WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental implant patients

  1. DENTAL IMPLANTS IN COMPLICATED EDENTULOUS PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katja Nelson

    2008-01-01

    @@ Dental implants have shown to increase retention and stability of dentures in the rehabilitation of edentulouspatients and still it remains one of the most complex restorative challenges due to a number of variables that affectthe esthetic and functional aspect of the prosthesis.Implant-retained prostheses must compensate forinsufficiencies while allowing the restoration of the white and the red esthetics and satisfying patient demands.

  2. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Procedure‑related and patient‑related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants ... Results: Out of 51, 29 patients were males while 22 were females, with ratio of 1.32:1. ... difference of average STAI‑State subscore before and after the surgery was ... bleeding, swelling, bruising, pain, and tenderness to.

  3. Dental implants in medically complex patients-a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Yifat; Simon, Roy; Haim, Doron; Garfunkel, Adi; Moses, Ofer

    2017-03-01

    Dental implant insertion for oral rehabilitation is a worldwide procedure for healthy and medically compromised patients. The impact of systemic disease risks on the outcome of implant therapy is unclear, since there are few if any published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The objective of this study is to investigate the rate of complications and failures following dental implantation in medically compromised patients in order to elucidate risk factors and prevent them. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from patient files treated with dental implantation between the years 2008-2014. The study group consisted of medically complex patients while the control group consisted of healthy patients. Preoperative, intraoperative, and post operative clinical details were retrieved from patients' files. The survival rate and the success rate of the dental implants were evaluated clinically and radiographically. A total of 204 patients (1003 dental implants) were included in the research, in the study group, 93 patients with 528 dental implants and in the control group, 111 patients with 475 dental implants. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding implant failures or complications. The failure rate of dental implants among the patients was 11.8 % in the study group and 16.2 % in the control group (P = 0.04). It was found that patients with a higher number of implants (mean 6.8) had failures compared with patients with a lower number of implants (mean 4.2) regardless of their health status (P dental implantation in medically complex patients and in healthy patients. Medically complex patients can undergo dental implantation. There are similar rates of complications and failures of dental implants in medically complex patients and in healthy patients.

  4. Oral rehabilitation with dental implants in oligodontia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, KJ; Raghoebar, GM; Meijer, HJA; Vissink, A

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective report was to evaluate the treatment outcome of oral rehabilitation with dental implants in oligodontia patients. Materials and Methods: Thirteen oligodontia patients treated with dental implants were examined clinically and radiographically (follow-up 3 +/- 2

  5. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  6. Dental Implants in Patients with Sjögren's Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, Anke; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Arends, Suzanne; Meiners, Petra M; Visser, Anita; Kroese, Frans Gm; Bootsma, Hendrika; Vissink, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited evidence is available for applying dental implants in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) patients. PURPOSE: This study aims to retrospectively assess clinical outcome of implant therapy in a cohort of well-classified patients with SS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All SS patients attending the Uni

  7. Dental Implant Patients and Their Satisfaction with Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawares, Mary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study developed a profile of dental implant patients from 38 private practices to document characteristics of endosseous implant recipients of the past 10 years. Data were then analyzed using multivariate techniques to examine the relationship between these characteristics and patient-reported outcomes. Patients tended to have high incomes and…

  8. Dental Implant Patients and Their Satisfaction with Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawares, Mary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study developed a profile of dental implant patients from 38 private practices to document characteristics of endosseous implant recipients of the past 10 years. Data were then analyzed using multivariate techniques to examine the relationship between these characteristics and patient-reported outcomes. Patients tended to have high incomes and…

  9. Dental implants in the diabetic patient: systemic and rehabilitative considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaeli, Eli; Weinberg, Ido; Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most prevalent endocrine disease, comprising the third highest cause of disability and morbidity in the Western world. In the past, implant placement was contraindicated in diabetic patients because of increased risk for implant failure and infection. Publications in recent years have shown success rates for dental implants in diabetic patients resembling those of the general population. Other studies, in diabetic patients, as well as in animal models, have shown an increased risk for implant failure. These results raise the question of whether diabetic patients are suitable for dental implant rehabilitation. This article reviews the literature and presents the factors used in assessing the severity of diabetes and its complications, as well as the considerations for rehabilitation planning in these patients. Integration of these factors by the dentist dictates whether as well as what type of implant-supported restoration should be preformed.

  10. Rehabilitative considerations for dental implants in the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyayan, Preeti Agarwal; Katyayan, Manish; Shah, Rupal J

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes is a serious illness that affects many people, and there are many new cases diagnosed every year in all populations around the world. Dental implant is one of the restorative methods to replace missing teeth. As implants are directly anchored into bones, they provide stability, a more natural appearance, and minimize the risk of bone resorption. Thus, today, there is a high demand of dental implants and it is inevitable to meet diabetics who request implant treatment. However, Diabetes mellitus patients may pose contraindications to dental implants because of microvascular complications leading to slower healing process after surgery. Studies have shown that dental implantation failure rate in diabetic patients is much higher than that in non-diabetic patients. This article reviews the effect of diabetes on the osseointegration of implants and the soft tissue healing. It presents the factors used in assessing the severity of diabetes and its complications, as well as considerations for rehabilitation planning in these patients. In addition, the role of antibiotic prophylaxis has been reviewed since its effect on wound healing in diabetics is controversial. Integration of these factors by the dentist can dictate whether, as well as what type of implant supported prosthesis should be given to the diabetic patient.

  11. Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-03-01

    The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene.

  12. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dental implants in patients with osteoporosis: a clinical reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetti-Jardim, Ellen Cristina; Santiago-Junior, Joel Ferreira; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Pellizer, Eduardo Piza; Magro-Filho, Osvaldo; Jardim Junior, Elerson Gaetti

    2011-05-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic disorder characterized by generalized decrease in bone mineral density. Dental implantology is a specialty with high predictability when both quantity and quality of the bone are respected. Therefore, the diagnosis and the implant treatment in patients with osteoporosis are important. In the current study, a literature review about osteoporosis and dental implant therapy was conducted. PubMed, Cochrane, ISI, Dentistry Oral Science, SciELO, and Bireme databases were consulted over the last 20 years. English- and Portuguese-language articles were included in this revision. Some authors stated that the osteoporotic bone is similar to the proposed model of bone type IV. Randomized clinical studies reported implant failure in patients with osteoporosis after menopause. Studies that contraindicate the use of implants in patients with osteoporosis infer that the impaired bone metabolism led to reduction of bone healing around the implants. Nevertheless, other authors believe that the presence of osteoporosis is not a definitive condition to contraindicate the therapy with dental implants. In these cases, the dentist should perform a proper treatment planning, modifying the implant geometry, and use larger implant diameter and with surface treatment. Thus, osteoporosis is not a contraindication for implant surgery because an accurate analysis of bone quality by means tomography is performed.

  14. Differences in knowledge related to dental implants between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken, Yukawa; Tachikawa, Noriko; Kasugai, Shohei

    2017-09-01

    This aim of this study was to investigate the differences between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants by use of a questionnaire survey in order to determine the information that is required for patients undergoing dental implants. The questionnaires were given to 4512 patients who visited the Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital for oral implants between January 2012 and December 2014, and 2972 (66%) valid questionnaires were collected. There were 857 patients with a treatment history of dental implants and 2115 patients without. "Preservation of an adjacent tooth" was the reason that 32% of these patients chose implant therapy, and the patients without treatment history were significantly higher than the patients with one. Significantly, more patients without a treatment history of dental implants selected the after-effects of surgery and pain after surgery as their main concerns for implant therapy compared to those with a treatment history. In the question "Pain after surgery," the patients without treatment history did not know significantly lower than the patients with one. Patients without a treatment history of dental implants placed more importance on the preservation of healthy teeth. Because patients, in particular those without a treatment history of dental implants, are anxious about surgery, we should provide them with more information on treatment than we already do and explain the risks of treatment to them. To keep the credence between doctors and patients, informed consent and patient education on treatment are six important concerns. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Results of dental implantation at patients with the accompanying somatic pathology

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Until recently operations of dental implantation were performed at patients of not having associated diseases. Now researches of opportunities of dental implantation at different types of the accompanying somatopathies are conducted.

  16. Oral rehabilitation of segmental mandibulectomy patient with osseointegrated dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical management of oral cancer lesions results in explicit aesthetic and functional disfigurement, including facial deformity, loss of hard and soft tissue, impaired speech, swallowing and mastication, which modify the patient′s self-image and quality-of-life. Recent advances in head and neck reconstruction techniques and dental implant based prosthetic rehabilitation may significantly improve the quality-of-life and self-esteem for such post-surgery patients. This clinical report describes rehabilitation of oral cancer patient having segmental mandibulectomy with implant-supported fixed partial denture.

  17. Dental implant survival in diabetic patients; review and recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Dubey, Rajendra Kumar; Gupta, Deepesh Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Rising population of diabetic individuals across the world has become a big concern to the society. The persistent hyperglycemia may affect each and every tissue and consequently results in morbidity and eventually mortality in diabetic patients. A direct negative response of diabetes has been observed on oral tissues with few contradictions however, little are known about effect of diabetes on dental implant treatment and the consequent results. Many studies concerned with osteointegration a...

  18. Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  19. Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Oshida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities.

  20. Rehabilitative Considerations for Dental Implants in the Diabetic Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Katyayan, Preeti Agarwal; Katyayan, Manish; Shah, Rupal J.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious illness that affects many people, and there are many new cases diagnosed every year in all populations around the world. Dental implant is one of the restorative methods to replace missing teeth. As implants are directly anchored into bones, they provide stability, a more natural appearance, and minimize the risk of bone resorption. Thus, today, there is a high demand of dental implants and it is inevitable to meet diabetics who request implant treatment. However, Diabet...

  1. Subgingival microbiome in patients with healthy and ailing dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Zheng; Lixin Xu; Zicheng Wang; Lianshuo Li; Jieni Zhang; Qian Zhang; Ting Chen; Jiuxiang Lin; Feng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are commonly used to replace missing teeth. However, the dysbiotic polymicrobial communities of peri-implant sites are responsible for peri-implant diseases, such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. In this study, we analyzed the microbial characteristics of oral plaque from peri-implant pockets or sulci of healthy implants (n = 10), peri-implant mucositis (n = 8) and peri-implantitis (n = 6) sites using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. An increase in microbial...

  2. Diversity of patients microflora on orthopaedic and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, Ursula; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Niessner, Christoph; Hartwig, Erich; Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diversity of microbial colonization on implant material from different individuals. Eubacterial DNA was extracted, separated and sequenced from orthopaedic metallic implant material, tissues or body fluids, and skin of 4 patients as well as from identical dental cement material from 10 individuals after revision and routine removal. Additionally, the composition of the bacterial population of the dental cement and the oral swab sample from one individual after direct extraction of bacterial DNA was compared to extraction after conventional microbiological enrichment. The latter investigation proved that the commonly used cultivation technique gave different results than direct extraction of DNA, especially as regards the detection of anaerobes. Comparing the bacterial colonization of implant materials from different patients showed significant individual diversity. The common focus on a constricted pathogen spectrum may have to be expanded toward a multispecies population. Moreover, the dependence of the bacterial population on the individual host has to be integrated in discussing implant colonization and infection.

  3. Dental Implants - Perceiving Patients' Satisfaction in Relation to Clinical and Electromyography Study on Implant Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khursheed Alam

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of patients with posterior implants in relation to the clinical success criteria and surface electromyography (sEMG findings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Total 42 subjects were investigated. Twenty one subjects with posterior dental implants were interviewed using a questionnaire and the clinical success criteria were determined based on The International Congress of Oral Implantologists. The myofunction of the masticatory muscles were assessed using sEMG (21 subjects and compared to the control group of subjects without implants (21 subjects. Out of 21 subjects, all were satisfied with the aesthetics of their implant. Twenty of them (95.2% were satisfied with its function and stability. As for clinical criteria, 100% (50 of the implants were successful with no pain, mobility or exudates. sEMG findings showed that patients have significantly lower (p<0.01 basal or resting median power frequency but with muscle burst. During chewing, control subjects showed faster chewing action. There was no difference in reaction and recovery time of clenching for both groups. In conclusion, the satisfaction of implant patients was high, and which was in relation to the successful clinical success criteria and sEMG findings.

  4. The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shugaa-Addin, Bassam; Al-Shamiri, Hashem M.; Al-Maweri, Sadeq A.; TARAKJI, BASSEL

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the current literature of the survival of dental implants in irradiated head and neck cancer patients considering the role of implant location, bone augmentation, dose of radiation and timing of implant placement. Study Design Pubmed search was conducted to identify articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 and presenting data of dental implant survival with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Studies on animal subjects and craniofacial implant...

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Nakayama, Yohei; Tatsumi, Junichi; Kubota, Takehiko; Sato, Shuichi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Onitsuka, Tokuya; Sakagami, Ryuji; Nozaki, Takenori; Murakami, Shinya; Matsubara, Naritoshi; Tanaka, Maki; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Ota, Junya; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Ishihara, Yuichi; Ito, Taichi; Saito, Atsushi; Yamaki, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Etsuko; Hidaka, Toshirou; Sasaki, Daisuke; Yaegashi, Takashi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Araki, Hisao; Ikumi, Noriharu; Aoyama, Yukihiko; Kogai, Hideki; Nemoto, Kenji; Deguchi, Shinji; Takiguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Inokuchi, Keita; Ito, Takatoshi; Kado, Takashi; Furuichi, Yasushi; Kanazashi, Mikimoto; Gomi, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yukie; Kubokawa, Keita; Yoshinari, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Hirose, Tetsushi; Sase, Toshinaga; Arita, Hirokazu; Kodama, Toshiro; Shin, Kitetsu; Izumi, Yuichi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prevalences and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients attending a follow-up visit at dental hospitals or clinics as part of their maintenance program...

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Nakayama, Yohei; Tatsumi, Junichi; Kubota, Takehiko; Sato, Shuichi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Onitsuka, Tokuya; Sakagami, Ryuji; Nozaki, Takenori; Murakami, Shinya; Matsubara, Naritoshi; Tanaka, Maki; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Ota, Junya; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Ishihara, Yuichi; Ito, Taichi; Saito, Atsushi; Yamaki, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Etsuko; Hidaka, Toshirou; Sasaki, Daisuke; Yaegashi, Takashi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Araki, Hisao; Ikumi, Noriharu; Aoyama, Yukihiko; Kogai, Hideki; Nemoto, Kenji; Deguchi, Shinji; Takiguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Inokuchi, Keita; Ito, Takatoshi; Kado, Takashi; Furuichi, Yasushi; Kanazashi, Mikimoto; Gomi, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yukie; Kubokawa, Keita; Yoshinari, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Hirose, Tetsushi; Sase, Toshinaga; Arita, Hirokazu; Kodama, Toshiro; Shin, Kitetsu; Izumi, Yuichi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    We investigated the prevalences and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients attending a follow-up visit at dental hospitals or clinics as part of their maintenance program...

  7. [Full dental rehabilitation of a patient with implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imre, Ildikó; Tóth, Zsuzsanna

    2012-06-01

    During dental rehabilitation of a patient with ICD, an upper telescope retained overdenture with acrylic baseplate and lower cantilever bridges were constructed. In the consultation following the anamnesis and the clinical examination, the cardiologist did not believe antibiotic profilaxis to be necessary, adding that it is advisable to avoid the use of ultrasonic depurator and electrocauter. Nowadays after saving the life the improving of patient's better quality of life is an important aspect. The risk of ICD-implantation is minimal however, not negligible, the patient can pursue a way of life free of limitation. According to the latest trends, the number of ICD-implantations will increase exponentially in the near future, due to the aging of the population, the simplification and safeness of implantation and the increase of patients who can be treated with the device. In case of arritmia or putative dysfunction, the latest ICD-s are able to send emergency alert to the arritmia centre with the help of an outer transmitter. Probably the system will completely change the follow-up of patients with ICD within the next few years, clinical researches of its efficiency are going on at present.

  8. Patient satisfaction relating to implant treatment by undergraduate and postgraduate dental students--a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, P

    2009-08-01

    Recordings of patient satisfaction with provision of dental implant treatment are scarce. This study aimed to evaluate satisfaction amongst patients attending for provision of implant treatment by training undergraduate and postgraduate students at Dublin Dental School and Hospital (DDSH). A questionnaire was formulated and distributed to 100 individuals randomly selected from records of patients who had received implant treatment via student clinics in the previous 5 years. The response rate was 68%. Results showed a high overall level of satisfaction with treatment received.

  9. What do patients expect from treatment with Dental Implants? Perceptions, expectations and misconceptions: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Li, Ming; Tang, Hua; Wang, Peng-Lai; Zhao, Yu-Xiao; McGrath, Colman; Mattheos, Nikos

    2017-03-01

    While research in terms of patient-centered care in implant therapy is growing, few studies have investigated patients' initial perceptions prior to consultation with the implant dentist. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to capture patients' initial information level, perceptions, as well as expectations from the implant therapy. A 34-item questionnaire was developed to investigate patients' preoperative information, perceptions and expectations from treatment with Dental Implants. The study was conducted in three locations (Hong Kong, SiChuan and JiangSu) during 2014-2015 with 277 patients. The main information source about implant therapy was the dentist or hygienist for less than half of the patients (n = 113, 42%). About 62.8% of participants considered that they were in general informed about implants, but only 17.7% felt confident with the information they had. More than 30% of the sample appeared to maintain dangerous misperceptions about Dental Implants: "Dental Implants require less care than natural teeth"; "Treatment with Dental Implants is appropriate for all patients with missing teeth"; "Dental Implants last longer than natural teeth"; and "Treatments with Dental Implants have no risks or complications." Patients were divided when asked whether "Dental Implants are as functional as natural teeth" (agreement frequency = 52.7%). Expectations from treatment outcome were commonly high, while there was a significant correlation between the overall mean of perception scores and outcome expectation scores (r = 0.32, P dental team would need to diagnose and correct prior to initiating implant treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Dental implant survival rate in well-controlled diabetic patients. A systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Heber Arbildo; César Lamas; Dora Camara; Hernán Vásquez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental implants have now become one of the most popular options for replacing a missing tooth. On the other hand, diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease that affects a large part of the population and is generally considered an absolute or relative contraindication to implant therapy. Aim: To determine the survival rate of dental implants in controlled diabetic patients through a systematic review. Material and methods: A systematic search in Pubmed, SciELO and RedALyC databases...

  12. Influence of platelet-rich plasma on dental implants. Osseointegration in well-controlled diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, A; Shaari, R; Rahman, S A; Aljuboori, M J

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the osseointegration of dental implants in diabetic patients. A split-mouth design was employed in all 14 patients, with each patient receiving two mini implants. A PRP-coated mini implant was installed in one quadrant as a trial and a plain mini implant was added in the opposite quadrant to serve as a control. Radiographic evaluation was done at 3, 6, and 9 weeks after implant placement. Radiographic density is measured at five points around the implants, repeatedly. Results showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups of implants. The minimally invasive mini implants successfully maintained integration at the end of 9 weeks. There were no cases of implant failure. The results of this study suggest that platelet-rich plasma implant coating has no significant effect in reducing the time for mini implant osseointegration in diabetic patients.

  13. Systemic assessment of patients undergoing dental implant surgeries: A trans- and post-operative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Byakodi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Procedure-related and patient-related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants to a major extent. Hence, we aimed to evaluate and analyze various systemic factors in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients were included in the study, in which a total of 110 dental implants were placed. Complete examination of the subjects was done before and after placement of dental implants. Implant surgery was planned, and osseointegrated dental implants were placed in the subjects. Postoperative evaluation of the dental implant patients was done after 3 weeks. Anxiety levels were determined using State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI questionnaire on the surgery day and after 1 week of surgery. The participant describes how they feel at the moment by responding to twenty items as follows: (1 absolutely not, (2 slightly, (3 somewhat, or (4 very much. All the results were recorded and statistical analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Out of 51, 29 patients were males while 22 were females, with ratio of 1.32:1. Female patients' mean age was 50.18 years while male patients' mean age was 52.71 years, with statistically nonsignificant difference between them. Functional rehabilitation was the main purpose of choosing dental implants in more than 90% of the subjects. Diameter of 3.75 mm was the shortest implants to be placed in the present study, whereas in terms of length, 8.5 mm was the shortest length of dental implant used in the present study. Tooth area in which maximum implants were placed in our study was 36 tooth region. Maximum implants were placed in Type II bone quality (n = 38. Implants installed in the mandible were clamped more efficiently than implants placed in the maxilla (P < 0.001. The difference of average STAI-State subscore before and after the surgery was statistically significant (P < 0.05; significant. Conclusion: Mandibular dental implants show more clamping (torque than maxillary

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Nakayama, Yohei; Tatsumi, Junichi; Kubota, Takehiko; Sato, Shuichi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Onitsuka, Tokuya; Sakagami, Ryuji; Nozaki, Takenori; Murakami, Shinya; Matsubara, Naritoshi; Tanaka, Maki; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Ota, Junya; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Ishihara, Yuichi; Ito, Taichi; Saito, Atsushi; Yamaki, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Etsuko; Hidaka, Toshirou; Sasaki, Daisuke; Yaegashi, Takashi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Araki, Hisao; Ikumi, Noriharu; Aoyama, Yukihiko; Kogai, Hideki; Nemoto, Kenji; Deguchi, Shinji; Takiguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Inokuchi, Keita; Ito, Takatoshi; Kado, Takashi; Furuichi, Yasushi; Kanazashi, Mikimoto; Gomi, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yukie; Kubokawa, Keita; Yoshinari, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Hirose, Tetsushi; Sase, Toshinaga; Arita, Hirokazu; Kodama, Toshiro; Shin, Kitetsu; Izumi, Yuichi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2017-03-31

    We investigated the prevalences and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients attending a follow-up visit at dental hospitals or clinics as part of their maintenance program. This cross-sectional multicenter study enrolled patients with dental implants who attended regular check-ups as part of a periodontal maintenance program during the period from October 2012 through September 2013. Patients with implants with at least 3 years of loading time were included in the study. The condition of peri-implant tissue was examined and classified into the following categories: healthy, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis. Patients were also evaluated for implant risk factors. A total of 267 patients (110 men, 157 women; mean age: 62.5 ± 10.7 years) were analyzed. The prevalence of patient-based peri-implant mucositis was 33.3% (n = 89), and the prevalence of peri-implantitis was 9.7% (n = 26). Poor oral hygiene and a history of periodontitis were strong risk factors for peri-implant disease. The present prevalences were lower than those previously reported. The quality of periodontal therapy before and after implant installation and patient compliance and motivation, as indicated by plaque control level, appear to be important in maintaining peri-implant tissue health.

  15. Dental implants in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  16. Early dental implant failure in patient associated with oral bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridhimaa Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral bisphosphonates are routinely prescribed to post menopausal women. These have shown to increase the risk of osteonecrosis. However, this action may be augmented by local factors. A case report is presented showing an early implant failure in a patient taking oral bisphosphonates. Two implants were placed in left maxillary incisor area. Central incisor was associated with a previous endodontic failure and extraction. Lateral incisor was avulsed 3 years back. After 4 weeks of an implant placement, necrotic bone was evident along with the failing implant in central incisor area. This case report emphasizes on the incidence and an increased risk of implant failure in patients taking oral bisphosphonates.

  17. Short dental implants: A scoping review of the literature for patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edher, Faraj; Nguyen, Caroline T

    2017-09-16

    Dental implants can be essential in the rehabilitation of various cancer defects, but their ideal placement can be complicated by the limited dimensions of the available host bone. Surgical interventions developed to increase the amount of bone are not all predictable or successful and can sometimes be contraindicated. Short dental implants have been suggested as an alternative option in sites where longer implants are not possible. Whether they provide a successful treatment option is unclear. The purpose of this study was to review the literature on short dental implants and assess whether they are a viable definitive treatment option for rehabilitating cancer patients with deficient bone. A scoping review of the literature was performed, including a search of established periodontal textbooks for articles on short dental implants combined with a search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. A search for all literature published before June 2016 was based on the following keywords: ['dental implants' OR 'dental implantation, endosseous' OR 'dental prosthesis, implant supported'] AND [short]. The minimum acceptable implant length has been considered to be 6 mm. The survival rates of short implants varied between 74% and 96% at 5 years, depending on factors such as the quality of the patient's bone, primary stability of the implant, clinician's learning curve, and implant surface. Short implants can achieve results similar to those of longer implants in augmented bone and offer a treatment alternative that could reduce the need for invasive surgery and associated morbidity and be safer and more economical. Short dental implants (6 mm to 8 mm) can be used successfully to support single or multiple fixed reconstructions or overdentures in atrophic maxillae and mandibles. The use of short dental implants lessens the need for advanced and complicated surgical bone augmentation procedures, which reduces complications

  18. DEALING WITH DENTAL IMPLANT FAILURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them. PMID:19089213

  19. Dealing with dental implant failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options.When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  20. Dental implants in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in dental implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated by dental implants and being previously irradiated in the head and neck region versus nonirradiated patients against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. The study suggests that irradiation negatively affects the survival of implants, as well as the difference in implant location (maxilla vs mandible), but there is no statistically significant difference in survival when implants are inserted before or after 12 months after radiotherapy. The study failed to support the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in irradiated patients. It was observed that there was a tendency of lower survival rates of implants inserted in the patients submitted to higher irradiation doses. The results should be interpreted with caution because of the presence of uncontrolled confounding factors in the included studies.

  1. To what extent should dental implant placement be adopted as a standard for diabetic patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Ahmed S.; Abed, Hassan H.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is considered one of the major chronic diseases in the world. Long-term hyperglycemia considerably affects the body tissues, and consequently, can lead to morbidity and mortality. Moreover, many oral complications have been observed with DM but little consideration in relation to the placement of dental implants has been investigated. Dental research has analyzed the relation of dental implants and bone osseointegration in diabetic patients. Theoretically, an impaired immune system and delayed wound healing of these patients might decrease the success rate of implant placement; however, with noticeable advances in evidence-based dentistry and statistically significant results, successful implant treatment could be achieved significantly in well-controlled diabetic patients. PMID:27761554

  2. Dental implant survival rate in well-controlled diabetic patients. A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heber Arbildo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental implants have now become one of the most popular options for replacing a missing tooth. On the other hand, diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease that affects a large part of the population and is generally considered an absolute or relative contraindication to implant therapy. Aim: To determine the survival rate of dental implants in controlled diabetic patients through a systematic review. Material and methods: A systematic search in Pubmed, SciELO and RedALyC databases was performed. The selection criteria were: studies published in the last 10 years, with at least 20 controlled diabetic patients, reporting survival rate and number of implants placed, with follow-up periods equal to or longer than 1 year, including a control group of healthy patients. Methodological quality was analyzed with the follwing scales: Jadad and Downs & Black’s CMQ. Results: Three articles with a follow-up period between 1 and 12 years were analyzed. The overall survival rate of dental implants in diabetic controlled patients was 97.43%. Conclusion: The reviewed literature suggests that survival rate of dental implants in well-controlled diabetic patients is similar to non-diabetic patients.

  3. Osseointegration of Dental Implants in a Patient with Hajdu-cheney Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokou, Panagiota; Karoussis, Ioannis K.; Papavasiliou, George; Kamposiora, Phophi; Vrahopoulos, Theophilos P.; Vrotsos, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome (HCS) is a rare hereditary bone metabolism disorder characterized by acro-osteolysis, short stature, craniofacial changes, periodontitis and premature tooth loss. Extensive search of the current literature revealed no reports of implant placement in patients with HCS. Case Report: A 22-year old woman with osteoporosis, generalized advanced chronic periodontitis and premature tooth loss was referred to the Postgraduate Clinic of Periodontology, University of Athens-Greece. The patient was diagnosed in 2001 with HCS. The patient received non-surgical periodontal treatment and several teeth were extracted due to extensive alveolar bone loss. After careful consideration of the possible implications deriving from the patient’s condition and having taken her young age into account, initially, a dental implant was placed in the upper right first premolar region. Specific protocols such as longer healing periods were implemented, so five years after placement and successful osseointegration of this implant, four additional dental implants were placed in the posterior regions of the maxilla and the mandible. Prosthetic rehabilitation followed 6 months after implant placement. Upon completion of periodontal treatment, the patient was enrolled in a periodontal maintenance program. Results: Clinical and radiographic examination of the patient during the periodontal maintenance program after implant placement revealed no abnormalities in the implant region. Conclusion: Patients with HCS suffer from periodontitis, bone destruction and premature tooth loss. This case indicates the successful osseointegration of dental implants in patients with HCS. However, further research is required in order to determine the predictability of dental implant placement in those patients. PMID:27857819

  4. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María-Jesús; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; López-Valverde-Centeno, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words "implant" AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication.

  5. Zirconia Dental Implants: Investigation of Clinical Parameters, Patient Satisfaction, and Microbial Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holländer, Jens; Lorenz, Jonas; Stübinger, Stefan; Hölscher, Werner; Heidemann, Detlef; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, dental implants made from zirconia have been further developed and are considered a reliable treatment method for replacing missing teeth. The aim of this study was to analyze dental implants made from zirconia regarding their clinical performance compared with natural teeth (control). One hundred six zirconia implants in 38 adults were analyzed in a clinical study after 1 year of loading. The plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing pocket depth (PPD), probing attachment level (PAL), and creeping or recession (CR/REC) of the gingiva were detected and compared with natural control teeth (CT). Furthermore, the papilla index (PAP), Periotest values (PTV), microbial colonization of the implant/dental sulcus fluid, and patient satisfaction were assessed. The survival rate was 100%. No statistical significance was observed between implants and teeth regarding BOP, PPD, and PAL. A statistical significance was detected regarding PI and CR/REC with significantly less plaque accumulation and recession in the study group. Mean PAP was 1.76 ± 0.55, whereas the mean PTV was -1.31 ± 2.24 (range from -5 to +6). A non-statistically significant higher colonization of periodontitis/peri-implantitis bacteria was observed in the implant group. The questionnaire showed that the majority of the patients were satisfied with the overall treatment. One-piece zirconia dental implants exhibited similar clinical results (BOP, PPD, and PAL) compared with natural teeth in regard to adhesion of plaque (PI) and creeping attachment (CR/REC); zirconia implants performed even better. The favorable results for PAL and CR/REC reflect the comparable low affinity of zirconia for plaque adhesion. Patient satisfaction indicated a high level of acceptance for zirconia implants. However, a long-term follow-up is needed to support these findings.

  6. Dental implants in patients with oral mucosal diseases - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, P A; Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Khongkhunthian, P; Strietzel, F P

    2016-05-01

    To reveal dental implants survival rates in patients with oral mucosal diseases: oral lichen planus (OLP), Sjögren's syndrome (SjS), epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). A systematic literature search using PubMed/Medline and Embase databases, utilising MeSH and search term combinations identified publications on clinical use implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in patients with OLP, SjS, EB, SSc reporting on study design, number, gender and age of patients, follow-up period exceeding 12 months, implant survival rate, published in English between 1980 and May 2015. After a mean observation period (mOP) of 53·9 months (standard deviation [SD] ±18·3), 191 implants in 57 patients with OLP showed a survival rate (SR) of 95·3% (SD ±21·2). For 17 patients with SjS (121 implants, mOP 48·6 ± 28·7 months), 28 patients with EB (165 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months) and five patients with SSc (38 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months), the respective SR was 91·7 ± 5·97% (SjS), 98·5 ± 2·7% (EB) and 97·4 ± 4·8% (SSc). Heterogeneity of data structure and quality of reporting outcomes did not allow for further comparative data analysis. For implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of patients suffering from OLP, SjS, EB and SSc, no evidence-based treatment guidelines are presently available. However, no strict contraindication for the placement of implants seems to be justified in patients with OLP, SjS, EB nor SSc. Implant survival rates are comparable to those of patients without oral mucosal diseases. Treatment guidelines as for dental implantation in patients with healthy oral mucosa should be followed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Dental implants in patients treated with oral bisphosphonates: a bibliographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Carralero, José-Maria; Parra-Mino, Pablo; Ramírez-Fernández, Piedad; Morata-Murcia, Isabel Maria; Mompeán-Gambín, Maria del Carmen; Calvo-Guirado, José-Luis

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates inhibit bone resorption and are used to treat a range of pathologies, including Paget disease, osteoporosis, multiple myeloma and metastases associated with breast or prostate cancer. At present, there is no effective treatment for bisphosphonate induced osteonecrosis, so prevention is extremely important. Since quality of life deteriorates for those suffering osteonecrosis, maximum precautions should be taken with patients at risk, and especially whenever oral surgery, including dental implant placement, is contemplated. Dentists and oral or maxillofacial surgeons must keep up to date with the latest approaches to prevention, particularly when treating patients who are presently taking, or who will be taking bisphosphonates and are also candidates for dental implants.

  8. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  9. Anodized dental implant surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Muktadar Anand; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  10. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  11. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised ...

  12. Adiponectin may improve osseointegration of dental implants in T2DM patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Yin, Guozhu; Luo, En

    2011-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the most common form of diabetes. Compared with the general population, a higher failure rate is seen in T2DM patients. There is also evidence that chronically high levels of plasma glycemia leads to inflammatory effect and a negative influence on bone formation and remodeling, and reduce osseointegration of implants. Recently studies reveal that adiponectin is an insulin-sensitizing adipokine, and closely associated with T2DM. Adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory properties and has been shown to increase bone density by inhibiting osteoclast formation and promoting the formation of osteoblasts. We therefore hypothesize systemically infused or locally used adiponectin could accelerate osseointegration of dental implants in T2DM. Our hypothesis could help to create an option to improve success ratio of dental implants in T2DM by the replenishment of adiponectin in T2DM patients.

  13. Absorbed doses on patients undergoing tomographic exams for pre-surgery planning of dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenobio, M.A.F. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 941, CEP 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br; da Silva, T.A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 941, CEP 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: madelon@cdtn.br

    2007-06-15

    The thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry was used to measure entrance skin absorbed doses at anatomical points close to critical organs of patients undergoing tomographic techniques as part of a pre-surgery planning for dental implants. The dosimetric procedure was applied in 19 patients, and absorbed doses could be measured with a combined uncertainty down to 14%. Results showed that patient doses may be increased by a factor of 20 in the helical computed tomography compared to panoramic and spiral conventional tomographic exams.

  14. Dental implants as Treatment Option in Patients With Osteopenic Syndrome and Type II Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    M.V. Kozlova; A.M. Mkrtumjan; A.M. Panin; D.R. Tovmasjan

    2009-01-01

    One of the important problems in modern dentistry is the study of jaw bone changes associated with type II diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of osteopenic syndrome on osseointegration when using dental implants in patients with type II diabetes. 40 patients with type II diabetes have been evaluated and assigned to two different groups based on the duration of the disease. Including criteria in patients with compensated diabetes were fasting glucose test results <...

  15. Long-term outcomes of oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients: A retrospective case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Escoda, Cosme; Pérez-Álvarez, Débora; Camps-Font, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Background The existing information on oral rehabilitations with dental implants in VIH-positive patients is scarce and of poor quality. Moreover, no long-term follow-up studies are available. Hence, the aims of this study were to describe the long-term survival and success rates of dental implants in a group of HIV-positive patients and to identify the most common postoperative complications, including peri-implant diseases. Material and Methods A retrospective case series of HIV-positive subjects treated with dental implants at the School of Dentistry of the University of Barcelona (Spain) was studied. Several clinical parameters were registered, including CD4 cell count, viral load and surgical complications. Additionally, the patients were assessed for implant survival and success rates and for the prevalence of peri-implant diseases. A descriptive statistical analysis of the data was performed. Results Nine participants (57 implants) were included. The patients’ median age was 42 years (IQR=13.5 years). The implant survival and success rates were 98.3% and 68.4%, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 77.5 months (SD=16.1 months). The patient-based prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were 22.2% and 44.4% respectively at the last appointment. Patients that attended regular periodontal maintenance visits had significantly less mean bone loss than non-compliant patients (1.3 mm and 3.9 mm respectively). Conclusions Oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients seems to provide satisfactory results. In order to reduce the considerably high prevalence of peri-implant diseases, strict maintenance programmes must be implemented. Key words:HIV infection, dental implants, oral implantology, complications, peri-implantitis, peri-implant diseases. PMID:26946205

  16. Progress and trends in patients' mindset on dental implants. I: level of information, sources of information and need for patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, Bernhard; Zechner, Werner; Watzak, Georg; Ulm, Christian; Watzek, Georg; Tepper, Gabor

    2011-02-01

    Little is known about the level of information on implant dentistry in the public. A representative opinion poll on dental implants in the Austrian population was published in 2003 (Clinical Oral Implants Research 14:621-642). Seven years later, the poll was rerun to assess the up-to-date information level and evaluate recent progress and trends in patients' mindset on dental implants. One thousand adults--representative for the Austrian population--were presented with a total of 19 questionnaire items regarding the level and the sources of information about dental implants as well as the subjective and objective need for patient information. Compared with the survey of 2003, the subjective level of patient information about implant dentistry has significantly increased in the Austrian population. The patients' implant awareness rate was 79%. The objective level of general knowledge about dental implants was still all but satisfactory revealing unrealistic patient expectations. Three-quarters trusted their dentists for information about dental implants, while one-quarter turned to the media. The patients' wish for high-quality implant restorations was significantly higher than in 2003, yet the majority felt that only specialists should perform implant dentistry. This representative survey reveals that dentists are still the main source of patient information, but throws doubt on the quality of their public relations work. Dentists must improve communication strategies to provide their patients with comprehensible, legally tenable information on dental implants and bridge information gaps in the future. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Dental Implant Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  18. Eleven dental implants placed in a liver transplantation patient: a case report and 5-year clinical evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Liang; WANG Qing; YU You-cheng

    2011-01-01

    Due to an increased risk of infection, dental implant in organ transplantation patients has long been considered questionable, particularly when the restoration is complicated. Five-year follow-up data of a 45-year-old liver transplant recipient with long-term immunosuppressive therapy was reported. One year after liver transplantation, 11 Br(a)nemark implants were inserted in the maxilla and mandible, using minimally invasive surgery. Oral clinical parameters included peri-implant bone absorption, probing depth, and implant mobility. The measured fifth-year parameters were within normal ranges indicating a stable osseointegration with moderate vertical bone loss. This case report suggests that immunocompromised patients can be successfully rehabilitated with dental implants through careful examination,suitable antibiotic administration, and minimally invasive dental implant procedure.

  19. Effect of Masticatory Forces Transmitted by Dental Implants on the Mandibular Bone of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Juncar Raluca-Iulia; Juncar Mihai; Gligor Florin-Onişor; Popa Amorin-Remus

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Diabetes mellitus is considered to be one of the most important diseases of our society, affecting a considerable proportion of the adult population. Currently, dental implant treatment of diabetic patients is controversial, the main controversy being related to changes that occur in the jaw bones of the diabetic patient and the ensuing side effects. This preliminary study aims to evaluate the response of mandibular bone to masticatory forces transmitted by dental implant...

  20. Immediate versus delayed loading of strategic mini dental implants for the stabilization of partial removable dental prostheses: a patient cluster randomized, parallel-group 3-year trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Torsten; Al Jaghsi, Ahmad; Schwahn, Bernd; Hilgert, Janina; Lucas, Christian; Biffar, Reiner; Schwahn, Christian; Heinemann, Friedhelm

    2016-07-30

    Acceptable short-term survival rates (>90 %) of mini-implants (diameter implants as strategic abutments for a better retention of partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) are not available. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that immediately loaded mini-implants show more bone loss and less success than strategic mini-implants with delayed loading. In this four-center (one university hospital, three dental practices in Germany), parallel-group, controlled clinical trial, which is cluster randomized on patient level, a total of 80 partially edentulous patients with unfavourable number and distribution of remaining abutment teeth in at least one jaw will receive supplementary min-implants to stabilize their PRDP. The mini-implant are either immediately loaded after implant placement (test group) or delayed after four months (control group). Follow-up of the patients will be performed for 36 months. The primary outcome is the radiographic bone level changes at implants. The secondary outcome is the implant success as a composite variable. Tertiary outcomes include clinical, subjective (quality of life, satisfaction, chewing ability) and dental or technical complications. Strategic implants under an existing PRDP are only documented for standard-diameter implants. Mini-implants could be a minimal invasive and low cost solution for this treatment modality. The trial is registered at Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (German register of clinical trials) under DRKS-ID: DRKS00007589 ( www.germanctr.de ) on January 13(th), 2015.

  1. Effect of Masticatory Forces Transmitted by Dental Implants on the Mandibular Bone of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juncar Raluca-Iulia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Diabetes mellitus is considered to be one of the most important diseases of our society, affecting a considerable proportion of the adult population. Currently, dental implant treatment of diabetic patients is controversial, the main controversy being related to changes that occur in the jaw bones of the diabetic patient and the ensuing side effects. This preliminary study aims to evaluate the response of mandibular bone to masticatory forces transmitted by dental implants in diabetic patients. Material and Method: 11 dental implants placed in the mandible were selected, and mandibular bone resorption as a result of masticatory forces transmitted by them was evaluated. Results: The mean bone resorption rates were the following: 2.72% at the time of dental implant exposure, 10% at 3 months from dental implant exposure, and 13.63% at 6 months from exposure. Conclusions: No significant changes in mandibular bone response to the action of dental implants were found in diabetic patients compared to standard response reported in non-diabetic patients.

  2. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  3. Survival of dental implants in native and grafted bone in irradiated head and neck cancer patients: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind Buddula

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the long-term survival of dental implants placed in native or grafted bone in irradiated bone in subjects who had received radiation for head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients who received dental implants following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer between May 1, 1987 and July 1, 2008. Only patients irradiated with a radiation dose of 50 Gy or greater and those who received dental implants in the irradiated field after head and neck radiation were included in the study. The associations between implant survival and patient/implant characteristics were estimated by fitting univariate marginal Cox proportional hazards models. Results: A total of 48 patients who had prior head and neck radiation had 271 dental implants placed during May 1987-July 2008. There was no statistically significant difference between implant failure in native and grafted bone (P=0.76. Survival of implants in grafted bone was 82.3% and 98.1% in maxilla and mandible, respectively, after 3 years. Survival of implants in native bone in maxilla and mandible was 79.8% and 100%, respectively, after 3 years. For implants placed in the native bone, there was a higher likelihood of failure in the maxilla compared to the mandible and there was also a tendency for implants placed in the posterior region to fail compared to those placed in the anterior region. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in survival when implants were placed in native or grafted bone in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. For implants placed in native bone, survival was significantly influenced by the location of the implant (maxilla or mandible, anterior or posterior.

  4. Long-term outcomes of oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients: A retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Escoda, C; Pérez-Álvarez, D; Camps-Font, O; Figueiredo, R

    2016-05-01

    The existing information on oral rehabilitations with dental implants in VIH-positive patients is scarce and of poor quality. Moreover, no long-term follow-up studies are available. Hence, the aims of this study were to describe the long-term survival and success rates of dental implants in a group of HIV-positive patients and to identify the most common postoperative complications, including peri-implant diseases. A retrospective case series of HIV-positive subjects treated with dental implants at the School of Dentistry of the University of Barcelona (Spain) was studied. Several clinical parameters were registered, including CD4 cell count, viral load and surgical complications. Additionally, the patients were assessed for implant survival and success rates and for the prevalence of peri-implant diseases. A descriptive statistical analysis of the data was performed. Nine participants (57 implants) were included. The patients' median age was 42 years (IQR=13.5 years). The implant survival and success rates were 98.3% and 68.4%, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 77.5 months (SD=16.1 months). The patient-based prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were 22.2% and 44.4% respectively at the last appointment. Patients that attended regular periodontal maintenance visits had significantly less mean bone loss than non-compliant patients (1.3 mm and 3.9 mm respectively). Oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients seems to provide satisfactory results. In order to reduce the considerably high prevalence of peri-implant diseases, strict maintenance programmes must be implemented.

  5. Dental implants inserted in male versus female patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL) and post-operative infection for implants inserted in male or female patients, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in December 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. Ninety-one publications were included, with a total of 27,203 implants inserted in men (1185 failures), and 25,154 implants inserted in women (1039 failures). The results suggest that the insertion of dental implants in male patients statistically affected the implant failure rates (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.07-1.37, P = 0.002). Due to the limited number of studies reporting results on MBL, it is difficult to estimate the real effect of the insertion of implants in different sexes on the marginal bone level. Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'post-operative infection' was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

  6. Dental management of a patient fitted with subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator device and concomitant warfarin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Khalil, Hesham Saleh; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2015-07-01

    Automated Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (AICD), simply known as an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD), has been used in patients for more than 30 years. An Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is a small battery-powered electrical impulse generator that is implanted in patients who are at a risk of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia or any such related event. Typically, patients with these types of occurrences are on anticoagulant therapy. The desired International Normalized Ratio (INR) for these patients is in the range of 2-3 to prevent any subsequent cardiac event. These patients possess a challenge to the dentist in many ways, especially during oral surgical procedures, and these challenges include risk of sudden death, control of post-operative bleeding and pain. This article presents the dental management of a 60 year-old person with an ICD and concomitant anticoagulant therapy. The patient was on multiple medications and was treated for a grossly neglected mouth with multiple carious root stumps. This case report outlines the important issues in managing patients fitted with an ICD device and at a risk of sudden cardiac death.

  7. Clinical and radiological results of patients treated with three treatment modalities for overdentures on implants of the ITI (R) Dental Implant System - A randomized controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D; van Waas, MAJ; Mulder, J; Vermeeren, JIJF; Kalk, W

    1999-01-01

    In a randomized controlled clinical trial carried out at the Ignatius teaching hospital in Breda, The Netherlands, 110 edentulous patients with severe mandibular bone loss were treated with implants of the ITI(R) Dental Implant System using 3 different treatment strategies: a mandibular overdenture

  8. Clinical and radiological results of patients treated with three treatment modalities for overdentures on implants of the ITI (R) Dental Implant System - A randomized controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D; van Waas, MAJ; Mulder, J; Vermeeren, JIJF; Kalk, W

    In a randomized controlled clinical trial carried out at the Ignatius teaching hospital in Breda, The Netherlands, 110 edentulous patients with severe mandibular bone loss were treated with implants of the ITI(R) Dental Implant System using 3 different treatment strategies: a mandibular overdenture

  9. Investigation of the Effects of Abutment and Implant Length on Stability of Short Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    OZYILMAZ, Eda; Aykul, Halil; OZYILMAZ, Emre; Dalkiz, Mehmet; M. Burak BİLGİN

    2015-01-01

    The use of dental implants to solve different problems in dentistry has been growing rapidly. The success rates of dental implants are also very important for patients. Depending on the bone level of patients, short dental implants are very popular and widely used by many dentists. Although many dentists are using short dental implants frequently, It can be guessed that there can be stability problems because of crown to implant ratios. In this study, it is aimed to find out...

  10. Dental implant as an option for tooth replacement: The awareness of patients at a tertiary hospital in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaide Shakeerah Gbadebo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A survey was set out to evaluate the knowledge of patients about tooth replacement as a whole, and assess their awareness of implant-retained prosthesis as an option of tooth replacement. Materials and Methods: Information on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge about implant-retained tooth as an option for missing tooth replacement, cost implication, source of information and knowledge about other options of tooth replacement were obtained from patients attending the dental clinics of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, using structured self-administered questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Result: A total of 220 patients aged 18-84 years with a mean age of 37.6 (±16.5 years participated in the study, with a male to female ratio of 1:1.1. The majority (92.5% knew that missing teeth can be replaced, while a significantly lower proportion (28.9% knew about dental implants as an option (P < 0.01. Dentists were the major source of information on dental implants (68%. Only 21 (36.8% of those who had heard about dental implant had knowledge about the cost (P < 0.000. Conclusion: A low level of awareness about dental implant as tooth replacement option exist in this environment, although most of the study participants were aware that missing teeth can be replaced.

  11. A clinical study on the effectiveness of implant supported dental restoration in patients with chronic periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, B Q; Lan, J; Huang, H Y; Liang, J; Ma, X N; Huo, L D; Xu, X

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of implant supported dental restorations in patients with chronic periodontal diseases at various stages within 2 years of completing treatment. 30 patients with periodontal diseases and 30 patients without periodontal diseases were studied. Total counts of 276 implant bodies were divided into group A (patients with periodontal diseases; a total of 149 implants) and group B (patients with healthy periodontium; a total of 127 implants). In group A subjects, periodontitis was treated prior to implant placement. The study focused on patients' modified sulcus bleeding index, modified plaque index, implant mobility index, periodontal probing depth and implant success rate 12 and 24 months after the completion of the treatment. The result show: there were no significant differences in implant success rate between groups A and B; modified sulcus bleeding index scores showed differences between the groups 24 months after treatment; there were no significant differences in other clinical indexes during the study between the groups; there were no significant differences in periodontal probing depth between the groups; modified plaque index and modified sulcus bleeding index were positively correlated in implant supported dental restoration patients with chronic periodontal diseases.

  12. Dental Implants: Dual Stabilization Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    More recent epidemiological data seem to show an increasing trend of tooth loss due to periodontal reasons rather than caries; the presence of initial attachment loss, bone height and the habit of smoking significantly increase the risk of tooth mortality. A dental implant is a titanium screw which is placed into bone to replace missing teeth. The implant mimics the root of a tooth in function. Dental Implants have changed the face of dentistry over the last three decades. Success of dental i...

  13. Physico-Chemical and Biochemical Characteristics of Mixed Saliva in Patients at Various Time After Dental Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekiy A.O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available he study deals with comparison of physico-chemical (pH, buffer capacity, viscosity and biochemical (concentration of albumin, calcium, phosphate, the activity of aamylase and alkaline phosphatase variables in the mixed saliva (oral fluid, OF in persons with dental implants depending on its number (1-2 or 3 and more and time after installation (2-4 and 5-11 months, and those with satisfactory state of oral health and without implants. The pH value in OF was almost similar in patients of group comparison and at different times after implantation and at different number of implants. The OF buffer capacity in different periods after the installation of single implants varied, been typical for the comparison group. A 2.4-fold decrease of buffer capacity was character at 2-4 months after installation of three or more implants, later this decline has not recovered fully. The installation of a single implant was not accompanied by changes in the OF viscosity, while multiple dental implant installation let to increase of viscosity 2.1 times less than in the comparison group at 2-4 months terms. The alterations of some biochemical properties of OF after dental implantation were shown to depend on the number and timing since the load on the installed constructions. Thus, more significant changes in oral fluid are to reduce the buffer capacity and viscosity of oral fluid, the concentration of calcium ions and the activity of a-amylase, they may be stored at the time of 5-11 months after implantation. These changes are associated with possible functional properties of oral fluid, which may affect the adaptation of dental system to new functional conditions connected to dental implant installation.

  14. Osseoperception in Dental Implants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Brånemark, Per-Ingvar

    2016-04-01

    Replacement of lost teeth has significant functional and psychosocial effects. The capability of osseointegrated dental implants to transmit a certain amount of sensibility is still unclear. The phenomenon of developing a certain amount of tactile sensibility through osseointegrated dental implants is called osseoperception. The aim of this article is to evaluate the available literature to find osseoperception associated with dental implants. To identify suitable literature, an electronic search was performed using Medline and PubMed database. Articles published in English and articles whose abstract is available in English were included. The articles included in the review were based on osseoperception, tactile sensation, and neurophysiological mechanoreceptors in relation to dental implants. Articles on peri-implantitis and infection-related sensitivity were not included. Review articles without the original data were excluded, although references to potentially pertinent articles were noted for further follow-up. The phenomenon of osseoperception remains a matter of debate, so the search strategy mainly focused on articles on osseoperception and tactile sensibility of dental implants. This review presents the histological, neurophysiological, and psychophysical evidence of osseoperception and also the role of mechanoreceptors in osseoperception. The literature on osseoperception in dental implants is very scarce. The initial literature search resulted in 90 articles, of which 81 articles that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this systematic review. Patients restored with implant-supported prostheses reported improved tactile and motor function when compared with patients wearing complete dentures. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Patient specific root-analogue dental implants – additive manufacturing and finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gattinger Johannes; Bullemer Christian N.; Harrysson Ola L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to prove the possibility of manufacturing patient specific root analogue two-part (implant and abutment) implants by direct metal laser sintering. The two-part implant design enables covered healing of the implant. Therefore, CT-scans of three patients are used for reverse engineering of the implants, abutments and crowns. Patient specific implants are manufactured and measured concerning dimensional accuracy and surface roughness. Impacts of occlusal forces are simulate...

  16. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants.

  17. [The impact of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the introduction of dental implants can only be understood when the historical context is clarified. In the past, the main treatment carried out by dentists consisted of filling or, in unfortunate cases, removal of painful teeth. Only since the introduction of dental implants did

  18. Assessment and Evaluation of Quality of Life (OHRQoL) of Patients with Dental Implants Using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) - A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzarea, Bader K

    2016-04-01

    Peri-implant tissue health is a requisite for success of dental implant therapy. Plaque accumulation leads to initiation of gingivitis around natural teeth and peri-implantitis around dental implants. Peri-implantitis around dental implants may result in implant placement failure. For obtaining long-term success, timely assessment of dental implant site is mandatory. To assess and evaluate Quality of Life (OHRQoL) of individuals with dental implants using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Total 92 patients were evaluated for assessment of the health of peri-implant tissues by recording, Plaque Index (PI), Probing Pocket Depth (PD), Bleeding On Probing (BOP) and Probing Attachment Level (PAL) as compared to contra-lateral natural teeth (control). In the same patients Quality of Life Assessment was done by utilizing Oral Health Impact Profile Index (OHIP-14). The mean plaque index around natural teeth was more compared to implants and it was statistically significant. Other three dimensions mean bleeding on probing; mean probing attachment level and mean pocket depth around both natural teeth and implant surfaces was found to be not statistically significant. OHIP-14 revealed that patients with dental implants were satisfied with their Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL). Similar inflammatory conditions are present around both natural teeth and implant prostheses as suggested by results of mean plaque index, mean bleeding on probing, mean pocket depth and mean probing attachment level, hence reinforcing the periodontal health maintenance both prior to and after incorporation of dental implants. Influence of implant prostheses on patient's oral health related quality of life (as depicted by OHIP-14) and patients' perceptions and expectations may guide the clinician in providing the best implant services.

  19. Comparative Clinical Study of Conventional Dental Implants and Mini Dental Implants for Mandibular Overdentures: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunmeungtong, Weerapan; Kumchai, Thongnard; Strietzel, Frank P; Reichart, Peter A; Khongkhunthian, Pathawee

    2017-04-01

    Dental implant-retained overdentures have been chosen as the treatment of choice for complete mandibular removable dentures. Dental implants, such as mini dental implants, and components for retaining overdentures, are commercially available. However, comparative clinical studies comparing mini dental implants and conventional dental implants using different attachment for implant-retained overdentures have not been well documented. To compare the clinical outcomes of using two mini dental implants with Equator(®) attachments, four mini dental implants with Equator attachments, or two conventional dental implants with ball attachments, by means of a randomized clinical trial. Sixty patients received implant-retained mandibular overdentures in the interforaminal region. The patients were divided into three groups. In Groups 1 and 2, two and four mini dental implants, respectively, were placed and immediately loaded by overdentures, using Equator(®) attachments. In Group 3, conventional implants were placed. After osseointegration, the implants were loaded by overdentures, using ball attachments. The study distribution was randomized and double-blinded. Outcome measures included changes in radiological peri-implant bone level from surgery to 12 months postinsertion, prosthodontic complications and patient satisfaction. The cumulative survival rate in the three clinical groups after one year was 100%. There was no significant difference (p dental implants with Equator attachments. However, there was a significant difference in marginal bone loss and patient satisfaction between those receiving mini dental implants with Equator attachments and conventional dental implants with ball attachments. The marginal bone resorption in Group 3 was significantly higher than in Groups 1 and 2 (p dental implants can be immediately used successfully for retaining lower complete dentures, as shown after a 1-year follow up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. 10-year survival rate and the incidence of peri-implant disease of 374 titanium dental implants with a SLA surface: a prospective cohort study in 177 fully and partially edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Frank J J; Ofec, Ronen; Schulten, Engelbert A J M; Ten Bruggenkate, Christiaan M

    2015-10-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates the 10-year survival and incidence of peri-implant disease at implant and patient level of sandblasted, large grid, and acid-etched titanium dental implants (Straumann, soft tissue level, SLA surface) in fully and partially edentulous patients. Patients who had dental implant surgery in the period between November 1997 and June 2001, with a follow-up of at least 10 years, were investigated for clinical and radiological examination. Among the 506 inserted dental implants in 250 patients, 10-year data regarding the outcome of implants were available for 374 dental implants in 177 patients. In the current study, peri-implantitis was defined as advanced bone loss (≧1.5 mm. postloading) in combination with bleeding on probing. At 10-year follow-up, only one implant was lost (0.3%) 2 months after implant surgery due to insufficient osseointegration. The average bone loss at 10 year postloading was 0.52 mm. Advanced bone loss at 10-year follow-up was present in 35 dental implants (9.8%). Seven percent of the observed dental implants showed bleeding on probing in combination with advanced bone loss and 4.2% when setting the threshold for advanced bone loss at 2.0 mm. Advanced bone loss without bleeding on probing was present in 2.8% of all implants. In this prospective study, the 10-year survival rate at implant and patient level was 99.7% and 99.4%, respectively. Peri-implantitis was present in 7% of the observed dental implants according to the above-mentioned definition of peri-implantitis. This study shows that SLA implants offer predictable long-term results as support in the treatment of fully and partially edentulous patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Current trends in dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evoluti...

  2. Voxel-based registration of simulated and real patient CBCT data for accurate dental implant pose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, António H. J.; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Correia, André Ricardo; Fernandes, Valter; Pinho, A. C. M.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    The success of dental implant-supported prosthesis is directly linked to the accuracy obtained during implant's pose estimation (position and orientation). Although traditional impression techniques and recent digital acquisition methods are acceptably accurate, a simultaneously fast, accurate and operator-independent methodology is still lacking. Hereto, an image-based framework is proposed to estimate the patient-specific implant's pose using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and prior knowledge of implanted model. The pose estimation is accomplished in a threestep approach: (1) a region-of-interest is extracted from the CBCT data using 2 operator-defined points at the implant's main axis; (2) a simulated CBCT volume of the known implanted model is generated through Feldkamp-Davis-Kress reconstruction and coarsely aligned to the defined axis; and (3) a voxel-based rigid registration is performed to optimally align both patient and simulated CBCT data, extracting the implant's pose from the optimal transformation. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the framework: (1) an in silico study using 48 implants distributed through 12 tridimensional synthetic mandibular models; (2) an in vitro study using an artificial mandible with 2 dental implants acquired with an i-CAT system; and (3) two clinical case studies. The results shown positional errors of 67+/-34μm and 108μm, and angular misfits of 0.15+/-0.08° and 1.4°, for experiment 1 and 2, respectively. Moreover, in experiment 3, visual assessment of clinical data results shown a coherent alignment of the reference implant. Overall, a novel image-based framework for implants' pose estimation from CBCT data was proposed, showing accurate results in agreement with dental prosthesis modelling requirements.

  3. Oral health and oral implant status in edentulous patients with implant-supported dental prostheses who are receiving long-term nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Rita; Becktor, Jonas P; Brown, Andrew; Laurizohn, Christer; Isaksson, Sten

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oral health and oral implant status in a group of edentulous patients receiving long-term residential or nursing care (LTC), all of whom had implant-supported fixed or removable dental prostheses. A dental examination was performed on a total of 3310 patients receiving LTC and from this population 35 edentulous patients in whom dental implants had been placed formed the cohort for this study. All examinations were performed by a specialist in hospital dentistry and took place in the patients' own home environment. Oral health was assessed by means of a protocol which evaluated oral hygiene status, possible oral mucosal inflammation and oral mucosal friction levels. Any problems with the implant-supported prosthesis, implant mobility or other complications were also assessed. In addition, patients were asked about any oral symptoms and their usual oral hygiene procedures. About half of the subjects (17/35) were registered as having no/mild inflammation with 18 of 35 having moderate/severe inflammation. Twelve of the 35 patients had good/acceptable oral hygiene and 23 of 35 had poor/bad oral hygiene. Twenty-one of the 35 patients depended on help from the nursing personnel for their daily oral hygiene procedures. Obvious problems with food impaction were noted in 11 patients. A total of 229 implants had been placed in 43 jaws supporting 40 full arch-fixed prostheses and three implant-borne overdentures. There was no evidence of mobility or fractures of either the implants or the prostheses. Fifteen implants showed some exposed screw threads. Pus was exuding from one implant site and general peri-implant gingival hyperplasia was noted in two patients. Twenty-four patients were completely satisfied with the function and appearance of their implant-supported prostheses. Two patients were totally dissatisfied. This study indicates that oral implant therapy can be considered as a treatment of choice in elderly patients, even if

  4. The Prevalence of Dental Implants and Related Factors in Patients with Sjögren Syndrome: Results from a Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Katinka; Callhoff, Johanna; Westhoff, Gisela; Dietrich, Thomas; Dörner, Thomas; Zink, Angela

    2016-07-01

    To investigate prevalence and patient-reported outcomes of dental implants in patients with Sjögren syndrome (SS). A total of 205 female patients from an observational cohort study answered oral health questionnaires about periodontal signs and symptoms, dentures, dental implants, comorbidities, and therapies that may interfere with bone remodeling. Data were compared with the reports of 87 female healthy controls. The patients were older than the controls (58 ± 12 and 54 ± 14 yrs, respectively) and differed substantially in the prevalence of self-reported gingivitis (60% and 35%), self-reported periodontitis (19% and 8%), and in the numbers of remaining teeth (21 ± 7 and 24 ± 5). Patients more frequently had removable prostheses (36% compared with 23%) and dental implants (16% compared with 7%). The 32 patients with SS with dental implants had a mean number of 3.1 ± 2.0 implants. Notably, for patients with implants, their oldest existing implant survived for a mean period of 4.9 ± 5.4 years. A total of 5 of 104 (4.8%) implants in the patients and none of the 14 implants in the controls had to be removed. A total of 75% of the patients were highly satisfied with the implants and 97% would recommend them to other patients with SS. A substantial portion of patients with SS have dental complications and require subsequent implants. The majority were satisfied with the implants and would recommend them to other patients. The high implant survival rate may encourage patients, rheumatologists, and dentists to consider dental implants for the treatment of patients with SS.

  5. Patient specific root-analogue dental implants – additive manufacturing and finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gattinger Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to prove the possibility of manufacturing patient specific root analogue two-part (implant and abutment implants by direct metal laser sintering. The two-part implant design enables covered healing of the implant. Therefore, CT-scans of three patients are used for reverse engineering of the implants, abutments and crowns. Patient specific implants are manufactured and measured concerning dimensional accuracy and surface roughness. Impacts of occlusal forces are simulated via FEA and compared to those of standard implants.

  6. Dental implants as Treatment Option in Patients With Osteopenic Syndrome and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Kozlova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the important problems in modern dentistry is the study of jaw bone changes associated with type II diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of osteopenic syndrome on osseointegration when using dental implants in patients with type II diabetes. 40 patients with type II diabetes have been evaluated and assigned to two different groups based on the duration of the disease. Including criteria in patients with compensated diabetes were fasting glucose test results <6 mM/l and glycohemoglobin concentration ≤6%. All patients have been evaluated by means of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry on Discovery W densitometer by HOLOGIC. Laboratory blood markers have been used to assess the rate of metabolic processes. 43 implants have been fixed in both groups and maxillary sinus lifting has been applied in 4 cases. No immediate or late post -operative complications have been registered. In cases of disease duration over 5 years and presence of osteopenia the period of surgical wound healing has been prolongated.

  7. A 6-year Evaluation of 223 Tapered Dental Implants and associated prosthesis in 92 patients at a University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagi, Sana Ehsen; Khan, Farhan Raza; Ali, Rabia

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the retrospective study was to assess the clinical and radiographic outcome of the dental implant surgery and prosthetics. It was conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised of medical charts and radiographic records of patients visiting between 2010 and 2015. Variables such as implant dimensions, final prosthesis, method of retention, loading protocol and patient factors were analysed. A total of 223 implants (143(64.1%) in maxilla and 80(35.9%) in mandible) were placed in 92 subjects (50(54.3%) males and 42(45.7%) females). All implants were Zimmer tapered screw-vent. Length of 108(48.4%) implants was 11.5mm and diameter of 84(37.7%) implants was 4.7mm. Besides, 6(2.7%) implants failed to osseointegrate, whereas 1(0.4%) implant failed at 12 months of loading. Among the 216(96.9%) successful implants, 140(64.8%) served as bridge abutments, 72(33.3%) were single crown abutments and 4(1.9%) were overdenture abutments. Also, 37(17.1%) implants were immediately loaded. The six-year survival rate of implants was 96.9%.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Dental Implants: A Utility Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A measure of dental patients' values and preferences was used to assess attitudes of 92 edentulous patients receiving implant and other dental reconstructive therapies. The implant group tended to be younger and better educated and to rate implant reconstruction as more desirable than the nonimplant denture group. (DB)

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Dental Implants: A Utility Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A measure of dental patients' values and preferences was used to assess attitudes of 92 edentulous patients receiving implant and other dental reconstructive therapies. The implant group tended to be younger and better educated and to rate implant reconstruction as more desirable than the nonimplant denture group. (DB)

  10. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Nagarajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy.

  11. No Evidence of Genotoxic Damage in a Group of Patients with Titanium Dental Implants and Different Metal Restorations in the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Sánchez-Siles, Mariano; Gilbel-del Águila, Osmundo

    2015-08-01

    Titanium is the most widely used metal in implant dentistry. In spite of its biocompatibility, when it is released into the oral environment, it can have local negative biological effects. The aims of this study were to detect the concentration of metal ions in patients with dental implants, to evaluate whether or not their release might be influenced by the presence of other metals, and to assay whether these ions might provoke genotoxic damage in oral mucosa cells. One hundred five patients with a total of 180 dental implants were included. The sample was divided into seven groups (n = 15 per group). Group 1 consisted of patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants; Group 2, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth; Group 3, patients with dental amalgams; Group 4, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants and metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth; Group 5, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants and dental amalgams; and Group 6, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants, metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth, and dental amalgams. Group 7 was the control group, without any dental treatment. The concentration of metal ions was detected using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; genotoxicity was measured using the buccal micronucleus cytome assay protocol. Group 5 displayed the highest concentration of metal ions in parts per billion (Ti, Co, Ni, Zn, Pd, Sn, and Pb). Group 6 was characterized by the highest presence of Hg. No signs of genotoxic damage were found in any of the study groups. Patients with titanium dental implants combined with other metal restorations presented higher concentrations of metal ions, but no genotoxic damage was observed in oral mucosal epithelial cells. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dental management of a patient fitted with subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator device and concomitant warfarin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Altaf Hussain Shah; Hesham Saleh Khalil; Mohammed Zaheer Kola

    2015-01-01

    Automated Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (AICD), simply known as an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD), has been used in patients for more than 30 years. An Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is a small battery-powered electrical impulse generator that is implanted in patients who are at a risk of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia or any such related event. Typically, patients with these types of occurrences are on antic...

  13. Long-term implant prognosis in patients with and without a history of chronic periodontitis: a 10-year prospective cohort study of the ITI Dental Implant System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoussis, Ioannis K; Salvi, Giovanni E; Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa J A; Brägger, Urs; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Lang, Niklaus P

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this 10-year study was to compare the failure, success and complication rates between patients having lost their teeth due to periodontitis or other reasons. Fifty-three patients who received 112 hollow screw implants (HS) of the ITI Dental Implant System were divided into two groups: group A - eight patients with 21 implants having lost their teeth due to chronic periodontitis; group B - forty five patients with 91 implants without a history of periodontitis. One and 10 years after surgical placement, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. The incidences of peri-implantitis were noticed over the 10 years of regular supportive periodontal therapy. Success criteria at 10 years were set at: pocket probing depth (PPD) periodontitis (group A) was 90.5%, while for the group with no past history of periodontitis (group B) it was 96.5%. Group A had a significantly higher incidence of peri-implantitis than group B (28.6% vs. 5.8%). With the success criteria set, 52.4% in group A and 79.1% of the implants in group B were successful. With a threshold set at PPD periodontitis demonstrated lower survival rates and more biological complications than patients with implants replacing teeth lost due to reasons other than periodontitis during a 10-year maintenance period. Furthermore, setting of thresholds for success criteria is crucial to the reporting of success rates.

  14. Introducing high-cost health care to patients: dentists' accounts of offering dental implant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernazza, Christopher R; Rousseau, Nikki; Steele, Jimmy G; Ellis, Janice S; Thomason, John Mark; Eastham, Jane; Exley, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The decision-making process within health care has been widely researched, with shared decision-making, where both patients and clinicians share technical and personal information, often being cited as the ideal model. To date, much of this research has focused on systems where patients receive their care and treatment free at the point of contact (either in government-funded schemes or in insurance-based schemes). Oral health care often involves patients making direct payments for their care and treatment, and less is known about how this payment affects the decision-making process. It is clear that patient characteristics influence decision-making, but previous evidence suggests that clinicians may assume characteristics rather than eliciting them directly. The aim was to explore the influences on how dentists' engaged in the decision-making process surrounding a high-cost item of health care, dental implant treatments (DITs). A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken using a purposive sample of primary care dentists (n = 25). Thematic analysis was undertaken to reveal emerging key themes. There were differences in how dentists discussed and offered implants. Dentists made decisions about whether to offer implants based on business factors, professional and legal obligations and whether they perceived the patient to be motivated to have treatment and their ability to pay. There was evidence that assessment of these characteristics was often based on assumptions derived from elements such as the appearance of the patient, the state of the patient's mouth and demographic details. The data suggest that there is a conflict between three elements of acting as a healthcare professional: minimizing provision of unneeded treatment, trying to fully involve patients in shared decisions and acting as a business person with the potential for financial gain. It might be expected that in the context of a high-cost healthcare intervention for which

  15. Public perceptions of dental implants: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward C M

    2015-07-01

    Dental implants have become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information on dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners at various levels/disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate the public's information acquisition and their perceptions of dental implants and the effects of these on their care-seeking and decision making. A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join six focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64 years of age, had never been engaged in dentally related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, and had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered into any dental consultation regarding dental implants. All of the focus groups discussions were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following a grounded theory approach. Participants acquired information on dental implants through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected dental implants to restore the patients' appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implants as a panacea for all cases of missing teeth, overestimated their functions and longevity, and underestimated the expertise needed to carry out the clinical procedures. They were deterred from seeking dental implant treatment by the high price, invasive procedures, risks, and complications. Members of the public were exposed to information of varying quality and had some unrealistic expectations regarding dental implants. Such perceptions may shape their care-seeking behaviours and decision-making processes in one way or another. The views and experiences gathered in this qualitative study could assist clinicians to better understand the public's perspectives, facilitate constructive patient-dentist communication, and contribute

  16. 10-year survival rate and the incidence of peri-implant disease of 374 titanium dental implants with a SLA surface: a prospective cohort study in 177 fully and partially edentulous patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, F.J.J.; Ofec, R.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This prospective cohort study evaluates the 10-year survival and incidence of peri-implant disease at implant and patient level of sandblasted, large grid, and acid-etched titanium dental implants (Straumann, soft tissue level, SLA surface) in fully and partially edentulous patients.

  17. Dental implant status of patients receiving long-term nursing care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toru; Wada, Masahiro; Suganami, Toru; Miwa, Shunta; Hagiwara, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Yoshiobu

    2015-01-01

    The increase in implant patients is expected to give rise to a new problem: the changing general health status of those who have had implants placed. The aim of this present study was to find out the needs of and proper measures for elderly implant patients in long-term care facilities. A questionnaire was sent by mail to 1,591 long-term care health facilities, daycare services for people with dementia, and private nursing homes for the elderly in the Osaka area, which is in the middle area of Japan, in order to extract patients with cerebrovascular disease or dementia who were possibly at risk of inadequate oral self-care, as well as patients with implants. Approximately half of all facilities responded that they cannot recognize implants, and many facilities did not know anything about oral care for implant patients. Residents with implants were reported at 19% of all facilities. Also, the facilities pointed out problems with implants relating to the difference in oral care between implants and natural teeth. There are people with implants in some 20% of caregiving facilities, and there is a low level of understanding regarding implants and their care among nurses and care providers who are providing daily oral care. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Analysis of dental implants' biointegration in animals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parshina, Valentina I; Vatnikov, Yury A; Kulikov, Evgeny V; Krasnikov, Alexander V; Annikov, Vyacheslav V; Sotnikova, Elena D

    2016-01-01

    This article presents characterization study of new coatings for dental implants, defines their basic requirements, and discusses the prospects of thermal oxide coatings application in animals' dental implantology...

  19. Instrumentation of dental implants: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana de Almeida Curylofo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective: The aim of this study was to review the literature on the systems used to decontaminate the implant’s surface. Different instruments have been proposed, but there is no agreement in the literature about which methods would be more efficient with no damage to the implant surface. It was reported the use of plastic, carbon fiber, stainless-steel and titanium curettes and also the use of other systems such as ultrasonic points with different tips, rubber cups and air abrasion. Literature review: In most of the studies, the injury caused on the titanium surface at the time of instrumentation was examined. In others, the cell adhesion on the titanium dental implants following instrumentation of the implant surface was observed. Moreover, to enhance cleaning around implants, ultrasonic systems were recently tested. Conclusion: Metal instruments can lead to major damage to implant surface, therefore, they are not indicated for decontamination of dental implants surfaces. Furthermore, non-metallic instruments, such as plastic curettes, rubber cups, air abrasion and some ultrasonic systems seem to be better choices to remove calculus and plaque of the sub- and supra-gingival peri-implant area. It is noteworthy that more studies evaluating the effects of these systems are required to establish best practices to be used in the treatment of patients with dental implants.

  20. Dental restoration with endosseous implants after mandibular reconstruction using a fibula free flap and TMJ prosthesis: a patient report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Martinez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis

    2006-01-01

    This patient report describes the secondary reconstruction of a hemimandibular and condylar defect and the dental restoration of a 56-year-old woman who had been subjected to radical ablative surgery 30 years earlier to remove a tumor. In the first phase, a fibula free flap was used in combination with a total TMJ prosthesis for the reconstruction of the hemimandible and condyle. Secondly, 3 endosseous implants were placed in the residual mandible. These implants were used to support an overdenture prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of 2 years.

  1. REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH PERIODONTALLY-AFFECTED BONE SUPPORT BY THE MINI-INVASIVE APPLICATION OF DENTAL IMPLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana RADU-GHICA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays, oral implantology came to represent an indispensable part of modern stomatology. Obtention and maintenance of implants’ osteointegration, alongwith “conservation” of the bone level of the periimplantary alveolar apophyies crest are especially important in implantological treatments. Scope and objectives Scope of the study: to optimize the rehabilitation process in patients with periodontally-afected bone support by minimum invasive application of dental endo-oseous implants. Materials and method. The study was developed on 112 persons – 48 men and 64 women, with ages between 22 and 71 years, divided into 2 groups, as follows: the former (control group included 54 persons, in whom the Alpha-BIO, ADIN and MIS implants had been applied by the standard method, namely flap surgery, while the latter (experimental group was formed of 58 patients, whose implants had been inserted without using flaps. The modifications produced at the level of the periimplantary cortical bone, along the healing stage, in the patients of both groups, prior and post implant, were appreciated by the difference between the distance from the apex of the implant up to the alveolar crest, determined on the first dental panoramic X-ray-OPG1 immediately after the surgery, and on the second dental panoramic X-ray-OPG2, prior to their discovery. Results. The OPG measurements made on the mandible demonstrated that resorption of the periimplantary cortical bone in the control group is more frequently occurring and more significant, varying between 0.00 and –2.82 mm. In the anterior part of the implants, its mean value is of –0.75 ± 0.09 while, in the posterior one – of –0.59 ± 0.09. In the experimental group, the modifications produced in the periimplantary cortical bone were also varying – namely, between +0.81 (aposition and –1.39. In the anterior part of the implants, the mean value of the resorption degree is of –0.22 ± 0.08 mm

  2. The impact of glucocorticosteroids administered for systemic diseases on the osseointegration and survival of dental implants placed without bone grafting-A retrospective study in 31 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsinis, Vassilis; Kamperos, Georgios; Alexandridi, Foteini; Alexandridis, Konstantinos

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of glucocorticosteroids, administered for the treatment of systemic diseases, on the osseointegration and survival of dental implants placed without bone grafting. A retrospective study was conducted in search of patients treated with dental implants while receiving glucocorticosteroid therapy for various systemic diseases. In these cases, a conventional two-stage surgical protocol was used, without bone regeneration procedures. The osseointegration was clinically and radiographically tested at the uncovering of the implants. The follow-up after loading was set at a minimum of 3 years. A total of 31 patients were included in the study. Of the 105 dental implants placed, 104 were osseointegrated (99%). No bone absorption was radiographically noted at the uncovering of the osseointegrated implants. All of the osseointegrated implants were successfully loaded for the prosthetic restoration. The mean follow-up period after loading was 71 months, with an implant survival rate of 99%. Glucocorticosteroid intake for systemic diseases does not have a significant impact on the osseointegration and the 3-year survival of dental implants placed with a conventional two-stage surgical protocol and without bone grafting. Therefore, it should not be considered a contraindication for dental implant placement. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Retrospective success and survival rates of dental implants placed with simultaneous bone augmentation in partially edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafshan, Nima; Darby, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the success and survival rate of dental implants placed with simultaneous hard tissue grafting. All patients treated in Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne who had implant placement with and without guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures were identified. Seventy-three attended a follow-up appointment. These patients were examined recording probing depth, bleeding on probing, plaque accumulation and radiographic bone loss by one examiner. Clinical and radiographic findings were compared in grafted and non-grafted groups and also analysed for years in function. Approximately 50% of implants were placed simultaneous guided bone regeneration technique. In the majority of cases, defects were filled by deproteinized bovine bone mineral and covered with collagen membrane. The range of time in function was 20-88 months with a mean 34.8 (±1.7). Seventy-nine per cent of the implants placed in anterior maxilla were placed with GBR, while only 18% in posterior mandible needed grafting procedure. The cumulative implant survival rates at the time of examination was 97.95% for both GBR and non-GBR group. The mean PPD, BOP, and Plaque index were not statistically significantly different in GBR vs. non-GBR groups two to seven years in function. However, bone loss is significantly less in GBR group 2-7 years after function. The overall success rate was around 90% after 2-7 years in function with the GBR group slightly less than the non-GBR group, but not statistically significant. For the subjects included in this retrospective study, the data demonstrate that GBR is a predictable procedure. The survival and success rates of the implants inserted with simultaneous GBR were similar, if slightly lower, to the non-grafted implants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Correlation between radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around dental implant and resonance frequency of dental implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawoko, S. S.; Nelwan, L. C.; Odang, R. W.; Kusdhany, L. S.

    2017-08-01

    The histomorphometric test is the gold standard for dental implant stability quantification; however, it is invasive, and therefore, it is inapplicable to clinical patients. Consequently, accurate and objective alternative methods are required. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and digital radiographic analysis are noninvasive methods with excellent objectivity and reproducibility. To analyze the correlation between the radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around a dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant. Digital radiographic images for 35 samples were obtained, and the resonance frequency of the dental implant was acquired using Osstell ISQ immediately after dental implant placement and on third-month follow-up. The alveolar bone density around the dental implant was subsequently analyzed using SIDEXIS-XG software. No significant correlation was reported between the alveolar bone density around the dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant (r = -0.102 at baseline, r = 0.146 at follow-up, p > 0.05). However, the alveolar bone density and resonance frequency showed a significant difference throughout the healing period (p = 0.005 and p = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: Digital dental radiographs and Osstell ISQ showed excellent objectivity and reproducibility in quantifying dental implant stability. Nonetheless, no significant correlation was observed between the results obtained using these two methods.

  5. Nanostructured surfaces of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-17

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  6. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  7. Outcome of dental implants in patients with and without a history of periodontitis: a 5-year pragmatic multicentre retrospective cohort study of 1727 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianserra, Rodolfo; Cavalcanti, Raffaele; Oreglia, Francesco; Manfredonia, Massimo Francesco; Esposito, Marco

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of dental implants placed in patients with a history of periodontitis. Patients with no or mild history of periodontitis served as controls. A total of 1727 patients were consecutively treated in four private practices. Patients were divided into three groups according to their initial periodontal conditions assessed with a modified periodontal screening and recording (PSR) index: 630 patients were in the severe periodontitis (SP) group, 839 in the moderate periodontitis (MP) group, and 258 had no periodontitis (NP). Patients requiring periodontal treatment were treated prior to implantation. Various implant systems and procedures were used. In total, 3260 implants and 1707 implant-supported prostheses were placed in the SP group, 2813 implants and 1744 implant-supported prostheses in the MP group, and 647 implants and 424 implant-supported prostheses in the NP group. Mixed implant–tooth supported prostheses (98 prostheses in 89 patients) were not considered. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant survival. Two-hundred and fifty patients were lost to follow-up 5 years after loading. Regarding prosthesis failures, 13 prostheses could not be placed or failed in 13 patients of the SP group (0.8%), 11 prostheses could not be placed or failed in 9 patients of the MP group (0.7%), and 3 prostheses failed in 3 patients of the NP group (0.9%). For implant failures, 130 (4.5%) implants failed in the SP group, 74 (3.1%) implants failed in the MP group, and 15 (3.0%) implants failed in the NP group. Most of the implant failures (90%) occurred before implant loading. Fitting a logistic regression for early implant failures and total implant failures, taking into account the clustering of implants in patients, there were no statistically significant differences between the three PSR groups (P > 0.05). Owing to the retrospective nature of this study, conclusions need to be interpreted with caution. A previous history of periodontal disease may not

  8. Exposed Dental Implant? Local Autograft A Saviour!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Raj; Punde, Prashant A; Suryavanshi, Harshal; Shree, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Implant exposure due to faulty placement, posses as the most common reason for implant failure. The implant placed too close to buccal or lingual cortex have lead to such failure on numerous occasions. Also, anatomic variations like the thin buccolingual width of alveolar ridge predispose exposure of the implant. 25-year-old female patient had undergone surgical placement of implants in mandibular anterior region 2 months back in the private dental clinic. The clinician noted Grade I mobility in one of the implants placed. The case was referred to the author. Thin overlying gingiva depicted an entire buccal aspect of the implant, which suggested more than 90 % loss of buccal cortex. According to literature and review of similar case reports, the only way suggested was to surgically remove the implant and wait for 12-24 months for the bone to heal for subsequent placement. Rather than the removal of implants as suggested, the author followed a naval approach of reinforcing buccal cortex using an autogenous cortical block from mandibular symphysis. The reinforcement surgery had certainly saved patients time, money and most importantly limits a crucial period of edentulism, which may be enforced on a patient in case the implant was removed. PMID:26668490

  9. Effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in irradiated maxillofacial dental implant patients: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana Nilesh Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The significantly higher implant failure rates in maxillofacial patients, undergoing radiotherapy, might be caused by the long-term effects of reduced vascularization compromising the implantation site. An extensive preclinical animal literature and a multitude of clinical reports suggest the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy as it can improve the tissue vascularity. Hence, it may increase the implant survival rate by enhancing osseointegration process in such patients. The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the effectiveness of HBO therapy on dental implant survival rate in irradiated maxillofacial patients who require prosthodontic rehabilitation. An electronic search without time restrictions was undertaken in April 2016 using databases: PubMed, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register. We also tried to contact the manufacturers and researchers in the field for necessary details. Clinical human studies, on irradiated maxillofacial dental implant patients, including randomized controlled trials (RCTs, prospective controlled trials, retrospective studies, and preliminary reports were included in the study. Data collection was carried out by two of the authors' independently. The titles and abstracts of all reports were screened for the study design and type of reported intervention; all the duplicates were removed. The data search yielded 62 titles, out of which 14 articles were selected for the study by the article filtration criteria: Title/abstract/full text. Data which were extracted by two authors with any disagreement were resolved by the third author, and a meta-analysis was done using binary random-effect model. The results show decreased implant failure rate in HBO group (9.21% compared to non-HBO group (22.44%. The potential limitations of this study are amount of radiation doses used, period lasting from radiotherapy to the placement of the implants, and follow-up period which varies

  10. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms ... KEYWORDS: Dental implants, surgical templates, surgical procedure, stent .... during the surgical stage for single implant therapy.[24] Afterward,.

  11. Zirconia dental implants: a literature review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Özkurt, Zeynep; Kazazoğlu, Ender

    2011-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used for fabrication of dental implants. Because of potential immunologic and possible esthetic compromises with titanium implants, novel implant technologies are being developed...

  12. Correction parameters in conventional dental radiography for dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barunawaty Yunus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiographic imaging as a supportive diagnostic tool is the essential component in treatment planning for dental implant. It help dentist to access target area of implant due to recommendation of many inventions in making radiographic imaging previously. Along with the progress of science and technology, the increasing demand of easier and simpler treatment method, a modern radiographic diagnostic for dental implant is needed. In fact, Makassar, especially in Faculty of Dentistry Hasanuddin University, has only a conventional dental radiography. Researcher wants to optimize the equipment that is used to obtain parameters of the jaw that has been corrected to get accurate dental implant. Purpose: This study aimed to see the difference of radiographic imaging of dental implant size which is going to be placed in patient before and after correction. Method: The type of research is analytical observational with cross sectional design. Sampling method is non random sampling. The amount of samples is 30 people, male and female, aged 20–50 years old. The correction value is evaluated from the parameter result of width, height, and thick of the jaw that were corrected with a metal ball by using conventional dental radiography to see the accuracy. Data is analyzed using SPSS 14 for Windows program with T-test analysis. Result: The result that is obtained by T-Test analysis results with significant value which p<0.05 in the width and height of panoramic radiography technique, the width and height of periapical radiography technique, and the thick of occlusal radiography technique before and after correction. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there is a significant difference before and after the results of panoramic, periapical, and occlusal radiography is corrected.

  13. Demographics of implant placement and complications of a patient subgroup in a dental hospital population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Maire

    2011-03-14

    Little has been reported about the demographics of implant placement in the Irish population and the complications that occur. This is important in terms of service planning and providing patient information.

  14. Demographics of implant placement and complications of a patient subgroup in a dental hospital population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Maire

    2010-05-01

    Little has been reported about the demographics of implant placement in the Irish population and the complications that occur. This is important in terms of service planning and providing patient information.

  15. Dental management of a patient fitted with subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator device and concomitant warfarin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Shah

    2015-07-01

    This article presents the dental management of a 60 year-old person with an ICD and concomitant anticoagulant therapy. The patient was on multiple medications and was treated for a grossly neglected mouth with multiple carious root stumps. This case report outlines the important issues in managing patients fitted with an ICD device and at a risk of sudden cardiac death.

  16. Investigation of the Effects of Abutment and Implant Length on Stability of Short Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda OZYILMAZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of dental implants to solve different problems in dentistry has been growing rapidly. The success rates of dental implants are also very important for patients. Depending on the bone level of patients, short dental implants are very popular and widely used by many dentists. Although many dentists are using short dental implants frequently, It can be guessed that there can be stability problems because of crown to implant ratios. In this study, it is aimed to find out the effects of dental implant and abutment lengths on stability of short dental implants. 3 different short dental implant design made with the use of Solidworks 2013. Abutment lengths were 3,5 mm, 4 mm, 4,5 mm, 5 mm and implant lengths were 5 mm, 6 mm, 7 mm for each model. Human mandible model is transferred from Computed Tomography. Then, each implant model is mounted to modeled mandible and Finite Element Analysis is performed for each model. In order to see the effects of implant number on stability, we performed same analysis by placing 4 implants to the mandible

  17. Dental Implant Treatment for a Patient with Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    OpenAIRE

    Sugahara, Toshio; Kuboki, Takuo; Shirasu,Nobuaki; Honda,Kozo; Kanou,Miwa; Kagawa,Toshimasa; Ueno, Takaaki; Sawaki, Masako

    2008-01-01

    Dental reconstruction in the cleft space is difficult in some patients with cleft lip and palate because of oronasal fistulas. Most of these patients receive a particle cancellous bone marrow (PCBM) graft to close the alveolar cleft, and secondary bone grafting is also required. Treatment options for the alveolar cleft including fixed or removable prostheses require the preparation of healthy teeth and are associated with functional or social difficulties. Recently, the effectiveness of denta...

  18. BISPHOSPHONATE-RELATED OSTEONECROSIS OF THE JAW AND DENTAL IMPLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Hassan A. Qamheya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonate (BP is one of the possible riskfactors in the osteonecrosis of the jaw (ON J. Surgical interventions during or after the course of treatment by using BPs may expose the patient under this risk. Animal studies, human studies, case reports, and systematic reviews are used to show the relationship between the use of bisphosphonates and dental implants. In this review data about bisphosphonaterelated osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRON J: incidence, prevention and treatment modalities for the patients who are scheduled for dental implant treatment plan and who have been already treated by dental implants will be investigated. Various views for the relationship between dental implants and bisphosphonates will be analyzed depending on the multifactors: duration, route of uptake, dosage of the drug and patient’s other medications that affect the effects of bisphosphonate. All patients treated with this drug must be informed about the risk of implant loss or possibility of osteonecrosis.

  19. Short dental implants versus standard dental implants placed in the posterior jaws: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Ferro-Alves, Marcio Luiz; Okamoto, Roberta; Mendonça, Marcos Rogério; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare short implants (equal or less than 8mm) versus standard implants (larger than 8mm) placed in posterior regions of maxilla and mandible, evaluating survival rates of implants, marginal bone loss, complications and prosthesis failures. This review has been registered at PROSPERO under the number CRD42015016588. Main search terms were used in combination: dental implant, short implant, short dental implants, short dental implants posterior, short dental implants maxilla, and short dental implants mandible. An electronic search for data published up until September/2015 was undertaken using the PubMed/Medline, Embase and The Cochrane Library databases. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, randomized controlled trials and/or prospective studies, which evaluated short implants in comparison to standard implants in the same study. The search identified 1460 references, after inclusion criteria 13 studies were assessed for eligibility. A total of 1269 patients, who had received a total of 2631 dental implants. The results showed that there was no significant difference of implants survival (P=.24; RR:1.35; CI: 0.82-2.22), marginal bone loss (P=.06; MD: -0.20; CI: -0.41 to 0.00), complications (P=.08; RR:0.54; CI: 0.27-1.09) and prosthesis failures (P=.92; RR:0.96; CI: 0.44-2.09). Short implants are considered a predictable treatment for posterior jaws. However, short implants with length less than 8 mm (4-7 mm) should be used with caution because they present greater risks to failures compared to standard implants. Short implants are frequently placed in the posterior area in order to avoid complementary surgical procedures. However, clinicians need to be aware that short implants with length less than 8mm present greater risk of failures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Satisfaction and Clinical Outcomes Among Patients with Immediately Loaded Mandibular Overdentures Supported by One or Two Dental Implants: Results of a 5-Year Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronstrom, Mats; Davis, Ben; Loney, Robert; Gerrow, Jack; Hollender, Lars

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes among subjects with mandibular overdentures supported by one or two immediately placed dental implants 5 years after loading. Thirty-six subjects (16 men and 20 women) received one or two dental implants in the anterior mandible, and all implants were loaded the day of surgery. Subjects were scheduled for follow-up 3-, 6-, and 12 months after implant placement and thereafter annually for 4 more years. Patient satisfaction scores were measured with the Oral Health Impact Profile-EDENT (OHIPEDENT) questionnaire. Seventeen subjects (7 male and 10 female) with a mean age of 59.4 years (range, 44 to 74 years) were available for the 5-year follow-up examination. Nine subjects with 10 failing implants were excluded during the first year and nine subjects were lost to follow-up. No implants failed between the 12- and 60-month follow-up examinations, and the need for denture maintenance was low. Mean peri-implant bone change was 0.92 mm, and the Spearman test failed to show correlation between the insertion torque value and implant stability quotient. Patient satisfaction scores increased significantly when compared with baseline values and continued to be high for both groups, with no significant differences. Ten implants in nine subjects failed early, but no failures were observed after the 12-month examination. No significant differences were found between subjects in the two groups with respect to implant survival rates and peri-implant bone loss, and patient satisfaction scores continued to be high. Although patient satisfaction and implant success were high during the 12- to 60-month period, the results should be interpreted with caution because of the high number of failing implants and patients lost to follow-up. More research is needed to study outcomes of treatment with immediately loaded mandibular implant overdentures.

  1. El tratamiento con implantes dentales postextracción Treatment with postextraction dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Velasco Ortega

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El objetivo del presente estudio era mostrar los resultados de del tratamiento con implantes dentales insertados inmediatamente después de la extracción. Métodos. 22 pacientes con pérdida dental unitaria, parcial o total fueron tratados con 82 implantes Microdent® con superficie con chorreado de arena y grabada con ácidos. Todos los implantes fueron insertados inmediatamente después de la extracción correspondiente. Los implantes fueron cargados después de un periodo de cicatrización de 3 meses en la mandíbula o 6 meses en el maxilar superior. Resultados. Los hallazgos clínicos indican una supervivencia y éxito de los implantes del 97,6%. 2 implantes se perdieron durante el periodo de cicatrización. El 73,2% de los implantes fueron insertados en el maxilar. superior mientras que el 26,8% en la mandíbula. Después de un periodo medio de carga funcional de 12 meses, no ha habido complicaciones tardías. Conclusiones. Este estudio indica que los implantes dentales insertados de forma inmediata después de la extracción pueden constituir una alternativa implantológica predecible y exitosa.Introduction. The aim of this study was to report the outcome of treatment with implant inserted immediately after tooth extraction. Methods. 22 patients with single, partially or totally tooth loss were treated with 82 Microdent® sandblasted-etched surface implants. All implants were inserted immediately after tooth extraction. Implants were loaded after a healing free-loading period of 3 months in mandible or 6 months in maxilla. Results. Clinical results indicate a survival and success rate of implants of 97,6%. 2 implants were lost during the healing period. 73.2% of implants were inserted at maxilla while 26.8% were inserted at mandible. After a functioning period of 12 months, no late complications were reported. Conclusions. This study indicate that dental implants inserted immediately after tooth extraction may constitute a

  2. Immediate loading of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, P J; Liddelow, G J

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the concept of immediate loading as it pertains to dental implants and the indications for clinical practice. The definition of immediate loading will be considered together with a review of the relevant literature in an attempt to provide evidence-based guidelines for successful implementation into practice. A search of electronic databases including Medline, PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was undertaken using the terms "immediate loading'', "dental implants'', "immediate function'', "early loading'', "oral implants'', "immediate restoration'' and "systematic review''. This was supplemented by handsearching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Emphasis was given to systematic reviews and controlled clinical trials. A definition of immediate loading was suggested pertinent to the realities of logistics in clinical practice with respect to application and time frame. The literature was evaluated and shown to be limited with significant shortcomings. Guidelines and recommendations for clinical protocols were suggested and illustrated by examples of case types with a minimum of 1-3 years follow-up. A list of additional references for further reading was provided. Within the limitations of this review, there is evidence to suggest that immediate loading protocols have demonstrated high implant survival rates and may be cautiously recommended for certain clinical situations. However, more high level evidence studies, preferably randomized controlled trials (RCTs), over a long time frame are required to show a clear benefit over more conventional loading protocols.

  3. Clinical and Histologic Evaluations of SLA Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Myron; Parma-Benfenati, Stefano; Quinti, Franco; Galletti, Prima; Sava, Cosmin; Sava, Catalin; Kim, David M

    The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the efficacy of dental implants with a surface that was sandblasted with large grit and acid etched in a human model. Seven patients volunteered to allow the biopsy of a small implant in exchange for complete dental rehabilitation at no cost. All biopsy sites received soft and hard tissue reconstruction, and this report provides observation of successful bone-to-implant contact and successful prosthesis construction for the patient. The patients enthusiastically reported improved quality of life as a result of participation in this study. The surgeons’ confidence in this implant was reflected by the clinical and histologic result of the study.

  4. Pilot Study on the Influence of Nutritional Counselling and Implant Therapy on the Nutritional Status in Dentally Compromised Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Wöstmann

    Full Text Available To investigate the impact of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation combined with nutritional counseling on the nutritional status of patients with severely reduced dentitions.An explorative intervention study including an intra-individual comparison of 20 patients with severely reduced dentitions in terms of nutrition- and quality of life-related parameters recorded at baseline and at six and twelve months after implant-prosthetic rehabilitation.Twenty patients from the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry of Justus-Liebig University of Giessen, with an mean age of 63 years, who had fewer than ten pairs of antagonists.The baseline data collection included dental status, a chewing ability test, laboratory parameters, anthropometric data (body mass index, energy supply, a 3-day dietary record, an analysis of the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL with the OHIP-G14, the Mini-Mental Status (MMS and Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA. Six months after implantation and prosthetic rehabilitation, individual nutritional counseling was performed by a dietician. Data were again collected and analyzed. A final follow-up was conducted 12 months after prosthetic rehabilitation.Despite the highly significant improvement in masticatory ability and OHRQoL after implant-prosthetic rehabilitation, no significant changes were observed regarding MNA, anthropometric data or energy supply. Except for cholinesterase (p = 0.012, ferritin (p = 0.003, folic acid (p = 0.019 and vitamin A (p = 0.004, no laboratory parameter changed significantly during the investigation period. In addition, no general significant differences were observed for nutrient intake or food choice.The present study does not confirm the assumption that the implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with severely reduced residual dentitions with or without an individual nutritional counseling influences nutritional status.

  5. Small-diameter dental implants: An adjunct for retention, stability, and comfort for the edentulous patient

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    Antonio Scarano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Studies have shown that mandibular implant overdentures significantly increase satisfaction and quality of life of edentulous elders. Improved chewing ability appears to have a positive impact on nutritional state. Materials and methods: Forty edentulous subjects received four permucosal mini-implants for overdentures in the interforamina region of the mandible. Almost all participants were still satisfied with their overdentures. Participant satisfaction concerning retention and stability of the mandibular overdenture was assessed. A micro invasive technique was adopted, without open flap and performed in one chirurgical step; this technique can be used also in the so-called “highrisk” patients (anticoagulant terapy, diabetes, etc. Results and conclusion: Results and conclusion The results suggest that a mandibular overdenture retained by 4 mini-implants may be the best treatment strategy for edentulous people with atrophic ridges. The use of mini-implants is in many cases a good clinical alternative to the use of larger diameter implants, in that they enable to reduce surgical time, bleeding, postoperative discomfort and healing time.

  6. R&D on dental implants breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Sorin Mihai; Popovici, Ion Alexandru

    2017-09-01

    Most used dental implants for human dental prostheses are of two steps type: first step means implantation and, after several months healing and osseointegration, second step is prosthesis fixture. For sure, dental implants and prostheses are meant to last for a lifetime. Still, there are unfortunate cases when dental implants break. This paper studies two steps dental implants breakage and proposes a set of instruments for replacement and restoration of the broken implant. First part of the paper sets the input data of the study: structure of the studied two steps dental implants based on two Romanian patents and values of the loading forces found in practice and specialty papers. In the second part of the paper, using DEFORM 2D™ FEM simulation software, worst case scenarios of loading dental implants are studied in order to determine which zones and components of the dental implant set are affected (broken). Last part of the paper is dedicated to design and presentation of a set for extracting and cutting tools used to restore the broken implant set.

  7. Dental implant surgery: planning and guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobregt, S.; Schillings, J.J.; Vuurberg, E. [MIMIT Easy Vision Advanced Development, Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands)

    2001-11-01

    A prototype application has been developed for interactive planning of dental implants on the EasyVision workstation. The user is led step by step via virtual positioning of the implant to the design of a customized drill guide. (orig.)

  8. Predictability of short dental implants: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alves de Almeida Júnior

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In clinical situations where severe bone resorption has occurred following tooth loss, implant treatment options may comprise either a previous bone reconstruction or only the use of short implants. Objective: This non-systematic review summarizes and discusses some aspects of the use of short implants, such as: biomechanical aspects, success rate, longevity and surgical-prosthetic planning. Literature review: Current and relevant references were selected in order to compare short dental implants to conventional ones. Several studies have highlighted the great importance of wide-diameter implants. Dental short implants have shown high predictability and success rates when some biomechanical aspects are taken into consideration. Conclusion: Placement of short dental implants is a viable treatment method for patients with decreased bone height.

  9. Knowledge and attitude of elderly persons towards dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Frauke; Salem, Kamel; Barbezat, Cindy; Herrmann, François R; Schimmel, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Despite their unrivalled place in restorative treatment, dental implants are still scarcely used in elderly patients. The aim of this survey was therefore to identify potential barriers for accepting an implant treatment. Participants were recruited from a geriatric hospital, two long-term-care facilities and a private clinic. The final study sample comprised 92 persons, 61 women and 31 men with an average age of 81.2 ± 8.0 years. In a semi-structured interview, the participants' knowledge of implants and attitude towards a hypothetical treatment with dental implants were evaluated. Twenty-seven participants had never heard of dental implants, and another 13 participants could not describe them. The strongest apprehensions against implants were cost, lack of perceived necessity and old age. Univariate and multiple linear regression analysis identified being women, type and quality of denture, having little knowledge on implants and being hospitalised as the risk factors for refusing implants. However, old age as such was not associated with a negative attitude. The acceptance of dental implants in the elderly population might be increased by providing further information and promoting oral health in general. Regardless of the age, dental implants should be placed when patients are still in good health and live independently. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Dental Implants and General Dental Practitioners of Nepal: A study of existing knowledge and need for further education

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    Bhageshwar Dhami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The use of dental implants in partially or completely edentulous patients has proved effective and an accepted treatment modality with predictable long-term success. Dental implants are becoming a popular choice for replacing the missing teeth because of increased awareness about implants both in dentists and patients. The objective of the study was to assess the basic knowledge and education about dental implants among general dental practitioners (GDPs of Nepal.Materials & Methods:  A cross sectional questionnaire was carried out among 110 GDPs which consist of twenty questions that were divided into three categories; first with some basic knowledge in implant dentistry, second with clinical knowledge of dental implants and third with dental implant education and training.Results: Out of 110 GDPs, 72.7% had basic knowledge about implant dentistry and 65.5% were not aware about advance surgical procedures like sinus lift and guided bone regeneration. All the GDPs were positive regarding more training and education in dental implants and 95.5% of them would like to incorporate dental implant treatment in their practice in future. Conclusion: GDPs should have adequate knowledge and training of dental implants which can be incorporated at undergraduate or post doctoral level so that they are skilled to provide quality dental implant therapy to their patients confidently.

  11. Dental implants with versus without peri-implant bone defects treated with guided bone regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Aloy Prósper, Amparo; Peñarrocha Oltra, David; Peñarrocha Diago, María; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique is highly successful for the treatment of peri-implant bone defects. The aim was to determine whether or not implants associated with GBR due to peri-implant defects show the same survival and success rates as implants placed in native bone without defects. Material and Methods Patients with a minimum of two submerged dental implants: one suffering a dehiscence or fenestration defect during placement and undergoing simultaneous guided bo...

  12. A Clinical Practice Update on the Latest AAOS/ADA Guideline (December 2012) on Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Dental Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hamedani Sh. DDS, MSc

    2013-01-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association (ADA), along with 10 other academic associations and societies recently (December 2012) published their mutual clinical practice guideline “Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.” This evidence-based guideline ,detailed in 325 pages, has three recommendations and substitutes the previous AAOS guideline. The new published clinical guideline is a protocol to pre...

  13. Restructuring of dental implant education in India

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    Abhay P Kolte

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various treatment modalities have been proposed and practiced over the years for comforting the functions of individuals with enhanced life expectancy leading to an aging population. These therapeutic modalities are directed toward providing masticatory apparatus to patients with atrophic edentulous ridges. After evolving over several years, clinicians have now been enabled to use dental implants and provide a functionally viable and esthetically pleasing masticatory apparatus to their patients. However, majority of the dentists lack the detailed knowledge, skills, and experience which are necessary and essential for a successful implant therapy. Various training programs have been conducted across the country with the motive to bridge the gap between the clinician and the therapy. However, the existing training programs and courses lack the detailed theoretical inputs and deliberations, which form the very basis for an implicative understanding of the therapeutic modality and thus do not offer desired outcomes many a times. The success of implant therapy depends not only merely in achieving osseointegration of the implant but also providing the esthetic and functional standards, which are in tune with the patient's expectation. Oral implantology cases can be briefly divided based on their complexity as either straightforward or complex placement and/or restoration of implant. To benefit the society at large, it is high time that training programs be proposed with differential skill upgradation with different avenues. The article proposes a few training avenues for the dental professionals which if taken up in the right perspective will restructure the education in oral implantology in our country. Such training avenues need to be brought under regulatory bodies such as the State Health Universities and Dental Council of India so as to achieve a desired standardization and uniformity.

  14. Exotic encounters with dental implants: managing complications with unidentified systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, N; Janda, M Schittek

    2012-06-01

    As the application of dental implants increases worldwide, so is the number of technical and biological complications that general dental practitioners will be called to manage, while maintaining implant patients. In addition, the greater patient mobility encountered today combined with a growing trend of 'dental implant tourism' will very often result in situations where the dentist is requested to deal with complications in implants placed elsewhere and which sometimes might be of an 'exotic' system one cannot directly recognize. Such a situation can pose significant challenges to even experienced clinicians. The challenges are not only in the scientific field, but often include professional and ethical implications. This case report will discuss strategies for the management of implant complications in cases of unidentified implant systems. Critical factors in such situations would be the clinician's experience and special training, the correct radiographic technique, as well as access to the appropriate tools and devices.

  15. Dental implants and diabetes mellitus—a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Naujokat, Hendrik; Kunzendorf, Burkhard; Wiltfang, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Dental implant surgery has developed to a widely used procedure for dental rehabilitation and is a secure and predictable procedure. Local and systemic risk factors can result in higher failure rates. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that goes in with hyperglycemia and causes multifarious side effects. Diabetes as a relative contraindication for implant surgery is controversially discussed. Because the number of patients suffering from diabetes increases, there are more diabetic patient...

  16. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient

    OpenAIRE

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline [UNESP; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-01-01

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocol...

  17. The relationship between panoramic indices and dental implant failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Jung; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Jin Koo; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Chang Hyeon [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    Several panoramic indices have been suggested to assess bone quality from the morphology and width of mandibular cortex on panoramic radiography. The purpose of this study was to compare dental implant failure group with control group in panoramic mandibular index (PMI), mandibular cortical index (MCI), and gonion index (GI) and to determine the effect of these panoramic indices on dental implant failure. A case-control study was designed. Test group (n = 42) consisted of the patients who had their implants extracted because of peri-implantitis. Control group (n = 139) consisted of the patients who retained their implants over one year without any pathologic changes and had been followed up periodically. They had dental implants installed in their mandibles without bone augmentation surgery from 1991 to 2001. The following measures were collected for each patients: 1) PMI, MCI, and GI were measured twice at one-week interval on preoperative panoramic views; and 2) age, sex, implant length, implant type, installed location, occluding dentition state, and complication were investigated from the chart record. The PMI showed moderate level of repeatability. The intra-observer agreement of MCI and GI were good. There was statistically significant difference in PMI between two groups. There were significant different patterns of distribution of MCI and GI between two groups. Among the panoramic indices, PMI and MCI showed significant correlation with dental implant failure. Panoramic indices can be used as reference data in estimating bone quality of edentulous patients who are to have implants installed in their mandibles.

  18. CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF DENTAL IMPLANT SYSTEM IN IMMEDIATE LOADING IMPLANT CASES

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Immediate loading of dental implant has been researched intensively in the development of Branemark’s early concept of 2 stages implant placement. This was embarked from both patients and practiitioner’s convenience towards a simpler protocol and shorter time frame. Many recent researchers later found that micromotions derived from occlusal loading for a certain degree, instead of resulting a fibrous tissue encapsulation, can enhance the osseointegration process. Dental Implant system enhance...

  19. Dental implant stability analysis by using resonance frequency method

    OpenAIRE

    Harirforoush, Reza

    2012-01-01

    The use of dental implants in the rehabilitation of partially and completely edentulous patients has been significantly increased in recent years. Although high survival rates of implants supporting prosthesis have been reported, failure still happens due to bone loss as results of primary and secondary implant stability. Primary stability of an implant mostly comes from mechanical interaction with cortical bone while secondary stability happens through bone regeneration and remodelling at th...

  20. Straightforward Case of Dental Implant in General Dentistry

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    Aji P. Tjikman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant has become a fast developing and dynamic field in dental practice. It is acknowledged as a predictable treatment modality with high clinical success rates. Conventional fixed prostheses are no longer considered to be the first choice of treatment for replacing a missing tooth. Despite the increasing number of patients requesting dental implant treatments, there are only some clinicians who are offering implant therapy in their daily practice. The International team for Implantology described a straightforward case as a simple case such as implant placements in adquate soft and hard tissue conditions and single-tooth restorations in a non-aesthetic zone. A review of the current literature discussed the implementation of implant dentistry in universities worldwide into their curriculum for both undergraduate and postgraduate programs in general dentistry. The European consensus in implant dentistry education concluded that it is desirable to include the surgical technique for implant placement for straightforward cases into the dental curriculum. The levels and limitations to which the various aspects of implant dentistry and related skills are taught to be determined by the academic community. This review aimed at promoting awareness amongst dental practitioners and institutions in Indonesia of the shifting treatment paradigm in the maangement of a missing tooth. Hence clinicians will be able to include implant dentistry in the treatment planning of their patients and also undertake a significant part in the execution of such treatments.

  1. Implantes en pacientes VIH-positivo: A propósito de tres casos Dental implants in HIV-positive patients: A presentation of three cases

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    E. Ferrús-Torres

    2008-12-01

    .The improvement in survival and quality of life of HIV-positive patients has led to a significant rise in demand for esthetic dental treatment among these patients. In this context, implant-supported prostheses are currently considered a valid treatment option. We present three HIV-positive males seen in our Service of Oral Implantology for the evaluation of possible implant-supported rehabilitation. The clinical course of the patients had remained stable for a minimum of four years. A total of 12 implants were positioned (case 1: 4 Defcon® implants, 2 in the upper maxilla and 2 in the mandible; case 2: 2 ITI® implants in the mandible; and case 3: 6 Brånemark System® implants in the upper maxilla;, all under locoregional anesthesia and applying the usual technique. No guided bone regeneration procedures were applied. There were no intra- and/or postoperative complications, and no alterations in the biological parameters of background disease control following the surgical intervention. Implants have been considered a treatment option in patients of this kind, despite the fact that their long-term reliability has not been established. With the exception of two articles (respectively involving immediate singe implant placement and complete oral rehabilitation, no other study has been published on rehabilitation with implants in HIV-positive patients. Both of these articles corroborate the hypothesis that minor oral surgery does not increase the risk of locoregional infection in correctly controlled HIV-positive patients, as reflected in our three cases. In the immediate postoperative period, there were no significant variations in CD4+ cell count or in any other biological parameter, as described in the literature, with excellent soft and hard tissue healing.

  2. Patient´s Awareness and Analysis of Dental Implants Treatment Skill

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    Aristides da Rosa PINHEIRO

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The patients' awareness about the attendance in the clinics of the FOUFF Implatology course, to pursue the betterment of the initial clinical attendance and the progress of previous education. Method: Preceding lectures has been given previously the entrance of the patients in the clinic. A survey about their knowledge before the lectures, and another one with the patients that had presented themselves for the attendance were affected, intending to know the importance of these lectures in the opinion of the patients. Results: Among 721 people who had assisted the previous lectures, 239 (33% were qualified to be attentive in the clinic. Conclusion: The previous lectures given before the initial clinical attendance had done the patients to be aware of the treatment with implants and it collaborates excessively for the improvement of the attendance and, consequently, also the practical education of the Implantology.

  3. CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF DENTAL IMPLANT SYSTEM IN IMMEDIATE LOADING IMPLANT CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Damayanti Marpaung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Immediate loading of dental implant has been researched intensively in the development of Branemark’s early concept of 2 stages implant placement. This was embarked from both patients and practiitioner’s convenience towards a simpler protocol and shorter time frame. Many recent researchers later found that micromotions derived from occlusal loading for a certain degree, instead of resulting a fibrous tissue encapsulation, can enhance the osseointegration process. Dental Implant system enhancement towards maximizing the primary stability held a key factor in Branemark’s concept development. Surgical protocol and implant design was found to give a significant contribution to the prognosis of immediate-loading implants.

  4. Dexmedetomidine Analgesia Effects in Patients Undergoing Dental Implant Surgery and Its Impact on Postoperative Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress

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    Sisi Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine whether or not dexmedetomidine- (DEX- based intravenous infusion in dental implantation can provide better sedation and postoperative analgesia via suppressing postoperative inflammation and oxidative stress. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to receive either DEX (group D or midazolam (group M. Recorded variables were vital sign (SBP/HR/RPP/SpO2/RR, visual analogue scale (VAS pain scores, and observer’s assessment of alertness/sedation scale (OAAS scores. The plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD, and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA were detected at baseline and after 2, 4, and 24 h of drug administration. The VAS pain scores and OAAS scores were significantly lower for patients in group D compared to group M. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and MDA were significantly lower in group D patients than those in group M at 2 h and 4 h. In group M, SOD levels decreased as compared to group D at 2 h and 4 h. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and MDA were positively correlated with VAS pain scores while SOD negatively correlated with VAS pain scores. Therefore, DEX appears to provide better sedation during office-based artificial tooth implantation. DEX offers better postoperative analgesia via anti-inflammatory and antioxidation pathway.

  5. Dexmedetomidine Analgesia Effects in Patients Undergoing Dental Implant Surgery and Its Impact on Postoperative Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sisi; Yang, Yang; Yu, Cong; Yao, Ying; Wu, Yujia; Qian, Lian; Cheung, Chi Wai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether or not dexmedetomidine- (DEX-) based intravenous infusion in dental implantation can provide better sedation and postoperative analgesia via suppressing postoperative inflammation and oxidative stress. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to receive either DEX (group D) or midazolam (group M). Recorded variables were vital sign (SBP/HR/RPP/SpO2/RR), visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation scale (OAAS) scores. The plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected at baseline and after 2, 4, and 24 h of drug administration. The VAS pain scores and OAAS scores were significantly lower for patients in group D compared to group M. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and MDA were significantly lower in group D patients than those in group M at 2 h and 4 h. In group M, SOD levels decreased as compared to group D at 2 h and 4 h. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and MDA were positively correlated with VAS pain scores while SOD negatively correlated with VAS pain scores. Therefore, DEX appears to provide better sedation during office-based artificial tooth implantation. DEX offers better postoperative analgesia via anti-inflammatory and antioxidation pathway.

  6. Choice of a dental implant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Peter R; Gartner, Judith L; Norkin, Frederic J

    2005-04-01

    Many dentists are bewildered by the intricacies and complexities of dental implants. They are constantly besieged by product advertisements and can find it difficult to choose which systems to work with. Some dentists are so intimidated by the subject that they choose to avoid getting involved with implants and instead stick to traditional tooth replacement systems. By breaking implants down into 4 main components, the body, collar, connection, and restorative post, it is easier to understand the structure and function of dental implants. Each portion should be designed to achieve certain objectives. Once these structural components are understood, it is easier to compare and contrast differing implant systems.

  7. Design optimization of functionally graded dental implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedia, H S; Mahmoud, Nemat-Alla

    2004-01-01

    The continuous increase of man's life span, and the growing confidence in using artificial materials inside the human body necessities introducing more effective prosthesis and implant materials. However, no artificial implant has biomechanical properties equivalent to the original tissue. Recently, titanium and bioceramic materials, such as hydroxyapatite are extensively used as fabrication materials for dental implant due to their high compatibility with hard tissue and living bone. Titanium has reasonable stiffness and strength while hydroxyapatite has low stiffness, low strength and high ability to reach full integration with living bone. In order to obtain good dental implantation of the biomaterial; full integration of the implant with living bone should be satisfied. Minimum stresses in the implant and the bone must be achieved to increase the life of the implant and prevent bone resorption. Therefore, the aim of the current investigation is to design an implant made from functionally graded material (FGM) to achieve the above advantages. The finite element method and optimization technique are used to reach the required implant design. The optimal materials of the FGM dental implant are found to be hydroxyapatite/titanium. The investigations have shown that the maximum stress in the bone for the hydroxyapatite/titanium FGM implant has been reduced by about 22% and 28% compared to currently used titanium and stainless steel dental implants, respectively.

  8. Short dental implants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibali, S; Cristalli, M P; Dell'Aquila, D; Bignozzi, I; La Monaca, G; Pilloni, A

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence has suggested the utility of short dental implants for oral reconstructive procedures in clinical situations of limited vertical bone height. The aim of this review was to systematically evaluate clinical studies of implants type of edentulism, and prosthetic restoration. Two randomized controlled trials and 14 observational studies were selected and analyzed for data extraction. In total, 6193 short-implants were investigated from 3848 participants. The observational period was 3.2 ± 1.7 yrs (mean ± SD). The cumulative survival rate (CSR) was 99.1% (95%CI: 98.8-99.4). The biological success rate was 98.8% (95%CI: 97.8-99.8), and the biomechanical success rate was 99.9% (95%CI: 99.4-100.0). A higher CSR was reported for rough-surfaced implants. The provision of short implant-supported prostheses in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges appears to be a successful treatment option in the short term; however, more scientific evidence is needed for the long term.

  9. The feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in edentulous jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Anders; Smeets, Ralf; Wahidi, Aria; Kluwe, Lan; Kornmann, Frank; Heiland, Max; Gerlach, Till

    2016-08-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants has been proved to be feasible in partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this retrospective investigation was to assess the feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in fully edentulous jaws. A total of 24 patients aged between 53 and 89 years received a total of 154 implants in their edentulous maxillae or mandibles. Among the implants, 45 were set in fresh extracted sockets and 109 in consolidated alveolar bones. The implants were provisionally managed with chair-side made provisional resin bridges and exposed to immediate loading. Implants were followed up for 1-8 years, including radiographic imaging. Marginal bone levels were evaluated based on radiographic imaging. A total of 148 out of the 154 implants survived over the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years, giving a survival rate of 96%. The time or region of the implantation, the pre-implant augmentation, and the length and diameter of the implants had no statistically significant influence on the survival or the success rate. The marginal bone level remained stable with only minimal loss of 0.3 mm after 60 months of loading. Within the limitations of this study, immediate loading is feasible for dental implants in edentulous jaws.

  10. COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF MATERIALS USED IN DENTAL IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Yegorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is a review of some characteristics of dental implants’ products and an analysis of prospects of using them in modern medicine.Dental implantation as a high-technology method of restoring the natural anatomical structure has no competitors at present. The advantages of dental implants consist in their high operational dependability, a longer life time, a higher functionality and a lesser rate of complications as compared to the use of complete or bridge prostheses.The materials used in dental implantation for this purpose are rather diverse. Doctors using them rely on extensive clinical experience, a developed industry of accessory materials, instruments, that is everything that ensures comfortable work and conveniences for the patient.At the same time, the data mentioned in the article testify to the effect that ceramic implants as compared to titanium alloy implants have comparable or better indices. This is guaranteed, for example, by the requirements of the new international standard ISO6474-2:2012: first-rate strength and wear resistance; thermal stability and corrosion resistance; ceramics’ four point bending strength over 750 MPa.The result of the conducted analysis is a review of using various materials in dental implantation. The author compares the aesthetic indices and durability of titanium or metal alloy implants to those of ceramic ones. The comparison shows that, under the current level of ceramic materials’ structural property, it is actual for dentistry to develop its own methodological approaches in relation to a wide use of ceramic implants and creation of various ceramic mono-implants with the purpose of improving the results of treatment of patients, suffering from secondary partial or complete adentia accompanied by bone tissue deficiency, by applying the methods of dental implantation.

  11. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  12. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Smeets

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions.

  13. Survival of dental implants placed in sites of previously failed implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno R; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2016-10-14

    To assess the survival of dental implants placed in sites of previously failed implants and to explore the possible factors that might affect the outcome of this reimplantation procedure. Patients that had failed dental implants, which were replaced with the same implant type at the same site, were included. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients and implants; survival analysis was also performed. The effect of systemic, environmental, and local factors on the survival of the reoperated implants was evaluated. 175 of 10,096 implants in 98 patients were replaced by another implant at the same location (159, 14, and 2 implants at second, third, and fourth surgeries, respectively). Newly replaced implants were generally of similar diameter but of shorter length compared to the previously placed fixtures. A statistically significant greater percentage of lost implants were placed in sites with low bone quantity. There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.032) in the survival rates between implants that were inserted for the first time (94%) and implants that replaced the ones lost (73%). There was a statistically higher failure rate of the reoperated implants for patients taking antidepressants and antithrombotic agents. Dental implants replacing failed implants had lower survival rates than the rates reported for the previous attempts of implant placement. It is suggested that a site-specific negative effect may possibly be associated with this phenomenon, as well as the intake of antidepressants and antithrombotic agents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Survival of dental implants in post-menopausal bisphosphonate users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Sreenivas; Babu, Nivedhitha Malli Suresh; Norell, Aaron

    2010-07-01

    To determine whether post-menopausal women with a history of bisphosphonate use are at greater risk for implant failure or osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) than an age- and gender-matched population with no history of bisphosphonate use. A retrospective chart review and phone interview was conducted of patients seen at the Mayo Clinic who had implants placed after November 2006. Bisphosphonate users were identified by medical chart review. Dental implant survival and ONJ incidence were determined in a total of 82 post-menopausal non-bisphosphonate users and 55 post-menopausal bisphosphonate users using a phone interview. Implant failures were recorded and survival percentages were calculated for comparison. ONJ was not observed consequent to implant placement in any of the bisphosphonate users or non-users. In non-users, 163 out of 166 implants were surviving for a cumulative survival rate of 98.19%. In bisphosphonate users, 120 out of 121 implants were surviving for a cumulative survival rate of 99.17%. Dental implants placed in post-menopausal women have the same survival potential regardless of whether patients have a history of bisphosphonate use. Bisphosphonate users who undergo dental implant surgery are at low risk for osteonecrosis of the jaw and a bisphosphonate "drug holiday" is not indicated in these patients. Copyright 2010 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Occlusal considerations for dental implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Ranier H

    2014-01-01

    When placed, dental implants are put into an ever-changing oral environment in which teeth can continue to migrate. Yet, the implants themselves are ankylosed. This can lead to occlusal instability. Teeth may continue to erupt, leaving the implants in infraocclusion. Teeth may move mesially away from an implant, requiring modification to close an open contact point. Friction in the connection between teeth and implants can lead to intrusion of teeth and damage to the periodontal attachment apparatus. Implant occlusion with shallow incisal guidance minimizes lateral and tipping forces. Cross-arch stabilization allows the best distribution of occlusal forces. The choice of restorative materials influences long-term occlusal stability.

  16. Fatigue of Dental Implants: Facts and Fallacies

    OpenAIRE

    Keren Shemtov-Yona; Daniel Rittel

    2016-01-01

    Dental implants experience rare yet problematic mechanical failures such as fracture that are caused, most often, by (time-dependent) metal fatigue. This paper surveys basic evidence about fatigue failure, its identification and the implant’s fatigue performance during service. We first discuss the concept of dental implant fatigue, starting with a review of basic concepts related to this failure mechanism. The identification of fatigue failures using scanning electron microscopy follows, to ...

  17. An Analysis of Patient Perceptions and Expectations to Dental Implants: Is There a Significant Effect on Long-Term Satisfaction Levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Here we present an analysis of patient perceptions and expectations to dental implant placement and their prosthetic reconstruction, to then consider whether they have an effect on long-term satisfaction levels. A Post-Treatment Completion Questionnaire was designed to analyse whether patient satisfaction is influenced by age and/or gender; has an effect on patient-reported self-confidence levels; contributes to increased levels of oral hygiene; provides further insight into the average pain levels during and after the surgical intervention; or influences further acceptance of dental implant surgery. And then whether relationships exist between any of these factors. 182 consecutive patients completed the survey: 68 males and 114 females (age mean 64.68 years ± 11.23 SD); the average number of months since treatment completion was 37.4 (males) and 62.6 (females). There is a significant relationship between comfort rating and “how well informed” the patient was (p = 0.015). A significantly positive relationship exists between “considering dental implants in the future” and “overall experience” (p = 0.001). A significantly positive relationship exists between “overall satisfaction with appearance” and “satisfaction with comfort” (p = 0.011). A significant relationship exists between “overall satisfaction with appearance,” “satisfaction with comfort,” and “overall satisfaction with experience” (p = 0.001). The results amplify the need to transmit logical, truthful information to patients when dental implant treatment is being considered. The “fully informed” patient will have realistic expectations that lead to high degrees of satisfaction. PMID:28928771

  18. LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OCCURRING DURING DENTAL IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihomir Georgiev

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the emergence of new concepts in dental treatment involving placement of dental implants and the significance of therapeutic treatment of the intrusion in their complications. The purpose of the article is to make a review of the problems and to point out options for their treatment.

  19. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  20. A Retrospective Analysis of Dental Implants Replacing Failed Implants in Grafted Maxillary Sinus: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Yifat; Chaushu, Gavriel; Lorean, Adi; Mijiritzky, Eithan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the survival rate of dental implants replacing failed implants in grafted maxillary sinuses using the lateral approach vs nongrafted posterior maxillae. A retrospective analysis was conducted to study the survival of secondary dental implants inserted in the posterior maxilla in previously failed implant sites between the years 2000 and 2010. The study group consisted of patients who had also undergone maxillary sinus augmentation, and the control group consisted of patients in whom implants in the posterior maxilla had failed. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed using a structured form. Seventy-five patients with a total of 75 replaced implants were included in the study. The study group comprised 40 patients and the control group, 35 patients. None of the replaced implants in the study group failed, resulting in an overall survival of 100%; three replaced implants in the control group failed (92% survival). The main reason for the primary implant removal was lack of osseointegration (35 [87.5%] of 40 study group implants and 23 [65.7%] of 35 control group implants [P = .027]). The difference between the groups with regard to the timing of primary implant failure was statistically significant. The study group had more early failures of the primary implant than did the control group (77% vs 62%; P = .038). Dental implants replaced in the posterior maxilla had a high survival rate. A higher rate of survival was found in augmented maxillary sinus sites. Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that previous implant failures in the grafted maxillary sinus should not discourage practitioners from a second attempt.

  1. Dental implant placement in type II diabetics: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Michael W; Snider, Taylor N; Cottrell, David A

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus was once considered a contraindication to the use of dental implant therapy as it has been associated with comorbidities, including increased susceptibility to infection, impaired wound healing, and periodontitis. Since dental implants and techniques for controlling diabetes have evolved, dental implant therapy has become increasingly common among patients with diabetes. The rising success of dental implants, along with the realized benefits of implant therapy has shifted current trends to accommodate patients with controlled diabetes as good candidates for treatment. The literature currently suggests that successful treatment results can be attained when placing implants on carefully selected patients with glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1C) less than 8 percent and with possible prophylactic antibiotic administration. This review aims to compile and critically evaluate the current literature for placement of dental implants in patients with diabetes.

  2. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    OpenAIRE

    Ralf Smeets; Bernd Stadlinger; Frank Schwarz; Benedicta Beck-Broichsitter; Ole Jung; Clarissa Precht; Frank Kloss; Alexander Gröbe; Max Heiland; Tobias Ebker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require...

  3. Bisphosphonate treatment and dental implants: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Freitas, Nayara-Ribeiro; de-Moura, Marcos-Boaventura; Veloso-Guedes, Cizelene-do-Carmo-Faleiros; Simamoto-Júnior, Paulo-César; de-Magalhães, Denildo

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze articles that studied patients submitted to diphosphonates therapy and who received dental implants before, during or after bisphosphonate (BP) treatment, compared to healthy patients, analyzing the increase of failure and loss of implants or bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) incidence. Material and Methods The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement was used in this study. The clinical question in “PICO” format was: In patients under bisphosphonate therapy, do dental implants placement, compared to healthy patients, increase the failure and loss of implants or bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw incidence? PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for articles published up until April 15, 2015 using a combination of MeSH terms and their Entry terms. Results The search resulted in 375 articles. After selection according to the eligibility criteria, 15 studies fulfilled were included (eight retrospective, one prospective and six case series), with a total of 1339 patients analyzed, 3748 implants placed, 152 loss of implants and 78 cases of BRONJ. Conclusions Due to the lack of randomized clinical trials looking at this theme, further studies with longer follow-up are needed to elucidate the remaining questions. Thus, it is wise to be careful when planning dental implant surgery in patients undergoing bisphosphonate therapy because of the risk of developing BRONJ as well as occurring failure of implant. Moreover, complete systemic condition of the patient must be also taking into considering when such procedures are performed. Key words:Bisphosphonates, diphosphonates, dental implants, osteonecrosis. PMID:27475681

  4. Short Dental Implants Retaining Two-Implant Mandibular Overdentures in Very Old, Dependent Patients: Radiologic and Clinical Observation Up to 5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniewicz, Sabrina; Buser, Ramona; Duvernay, Elena; Vazquez, Lydia; Loup, Angelica; Perneger, Thomas V; Schimmel, Martin; Müller, Frauke

    To describe the survival rate and peri-implant bone loss in very old patients dependent for their activities of daily living (ADL), treated with mandibular two-implant overdentures (IODs) in the context of a previously reported randomized controlled trial. A total of 19 patients received two interforaminal Straumann implants (Regular Neck, 4.1 mm diameter, 8 mm length) that were subsequently loaded with Locator attachments, transforming their preexisting inferior conventional denture into an IOD. The primary outcome measures were implant survival rate and radiographically assessed peri-implant bone loss. Secondary outcome measures included peri-implant probing depth and Plaque Index scores, as well as implant mobility. Nutritional state (body mass index and blood markers) and cognitive state (Mini-Mental State Examination) were also analyzed. The patient cohort comprised eight men and 11 women with a mean age of 85.7 ± 6.6 years. The implant survival rate up to 5 years was 94.7%, with one early and one late implant failure. The mean loss of peri-implant bone height was 0.17 mm per year (95% confidence interval: 0.09 to 0.24; P implant probing depth and Plaque Index scores were low and stable during the first 2 years, and thereafter increased continuously. Correlation analysis suggests that a reduced cognitive function and nutritional state are not a particular risk factor for accelerated peri-implant bone loss. The high implant survival and acceptable peri-implant health suggest that neither age nor dependency for the ADLs is a contraindication for the placement of implants. Nevertheless, close monitoring of the patients concerning a potential further functional decline precluding denture management and performing oral hygiene measures is advised.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices intended...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  8. Pyogenic granuloma in relation to dental implants: clinical and histopathological findings

    OpenAIRE

    Anitua Aldecoa, Eduardo; Piñas Caballero, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of pyogenic granuloma in association to dental implants is rare and only five cases have been reported in the literature. Material and Methods Patients charts were analyzed to select patients who had been diagnosed for pyogenic granuloma and its association with dental implants had been evaluated. The clinical status of the dental implants and the prosthesis had also been assessed. Results Clinical and histopathological diagnosis of pyogenic granuloma had been reache...

  9. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals - clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human studies, abstracts, review articles.

  10. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals – clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human) studies, abstracts, review articles. PMID:23633764

  11. Femtosecond laser microstructuring of zirconia dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delgado-Ruiz, R. A.; Calvo-Guirado, J. L.; Moreno, P.; Guardia, J.; Gomez-Moreno, G.; Mate-Sanchez, J. E.; Ramirez-Fernandez, P.; Chiva, F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of femtosecond laser for microtexturizing cylindrical zirconia dental implants surface. Sixty-six cylindrical zirconia implants were used and divided into three groups: Control group (with no laser modification), Group A (microgropored texture), and Group 13 (mic

  12. Idiopathic facial pain related with dental implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Geon Kwon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain after dental implantation is rare but difficult issue for the implant practitioner. Patients with chronic pain who had been performed previous implant surgery or related surgical intervention sometimes accompany with psychological problem and difficult to adequately manage. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD 3rd eds, Cepalagia 2013, painful neuropathies and other facial pains are subdivided into the 12 subcategories; 13.1. Trigeminal neuralgia; 13.2 Glossopharyngeal neuralgia; 13.3 Nervus intermedius (facial nerve neuralgia; 13.4 Occipital neuralgia; 13.5 Optic neuritis; 13.6 Headache attributed to ischaemic ocular motor nerve palsy; 13.7 Tolosa-Hunt syndrome; 13.8 Paratrigeminal oculo-sympathetic (Raeder’s syndrome; 13.9 Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy; 13.10 Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS; 13.11 Persistent Idiopathic Facial Pain (PIFP; 13.12 Central neuropathic pain. Chronic orofacial pain after dental implant surgery can be largely into the two main categories that can be frequently encountered in clinical basis ; 1 Neuropathic pain, 2 Idiopathic pain. If there is no direct evidence of the nerve injury related with the implant surgery, the clinician need to consider the central cause of pain instead of the peripheral cause of the pain. There might be several possibilities; 1 Anaesthesia dolorosa, 2 Central post-stroke pain, 3 Facial pain attributed to multiple sclerosis, 4 Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP, 5 Burning mouth syndrome. In this presentation, Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP, the disease entity that can be frequently encountered in the clinic would be discussed. Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP can be defined as “persistent facial and/or oral pain, with varying presentations but recurring daily for more than 2 hours per day over more than 3 months, in the absence of clinical neurological deficit”. ‘Atypical’ pain is a diagnosis of

  13. Radiographic examination for successful dental implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    Recently implant has become an important field in dental clinic. Radiographic examination of pre- and post-operation is essential for successful treatment. Clinicians should have knowledge about the purpose of the radiographic examination, suitable imaging modality for the cases, anatomic landmarks of tooth and jaw bone, advantage and limitation of panoramic radiographic examination for implant, principle and interpretation of cross-sectional imaging, bone mineral density, post-operative radiographic examination. This paper will be helpful to get above information for dentists who want to do dental implant successfully.

  14. Impact of a "TED-Style" presentation on potential patients' willingness to accept dental implant therapy: a one-group, pre-test post-test study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Henry; Abi-Nader, Samer

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE A survey was conducted to assess the impact of a TED-like educational session on participants' willingness to accept dental implant therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Volunteers interested in having information about dental implant therapies were recruited and asked to complete a two-part survey before and after an educational session. The initial survey elicited demographic information, self-perceived knowledge on dental implants and willingness to this kind of treatment. A "TED-style" presentation that provided information about dental implant treatments was conducted before asking the participants to complete a second set of questions assessing the impact of the session. RESULTS The survey was completed by 104 individuals, 78.8% were women and the mean age was 66.5±10.8. Before the educational session, 76.0% of the participants refused dental implants mainly due to lack of knowledge. After the educational session, the rejection of dental implants decreased by almost four folds to 20.2%. CONCLUSION This study proved that an educational intervention can significantly increase willingness to accept treatment with dental implants in a segment of the population who is interested in having information about dental implant therapy. Furthermore, educational interventions, such as TED-like talks, might be useful to increase popular awareness on dental implant therapy. PMID:26816573

  15. A Hybrid Method to Predict Success of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhaneh Sadat Moayeri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: The market demand for dental implants is growing at a significant pace. Results obtained from real cases shows that some dental implants do not lead to success. Hence, the main problem is whether machine learning techniques can be successful in prediction of success of dental implants. Methods/Statistical Analysis: This paper presents a combined predictive model to evaluate the success of dental implants. The classifiers used in this model are W-J48, SVM, Neural Network, K-NN and Naïve Bayes. All internal parameters of each classifier are optimized. These classifiers are combined in a way that results in the highest possible accuracies. Results: The performance of the proposed method is compared with single classifiers. Results of our study show that the combinative approach can achieve higher performance than the best of the single classifiers. Using the combinative approach improves the sensitivity indicator by up to 13.3%. Conclusion/Application: Since diagnosis of patients whose implant does not lead to success is very important in implant surgery, the presented model can help surgeons to make a more reliable decision on level of success of implant operation prior to surgery.

  16. Exfoliative cytology and titanium dental implants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Nalli, Gabriela; Verdú, Sergio; Paparella, María L; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2013-01-01

    Oral exfoliative cytology is a diagnostic method that involves the study of cells exfoliated from the oral mucosa. Ions/particles released from metallic implants can remain in the peri-implant milieu. The aim of the present study is to assess the presence of metal particles in cells exfoliated from peri-implant oral mucosa around titanium dental implants. The study comprised 30 patients carrying titanium dental implants, who had neither a metallic prosthesis nor metal restorations in neighboring teeth. Individuals undergoing orthodontic therapy and those who had oral piercing were also excluded from the study. The study sample included patients with and without peri-implantitis. Cytologic samples of the peri-implant area were collected. Samples of the marginal gingiva on the contralateral side of the implant were taken from the same individuals to serve as control. Cytologic analysis was performed using light microscopy. Titanium concentration was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometry. Metal-like particles were observed inside and outside epithelial cells and macrophages in cytologic smears of peri-implant mucosa of both patients with and without peri-implantitis. No particles were found in the control cytologic samples. The concentration of titanium was higher in the peri-implantitis group compared with the group without peri-implantitis; no traces of titanium were observed in controls. Regardless of an inflammatory response, ions/particles are released from the surface of the implant into the biologic milieu. Exfoliative cytology is a simple technique that may be used to detect metal particles in cells exfoliated from the peri-implant mucosa.

  17. Micromotion of Dental Implants: Basic Mechanical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Winter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Micromotion of dental implants may interfere with the process of osseointegration. Using three different types of virtual biomechanical models, varying contact types between implant and bone were simulated, and implant deformation, bone deformation, and stress at the implant-bone interface were recorded under an axial load of 200 N, which reflects a common biting force. Without friction between implant and bone, a symmetric loading situation of the bone with maximum loading and displacement at the apex of the implant was recorded. The addition of threads led to a decrease in loading and displacement at the apical part, but loading and displacement were also observed at the vertical walls of the implants. Introducing friction between implant and bone decreased global displacement. In a force fit situation, load transfer predominantly occurred in the cervical area of the implant. For freshly inserted implants, micromotion was constant along the vertical walls of the implant, whereas, for osseointegrated implants, the distribution of micromotion depended on the location. In the cervical aspect some minor micromotion in the range of 0.75 μm could be found, while at the most apical part almost no relative displacement between implant and bone occurred.

  18. Osseointegrated dental implants in growing children: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankani, Nivedita; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Patil, Brijesh A; Nagaraj, E; Madalli, Poornima

    2014-10-01

    Edentulism is usually associated with the aging patient. However, total or partial tooth loss also affects young individuals, mainly as a result of trauma, decay, anodontia, or congenital and acquired jaw defects involving the alveolar processes. For elderly patients, the use of oral implants has become an accepted treatment modality for edentulism, and most of today's knowledge regarding implants is based on such practice. There has been hesitation to perform implant therapy for growing children; hence, few children to date have been provided with implant-supported construction. Consequently, little is known about the outcome of the osseointegration procedure in young patients, and until now, only a limited number of case presentations have been reported. This article reviews the current literature to discuss the use of dental implants in growing patients and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. The literature review was performed through Science Direct, Wileys Blackwell Synergy, PubMed, Google, Embase, Medknow publications, and Springer for references published from 1963 to 2011. It is recommended to wait for the completion of dental and skeletal growth, except for severe cases of ectodermal dysplasia.

  19. Immediate placement of dental implants in the mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkar Haraswarupa Puttaraju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case describes extraction of teeth in the mandibular arch, i.e., 41 42 43 44 45 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 (grade two mobility, followed by immediate placement of four dental implants (3i biomet, two in the 45 55 region and two dental implants in 12 21 region. A prefabricated provisional mandibular denture was immediately placed. The purpose of immediate placement was to aid the patient resume his professional duties the next day itself along with esthetic and functional comfort, psychological well-being and most importantly preserving the remaining tissue in a healthy condition.

  20. 78 FR 2647 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ...-Form Endosseous Dental Implant AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed order... dental implant, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls). On its own initiative... published a proposed rule for classification of endosseous dental implants (without distinguishing implants...

  1. A Hybrid Method to Predict Success of Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Reyhaneh Sadat Moayeri; Mehdi Khalili; Mahsa Nazari

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The market demand for dental implants is growing at a significant pace. Results obtained from real cases shows that some dental implants do not lead to success. Hence, the main problem is whether machine learning techniques can be successful in prediction of success of dental implants. Methods/Statistical Analysis: This paper presents a combined predictive model to evaluate the success of dental implants. The classifiers used in this model are W-J48, SVM, Neural Network...

  2. Effect of Dental Health Instruction on Dental Anxiety of Patients Undergoing Implantation%口腔健康宣教对种植牙患者牙科焦虑心理的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商玲燕; 栾明亮; 张仁国; 赵金华; 徐小丽

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价口腔健康宣教对种植牙患者牙科焦虑心理的影响.方法 种植牙患者60例,试验组和对照组各30例,于术前30 min、术前2 min应用牙科焦虑量表测评焦虑程度,2次测评之间试验组患者接受口腔健康宣教.手术完成时,记录2组患者术中焦虑状态及疼痛程度.结果 2组术前30 min焦虑程度差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),试验组术前2 min的焦虑程度低于术前30 min(P<0.05),也显著低于对照组术前2 min(P<0.01),同时,试验组术中焦虑及疼痛程度与对照组相比均明显降低(P<0.05).结论 口腔健康宣教能显著缓解种植牙患者术前的焦虑心理,减轻术中疼痛.%Objective To evaluate the effect of dental health instruction on dental anxiety of patients undergoing dental implantation. Methods A total of 60 patients needing implantation were randomly selected as the trial and control group, with 30 patients in each group. The modified dental anxiety scale was used to evaluate the dental anxiety degree ofall patients at 30 min and 2 min before operation. The dental health instruction was given to the trial group between two e-valuations. Results The anxiety degree of trial group at 2 min before operation was significantly lower than that of trial group at 30 min before operation (P 0. 05). The anxiety index and pain index of trial group after operation were significantly lower than that of control group ( P < 0.05 ). Conclusion The dental health instruction was effective to release dental anxiety and pain of patients undergoing implantation.

  3. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-01-01

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported. PMID:24907215

  4. Knowledge and attitudes of dental interns in Karnataka state, India, regarding implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sohini; Gowda, Triveni M; Kumar, Tarun A B; Mehta, Dhoom S

    2013-10-01

    Implant treatment today is highly reliable as a valid restorative option for missing teeth. As more patients worldwide opt for implant treatment, it is now imperative for dental practitioners to have sound information about dental implants so they can help patients make informed decisions. This study sought to define the knowledge and attitudes regarding dental implants of dental interns in the state of Karnataka, India, and to evaluate the dental implant curriculum structure at the undergraduate level. A survey was conducted of dental interns (students in their fifth, clinical year of undergraduate study) in seven of the forty-five academic dental institutions in this state. The questionnaire consisted of fifteen questions that assessed the respondents' level of knowledge and source of information regarding implants. A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed, and 417 interns responded for a response rate of 83.4 percent. In the results, 73.3 percent reported they were not provided sufficient information about implants in their undergraduate curriculum, and 95.7 percent of them wanted more. Also, 63.5 percent of the respondents believed that high costs could limit the use of dental implants as a tooth replacement modality in India. This study concludes that revision in the undergraduate dental curricula at these schools is needed to better prepare students for practicing implant dentistry.

  5. Fatigue of Dental Implants: Facts and Fallacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Shemtov-Yona

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants experience rare yet problematic mechanical failures such as fracture that are caused, most often, by (time-dependent metal fatigue. This paper surveys basic evidence about fatigue failure, its identification and the implant’s fatigue performance during service. We first discuss the concept of dental implant fatigue, starting with a review of basic concepts related to this failure mechanism. The identification of fatigue failures using scanning electron microscopy follows, to show that this stage is fairly well defined. We reiterate that fatigue failure is related to the implant design and its surface condition, together with the widely varying service conditions. The latter are shown to vary to an extent that precludes devising average or representative conditions. The statistical nature of the fatigue test results is emphasized throughout the survey to illustrate the complexity in evaluating the fatigue behavior of dental implants from a design perspective. Today’s fatigue testing of dental implants is limited to ISO 14801 standard requirements, which ensures certification but does not provide any insight for design purposes due to its limited requirements. We introduce and discuss the random spectrum loading procedure as an alternative to evaluate the implant’s performance under more realistic conditions. The concept is illustrated by random fatigue testing in 0.9% saline solution.

  6. Immediate dental implant placement in the aesthetic zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten Willemijn

    2016-01-01

    After pulling a tooth when aesthetics play a role, there is a tendency to place a dental implant immediately after pulling the tooth, preferably in combination with a temporary crown. This tendency is probably related to evolving society factors, with more demanding patients and a wish for an aesthe

  7. Methods to measure stability of dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Digholkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant treatment is an excellent option for prosthetic restoration that is associated with high success rates. Implant stability is essential for a good outcome. The clinical assessment of osseointegration is based on mechanical stability rather than histological criteria, considering primary stability (absence of mobility in bone bed after implant insertion and secondary stability (bone formation and remodeling at implant-bone interface. However, due to the invasive nature of the histological methods various other methods have been proposed: Radiographs, the surgeon′s perception, Insertion torque (cutting torque analysis, seating torque, reverse torque testing, percussion testing, impact hammer method, pulsed oscillation waveform, implant mobility checker, Periotest, resonance frequency analysis. This review focuses on the methods currently available for the evaluation of implant stability.

  8. Nanotechnology approaches to improve dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomisa, Antoni P; Launey, Maximilien E; Lee, Janice S; Mankani, Mahesh H; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The requirements imposed by the enormous scale and overall complexity of designing new implants or complete organ regeneration are well beyond the reach of present technology in many dimensions, including nanoscale, as researchers do not yet have the basic knowledge required to achieve these goals. The need for a synthetic implant to address multiple physical and biologic factors imposes tremendous constraints on the choice of suitable materials. There is a strong belief that nanoscale materials will produce a new generation of implant materials with high efficiency, low cost, and high volume. The nanoscale in materials processing is truly a new frontier. Metallic dental implants have been used successfully for decades, but they have serious shortcomings related to their osseointegration and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. This paper reviews recent advances in the fabrication of novel coatings and nanopatterning of dental implants. It also provides a general summary of the state of the art in dental implant science and describes possible advantages of nanotechnology for future improvements. The ultimate goal is to produce materials and therapies that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and improve quality of life and current standards of care.

  9. Nanotechnology Approaches for Better Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Lee, Janice S.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The combined requirements imposed by the enormous scale and overall complexity of designing new implants or complete organ regeneration are well beyond the reach of present technology in many dimensions, including nanoscale, as we do not yet have the basic knowledge required to achieve these goals. The need for a synthetic implant to address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the choice of suitable materials. There is a strong belief that nanoscale materials will produce a new generation of implant materials with high efficiency, low cost, and high volume. The nanoscale in materials processing is truly a new frontier. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades but they have serious shortcomings related to their osseointegration and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. This paper reviews recent advances in the fabrication of novel coatings and nanopatterning of dental implants. It also provides a general summary of the state of the art in dental implant science and describes possible advantages of nanotechnology for further improvements. The ultimate goal is to produce materials and therapies that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and improve quality of life and current standards of care. PMID:21464998

  10. Porous Titanium for Dental Implant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena J. Wally

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an increasing amount of research has focused on the biological and mechanical behavior of highly porous structures of metallic biomaterials, as implant materials for dental implants. Particularly, pure titanium and its alloys are typically used due to their outstanding mechanical and biological properties. However, these materials have high stiffness (Young’s modulus in comparison to that of the host bone, which necessitates careful implant design to ensure appropriate distribution of stresses to the adjoining bone, to avoid stress-shielding or overloading, both of which lead to bone resorption. Additionally, many coating and roughening techniques are used to improve cell and bone-bonding to the implant surface. To date, several studies have revealed that porous geometry may be a promising alternative to bulk structures for dental implant applications. This review aims to summarize the evidence in the literature for the importance of porosity in the integration of dental implants with bone tissue and the different fabrication methods currently being investigated. In particular, additive manufacturing shows promise as a technique to control pore size and shape for optimum biological properties.

  11. Platform switch and dental implants: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-06-01

    To test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL) and postoperative infection in patients who received platform-switched implants or platform-matched implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. Main search terms used in combination: dental implant, oral implant, platform switch, switched platform, platform mismatch, and dental implant-abutment design. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in December/2014 in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register plus hand-searching. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. Twenty-eight publications were included, with a total of 1216 platform-switched implants (16 failures; 1.32%) and 1157 platform-matched implants (13 failures; 1.12%). There was less MBL loss at implants with platform-switching than at implants with platform-matching (mean difference -0.29, 95% CI -0.38 to -0.19; Pimplant platform and the abutment (P=0.001). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analyses for the outcomes 'implant failure' and 'postoperative infection' were not performed. The results of the present review should be interpreted with caution due to the presence of uncontrolled confounding factors in the included studies, most of them with short follow-up periods. The question whether platform-matched implants are more at risk for failure and loose more marginal bone than platform-switched implants has received increasing attention in the last years. As the philosophies of treatment alter over time, a periodic review of the different concepts is necessary to refine techniques and eliminate unnecessary procedures, forming a basis for optimum treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Axial relationship between dental implants and teeth/implants: a radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machtei, Eli E; Oettinger-Barak, Orit; Horwitz, Jacob

    2014-08-01

    The relationship of dental implants with neighboring teeth will affect both occlusal relationship and distribution of forces; thus, the purpose of this study was to examine implants' axial relationship with adjacent and opposing teeth/implants. Data of dental implants patients was retrieved. Panoramic X rays were digitized. Computer-based software was used to measure the angular relationship between the implants and adjacent/opposing teeth and implants. Data was further sorted by the mode of placement and implants position. 50 patients (219 implants) were included. Mean angle to adjacent tooth/implant was 178.71° ± 9.18° (range 129.7°-206°). Implants were more parallel to adjacent teeth (180.99° ± 1.06°) than to adjacent implants (176.32° ± 0.54°; P = .0001). Mean angular relationship to opposite tooth was 167.88° ± 8.92° (range 137.7°-179.8°). Implants that were placed freehand or with positional guide had similar intra-arch relationship (178.22° and 178.81°, respectively) and similar inter-arch angulations (164.46° and 167.74°). Molars had greater deviation of the angular relationship (175.54°) compared to premolars (181.62°) and incisors (180.55°, P = .0001). Implants placed in the maxilla had smaller axial deviation compared to implants in the mandible (180.41° ± 0.64 vs 177.14° ± 1.02; P = .0081). Good axial relationship may be obtained in most implants placed by an experienced clinician, even when placed freehand. The mandibular posterior region is more prone to axial deviation and as such requires special attention.

  13. Tissue response: biomaterials, dental implants, and compromised osseous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu RS, Arvind; Ogle, Orrett

    2015-04-01

    Tissue response represents an important feature in biocompatibility in implant procedures. This review article highlights the fundamental characteristics of tissue response after the implant procedure. This article also highlights the tissue response in compromised osseous conditions. Understanding the histologic events after dental implants in normal and abnormal bone reinforces the concept of case selection in dental implants.

  14. Assessment of Various Risk Factors for Success of Delayed and Immediate Loaded Dental Implants: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasant, M C; Thukral, Rishi; Kumar, Sachin; Sadrani, Sannishth M; Baxi, Harsh; Shah, Aditi

    2016-10-01

    Ever since its introduction in 1977, a minimum of few months of period is required for osseointegration to take place after dental implant surgery. With the passage of time and advancements in the fields of dental implant, this healing period is getting smaller and smaller. Immediate loading of dental implants is becoming a very popular procedure in the recent time. Hence, we retrospectively analyzed the various risk factors for the failure of delayed and immediate loaded dental implants. In the present study, retrospective analysis of all the patients was done who underwent dental implant surgeries either by immediate loading procedure or by delayed loading procedures. All the patients were divided broadly into two groups with one group containing patients in which delayed loaded dental implants were placed while other consisted of patients in whom immediate loaded dental implants were placed. All the patients in whom follow-up records were missing and who had past medical history of any systemic diseases were excluded from the present study. Evaluation of associated possible risk factors was done by classifying the predictable factors as primary and secondary factors. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and chi-square test were used for assessment of level of significance. In delayed and immediate group of dental implants, mean age of the patients was 54.2 and 54.8 years respectively. Statistically significant results were obtained while comparing the clinical parameters of the dental implants in both the groups while demographic parameters showed nonsignificant correlation. Significant higher risk of dental implant failure is associated with immediate loaded dental implants. Tobacco smoking, shorter implant size, and other risk factors play a significant role in predicting the success and failure of dental implants. Delayed loaded dental implant placement should be preferred

  15. [Sinus lift and dental implantation after endosurgical treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoliatin, S P; Sysoliatin, P G; Palkina, M O; Solop, M V

    2013-01-01

    The long-term results of dental implant placement in patients with the history of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis are assessed in retrospective study. Maxillary sinusotomy and endoscopic surgery procedures are compared in regard to complications risks after subsequent sinus lift and dental implantation, the latter proving to be method of choice in such cases.

  16. Accuracy of digital impression in dental implants: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudabe Kulivand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of dental implants remains one of the most challenging aspects of implant dentistry. Although it is not clear whether prosthetic misfit could affect osseointegration, mechanical complications of implant-supported prostheses can be avoided by achieving a good passive fit between the framework and the implants. Passive fit is a difficult concept to define. Obtaining absolute passive fit of the prosthetic framework on implants has been reported to be nearly impossible. Because of the multiple steps involved in processing and manufacturing implant-borne prostheses, errors in precision seem to be unavoidable. Misfit of prosthesis may lead to mechanical failures such as screw distortion and loosening, component fractures and even implant failure. Digital impressions offer advantages to both the clinician and the patient. For clinicians, digital impressions may reduce laboratory remakes because the computer screen image of the prepared teeth is magnified, improving the view of the preparation quality. The quality and accuracy of impressions has been demonstrated to be an effective clinical procedure for reducing inaccuracies in prostheses. So, the aim of the current research was to determine accuracy of digital impression in dental implants using the PubMed and Medline database English literature by the terms “Digital impression”, “Implants”, Dentistry”.

  17. 30-Year Outcomes of Dental Implants Supporting Mandibular Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Retrospective Review of 4 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Tözüm, Tolga F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to present the 30-year outcomes of 28 implants supporting mandibular screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Dental charts of the 4 patients were carefully reviewed, and it was noticed that they received 28 implants and 5 screw-retained FDPs in 1983 and 1984. The chief concerns raised by these patients were poor retention of their complete dentures and decreased masticatory function at the time of treatment planning. Each dental care they received was recorded in the last 30 years. Implant survival, radiographic, and prosthodontic examinations were performed. No implants were lost after 30 years, giving the implant a survival rate of 100%. The average marginal bone level was 2.6 ± 0.5 mm at the last recall appointment. Of the 5 FDPs delivered, 1 needed replacement, indicating a prosthesis survival rate of 80%. The patients needed 21 repairs such as replacement of denture teeth/gold screws and hard relining, and 19 adjustments such as occlusal adjustments and acrylic resin contouring, over 30 years. This clinical report shows that machined-surface dental implants can successfully support screw-retained fixed dental prostheses for over 30 years, making dental implants an important dental treatment alternative compared to the traditional prosthetic treatment methods.

  18. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A., Jr.; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C.-M.

    2013-02-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose calculation

  19. Marginal tissue response adjacent to Astra Dental Implants supporting overdentures in the mandible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Holm, B; Sewerin, I

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal tissue response adjacent to implant supported overdentures. Twenty edentulous patients had 2 Astra Dental Implants placed in the canine region of the lower jaw. New overdentures were retained by individual ball attachments in 11 patients...... that two osseointegrated Astra Dental Implants could successfully retain an overdenture in the lower jaw. However, long-term observation is needed for a definitive evaluation of this treatment concept....

  20. Dental implants from functionally graded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Shirazi, Farid Seyed; Mehrali, Mohammad; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib Bin; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2013-10-01

    Functionally graded material (FGM) is a heterogeneous composite material including a number of constituents that exhibit a compositional gradient from one surface of the material to the other subsequently, resulting in a material with continuously varying properties in the thickness direction. FGMs are gaining attention for biomedical applications, especially for implants, owing to their reported superior composition. Dental implants can be functionally graded to create an optimized mechanical behavior and achieve the intended biocompatibility and osseointegration improvement. This review presents a comprehensive summary of biomaterials and manufacturing techniques researchers employ throughout the world. Generally, FGM and FGM porous biomaterials are more difficult to fabricate than uniform or homogenous biomaterials. Therefore, our discussion is intended to give the readers about successful and obstacles fabrication of FGM and porous FGM in dental implants that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and develop quality of life and present standards of care.

  1. 糖尿病患者种植牙16例临床观察%Clinical Dental Implant Observation of 16 Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕万龙

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨糖尿病患者种植牙的临床效果。方法选取我院2010年6月~2013年6月收治的16例糖尿病种植牙患者,对患者的种植效果进行分析,并进行2年的回访,观察患者种植牙颈部骨吸收情况以及种植牙周炎发病情况。结果患者的种植牙成功率为87.5%,通过2年的随访,其中3例患者出现牙周炎,经治疗康复。结论糖尿病患者在进行种植牙治疗过程中,较普通患者的情况复杂,经重视能够得到良好效果。%Objective To investigate the clinical effect of dental implantation in patients with diabetes melitus.Methods 16 patients with diabetes who were treated in our hospital from June 2010 to June 2013 were analyzed,and the effect of the patients were analyzed,and the patients were treated with 2 years.Results The success rate of dental implant was 87.5%,and 3 cases of patients with periodontitis were treated by 2 years of folow-up. ConclusionPatients with diabetes melitus in the course of dental treatment,compared with the general situation of patients with complex,the attention can get good results.

  2. Dental Implants in an Aged Population: Evaluation of Periodontal Health, Bone Loss, Implant Survival, and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, William; Hujoel, Philippe; Becker, Burton E; Wohrle, Peter

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate aged partially and fully edentulous patients who received dental implants and were maintained over time. Further, to determine how the partially and edentulous ageing populations (65 and above) with dental implants maintain bone levels, proper oral hygiene, and perceive benefits of dental implants. Since 1995, patients receiving dental implants have been prospectively entered into an Access-based computerized program (Triton Tacking System). Patient demographics (age, sex), bone quality, quantity, implant location, and type of surgery have been continuously entered into the database. The database was queried for patients receiving implants (first stage) between 66 and 93 years of age. Thirty-one patients were within this age group. Twenty-five patients returned to the clinic for periodontal and dental implant evaluation. The Periodontal Index was used to evaluate selected teeth in terms of probing depth, bleeding on probing, plaque accumulation, and mobility. Using NIH Image J, radiographs taken at second stage and last examination were measured for changes in interproximal bone levels. Once identified, each patient anomalously filled out an abbreviated quality of health life form. Due to small sample size, descriptive statistics were used to compare clinical findings. Fifteen males ranging from 78 to 84 (mean age 84 years) years and 16 females from 66 to 93 (mean age 83 years) (age range 66-93) were contacted by phone or mail and asked to return to our office for a re-examination. For this group, the first dental implants were placed in 1996 (n = initial two implants) and continuously recorded through 2013 (n = last seven implants). Thirty-one patients received a total of 84 implants. Two patients were edentulous, and the remaining were partially edentulous. Four implants were lost. Between implant placement and 6- to 7-year interval, 13 patients with 40 implants had a cumulative survival rate of 94.6%. Of the original group (n = 33), three

  3. Induction of periimplantitis in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephan T; Föge, Marc; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E; Gavrilova, Olga; Bolte, Hendrik; Rosenstiel, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Development, progression, and therapy of periimplantitis are nonresolved emerging problems. The aim of this pilot study was to establish a model for periimplantitis in mice to have a base for tests with immune-deficient knockout organisms to improve the knowledge about development and progression of periimplantitis and to develop further therapeutic options.In 8 mice, titanium implants were inserted in the median of the palate. Four of these implants had ligatures (periimplantitis group). After 2 weeks, the animals received a special diet enriched with sugar and flavor. After 9 weeks, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) examinations to evaluate the periimplant tissue and histologies were performed.Dental implant insertions within the oral cavity are possible in living mice. Implants with ligatures showed significantly larger periimplant bone defects than controls. The radiologic findings were confirmed by histology. At the end of the observation period, the portion of implants lost was higher in the ligature group.This is the first publication to describe the insertion of dental implants in living mice. In addition, it is the first time that periimplant infection could be induced in that species. This model will pave the way to study knockout mice with reduced or even enhanced resistance to periimplantitis.

  4. A retrospective study on related factors affecting the survival rate of dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Kyung; Lee, Ki; Lee, Yong-Sang; Park, Pil-Kyoo

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the relationship between local factors and survival rate of dental implant which had been installed and restored in Seoul Veterans Hospital dental center for past 10 years. And when the relationship is found out, it could be helpful to predict the prognosis of dental implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study of patients receiving root-shaped screw-type dental implants placed from January 2000 to December 2009 was conducted. 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients. The following data were collected from the dental records and radiographs: patient's age, gender, implant type and surface, length, diameter, location of implant placement, bone quality, prosthesis type. The correlations between these data and survival rate were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis, Chi-square test and odds ratio. RESULTS In all, 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients (3120 male, 635 female; mean age 65 ± 10.58 years). 108 implants failed and the cumulative survival rate was 96.33%. There were significant differences in age, implant type and surface, length, location and prosthesis type (P.05). CONCLUSION Related factors such as age, implant type, length, location and prosthesis type had a significant effect on the implant survival. PMID:22259704

  5. Tilted versus axially placed dental implants: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the present review was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rate, marginal bone loss, and postoperative infection for patients being rehabilitated by tilted or by axially placed dental implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in July 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not, interventional or observational. The estimates of an intervention were expressed in risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimetres. The search strategy resulted in 44 publications. A total of 5029 dental implants were tilted (82 failures; 1.63%), and 5732 implants were axially placed (104 failures; 1.81%). The difference between the procedures did not significantly affect the implant failure rates (P=0.40), with a RR of 1.14 (95% CI 0.84-1.56). A statistically significant difference was found for implant failures when studies evaluating implants inserted in maxillae only were pooled (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.05-2.74; P=0.03), the same not happening for the mandible (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.39-1.52; P=0.45). There were no apparent significant effects of tilted dental implants on the occurrence of marginal bone loss (MD 0.03, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.08; P=0.32). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'postoperative infection' was not performed. It is suggested that the differences in angulation of dental implants might not affect the implant survival or the marginal bone loss. The reliability and validity of the data collected and the potential for biases and confounding factors are some of the shortcomings of the present study. The question whether tilted implants are more at risk for failure than axially placed implants has received increasing attention in the last years. As the philosophies of treatment alter over time, a periodic review of the different concepts is necessary to refine

  6. Assessment of Final Year Dental Students' Views of Science Education in Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MajidReza Mokhtari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dental student's concepts about dental implant education which can be used in dentistry doctorate curriculum revision and could be useful for professors of periodontology, prosthodontics and maxillofacial surgery.Materials & Methods: This was an educational research which was conducted in Mashhad dental school in 2011 and 58 end year dental students were participated in this study and filled out questionnaires about dental implant education and the concepts of these students about theoretical and practical aspects of dental implant education were evaluated.Results: A total of 98.27% of the students were agreed about education of simple implant surgery so that they could put a simple implant and 87.94% of the students were agreed about education of dental implant as a single course credit and about creation of a dental educational group, 96.56% were agreed. About dental implant educational topics, the most educational need was education of principles of implant surgery followed by education of putting a simple frontal implant, and the least, was introduction and history of dental implants.Conclusions: Because of necessity of development for new sciences in order to promote health in the society, education of dental implant for general dentistry students and revision of general dentistry curriculum seems necessary.

  7. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by titanium screws and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, Maki; Nishigawa, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Youji; Ohe, Go; Matsuka, Yoshizo

    2016-07-01

    Titanium has been considered to be a non-allergenic material. However, several studies have reported cases of metal allergy caused by titanium-containing materials. We describe a 69-year-old male for whom significant pathologic findings around dental implants had never been observed. He exhibited allergic symptoms (eczema) after orthopedic surgery. The titanium screws used in the orthopedic surgery that he underwent were removed 1 year later, but the eczema remained. After removal of dental implants, the eczema disappeared completely. Titanium is used not only for medical applications such as plastic surgery and/or dental implants, but also for paints, white pigments, photocatalysts, and various types of everyday goods. Most of the usage of titanium is in the form of titanium dioxide. This rapid expansion of titanium-containing products has increased percutaneous and permucosal exposure of titanium to the population. In general, allergic risk of titanium material is smaller than that of other metal materials. However, we suggest that pre-implant patients should be asked about a history of hypersensitivity reactions to metals, and patch testing should be recommended to patients who have experienced such reactions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeta Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discu...

  9. Longevity of dental implants in type IV bone: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, M C; dos Santos, D M; Santiago, J F; Moreno, A; Pellizzer, E P

    2014-09-01

    Bone quality and quantity are important factors with regard to the survival rate of dental implants. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of dental implants inserted in low-density bone and to determine the survival rate of dental implants with surface treatments over time. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken by two independent individuals; the Medline/PubMed database was searched for the period July 1975 to March 2013. Relevant reports on bone quality and osseointegration of dental implants were selected. The search retrieved 1018 references, and after inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 19 studies were selected for review. A total of 3937 patients, who had received a total of 12,465 dental implants, were analyzed. The survival rates of dental implants according to the bone density were: type I, 97.6%; type II, 96.2%; type III, 96.5%; and type IV, 88.8%. The survival rate of treated surface implants inserted in low-density bone was higher (97.1%) than that of machined surface implants (91.6%). Surface-treated dental implants inserted in low-density bone have a high survival rate and may be indicated for oral rehabilitation. However, more randomized studies are required to better evaluate this issue.

  10. Dental implant superstructures by superplastic forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, R.V.; Garriga-Majo, D.; Soo, S.; Pagliaria, D. [Kings Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Dental Biomaterials Science; Juszczyk, A.S.; Walter, J.D. [Kings Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Prosthetic Dentistry

    2001-07-01

    A novel application of superplastic forming is described for the production of fixed-bridge dental implant superstructures. Finite element analysis (FEA) has shown that Ti-6Al-4V sheet would be a suitable candidate material for the design of a fixed-bridge dental implant superstructure. Traditionally superstructures are cast in gold alloy onto pre-machined gold alloy cylinders but castings are often quite bulky and 25% of castings do not fit accurately (1) which means that sectioning and soldering is required to obtain a fit that is clinically acceptable and will not prejudice the integrity of the commercially pure cp-titanium implants osseointegrated with the bone. Superplastic forming is shown to be a forming technique that would allow the production of strong, light-weight components of thin section with low residual stress that could be suitable for such applications. Considerable cost savings over traditional dental techniques can be achieved using a low-cost ceramic die material. The properties of these die materials are optimised so that suitable components can be produced. Satisfactory hot strength is demonstrated and thermal properties are matched to those of the titanium alloy for accurate fit of the prosthesis. (orig.)

  11. Dental implant restoration for elderly patients with specific situations%老年患者特定情况的人工种植牙修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪臣

    2012-01-01

    Dental implant restoration for the elderly patients has confronted with some difficulties such as more missing teeth, complicated edentulous situation and associated with systemic diseases. The preliminary discusses on the effects of dental implant restoration for the elderly patients with systemic diseases, for instance, diabetes, osteoporosis, xerostomia, radiation therapy, smoking, oral lichen planus, were made in this paper. Implantation surgery without stopping anticoagulant drugs and combined with absolutely painless anesthesia method for the elderly patients were proposed. Wiich serve as a reference.%老年人的人工种植牙修复由于其缺牙较多,缺牙情况复杂且伴有全身性疾病有较多的困难.本文就高龄老年人的种植修复,老年糖尿病、骨质疏松、口干症、放疗、吸烟、口腔扁平苔藓等老年人常见口腔全身疾病对人工种植牙的影响做了初步论述.对老年人服用抗凝药物的人工种植牙修复提出了不停用抗凝药的人工种植牙术式.对老年人人工种植牙的绝对无痛的麻醉方法的改进提出了自己的方法和观点.以供同行参考和评论.

  12. Immediate CAD/ CAM Custom Fabricated Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Kolahi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There will almost always be gaps between cylin-drical or screw shaped prefabricated implant surface and funnel-shaped tooth socket when an implant is placed immediately after tooth extraction. Hence expensive and difficult bone grafting is re-quired. A custom fabricated implant will be a pragmatic solution for this limitation.The hypothesis: First step following extraction of a tooth is data capture or scanning via a 3D scan method e.g. coordinate measuring machine or non-contact laser scanners such as triangulation range finder. Second step is reconstruction or modeling via editable CAD (computer-aided design model, allowing us to add retentive holes and correction of implant angle. Third step is fabrication via CAM (computer aided manufacturing followed by plasma cleaning process. Fourth step is insertion of the CAD/CAM custom fabricated one-stage implant in the fresh tooth socket. Optimal time for this step is 24-48 hours after extraction. The custom fabricated implant should not load 3-4 months. Usage of chlorhexidine mouth-rinse or chewing gum twice daily for 2 weeks and, in some cases oral antibiotic is recommended. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Contemporary dental implant system faced with several clinical and anatomical limitations such is low sinuses or nerve bundles. Complex and expensive surgical procedures such as nerve repositioning and sinus lift are frequently required. With custom fabricated implant we can overcome several of these limitations because insertion of custom fabricated implant will perform before alveolar bone recession.

  13. Apicetomy or dental implant: Report of a clinical case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Fernández-Bodereau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a clinical case of a patient who underwent apicectomy on an upper premolar, presumably by endodontic done improperly, and have cast a bolt where the extraction run the risk of tooth fracture. Failed such treatment, an implant is performed, placed immediately after extraction, in which bone filling with xenograft and guided bone regeneration with resorbable collagen membrane was done. From this we deduce that the phase diagnosed is of paramount importance. Two months after functional load of the implant is made with a cemented ceramic crown. One of the factors that influenced the positive outcome of this case, where immediately implants are placed to the tooth extraction is ultra microtextured surface of the used implant, besides being the bone table of these dental elements of thicker vestibular.

  14. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bertoli, Elizangela; Medynski, Denielle C; Khalaf, Mohd W

    2015-01-01

    Nerve trauma caused by dental implant placement is associated with altered sensation and chronic pain. Complete or partial loss of sensation is often reported by patients who have experienced nerve trauma during implant surgery. Some patients report persistent pain and neurosurgery disturbance long after the normal healing time has passed. In addition, neuropathic pain is reported after implant surgery. Practitioners who place dental implants must be familiar with the differential diagnosis, prevention, and management of neuropathic pain. This article provides insights into the prevention and management of neurosensory deficits and chronic persistent neuropathic pain and considerations for patient referral.

  15. A Review of Dental Implant Treatment Planning and Implant Design Based on Bone Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torkzaban

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Context A key determinant for clinical success is the diagnosis of the bone density in a potential implant site. The percentage of bone-implant contact is related to bone density, and the axial stress contours around an implant are affected by the density of bone. Evidence Acquisition A number of reports have emphasized the importance of the quality of bone on the survival of dental implants. The volume and density of the recipient bone have also been shown to be determining criteria to establish proper treatment plans with adequate number of implants and sufficient surface area. Previous clinical reports that did not alter the protocol of treatment related to bone density had variable survival rates. To the contrary, altering the treatment plan to compensate for soft bone types has provided similar survival rates in all bone densities. Results When bone density decreases and bone become softer, the implant surface in contact with the bone decreases, therefore treatment plan should be modified by changing the drilling protocol, using gradual loading and reducing the force on the prosthesis or increasing the loading area with increasing implant number, implant position, implant size, implant design (deeper and more threads with more pitch, squared shape and implant body surface condition. Conclusions Once the prosthetic option, key implant position, and patient force factors have been determined, the bone density in the implant sites should be evaluated to modify the treatment plan. Inappropriate implant number or design in poor quality bone results in higher failure rates. Changing the treatment plan and implant design is suggested, based on bone density to achieve higher survival rates.

  16. DENTAL IMPLANTS: AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR TOOTH REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Nandini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A dental implant is an artificial tooth that replaces a tooth that has been taken out. Implants are natural-looking, can provide support for dentures and do not affect the teeth bordering them. They are as stable as your real teeth and protect you from the loss of jawbone, which occurs when you lose teeth. Endosseous dental implants have revolutionized the fields of implants and periodontics. During the last decade, a great deal of information has been generated concerning the effectiveness and predictability of endosseous implants. Implant placement is a viable option in the treatment of partial and full edentulism and has become an integral facet of periodontal therapy. The available implants are remarkably successful. This review discusses the different aspects of dental implant including its advantages over the contemporary removable implants, its procedure in detail and the financial outlook of the same. The review also has a small consideration on minidental implant.

  17. Evaluating mechanical properties and degradation of YTZP dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevilla, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.sevilla@upc.edu [Biomaterials and Biomechanics Division, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (Spain); Sandino, Clara; Arciniegas, Milena [Biomaterials and Biomechanics Division, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (Spain); Martinez-Gomis, Jordi; Peraire, Maria [Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, University of Barcelona (Spain); Gil, Francisco Javier [Biomaterials and Biomechanics Division, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    Lately new biomedical grade yttria stabilized zirconia (YTZP) dental implants have appeared in the implantology market. This material has better aesthetical properties than conventional titanium used for implants but long term behaviour of these new implants is not yet well known. The aim of this paper is to quantify the mechanical response of YTZP dental implants previously degraded under different time conditions and compare the toughness and fatigue strength with titanium implants. Mechanical response has been studied by means of mechanical testing following the ISO 14801 for Standards for dental implants and by finite element analysis. Accelerated hydrothermal degradation has been achieved by means of water vapour and studied by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation tests. The results show that the degradation suffered by YTZP dental implants will not have a significant effect on the mechanical behaviour. Otherwise the fracture toughness of YTZP ceramics is still insufficient in certain implantation conditions.

  18. Treatment strategies for infraoccluded dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Arnold, Dario; Ball, Judith; Brusco, Daniel; Triaca, Albino; Verna, Carlalberta

    2015-03-01

    Single-tooth implants in the maxillary anterior region have the highest risk of esthetic complications from infrapositioning due to continuing maxillary growth and the eruption of adjacent teeth. Although the placement of anterior single-tooth implants should normally be postponed, particularly girls and young women with a hyperdivergent growth pattern, if an infraposition of an implant is present, then thorough examination and strategic planning are required. According to the severity, the strategic treatment options are as follows: simple retention; adjustment or replacement of the implant restoration, possibly including adjacent teeth; surgical implant repositioning by segmental osteotomy combined with osseodistraction; or submergence or removal of the implant. With the patient presented, an interdisciplinary approach that combined orthodontic alignment, surgical segmental osteotomy, distraction osteogenesis, and restorative features offered the opportunity to realign the adjacent teeth into the arch and to harmonize the gingival contour by means of continuous soft tissue enlargement and adaptation.

  19. DENTAL IMPLANTS: AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR TOOTH REPLACEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee Nandini; Singh Sushma

    2013-01-01

    A dental implant is an artificial tooth that replaces a tooth that has been taken out. Implants are natural-looking, can provide support for dentures and do not affect the teeth bordering them. They are as stable as your real teeth and protect you from the loss of jawbone, which occurs when you lose teeth. Endosseous dental implants have revolutionized the fields of implants and periodontics. During the last decade, a great deal of information has been generated concerning the effectiveness a...

  20. Osseointegration of dental implants in Macaca fascicularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, R. S.; Odang, R. W.; Odelia, L.

    2017-08-01

    Osseointegration is an important factor in determining the success of a dental implant. It can be assessed from the osseointegration that occurs between the implant and the bone. The implant stability is determined by the osseous support at the implant-bone interface, which is commonly evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. This study aimed to evaluate whether the osseointegration level measured by a Low Resonance Frequency Analyzer (LRFA) gave results as good as those obtained by histomorphometric examination. Six male Macaca fascicularis were used in this study. In each animal, two types of loading were performed: immediate and delayed loading. Clinical examination and LRFA measurement were performed to determine osseointegration at the first and second weeks and at the first, second, third, and fourth months. After four months, histomorphometric examination was performed. The relationship between the histomorphometric examination and LRFA measurement was compared using the Pearson correlation coefficient. There was no significant difference in the osseointegration between immediate loading and delayed loading (p > 0.05) The bone-implant contact percentage in the first group did not differ significantly from that in the second group. Statistical analysis showed that there was a strong correlation between LRFA measurement and histomorphometric examination. Osseointegration could be evaluated through LRFA measurement as well as through histomorphometric examination.

  1. PEEK dental implants: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitalla, Andreas; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2013-12-01

    The insertion of dental implants containing titanium can be associated with various complications (eg, hypersensitivity to titanium). The aim of this article is to evaluate whether there are existing studies reporting on PEEK (polyetheretherketone) as an alternative material for dental implants. A systematic literature search of PubMed until December 2010 yielded 3 articles reporting on dental implants made from PEEK. One article analyzed stress distribution in carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFR-PEEK) dental implants by the 3-dimensional finite element method, demonstrating higher stress peaks due to a reduced stiffness compared to titanium. Two articles reported on investigations in mongrel dogs. The first article compared CFR-PEEK to titanium-coated CFR-PEEK implants, which were inserted into the femurs and evaluated after 4 and 8 weeks. The titanium-coated implants showed significantly higher bone-implant contact (BIC) rates. In a second study, implants of pure PEEK were inserted into the mandibles beside implants made from titanium and zirconia and evaluated after 4 months, where PEEK presented the lowest BIC. The existing articles reporting on PEEK dental implants indicate that PEEK could represent a viable alternative material for dental implants. However, further experimental studies on the chemical modulation of PEEK seem to be necessary, mainly to increase the BIC ratio and to minimize the stress distribution to the peri-implant bone.

  2. Short dental implants in the posterior maxilla: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahrood, Zeinab Rezaei; Ahmadi, Loghman; Karami, Elahe; Asghari, Shima

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a literature review of short implants in the posterior maxilla and to assess the influence of different factors on implant success rate. A comprehensive search was conducted to retrieve articles published from 2004 to 2015 using short dental implants with lengths less than 10 mm in the posterior maxilla with at least one year of follow-up. Twenty-four of 253 papers were selected, reviewed, and produced the following results. (1) The initial survival rate of short implants in the posterior maxilla was not related to implant width, surface, or design; however, the cumulative success rate of rough-surface short implants was higher than that of machined-surface implants especially in performance of edentulous dental implants of length dental implants may be an alternative approach with fewer biological complications. (3) The increased crown-to-implant (C/I) ratio and occlusal table (OT) values in short dental implants with favorable occlusal loading do not seem to cause peri-implant bone loss. Higher C/I ratio does not produce any negative influence on implant success. (4) Some approaches that decrease the stress in posterior short implants use an implant designed to increase bone-implant contact surface area, providing the patient with a mutually protected or canine guidance occlusion and splinting implants together with no cantilever load. The survival rate of short implants in the posterior edentulous maxilla is high, and applying short implants under strict clinical protocols seems to be a safe and predictable technique.

  3. Oral rehabilitation with dental implants and quality of life following mandibular reconstruction with free fibular flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Hans-Christian; Wahnschaff, Falko; Trenkle, Thomas; Sieg, Peter; Hakim, Samer G

    2016-01-01

    Bony reconstruction of jaw defects using the free fibular flap and dental rehabilitation mostly requires insertion of dental implants within the transferred fibula bone. The aim of this paper was to discuss results of the implant stability with data on the possible benefit for the patient's quality of life after such treatment. For clinical outcome of implants, we evaluated 26 patients with a total number of 94 dental implants after a follow-up period of 12 to 132 months. A group of 38 patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction with free fibular flap could be included in the life-quality study. Evaluation included 23 patients with and 15 patients without implant-borne restoration. The quality of life was assessed using the standard QLQ C-30 questionnaire and the H&N35 module of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Of implants, 94.7 % were stable at the time of investigation and could be used for prosthesis. Patients with dental implants reported improvement of life quality along with better scores in most function and symptom scales; however, only values for global health status (QL2), absence of dyspnea (DY) and absence of feeding tube (HNFE) were significantly better than in the control group. Dental implant insertion in fibula grafts along with implant-borne restoration is a proven concept and might lead to improved quality of life following ablative surgery of the jaw. The effect on the quality of life is not as predictable as on the implant stability. Patients with bony defects of the jaw require bony reconstruction. This allows further masticatory rehabilitation using dental implants and might lead to improved quality of life.

  4. Dental Implants in the Elderly Population: A Long-Term Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Sharon M; Clark, Danielle; Chan, Stephanie; Kuc, Iris; Wubie, Berhanu A; Levin, Liran

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate implant survival and success in the elderly population and to assess indicators and risk factors for success or failure of dental implants in older adults (aged 60 years and older). This historical prospective study was developed from a cohort of patients born prior to 1950 who received dental implants in a single private dental office. Implant survival and marginal bone levels were recorded and analyzed with regard to different patient- and implant-related factors. The study examined 245 patient charts and 1,256 implants from one dental clinic. The mean age at the time of implant placement was 62.18 ± 8.6 years. Smoking was reported by 9.4% of the cohort studied. The overall survival rate of the implants was 92.9%; 7.1% of the implants had failed. Marginal bone loss depicted by exposed threads was evident in 23.3% of the implants. Presenting with generalized periodontal disease and/or severe periodontal disease negatively influenced the survival probability of the implant. Implants placed in areas where bone augmentation was performed prior to or during implant surgery did not have the same longevity compared with those that did not have augmentation prior to implantation. The overall findings concluded that implants can be successfully placed in older adults. A variety of factors are involved in the long-term success of the implant, and special consideration should be taken prior to placing implants in older adults to limit the influence of those risk factors.

  5. Occurrence of trigeminocardiac reflex during dental implant surgery: An observational prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, James I-Sheng; Yu, Hui-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2017-10-01

    Trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) is a clinical phenomenon that manifests as s sudden onset of hemodynamic perturbations. TCR has been reported in cranio-maxillofacial surgery resulting in severe medical risks. Monitoring the hemodynamic changes during cranio-maxillofacial surgery can provide important information to ensure the continuous evaluation of patient's physical conditions. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine the hemodynamic alterations related to the possibly of occurrence of TCR in patients during dental implant surgery. One hundred and thirty-five patients (69 males and 66 females) received dental implant placement were enrolled in this study. The hemodynamic changes were evaluated by monitoring heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and pulse oximetry (SpO2). The above data were collected before, during, and after dental implant surgery. The data demonstrated that the minimal values of HR, SBP, and DBP as well as MABP decreased significantly during operation comparing with the corresponding values before operation (p implant placement in the mandible, patients received dental implant placement in the maxilla had more risks to confront with MABP reduction (OR = 3.98; 95% confidence interval: 1.12-13.2). A significant HR and BP reduction possibly due to TCR can occur during dental implant surgery. Therefore, the dentists should monitor the hemodynamic changes during dental implant surgery to prevent the possible occurrence of medical risks related to TCR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Clinical Outcomes of Zirconia Dental Implants: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieralli, S; Kohal, R J; Jung, R E; Vach, K; Spies, B C

    2017-01-01

    To determine the survival rate and marginal bone loss (MBL) of zirconia dental implants restored with single crowns or fixed dental prostheses. An electronic search was conducted up to November 2015 (without any restriction regarding the publication time) through the databases MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane Library, and EMBASE to identify randomized controlled clinical trials and prospective clinical trials including >15 patients. Primary outcomes were survival rate and MBL. Furthermore, the influence of several covariates on MBL was evaluated. Qualitative assessment and statistical analyses were performed. This review was conducted according to preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines for systematic reviews. With the applied search strategy, 4,196 titles could be identified. After a screening procedure, 2 randomized controlled clinical trials and 7 prospective clinical trials remained for analyses. In these trials, a total of 326 patients received 398 implants. The follow-up ranged from 12 to 60 mo. Implant loss was mostly reported within the first year, especially within the healing period. Thereafter, nearly constant survival curves could be observed. Therefore, separate meta-analyses were performed for the first and subsequent years, resulting in an implant survival rate of 95.6% (95% confidence interval: 93.3% to 97.9%) after 12 mo and, thereafter, an expected decrease of 0.05% per year (0.25% after 5 y). Additionally, a meta-analysis was conducted for the mean MBL after 12 mo, resulting in 0.79 mm (95% confidence interval: 0.73 to 0.86 mm). Implant bulk material and design, restoration type, and the application of minor augmentation procedures during surgery, as well as the modes of temporization and loading, had no statistically significant influence on MBL. The short-term cumulative survival rates and the MBL of zirconia implants in the presented systematic review are promising. However, additional data are still

  7. [Experience with the use of short dental implants in the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajdovich, István; Orosz, Mihály

    2015-06-01

    According to the literature short dental implants have often been used for the replacement of teeth in the daily praxis. The implantation of short dental implants raise a lot of questions. The autors's aim is to collect the most important experiences of current literature on the mentioned theme to oral implantologists. In the article 33 reviews and clinical studies have been overviewed. The analysis of the different studies suggest that the use of short implants--taking into account of indications and contraindications--decreases the incidence of complications and the patient's discomfort as well as the cost of treatment. The use of short dental implants is proposed as an alternative method in the daily dental praxis.

  8. Carga inmediata en implantes dentales Immediate loading of dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Concejo Cútoli

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available El protocolo de carga convencional en una o dos fases quirúrgicas ha sido evaluado durante los últimos 30 años bajo todas las condiciones clínicas posibles. En comparación, la carga inmediata es un protocolo relativamente nuevo que necesita de una estricta evaluación clínica. Realizamos una búsqueda bibliográfica sobre los ensayos clínicos publicados de carga inmediata en función de las diferentes opciones terapéuticas que se pueden plantear. Se hallaron resultados comparables para las dos estrategias de carga en mandíbulas edéntulas. Para el tratamiento con prótesis inmediata de maxilares totalmente edéntulos, restauraciones parciales e unitarias es todavía necesaria una selección adecuada de pacientes y un diseño conservador de la prótesis provisional. La necesidad de ensayos clínicos sencillos aleatorizados de doble ciego, con suficiente número de pacientes y adecuado seguimiento, que comparen una determinada situación clínica con un patrón oclusal de la prótesis provisional bien definido, son imprescindibles para acabar de confirmar la seguridad de la técnica.The protocol for conventional loading in one or two surgical stages has been evaluated over the last 30 years under all the possible clinical conditions. By comparison, immediate loading is a relatively new protocol that requires strict clinical evaluation. We conducted a search of the literature published concerning clinical trials on immediate loading according to the different therapeutic options that could be considered. Comparable results were found for both loading strategies in edentulous mandibles. For treatment involving an immediate prosthesis for totally edentulous mandibles, partial and single tooth restorations, patients have to be selected adequately and provisional prostheses have to be designed conservatively. In order to completely confirm the safety of the technique, double-blind, simple, randomized clinical trials have to be carried out with

  9. Posterior partially edentulous jaws, planning a rehabilitation with dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Emily V F; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Goiato, Marcelo C

    2015-01-16

    To discuss important characteristics of the use of dental implants in posterior quadrants and the rehabilitation planning. An electronic search of English articles was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1990 up to the period of March 2014. The key terms were dental implants and posterior jaws, dental implants/treatment planning and posterior maxilla, and dental implants/treatment planning and posterior mandible. No exclusion criteria were used for the initial search. Clinical trials, randomized and non randomized studies, classical and comparative studies, multicenter studies, in vitro and in vivo studies, case reports, longitudinal studies and reviews of the literature were included in this review. One hundred and fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria of treatment planning of dental implants in posterior jaw and were read in their entirety. The selected articles were categorized with respect to their context on space for restoration, anatomic considerations (bone quantity and density), radiographic techniques, implant selection (number, position, diameter and surface), tilted and pterygoid implants, short implants, occlusal considerations, and success rates of implants placed in the posterior region. The results derived from the review process were described under several different topic headings to give readers a clear overview of the literature. In general, it was observed that the use of dental implants in posterior region requires a careful treatment plan. It is important that the practitioner has knowledge about the theme to evaluate the treatment parameters. The use of implants to restore the posterior arch presents many challenges and requires a detailed treatment planning.

  10. Microcomputed tomography-based assessment of retrieved dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narra, N.; Antalainen, A.K.; Zipprich, H.; Sándor, G.K.; Wolff, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) technology in the assessment of retrieved dental implants. Cases are presented to illustrate the value of micro-CT imaging techniques in determining possible mechanical causes for dental implant

  11. Effects of diabetes on the osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado-Valero, Ana; Ferrer García, Juan Carlos; Herrera Ballester, Agustín; Labaig Rueda, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus has become a public health problem. Hyperglycaemia entails a rise in the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Although a direct relationship with periodontal disease has already been shown, little is known about the results of dental implants in diabetics. The present paper reviews the bibliography linking the effect of diabetes on the osseointegration of implants and the healing of soft tissue. In experimental models of diabetes, a reduced level of bone-implant contact has been shown, and this can be reversed by means of treatment with insulin. Compared with the general population, a higher failure rate is seen in diabetic patients. Most of these occur during the first year of functional loading, seemingly pointing to the microvascular complications of this condition as a possible causal factor. These complications also compromise the healing of soft tissues. It is necessary to take certain special considerations into account for the placement of implants in diabetic patient. A good control of plasma glycaemia, together with other measures, has been shown to improve the percentages of implant survival in these patients.

  12. Soft tissue sealing around dental implants based on histological interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsuta, Ikiru; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Kondo, Ryosuke; Oshiro, Wakana; Matsuura, Yuri; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue sealing around dental implants and teeth. This is a narrative review performed through scientific articles published between 1977 and 2014, indexed in MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The study selected articles that focused on epithelial sealing around dental implant or teeth with cell biology and histology of soft tissue. Implant therapy has been widely applied in dental rehabilitation for many years, with predictable long-term results. The longevity and functionality of dental implants is dependent on both osseointegration around the implant body and the establishment of a soft tissue barrier that protects the underlying hard tissue structures and the implant itself. The health and stability of the peri-implant mucosa also affects the esthetics of the implant. The healing and maintenance of the epithelial and connective tissues around implants are increasingly recognized as being fundamental to implant success. However, there has been little research into the function or formation of the soft tissue seal around dental implants, and the roles of this unique mucosal interface remain unclear. This narrative review explores the extent of the current knowledge of soft tissue barriers around implants from both a basic and clinical perspective, and aims to consolidate this knowledge and highlight the most pertinent questions relating to this area of research. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immediate loading of subcrestally placed dental implants in anterior and premolar sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Anders; Smeets, Ralf; Köppen, Kai; Sehner, Susanne; Kornmann, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Gerlach, Till

    2017-08-23

    Immediate loading of dental implants has been evolving into an appropriate procedure for the treatment of partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical success and radiological outcome of immediately and delayed loaded dental implants in anterior and premolar sites. In this retrospective study, data of 163 individuals requiring tooth removal with subsequent implant placement in anterior and premolar sites were analyzed. Implants were immediately loaded by provisional acrylic resin bridges or loaded with delay. Implants were followed up annually for up to 9 years including intraoral radiographs. A total of 285 implants in 163 patients were placed. 218 implants were immediately loaded and 67 implants with delay. Fifteen implants failed during the follow-up period resulting in survival rates of 94.5% for immediate loading and 95.5% for delayed loading. After an initial decrease of 0.3 mm in the first 12 months the marginal bone level remained stable. No statistically significant differences were found in marginal bone loss between immediately and delayed loaded implants (P = 0.518, 95% CI). Within the limits of this study, immediate loading of immediately subcrestally placed dental implants in anterior and premolar sites is a reliable treatment option for dental rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 9. Dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R M

    2010-11-27

    Patients have high expectations of dental implants in terms of appearance, function and longevity. It is essential that these expectations are realistically managed and that treatment of the highest standard is provided. This involves very careful evaluation, including clinical and radiographic, and presentation of the pros and cons of treatment alternatives. Provision of a successful implant restoration requires many skills including a surgical procedure to place the implant in the best possible position and prosthodontic techniques to provide an aesthetic restoration in occlusal harmony with the rest of the dentition. Recognition of risk factors and long-term maintenance requirements are equally important. Clinicians involved in these treatments must obtain adequate training and develop skills through treatment of straightforward cases using well established protocols before embarking on more demanding cases.

  15. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: pathophysiology, etiology, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Khalaf, Mohd W; Bhavsar, Ishita

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented the successful outcomes of dental implants, but have also reported the association of sensory disturbances with the surgical implant procedure. Postsurgical pain is a normal response to tissue injury, and usually resolves after the tissue heals. However, some patients who receive dental implants experience persistent pain even after normal healing. This article describes the basic anatomy and pathophysiology associated with nerve injury. The incidence and diagnosis of these problems, in addition to factors that result in the development of chronic persistent neuropathic pain and sensory disturbances associated with surgical implant placement, are discussed.

  16. Atypical Case of Three Dental Implants Displaced into the Maxillary Sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Felipe Bonatto Bruniera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral rehabilitation with dental implants has become a routine treatment in contemporary dentistry. The displacement of dental implants into the sinus membrane, a complication related to the maxillary sinus, is one of the most common accidents reported in the literature. The treatment for this complication is the surgical removal of the implant. A 60-year-old woman with three dental implants displaced into the maxillary sinus (one implant displaced into the left maxillary sinus and two implants displaced into the right maxillary sinus underwent surgery for removal of the implants. The surgery to remove the implants was performed under local anesthesia through the Caldwell-Luc technique. The patient was subsequently administered antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic drugs. The patient returned 7 days after the surgery for suture removal and is being regularly monitored to determine whether future rehabilitation of the edentulous area is necessary. In conclusion, surgical removal of the dental implant displaced into the maxillary sinus is the treatment of choice. This technique is appropriate because it allows the use of local anesthesia and provides direct visualization for the removal of the implants.

  17. [Biological dental implant: myth or reality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magloire, H; Couble, M-L

    2011-09-01

    The currently available options for tooth-loss are prostheses, implants, or surgery (auto-transplantation). They all have their limitations. The emergence of tissue engineering, 15 years ago, was made possible by a better knowledge of the various stages of dental development, and the mastery of stem cell differentiation. It opened a new alternative approach for tooth regeneration. Even if animal experiments have demonstrated that it was possible to obtain a biological tooth from stem cells, two major issues remain to be discussed. Is it possible to use induced pluripotent stem cells instead of embryonic stem cells, which raise an ethical problem? Is it possible to reproduce a dental crown with an adapted shape and colour? Or should we consider the simpler creation of a biological root secondarily covered by a ceramic prosthesis? Our study mentions the main landmarks and the key cells involved in the embryological development of the tooth, establishes a mapping and a list of the various types of stem cells. It details the various methods used to create a biological implant.

  18. A Survey of the Knowledge of Dental Implants as a Choice in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    Choice in Treatment of Edentulous Jaws among Health ... the awareness and practice of dental implantology in the government ... Key words: Survey, knowledge, dental implants, health workers. Received on 19/11/2010; revised on 20/12/2010; accepted on 22/12/2010 ... and plaque that will embarrass the patient with.

  19. Management of dental implant fractures. A case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Quran, Firas A M; Rashan, Bashar A; Al-Dwairi, Ziad N

    2009-01-01

    The widespread use of endosseous osseointegrated implants to replace missing natural teeth increases the chances of implant complications and failures, despite the high initial success rate reported in the literature. Implant fracture is one possible complication that results in ultimate failure of the dental implant. Such a complication poses a management crisis even for the most experienced clinician. This article reports on a case of implant fracture, its possible causes, and how the case was managed.

  20. The role of dental implants in the management of dento-alveolar trauma. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Eugene; Shahdad, Shakeel

    2015-01-01

    Patients who suffer dento-alveolar trauma present a unique challenge for the dentist. There are numerous options to consider when attempting to restore the dentition. This article reviews the role of dental implants and how thorough planning and execution of such treatment could result in an optimal outcome. Clinical Relevance: Knowledge of the role of dental implants and factors imperative for a successful treatment outcome will assist the clinician in achieving optimal restorative results.

  1. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Keren Shemtov-Yona; Daniel Rittel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants’ failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on...

  2. Immediate bleeding complications in dental implants: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Balaguer Martí, José Carlos; Peñarrocha Oltra, David; Balaguer Martínez, José; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A review is made of the immediate or immediate postoperative bleeding complications in dental implants, with a view to identifying the areas of greatest bleeding risk, the causes of bleeding, the length of the implants associated with bleeding, the most frequently implicated blood vessels, and the treatments used to resolve these complications. Material and Methods: A Medline (PubMed) and Embase search was made of articles on immediate bleeding complications in dental implants publ...

  3. Osseointegration of standard and mini dental implants: a histomorphometric comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Jagjit S; Albuquerque, Rubens F; Murshed, Monzur; Feine, Jocelyne S

    2017-12-01

    Mini dental implants (MDIs) are becoming increasingly popular for rehabilitation of edentulous patients because of their several advantages. However, there is a lack of evidence on the osseointegration potential of the MDIs. The objective of the study was to histomorphometrically evaluate and compare bone apposition on the surface of MDIs and standard implants in a rabbit model. Nine New Zealand white rabbits were used for the study to meet statistical criteria for adequate power. Total 18 3M(™)ESPE(™) MDIs and 18 standard implants (Ankylos(®) Friadent, Dentsply) were inserted randomly into the tibia of rabbits (four implants per rabbit); animals were sacrificed after a 6-week healing period. The specimens were retrieved en bloc and preserved in 10% formaldehyde solution. Specimens were prepared for embedding in a light cure acrylic resin (Technovit 9100). The most central sagittal histological sections (30-40 μm thick) were obtained using a Leica SP 1600 saw microtome. After staining, the Leica DM2000 microscope was used, the images were captured using Olympus DP72 camera and associated software. Bone implant contact (BIC) was measured using Infinity Analyze software. All implants were osseointegrated. Histologic measures show mineralized bone matrix in intimate contact with the implant surface in both groups. The median BIC was 57.5% (IQR 9.0) in the MDI group and 55.0% (IQR 4.5) in the control group (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney test). There were no statistical differences in osseointegration at 6 weeks between MDIs and standard implants in rabbit tibias. Based on these results, it is concluded that osseointegration of MDIs is similar to that of standard implants.

  4. Pansinusitis y afectación intracraneal por implante dental Pansinusitis and intracranial impact of a dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Rubio-Palau

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Las sinusitis odontógenas son una patología relativamente frecuente causada por infecciones dentales, quistes periapicales así como tras procedimientos bucodentales como una endodoncia, una elevación sinusal o la colocación de un implante. A continuación se presenta un caso extremo de una pansinusitis derecha con fistulización a espacio epidural causada por un implante osteointegrado. Ante la sospecha de una sinusitis maxilar de origen odontogénico se debe iniciar rápidamente un tratamiento antibiótico correcto y un seguimiento estrecho ya que pueden tener consecuencias fatales como la pérdida de un ojo, abscesos cerebrales o incluso la muerte.Odontogenic sinusitis is a relatively common disease caused by dental infections, periapical cysts and oral procedures such as root canal, sinus lift or implant placement. We report an extreme case of a right pansinusitis with an epidural space fistula caused by osseointegrated implants. When maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is suspected, we should quickly start effective antibiotic treatment and monitor the patient closely because odontogenic sinusitis can have serious consequences, such as the loss of an eye, brain abscess or death.

  5. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2014-10-01

    Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1-3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. No significant relationship existed between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Because of the absence of a periodontal ligament, this clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and lighter contacts than those supported by natural dentition

  6. Bacterial communities associated with apical periodontitis and dental implant failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Dingsdag

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previously, we demonstrated that bacteria reside in apparently healed alveolar bone, using culture and Sanger sequencing techniques. Bacteria in apparently healed alveolar bone may have a role in peri-implantitis and dental implant failure. Objective: To compare bacterial communities associated with apical periodontitis, those colonising a failed implant and alveolar bone with reference biofilm samples from healthy teeth. Methods and results: The study consisted of 196 samples collected from 40 patients undergoing routine dental implant insertion or rehabilitation. The bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences were amplified. Samples yielding sufficient polymerase chain reaction product for further molecular analyses were subjected to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP; 31 samples and next generation DNA sequencing (454 GS FLX Titanium; 8 samples. T-RFLP analysis revealed that the bacterial communities in diseased tissues were more similar to each other (p<0.049 than those from the healthy reference samples. Next generation sequencing detected 13 bacterial phyla and 373 putative bacterial species, revealing an increased abundance of Gram-negative [Prevotella, Fusobacterium (p<0.004, Treponema, Veillonellaceae, TG5 (Synergistetes] bacteria and a decreased abundance of Gram-positive [(Actinomyces, Corynebacterium (p<0.008] bacteria in the diseased tissue samples (n=5 relative to reference supragingival healthy samples (n=3. Conclusion: Increased abundances of Prevotella, Fusobacterium and TG5 (Synergistetes were associated with apical periodontitis and a failed implant. A larger sample set is needed to confirm these trends and to better define the processes of bacterial pathogenesis in implant failure and apical periodontitis. The application of combined culture-based, microscopic and molecular technique-based approaches is suggested for future studies.

  7. Smoking interferes with the prognosis of dental implant treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strietzel, Frank Peter; Reichart, Peter A; Kale, Abhijit; Kulkarni, Milind; Wegner, Brigitte; Küchler, Ingeborg

    2007-06-01

    This systematic literature review was performed to investigate if smoking interferes with the prognosis of implants with and without accompanying augmentation procedures compared with non-smokers. A systematic electronic and handsearch (articles published between 1989 and 2005; English and German language; search terms "dental or oral implants and smoking"; "dental or oral implants and tobacco") was performed to identify publications providing numbers of failed implants, related to the numbers of smokers and non-smokers for meta-analysis. Publications providing statistically examined data of implant failures or biologic complications among smokers compared with non-smokers were included for systematic review. Of 139 publications identified, 29 were considered for meta-analysis and 35 for systematic review. Meta-analysis revealed a significantly enhanced risk for implant failure among smokers [implant-related odds ratio (OR) 2.25, confidence interval (CI(95%)) 1.96-2.59; patient-related OR 2.64; CI(95%) 1.70-4.09] compared with non-smokers, and for smokers receiving implants with accompanying augmentation procedures (OR 3.61; CI(95%) 2.26-5.77, implant related). The systematic review indicated significantly enhanced risks of biologic complications among smokers. Five studies revealed no significant impact of smoking on prognosis of implants with particle-blasted, acid-etched or anodic oxidized surfaces. Smoking is a significant risk factor for dental implant therapy and augmentation procedures accompanying implantations.

  8. Diseño de los implantes dentales: Estado actual Dental implants design: state or art

    OpenAIRE

    J.M. Martínez-González; J. Cano Sánchez; J. Campo Trapero; M. J. S. Martínez-González; F. García-Sabán

    2002-01-01

    El diseño de los implantes dentales se están modificando continuamente debido a razones clínico- científicas y comerciales. Se realiza un revisión de la literatura en relación a las implicaciones clínicas y biológicas de las variaciones en macrogeometría y su influencia en la interfase con la mucosa y el hueso. Los resultados descritos en la literatura muestran que los nuevos diseños de implantes mejoran la estabilidad primaria en huesos de baja densidad y distribuyen mejor las cargas biomecá...

  9. Bruxism and dental implant failures: a multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, B R; Kisch, J; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the insertion of dental implants in patients being diagnosed with bruxism negatively affected the implant failure rates. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the bruxism and the risk of dental implant failure. This retrospective study is based on 2670 patients who received 10 096 implants at one specialist clinic. Implant- and patient-related data were collected. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients and implants. Multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analysis was used to test the association between bruxism and risk of implant failure adjusting for several potential confounders. Criteria from a recent international consensus (Lobbezoo et al., J Oral Rehabil, 40, 2013, 2) and from the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (International classification of sleep disorders, revised: diagnostic and coding manual, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Chicago, 2014) were used to define and diagnose the condition. The number of implants with information available for all variables totalled 3549, placed in 994 patients, with 179 implants reported as failures. The implant failure rates were 13·0% (24/185) for bruxers and 4·6% (155/3364) for non-bruxers (P < 0·001). The statistical model showed that bruxism was a statistically significantly risk factor to implant failure (HR 3·396; 95% CI 1·314, 8·777; P = 0·012), as well as implant length, implant diameter, implant surface, bone quantity D in relation to quantity A, bone quality 4 in relation to quality 1 (Lekholm and Zarb classification), smoking and the intake of proton pump inhibitors. It is suggested that the bruxism may be associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure.

  10. Biofilm on dental implants: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Karthikeyan; Jung, Ronald E; Molenberg, Aart; Hammerle, Christoph H F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the current literature with regard to biofilm formation on dental implants and the influence of surface characteristics (chemistry, surface free energy, and roughness) of dental implant and abutment materials and their design features on biofilm formation and its sequelae. An electronic MEDLINE literature search was conducted of studies published between 1966 and June 2007. The following search terms were used: biofilm and dental implants, biofilm formation/plaque bacterial adhesion and implants, plaque/biofilm and surface characteristics/roughness/surface free energy of titanium dental implants, implant-abutment interface and plaque/biofilm, biofilm and supragingival/subgingival plaque microbiology, biofilm/plaque and implant infection, antibacterial/bacteriostatic titanium, titanium nanocoating/nanopatterning, antimicrobial drug/titanium implant. Both in vitro and in vivo studies were included in this review. Fifty-three articles were identified in this review process. The articles were categorized with respect to their context on biofilm formation on teeth and dental implant surfaces and with regard to the influence of surface characteristics of implant biomaterials (especially titanium) and design features of implant and abutment components on biofilm formation. The current state of literature is more descriptive, rather than providing strong data that could be analyzed through meta-analysis. Basic research articles on surface modification of titanium were also included in the review to analyze the applications of such studies on the fabrication of implant surfaces that could possibly decrease early bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Increase in surface roughness and surface free energy facilitates biofilm formation on dental implant and abutment surfaces, although this conclusion is derived from largely descriptive literature. Surface chemistry and the design features of the implant-abutment configuration also

  11. Advanced Implant-Prosthetic Rehabilitation: How to Obtain a Correct Restoration of Both Functions and Aesthetics in Patients with Complex Combined Dental and Maxillofacial Trauma: A Case Report and Topical Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim. This study aims to explain the main steps that characterize the implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in complex combined dental and maxillofacial trauma. Material and Methods. A 20-year-old patient reported an extensive facial trauma which also involved the alveolar process of the maxillary bone. The patient reported a maxillofacial fracture and the loss of teeth 1.3, 1.2, 1.1, and 2.1. A “Le Fort” type 2 fracture was also reported, with the malar bone involvement. After reduction and containment of bone fractures, through appropriate mounting plates, appropriate functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patient were replaced thanks to a temporary removable prosthesis. After 6 months, the patient performed numerous clinical investigations, aimed at a proper planning of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper dental arch. Conclusion. With the planning of the case, as well as respecting the surrounding biological structures, the surgery of implants can be carried out with the most appropriate procedure. Lastly, new dental implants with highly bioactive surfaces have been developed, providing an excellent and rapid bone integration. PMID:28392948

  12. An overview of zirconia dental implants: basic properties and clinical application of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoğlu Güngör, Merve; Aydın, Cemal; Yılmaz, Handan; Gül, Esma Başak

    2014-08-01

    Due to the possible aesthetic problems of titanium implants, the developments in ceramic implant materials are increasing. Natural tooth colored ceramic implants may be an alternative to overcome aesthetic problems. The purpose of this article is to give information about the basic properties of dental zirconia implants and present 3 cases treated with two-piece zirconia implants. Two-piece zirconia dental implants, 4.0 mm diameter and 11.5 mm in length, were inserted into maxillary incisor region. They were left for 6 months to osseointegrate. Panoramic and periapical radiographs were obtained and examined for bone-implant osseointegration. During the follow-up period the patients were satisfied with their prosthesis and no complication was observed.

  13. The provision of dental implants in the National Health Service Hospital dental services--a national questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, C J; Baxter, A M; Shaw, M J; Bradnock, G

    2001-01-27

    To assess the activity of consultants in restorative dentistry in the United Kingdom in the provision of osseointegrated dental implants within the National Health Service Hospital service and to evaluate their attitudes concerning the relevant medical and oral factors considered in patient selection for implant treatment. Anonymous postal questionnaire in the United Kingdom. Consultants in restorative dentistry. Out of the sample of 145, 109 consultants (75%) completed the questionnaire in 1999. 54 of the 109 consultants (49.5%) are involved in the provision of osseointegrated implant treatment, treating an average of 29 cases/year (range 2-150). However, over one third of the respondents treated 10 or less cases/year. 89% worked with oral surgeons as an implant team. 68% used Branemark (Nobel Biocare) implants as their main system. The majority of consultants felt that smoking, psychoses and previous irradiation were the most important medical factors that contra-indicated implant retained restorations whilst untreated periodontitis, poor oral hygiene and uncontrolled caries were the most important oral contra-indications. Many centres were experiencing significant problems with the funding of implant treatment with one centre receiving no funding. The implications for patient care and specialist training are discussed. There is a marked variation in the number of patients treated with endosseous dental implants within the United Kingdom National Health Service hospitals. Many consultants treat 10 or fewer patients each year. In the main, there is agreement about the factors that contra-indicate implant treatment; these are in line with national guidelines.

  14. Functional results of dental restoration with osseointegrated implants after mandible reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürlek, A; Miller, M J; Jacob, R F; Lively, J A; Schusterman, M A

    1998-03-01

    We reviewed the cases of 20 cancer patients (mean age 47.4 years) in whom osseointegrated implants were used for dental restoration after mandibular reconstruction between January of 1988 and December of 1994. Seventy-one implants were placed into bone flaps (n = 60) or native mandible (n = 11), an average of 3.55 per patient (range, 2 to 5). Successful integration occurred in 91.5 percent (65 of 71); there were five early failures and one late failure, with no significant difference between the number lost in microvascular flaps (5 of 60) and native mandible (1 of 11) (as determined by Fisher's exact test). Functional evaluation included assessments of diet, speech, and cosmesis. Based on our review, we concluded that (1) implants enhance dental restoration in selected patients, and (2) microvascular bone flaps, including the fibula and iliac crest, are well suited for dental implant restoration.

  15. Rehabilitation of Posterior Maxilla with Zygomatic and Dental Implant after Tumor Resection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faysal Ugurlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Zygomatic implants have been used for dental rehabilitation in patients with insufficient bone in the posterior upper jaw, due to, for example, tumor resection, trauma, or atrophy. Zygomatic implants are an alternative to complex free or vascularized bone grafting and distraction osteogenesis. A 42-year-old male patient with a severe defect in the right posterior maxilla, starting from the first canine region, which had occurred after tumor resection 3 years earlier, was referred to our department. One zygomatic implant (Brenemark System, Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden to the zygoma and one dental implant to the canine region were placed. After a 5-month osseointegration period, a fixed denture was fabricated and adapted to the implants. Although the surgical and prosthetic procedures for zygoma implants are not easy, the final outcomes can be successful with appropriate planning.

  16. Retrospective analysis of dental implants placed and restored by advanced prosthodontic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barias, Pamela A; Lee, Damian J; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Campbell, Stephen D; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2013-02-01

    The purposes of this retrospective clinical review were to: (1) describe the demographics of implant patients, types of implant treatment and implant-supported prostheses in an Advanced Education in Prosthodontic Program, (2) evaluate the survival rate of dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents from 2006 to 2008, and (3) analyze the relationship between resident year of training and implant survival rate. All patients who received dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents from January 2006 to October of 2008 in the Advanced Prosthodontic Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry were selected for this study. Age, gender, implant diameter, length, implant locations, surgical and restorative detail, and year of prosthodontic residency training were collected and analyzed. Life-table and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed based on implants overall, locations, year of training, and use of a computer-generated surgical guide. A Logrank statistic was performed between implant survival and year of prosthodontic residency training, location, and use of computer-generated surgical guide (α= 0.05). Three hundred and six implants were placed, and of these, seven failed. Life-table and Kaplan-Meier analyses computed a cumulative survival rate (CSR) of 97% for overall implants and implants placed with a computer-generated surgical guide. No statistical difference was found in implant survival rates as a function of year of training (P= 0.85). Dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents had a CSR comparable to previously published studies by other specialties. The year of prosthodontic residency training and implant failure rate did not have any significant relationship. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Survival of Dental Implants Placed in Grafted and Nongrafted Bone: A Retrospective Study in a University Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duong T; Gay, Isabel C; Diaz-Rodriguez, Janice; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Weltman, Robin; Friedman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    To compare dental implant survival rates when placed in native bone and grafted sites. Additionally, risk factors associated with dental implant loss were identified. This study was based on the hypothesis that bone grafting has no effect on implant survival rates. A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients receiving dental implants at the University of Texas, School of Dentistry from 1985 to 2012. Exclusion criteria included patients with genetic diseases, radiation and chemotherapy, or an age less than 18 years. To avoid misclassification bias, implants were excluded if bone grafts were only done at the same time of placement. Data on age, sex, tobacco use, diabetes, osteoporosis, anatomical location of the implant, implant length and width, bone graft, and professional maintenance were collected for analysis. A total of 1,222 patients with 2,729 implants were included. The cumulative survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92% and 87% for implants placed in native bone and 90% and 79% for implants placed in grafted bone, respectively. The results from multivariate analysis (Cox regression) indicated no significant difference in survival between the two groups; having maintenance therapy after implant placement reduced the failure rate by 80% (P dental implant survival rate when implants were placed in native bone or bone-grafted sites. Smoking and lack of professional maintenance were significantly related to increased implant loss.

  18. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...

  19. A Review on the Wettability of Dental Implant Surfaces II: Biological and Clinical Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Gittens, Rolando A.; Scheideler, Lutz; Rupp, Frank; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Dental and orthopaedic implants have been under continuous advancement to improve their interactions with bone and ensure a successful outcome for patients. Surface characteristics such as surface topography and surface chemistry can serve as design tools to enhance the biological response around the implant, with in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies confirming their effects. However, the comprehensive design of implants to promote early and long-term osseointegration requires a better unde...

  20. Success of dental implants in vascularised fibular osteoseptocutaneous flaps used as onlay grafts after marginal mandibulectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y-M; Pan, Y-H; Shen, Y-F; Chen, J-K; ALDeek, N F; Wei, F-C

    2016-12-01

    We have evaluated the survival of dental implants placed in vascularised fibular flap onlay grafts placed over marginal mandibulectomies and the effects on marginal bone loss of different types of soft tissue around implants under functional loading. From 2001-2009 we studied a total of 11 patients (1 woman and10 men), three of whom had had ameloblastoma and eight who had had squamous cell carcinomas resected. A total of 38 dental implants were placed either at the time of transfer of the vascularised fibular ostoseptocutaneous flaps (nine patients with 30 implants) or secondarily (two patients with eight implants). Four patients were given palatal mucosal grafts to replace intraoral skin flaps around the dental implants (n=13), and the other seven had the skin flaps around the dental implants thinned (n=25) at the second stage of implantation of the osteointegrated teeth. All vascularised fibular osteoseptocutaneous flaps were successfully transferred, and all implants survived a mean (range) of 73 (33-113) months after occlusal functional loading. The mean (SD) marginal bone loss was 0.5 (0.3) mm on both mesial and distal sides in patients who had palatal mucosal grafts, but 1.8 (1.6) mm, and 1.7 (1.5) mm, respectively, on the mesial and distal sides in the patients who had had thinning of their skin flaps. This difference is significant (p=0.008) with less resorption of bone in the group who had palatal mucosal grafts. Palatal mucosa around the implants helps to reduce resorption of bone after functional loading of implants.

  1. Mecanobiología de la interfase hueso-implante dental Mechanobiology of bone-dental implant interphase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Vanegas Acosta

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La osteointegración es la conexión estructural y funcional entre el hueso y un implante. Cuando un implante se inserta en el hueso, se crea la denominada interfase hueso-implante, una zona de unión entre la superficie del biomaterial del implante y el hueso circundante. La cicatrización de esta interfase depende de las condiciones biológicas del hueso, las características de diseño del implante y la distribución de cargas entre hueso e implante. En este artículo se hace una revisión del proceso de cicatrización de la interfase hueso-implante para el caso de un implante dental. El objetivo es describir la secuencia de eventos biológicos iniciados con la lesión causada por la inserción del implante y que concluyen con la formación de nuevo hueso en la interfase. Esta descripción incluye una novedosa clasificación de los fenómenos mecánicos que intervienen durante el proceso de cicatrización de los tejidos lesionados. Esta descripción mecanobiológica de la interfase hueso-implante dental se utiliza para determinar las características más relevantes a tener en cuenta en la formulación de un modelo matemático de la osteointegración de implantes dentales.The osteointegration is the structural and functional connection between bone and implant. When an implant is inserted in bone, it creates the so-called bone-implant interphase, a joint zone between implant biomaterial surface and the surrounding bone. The healing of this interphase depends on bone biological conditions, characteristic of implant design and the distribution of loads between bone and implant. The aim of present article is to review of healing process of bone-implant interphase for a dental implant and also to describe the sequence of biological events beginning with lesion caused by implant insertion and leading to the formation of a new bone in the interphase. This description includes a novel classification of mechanical phenomena present in the healing

  2. Diseño de los implantes dentales: Estado actual Dental implants design: state or art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Martínez-González

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available El diseño de los implantes dentales se están modificando continuamente debido a razones clínico- científicas y comerciales. Se realiza un revisión de la literatura en relación a las implicaciones clínicas y biológicas de las variaciones en macrogeometría y su influencia en la interfase con la mucosa y el hueso. Los resultados descritos en la literatura muestran que los nuevos diseños de implantes mejoran la estabilidad primaria en huesos de baja densidad y distribuyen mejor las cargas biomecánicas. Existen diseños que favorecen la colocación de implantes en defectos de la anatomía alveolar y alveólos postextracción. Losresultados experimentales y clínicos evidencian un beneficio para diseños que eliminan el cuello pulido, con cuerpo cónico, con ápice autorroscante, a base de dobles o triple s espiras y perfiles de rosca redondeadas.Dental implant design is frequently changing by scientific and comercial reasons. We realised a review about how clinical and biological aspects of macrogeometry affect at mucous and bone interface. The results of articles revised showed that new implant designs improved the primary stability in bone with low density and are better to distribute biomechanical loads. Some designs permit implant placement in defects of alveolar anatomy and in postextraction sockets.The experimental and clinical results proved that designs without smooth neck, conic form, self-tapping apex, those with a double or three espiral and round profile threads.

  3. Need of implant dentistry at undergraduate dental curriculum in Indian dental colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chowdhary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Edentulism is the major problem in the developing countries, and is widely spread in the current population, although the prevalence is declining and incidence of tooth loss is decreasing in the developed nations. The prevalence of edentulism in India varies from 60% to 69% of 25 years and above age group. It is obvious that the number of lost teeth increases with age leading to an increase in prevalence of partially edentulous patients. From a biological point of view, the replacement of a single missing tooth with an implant rather than a three-unit fixed partial denture, and the implant-supported complete denture has been proved more efficient in improving the mastication and maintaining the bone for a longer time and also more cost-effective treatment. Many dental schools throughout Europe and America have to a various extent introduced implant dentistry as part of the compulsory undergraduate curriculum. Thus, it becomes more essential to introduce implant dentistry at undergraduate level in Indian dental schools to manage the higher percentage of edentulism.

  4. Clinical outcome of dental implants placed in fibula-free flaps for orofacial reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yi-qun; HUANG Wei; ZHANG Zhi-yong; ZHANG Zhi-yuan; ZHANG Chen-ping; SUN Jian

    2008-01-01

    Background Functional reconstruction of the jaw defect due to tumor resection poses a challenging problem in maxillofacial surgery. The osteocutaneous fibula free flap in combination with simultaneous or second stage insertion of dental implants has exhibited growing popularity for such reconstructions. This study was aimed at evaluating the clinical status and the success rates of dental implants inserted in fibula-free flaps for orofacial reconstruction following ablation of tumors. Methods We conducted a clinical follow-up study based on 29 patients after oral tumor surgery, who received vascularized fibula bone grafts and endosseous implants for functional jaw reconstruction during a 5-year period. The follow-up protocol included clinical examination and radiological evaluation. The clinical records of the patients were reviewed retrospectively. Information on treatment modalities, dentition, implant parameters, and prostheses was collected and analyzed. Results In general, a high primary stability for implants placed into the free fibula grafts was achieved. The 1-year and 5-year cumulative survival rates of the implants were 96% and 91%, respectively, using the Kaplan-Meier method. The 1-year and 5-year cumulative success rates of implants placed into the fibula bone grafts were 95% and 87%,respectively. The main reasons for failure of the dental implants were infection, tumor recurrence and soft tissue proliferation. The fibula flap presents many advantages for implant placement, but its limited height sometimes makes implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation difficult. Conclusions Vascularized fibula bone grafts provide a firm basis for the placement of dental implants in jaw reconstruction. Implants placed in fibula bone grafts were shown to integrate normally. The double-barrel technique, or increasing the height of the fibula flap by vertical distraction osteogenesis before implant placement in the mandible, is desirable from a functional and esthetic

  5. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  6. Analysis of risk factors for cluster behavior of dental implant failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2017-08-01

    Some studies indicated that implant failures are commonly concentrated in few patients. To identify and analyze cluster behavior of dental implant failures among subjects of a retrospective study. This retrospective study included patients receiving at least three implants only. Patients presenting at least three implant failures were classified as presenting a cluster behavior. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models and generalized estimating equations analysis evaluated the effect of explanatory variables on the cluster behavior. There were 1406 patients with three or more implants (8337 implants, 592 failures). Sixty-seven (4.77%) patients presented cluster behavior, with 56.8% of all implant failures. The intake of antidepressants and bruxism were identified as potential negative factors exerting a statistically significant influence on a cluster behavior at the patient-level. The negative factors at the implant-level were turned implants, short implants, poor bone quality, age of the patient, the intake of medicaments to reduce the acid gastric production, smoking, and bruxism. A cluster pattern among patients with implant failure is highly probable. Factors of interest as predictors for implant failures could be a number of systemic and local factors, although a direct causal relationship cannot be ascertained. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Optimal restoration of dental esthetics and function with advanced implant-supported prostheses: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulen, Peter van der; Linden, Wynand van der; Eeden, Ronnie van

    2012-07-01

    For more than 25 years, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used in implant restorative dentistry. Today this technology offers a means of milling titanium frameworks that fit dental implants accurately. This report presents a restoratively driven protocol employing advanced implant restorative and surgical techniques. Treatment of a patient with advanced periodontitis with extensive loss of hard and soft tissues is presented. After extraction of the patient's remaining hopeless teeth, dental implants were placed, along with interim, fixed-margin abutments and abutment protection caps. Two days later, acrylic resin fixed-interim prostheses restored the patient's esthetics and partial masticatory function. After implant osseointegration, maxillary, and mandibular frameworks for definitive prostheses were milled from Ti alloy, using one specific CAD/CAM technology. The benefits of this technology are also discussed.

  8. Implantes dentales en pacientes adultos postrauma dentoalveolar. Estudio descriptivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo González

    2016-04-01

    Conclusiones: En este estudio se presenta un protocolo establecido y se establece la necesidad de un diagnóstico detallado para planificar la rehabilitación mediante implantes dentales posterior a un trauma con un equipo multidisciplinario.

  9. Clinical and radiological investigations of mandibular overdentures supported by conventional or mini-dental implants: A 2-year prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temizel, Sonay; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Dirk, Cornelius; Bourauel, Christoph; Hasan, Istabrak

    2017-02-01

    Conventional dental implants are not applicable in the mandibular interforaminal region if bone volume is limited. Mini-dental implants offer an alternative means of supporting mandibular overdentures in a narrow residual ridge, without additional surgery. The purpose of this nonrandomized clinical trial was to compare the ability of mini-dental implants with that of conventional dental implants in supporting mandibular overdentures during a 2-year clinical follow-up. Bone quality, bone resorption, implant stability, and oral health were assessed radiographically. A total of 32 participants with edentulism were included. Twenty-two participants (99 implants) received 4 to 5 mini-dental implants (diameter: 1.8-2.4 mm; length: 13-15 mm, study group), and 10 participants (35 implants) received 2 to 4 conventional dental implants (diameter: 3.3-3.7 mm; length: 11-13 mm, control group). The selection of the participants in the study or control group was based on the available bone volume in the mandible. The selection was not randomized. The density of cortical bone thickness was measured in Hounsfield units (HU) from computed tomography data, and patients were followed for 2 years. The participants were examined 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Primary stability immediately after the insertion of dental implants (Periotest), secondary stability 6 months after implantation, modified plaque, bleeding on probing indices, and probing depth were measured and analyzed statistically (α=.05). The mean HU value 6 months after implantation in the participants who received mini-dental implants was significantly (P=.035) higher (1250 HU) than that in the participants who received conventional dental implants (1100 HU). The probing depths around the conventional dental implants (1.6 and 1.8 mm, respectively) were significantly higher than those around the mini-dental implants (1.3 and 1.2 mm, respectively) 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively (Pdental implants were

  10. Research on dental implant and its industrialization stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongjoon, Yang; Sukyoung, Kim

    2017-02-01

    Bone cell attachment to Ti implant surfaces is the most concerned issue in the clinical implant dentistry. Many attempts to achieve the fast and strong integration between bone and implant have been tried in many ways, such as selection of materials (for example, Ti, ZrO2), shape design of implant (for example, soft tissue level, bone level, taped or conical, etc), and surface modification of implants (for example, roughed. coated, hybrid), etc. Among them, a major consideration is the surface design of dental implants. The surface with proper structural characteristics promotes or induces the desirable responses of cells and tissues. To obtain such surface which has desirable cell and tissue response, a variety of surface modification techniques has been developed and employed for many years. In this review, the method and trend of surface modification will be introduced and explained in terms of the surface topography and chemistry of dental implants.

  11. Polymorphisms of Il-10 (-1082) and RANKL (-438) Genes and the Failure of Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo; Melo, Rayanne; Tortamano Neto, Pedro; Vajgel, André

    2017-01-01

    Background. Genetic polymorphisms in certain cytokines and chemokines have been investigated to understand why some individuals display implant flaws despite having few risk factors at the time of implant. Purpose. To investigate the association of genetic polymorphisms in interleukin- (IL-) 10 [-1082 region (A/G)] and RANKL [-438 region (A/G)] with the failure of dental implants. Materials and Methods. This study included 90 partially edentulous male and female patients who were rehabilitated with a total of 245 Straumann dental implants. An implant was considered a failure if any of the following occurred: mobility, persistent subjective complaint, recurrent peri-implant infection with suppuration, continuous radiolucency around the implant, probing depth ≥ 5 mm, and bleeding on probing. Buccal mucosal cells were collected for analysis of RANKL438 and IL-10. Results. The implant success rate in this population was 34.4%. The mutant allele (G) in RANKL had an incidence of 52.3% and mutant allele (A) in IL-10 was observed in 37.8%. No statistically significant difference was detected between the failure of the implant and the genotypes and allelic frequencies. Conclusion. No association was detected between the genetic polymorphisms of RANKL (-438) and IL-10 (-1082) and the failure of dental implants in the population studied.

  12. A macro- and nanostructure evaluation of a novel dental implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetè, Stefano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Traini, Tonino; Vinci, Raffaele; Sammartino, Gilberto; Marenzi, Gaetano; Gherlone, Enrico

    2008-09-01

    Success in implant dentistry also comes from the implant macrodesign and nanostructure of its surface. Titanium implant surface treatments have been shown to enhance osseointegration, maximize bone healing, and bone-to-implant contact for predictable clinical results. The aim of the study, was to evaluate the geometric macrodesign and the surface nanostructure of a novel dental implant full contact covering (FCC) obtained by electrochemical procedures. FCC implants were analyzed by scanning electronic microscope, profilometer, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with commercial sandblasted and sandblasted, large-grit acid-etched dental implants. Sample analysis allowed to distinguish the different implant macrodesigns, the step and the profile of the coils that cover the fixture, and the surface characteristics. FCC implant showed novel macro-characteristic of crestal module, coils, and apical zone compared with sandblasted and sandblasted and acid-etched dental implants. Moreover, the FCC nanostructure surface showed roughness values statistically higher than the 2 other surfaces, with a more homogeneity in a peaks and valleys arrangement. Finally, the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis detected differences between the examined surfaces, with the presence of several contaminants according to the different treatment procedures. Research on new macrostructures and nano morphology should result in a better qualitative and quantitative osseointegration response, with a predictability of the clinical results and long-term success of the implants.

  13. Novel surface coating materials for endodontic dental implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathi, M.H. [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Materials Engineering Dept., Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, V.; Moosavi, S.B. [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to design and produce novel coating materials in order to obtain two goals including; improvement of the corrosion behavior of metallic dental endodontic implant and the bone osteointegration simultaneously. Stainless steel 316L (SS) was used as a metallic substrate and a novel Hydroxyapatite/Titanium (HA/Ti) composite coating was prepared on it. Structural characterization techniques including XRD, SEM and EDX were utilized to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the coating. Electrochemical tests were performed in physiological solutions in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens as an indication of biocompatibility. Two types of endodontic implants including; SS with and without (HA/Ti) composite coating were prepared and subsequently implanted in the mandibular canine of 20 cats after completion of root canal treatment and osseous preparation. After a healing period of 4 months, osteointegration evaluation and histopathological interpretation was carried out using SEM and optical microscopy. Results indicate that the novel HA/Ti composite coating improves the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of SS endodontic dental implant. The clinical evaluation (in vivo test) results showed that there was significant difference in osteointegration between coated and uncoated endodontic dental implants and average bone osteointegration of coated implants were more than uncoated implants. The histopathological results and bone tissue response to the coated implants was acceptable and it was concluded that HA/Ti composite coated SS could be used as well as an endodontic dental implant. (author)

  14. Radiographic dental implants recognition for geographic evaluation in human identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzolese, E; Lusito, S; Solarino, B; Di Vella, G

    2008-06-01

    Dental implants for prosthetic rehabilitation with fixed crown or mobile partial/total dentures is a very common oral treatment among the population in Italy as elsewhere. There is a great number of implant systems of different designs. However, a catalogue of radiographic images and a description of the dental implants available in Italy would be useful in order to identify the manufacturer and the type of implant encountered in forensic casework. When an unidentified body is found with one or more implants in the jaws, and no dental record is available, clues gleaned from the type of implants used could give direction to the investigation. In this study Italian implant manufactures were contacted and asked to provide specimen implants. Digital radiographs were taken of all the implants donated at 0º, 30º, and 60º horizontal rotation, combined with -20º, -10º, 0º, +10º, and +20º vertical inclination relative to the radiographic beam and the X-ray sensor. A total of 15 images per implant were taken and examined to identify consistent, unique features that would aid in implant recognition. Only those observations made from radiographs between -10º and +10º vertical inclination would ever be used for definite identification of any implant. The information from this study should be considered a survey of the commercial distribution of dental implants in Italy through their digital radiographic images. It is also a starting point for a wider geographical evaluation of different manufacturers in other countries and continents. The radiographic images provided should help both the forensic odontologist and the prosthodontist to identify pre-existing implants which they may discover from their radiographic images.

  15. Oral health: dentures and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    More than 35 million Americans have lost all of their teeth, and 178 million are missing at least one tooth. Left unmanaged, tooth loss, or edentulism, can lead to nutritional deficiencies, oral pain, and poor psychosocial functioning. The family physician may be the first clinician to discuss tooth loss as a health concern with the patient. A patient who is interested in replacing missing teeth may be a candidate for dentures, implants, or a combination of these. The patient's preferences, general health, degree of edentulism, ability to follow up regularly, smoking status, and overall oral health should be considered when the prosthodontist makes recommendations for treatment. Smoking can delay tissue healing; therefore, heavy smoking may be a contraindication to implant placement. If a patient chooses dentures, the family physician should perform regular oral examinations, because up to 70% of denture wearers are affected by denture stomatitis at some point. Poor fit, poor hygiene, nighttime wearing of removable dentures, and bacterial or candidal infections can all be identified and managed by the family physician. The physician also can reinforce proper wear and care instructions for dentures and proper care of implants.

  16. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of hypophosphatasia using dental implants: a review of the literature and two case reports.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, C D

    2009-06-01

    There are reports in the literature of the various dental features of hypophosphatasia, especially where it affects the deciduous dentition. The descriptions include both the manifestations of the disorder and the subsequent patterns of tooth loss. There are fewer descriptions of the effects of hypophosphatasia on the permanent dentition and little information on the subsequent prosthodontic management of these patients, particularly in relation to the use of dental implants. The aim of this paper was to review the literature on the dental effects of hypophosphatasia, present two cases and describe how one of those patients, a young adult, was successfully rehabilitated using dental implants. That latter patient\\'s pattern of tooth loss as well as some histological and scanning electron microscopic findings of root cementum from the other case is also described.

  17. Implant Education Programs in North American Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbree, Nancy S.; Chapman, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 52 dental schools found that dental implant techniques were taught in 34 pre- and 34 postdoctoral curricula, involving mostly prosthodontics and oral surgery departments, with periodontology departments lagging behind. Most predoctoral programs did not have research involvement. Cooperation among specialties is recommended over implant…

  18. Implant Education Programs in North American Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbree, Nancy S.; Chapman, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 52 dental schools found that dental implant techniques were taught in 34 pre- and 34 postdoctoral curricula, involving mostly prosthodontics and oral surgery departments, with periodontology departments lagging behind. Most predoctoral programs did not have research involvement. Cooperation among specialties is recommended over implant…

  19. Treatment of midfacial defects using prostheses supported by ITI dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Jaques, Bertrand

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the use of ITI dental implants used for anchoring facial prostheses in the restorative treatment of midface defects. The authors analyzed the clinical data of 26 patients with orbital defects (n = 11), orbitonasal defects (n = 4), orbitonasomaxillary defects (n = 3), and nasal defects (n = 8). Data included age, sex, primary disease, implant position, implant length, implant failure, prosthetic attachment, radiation therapy, and peri-implant skin reactions. Follow-up was at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then on a yearly basis. The authors noted the status of healing and complications, if any. In total, 62 implants were placed as follows: 27 (43.5 percent) for orbital prostheses, 12 (19.4 percent) for orbitonasal prostheses, 14 (22.6 percent) for orbitonasomaxillary prostheses, and nine (14.5 percent) for nasal prostheses. Thirty-eight implants (61.3 percent) were placed in previously irradiated areas in 18 patients (69.2 percent). Mild skin reactions together with mild accumulation of sebaceous crusting around implants were recorded in 14.2 percent of the skin observations. No patient experienced severe inflammation requiring administration of systemic antibiotics or surgical revision. Implant success was 100 percent in both irradiated and nonirradiated patients. In conclusion, ITI dental implants result in a high rate of success in retaining midface prostheses and offer good stability and aesthetic satisfaction.

  20. Evaluation of the effectiveness of dental implant therapy in a practice-based network (FOCUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Clark M; Wagner, Wilfried; Rodriguez Y Baena, Ruggero; Norton, Michael; McGlumphy, Edwin; Schmidt, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of multicenter clinical trials are needed to determine the effectiveness of care in routine implant therapy in clinical practice. Ninety-two clinicians in 75 clinics in 13 countries recruited five subjects per clinic who were in need of a minimum of two dental implants to restore a partially edentulous quadrant and were followed for a minimum of 1 year after loading. A centralized Internet-based case report form was developed to coordinate data recording. Data entry was done by each clinic, with follow-up source verification. The study recruited 549 subjects in 101 clinics with 1,893 implants placed. Three hundred forty subjects completed the 1-year recall (gender distribution of 56% female, 44% male; mean age of 57 years with a range of 18 to 84 years). In all, 1,246 dental implants were followed; a majority of subjects had two to four implants. Twenty-eight percent of subjects received osseous grafting prior to or coincident with implant placement. In the maxilla, 779 (63%) implants were placed, 256 in the anterior and 523 in the posterior; in the mandible, 467 implants were placed, 85 in the anterior and 382 in the posterior arch. The median edentulous period prior to implant placement was 24 months (range, 0 to 480 months); 46% of all patients received implants within 12 months of tooth loss. At 1 year after prosthesis insertion, 15 subjects had lost a total of 17 implants, for a cumulative implant survival rate of 98.6%. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests indicated a higher risk of implant loss at sites with advanced resorption and for wider-diameter implants (5-mm tapered body). There was no statistical relationship with implant loss relative to implant length or anatomic location within the oral cavity. The outcomes support the need for ongoing involvement of clinicians in routine practice assessments of patient-based outcomes of implant therapy.

  1. Smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis as risk factors for dental implant failure: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are conflicting reports as to the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. We undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. METHODS: A comprehensive research on MEDLINE and EMBASE, up to January 2013, was conducted to identify potential studies. References of relevant studies were also searched. Screening, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool estimates of relative risks (RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: A total of 51 studies were identified in this meta-analysis, with more than 40,000 dental implants placed under risk-threatening conditions. The pooled RRs showed a direct association between smoking (n = 33; RR = 1.92; 95% CI, 1.67-2.21 and radiotherapy (n = 16; RR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.49-3.51 and the risk of dental implant failure, whereas no inverse impact of diabetes (n = 5; RR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.62-1.32 on the risk of dental implant failure was found. The influence of osteoporosis on the risk of dental implant failure was direct but not significant (n = 4; RR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.79-1.52. The subgroup analysis indicated no influence of study design, geographical location, length of follow-up, sample size, or mean age of recruited patients. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking and radiotherapy were associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure. The relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of implant failure warrant further study.

  2. Influence of patient age on the success rate of dental implants supporting an overdenture in an edentulous mandible : A 3-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, HJA; Batenburg, RHK; Raghoebar, GM

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of age on peri-implant tissues in patients treated with implant-supported overdentures in the mandible. A prospective study was carried out with 2 groups of healthy edentulous patients. The mean age of the younger group (n = 32) was 46 years (rang

  3. Immediate Dental Implant Placements Using Osteotome Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Almaie, Saad

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case describes the effect of the osteotome technique on the osseointegration of a mandibular dental implant in a 42-year-old female patient with dento-alveolar bony defects and to review the literature regarding immediate implant placement using osteotome technique. The amount of bone expansion at the alveolar ridge and the marginal bone resorption from the time of implant placement to one year after the implant's functional loading were recorded clinically. The esthetic outcome for the restored implant (the gingival margin) was achieved one years after the implant's functional loading. The surgical and prosthetic sites for the implant showed no postoperative complications, and no infection or wound dehiscence was recorded during the follow-up period. The osteotome technique is good for the purpose for which it was introduced, and its advantages with immediate implant placement include reduced surgical trauma and a shorter treatment time.

  4. A Case of Simultaneous Ectopic Tooth Extraction and Removal of Migrated Dental Implant from Maxillary Sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yoshitaka; Norizuki, Yoshie; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2015-01-01

    When a dental implant migrates to the maxillary sinus it should be extracted immediately as it may cause sinusitis or further migrate to one of the other paranasal sinuses. Although usually detected due to symptoms such as nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, and nasal bleeding, an ectopic tooth in the maxillary sinus can sometimes be revealed incidentally on radiographic examination. Here, we report a case of simultaneous extraction of a dental implant that had migrated to the maxillary sinus and removal of an ectopic tooth that had arisen in the same location. The patient was a 73-year-old man who had received the implant to replace the first left maxillary molar at a local dental office. The implant had subsequently migrated to the left maxillary sinus and the patient was referred to us for its removal. On locating the implant on a CT scan at our hospital, an ectopic tooth was also observed at the base of the maxillary sinus. With patient consent, the decision was made to remove the ectopic tooth and extract the implant simultaneously. Excision of the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus allowed easy extraction of the implant. The ectopic tooth was removed by slightly expanding a fenestration in the sinus wall. Ectopic teeth in the maxillary sinus are sometimes put on follow-up if asymptomatic. Removal should be considered, however, if there is a risk of it becoming infected due to implantation-induced inflammation.

  5. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, G., E-mail: enggiova@hotmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Facultad de Quimica, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Arzate, H. [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Olaya, J.J. [Unidad de Materiales, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Cra. 30 45-03 Bogota (Colombia)

    2011-01-15

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  6. Dental implants placed on bone subjected to vertical alveolar distraction show the same performance as those placed on primitive bone

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Sayáns, Mario; León Camacho, María De Los Ángeles; Somoza Martín, José Manuel; Fernández González, Beatriz; Blanes-Vázquez-Gundín, Silvia; Gándara Rey, José Manuel; García García, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vertical osteogenic alveolar distraction (VOAD) allows for the augmentation of the alveolar ridge for the placement of dental implants in atrophic alveolar ridges. The goal of this paper is to assess long-term peri-implant bone resorption in implants placed on bones subjected to VOAD, comparing it with a group of patients who had implants placed directly on the alveolar bone without previous bone regeneration. Material and Methods: We conducted a follow-up study on 32 patients w...

  7. Dental considerations in pregnant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khedmat S.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available During the human gestation period, various systemic alterations occur in the mother"nsecondary to endocrine changes. These changes, combined with the presence of the gravid uterus, result"nin conditions affecting the various systems of the mother which must be considered by the dentist."nFetal development is divided into three stages:"n1 The fertilization and implantation period"n2 The embryonic period and"n3 The fetal period."nThe second period characterized by organogenesis which taratogens may result in functional and"nmorphogenic malformations."nThe ideal dental treatment schedule for the pregnant patient is twice during first trimester, at least once"nduring second trimester and once during third trimester."nThe second trimester is an ideal time for performing dental treatment."nEmergency problem should be alleviated immediately during pregnancy."nIndicated medications should not be with held because of pregnancy but patients must be informed of"nbenefits and risks."nWith careful attention to the special needs of the pregnant patient, the dentist can provide high quality"ndental care while minimizing potential risks to mother and fetus."nEmphasis should be on preventive strategies and meticulous oral hygiene to manage common oral"nproblems associated with pregnancy.

  8. Assessment of the Survival of Dental Implants in Irradiated Jaws Following Treatment of Oral Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Meenakshi Chauhan Rana; Swati Solanki; Pujari, Sudarshan C; Eisha Shaw; Swati Sharma; Abhishek Anand Anand; Harkanwal Preet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients undergoing head and neck surgery for various pathologic conditions, implants are one of the best restorative options and are increasing widely used. Therefore, we evaluated the success of dental implants in the irradiated jaws of patients following treatment of oral cancer oral cancer treated patients. Materials and Methods: Data of oral cancer treated patients was collected retrospectively from 2002 to 2008. We took 46 oral cancer treated patients in which implants we...

  9. CO2 laser surface treatment of failed dental implants for re-implantation: an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Torkzaban, Parviz; Shams, Bahar; Hosseinipanah, Seyed Mohammad; Farhadian, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the success rate of failed implants re-implanted after surface treatment with CO2 laser. Despite the widespread use of dental implants, there are many incidents of failures. It is believed that lasers can be applied to decontaminate the implant surface without damaging the implant. Ten dental implants that had failed for various reasons other than fracture or surface abrasion were subjected to CO2 laser surface treatment and randomly placed in the maxillae of dogs. Three failed implants were also placed as the negative controls after irrigation with saline solution without laser surface treatment. The stability of the implants was evaluated by the use of the Periotest values (PTVs) on the first day after surgery and at 1, 3, and 6 months post-operatively. The mean PTVs of treated implants increased at the first month interval, indicating a decrease in implant stability due to inflammation followed by healing of the tissue. At 3 and 6 months, the mean PTVs decreased compared to the 1-month interval (P implant stability. The mean PTVs increased in the negative control group compared to baseline (P implants were significantly lower than control group at 3 and 6 months after implant placement (P implantation of failed implants in Jack Russell Terrier dogs after CO2 laser surface debridement is associated with a high success rate in terms of implant stability.

  10. Targeted Nursing for Elderly Patients in the Perioperative Period of Dental Implantation%老年患者人工种植牙围手术期的针对性护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽玉

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨老年患者人工种植牙围手术期的针对性护理方法。方法:收集2013年3月-2014年3月接受人工种植牙手术的老年患者42例,根据患者的生理、心理特点,给予围手术期护理。结果:接受手术的42例老年患者,术后随访3个月~1年检查结果,患者人工种植牙均形成良好骨结合,且无1例患者出现种植体脱落、牙龈发炎等各种并发症。结论:采用微创人工种植牙技术,并对老年患者给予术前、术中、术后针对性的护理干预措施,可有效避免切口感染的发生,进一步促进切口愈合,从而提高老年患者人工种植牙成功率。%Objective:To explore the targeted nursing for elderly patients in the perioperative period of dental implantation.Method:A total of 42 elderly patients who received dental implantation from March 2013 to March 2014 were selected as the subjects and the perioperative nursing was administered according to the physiological and psychological characteristics of patients.Result:According to the 3-month to 1-year postoperative follow-up,all the implants of 42 elderly patients showed good osseointegration,and complications like falling off of implant and gingival inflammation occurred in no patients.Conclusion:Minimally-invasive dental implantation technique and targeted preoperative,intraoperative and postoperative nursing intervention for elderly patients can effective prevent incision infection and promote incision healing,thus improving the success rate of dental implantation for elderly patients.

  11. Antibiotics in dental implants: A review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, Hemchand; Yalamanchili, Pallavi Samatha; Basha, Md. Hafeez; Potluri, Sushma; Elisetti, Nirupa; Kiran Kumar, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    The routine use of antibiotics in oral implant treatment seems to be widespread. The pre- or post-operative use of antibiotics in conjunction with implant surgery and its correlation with failure and success rates are poorly documented in the literature. The debate regarding overprescription of antibiotics raises the need for a critical evaluation of proper antibiotic coverage in association with implant treatment. The benefits of prophylactic antibiotics are well-recognized in dentistry. However, their routine use in the placement of endosseous dental implants remains controversial. The purpose of this review is to know the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in implant dentistry. PMID:27829741

  12. Patient's opinion and treatment outcome of fixed rehabilitation on Brånemark implants. A 3-year follow-up study in private dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyn, H; Collaert, B; Lindén, U; Björn, A L

    1997-08-01

    In this study, patient opinion on oral rehabilitation by means of Brånemark implants was investigated. All patients were referred to a periodontal clinic for implant installation and treated by one and the same operator. Prosthetic restorations were performed by dentists, who had no previous experience with prostheses on implants, but had completed a postgraduate training course. Patient opinion was obtained through questionnaires, pertaining to satisfaction and oral function. A comparison was made between pre-implant situation, short-term (implant-restorative rehabilitation. In total, 61 patients participated in the study; 23 received a full lower arch bridge and 18 a full upper arch bridge, while 20 patients got partial bridges. Of 298 installed implants, 7 failed at abutment connection (2.3%) and 1 during the 3-year follow-up interval (0.3%). The study results indicated that a great majority of patients were very satisfied with the treatment. Comfort with eating, aesthetics, phonetics and overall satisfaction improved significantly and nearly all patients said that they would undergo the treatment again or recommend it to others. Patients experienced their implants as "natural" teeth. The conclusion is that rehabilitation ad modum Brånemark, even in the hands of non-specialized dentists, can be of high quality, improving oral function and satisfying the needs and demands of patients.

  13. Recubrimientos antibacterianos basados en silicio para implantes dentales

    OpenAIRE

    Pallá Rubio, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    232 p. El uso de implantes dentales en odontología está tan extendido hoy en día, que ya nadie discute su relevancia. Su tasa de éxitos es elevada (debido al criterio de selección de pacientes), si bien un porcentaje cercano al 10% de los implantes debe ser eliminado, por problemas de osteointegración, o por la aparición de infecciones, considerándose esto último hoy en día, la principal causa del fallo de los implantes dentales. Sin embargo, una gran parte de la investigación destinada a ...

  14. Periodontal parameters of osseointegrated dental implants. A 4-year controlled follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K; Itoh, T; Takaki, K; Hosokawa, R; Naito, T; Yokota, M

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the periodontal parameters of osseointegrated dental implants. The condition of the peri-implant mucosa was assessed using periodontal parameters, i.e., of plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, probing attachment level and Periotest scores as well as a radiographic parameter, over a 4-year follow-up period. 32 non-submerged ITI dental implants, all placed in the mandible, were studied in 12 patients who had good oral hygiene. All patients were regularly recalled at 6-month intervals. The overall implant success rate was 100%. None of the implants showed any signs of inflammation, radiographic bone loss or any detectable mobility during the follow-up period. Methods similar to those used to evaluate the natural dentition were effectively employed to assess the clinical status of the dental implants. The diagnostic value of these parameters could not, however, be determined from this study due to the absence of any peri-implant tissue complications. The results indicated that some periodontal parameters of healthy peri-implant mucosa might be slightly different from healthy periodontal tissue.

  15. Clinical management and microscopic characterisation of fatique-induced failure of a dental implant. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Frenza G

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osseointegrated endosseous implants are widely used for the rehabilitation of completely and partially edentulous patients, being the final prosthodontic treatment more predictable and the failures extremely infrequent. A case of fracture of an endosseous dental implant, replacing the maxillary first molar, occurring in a middle-age woman, 5 years after placement is reported. Materials and methods The difficult management of this rare complication of implant dentistry together with the following rehabilitation is described. Additionally, the authors performed an accurate analysis of the removed fractured implant both by the stereomicroscope and by the confocal laser scanning microscope. Results and discussion The fractured impant showed the typical signs of a fatigue-induced fracture in the coronal portion of the implant together with numerous micro-fractures in the apical one. Three dimensional imaging performed by confocal laser scanning microscope led easily to a diagnosis of "fatigue fracture" of the implant. The biomechanical mechanism of implant fractures when overstress of the implant components due to bending overload is discussed. Conclusion When a fatigue-induced fracture of an dental implant occurs in presence of bending overload, the whole implant suffers a deformation that is confirmed by the alterations (micro-fractures of the implant observable also in the osseointegrated portion that is easily appraisable by the use of stereomicroscope and confocal laser scanning microscope without preparation of the sample.

  16. A Review of Dental Implant Treatment Planning and Implant Design Based on Bone Density

    OpenAIRE

    Torkzaban; Moradi Haghgoo; khoshhal; Arabi; Razaghi

    2013-01-01

    Context A key determinant for clinical success is the diagnosis of the bone density in a potential implant site. The percentage of bone-implant contact is related to bone density, and the axial stress contours around an implant are affected by the density of bone. Evidence Acquisition A number of reports have emphasized the importance of the quality of bone on the survival of dental implants. The volume and density of the recipien...

  17. Electrochemical behavior of dental implant system before andafter clinical use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chae-Heon CHUNG; Hee-Jung KIM; Yong-Tae JEONG; Mee-Kyoung SON; Yong-Hoon JEONG; Han-Cheol CHOE

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of dental implant system before and after clinical use (in vivo and in vitro) was researched by using abutment and titanium fixture. To simulate an oral environment, the samples of clinically used and non-used implant systems as a working electrode were exposed to artificial saliva at (36.5±1) ℃. Electrochemical tests were carried out using a potentiostat. After electrochemical test, the corrosion morphology of each sample was investigated by FE-SEM and EDS. The corrosion potential and pitting potential of clinically used implant system are lower than those of non-used implant system, and clinically used implant system exhibits a lower range of passivation, indicating a less degree of inherent resistance against chloride ion. The polarization resistance decreases in the case of clinically used implant system, whereas, Rp for clinically non-used implant system increases compared with clinically used implant system.

  18. Prognosis of implants and abutment teeth under combined tooth-implant-supported and solely implant-supported double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelsberg, Peter; Bernhart, Gunda; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Schmitter, Marc; Schwarz, Stefanie

    2014-07-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of complications in dental implants and abutment teeth used for combined tooth-implant- and solely implant-supported double crown-retained removable dental prostheses (RDPs). Patients were selected from a prospective clinical study. Seventy-three RDPs retained by 234 implants and 107 abutment teeth were placed in 39 men and 22 women with a mean age of 65 years. Forty-five RDPs were located in the maxilla and 28 in the mandible. Thirty-four RDPs were solely implant-supported and 39 were combined tooth-implant-supported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate success defined as survival without severe abutment-related complications, and Cox regression was used to isolate the most relevant prognostic risk factors. After a median observation period of 2.7 years for the RDPs, six implants failed and eleven implants were diagnosed with peri-implantitis. Four abutment teeth were extracted, and three abutment teeth showed severe complications requiring extended interventions. For both abutment teeth and implants, Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed a 5-year probability of success of 85% for solely implant-supported RDPs and 92% for combined tooth-implant-supported RDPs. Multiple Cox regression identified RDP location (P = 0.01), age (P = 0.01), and gender (P = 0.04) as prognostic risk factors for severe implant-related complications. Solely implant-supported RPDs showed a poorer prognosis, but the risk difference did not reach statistical significance. Preliminary data suggest that the combination of teeth and implants to support double crown-retained RDPs may result in a prognostic advantage. The present findings should be validated in independent studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Implantes en pacientes VIH-positivo: A propósito de tres casos Dental implants in HIV-positive patients: A presentation of three cases

    OpenAIRE

    E. Ferrús-Torres; M. Piñera-Penalva; L. Berini-Aytés; C. Gay-Escoda

    2008-01-01

    El aumento de la calidad y la esperanza de vida de los pacientes VIH-positivo, ha hecho que la solicitud de tratamiento estético dental se haya incrementado significativamente en estos pacientes, considerándose actualmente las prótesis implantosoportadas como una opción terapéutica válida. Se presentan 3 pacientes varones, VIH-positivo que acudieron a nuestro Servicio de Implantología Bucofacial, para valorar una posible rehabilitación implantosoportada. La evolución clínica de los pacientes ...

  20. Melatonin plus porcine bone on discrete calcium deposit implant surface stimulates osteointegration in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Barone, Antonio; Cutando, Antonio; Alcaraz-Baños, Miguel; Chiva, Fernando; López-Marí, Laura; Guardia, Javier

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the topical application of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone to accelerate the osteointegration on the rough discrete calcium deposit (DCD) surface implants in Beagle dogs 3 months after their insertion. In preparation for subsequent insertion of dental implants, lower premolars and molars were extracted from 12 Beagle dogs. Each mandible received three parallel wall implants with discrete calcium deposit (DCD) surface of 4 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length. The implants were randomly assigned to the distal sites on each side of the mandible in three groups: group I implants alone, group II implants with melatonin and group III implants with melatonin and porcine bone. Prior to implanting, 5 mg lyophylized powdered melatonin was applied to one bone hole at each side of the mandible. None was applied at the control sites. Ten histological sections per implant were obtained for histomorphometric studies. After a 4-wk treatment period, melatonin significantly increased the perimeter of bone that was in direct contact with the treated implants (P implants. Topical application of melatonin on DCD surface may act as a biomimetic agent in the placement of endo-osseous dental implants and enhance the osteointegration. Melatonin combined with porcine bone on DCD implants reveals more bone to implant contact at 12 wk (84.5 +/- 1.5%) compared with melatonin treated (75.1 +/- 1.4%) and nonmelatonin treated surface implants (64 +/- 1.4%).

  1. Rehabilitation of orbital defect with silicone orbital prosthesis retained by dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Desai, Jhanvi; Kudva, Adarsh; Patil, Basavaraj R

    2016-01-01

    Orbital defects can result from cancer, birth anomalies, or trauma leading to an onslaught of problems in the function and psyche of the patient. These defects are restored by surgical reconstruction and followed by placement of orbital prosthesis for cosmetic makeup. The use of dental implants in retaining orbital prosthesis improves patient acceptance of the prosthesis owing to better retention and stability than conventional adhesive retained prosthesis. This case report describes a custom-made magnetic retentive assembly anchored by a dental implant which offers the orbital prosthesis the simplicity of self-alignment and ease of use. PMID:26953033

  2. Rehabilitation of orbital defect with silicone orbital prosthesis retained by dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Desai, Jhanvi; Kudva, Adarsh; Patil, Basavaraj R

    2016-01-01

    Orbital defects can result from cancer, birth anomalies, or trauma leading to an onslaught of problems in the function and psyche of the patient. These defects are restored by surgical reconstruction and followed by placement of orbital prosthesis for cosmetic makeup. The use of dental implants in retaining orbital prosthesis improves patient acceptance of the prosthesis owing to better retention and stability than conventional adhesive retained prosthesis. This case report describes a custom-made magnetic retentive assembly anchored by a dental implant which offers the orbital prosthesis the simplicity of self-alignment and ease of use.

  3. Electromechanical impedance method to assess dental implant stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Aydin; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Ochs, Mark W.

    2012-11-01

    The stability of a dental implant is a prerequisite for supporting a load-bearing prosthesis and establishment of a functional bone-implant system. Reliable and noninvasive methods able to assess the bone interface of dental and orthopedic implants (osseointegration) are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. In this paper, we propose the electromechanical impedance method as a novel approach for the assessment of dental implant stability. Nobel Biocare® implants with a size of 4.3 mm diameter ×13 mm length were placed inside bovine bones that were then immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation. The degradation simulated the inverse process of bone healing. The implant-bone systems were monitored by bonding a piezoceramic transducer (PZT) to the implants’ abutment and measuring the admittance of the PZT over time. It was found that the PZT’s admittance and the statistical features associated with its analysis are sensitive to the degradation of the bones and can be correlated to the loss of calcium measured by means of the atomic absorption spectroscopy method. The present study shows promising results and may pave the road towards an innovative approach for the noninvasive monitoring of dental implant stability and integrity.

  4. Dental implants for severely atrophied jaws due to ectodermal dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to present the successful esthetical and functional rehabilitation of partial anodontia in a case of severe ectodermal dysplasia with complete atrophy of the jaws. A 17-year-old male with Class III malocclusion with partial anodontia sought dental implant treatment. His expectation was that of Class I occlusion. The challenge in the case was to match the expectation, reality, and the clinical possibilities. Ridge augmentation was performed with a combination of rib graft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Simultaneously, 6 implants (Nobel Biocare™ - Tapered Groovy were placed in maxillary arch and 10 in the mandible. Simultaneous placement ensured faster and better osseointegration though a mild compromise of the primary stability was observed initially. After adequate healing, Customized Zirconia Procera™ system was used to build the framework. Zirconia crown was cemented to the framework. Radiological and clinical evidence of osseointegration was observed in all 16 dental implants. Successful conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion was achieved with the combination of preprosthetic alveolar ridge augmentation, Procera™ Implant Bridge system. Abnormal angulations and or placement of dental implants would result in failure of the implant. Hence conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion needs complete and complex treatment planning so that the entire masticatory apparatus is sufficiently remodeled. Planning should consider the resultant vectors that would otherwise result in failure of framework or compromise the secondary stability of the dental implant during function. A successful case of rehabilitation of complex partial anodontia is presented.

  5. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jemat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants.

  6. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemat, A; Ghazali, M J; Razali, M; Otsuka, Y

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants.

  7. Bone remodeling induced by dental implants of functionally graded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Daniel; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Functionally graded material (FGM) had been developed as a potential implant material to replace titanium for its improved capability of initial osseointegration. The idea behind FGM dental implant is that its properties can be tailored in accordance with the biomechanical needs at different regions adapting to its hosting bony tissues, therefore creating an improved overall integration and stability in the entire restoration. However, there have been very few reports available so far on predicting bone remodeling induced by FGM dental implants. This article aims to evaluate bone remodeling when replacing the titanium with a hydroxyapatite/collagen (HAP/Col) FGM model. A finite element model was constructed in the buccal-lingual section of a dental implant-bone structure generated from in vivo CT scan images. The remodeling simulation was performed over a 4 year healing period. Comparisons were made between the titanium implant and various FGM implants of this model. The FGM implants showed an improved bone remodeling outcome. The study is expected to provide a basis for future development of FGM implants.

  8. Measurement of Primary and Secondary Stability of Dental Implants by Resonance Frequency Analysis Method in Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Mehran; Daraeighadikolaei, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is no doubt that the success of the dental implants depends on the stability. The aim of this work was to measure the stability of dental implants prior to loading the implants, using a resonance frequency analysis (RFA) by Osstell mentor device. Methods. Ten healthy and nonsmoker patients over 40 years of age with at least six months of complete or partial edentulous mouth received screw-type dental implants by a 1-stage procedure. RFA measurements were obtained at surgery and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 11 weeks after the implant surgery. Results. Among fifteen implants, the lowest mean stability measurement was for the 4th week after surgery in all bone types. At placement, the mean ISQ obtained with the magnetic device was 77.2 with 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.49, and then it decreased until the 4th week to 72.13 (95% CI = 2.88), and at the last measurement, the mean implant stability significantly (P value implant placement. These suggestions need to be further assessed through future studies. PMID:23737790

  9. Frequency of Dental Implants Placed in the Esthetic Zone in Dental Clinic of Tehran University: A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Alireza Rasouli Ghahroudi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Anterior maxilla, known as the esthetic zone, plays an important role in facial and smile esthetics. This study assessed the frequency of implant treatments in the esthetic zone of patients presenting to Dental Implant Department of Tehran University during 2002-2012.Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on dental records of patients receiving implant treatment during 2002-2012. Patient records were retrieved from the archives and patient demographics, implant characteristics, failure rate, prevalence of complications and implant systems were collected. The data were reported as frequency and percentage.Results: Of a total of 2,381 implants placed in the mentioned time period, 492 (20.8% had been placed in the anterior maxilla and 531 (22.3% had been placed in the anterior mandible from canine to canine.  Timing of implant placement was immediate in 12.0%, early in 0.5% and late in 87.4%. Survival rate was 99.1%. Rate of failure was 0.8%. Failure rate was 0.4% in the maxillary and 1.1% in the mandibular canine to canine region. Complications were reported in 10.1% of patients. Rate of complications was 18.3% in the maxillary canine to canine, 8.9% in the mandibular canine to canine, 18.1% in the maxillary first premolar to first premolar and 9.5% in the mandibular first premolar to first premolar. The frequency of bone grafts placed in these areas was 17.6%, 33.9%, 13.6%, 32.1% and 14.3%, respectively.Conclusion: Of implants placed in our center, around 20% were in the anterior maxilla, and delayed implant placement was the most commonly adopted technique.

  10. Electrochemical Disinfection of Dental Implants – a Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Dirk; Zehnder, Matthias; Stark, Wendelin J.; Imfeld, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis has gained significant clinical attention in recent years. This disease is an inflammatory reaction to microorganisms around dental implants. Due to the limited accessibility, non-invasive antimicrobial strategies are of high interest. An unexpected approach to implant disinfection may evolve from electrolysis. Given the electrical conductivity of titanium implants, alkalinity or active oxidants can be generated in body fluids. We investigated the use of dental titanium implants as electrodes for the local generation of disinfectants. Our hypothesis was that electrolysis can reduce viable counts of adhering bacteria, and that this reduction should be greater if active oxidative species are generated. Methodology/Principal Findings As model systems, dental implants, covered with a mono-species biofilm of Escherichia coli C43, were placed in photographic gelatin prepared with physiological saline. Implants were treated by a continuous current of 0 - 10 mA for 15 minutes. The reduction of viable counts was investigated on cathodes and anodes. In separate experiments, the local change in pH was visualized using color indicators embedded in the gelatin. Oxidative species were qualitatively detected by potassium iodide-starch paper. The in situ generated alkaline environment around cathodic implants caused a reduction of up to 2 orders of magnitude in viable E. coli counts. On anodic implants, in contrast to cathodic counterparts, oxidative species were detected. Here, a current of merely 7.5 mA caused complete kill of the bacteria. Conclusions/Significance This laboratory study shows that electrochemical treatment may provide access to a new way to decontaminate dental implants in situ. PMID:21264247

  11. A new testing protocol for zirconia dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Clarisse; Chevalier, Jérôme; Douillard, Thierry; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Scherrer, Susanne S; Gremillard, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Based on the current lack of standards concerning zirconia dental implants, we aim at developing a protocol to validate their functionality and safety prior their clinical use. The protocol is designed to account for the specific brittle nature of ceramics and the specific behavior of zirconia in terms of phase transformation. Several types of zirconia dental implants with different surface textures (porous, alveolar, rough) were assessed. The implants were first characterized in their as-received state by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Focused Ion Beam (FIB), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Fracture tests following a method adapted from ISO 14801 were conducted to evaluate their initial mechanical properties. Accelerated aging was performed on the implants, and XRD monoclinic content measured directly at their surface instead of using polished samples as in ISO 13356. The implants were then characterized again after aging. Implants with an alveolar surface presented large defects. The protocol shows that such defects compromise the long-term mechanical properties. Implants with a porous surface exhibited sufficient strength but a significant sensitivity to aging. Even if associated to micro cracking clearly observed by FIB, aging did not decrease mechanical strength of the implants. As each dental implant company has its own process, all zirconia implants may behave differently, even if the starting powder is the same. Especially, surface modifications have a large influence on strength and aging resistance, which is not taken into account by the current standards. Protocols adapted from this work could be useful. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cytocompatibility, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M, Reigosa [Instituto Multidisciplinario de BiologIa Celular (IMBICE) CONICET-CIC.C.C. 403 (1900) La Plata. (Argentina); V, Labarta [Instituto Multidisciplinario de BiologIa Celular (IMBICE) CONICET-CIC.C.C. 403 (1900) La Plata. (Argentina); G, Molinari [Catedra de CitologIa.Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo.UNLP (Argentina); D, Bernales

    2007-11-15

    Several types of materials are frequently used for dental prostheses in dental medicine. Different treatments with titanium are the most used. The aim of the present study was to analyze by means of cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility techniques the capacity of dental implants to integrate to the bone tissue. Cultures of UMR 106 cell line derived from an osteosarcoma were used for bioassays mainly because they show many of the properties of osteoblasts. Dental implant samples provided by B and W company were compared with others of recognized trademarks. The first ones contain ASTM titanium (8348 GR2) with acid printing. Cytotoxicity was analyzed by means of lysosome activity, using the neutral red technique and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Cell variability was determined by means of the acridine ethidium-orange bromide technique. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni and Duncan post-ANOVA tests were used for the statistical analysis. The assays did not show significant differences among the dental implants analyzed. Our findings show that the dental prostheses studied present high biocompatibility, quantified by the bioassays performed. The techniques employed revealed that they can be a useful tool for the analysis of other materials for dental medicine use.

  13. Cytocompatibility, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigosa, M.; Labarta, V.; Molinari, G.; Bernales, D.

    2007-11-01

    Several types of materials are frequently used for dental prostheses in dental medicine. Different treatments with titanium are the most used. The aim of the present study was to analyze by means of cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility techniques the capacity of dental implants to integrate to the bone tissue. Cultures of UMR 106 cell line derived from an osteosarcoma were used for bioassays mainly because they show many of the properties of osteoblasts. Dental implant samples provided by B&W company were compared with others of recognized trademarks. The first ones contain ASTM titanium (8348 GR2) with acid printing. Cytotoxicity was analyzed by means of lysosome activity, using the neutral red technique and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Cell variability was determined by means of the acridine ethidium-orange bromide technique. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni and Duncan post-ANOVA tests were used for the statistical analysis. The assays did not show significant differences among the dental implants analyzed. Our findings show that the dental prostheses studied present high biocompatibility, quantified by the bioassays performed. The techniques employed revealed that they can be a useful tool for the analysis of other materials for dental medicine use.

  14. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhitkov, Alex E; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y; Leroux, Brian G; Hunter, Colby M; Flemmig, Thomas F; Noble, Peter A; Bryers, James D

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  15. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex E Pozhitkov

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  16. Assessment of the increased calcification of the jaw bone with CT-Scan after dental implant placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunus, Barunawaty [Faculty of Dentistry, Hasanuddin University, Makassar (Malaysia)

    2011-06-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the changes of jaw bone density around the dental implant after placement using computed tomography scan (CT-Scan). This retrospective study consisted of 30 patients who had lost 1 posterior tooth in maxilla or mandible and installed dental implant. The patients took CT-Scan before and after implant placement. Hounsfield Unit (HU) was measured around the implants and evaluated the difference of HU before and after implant installation. The mean HU of jaw bone was 542.436 HU and 764.9 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). The means HUs for male were 632.3 HU and 932.2 HU and those for female 478.2 HU and 645.5 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). Also, the jaw bone with lower density needed longer period for implant procedure and the increased change of HU of jaw bone was less in the cases which needed longer period for osseointegration. CT-Scan could be used to assess the change of bone density around dental implants. Bone density around dental implant was increased after placement. The increased rate of bone density could be determined by the quality of jaw bone before implant placement.

  17. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  18. Surface analysis of titanium dental implants with different topographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva M.H. Prado da

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical dental implants made of commercially pure titanium were analysed in four different surface finishes: as-machined, Al2O3 blasted with Al2O3 particles, plasma-sprayed with titanium beads and electrolytically coated with hydroxyapatite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX revealed the topography of the surfaces and provided qualitative results of the chemical composition of the different implants. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS was used to perform chemical analysis on the surface of the implants while Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSM produced topographic maps of the analysed surfaces. Optical Profilometry was used to quantitatively characterise the level of roughness of the surfaces. The implant that was plasma-sprayed and the hydroxyapatite coated implant showed the roughest surface, followed by the implant blasted with alumina and the as-machined implant. Some remnant contamination from the processes of blasting, coating and cleaning was detected by XPS.

  19. Marginal tissue response adjacent to Astra Dental Implants supporting overdentures in the mandible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Holm, B; Sewerin, I

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal tissue response adjacent to implant supported overdentures. Twenty edentulous patients had 2 Astra Dental Implants placed in the canine region of the lower jaw. New overdentures were retained by individual ball attachments in 11 patients...... that two osseointegrated Astra Dental Implants could successfully retain an overdenture in the lower jaw. However, long-term observation is needed for a definitive evaluation of this treatment concept....... showed any periodontal signs of failure. At the 2-year examination, no pocket depths adjacent to the implants exceeded 4 mm and no bone loss exceeded 3 mm. The mean annual bone loss was less than 0.2 mm during the first 2 years. The preliminary results from this limited study were promising and showed...

  20. Biological aspects of dental implant; Current knowledge and perspectives in oral implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukant Sahoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of dental implants became a scientifically accepted treatment modality for the rehabilitation of fully and partially edentulous patients. The evolution of dental implants has completely changed dentistry. Implants can offer a number of benefits, from improved esthetics, to reducing bone loss, to improving denture retention for edentulous patients. Branemark et al., was the first person to examined submerged titanium implants with a machined surface in dogs and later called this procedure as osseointegration, which is now defined as "A direct structural and functional connection between ordered, living bone and the surface of a load-bearing implant." Commercially pure titanium is recognized today as a material of choice, since it is characterized by excellent biological and also good mechanical properties. In this comprehensive review, authors have sought to explore various biological aspects of dental implant as pertinent to clinical procedure so as to provide research foundation for the establishment of suitable strategies that can assist in successful implant therapy.

  1. Analysis of surface cleanliness of three commercial dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B N; Gold, B R

    1992-01-01

    Six routinely packaged commercially pure titanium dental implants (three commercial brands) were analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry to examine the outermost surface layer. The aim of the analysis was to compare the surface purity (99.95%) of the implants with the substrate metal, common to all three brands. The use of a low primary ion current density provided a nominal protection limit of 0.01% or 100 p.p.m. All the implants examined had extremely pure surfaces. However, only one brand of implant had an ultraclean oxide surface in relation to the substrate.

  2. Immediately loaded mini dental implants as overdenture retainers: 1-Year cohort study of implant stability and peri-implant marginal bone level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šćepanović, Miodrag; Todorović, Aleksandar; Marković, Aleksa; Patrnogić, Vesna; Miličić, Biljana; Moufti, Adel M; Mišić, Tijana

    2015-05-01

    This 1-year cohort study investigated stability and peri-implant marginal bone level of immediately loaded mini dental implants used to retain overdentures. Each of 30 edentulous patients received 4 mini dental implants (1.8 mm × 13 mm) in the interforaminal mandibular region. The implants were immediately loaded with pre-made overdentures. Outcome measures included implant stability and bone resorption. Implant stability was measured using the Periotest Classic(®) device immediately after placement and on the 3rd and 6th weeks and the 4th, 6th and 12th months postoperatively. The peri-implant marginal bone level (PIBL) was evaluated at the implant's mesial and distal sides from the polished platform to the marginal crest. Radiographs were taken using a tailored film holder to reproducibly position the X-ray tube at the 6th week, 4th and 12th months postoperatively. The primary stability (Periotest value, PTV) measured -0.27 ± 3.41 on a scale of -8 to + 50 (lower PTV reflects higher stability). The secondary stability decreased significantly until week 6 (mean PTV = 7.61 ± 7.05) then increased significantly reaching (PTV = 6.17 ± 6.15) at 12 months. The mean PIBL measured -0.40 mm after 1 year of functional loading, with no statistically significant differences at the various follow-ups (p = 0.218). Mini dental implants placed into the interforaminal region could achieve a favorable primary stability for immediate loading. The follow-up Periotest values fluctuated, apparently reflecting the dynamics of bone remodeling, with the implants remaining clinically stable (98.3%) after 1 year of function. The 1-year bone resorption around immediately loaded MDIs is within the clinically acceptable range for standard implants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Dental problems in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioło, Anna; Mielnik-Błaszczak, Maria

    2004-01-01

    On the grounds of literature and own clinical experience, pathological changes in epilepitic patients have been described. Dental management procedures in these patients have also been presented. The unquestionable importance of prophylaxis, which may markedly minimize the impact of epilepsy on the incidence of mouth diseases, has been emphasised. It has also been stated that epileptic patients should receive specialised and integrated dental treatment.

  4. Computer-aided recognition of dental implants in X-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Pedro; Queirós, Sandro; Moreira, António H. J.; Ferreira, Adriano; Ferreira, Ernesto; Duque, Duarte; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    Dental implant recognition in patients without available records is a time-consuming and not straightforward task. The traditional method is a complete user-dependent process, where the expert compares a 2D X-ray image of the dental implant with a generic database. Due to the high number of implants available and the similarity between them, automatic/semi-automatic frameworks to aide implant model detection are essential. In this study, a novel computer-aided framework for dental implant recognition is suggested. The proposed method relies on image processing concepts, namely: (i) a segmentation strategy for semi-automatic implant delineation; and (ii) a machine learning approach for implant model recognition. Although the segmentation technique is the main focus of the current study, preliminary details of the machine learning approach are also reported. Two different scenarios are used to validate the framework: (1) comparison of the semi-automatic contours against implant's manual contours of 125 X-ray images; and (2) classification of 11 known implants using a large reference database of 601 implants. Regarding experiment 1, 0.97±0.01, 2.24±0.85 pixels and 11.12±6 pixels of dice metric, mean absolute distance and Hausdorff distance were obtained, respectively. In experiment 2, 91% of the implants were successfully recognized while reducing the reference database to 5% of its original size. Overall, the segmentation technique achieved accurate implant contours. Although the preliminary classification results prove the concept of the current work, more features and an extended database should be used in a future work.

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma and dental implants: A systematic review of case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelani, S; Rajkumar, E; Mary, G Geena; Khan, Parvez Ahmad; Gopal, Harish; Roy, Soumya; Maheswaran, T; Anand, B

    2015-08-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death world-wide. Apart from the most common etiopathological factors related to cancer, at times very rare causes such as irritant or foreign body induced carcinogenesis is not to be overlooked. To systematically review case reports concerned with the association between dental implants and oral squamous cell carcinoma. A Medline (PubMed), Cochrane database, and Google Scholar search was conducted of dental article published in English related to case reports concerned with oral squamous cell carcinoma occurring around dental implants from 2000 to 2014. Twenty articles were retrieved, which included 20 rare case reports which were systematically reviewed and the results were obtained pertaining to age, clinical symptoms, habits, previous history of cancer, potentially malignant disorders, systemic illness, and local factors. It is imperative to identify promptly persisting inflammation associated with implants. Since malignancy may disguise as periimplantitis, especially in patients who are at risk with contributing prominent predisposing factors.

  6. The impact of diabetes on the success of dental implants and periodontal healing

    OpenAIRE

    Loo, WTY; Jin, LJ; Cheung, MNB; Wang, M

    2009-01-01

    Dental implant is one of the restorative methods to replace missing teeth. As implants are directly anchored into bones, they provide stability, a more natural appearance, and minimize the risk of bone resorption and atrophy. However, studies found that diabetes mellitus patients had a slower healing process after surgery because of the reduction of vascular supply due to microangiopathies, decreased host defense, formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), reduction of collagen prod...

  7. A 2-year report on maxillary and mandibular fixed partial dentures supported by Astra Tech dental implants. A comparison of 2 implants with different surface textures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, U; Gotfredsen, K; Olsson, C

    1998-01-01

    In 50 partially edentulous patients, 133 (48 maxillary; 85 mandibular) Astra Tech dental implants of 2 different surface textures (machined; TiO-blasted) were alternately installed, supporting 52 fixed partial dentures (FPDs). Before abutment connection 2 machined implants (1 mandibular; 1...

  8. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Muhammed Shadid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability.

  9. Prevention and treatment of peri-implant diseases : Cleaning of titanium dental implant surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louropoulou, A.

    2017-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis assessed the effect of variable instruments on differed titanium dental implant surfaces. Furthermore, a clinical guideline was developed and recommendations are made regarding the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of peri-implant diseases. Air abrasive device

  10. Assessment of Myeloperoxidase and Nitric Levels around Dental Implants and Natural Teeth as a Marker of Inflammation: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Gayithri H; Jadhav, Prashant; Kulkarni, Kiran; Shinde, Sachin V; Patil, Yojana B; Kumar, Manish

    2016-11-01

    Dental implants form the mainstay of dental treatment involving rehabilitation of missing teeth. One of the major concerns for the clinicians doing dental implants is the postsurgical failure of dental implants. Success of dental implants is dependent upon the skills of the surgeon and the amount and quality of the bone remaining at the edentulous area where dental implant has to be placed. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and nitrites are few of the enzymes and molecules which are said to be altered in inflammation. However, their exact role in the inflammatory processes around natural tooth and dental implant is still unclear. Hence we comparatively evaluated the levels of MPO and nitrites in the areas around the dental implants and natural teeth. The present study comprises 42 patients who underwent prosthetic rehabilitation by dental implants from 2011 to 2014. Depth of probing value (DP), score of plaque index (SPI), gingival index (GI), and index of gingival bleeding time (GBT) were evaluated for the assessment of the periimplant soft tissue changes. Assessment of inflammation around the dental implant surface and around natural tooth was done based on the readings of these parameters. For the measurement of the MPO levels, spectrophotometric MPO assay was used. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. The mean plaque index values were 1.56 and 0.97 in periodontitis cases of natural teeth and inflamed cases of dental implants respectively. While comparing mean plaque index, mean probing depth, and mean gingival bleeding index in between the two groups, significant difference was obtained. Mean MPO concentration in periodontitis and gingivitis cases in natural teeth were 0.683 and 0.875 U/μL, while in inflamed dental implant cases, the mean value was 0.622 U/μL. While comparing the total MPO levels, total nitrite levels, and total nitrite concentration in between two study groups, significant difference was obtained

  11. The effect of mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants during healing abutment replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, J; Zenziper, E; Rosner, O; Kolerman, R; Chaushu, L; Chaushu, G

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue shrinkage during the course of restoring dental implants may result in biological and prosthodontic difficulties. This study was conducted to measure the continuous shrinkage of the mucosal cuff around dental implants following the removal of the healing abutment up to 60 s. Individuals treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures were included. Implant data--location, type, length, diameter and healing abutments' dimensions--were recorded. Mucosal cuff shrinkage, following removal of the healing abutments, was measured in bucco-lingual direction at four time points--immediately after 20, 40 and 60 s. anova was used to for statistical analysis. Eighty-seven patients (49 women and 38 men) with a total of 311 implants were evaluated (120 maxilla; 191 mandible; 291 posterior segments; 20 anterior segments). Two-hundred and five (66%) implants displayed thick and 106 (34%) thin gingival biotype. Time was the sole statistically significant parameter affecting mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants (P < 0.001). From time 0 to 20, 40 and 60 s, the mean diameter changed from 4.1 to 4.07, 3.4 and 2.81 mm, respectively. The shrinkage was 1%, 17% and 31%, respectively. The gingival biotype had no statistically significant influence on mucosal cuff shrinkage (P = 0.672). Time required replacing a healing abutment with a prosthetic element should be minimised (up to 20/40 s), to avoid pain, discomfort and misfit.

  12. Clinical, microbiological and radiographic considerations observed around dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Amaral Chiapinotto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periimplantitis is characterized by the inflammation of the soft tissues, bleeding, and suppuration, as well as rapid bone loss around dental implants that are in function. The lesion is associated with the presence of subgingival plaque, which contains a wide variety of Gram-negative anaerobic microorganisms. Objective: This review aimed to expose some clinical, microbiological and radiographic characteristics found in periodontal tissues and around dental implants. Literature review: Despite the anatomical differences between the periodontium and the tissues around implants, several studies have indicated some similarities, such as the production of inflammatory mediators and active microbiota. Conclusion: Regular maintenance and daily plaque control may be important factors in the long-term maintenance of implant-supported prostheses.

  13. Clinical evidence on titanium-zirconium dental implants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuna, P; Lucas-Taulé, E; Gargallo-Albiol, J; Figueras-Álvarez, O; Hernández-Alfaro, F; Nart, J

    2016-07-01

    The use of titanium implants is well documented and they have high survival and success rates. However, when used as reduced-diameter implants, the risk of fracture is increased. Narrow diameter implants (NDIs) of titanium-zirconium (Ti-Zr) alloy have recently been developed (Roxolid; Institut Straumann AG). Ti-Zr alloys (two highly biocompatible materials) demonstrate higher tensile strength than commercially pure titanium. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the existing clinical evidence on dental NDIs made from Ti-Zr. A systematic literature search was performed using the Medline database to find relevant articles on clinical studies published in the English language up to December 2014. Nine clinical studies using Ti-Zr implants were identified. Overall, 607 patients received 922 implants. The mean marginal bone loss was 0.36±0.06mm after 1 year and 0.41±0.09mm after 2 years. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 36 months. Mean survival and success rates were 98.4% and 97.8% at 1 year after implant placement and 97.7% and 97.3% at 2 years. Narrow diameter Ti-Zr dental implants show survival and success rates comparable to regular diameter titanium implants (>95%) in the short term. Long-term follow-up clinical data are needed to confirm the excellent clinical performance of these implants.

  14. Impact of dental implant insertion method on the peri-implant bone tissue: Experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatović Novak; Matić Smiljana; Tatić Zoran; Petković-Ćurčin Aleksandra; Vojvodić Danilo; Rakić Mia

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. The function of dental implants depends on their stability in bone tissue over extended period of time, i.e. on osseointegration. The process through which osseointegration is achieved depends on several factors, surgical insertion method being one of them. The aim of this study was to histopathologically compare the impact of the surgical method of implant insertion on the peri-implant bone tissue. Methods. The experiment was performed on 9 dogs. Eight weeks following t...

  15. Surface Modification of Titanium Dental Implants by Excimer Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Radnai, M; Bereznai, M.; Pelseczi, I.; Z. Toth; Turzo, K.; Bor, Z.; Fazekas, A

    2002-01-01

    The perfect osseointegration process of the dental implants depends among other factors on the surfact characteristics of the titanium. In this study enlarged mechanical roughness was produced by a laser-based technique, in order to decrease the healing period of the implant. There are different ways of forming laser induced surface structures. In the case of mask projection techniques the surface can be modified in larger areas and surface patterns. An ArF nanosecond excimer laser was use...

  16. On the mechanical integrity of retrieved dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the potential state of mechanical damage in used, albeit mechanically intact, dental implants, after their retrieval from the oral cavity because of progressive bone loss (peri-implantitis). 100 retrieved dental implants were characterized with no medical record made available prior to the analysis. The implants' composition, dimensions, and surface treatments were characterized using energy dispersive X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX). Each implant was thoroughly examined for signs of mechanical defects and damage. The implants represent a random combination of two materials, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) and commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti), surface treatments and geometries. Two kinds of surface defects were identified: crack-like defects and full cracks that were arbitrarily divided according to their length and appearance. We found that over 60% of the implants contained both crack-like defects and full cracks. In the retrieved sample, we observed that the CP-Ti implants contained more defects and cracks than the Ti-6Al-4V ones. For the various surface roughening treatments, a general correlation with the presence of defects was observed, but without a clear differentiation between the treatments. The high incidence of embedded particles among the observed defect further strengthens the role played by the particles upon defects generation, some of which later evolve into full cracks. It was also found that the dimensions of the implant (width and length) were not correlated with the observed defects, for this specific sample. Our observations indicate that early retrieval of biologically failed implants, many of which contain early signs of mechanical failure as shown here, does actually hinder the later occurrence of implant fracture. It seems that once biological complications will be successfully overcome, such defects might grow later into full cracks as a result of cyclic mastication

  17. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants' failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants' mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants' mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance.

  18. The Relationship between Biofilm and Physical-Chemical Properties of Implant Abutment Materials for Successful Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; de Assis Mollo, Francisco; Salih, Vehid

    2014-05-07

    The aim of this review was to investigate the relationship between biofilm and peri-implant disease, with an emphasis on the types of implant abutment surfaces. Individuals with periodontal disease typically have a large amount of pathogenic microorganisms in the periodontal pocket. If the individuals lose their teeth, these microorganisms remain viable inside the mouth and can directly influence peri-implant microbiota. Metal implants offer a suitable solution, but similarly, these remaining bacteria can adhere on abutment implant surfaces, induce peri-implantitis causing potential destruction of the alveolar bone near to the implant threads and cause the subsequent loss of the implant. Studies have demonstrated differences in biofilm formation on dental materials and these variations can be associated with both physical and chemical characteristics of the surfaces. In the case of partially edentulous patients affected by periodontal disease, the ideal type of implant abutments utilized should be one that adheres the least or negligible amounts of periodontopathogenic bacteria. Therefore, it is of clinically relevance to know how the bacteria behave on different types of surfaces in order to develop new materials and/or new types of treatment surfaces, which will reduce or inhibit adhesion of pathogenic microorganisms, and, thus, restrict the use of the abutments with indication propensity for bacterial adhesion.

  19. The Relationship between Biofilm and Physical-Chemical Properties of Implant Abutment Materials for Successful Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Dorigatti de Avila

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to investigate the relationship between biofilm and peri-implant disease, with an emphasis on the types of implant abutment surfaces. Individuals with periodontal disease typically have a large amount of pathogenic microorganisms in the periodontal pocket. If the individuals lose their teeth, these microorganisms remain viable inside the mouth and can directly influence peri-implant microbiota. Metal implants offer a suitable solution, but similarly, these remaining bacteria can adhere on abutment implant surfaces, induce peri-implantitis causing potential destruction of the alveolar bone near to the implant threads and cause the subsequent loss of the implant. Studies have demonstrated differences in biofilm formation on dental materials and these variations can be associated with both physical and chemical characteristics of the surfaces. In the case of partially edentulous patients affected by periodontal disease, the ideal type of implant abutments utilized should be one that adheres the least or negligible amounts of periodontopathogenic bacteria. Therefore, it is of clinically relevance to know how the bacteria behave on different types of surfaces in order to develop new materials and/or new types of treatment surfaces, which will reduce or inhibit adhesion of pathogenic microorganisms, and, thus, restrict the use of the abutments with indication propensity for bacterial adhesion.

  20. Fracaso en los implantes dentales: Fibrointegración. Reporte de caso clínico

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    Iris Luz Santís Chamorro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available  ResumenLa rehabilitación con implantes dentales en los pacientes con edentulismo parcial o total posee amplias indicaciones que se ven limitadas por factores anatómicos y biológicos. La oseointegración surge como un hecho descubierto entre la adaptación biológica del hueso a la superficie del titanio del implante (interfase hueso-implante por lo que se afirma que el motivo de fracaso de la mayoría de los sistemas de implantes es que éstos se encapsulen en un tejido de cicatrización fibroso (fibrointegración mal diferenciado lo que crea movilidad, que lleva a reacciones en la mucosa y finalmente a la pérdida. El objetivo del presente artículo es promover la presentación de casos clínicos de pacientes con fracaso de implantes dentales, con el ánimo de esclarecer las posibles causas y los factores coadyuvantes de dicho fracaso, y así mejorar los resultados en implantología. (Duazary 2008; 115-120AbstractThe rehabilitation with dental implants in the patients with partial absence or total of teeth possesses extensive indications that are seen limited by biological and anatomical factors. The oseointegration arises like a discovered fact among the biological adaptation of the bone to the surface of the titanic of the implant (interface bone-implant for which it is affirmed that the motive of failure of the majority of the systems of implants is that these it self envelop in a scar formation of fibrous tissue (Fibrointegration badly differentiated what creates mobility, that carries to reactions in the mucous membrane and finally to the loss. The objective of the present article is to promote the presentation of patients' clinical cases with failure of dental implants, with the intention of clarifying the possible reasons and the helping factors of the above mentioned failure, and this way to improve the results in implantology.Key Words: Fibrointegration; oseointegration; dentals implants; interface; implants failure.

  1. Clinical Management of Implant Prostheses in Patients with Bruxism

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    Osamu Komiyama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is general agreement that excessive stress to the bone-implant interface may result in implant overload and failure. Early failure of the implant due to excessive loading occurs shortly after uncovering the implant. Excess load on a final restoration after successful implant integration can result in physical failure of the implant structure. Many clinicians believe that overload of dental implants is a risk factor for vertical peri-implant bone loss and/or may be detrimental for the suprastructure in implant prostheses. It has been documented that occlusal parafunction, such as, bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching affects the outcome of implant prostheses, but there is no evidence for a causal relation between the failures and overload of dental implants. In spite of this lack of evidence, often metal restorations are preferred instead of porcelain for patients in whom bruxism is presumed on the basis of tooth wear. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of the occlusal scheme used in implant restorations for implant longevity and to suggest a clinical approach and occlusal materials for implant prostheses in order to prevent complications related to bruxism.

  2. Clinical Management of Implant Prostheses in Patients with Bruxism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Osamu; Lobbezoo, Frank; De Laat, Antoon; Iida, Takashi; Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kato, Takao; Kawara, Misao

    2012-01-01

    There is general agreement that excessive stress to the bone-implant interface may result in implant overload and failure. Early failure of the implant due to excessive loading occurs shortly after uncovering the implant. Excess load on a final restoration after successful implant integration can result in physical failure of the implant structure. Many clinicians believe that overload of dental implants is a risk factor for vertical peri-implant bone loss and/or may be detrimental for the suprastructure in implant prostheses. It has been documented that occlusal parafunction, such as, bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) affects the outcome of implant prostheses, but there is no evidence for a causal relation between the failures and overload of dental implants. In spite of this lack of evidence, often metal restorations are preferred instead of porcelain for patients in whom bruxism is presumed on the basis of tooth wear. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of the occlusal scheme used in implant restorations for implant longevity and to suggest a clinical approach and occlusal materials for implant prostheses in order to prevent complications related to bruxism. PMID:22701484

  3. Clinical analysis of Dental Implantation on the patients with periodontitis%牙周炎患者种植手术的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程广标

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effectiveness of dental implantation on periodontitis. Methods:92 patients with periodontitis were divided into treatment group and control group with 46 patients each group. Control group was treated with routine denture repair treatment. Treatment group were treated by therapeutics of denture planting. The curative effects were observed. Results:The total effective rate of periodontitis treatment was significantly higher than that of control group(P<0.05). The differences were significant in both periodontitis symptoms disappearance time and masticatory function recovery time(P<0.05). Conclusions:Denture cultivation method could effectively improve the effectiveness of treatment;reduce the function recovery time. It is worthy of studying further.%目的:探讨义齿种植手术治疗牙周炎症的临床疗效。方法:选取92例牙周炎患者,将其随机分成对照组、观察组,各46例,对照组给予常规的义齿的修复治疗方案,观察组给予义齿的种植治疗方案,观察两组患者牙周炎的治疗效果。结果:牙周炎治疗效果总有效率观察组明显高于对照组(P<0.05);两组患者牙周炎症状消失时间、咀嚼功能恢复正常所需时间比较,均有显著性差异(P<0.05)。结论:采用义齿种植的方法可以有效提高牙周炎治疗的有效率,缩短患者的恢复时间,值得对其进行进一步研究。

  4. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. Method From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Results Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants. PMID:26696528

  5. Knowledge and awareness of dental implants among elderly people in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjcic, Josip; Mikus, Anja; Mehulic, Ketij; Vojvodic, Denis

    2015-01-01

    The use of inserted dental implants is growing every day in order to improve retention and stability of complete removable dental prostheses (RDPs), especially in the mandible. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the knowledge and awareness of dental implants among elderly people wearing complete RDPs. This study, based on answers from a questionnaire designed for the purpose of this study, included 301 participants wearing complete RDPs from elderly care homes with average age of 74 years. The awareness of dental implants was statistically significantly (p dental implants (56.5%; p dental implants (56.1%; p dental implants (59.4%; p dental implants (82.4%; p dental implants, this did not mean they were well informed about the implant insertion procedure and the costs for such a treatment. In conclusion, awareness of dental implants in studied participants was insufficient. The results reinforce the need for better education and the provision of proper information to elderly people about dental implants and implant treatment options. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Assessment of the Survival of Dental Implants in Irradiated Jaws Following Treatment of Oral Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Meenakshi Chauhan; Solanki, Swati; Pujari, Sudarshan C; Shaw, Eisha; Sharma, Swati; Anand, Abhishek; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients undergoing head and neck surgery for various pathologic conditions, implants are one of the best restorative options and are increasing widely used. Therefore, we evaluated the success of dental implants in the irradiated jaws of patients following treatment of oral cancer oral cancer treated patients. Materials and Methods: Data of oral cancer treated patients was collected retrospectively from 2002 to 2008. We took 46 oral cancer treated patients in which implants were placed in irradiated jaws for rehabilitation. Results: It was found that out of 162 dental implants placed, 52 failed. Furthermore, there was no variation in the implant survival rate in between both the jaws. Radiation dose of esthetics and quality of life of cancer treated patients. PMID:27843270

  7. 高龄老年患者人工牙种植术的围手术期护理%Perioperation period care of elderly patients with artificial dental implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫琦玮; 李红梅; 王懿

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss essential aspects in the clinical cooperation and care in artificial tooth implantation for the elderly patients, so as to improve the success rate of dental implant surgery for the elderly patients. Method: Given the distinct physical and psychological changes of the elderly patients, sufficient pre-operative preparation were made and intranperative appropriate co-ordination strategies were applied, followed by correct post-operative oral care measures. Results: After a follow-up observation period, varying from 3 months to 2 years in different cases, 50 elderly patients in experimental groups with dental plantation were all found to have good osseointegration without any complications such as implant abscission or ngivitis. Conclusion: The combination of application of the minimally implantation technology, careful nursing during all pre-operative, intranperative and post-operative stages could prevent infections of incisional wound, promote wound healing, and therefore improve the success rate of dental implant surgeries for the elderly patients.%目的:探讨高龄患者人工牙种植术临床配合与护理要点,提高老年种植牙手术的成功率.方法:根据老年生理改变及心理变化的特点,在术前做好充分准备,术中采取相应的配合和术后正确的口腔护理措施.结果:本组50例老年种植牙患者种植后,经随访3个月~2年,均形成良好的骨结合,无种植体脱落及牙龈炎等并发症.结论:采用微创种植技术,对老年种植患者术前、术中、术后三个阶段实施精心护理,避免了切口感染,促进切口愈合,提高了老年种植牙手术的成功率.

  8. Localized ridge augmentation using autogenous block bone graft followed by dental implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K V Prabhakara Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The placement of endosseous dental implants is often hampered by unfavourable anatomy of the alveolar bone. Most frequently patients lose their teeth due to alveolar bone loss, tooth extraction; trauma and long term use of removable appliances tend to lose the bone making it difficult for the placement of implant in an optimal prosthetic position. The loss of width of the residual alveolar ridge necessitated measures which could refurbish the lost dimensions. Here we report the successful management of such a condition wherein placement of implant was made possible by placement of autogenous bone block graft obtained from the mandibular symphysis region and predictable osseointegration thus achieved.

  9. Dental implants in persons with severe epilepsy and multiple disabilities: a long-term retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cune, Marco S; Strooker, Hans; van der Reijden, Willy A; de Putter, Cornelis; Laine, Maria L; Verhoeven, Jan Willem

    2009-01-01

    A retrospective study on the performance of endosseous implants in a population of patients with severe epilepsy and additional motor and/or intellectual impairments was performed. All residents of an inpatient center for persons affected by severe, refractory epilepsy and multiple disabilities who received endosseous implants between 1991 and April 2007 were included in the study. Implant survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. A subset of patients who were treated between 1991 and 2004 was invited to participate in a clinical and radio?graphic evaluation in 2004 and 2005. A total of 61 patients were treated between 1991 and April 2007 (n=134 implants). Three of these implants in three different patients failed during the observation period, demonstrating an estimated probability of functional implant survival of 97.6% (SE 1.4%) after 16 years. In patients who were seen during the clinical evaluation in 2004 (n=76 implants), only mild inflammation of the peri-implant mucosa was generally observed (Gingival-Bleeding Index=1), despite the fact that the level of oral hygiene was considered inadequate around 55 of 76 implants (72%). Obvious signs of drug-induced gingival hyperplasia in relation to the implants were not observed. Probing depths averaged approximately 2 mm. Stable marginal bone levels were observed on the radiographs. Dental implant treatment in a population of patients with severe epilepsy and additional disabilities seems to be a viable treatment option. Implant loss is rare. Although adequate plaque control was not feasible in all patients, marginal bone levels remained stable.

  10. Mechanical assessment of grit blasting surface treatments of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of surface preparation treatments of dental implants on their potential (mechanical) fatigue failure, with emphasis on grit-blasting. The investigation includes limited fatigue testing of implants, showing the relationship between fatigue life and surface damage condition. Those observations are corroborated by a detailed failure analysis of retrieved fracture dental implants. In both cases, the negative effect of embedded alumina particles related to the grit-blasting process is identified. The study also comprises a numerical simulation part of the grit blasting process that reveals, for a given implant material and particle size, the existence of a velocity threshold, below which the rough surface is obtained without damage, and beyond which the creation of significant surface damage will severely reduce the fatigue life, thus increasing fracture probability. The main outcome of this work is that the overall performance of dental implants comprises, in addition to the biological considerations, mechanical reliability aspects. Fatigue fracture is a central issue, and this study shows that uncontrolled surface roughening grit-blasting treatments can induce significant surface damage which accelerate fatigue fracture under certain conditions, even if those treatments are beneficial to the osseointegration process.

  11. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciù, M.; Cervino, G.; Bramanti, E.; Lauritano, F.; Lo Gudice, G.; Scappaticci, L.; Rapparini, A.; Guglielmino, E.; Risitano, G.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  12. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cicciù

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results.

  13. Comparison of Clinical, Radiographic, and Immunologic Inflammatory Parameters around Crestally and Subcrestally Placed Dental Implants: 5-Year Retrospective Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, Mohammad D; Alfadda, Sara A; Labban, Nawaf Y; Alasqah, Mohammed N; Alshehri, Fahad A; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz S

    2017-09-28

    To compare changes in clinical (bleeding on probing [BOP] and probing pocket depth [PPD]), radiographic (crestal bone loss [CBL]), and immunologic inflammatory (interleukin-1beta [IL-1β] and matrix metalloproteinase-9 [MMP-9]) parameters around crestally and subcrestally placed dental implants 5 years after implant placement. Fifty-two patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (n = 27): patients with single implants placed approximately 2 mm below the alveolar crest; group 2 (n = 25): patients with single implants placed at bone level. In both groups, peri-implant BOP, PPD, and CBL were measured, and levels of IL-1β and MMP-9 were determined in duplicates using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Full-mouth debridement was performed biannually in both groups. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test (significance set at p implant placement, respectively. The mean CBL was 1.2 ± 0.2 mm and 1.4 ± 0.2 mm in groups 1 and 2, respectively. There was no significant difference in mean BOP, PPD, CBL and in levels of IL-1β, and MMP-9 among implants in both groups. Clinical, radiographic, and immunologic inflammatory parameters are comparable around crestally and subcrestally placed single dental implants up to 5 years after placement. The depth of implant placement appears to have no effect on clinical status and performance of single dental implants. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. The Ukrainian Dental Market: Characteristics of Demand for Services in the Segment of Dental Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slipchenko Tetiana O.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at analyzing the market for dental services in Ukraine in the implantology segment, studying the demand factors for these services and developing a system of measures to manage the demand for dental implantation services. It has been proven that the market for dental services according to a complex of its attributes is more in line with the type of market of monopolistic competition. One of the promising ways of developing the dental market is to transform producers of dental services into the vertically integrated holdings. As one of the specific features of the dental services market is allocated the asymmetry of information, which leads to a conflict between the medical and economic interests of dentists. The price and non-price factors of demand for dental implantation services were determined, the prime cost structure of a dental service was analyzed. The characteristic attributes of a medical service have been defined as consistently defined actions or a complex of actions by medical personnel aimed at prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation, which have a self-contained complete meaning and a certain price.

  15. Comparison of two multiaxial fatigue models applied to dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM. Ayllon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two multiaxial fatigue life prediction models applied to a commercial dental implant. One model is called Variable Initiation Length Model and takes into account both the crack initiation and propagation phases. The second model combines the Theory of Critical Distance with a critical plane damage model to characterise the initiation and initial propagation of micro/meso cracks in the material. This paper discusses which material properties are necessary for the implementation of these models and how to obtain them in the laboratory from simple test specimens. It also describes the FE models developed for the stress/strain and stress intensity factor characterisation in the implant. The results of applying both life prediction models are compared with experimental results arising from the application of ISO-14801 standard to a commercial dental implant.

  16. Persistent idiopathic facial pain following dental implant placement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queral-Godoy, Elena; Vazquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2006-01-01

    The present case report depicts the management of a patient with persistent idiopathic facial pain following the placement of 2 dental implants in the mandibular anterior alveolar ridge. After 15 months of unsuccessful diagnosis and management, the patient was seen at the Orofacial Pain Unit of the Oral Surgery and Implantology master's degree program of the University of Barcelona. Seven months after treatment onset, a combination of nortriptyline, clonazepam, and relaxation procedures has successfully controlled the patient's facial pain symptoms.

  17. Economic evaluation of single-tooth replacement: dental implant versus fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younhee; Park, Joo-Yeon; Park, Sun-Young; Oh, Sung-Hee; Jung, YeaJi; Kim, Ji-Min; Yoo, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Seong-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of a dental implant compared with a three-unit tooth-supported fixed partial denture (FPD) for the replacement of a single tooth in 2010. A decision tree was developed to estimate cost-effectiveness over a 10-year period. The survival rates of single-tooth implants and FPDs were extracted from a meta-analysis of single-arm studies. Medical costs included initial treatment costs, maintenance costs, and costs to treat complications. Patient surveys were used to obtain the costs of the initial single-tooth implant or FPD. Maintenance costs and costs to treat complications were based on surveys of seven clinical experts at dental clinics or hospitals. Transportation costs were calculated based on the number of visits for implant or FPD treatment. Patient time costs were estimated using the number of visits and time required, hourly wage, and employment rate. Future costs were discounted by 5% to convert to present values. The results of a 10-year period model showed that a single dental implant cost US $261 (clinic) to $342 (hospital) more than an FPD and had an average survival rate that was 10.4% higher. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $2,514 in a clinic and $3,290 in a hospital for a prosthesis in situ for 10 years. The sensitivity analysis showed that initial treatment costs and survival rate influenced the cost-effectiveness. If the cost of an implant were reduced to 80% of the current cost, the implant would become the dominant intervention. Although the level of evidence for effectiveness is low, and some aspects of single-tooth implants or FPDs, such as satisfaction, were not considered, this study will help patients requiring single-tooth replacement to choose the best treatment option.

  18. A 5-year retrospective study on Replace Select Tapered dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Pelle; Sennerby, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Long-term data regarding survival and crestal bone loss for Replace Select Tapered implants (Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) are lacking. The study aims to present the 5-year outcomes from a retrospective analysis of Replace Select Tapered implants placed and restored in consecutive patients. A total of 88 consecutive patients (32 male, 56 female, mean age 65 ± 12 years) treated by one clinician (PP) were clinically and radiographically evaluated during at least 5 years of function. A total of 271 dental implants (Replace Select Tapered, Nobel Biocare AB) with an oxidized surface (TiUnite, Nobel Biocare AB) had been placed in both jaws (228 in the maxilla, 43 in the mandible). The majority of implants were placed in healed sites (n = 244), while 27 implants were immediately placed in extraction sockets. The majority of implants (n = 262) healed for 3 to 4 months prior to loading, and nine implants were immediately loaded. A total of 121 implant-supported restorations were delivered; 42 single tooth replacements, 61 fixed partial bridges, 14 fixed full bridges, and 4 fixed partial implant-tooth connected bridges. The marginal bone level was measured in intraoral radiographs taken after surgery (baseline), and after 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years. Fifty-one patients with 160 implants were followed throughout the study. One implant failed at healing abutment connection 4 months after insertion, resulting in a cumulative survival rate of 99.6%. The average crestal bone loss was 0.9 ± 1.6 mm after 1 year and 0.1 mm ± 2.4 after 5 years. There were 14.8% of measured implants that showed more than 2 mm and 5.2% more than 3 mm bone loss after 5 years, with no progression since the 1-year examination. One patient (2.0%) treated with six implants presented with significant crestal bone loss and recurrent peri-implant purulent infections at all implants. The present retrospective 5-year study showed high survival rate and steady crestal bone

  19. Initial Stability Study of Calcium Phosphate Coated Dental Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Thin film of biodegradable calcium phosphate coated on threaded commercially pure titanium( cp- Ti) dental implants has been investigated as one of alternatives to eliminate the problem of the long-term instability of plasma sprayed HA coated implants. In order to compare in-vivo hone-to-implant response behavior among as-machined, HA coated and CMP coated groups, each group was implanted into New Zealand white mature male rabbits for 2 and 6 weeks, and then in- vivo biological behavior was examined in terms of H&E staining. Initial stability and removable torques of implants were compared among three groups. Measured removable torque of CMP coated specimen at 6 wceks after implantation was significantly higher than that of non-coated group, but slightly lower than that of HA coated group, without any inflammatory response at the surrounding of the implants. The initial stability (ISQ value; implant stability quotient ) of CMP coated specimen at 2 weeks after implantation was slightly lower than that of HA coated group and significantly higher than that of non-coated group. However, after 6 weeks, ISQ value of CMP coated group was slightly higher than that of HA coated group and significantly higher than that of non-coated group.

  20. Nanotechnology Approaches for Better Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Tomsia, Antoni P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Lee, Janice S.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The combined requirements imposed by the enormous scale and overall complexity of designing new implants or complete organ regeneration are well beyond the reach of present technology in many dimensions, including nanoscale, as we do not yet have the basic knowledge required to achieve these goals. The need for a synthetic implant to address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the choice of suitable materials. There is a strong belief that nanoscale mate...

  1. Design optimization of a radial functionally graded dental implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichim, Paul I; Hu, Xiaozhi; Bazen, Jennifer J; Yi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use FEA to test the hypothesis that a low-modulus coating of a cylindrical zirconia dental implant would reduce the stresses in the peri-implant bone and we use design optimization and the rule of mixture to estimate the elastic modulus and the porosity of the coating that provides optimal stress shielding. We show that a low-modulus coating of a dental implant significantly reduces the maximum stresses in the peri-implant bone without affecting the average stresses thus creating a potentially favorable biomechanical environment. Our results suggest that a resilient coating is capable of reducing the maximum compressive and tensile stresses in the peri-implant bone by up to 50% and the average stresses in the peri-implant bone by up to 15%. We further show that a transitional gradient between the high-modulus core and the low-modulus coating is not necessary and for a considered zirconia/HA composite the optimal thickness of the coating is 100 µ with its optimal elastic at the lowest value considered of 45 GPa. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Did we push dental ceramics too far? A brief history of ceramic dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubenreich, James E; Robinson, Fonda G; West, Karen P; Frazer, Robert Q

    2005-01-01

    Humankind has developed and used ceramics throughout history. It currently has widespread industrial applications. Dental ceramics are used for fabricating highly esthetic prosthetic denture teeth, crowns, and inlays. However, ceramic's biocompatibility and compressive strength are offset by its hardness and brittleness. Nonetheless, a single crystal sapphire aluminum oxide endosseous implant was developed in 1972 as an alternative to metal. It was more esthetic than its metallic counterparts and was eventually produced in a variety of shapes and sizes. Clinical studies demonstrated its excellent soft and hard tissue biocompatibility, yet the range of problems included fractures during surgery, fractures after loading, mobility, infection, pain, bone loss, and lack of osseointegration. Ultimately, single crystal sapphire implants fell into irredeemable disfavor because of its poor impact strength, and dentists and surgeons eventually turned to other implant materials. However, bioactive ceramic coatings on metal implants have kept ceramics as a key component in dental implantology.

  3. Scapular Free Vascularised Bone Flaps for Mandibular Reconstruction: Are Dental Implants Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lanzer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Free fibula flap remains the flap of choice for reconstruction of mandibular defects. If free fibula flap is not possible, the subscapular system of flaps is a valid option. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of dental implant placement in patients receiving a scapular free flap for oromandibular reconstruction. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients undergoing mandible reconstruction with a subscapular system free-tissue (lateral border of the scapula transfer at the University Hospital Zürich between January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2013. Bone density in cortical and cancellous bone was measured in Hounsfield units (HU. Changes of bone density, height and width were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22. Comparisons of bone dimensions as well as bone density were performed using a chi-square test. Results: Ten patients were included. Implantation was conducted in 50%. However, all patients could have received dental implants considering bone stock. Loss of bone height and width were significant (P < 0.001. There was a statistical significant increase in bone density in cortical (P < 0.001 and cancellous (P = 0.004 bone. Conclusions: Dental implants are possible after scapular free flap reconstruction of oromandibular defects. Bone height and width were reduced, while bone density increased with time.

  4. Nursing care for hypertension patients in the perioperative period of dental implantation%高血压患者种植手术的围手术期护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翀; 刘欣

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨高血压患者种植手术的围手术期护理方法。方法:回顾我院种植中心从2012年12月到2014年12月接受种植手术的高血压患者87例,根据患者的术前血压分级情况给予围手术期护理。同时跟踪调查。结果:在术后12天拆线时,患者伤口均愈合良好,术后3~6个月行二期手术时, X线片显示种植体均形成良好的骨结合。结论:采用术前服用降压药进行控制性降压并给予一定的心理辅导,术中心电监护,术后针对性护理,可提高高血压患者种植手术的安全性。高血压作为种植手术的非适应症,今年来随着种植手术的开展,患者量逐年增多,本文旨在为提高高血压患者的手术安全开展提高参考。%Objective: To explore the targeted nursing for hypertension patients in the perioperative period of dental implantation. Method: To review Implant Center in our hospital since December 2012 from De-cember 2014 to accept the implant surgery in 87 patients with hypertension, according to patients be-fore surgery blood pressure grades circumstances give perioperative care. While tracking survey. Re-sults: When stitches after 12 days, the patients wound healed well, when after 3 to 6 months the line second stage surgery, X-ray films showed good form implants are osseointegration. Conclusion:Using preoperative blood pressure medication were induced hypotension and give some psychological counsel-ing, intraoperative electrocardiographic monitoring, targeted postoperative care, patients with hyperten-sion implant surgery can improve safety. As a non-hypertensive implant surgery indications, this year with implant surgery carried out, the patient volume increased year by year, this paper aims to improve surgical safety in patients with hypertension conduct awareness reference.

  5. Intricate Assessment and Evaluation of Effect of Bruxism on Long-term Survival and Failure of Dental Implants: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Kajal; Nagpal, Abhishek; Agarwal, S K; Kochhar, Aarti

    2016-08-01

    Dental implants are one of the common lines of treatment used for the treatment of missing tooth. Various risk factors are responsible for the failure of the dental implants and occurrence of postoperative complications. Bruxism is one such factor responsible for the failure of the dental implants. The actual relation between bruxism and dental implants is a subject of long-term controversy. Hence, we carried out this retrospective analysis to assess the complications occurring in dental implants in patients with and without bruxism. The present study included 1100 patients which were treated for rehabilitation by dental implant procedure at 21 dental offices of Ghaziabad (India) from 2004 to 2014. Analyzing the clinical records of the patients along with assessing the photographs of the patients was done for confirming the diagnosis of bruxism. Clinical re-evaluation of the patients, who came back for follow-up, was done to confirm the diagnosis of bruxism. Systemic questionnaires as used by previous workers were used to evaluate the patients about the self-conscience of the condition. Estimation of the mechanical complications was done only in those cases which occurred on the surfaces of the restoration of the dental implants. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Student's t-test and Pearson's chi-square test were used to evaluate the level of significance. In both bruxer and non-bruxers, maximum number of dental implants was placed in anterior maxillary region. Significant difference was obtained while comparing the two groups for dimensions of the dental implants used. On comparing the total implant failed cases between bruxers and non-bruxers group, statistically significant result was obtained. Statistically significant difference was obtained while comparing the two study groups based on the health parameters, namely hypertension, diabetes, and smoking habit. Success of dental implant is significantly

  6. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF ATROPHIC MAXILLA FOR INSERTION OF ENDOSSEOUS DENTAL IMPLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Žerdoner

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alveolar process atrophy is a physiological process in edentulous patients that may heavily compromise the succes of dental prosthetic rehabilitation. This is particulary important for insertion of endosseous implants. Because of the direct vicinity of maxillary sinuses, implantation is often impossible without previous pre-prosthetic surgical intervention.Methods. Two types of pre-prosthetic surgical procedures are described and their relative advantages are discussed. An illustrative case report is presented, describing the patient’s problems, his treatment and clinical outcome.Conclusions. In cases when maxillary alveolar process atrophy is so severe that insertion of dental implants is impossible, surgical correction with sinus floor lift is necessary. In our institution, the results of this procedure are good. Good quality of the antral mucosa and normal anatomic shape of the maxillary sinuses are two prerequisites for its success.

  7. PET/MR imaging of head/neck in the presence of dental implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes; Beyer, Thomas; Keller, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Aim: In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC (MR-AC). We evaluate the accuracy of MR-AC in PET/MR in patients with metallic dental...... void. Conclusion: Metallic dental work causes severe MR signal voids and PET/MR artifacts that exceed the actual implant volume. The resulting bias in AC-PET is severe in regions in and near the signal voids. Notably, the bias is present also in areas further away from the implants. In selected cases...... this bias may markedly affect regions used commonly as reference for kinetic modeling. Artifacts and bias can be corrected to a first degree by inpainting with soft tissue prior to MR-AC....

  8. Patient Discomfort Following Single-Tooth Implant Placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spin-Neto, Rubens; Pontes, Ana Emília Farias; Wenzel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Evaluate postoperative discomfort (pain, bleeding and swelling) in single-tooth implant patients submitted to immediate or conventional tooth restoration together with assessment of treatment time. Methods: Twenty-four patients who received single-tooth maxillary dental implants were randomly...... assigned to an IR (Immediate Restoration) or CR (Conventional Restoration) group. In IR, an implant was inserted and a provisional tooth crown was delivered within the same session, while in CR it was delivered three months after implantation. Pain (first three days), bleeding (first day) and swelling...

  9. The impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible: a before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, A M; Ferrero, A; Brunton, P; Goodwin, M; Horner, K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible, using a "before-after" study design. Eight dental practitioners, who regularly place dental implants in independent dental practice in the North West of England, were presented with realistic simulations of four edentulous cases. The practitioners were asked to assess case difficulty, select implants and then drill osteotomies in preparation for dental implants in the lower canine regions to support a complete overdenture. In the "before" part of the study, a panoramic and a trans-symphyseal view were available. In the "after" part of the study, a CBCT image was added. Perception of case difficulty, implant selection and the incidence of perforations or "near miss perforations" of the lingual cortical plate were recorded. Two cases were regarded as "regular" and two as "challenging". In challenging cases, the availability of CBCT led practitioners to select narrower implants and to assess cases as more difficult. In the challenging cases only, there were fewer perforations of the lingual cortical plate after the availability of CBCT, but this difference was not statistically significant. There were no perforations in the regular cases either before or after the availability of CBCT. Perception of case difficulty and implant selection are of importance only if they change the outcome for the patient. This study provided weak evidence that CBCT is helpful in avoiding perforations in challenging cases. The availability of CBCT had no impact in regular cases.

  10. Basis of bone metabolism around dental implants during osseointegration and peri-implant bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Angel; Monje, Alberto; Wang, Hom-Lay; Miron, Richard J

    2017-07-01

    Despite the growing number of publications in the field of implant dentistry, there are limited studies to date investigating the biology and metabolism of bone healing around dental implants and their implications in peri-implant marginal bone loss. The aim of this review article is to provide a thorough understanding of the biological events taking place during osseointegration and the subsequent early and late phases of bone remodeling around dental implants. An update on the coupling mechanism occurring during bone resorption-bone remodeling is provided, focused on the relevance of the osteocytes, bone lining cells and immune cells during bone maintenance. An electronic and manual literature search was conducted by three independent reviewers in several databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases for articles up to September 2016 with no language restriction. Local bone metabolism is subject to signals from systemic calcium-phosphate homeostasis and bone remodeling. Three areas of interest were reviewed due to recent reported compromises in bone healing including the putative effects of (1) cholesterol, (2) hyperlipidemia, and (3) low vitamin D intake. Moreover, the prominent influence of osteocytes and immune cells is discussed as being key regulators during dental implant osseointegration and maintenance. These cells are of crucial importance in the presence of biofilm accumulation and their associated byproducts that leads to hard and soft tissue breakdown; the so called peri-implantitis. Factors that could negatively impact osteoclastogenesis or osteal macrophage activation should be monitored in future research including implant placement/torque protocols, bone characteristics, as well as meticulous maintenance programs to favor osseointegration and future long-term stability and success of dental implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res

  11. Novel nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating for dental and orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huinan; Jiang, Wenping; Malshe, Ajay

    2009-09-01

    A novel hybrid coating process, combining NanoSpray® (built on electrostatic spray coating) technology with microwave sintering process, was developed for synthesizing hydroxyapatite- (HA-) based nanostructured coating with favorable properties for dental and orthopedic implants. Specifically, HA nanoparticles were deposited on commercially pure titanium substrates using NanoSpray technique to produce the HA coating, which was then sintered in a microwave furnace under controlled conditions. The study showed that the use of NanoSpray followed by microwave sintering results in nanoscale HA coating for dental/orthopedic application.

  12. Bioceramic in dental implants: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav P Jayaswal; Dange, S. P.; Khalikar, A. N.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials are non-drug substance suitable for inclusion in system which augment or replace the function of bodily tissue or organ. Orthopedic and dental applications represent approximately 55% of the total biomaterials market. Changes in biologic responses and device design have been the direct result of advances in material science. Bioceramics fulfill a unique function as biomedical materials. Bioceramics are non-toxic and bioinert, bioactive or bioresorbable. Bioceramics continue to be...

  13. Placement of dental implants in the maxillary tuberosity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, L F dT P; da Silva, V F; Santiago, J F; Panzarini, S R; Pellizzer, E P

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify clinical studies on implants placed in the tuberosity region to determine the survival rate of these implants when compared to implants placed in other regions of the maxilla. A search for data published up until March 2014 was undertaken using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and ScienceDirect databases. Eligible studies were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The first database search revealed 310 titles. After inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, five studies remained for the detailed analysis. A total of 113 patients were followed for a period of 6-144 months; 289 implants were placed in the patients evaluated. There were eight failures/losses of dental implants in the tuberosity region; the overall survival rate was 94.63% for these implants. In controlled studies, the cumulative survival rates for implants placed in the maxillary tuberosity and other maxillary regions were 96.1% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, implants placed into the maxillary tuberosity are a predictable alternative for the treatment of patients with insufficient bone volume in the maxillary region. However, randomized trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of this treatment.

  14. Replacement of hopeless retained primary teeth by immediate dental implants: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rafael R; Macedo, Guilherme O; Muglia, Valdir A; Souza, Sérgio L S; Novaes, Arthur B; Taba, Mário

    2009-01-01

    Hopeless retained primary teeth without permanent successors represent a restorative challenge for clinicians, along with esthetic and functional problems for patients. While various treatment approaches for congenitally missing teeth have been proposed, the replacement of a missing tooth with a dental implant offers specific advantages, such as preservation of the alveolar crest and elimination of the need to restore the adjacent teeth, over other options for tooth replacement. The aim of this article was to illustrate the surgical and prosthetic treatment with implants of a patient with primary teeth without permanent successors.

  15. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Shemtov-Yona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants’ failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants’ mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants’ mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance.

  16. Topographic characterisation of dental implants for commercial use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Arnau, Amparo; Vallecillo-Capilla, Manuel-Francisco; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel-Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Background To characterize the surface topography of several dental implants for commercial use. Material and Methods Dental implants analyzed were Certain (Biomet 3i), Tissue Level (Straumann), Interna (BTI), MG-InHex (MozoGrau), SPI (Alphabio) and Hikelt (Bioner). Surface topography was ascertained using a confocal microscope with white light. Roughness parameters obtained were: Ra, Rq, Rv, Rp, Rt, Rsk and Rku. The results were analysed using single-factor ANOVA and Student-Neuman-Keuls(p<0.05) tests. Results Certain and Hikelt obtained the highest Ra and Rq scores, followed by Tissue Level. Interna and SPI obtained lower scores, and MG-InHex obtained the lowest score. Rv scores followed the same trend. Certain obtained the highest Rp score, followed by SPI and Hikelt, then Interna and Tissue Level. MG-InHex obtained the lowest scores. Certain obtained the highest Rt score, followed by Interna and Hikelt, then SPI and Tissue Level. The lowest scores were for MG-InHex. Rsk was negative (punctured surface) in the MG-InHex, SPI and Tissue Level systems, and positive (pointed surface) in the other systems. Rku was higher than 3 (Leptokurtic) in Tissue Level, Interna, MG-InHex and SPI, and lower than 3 (Platykurtic) in Certain and Hikelt. Conclusions The type of implant determines surface topography, and there are differences in the roughness parameters of the various makes of implants for clinical use. Key words:Implants for clinical use, topography, confocal microscopy. PMID:27475680

  17. Progressive immediate loading of a perforated maxillary sinus dental implant: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Juboori MJ

    2015-01-01

    Mohammed Jasim Al-Juboori Department of Oral Surgery, MAHSA University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: The displacement of a dental implant into the maxillary sinus may lead to implant failure due to exposure of the apical third or the tip of the implant beyond the bone, resulting in soft tissue growth. This case report discusses dental implant placement in the upper first molar area with maxillary sinus involvement of approximately 2 mm. A new technique for progressive implant loading was...

  18. How could multimedia information about dental implant surgery effects patients’ anxiety level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahhan, Ameer-Shani; Acar, Ahmet-Hüseyin

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effects of different patient education techniques on patients’ anxiety levels before and after dental implant surgery. Material and Methods Sixty patients were randomized into three groups; each contained 20 patients; [group 1, basic information given verbally, with details of operation and recovery; group 2 (study group), basic information given verbally with details of operative procedures and recovery, and by watching a movie on single implant surgery]; and a control group [basic information given verbally “but it was devoid of the details of the operative procedures and recovery”]. Anxiety levels were assessed using the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS). Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). Results The most significant changes were observed in the movie group (P < 0.05). Patients who were more anxious also used more analgesic medication. Linear regression analysis showed that female patients had higher levels of anxiety (P < 0.05). Conclusions Preoperative multimedia information increases anxiety level. Key words:Implant, anxiety, pain, dental, video and patient knowledge. PMID:27918733

  19. Autogenous bone graft combined with polylactic polyglycolic acid polymer for treatment of dehiscence around immediate dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Khalid S

    2009-11-01

    The use of composite bone grafts in dehiscence defects around immediate dental implants are aimed at improving the outcome of the regenerative process. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of combinations of autogenous bone graft with a synthetic copolymer polylactic and polyglycolic acid (Fisiograft) on bone healing of buccal dehiscence defects around immediate dental implants. Sixteen adult male patients who each received an immediate implant for a single tooth replacement at a maxillary anterior or premolar site were included in this study. Patients were divided into 2 groups. One group received immediate dental implants augmented with autogenous bone graft combined with Fisiograft. The other group received immediate dental implants augmented with autogenous bone graft alone. The results revealed that both treatment modalities led to significant improvements for the primary outcome regarding bone fill as well as a significant reduction of probing pocket depth and gain of attachment level. Moreover, there were slightly statistically significant differences between the groups. In conclusion, the combination of autogenous bone graft and Fisiograft showed a slight superiority to autogenous bone graft alone, suggesting that it could be an optimum bone substitute for treatment of dehiscence around immediate dental implant.

  20. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  1. Review of Immediate and Early Loading Protocols in Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rismanchian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The concept of treating edentulous patients by osseointegrated implants was first proposed in 1960s. To minimize the failure rate of implants, it has been recommended to keep the implants free of load during the healing period .Recent studies have been directed to achieve faster integration and shorter healing periods prior to implant restoration. Loading protocols (immediate loading , early loading can best be interpreted on the biologic basis of implant integration. Each of these protocols needs special prerequisites and there are special risk factors for different loading protocols. Objectives: In this review article, different loading protocols and their surgical and prosthetic considerations are discussed.

  2. Removal of dental implants: review of five different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajčić, Z; Stojčev Stajčić, L J; Kalanović, M; Đinić, A; Divekar, N; Rodić, M

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study were to review five different explantation techniques for the removal of failing implants and to propose a practical clinical protocol. During a 10-year period, 95 implants were explanted from 81 patients. Explantation techniques used were the bur-forceps (BF), neo bur-elevator-forceps (ηBEF), trephine drill (TD), high torque wrench (HTW), and scalpel-forceps (SF) techniques. The following parameters were analyzed: indications for explanation, site of implantation, and the type, diameter, and length of the implant removed. The most frequent indications for implant removal were peri-implantitis (n=37) and crestal bone loss (n=48). The posterior maxilla was the most frequent site of implant removal (n=48). The longer implants were more frequently removed (n=78). The majority of implants were removed after 1 year in function (n=69). The BF/ηBEF and SF techniques were found to be the most efficient. Explantation techniques appeared to be successful for the removal of failing implants. The BF/ηBEF and SF techniques demonstrated 100% success. The ηBEF technique enabled safe insertion of a new implant in the same explantation site. The HTW technique appeared to be the most elegant technique with the highest predictability for insertion of another implant. An explantation protocol is proposed.

  3. Biomechanics and load resistance of small-diameter and mini dental implants: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Istabrak; Bourauel, Christoph; Mundt, Torsten; Stark, Helmut; Heinemann, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, the application of small-diameter and mini dental implants to support removable and fixed prosthesis has dramatically increased. However, the success of these implants under functional biting forces and the reaction of the bone around them need to be analyzed. This review was aimed to present studies that deal with the fatigue life of small-diameter and mini dental implants under normal biting force, and their survival rate. The numerical and experimental studies concluded that an increase in the risk of bone damage or implant failure may be assumed in critical clinical situations and implants with dental implants over 5 years was 98.3-99.4%.

  4. Surface characterization of titanium based dental implants; Caracterizacao de implantes odontologicos a base de titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilho, Guilherme Augusto Alcaraz

    2006-07-01

    Dental implantology uses metallic devices made of commercially pure titanium in order to replace lost teeth. Titanium presents favorable characteristics as bio material and modern implants are capable of integrate, witch is the union between bone and implant without fibrous tissue development. Three of the major Brazilian implant manufacturers were chosen to join the study. A foreign manufacturer participated as standard. The manufacturers had three specimens of each implant with two different surface finishing, as machined and porous, submitted to analysis. Surface chemical composition and implant morphology were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microprobe. Implant surface is mainly composed of titanium, oxygen and carbon. Few contaminants commonly present on implant surface were found on samples. Superficial oxide layer is basically composed of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), another oxides as Ti O and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} were also found in small amount. Carbon on implant surface was attributed to manufacturing process. Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Silicon appeared in smaller concentration on surface. There was no surface discrepancy among foreign and Brazilian made implants. SEM images were made on different magnification, 35 X to 3500 X, and showed similarity among as machined implants. Porous surface finishing implants presented distinct morphology. This result was attributed to differences on manufacturing process. Implant bioactivity was accessed through immersion on simulated body solution (SBF) in order to verify formation of an hydroxyapatite (HA) layer on surface. Samples were divided on three groups according to immersion time: G1 (7 days), G2 (14 days), G3 (21 days), and deep in SBF solution at 37 deg C. After being removed from solution, XPS analyses were made and then implants have been submitted to microprobe analysis. XPS showed some components of SBF solution on sample surface but microprobe

  5. Diabetes mellitus and dental implants: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwassie, Hassan; Dhanrajani, P J

    2002-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is no longer considered to be a contraindication for implant-supported prostheses, provided that the patient's blood sugar is under control, and that there is motivation for oral hygiene procedures. This paper presents the experiences of treating diabetic patients using implants with good success rates.

  6. Comparison of Results of Measurement of Dimensions of the Placed Dental Implants on Cone Beam Computed Tomography with Dimensions of the Producers of the Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repesa, Merisa; Sofic, Amela; Jakupovic, Selma; Tosum, Selma; Kazazic, Lejla; Dervisevic, Almir

    2017-06-01

    One of the most frequently used method for scanning patients with indication for dental implantation in dentistry is cone beam computed tomography. Implantation, CBCT imaging and implant programme are inevitable when planning a successful replacement of lost teeth. CBCT offers exact information about available bone and its density, adjacent tooth roots, the place of mandibular canal and maxillary sinus and adjacent anatomical structure. The goal of this study is to estimate accuracy of measurements on CBCT images ofpatients who have implants of different producers and determine if there is any statistically significant correlation between four test groups regardless of the alloy of which implants are made. The study was a prospective-comparative, and included fifteen patients with hundred dental implants divided in four groups depending on the producer. Over dimensioning in the gained measurements of the whole sample on CBCT images in relation to dimensions of producers is between 0.1006mm and 0.368mm. Even though over dimensioning is measured in millimetres, it has to be taken into consideration in clinical practice when planning an implant placement, and we can recommend safety zone of 0.5mm. There have been no statistically significant differences in the gained results in over dimensioning of implants of different alloys for horizontal and vertical measurements on CBCT images of Astra Tech, Brendet titanium implants and Straumann titanium-zirconium implants. Based on the goals of the study there have been confirmed statistically significant correlations of great value (from 0.841 to 0.936) of high level of importance between manufactured value of dimensions and average dimensions values gained through CBCT imaging in four types of implants (four test groups). The total exactness of measurements on CBCT scan in this research is 96.66% for horizontal measuring and 96.92% for vertical measuring. Therefore, we can conclude that CBCT as radiological method has an

  7. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  8. Pansinusitis y afectación intracraneal por implante dental Pansinusitis and intracranial impact of a dental implant

    OpenAIRE

    Josep Rubio-Palau; Jordi García-Linares; Javier Gutiérrez-Santamaría; Juan Antonio Hueto-Madrid; Mitchel Chávez-Gatty; Eduard Ferrés-Padró

    2012-01-01

    Las sinusitis odontógenas son una patología relativamente frecuente causada por infecciones dentales, quistes periapicales así como tras procedimientos bucodentales como una endodoncia, una elevación sinusal o la colocación de un implante. A continuación se presenta un caso extremo de una pansinusitis derecha con fistulización a espacio epidural causada por un implante osteointegrado. Ante la sospecha de una sinusitis maxilar de origen odontogénico se debe iniciar rápidamente un tratamiento a...

  9. Computer methods for automating preoperative dental implant planning: implant positioning and size assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanis, Christos C; Sfantsikopoulos, Michael M; Koidis, Petros T; Kafantaris, Nikolaos M; Mpikos, Pavlos G

    2007-04-01

    The paper presents computer-aided methods that allocate a dental implant and suggest its size, during the pre-operative planning stage, in conformance with introduced optimization criteria and established clinical requirements. Based on computed tomography data of the jaw and prosthesis anatomy, single tooth cases are planned for the best-suited implant insertion at a user-defined region. An optimum implantation axis line is produced and cylindrical implants of various candidate sizes are then automatically positioned, while their occlusal end is leveled to bone ridge, and evaluated. Radial safety margins are used for the assessment of the implant safety distance from neighboring anatomical structures and bone quantity and quality are estimated and taken into consideration. A case study demonstrates the concept and allows for its discussion.

  10. Interest in dental implantology and preferences for implant therapy: a survey of Victorian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M C; Kao, Plh; Lee, N; Sivathasan, D; Vong, C W; Zhu, J; Polster, A; Darby, I

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to gauge dentists' interest, knowledge and training in implantology, and to compare their treatment preferences with current literature. Subsequently, this information may be used to evaluate implantology education pathways. A cross-sectional postal survey of 600 randomly selected dentists registered with the Dental Practice Board of Victoria was conducted. Respondents were asked about background, interest and training in implantology, and implant treatment preferences. Results were analysed according to primary practice location, decade of graduation and attendance at continuing professional development (CPD) programmes. One hundred and seventy-six questionnaires were included for analysis. In general, dentists rate their implant knowledge, interest and enjoyment in restoring implants favourably. No differences were found between city and country practitioners, and different graduation decades. The level of CPD significantly influenced treatment preferences. Practitioners were generally unwilling to treat patients taking bisphosphonates, or to perform grafting procedures. Most dentists provide common services to treat peri-implant conditions. Direct-to-fixture is the most popular fixture-abutment connection. Overall, there is a high level of implant knowledge corresponding to current evidence in the literature. Level of CPD attendance is the most important factor in dentists' willingness to provide more implant therapy options. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  11. Immediately loaded non-submerged versus delayed loaded submerged dental implants: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rate, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated with immediately loaded non-submerged dental implants or delayed loaded submerged implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 28 publications. The inverse variance method was used for a random- or fixed-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity. The estimates of an intervention were expressed as the risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimetres. Twenty-three studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, one at moderate risk of bias, and four studies were considered at low risk of bias. The difference between procedures (submerged vs. non-submerged implants) significantly affected the implant failure rate (P = 0.02), with a RR of 1.78 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-2.83). There was no apparent significant effect of non-submerged dental implants on the occurrence of postoperative infection (P = 0.29; RR 2.13, CI 0.52-8.65) or on marginal bone loss (P = 0.77; MD -0.03, 95% CI -0.23 to 0.17).

  12. Assessment of the Survival of Dental Implants in Irradiated Jaws ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In patients undergoing head and neck surgery for various pathologic ... Dentistry and Endodontics, PDU Dental College, Solapur, Maharashtra, 3Department of Pedodontics, Buddha ... were reconstructed through flap procedure and a total of.

  13. 即刻修复用于67例牙种植患者效果观察%Observation on the effect for immediate restoration for 67 cases of patients with dental implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于开涛; 邹敬才; 龙国平; 葛成; 舒瑶; 刘宝林

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察即刻修复用于67例牙种植患者的临床效果.方法 选取2010年2~10月进行牙种植的患者120例作为实验的研究对象.随机将120例患者分为实验组和对照组,其中实验组为67例(即可修复组),对照为53例(传统方法组),实验组在牙种植后1周内即进行修复,对照组在牙齿经历4到6个月无负荷期后进行修复,最后观察两种方法种植体脱落的次数、感染或松动的例数以及X线下异常情况的例数,同时调查两组患者的满意度并进行组内的分析比较.结果 实验组种植体脱落的、感染、X线下出现异常的例数均为0例,满意度为100%明显高于对照组,以上P均小于0.05,差异有统计学意义.结论 牙种植后即刻修复临床效果更好,患者的满意度更高,可以在口腔临床上广泛应用.%OBJECTIVE To observe the clinical effect of immediate restoration for 67 cases with dental implants. METHODS 120 cases in the outpatient for dental implants from February 2010 to October 2010 were chosen as the research objects. 120 patients were randomly divided into the experimental group and the control group. The experimental group was of 67 cases (can be fixed in the group), and the control group was of 53 cases (the traditional method group) . The experimental group was taken with repair within a week after dental implants. The control group was taken for repair after the teeth experienced 4-6 months without load. The times for the two ways of implant shedding, the number of cases with infection or loosening and the number of cases with X-ray abnormalities were taken for observation. The levels of the satisfaction were invesbgatd and compared in the two groups. RESULTS The number of cases with implants dropping, infection, abnormal X-ray was 0 in the experimental group, the satisfaction was 100% , significantly higher than the control group, with significant differences. CONCLUSION The effect of immediate restoration for dental

  14. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre E-mail: andre.gahleitner@univie.ac.at; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement.

  15. Dental implant restoration in 248 patients with periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes%牙周病伴2型糖尿病248例种植义齿治疗总结

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴大怡; 李刚; 张青; 滕立钊; 卢焕友

    2011-01-01

    Objective To discuss the risk and strategy of dental implantation in patients with periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes.Methods Retrospective analysis was performed of dental implantation results in 248 patients with periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes from 2000 to 2008.The survival rate was evaluated and the data statistically analyzed.Results The Nobel implant system and CDIC implant system were used.The operation applied flapless and bone expanding techniques.A total of 1190 implants were inserted (333 Nobel Replace implants and 857 CDIC implants).0.5% (6 implants) lost during the first 6 months healing stage.The l-year,5-year and 8-year survival rate were 98.4% (1165/1184),95.3%(487/511)and 89.2%(91/102) respectively.Conclusions The patients with periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes are suitable for implant treatment with satisfactory results under the conditions that the indication and risk factors are evaluated and controlled strictly.%目的 探讨牙周病伴2型糖尿病患者实施种植义齿治疗的风险和处理对策.方法 回顾分析2000至2008年在成都华西牙种植医院、华西口腔深圳门诊部、华西口腔重庆门诊部接受种植义齿治疗的248例牙周病伴2型糖尿病患者,以种植体存留率为评价指标,对数据进行统计分析.结果 248例患者选用Nobel Replace和CDIC两个种植系统,采用不翻瓣和骨膨胀的微创植入术,共植入牙种植体1190枚(Nobel Replace 333枚、CDIC 857枚).6枚(0.5%)种植体在术后6个月愈合期内脱落,术后1年种植体存留率为98.4% (1165/1184)、5年存留率为95.3% (487/511)、8年存留率为89.2% (91/102).结论 严格掌握适应证和控制风险的情况下,牙周病伴2型糖尿病患者种植修复可获得较高的满意度.

  16. Vestibuloplasty with Retroauricular Skin Grafts for Dental Implant Rehabilitation in Vascularized Fibula Grafts: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sencimen, Metin; Gulses, Aydin; Varol, Altan; Ayna, Mustafa; Ozen, Jölide; Dogan, Necdet; Açil, Yahya

    The aim of this study was to present the use of retroauricular full-thickness skin grafts in vestibuloplasty surgeries for dental implant rehabilitation in vascularized fibula grafts. Two patients underwent mandibular reconstruction with vascularized fibula grafts due to mandibular gunshot injuries. Inadequate sulcus gaps secondary to mandibular soft tissue deficiencies were managed by full-thickness autologous skin grafts harvested from the retroauricular region. Dental rehabilitation was achieved by implants placed in free fibula grafts. In both cases, complete graft survival was achieved. Cosmetic and functional outcomes were satisfactory. Owing to its high resiliency and elasticity and its thin and hairless structure, full-thickness retroauricular skin graft is an effective treatment modality in the management of intraoral soft tissue deficiencies. Patients with gunshot injuries present great functional and esthetic demands, and every report presenting new treatment modalities is helpful in the management of the condition.

  17. Brånemark and ITI dental implants in the human bone-grafted maxilla: a comparative evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, Else M

    2003-01-01

    and the patients were followed between 20 and 67 months post implantation. The bone graft was transplanted to add bony volume in the maxillary sinus, the anterior floor of the nose and/or the alveolar ridge. After a healing period of 4(1/2) months, dental implants were inserted and left for healing for 8 months......The development of new characteristics concerning implant surface makes it interesting to clinically compare different implant systems in the bone-grafted maxilla. The aim of this evaluation was to compare clinical data of a two-staged procedure on the augmented extremely atrophic maxilla using...... either Brånemark- or ITI-fixures. In 25 patients (18 females, seven males) the severely atrophied maxilla was reconstructed with autogenous iliac or mandibular bone and either Brånemark or ITI implants. Seventy-eight Brånemark implants and 80 SLA-ITI implants were inserted in the augmented bone...

  18. Effects of Dental Implant-abutment Interfaces on the Reliability of Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, by analyzing the effects of two different kinds of implant-abutment connection interfaces under the same working condition on the mechanical and fatigue performances of the implant system as well as on the surrounding bones, we intend to study such effects on the reliability of the implants and provide a theoretical basis for the design and clinical application of dental implant systems. For the purpose, we adopt a 3-D modeling method to establish the model, and use FEA (finite element analysis to carry out static mechanic and fatigue analysis on the implant system and its surrounding bones; then we make the two implant systems, and carry out fatigue tests on a dynamic fatigue testing machine to verify the FEA results. After comparing the results from the two different systems, we find that the stress distribution and fatigue safety factor of the system which has deeper axial matching of the taper connection are better than those of the other system, that is to say, between the two major elements of a implant system, the axial length of the connecting taper and the size of the hexagon, the former has greater effects than the latter. When the axial matching is deeper, the stress distribution of the implant system will be better, the fatigue safety factor will be higher, and the implant system will be more reliable.

  19. Non-favorable positioning of anterosuperior dental implants — case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Miranda DELIBERADOR

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The treatment with implants has demonstrated to be a good alternative to oral rehabilitation. However, it is important to follow some criteria in order to achieve success. Objective: This report showed an alternative approach to a clinical condition of non-favorable positioning of anterosuperior dental implants, added to an also non- favorable initial prosthetic planning. Case report: Female patient, 60 years old, with fixed prosthesis over labial inclined implants, in the central and lateral superior incisors region, and with peri-implant disease. A new approach with fixed prosthesis and single abutments, what allows cleaning, and also removable gingival mask was applied. Monitoring of 3, 6, 9 and 12 months were done. Conclusion: The use of a prosthetic alternative such as gingival mask demonstrated to be efficient regarding esthetic and masticatory functions, contributing to oral hygiene, an important factor to peri-implanttissues health.

  20. A new operative method for obtaining full-arch prostheses for immediate loading dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Guilherme Paulo Scarpel; Mello, Elaine Duarte Artuso de; Corazza, Pedro Henrique

    2017-04-01

    Implant supported full-arch immediate prosthesis (also called the immediate Brånemark protocol) revolutionized dental clinical practice due to the aesthetic/functional benefits it offers to the patient. This work presents a simplified and efficient technique for implant supported full-arch immediate prosthesis fabrication. After diagnosing the necessity of the protocol, the implants were installed with a minimum torque of 35Ncm. For implant impression, the use of previously prepared castable cylinders (dispensing with impression posts), and a U-shaped acrylic (Mello technique) generated a cast without distortion. The Brånemark protocol was fabricated on this cast without the metal test specimen. The simplified technique proposed in this article for Brånemark protocol fabrication seemed to be effective. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of a new design for zirconia dental implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the biomechanical properties of a new design configuration for zirconia dental implants. Methods: The new design has a cylindrical shape that is partially hollow and porous in the bottom, which permits the implants to be locked into the alveolar bone over time. It also utilizes bioactive glass coatings to increase adhesion to surrounding bone structure. Samples of the new design were fabricated in the laboratory and their material strength, hardness, and fracture toughness were evaluated. In addition, biocompatibility of the new design was evaluated through testing in dogs. Results: Results of mechanical tests indicate that structural properties of the new design exceed the usual requirements for implants. Moreover, animal tests suggest that there is appreciable improvement in lock-in strength and os-teointegration. Conclusion: The new design configuration is biomechanically feasible and further research is warranted to improve the design for human use.

  2. Molecular Approaches to Functionalization of Dental Implant Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina O. Zekiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review examines several approaches to improve properties of dental implants by modifying their bioactive surfaces (functionalization using the techniques of molecular transplantation. The first group of functional ligands is designed to enhance osseointegration of implants, it includes growth factors, promoting the formation and bone remodeling: bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF and their combinations with each other, and several other ones. The second group of bioactive molecules does not directly stimulate bone formation, but it promotes osteoblast seeding on the implant surface due to the adhesive properties, thus accelerating osseointegration. Finally, the third group of substances used to increase the antibacterial properties of coatings, thereby reducing the formation of bacterial film on the implant surface and the risk of inflammatory rejection of the implant. Key issues of using biofunctional coatings, despite their obvious promise today still are relatively high cost, difficulties of controlling properties and its storage between the fabrication and installation of implants in the bone of the recipient.

  3. [Experimental study of osseointegration of zirconium and titanium dental implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakov, O B; Doktorov, A A; D'iakova, S V; Denisov-Nikol'skiĭ, Iu I; Grötz, K A

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment performed on pigs, methods of light and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the interaction of zirconium and titanium dental implants with bone 6 months following their insertion. Distinct features of integration of both implant types with bone structures were detected. Sites of direct contact of bone structures with metal were found to undergo constant remodeling according to biochemical and metabolic conditions in each zone of an implant surface. Statistically the degree of interactive properties of zirconium implants significantly exceeded similar parameter for titanium screws. Along the perimeter of the zones of bone contact with zirconium implants greater numbers of forming and formed bone areas were revealed as compared to the zones of bone contact with titanium implants, where erosion lacunae were more numerous. The complex of research methods used in this study have not revealed distinct changes in the structure of osteocytes, located in immediate proximity to the metal surface in comparison with more distant sites in the bone.

  4. 3D Metal Printing - Additive Manufacturing Technologies for Frameworks of Implant-Borne Fixed Dental Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla León, M; Klemm, I M; García-Arranz, J; Özcan, M

    2017-09-01

    An edentulous patient was rehabilitated with maxillary metal-ceramic and mandibular metal-resin implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Metal frameworks of the FDPs were fabricated using 3D additive manufacturing technologies utilizing selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) processes. Both SLM and EBM technologies were employed in combination with computer numerical control (CNC) post-machining at the implant interface. This report highlights the technical and clinical protocol for fabrication of FDPs using SLM and EBM additive technologies. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  5. Clinical evaluation of a collagen matrix to enhance the width of keratinized gingiva around dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kang-Ho; Kim, Byung-Ock; Jang, Hyun-Seon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of collagen matrix with apically positioned flap (APF) on the width of keratinized gingiva, comparing to the results of APF only and APF combined with free gingival graft (FGG) at the second implant surgery. Methods Nine patients were selected from those who had received treatments at the Department of Periodontics, Chosun University Dental Hospital, Gwangju, Korea. We performed APF, APF combined with FGG, and APF combined with coll...

  6. Myxofibroma of the maxilla. Reconstruction with iliac crest graft and dental implants after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Martínez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxomas are benign odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origin of rare presentation in the oral cavity, which exhibit locally aggressive behavior and are prone to local recurrence. The controversy has mainly been on therapeutic management with recommendations varying, depending on the clinical cases, from simple curettage of lesion to segmental bone resection. We present a case report describing the reconstruction of an osseous defect in the maxilla and the restoration with dental implants in a 32 year old female patient after radical surgical excision due to an odontogenic fibromyxoma with locally aggressive behavior. The primary reconstruction of maxillary discontinuity defect was carried out by an immediate non-vascularized cortico-cancellous iliac crest graft. Using a computer-guided system for the implant treatment-planning, three dental implants were secondary placed in the bone graft by means of flapless implant surgery. The patient was subsequently restored with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of three years. The surgical, reconstructive and restorative treatment sequence and techniques are discussed.

  7. Success and Survival Rates of Dental Implants Restored at an Undergraduate Dental Clinic: A 13-Year Retrospective Study with a Mean Follow-up of 5.8 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Shahrzad S; Matthews, Debora C; Michuad, Pierre-Luc; Ghiabi, Edmond

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical, radiographic, and patient-based outcomes of dental implants placed at an undergraduate student dental clinic. A retrospective study was performed to determine the success and survival rates of dental implants placed at the undergraduate dental clinic at Dalhousie University between January 1999 and January 2012. Only patients with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were included. Clinical and radiographic assessments determined implant success and survival rates. Questionnaires recorded patients' satisfaction with esthetics, comfort, and ease of hygiene. Of the 352 patients (n = 591 implants) who received implants over 13 years, 165 patients completed the clinical and radiographic examinations. By the end of the study period, demographic information and implant characteristics were collected for 111 (n = 217 implants; 47.5% in the maxilla, 52.6% in the mandible) of these patients. Of those assessed clinically, 36.4% were males and 63.6% females, with a mean age of 56.1 ± 14.15 years (range, 17 to 86 years) at the time of implant placement. The mean follow-up period was 5.8 years (range, 1 to 13 years). The overall implant success and survival rates were 88.0% and 97.2%, respectively. No observable bone loss was evident in 88.0% of the surviving implants. There were no implant fractures. Most patients (91.2%) were very satisfied with the implant restoration appearance, 88.0% were very comfortable with the implant, 92.6% were very satisfied with their ability to chew, and 84.8% reported easy hygiene maintenance at the implant sites. Implant success and survival in an undergraduate student clinic were comparable to those reported in the literature. It seems that inexperienced students were able to provide restorations that were very satisfying to the patients.

  8. Effect of surface contamination on osseointegration of dental implants surrounded by circumferential bone defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohamed, Seif

    2010-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of surface contamination on osseointegration of dental implants surrounded by a circumferential bone defect and to compare osseointegration around Osseotite with that around Nanotite implants.

  9. A study of the bone healing kinetics of plateau versus screw root design titanium dental implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Gary

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the bone healing process around plateau root from (PRF) and screw root from (SRF) titanium dental implants over the immediate 12 week healing period post implant placement.

  10. Short surface-porous dental implants as an alternative to open sinus lift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksyutov А.Е.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the comparative effectiveness of clinical application of short surface-porous of dental implants and sinus lift open with the subsequent installation of screw implants usual length

  11. Analysis of surgical referral patterns for endosseous dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraw, S J; Eckert, S E; Yacyshyn, C E; Wollan, P C

    1999-01-01

    Endosseous implants have traditionally been surgically placed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, periodontists, and general practitioners. The purpose of this study was to examine surgical referral patterns for patients receiving implants in the treatment of partial edentulism. The records of 542 patients who received 1,313 implants between 1993 and 1997 were analyzed. Data relative to anatomic area, patient demographics, type of implant system, and any complication encountered were collected. Surgical cohorts were compared using Wilcoxon's rank-sum or chi-square tests, and complication rates were estimated using survival analysis methods. Results indicate no significant difference (P > .05) between cohorts with regard to placement of implants in the anatomic locations of the anterior mandible, anterior maxilla, posterior mandible, and posterior maxilla. Patient demographic information was not statistically different, with the exception of mean patient age, where oral and maxillofacial surgeons have been younger patients (P .05). The type of implant system used showed no significant difference with respect to anatomic location or complication occurrence (P > .05). This study indicates that implant surgical referral patterns were similar in this setting between periodontal and oral and maxillofacial surgeons, with the only difference being a tendency to refer younger patients to the oral surgeons.

  12. Dental considerations in patients with respiratory problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Claramunt Lozano, Ariadna; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia; Gavaldá Esteve, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Many respiratory disorders can compromise routine dental care and require special treatment for the affected patients. Patients often visit the dental clinic with respiratory problems already diagnosed by other specialists. The dental professional therefore must provide correct dental care in the context of such a diagnosis. The present study offers a literature review of those respiratory disorders which can have implications for dental care. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (CO...

  13. Investigation of corrosion and ion release from titanium dental implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ektessabi, A.M. (Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)); Mouhyi, J.; Louvette, P.; Sennerby, L.

    1997-01-01

    A thin passive titanium dioxide, in its stoichiometric form, has a very high corrosion resistance, but the same conclusion can not be made on corrosion resistance of a surface which is not stoichiometrically titanium dioxide, or even a surface which is a composition of various elements and oxides. In practice, the implants available on the market have an oxide surface contaminated with other elements. The aim of this paper is to correlate clinical observations that show the deterioration of Ti made implants after certain period of insertion in the patients, and in vitro corrosion resistance of Ti implants with surface passive oxide layer. For this purpose, surface analysis of the retrieved failed implants were performed and in vivo animal experiments with relation to ion release from implants were done. Finally, on the basis of the clinical observation, in vivo animal test, and in vitro electrochemical corrosion test, a model is proposed to explain the corrosion and ion release from the Ti implant. (author)

  14. A hydrophilic dental implant surface exhibits thrombogenic properties in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jaan; Kurt, Seta; Thor, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Surface modifications of dental implants have gained attention during several years and the thrombotic response from blood components with these materials has become more important during recent years. The aims of this study were to evaluate the thrombogenic response of whole blood, in contact with clinically used dental surfaces, Sandblasted Large grit Acid etched titanium (SLA) and Sandblasted Large grit Acid etched, and chemically modified titanium with hydrophilic properties (SLActive). An in vitro slide chamber model, furnished with heparin, was used in which whole blood came in contact with slides of the test surfaces. After incubation (60-minute rotation at 22 rpm in a 37°C water bath), blood was mixed with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or citrate, further centrifuged at +4°C. Finally, plasma was collected pending analysis. Whole blood in contact with surfaces resulted in significantly higher binding of platelets to the hydrophilic surface, accompanied by a significant increase of contact activation of the coagulation cascade. In addition, the platelet activation showed a similar pattern with a significant elevated release of β-TG from platelet granule. The conclusion that can be drawn from the results in our study is that the hydrophilic modification seems to augment the thrombogenic properties of titanium with implications for healing into bone of, that is titanium dental implants. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Immediate placement of dental implants in the esthetic zone : a systematic review and pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W; den Hartog, Laurens; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    Background: Research interest on immediate placement of dental implants has shifted from implant survival toward optimal preservation of soft and hard tissues. The aim of this study is to systematically assess the condition of implant survival, peri-implant hard and soft tissue changes, esthetic

  16. Immediate placement of dental implants in the esthetic zone : a systematic review and pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W; den Hartog, Laurens; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research interest on immediate placement of dental implants has shifted from implant survival toward optimal preservation of soft and hard tissues. The aim of this study is to systematically assess the condition of implant survival, peri-implant hard and soft tissue changes, esthetic out

  17. Soft tissue integration versus early biofilm formation on different dental implant materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henderina; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; de Vries, Joop; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J.; Qu-Ren, Yijin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dental implants anchor in bone through a tight fit and osseo-integratable properties of the implant surfaces, while a protective soft tissue seal around the implants neck is needed to prevent bacterial destruction of the bone-implant interface. This tissue seal needs to form in the unster

  18. Clinical Effect Observation of Dental Implant Restoration Dentition Defects in Diabetic Patients%种植牙修复糖尿病患者牙列缺损效果的临床探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐兴东

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察种植牙修复糖尿病牙列缺损患者的效果。方法以2013年6月以来的40例糖尿病牙列缺损患者为研究对象,在围术期控制血糖在正常范围条件下,采用该诊所所用种植机和减速手机,选用两段式柱状或根形螺纹种植体和相应种植系统进行牙列缺损修复。结果该组患者围术期均控制血糖在正常范围。55枚人工种植牙临床术后进行为期6个月~2年的随访,平均1.5年。至末次随访时,患者无不适感,咀嚼良好,无牙龈出血,有1枚种植体脱落,成功种植54枚,成功率为98.18%。其余种植体均无松动,X线牙片结果骨吸收均在0.5 mm以下,种植体周围无透视区,与骨结合均较好。结论在围术期控制血糖在正常范围条件下,种植牙是修复糖尿病牙列缺损有效的方法,值得临床推广应用。%Objective To investigate the dental implant restoration effects in diabetic patients with dentition defects. Methods 40 cases of diabetes patients with dentition defects for the study, perioperative glucose control in the normal range of condi-tions, the use of the clinic and gear used in planting the phone, use a two-stage cylindrical or root-shaped screw implants and corresponding cropping systems conduct dentition defect. Results This group of patients are controlled perioperative blood sugar in the normal range. 55 dental implants after a period of 6 months to 2 years of follow-up, an average of 1.5 years. To the last follow-up, patients with no discomfort, chew well, no bleeding gums, implants have a loss, successful planting 54, the success rate was 98.18%. The rest had no implant loosening, X-ray radiograph results resorption were 0.5mm or less, no perspective area around the implant, osseointegration are good. Conclusion Perioperative control of blood glucose in the normal range of conditions, the implant is to repair the defect dentition diabetes effective way, worthy of clin

  19. Impact of dental implant insertion method on the peri-implant bone tissue: Experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatović Novak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The function of dental implants depends on their stability in bone tissue over extended period of time, i.e. on osseointegration. The process through which osseointegration is achieved depends on several factors, surgical insertion method being one of them. The aim of this study was to histopathologically compare the impact of the surgical method of implant insertion on the peri-implant bone tissue. Methods. The experiment was performed on 9 dogs. Eight weeks following the extraction of lower premolars implants were inserted using the one-stage method on the right mandibular side and two-stage method on the left side. Three months after implantation the animals were sacrificed. Three distinct regions of bone tissue were histopathologically analyzed, the results were scored and compared. Results. In the specimens of one-stage implants increased amount of collagen fibers was found in 5 specimens where tissue necrosis was also observed. Only moderate osteoblastic activity was found in 3 sections. The analysis of bone-to-implant contact region revealed statistically significantly better results regarding the amount of collagen tissue fibers for the implants inserted in the two-stage method (Wa = 59 105, α = 0.05. No necrosis and osteoblastic activity were observed. Conclusion. Better results were achieved by the two-stage method in bone-to-implant contact region regarding the amount of collagen tissue, while the results were identical regarding the osteoblastic activity and bone tissue necrosis. There was no difference between the methods in the bone-implant interface region. In the bone tissue adjacent to the implant the results were identical regarding the amount of collagen tissue, osteoblastic reaction and bone tissue necrosis, while better results were achieved by the two-stage method regarding the number of osteocytes.

  20. Optimally oriented grooves on dental implants improve bone quality around implants under repetitive mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Nakano, Takayoshi; Ishimoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Muneteru; Inoue, Maaya; Yasutake, Munenori; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-01-15

    The aim was to investigate the effect of groove designs on bone quality under controlled-repetitive load conditions for optimizing dental implant design. Anodized Ti-6Al-4V alloy implants with -60° and +60° grooves around the neck were placed in the proximal tibial metaphysis of rabbits. The application of a repetitive mechanical load was initiated via the implants (50N, 3Hz, 1800 cycles, 2days/week) at 12weeks after surgery for 8weeks. Bone quality, defined as osteocyte density and degree of biological apatite (BAp) c-axis/collagen fibers, was then evaluated. Groove designs did not affect bone quality without mechanical loading; however, repetitive mechanical loading significantly increased bone-to-implant contact, bone mass, and bone mineral density (BMD). In +60° grooves, the BAp c-axis/collagen fibers preferentially aligned along the groove direction with mechanical loading. Moreover, osteocyte density was significantly higher both inside and in the adjacent region of the +60° grooves, but not -60° grooves. These results suggest that the +60° grooves successfully transmitted the load to the bone tissues surrounding implants through the grooves. An optimally oriented groove structure on the implant surface was shown to be a promising way for achieving bone tissue with appropriate bone quality. This is the first report to propose the optimal design of grooves on the necks of dental implants for improving bone quality parameters as well as BMD. The findings suggest that not only BMD, but also bone quality, could be a useful clinical parameter in implant dentistry.

  1. Evaluation of bone remodeling around single dental implants of different lengths: a mechanobiological numerical simulation and validation using clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Mercuri, Emílio Graciliano Ferreira; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic models have been proposed to explain adaptive behavior of bone to loading; however, these models have not been applied to explain the biomechanics of short dental implants. Purpose of present study was to simulate bone remodeling around single implants of different lengths using mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation model derived from the Stanford theory, using finite elements analysis (FEA) and to validate the theoretical prediction with the clinical findings of crestal bone loss. Loading cycles were applied on 7-, 10-, or 13-mm-long dental implants to simulate daily mastication and bone remodeling was assessed by changes in the strain energy density of bone after a 3, 6, and 12 months of function. Moreover, clinical findings of marginal bone loss in 45 patients rehabilitated with same implant designs used in the simulation (n = 15) were computed to validate the theoretical results. FEA analysis showed that although the bone density values reduced over time in the cortical bone for all groups, bone remodeling was independent of implant length. Clinical data showed a similar pattern of bone resorption compared with the data generated from mathematical analyses, independent of implant length. The results of this study showed that the mechanoregulatory tissue model could be employed in monitoring the morphological changes in bone that is subjected to biomechanical loads. In addition, the implant length did not influence the bone remodeling around single dental implants during the first year of loading.

  2. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  3. Biomechanical evaluation of dental implants with different surfaces: Removal torque and resonance frequency analysis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jung-Woo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2009-07-01

    Macroscopic and especially microscopic properties of implant surfaces play a major role in the osseous healing of dental implants. Dental implants with modified surfaces have shown stronger osseointegration than implants which are only turned (machined). Advanced surface modification techniques such as anodic oxidation and Ca-P application have been developed to achieve faster and stronger bonding between the host bone and the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatment of titanium dental implant on implant stability after insertion using the rabbit tibia model. THREE TEST GROUPS WERE PREPARED: sandblasted, large-grit and acid-etched (SLA) implants, anodic oxidized implants, and anodized implants with Ca-P immersion. The turned implants served as control. Twenty rabbits received 80 implants in the tibia. Resonance frequencies were measured at the time of implant insertion, 2 weeks and 4 weeks of healing. Removal torque values (RTV) were measured 2 and 4 weeks after insertion. The implant stability quotient (ISQ) values of implants for resonance frequency analysis (RFA) increased significantly (P .05). The test and control implants also showed significantly higher ISQ values during 4 weeks of healing period (P .05). The SLA, anodized and Ca-P immersed implants showed higher RTVs at 2 and 4 weeks of healing than the machined one (P anodic oxidation nor Ca-P immersion techniques have any advantage over the conventional SLA technique with respect to implant stability.

  4. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, M; Croharé, L; Ibañez, J C

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm(2) was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces..

  5. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  6. Modelling dental implant extraction by pullout and torque procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A; Shemtov-Yona, K

    2017-07-01

    Dental implants extraction, achieved either by applying torque or pullout force, is used to estimate the bone-implant interfacial strength. A detailed description of the mechanical and physical aspects of the extraction process in the literature is still missing. This paper presents 3D nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations of a commercial implant extraction process from the mandible bone. Emphasis is put on the typical load-displacement and torque-angle relationships for various types of cortical and trabecular bone strengths. The simulations also study of the influence of the osseointegration level on those relationships. This is done by simulating implant extraction right after insertion when interfacial frictional contact exists between the implant and bone, and long after insertion, assuming that the implant is fully bonded to the bone. The model does not include a separate representation and model of the interfacial layer for which available data is limited. The obtained relationships show that the higher the strength of the trabecular bone the higher the peak extraction force, while for application of torque, it is the cortical bone which might dictate the peak torque value. Information on the relative strength contrast of the cortical and trabecular components, as well as the progressive nature of the damage evolution, can be revealed from the obtained relations. It is shown that full osseointegration might multiply the peak and average load values by a factor 3-12 although the calculated work of extraction varies only by a factor of 1.5. From a quantitative point of view, it is suggested that, as an alternative to reporting peak load or torque values, an average value derived from the extraction work be used to better characterize the bone-implant interfacial strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Finite element analysis for dental implants subjected to thermal loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Reza Khalili

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Dental implants have been studied for replacement of missing teeth for many years. Productivity of implants is extremely related to the stability and resistance under applied loads and the minimum stress in jaw bone. The purpose of this study was to study numerically the 3D model of implant under thermal loads.   Materials and Methods: Bone and the ITI implant were modeled in “Solidworks” software. To obtain the exact model, the bone was assumed as a linear orthotropic material. The implant system, including implant, abutment, framework and crown were modeled and located in the bone. After importing the model in Abaqus software, the material properties and boundary conditions and loads were applied and after meshing, the model was analyzed. In this analysis, the loads were applied in two steps. In the first step, the mechanical load was applied as tightening torque to the abutment and the abutment was tightened in the implant with 35 N.cm torque. In the second step, the thermal load originated from drinking cold and hot water was applied as thermal flux on the ceramic crown surface in this model.   Results: Thermal analysis results showed that the thermal gradient in the bone was about 5.5 and 4.9 degrees of centigrade in the case of drinking cold and hot water respectively , although the maximum gradient of the whole system was reduced to 14 degrees, which occurred, in the crown by drinking cold water.   Conclusion Thermal stresses were so small and it was because of the low thermal gradient. Maximum stresses occurred in the abutment were due to the tension preloads which were originated from the tightening torque.

  8. A 2-year report on maxillary and mandibular fixed partial dentures supported by Astra Tech dental implants. A comparison of 2 implants with different surface textures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, U; Gotfredsen, K; Olsson, C

    1998-01-01

    In 50 partially edentulous patients, 133 (48 maxillary; 85 mandibular) Astra Tech dental implants of 2 different surface textures (machined; TiO-blasted) were alternately installed, supporting 52 fixed partial dentures (FPDs). Before abutment connection 2 machined implants (1 mandibular; 1...... maxillary) were found to be non-osseointegrated and were replaced. Another implant could not be restored due to a technical complication. Two FPDs were remade because of technical complications, both because of abutment fractures. Thus, after 2 years in function, the cumulative survival rates were 97.......7% and 95.7% for implants and prostheses, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in survival rate between the 2 types of implants, 100% (TiO-blasted) vs 95.3% (machined), P = 0.24. After 2 years in function, when both jaw and type of implants were combined, the mean (SD) marginal...

  9. Esthetic outcome for maxillary anterior single implants assessed by different dental specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dosari, Abdullah; Al-Rowis, Ra'ed; Moslem, Feras; Alshehri, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to assess the esthetic outcome of maxillary anterior single implants by comparing the esthetic perception of dental professionals and patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-three patients with single implants in the esthetic zone were enrolled in this study. Dentists of four different dental specialties (Three orthodontists, three oral surgeons, three prosthodontists, and three periodontists) evaluated the pink esthetic score (PES)/white esthetic score (WES) for 23 implant-supported single restorations. The satisfactions of the patients on the esthetic outcome of the treatment have been evaluated according to the visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS The mean total PES/WES was 12.26 ± 4.76. The mean PES was 6.45 ± 2.78 and mean WES was 5.80 ± 2.82. There was a statistically significant difference among the different specialties for WES (P<.01) and Total PES/WES (P<.01). Prosthodontists were found to have assigned poorer ratings among the other specialties, while oral surgeons gave the higher ratings than periodontists, orthodontists, and prosthodontists. CONCLUSION Prosthodontists seemed to be stricter when assessing aesthetic outcome among other specialties. Moreover, a clear correlation existed between dentists' and patients' esthetic perception, thereby providing rationales for involving patients in the treatment plan to achieve higher levels of patient satisfaction. PMID:27826384

  10. Clinical evaluation of a novel dental implant system as single implants under immediate loading conditions - 4-month post-loading results from a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Blasone, Rodolfo; Malaguti, Giuliano; Gaffuri, Cristiano; Caneva, Marco; Minciarelli, Armando; Luongo, Giuseppe

    To evaluate the safety and clinical effectiveness of a novel dental implant system (GENESIS Implant System, Keystone Dental, Massachusetts, USA) using another dental implant system by the same manufacturer as a control (PRIMA Implant System, Keystone Dental). A total of 53 patients requiring at least two single crowns had their sites randomised according to a split-mouth design to receive both implant systems at six centres. If implants could be placed with a torque superior to 40 Ncm they were to be loaded immediately with provisional crowns, otherwise after 3 months of submerged healing. Provisional crowns were replaced by definitive crowns 4 months after initial loading, when the follow-up period for the initial part of this study was completed. Outcome measures were crown/implant failures, complications, pink esthetic score (PES), peri-implant marginal bone level changes, plaque score, marginal bleeding, patients and preference of the clinician. In total 53 PRIMA and 53 GENESIS implants were placed. Three patients dropped out but all of the remaining patients were followed up to 4-months post-loading. No PRIMA implant failed whereas four GENESIS implants failed. Only two complications were reported for PRIMA implants. There were no statistically significant differences for crown/implant failures (difference in proportions = 0.080; P (McNemar test) = 0.125) and complications (difference in proportions = -0.04; P (McNemar test) = 0.500) between the implant systems. There were no differences at 4-months post-loading for plaque (difference = -0.54, 95% CI: -3.01 to 1.93; P (Paired t-test) = 0.660), marginal bleeding (difference = -3.8, 95% CI: -7.63 to 0.019; P (Paired t-test) = 0.051), PES (difference = 0.47, 95% CI: -0.56 to 1.50; P (Paired t-test) = 0.365) and marginal bone level changes (difference in mm = -0.04, 95% CI: -0.33 to 0.26; P (Paired t-test) = 0.795). The majority of the patients (46) had no

  11. [Implant placement with metal ceramic restorations in a patient with type II diabetes and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, S V; Markina, M S

    2013-01-01

    In out-patient dental care a history of somatic pathology is of vital importance. Unfortunately patients are not always compliant enough not understanding the impact of somatic pathology on dental treatment. The current paper presents a case of dental implant placement and splint bridge fixation in a patient with type II diabetes and asthma. The authors summarize the most useful recommendations for treatment and follow-up of such patients.

  12. State of the Art of Short Dental Implants: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neldam, Camilla Albeck; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2012-01-01

    of this study was systematically to evaluate publications concerning short dental implants defined as an implant with a length of =8 mm installed in the maxilla or in the mandible with special reference to implant type, survival rate, location of implant site, and observation time. Materials and Methods......: A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning short dental implants of length =8 mm published between 1992 and October 2009. The articles included in this study report data on implant length =8 mm, implant surface, registered region of installment, observation time, single tooth......Background: Short implants (=8 mm) are manufactured for use in atrophic regions of the jaws. As implant length in many studies has been proven to play a major role in implant survival it is indicated to evaluate survival of short implants in the present literature. Purpose: The purpose...

  13. Preliminary fabrication and characterization of electron beam melted Ti–6Al–4V customized dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar Ramakrishnaiah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study was aimed to fabricate customized root form dental implant using additive manufacturing technique for the replacement of missing teeth. The root form dental implant was designed using Geomagic™ and Magics™, the designed implant was directly manufactured by layering technique using ARCAM A2™ electron beam melting system by employing medical grade Ti–6Al–4V alloy powder. Furthermore, the fabricated implant was characterized in terms of certain clinically important parameters such as surface microstructure, surface topography, chemical purity and internal porosity. Results confirmed that, fabrication of customized dental implants using additive rapid manufacturing technology offers an attractive method to produce extremely pure form of customized titanium dental implants, the rough and porous surface texture obtained is expected to provide better initial implant stabilization and superior osseointegration.

  14. Preliminary fabrication and characterization of electron beam melted Ti-6Al-4V customized dental implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Mohammad, Ashfaq; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Kotha, Sunil Babu; Celur, Sree Lalita; Hashem, Mohamed I; Vallittu, Pekka K; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2017-05-01

    The current study was aimed to fabricate customized root form dental implant using additive manufacturing technique for the replacement of missing teeth. The root form dental implant was designed using Geomagic™ and Magics™, the designed implant was directly manufactured by layering technique using ARCAM A2™ electron beam melting system by employing medical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder. Furthermore, the fabricated implant was characterized in terms of certain clinically important parameters such as surface microstructure, surface topography, chemical purity and internal porosity. Results confirmed that, fabrication of customized dental implants using additive rapid manufacturing technology offers an attractive method to produce extremely pure form of customized titanium dental implants, the rough and porous surface texture obtained is expected to provide better initial implant stabilization and superior osseointegration.

  15. Stability of dental implants in grafted bone in the anterior maxilla: longitudinal study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Khaldi, Nasser

    2010-06-06

    We aimed to assess the stability over time of dental implants placed in grafted bone in the maxilla using resonance frequency analysis, and to compare the stability of implants placed in grafted and non-grafted bone. Data were collected from 23 patients (15 test and 8 controls) in whom 64 implants (Brånemark system, Nobel Biocare, Göteborg, Sweden) were placed in accordance with the two-stage surgical protocol. In the test group 36 fixtures were placed in grafted bone, and in the control group 28 fixtures were placed in non-grafted bone. Resonance frequency analysis was used to assess the test sites at implant placement and abutment connection. The mean (SD) implant stability quotient (ISQ) for test sites at the time of implant placement was 61.91 (6.68), indicating excellent primary stability, and was 63.53 (5.76) at abutment connection. ISQ values at abutment connection were similar for test and control sites. Implants placed in grafted bone compared favourably with those in non-grafted bone, and showed excellent stability.

  16. BMP-2/ACS/allograft for combined maxillary alveolar split/sinus floor grafting with and without simultaneous dental implant placement: report of 21 implants placed into 7 alveolar split sites followed for up to 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ole T; Kuhlke, K Lee; Leopardi, Aldo; Adams, Mark W; Ringeman, Jason L

    2014-01-01

    This report presents seven patients who were treated with combined alveolar split/sinus grafting technique and dental implants and followed for 1 to 3 years. The grafting material included bone morphogenetic protein-2 in an absorbable collagen sponge plus allograft. The procedure was successful in all patients, who received implants either simultaneously with grafting or 4 to 6 months after grafting.

  17. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Immediate Loaded Dental Implants With Local Application of Melatonin: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gammal, Mona Y; Salem, Ahmed S; Anees, Mohamed M; Tawfik, Mohamed A

    2016-04-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants in situations where low bone density exist, such as the posterior maxillary region, became possible recently after the introduction of biomimetic agents. This 1-year preliminary clinical trial was carried out to clinically and radiographically evaluate immediate-loaded 1-piece implants with local application of melatonin in the osteotomy site as a biomimetic material. 14 patients with missing maxillary premolars were randomized to receive 14 implants of 1-piece type that were subjected to immediate loading after 2 weeks of initial placement. Group I included 7 implants with acid-etched surface while group II included 7 implants with acid-etched surface combined with local application of melatonin gel at the osteotomy site. Patients were recalled for follow up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after loading. All implants were considered successful after 12 months of follow-up. Significant difference (P implant loading when considering the implant stability. At 1 and 3 months there were significant differences in the marginal bone level between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the local application of melatonin at the osteotomy site is associated with good stability and minimal bone resorption. However, more studies for longer follow-up periods are required to confirm the effect of melatonin hormone on osseointegration of dental implants.

  18. Estudio de asociación entre enfermedades sistémicas y el fracaso de implantes dentales Study of association between systemic diseases and dental implant failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Domínguez

    2013-04-01

    , genero y el habito de fumar.Since the beginning of oral implant surgery it has been recommended to exclude or limit certain patients with health issues or smoking habits. The chronic non-communicable diseases are not considered an absolute contraindication to the use of oral implants, but the type of disease should be evaluated in detail, as a potential risk that could affect the process of osseointegration. There are certain systemic conditions, such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and hypothyroidism, as well as the habit of smoking, that affect the success, survival or failure of the implants. The purpose of the investigation is to determine whether there is an association between the failure of dental implants and systemic diseases in the population of patients undergoing dental implant surgery of San José de Santiago de Chile Hospital. We conducted a retrospective observational study and the variables studied were systemic diseases (osteoporosis, hypertension, diabetes, and hypothyroidism and the criteria used to assess the health of implants were those of the International Congress of Oral Implantology of Pisa, where "failure" is the term used for implants requiring removal or that were already lost. These variables were recorded from the clinical record and during a clinical examination, in a data collection sheet. This allowed to describe variables and their distribution, and then to analyze the data to find statistically valid evidence. For this study we can conclude that the analysis of each of the variables such as systemic hypertension or ASA II, have an association with the failure of dental implants, but not osteoporosis, hypothyroidism, diabetes, age, nutritional status, gender and cigarette smoking.

  19. Studies of the quality of the intraosseous dental implant bed and of thermal effects in implant pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K

    2000-07-01

    Dental implants may offer solutions to problems of tooth loss and removable dentures, avoiding the blighting of sound teeth in conventional bridgework. However, there may be severe problems due to deficient and poor quality host bone, particularly in the maxillary sinus region. The success of particulate irradiated mineralised cancellous allograft (IMCA) in generating new bone in the sinus was analysed using the trephine bone cores removed to create an implant bed. Bone cores were embedded and examined using 3D fluorescence fight microscopy and scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode to study the quantity and the quality [degree of mineralisation] of bone in implant sites. In all graft cases, new bone as immature (woven) or mature (lamellar) bone formed on the surfaces of the allograft. The bone volume fraction was found to be significantly greater within 5 mm height of the host sinus floor. In an extended study, control sinuses grafted with IMCA soaked in saline showed no significant difference to the test side treated with the patient's own serum. IMCA was shown to retain much of its original topographical and morphological characteristics. Biopsy core specimens from other (non-sinus) sites in both maxilla and mandible were treated similarly. The highest mineral density distributions were observed in the mandible, with the lowest in the residual posterior maxilla beneath the sinus floor. A novel quantitative bone quality scale is proposed to include three parameters of bone quality: mineralisation density, bone volume fraction and connectivity. Clinical use of Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) confirmed positive blood flow in grafts, sinus membrane, and oral tissues. A model of heat conduction in dental implants, predicted oral heat to be a possible factor in implant pathology. The effect of temperature on avian osteoclastic resorption in vitro was studied using a volumetric pit assay. Osteoclastic function measured as volumes and

  20. Bone regeneration at dental implant sites with suspended stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, R C; Park, Y K; Cho, J J; Kim, S K; Heo, S J; Koak, J Y; Lee, J H

    2014-10-01

    During the maintenance of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), suspended cells are discarded normally. We noted the osteogenic potential of these cells to be like that of anchorage-dependent BMMSCs. Therefore, we characterized suspended BMMSCs from rabbit bone marrow by bioengineering and applied the suspended BMMSCs to double-canaled dental implants inserted into rabbits. After primary isolation of BMMSCs, we collected the suspended cells during primary culture on the third day. The cells were transferred and maintained on an extracellular-matrix-coated culture plate. The cells were characterized and compared with BMMSCs by colony-forming-unit fibroblast (CFU-f) and cell proliferation assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), in vitro multipotency, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also analyzed the osteogenic potential of cells mixed with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) and transplanted into immunocompromised mice. We compared the viability and proliferation of the suspended BMMSCs and BMMSCs on the titanium implant surface and observed cell morphology. Then, the cells mixed with HA/TCP were applied to the double-canaled implants during installation into rabbit tibia. Four weeks later, we analyzed bone formation inside the canal by histomorphometry. The suspended cells showed higher CFU-f on the extracellular matrix (ECM)-coated culture plate and similar results of proliferation capacity compared with BMMSCs. The cells also showed osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic ability. The suspended cells showed levels of attachment survival and proliferation on the surfaces of titanium implant discs to be higher than or similar to those of BMMSCs. The suspended cells as well as BMMSCs showed stronger bone formation ability in both upper and lower canals of the implants compared with controls on double-canaled implants inserted into rabbit tibia. In this study, we showed that suspended cells after

  1. The cost of dental implants as compared to that of conventional strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijk, P; Bouma, J; van Waas, MAJ; van Oort, RP; Rutten, FFH

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of dental implants is widely studied, especially in terms of their clinical outcomes. However, from the policymaker's point of view, variables other than safety and efficacy such as the costs and effectiveness of dental implants as compared to other treatment alternatives, are

  2. Dental implant treatment following trauma: An investigation into the failure to complete Accident Compensation Corporation funded care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R; Murray, C; Leichter, J

    2016-03-01

    Among other restorative strategies, the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) provides benefits for dental implant treatment to replace teeth lost as a result of trauma. While ACC has funded over 15,000 dental implants since 2002, the outcomes of this treatment and patient perceptions of this treatment have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of the dental implant treatment outcomes and reasons for failure to complete restorative treatment in patients who had undergone trauma-related implant surgery funded by ACC between February 2006 and September 2009, but had not completed the prosthetic component of the treatment. A randomly selected sample of 399 patients, who had undergone dental implant surgery but not completed the crown restoration, was identified from the ACC database. These individuals were contacted by mail for expressions of interest and 181 clients were interviewed by telephone. Responses to open-ended questions were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and analysed using a general inductive technique. A common emergent theme was the high level of satisfaction expressed by participants with the implant process, however just under half of those responding felt they had been pushed into having implants and were given the impression that this was the only treatment ACC paid for. The cost of the prosthetic phase of the treatment and surgical complications were identified as the primary reasons why participants failed to complete the restorative phase of treatment, after completing the surgical phase. The results highlighted the need to better inform patients of their treatment options and to allow time for them to process this information before progressing with care. A patient decision tool may help to give greater ownership of the treatment options. Newly implemented protocols to assist dentists to better assess treatment needs may also assist in achieving improvements in perceived treatment outcomes for

  3. Bioinspired micro/nano fabrication on dental implant-bone interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Shi, Liang; He, Wen-Xi; Han, Dong; Yan, Yan; Niu, Zhong-Ying; Shi, Sheng-Gen

    2013-01-01

    Pioneering research suggests fabricating a biomimetic interface with multiscaled surfacial architecture can greatly improve biomaterials' function and property. According to this inspiration, we chiefly single out and analyze the natural hierarchical micro/nano structure in rat's alveolar bone. Then, a combined hierarchical structure, i.e. micro-pits interlaced self-assemble TiO2 nanotubes of several tens of nanometers on dental implant's surface is developed. The as-prepared surface showed that hundreds of self-assembled TiO2 nanotubes were tightly arrayed with a diameter range of 30-50 nm, similar to collagen fibers within rat's mandible (60-80 nm). Meanwhile, this hierarchical micro/nano surface can provide a larger surface energy and roughness, a preferable hydrophilicity, a more adaptive mechanical property and adhesion work, a better bioactivity and biocompatibity, a superior attachment and growth of osteoblasts as compared to the smooth and purely micro-treated counterparts. The results indicated that this bioinspired micro/nano fabrication on dental implant-bone interface can be potentially applied in the update of dental implant in patients' clinical therapy and provide a new strategy for fabricating other osteocompatible materials.

  4. Influence of Implant Shape (Tapered vs Cylindrical) on the Survival of Dental Implants Placed in the Posterior Maxilla: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Mohammed; Alshehri, Fahad

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the effect of implant shape (tapered vs cylindrical) on the survival of dental implants placed in the posterior maxilla. Databases were searched from 1977 up to and including February 2015 using various key words. Only original clinical studies were included. Experimental studies, letters to the editor, review articles, case reports, and unpublished literature were excluded. The pattern of the present review was customized to mainly summarize the relevant information. Five studies were included. The number of patients included ranged between 4 and 29 participants. In total, 7 to 72 implants were placed in the posterior maxilla. Tapered and cylindrical shaped implants were placed in 1 and 1 study, respectively. In 1 study, both 41 tapered and cylindrical implant were placed. In all studies, rough-surfaced and threaded implants were used. Three studies reported the diameter and lengths of implants placed, which ranged between 3.75 to 4 mm and 10 to 20 mm, respectively. The mean follow-up period and survival rate of implants ranged between 19 and 96 months and 84.2% to 100%, respectively. In 1 study, implants were placed subcrestally in the posterior maxilla. Guided bone regeneration was performed in none of the studies. In all studies, participants were nonsmokers and were systemically healthy. There is no influence of implant shape on the survival of implants placed in the posterior maxilla.

  5. Periodontal ligament formation around different types of dental titanium implants. I. The self-tapping screw type implant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, K; Karring, T; Gotfredsen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a periodontal ligament can form around self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants. Implants were inserted in contact with the periodontal ligament of root tips retained in the mandibular jaws of 7 monkeys. In each side of the mandible, 1 premolar......, a periodontal ligament can form on self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants in areas where a void is present between the surrounding bone and the implant at the time of insertion....

  6. Efficiency of Nanotube Surface-Treated Dental Implants Loaded with Doxycycline on Growth Reduction of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cimara Fortes; Babu, Jegdish; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Patel, Sweetu; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    The prevalence of peri-implant infection in patients with dental implants has been shown to range from 28% to 56%. A nanotube-modified implant surface can deliver antibiotics locally and suppress periodontal pathogenic bacterial growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the deliverability of antibiotics via a nanotube-modified implant. Dental implants with a nanotube surface were fabricated and loaded with doxycycline. Afterward, each dental implant with a nanotube surface was placed into 2-mL tubes, removed from solution, and placed in a fresh solution daily for 28 days. Experimental samples from 1, 2, 4, 16, 24, and 28 days were used for this evaluation. The concentration of doxycycline was measured using spectrophotometric analysis at 273-nm absorbance. The antibacterial effect of doxycycline was evaluated by supplementing Porphyromonas gingivalis (P gingivalis) growth media with the solution collected from the dental implants at the aforementioned time intervals for a period of 48 hours under anaerobic conditions. A bacterial viability assay was used to evaluate P gingivalis growth at 550-nm absorbance. Doxycycline concentration varied from 0.33 to 1.22 μg/mL from day 1 to day 28, respectively. A bacterial viability assay showed the highest P gingivalis growth at day 1 (2 nm) and the lowest at day 4 (0.17 nm), with a gradual reduction from day 1 to day 4 of approximately 87.5%. The subsequent growth pattern was maintained and slightly increased from baseline in approximately 48.3% from day 1 to day 24. The final P gingivalis growth measured at day 28 was 29.4% less than the baseline growth. P gingivalis growth was suppressed in media supplemented with solution collected from dental implants with a nanotube surface loaded with doxycycline during a 28-day time interval.

  7. A prospective clinical study to evaluate the performance of zirconium dioxide dental implants in single-tooth gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlert, Michael; Kniha, Heinz; Weingart, Dieter; Schild, Sabine; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Bormann, Kai-Hendrik

    2016-12-01

    Dental implants have traditionally been made from titanium or its alloys, but recently full-ceramic implants have been developed with comparable osseointegration properties and functional strength properties to titanium. These ceramic implants may have advantages in certain patients and situations, for example, where esthetic outcomes are particularly important. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the performance of a newly developed full-ceramic ZrO2 monotype implant design (PURE Ceramic Implant; Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) in single-tooth gaps in the maxilla and mandible. This was a prospective, open-label, single-arm study in patients requiring implant rehabilitation in single-tooth gaps. Full-ceramic implants were placed, with provisional and final prostheses inserted after 3 and 6 months, respectively. Crestal bone level was measured at implant placement and after 6 and 12 months. Implant survival and success were evaluated after 6 and 12 months. Further evaluations are planned after 24 and 36 months. Forty-six patients were screened for potential study participation, of whom 44 (17 men and 27 women, mean age 48 ± 14 years) were recruited into the study. The majority of implants (90.9%) were placed in the maxilla. The implant survival and implant success rate after 12 months were 97.6%. A minor change of the mean bone level occurred between implant loading (final prosthesis insertion after 6 months) and 12 months (-0.14 mm) after initial bone remodeling was observed between implant placement and loading (-0.88 mm). The results indicated that monotype ceramic implants can achieve clinical outcomes comparable to published outcomes of equivalent titanium implants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Convergent methods assessing bone growth in an experimental model at dental implants in the minipig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Anton; Friedmann, Asisa; Grize, Leticia; Obrecht, Marcel; Dard, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Implant dentistry demonstrated its reliability in treating successfully an increased amount of patients with dental implants exhibiting hydrophilic (modSLA) or non-hydrophilic (SLA) surfaces. Objectives of this minipig study consisted in assessing bone regeneration at both types of dental implants in a new experimental model (lateral bone defects) by implementing a convergent analysis approach combining histology and contact radiography. In six adult female minipigs standardized acute alveolar defects were created, then receiving two implants in the mandibles bilaterally (modSLA and SLA, one of each combined with Guided Bone Regeneration). Animals were sacrificed after 28 days of healing. Mid-crestal specimen were analyzed assessing missing BIC to implant shoulder (fBIC); vertical bone growth upon implant surface, bone:tissue ratio and grafting material area occupied by material remnants for GBR sites. Values obtained from both analyses were compared and statistical correlations scrutinized. Although dimensions of mean differences and adjusted means given by radiographic method were lower than histological ones, comparison of different implants yielded similar results. Statistical analyses of correlation and concordance coefficients used to evaluate radiological method of measurement showed high level of concordance (concordance coefficient=0.912 and correlation coefficient=0.939) for fBIC. Similar results were observed for vertical new bone and for remnants of graft. Discrepancies for new bone and for mineralized tissue resulted in concordance coefficient of 0.182 and 0.054. The results indicate that contact X-rays can be used for morphometric assessments regarding defect fill; however, histological staining remains beneficial if greater resolution for distinguishing qualitative differences in the tissues is required.

  9. Influence of implant shape, surface morphology, surgical technique and bone quality on the primary stability of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; Rocha, Felipe Assis; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; Coelho, Paulo Guilherme

    2012-12-01

    The primary stability of dental implants has been investigated before, but a study of the influence of implant shape, size and surface morphology (machined, acid etched or anodized), surgical technique (press-fit or undersized) and substrate (natural or simulated bone) on the primary stability of dental implants has not been reported. The present work intends to fill this gap. In this work, six different dental implants were inserted into and removed from synthetic and natural bone while measuring the torque. A total of 255 dental implants with three shapes, four sizes and three surface topographies were inserted into pig rib, PTFE and polyurethane. The implant sites were prepared using straight and tapered drills. The primary stability was estimated from the maximum insertion torque. Comparisons between samples were based on the maximum insertion torque (MIT), the maximum removal torque (MRT) and the torque ratio (TR=MRT/MIT). The insertion torque into pig ribs showed larger dispersion. All parameters (shape, size and surface morphology of the implant, surgical technique and substrate type) were found to have a significant influence on primary stability. The insertion of a tapered implant requires a higher torque than the insertion of a straight implant. Surface treatments improve the primary stability. The influence of the surgical technique is smaller than that of implant size and shape. The highest insertion torque was that of anodized tapered implants inserted into undersized sites. Finally, the primary stability of dental implants is highly dependent on implant design, surgical technique and substrate type. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dental loss among ambulatory patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth E. Izuora

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Dental loss is common in patients with diabetes and is associated with older age, diabetic retinopathy and not flossing. In order to reduce dental loss among patients with diabetes, regular flossing should be emphasized as an important component of dental care.

  11. Progressive immediate loading of a perforated maxillary sinus dental implant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Juboori, Mohammed Jasim

    2015-01-01

    The displacement of a dental implant into the maxillary sinus may lead to implant failure due to exposure of the apical third or the tip of the implant beyond the bone, resulting in soft tissue growth. This case report discusses dental implant placement in the upper first molar area with maxillary sinus involvement of approximately 2 mm. A new technique for progressive implant loading was used, involving immediately loaded implants with maxillary sinus perforation and low primary stability. Follow-up was performed with resonance frequency analysis and compared with an implant placed adjacent in the upper second premolar area using a conventional delayed loading protocol. Implants with maxillary sinus involvement showed increasing stability during the healing period. We found that progressive implant loading may be a safe technique for the placement of immediately loaded implants with maxillary sinus involvement.

  12. A new approach to modelling and designing mono-block dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    R. Hunter; F. Alister; Möller, J.; J. Alister

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is present a new approach to modelling and design the low cost mono-block dental implants based on the integration of the computer aided techniques. This approach provides the automation of the design process of the mono-block dental implants.Design/methodology/approach: The approach used to develop the modelling and design of the mono-block dental implants are based on the parametrization of the main geometric features of the implants. This approach allows to generate ...

  13. Histology of a dental implant with a platform switched implant-abutment connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Perrotti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peri-implant crestal bone must be stable for aesthetic reasons. Aim of this study was a histologic analysis of an implant with a platform switched implant-abutment connection. Materials and methods: A 32-year-old male patient participated in this study. The patient needed a bilateral mandibular restoration. Four implants were used, and were immediately restored and loaded the same day of insertion. After a 6 weeks healing period, one implant with platform-switched abutment was retrieved with trephine. Before retrieval the implant was osseointegrated and not mobile. On one side of the implant, a 1 mm resorption of the crestal bone was present. On the contrary, on the other side no bone resorption had occurred and about 1 mm of bone was present over the implant shoulder. Results: The bone-implant contact percentage was 65.1 ± 6.3 %. Platform- switching could help in maintaining the height of the peri-implant crestal bone.

  14. Surgical templates for dental implant positioning; current knowledge and clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zaheer Kola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants have been used in a variety of different forms for many years. Since the mid-20 th century, there has been an increase in interest in the implant process for the replacement of missing teeth. Branemark was one of the initial pioneers who applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms an immobile connection with bone. The need for a dental implant to completely address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the surgical and handling protocol. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have serious shortcomings related to their bony union and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. However, anatomic limitation and restorative demands encourage the surgeon to gain precision in planning and surgical positioning of dental implants. Ideal placement of the implant facilitates the establishment of favorable forces on the implants and the prosthetic component as well as ensures an aesthetic outcome. Therefore, it is advisable to establish a logical continuity between the planned restoration and the surgical phases, it is essential to use a transfer device that for sure increases the predictability of success. The surgical guide template is fabricated by a dental technician after the presurgical restorative appointments that primarily include determination of occlusal scheme and implant angulations. Here, authors genuinely attempted to review the evolution and clinical applicability of surgical templates used in the placement of dental implants.

  15. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment for failing dental implants due to peri-implantitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Dawn; Blodgett, Kris; Braga, Charles; Finkbeiner, Larry; Fourrier, Jeanne; George, John; Gregg, Robert; Honigman, Allen; Houser, Bruce; Lamas, William; Lehrman, Neal; Linden, Eric; McCarthy, Delwin; McCawley, Tom; McCormick, Randy; Marcus, Ed; Noraian, Kirk; Rubelman, Peter; Salama, Maurice; Saunders, Steven; Seamons, Brandon; Thein, David; Toms, Michael; Vassos, George; Harris, David M.

    2014-02-01

    A large percentage of dental implants experience complications, most commonly, infection leading to peri-implantitis and peri-mucositis, inflammatory disease involving pathogen contamination. It presents with radiographic findings of crestal bone loss. At this time there appears to be no compelling evidence for an effective intervention. The LANAP protocol is a FDA cleared surgical protocol that produces new attachment and bone regeneration when applied to periodontally infected natural teeth. The LANAP protocol and laser dosimetry have been modified to treat ailing and failing implants. Twenty-one clinicians who have been trained to perform the LANAP protocol and the LAPIPTM protocol have volunteered 26 LAPIP case reports. The time from implant to intervention ranges from 3 months to 16 years. Post-LAPIP radiographs range from 2-48 months. Ten cases were excluded for technical reasons. All 16 remaining cases provide radiographic evidence of increase in crestal bone mass around the implant and, when reported, probe depth reductions. All treating clinicians report control of the infection, reversal of bone loss and rescue of the incumbent implant. Although the success/failure rate cannot be judged from these data, any successes in this area deserve reporting and further study.

  16. Decontamination methods using a dental water jet and dental floss for microthreaded implant fixtures in regenerative periimplantitis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Shin, Seung-Yun; Koo, Ki-Tae; Lee, Yong-Moo; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Seol, Yang-Jo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated decontamination methods using a dental water jet and dental floss on microthreaded implants for regenerative periimplantitis therapy. In 6 beagle dogs, experimental periimplantitis was induced, and decontamination procedures, including manual saline irrigation (control group), saline irrigation using a dental water jet (group 1) and saline irrigation using a dental water jet with dental flossing (group 2), were performed. After in situ decontamination procedures, some of the implant fixtures (n = 4 per group) were retrieved for analysis by SEM, whereas other fixtures (n = 4 per group) underwent regenerative therapy. After 3 months of healing, the animals were killed. The SEM examination indicated that decontamination of the implant surfaces was the most effective in group 2, with no changes in implant surface morphology. The histological examination also revealed that group 2 achieved significantly greater amounts of newly formed bone (6.75 ± 2.19 mm; P = 0.018), reosseointegration (1.88 ± 1.79 mm; P = 0.038), and vertical bone fill (26.69 ± 18.42%; P = 0.039). Decontamination using a dental water jet and dental floss on microthreaded implants showed positive mechanical debridement effects and positive bone regeneration effects.

  17. Evaluation of implant-materials as cell carriers for dental stem cells under in vitro conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gosau, Martin; Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Eickhoff, Hannah; Prateeptongkum, Esthera; Reck, Anja; Götz, W.; Klingelhöffer, Christoph; Müller, Steffen; Morsczeck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental stem cells in combination with implant materials may become an alternative to autologous bone transplants. For tissue engineering different types of soft and rigid implant materials are available, but little is known about the viability and the osteogenic differentiation of dental stem cells on these different types of materials. According to previous studies we proposed that rigid bone substitute materials are superior to soft materials for dental tissue engineering. Method...

  18. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of single tantalum dental implants: a prospective pilot clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE FRANCESCO, M.; GOBBATO, E.A.; NOCE, D.; CAVALLARI, F.; FIORETTI, A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective The aim of this prospective pilot clinical case series report was to evaluate, through a clinical and radiographic analysis, the peri-implant bone resorption of the tantalum dental implants (TMT) (Zimmer TMT, Parsippany, NJ, USA) one year after prosthetic rehabilitation. Methods Twenty tantalum dental implants were placed in both maxillas and mandibles of 20 patients. Patients were asked to attend a radiographic and clinical follow-up and their previous clinical records and X-rays were assessed. Bone levels were calculated by digitally measuring the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant on periapical radiographs taken at surgery and after 6 and 12 months of functioning. The Pearson correlation analysis was performed to assess it there was a correlation between the measurement of the marginal bone loss (MBL). The Anova Test with a post-hoc analysis using Bonferroni’s test was used to compare the three group (0, 6 months and 12 months). Results The mean total MBL for the group 0 months was 0.84 mm (SD 0.21), 6 months was 0.87 mm (SD 0.22) and for 12 months was 0.89 mm (SD 0.23). The values of the Pearson’s coefficients showed that the data measurement were positively correlated. The Anova test showed a statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusion The statistically significant difference in marginal bone loss can be considered physiological. Within the limits of this study it can be concluded that TMT implants have an excellent bone crest’s stability, however, to have most accurate information, will be necessary extend the sample. PMID:28280531

  19. Implant therapy for a patient with Down syndrome and oral habits: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponaro, Paola C; Deguchi, Toru; Lee, Damian J

    2016-09-01

    This clinical report describes prosthodontic therapy with an implant-supported partial fixed dental prosthesis for a patient with Down syndrome and concomitant oral habits, including tongue thrusting and thumb sucking.

  20. Biomechanical comparison of sinus floor elevation and alternative treatment methods for dental implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükkurt, Sercan; Alpaslan, Gökhan; Kurt, Ahmet

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we compared the success of sinus lifting and alternative treatment methods in applying dental implants in cases lacking adequate bone due to pneumatization of the maxillary sinus. In a computer environment, 3D models were created using computerized tomography data from a p