105 patients with wedge-shaped defects were studied and divided into Group A and Group B randomly with self-contrasted method.The depth of wedge-shaped defects was more than 1 mm and less than 2 mm,and the patients were with dentin hypersensitiveness and without pulpitis.Group A was restored with composite resin after applying flowable

  17. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15 according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [2] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of Panavia F; [3] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [4] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of Panavia F. The adhesive systems and the resin cements were applied according to the experimental groups, using a Tygon matrix.The samples were stored in distilled water at 37±2ºC for 24 hours.Microshear bond strengths were determined using an apparatus attached to an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Results: The results obtained in MPa (SD were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, p<0.05, and showed the following results: [1] 39.76 (5.34; [2] 45.01 (8.53; [3] 46.39 (9.22; [4]45.78 (9.06.There was no statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [2]; and between groups [3] and [4]. However, there was statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [3]. Conclusion:When Clearfil AP-X block was used with Clearfil SE Bond adhesive or RelyX resin cement, the microshear bond strength values were higher.The results suggest that in the union of the resin cements to the restorative composites, hydrophobic adhesives are necessary.

  18. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  19. Biodeterioration of the Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luptáková, Alena; Eštoková, Adriana; Mačingová, Eva; Kovalčíková, Martina; Jenčárová, Jana

    2016-10-01

    The destruction of natural and synthetic materials is the spontaneous and irreversible process of the elements cycling in nature. It can by accelerated or decelerated by physical, chemical and biological influences. Biological influences are represented by the influence of the vegetation and microorganisms (MO). The destruction of cement composites by different MO through the diverse mechanisms is entitled as the concrete biodeterioration. Several sulphur compounds and species of MO are involved in this complex process. Heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic bacteria together with fungi have all been found in samples of corroding cement composites. The MO involved in the process metabolise the presented sulphur compounds (hydrogen sulphide, elemental sulphur etc.) to sulphuric acid reacting with concrete. When sulphuric acid reacts with a concrete matrix, the first step involves a reaction between the acid and the calcium hydroxide forming calcium sulphate. This is subsequently hydrated to form gypsum, the appearance of which on the surface of concrete pipes takes the form of a white, mushy substance which has no cohesive properties. In the continuing attack, the gypsum would react with the calcium aluminate hydrate to form ettringite, an expansive product. The use supplementary cementing composite materials have been reported to improve the resistance of concrete to biodeterioration. The aim of this work was the study of the cement composites biodeterioration by the bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Experimental works were focused on the comparison of special cement composites and its resistance affected by the activities of used sulphur-oxidising

  20. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4281 (December 2011), entitled Gray Portland...

  1. Novel rechargeable calcium phosphate nanoparticle-containing orthodontic cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xian-Ju; Xing, Dan; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Han; Weir, Michael D; Bai, Yu-Xing; Xu, Hockin Hk

    2016-11-04

    White spot lesions (WSLs), due to enamel demineralization, occur frequently in orthodontic treatment. We recently developed a novel rechargeable dental composite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) with long-term calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion release and caries-inhibiting capability. The objectives of this study were to develop the first NACP-rechargeable orthodontic cement and investigate the effects of recharge duration and frequency on the efficacy of ion re-release. The rechargeable cement consisted of pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA). NACP was mixed into the resin at 40% by mass. Specimens were tested for orthodontic bracket shear bond strength (SBS) to enamel, Ca and P ion initial release, recharge and re-release. The new orthodontic cement exhibited an SBS similar to commercial orthodontic cement without CaP release (P>0.1). Specimens after one recharge treatment (e.g., 1 min immersion in recharge solution repeating three times in one day, referred to as "1 min 3 times") exhibited a substantial and continuous re-release of Ca and P ions for 14 days without further recharge. The ion re-release did not decrease with increasing the number of recharge/re-release cycles (P>0.1). The ion re-release concentrations at 14 days versus various recharge treatments were as follows: 1 min 3 times>3 min 2 times>1 min 2 times>6 min 1 time>3 min 1 time>1 min 1 time. In conclusion, although previous studies have shown that NACP nanocomposite remineralized tooth lesions and inhibited caries, the present study developed the first orthodontic cement with Ca and P ion recharge and long-term release capability. This NACP-rechargeable orthodontic cement is a promising therapy to inhibit enamel demineralization and WSLs around orthodontic brackets.International Journal of Oral Science advance online publication,4 November 2016; doi:10.1038/ijos.2016.40.

  2. Freezing resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. X.; Lu, L. C.; Wang, S. D.; Zhao, P. Q.; Gong, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the mechanical properties of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement was investigated in the present study. The visual examination was conducted to evaluate the surface damage. The deterioration considering the weight loss, modulus loss of relative dynamic elastic and strength loss of mortar were also investigated. The morphology of hydration products were analysed by SEM. Compared with ordinary Portland cement and sulphoaluminate cement, the frost resistance of high iron phosphoraluminate cement is better. Hydration products of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement contain sheet crystals, and a lot of gel form a dense three-dimensional network structure, which results in a lower porosity. Different from ordinary Portland cement, the hydration product of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement does not contain Ca(OH)2, and low alkalinity reduces its osmotic pressure. The lower porosity and osmotic pressure are the two main reasons which causes in the higher frost resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement.

  3. 76 FR 24519 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and cement clinker...

  4. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United... cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  5. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  6. PERFORMANCE OF PULVERIZED SLAG-SUBSTITUTED CEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The Portland cement is equivalently substituted by slag micropowders with various specific areas. The workability,activity and acid-corrosion resistance of the slag-substituted cements are investigated,the activation of gypsum is discussed,also the porosity and pore distribution of mortars of the slag micropowders cement are determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  7. Cementation in adhesive dentistry: the weakest link

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    Het succesvol bevestigen van tandrestauraties is een belangrijke en veeleisende procedure. Met behulp van cement wordt het restauratiemateriaal aan de tandstructuur verbonden. Op die manier worden twee hechtvlakken gecreëerd: het raakvlak tussen tand en cement, en het raakvlak tussen cement en resta

  8. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well

  9. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Home > Medicaid > Benefits > Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  10. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Luting CAD/CAM Composite Resin Overlay Workpieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotakis, Emmanuel M; Stavridakis, Minos; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Ardu, Stefano; Krejci, Ivo

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on luting CAD/CAM composite resin workpieces. One-hundred eight (108) composite CAD/CAM block sections (Lava Ultimate) 3 mm in thickness were polished up to 4000 grit and then randomly assigned to 6 experimental groups according to the applied surface treatment (no treatment, sodium bicarbonate [NaHCO3], glycine, alumina [Al2O3], CoJet, and SilJet). After standardized sandblasting procedures, 2 block sections from each group were randomly chosen for the qualitative SEM evaluation of the sandblasted surfaces. The remaining 96 CAD/CAM block sections were luted in pairs using a bonding agent (Single Bond) and a restorative composite resin (Filtek Ultimate). Specimens were aged for 2 weeks in 37°C water with 3000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C), the microtensile test was performed (n = 30), and the values were statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test (p = 0.05). The qualitative SEM evaluation of the sandblasted surfaces showed that sodium bicarbonate and glycine had almost no conditioning effect on the CAD/CAM composite resin. In contrast, aluminum oxide, CoJet, and SilJet had a profound conditioning effect on the CAD/CAM composite resin. No treatment, sodium bicarbonate, and glycine specimens were debonded after thermal stressing (0 MPa), while aluminum oxide, CoJet, and SilJet showed high microtensile values (Al2O3: 104.45 ± 18.76 MPa; CoJet: 105.55 ± 11.88 MPa; SilJet: 105.02 ± 20.84 MPa), which were not statistically significantly different from each other. Aluminum oxide-based sandblasting powders are the best choice for the surface treatment of CAD/ CAM workpieces.

  11. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  12. Physicochemical Properties of MTA and Portland Cement after Addition of Aloe Vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique Borges, Alvaro; Aguirre Guedes, Orlando; Evaristo Ricci Volpato, Luiz; Siebert Filho, Gilberto; Meireles Borba, Alexandre; Zina, Omar; Piva, Evandro; Estrela, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the liquid-powder ratio, setting time, solubility, dimensional change, pH, and radiopacity of white structural and non-structural Portland cement, ProRoot MTA and MTA Bio, associated with a 2% glycolic solution containing Aloe Vera, as vehicle. Five samples of each material were used for each test, according to the American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA) specification No. 57. Statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance. When sample distribution was not normal, non-parametric analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used (α=0.05). No statistical differences were found in liquid-powder ratios among the tested materials. ProRoot MTA showed the longest setting time. Dimensional change values were acceptable in all groups. Also, no significant differences were found in pH values and pH was alkaline in all samples throughout the experiment. Mean radiopacity results obtained for white Portland cements did not meet ANSI/ADA requirements, and were significantly lower than those obtained for MTA-based cements. Finally, Portland cements showed significantly higher mean solubility values compared to the other samples. The physicochemical properties of the tested materials in association with Aloe Vera were compatible with ANSI/ADA requirements, except for the white Portland cements, which failed to meet the radiopacity specification.

  13. Investigation of the physical properties of tricalcium silicate cement-based root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-02-01

    Tricalcium silicate-based cements have been displayed as suitable root-end filling materials. The physical properties of prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material was used as a control. The physical properties of a prototype zirconium oxide replaced tricalcium silicate cement and two proprietary cements composed of tricalcium silicate namely Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material (IRM) was used as a control. Radiopacity assessment was undertaken and expressed in thickness of aluminum. In addition the anti-washout resistance was investigated using a novel basket-drop method and the fluid uptake, sorption and solubility were investigated using a gravimetric method. The setting time was assessed using an indentation technique and compressive strength and micro-hardness of the test materials were investigated. All the testing was performed with the test materials immersed in Hank's balanced salt solution. All the materials tested had a radiopacity value higher than 3mm thickness of aluminum. IRM exhibited the highest radiopacity. Biodentine demonstrated a high washout, low fluid uptake and sorption values, low setting time and superior mechanical properties. The fluid uptake and setting time was the highest for Bioaggregate. The addition of admixtures to tricalcium silicate-based cements affects the physical properties of the materials. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rechargeable calcium phosphate orthodontic cement with sustained ion release and re-release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Weir, Michael D.; Chow, Laurence C.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2016-11-01

    White spot lesions (WSL) due to enamel demineralization are major complications for orthodontic treatments. Calcium phosphate (CaP) dental resins with Ca and P ion releases are promising for remineralization. However, previous Ca and P releases lasted for only weeks. Experimental orthodontic cements were developed using pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) at mass ratio of 1:1 (PE); and PE plus 10% of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 5% of bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) (PEHB). Particles of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) were incorporated into PE and PEHB at 40% filler level. Specimens were tested for bracket-enamel shear bond strength, water sorption, CaP release, and ion recharge and re-release. PEHB+40ACP had higher bracket-enamel bond strength and ion release and rechargeability than PE+40ACP. ACP incorporation into the novel orthodontic cement did not adversely affect the bracket-enamel bond strength. Ion release and re-release from the novel ACP orthodontic cement indicated favorable release and re-release patterns. The recharged orthodontic cement could release CaP ions continuously for four weeks without further recharge. Novel rechargeable orthodontic cement containing ACP was developed with a high bracket-enamel bond strength and the ability to be repeatedly recharged to maintain long-term high levels of CaP ion releases.

  15. Factors influencing success of cement versus screw-retained implant restorations: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Manawar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw retained prosthesis to be the best choice. Discussion: In screw-retained restorations, the fastening screw provides a solid joint between the restoration and the implant abutment, while in cement-retained prostheses the restorative screw is eliminated to enhance esthetics, occlusal stability, and passive fit of the restorations. The factors that influence the type of fixation of the prostheses to the implants like passivity of the framework, ease of fabrication, occlusion, esthetics, accessibility, retention and retrievability are discussed in this article with scientific studies demonstrating superior outcomes of one technique over another. Screwretained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained subgingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminate unesthetic screw access holes, have passive fit of castings, reduced complexity of clinical and lab procedures, enhanced esthetics, reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. Conclusion: This article compares the advantages, potential disadvantages and limitations of screw and cement retained restorations and their specific implications in the most common clinical situation.

  16. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  17. Thoughts on the Current Cement Industry Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhihe

    2003-01-01

    According to the analysis of cement capacity andits relations with macro economy running index, the mainreasons for the present rapid development of cement capacityare the rapid development of economy and the shot up ofwhole society fixed asset investment. According to the presentspeed of economy development, cement still enjoys a po-tential increase, So here has not been an overall excessivepopularity of cement industry. The best way to prevent lowlevel repeated construction is to promote the development ofnew dry- process cement as well as try to get rid of blindness.

  18. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  19. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  20. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    Th