WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental disciplines including

  1. Comparison of oral health behavior among dental students, students of other disciplines, and fashion models in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Julien; Filippi, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Self-reliant oral health behavior exert great influence on the oral health of our society. The aim of the present study was to find out whether there is an occupation-related difference in the oral health behavior between dental students, students of other disciplines, and fashion models in German-speaking Switzerland. The survey comprised 19 questions which were asked using a web-based anonymous questionnaire. The investigation particularly inquired about employed auxiliaries and their application for an improvement of oral hygiene. In addition, the satisfaction with the own teeth and smile as well as the influence of the occupation or the study on oral hygiene were examined. Included in this evaluation were 204 dental students, 257 students of other disciplines, and 117 fashion models aged between 21 and 25 years. The evaluation reveals that the state of knowledge and the professional relationship affect the practice of oral hygiene, in particular among dental students. Fashion models, however, are most intensively concerned with body care and oral hygiene. Their attention is directed particularly to means supposed to improve the smile as well as to ensure fresh breath. Dental students and fashion models constitute a selected minority clearly demarcated from students of other disciplines regarding a higher awareness of self-reliant oral hygiene. The comparatively minor rating of oral health in a group of basically well-trained individuals suggests great need of educational work in the general population.

  2. Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... approval, you encourage good behavior and help build self-esteem. Let natural consequences teach your child. While it ... children; Punishment References American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Discipline. No. 43; updated September 2008. Available ...

  3. The Development of Dental Anesthesiology As a Discipline and Its Role As a Model of Interdisciplinary Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannitti, Joseph A; Montandon, Richard J; Herlich, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The majority of dental procedures can be performed with an awake patient and the use of a local anesthetic, but when deep sedation and general anesthesia are needed, they typically are provided by those dentists with advanced training in anesthesiology, i.e., oral and maxillofacial surgeons and dentist anesthesiologists. Dental anesthesiology began with the discovery of anesthesia by a dentist in 1844 and has been recognized as a separate discipline in dentistry for nearly 70 years. Training over this time evolved from apprenticeships to one-year training programs, and in 2007, the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) began accrediting two-year dental anesthesiology training programs. Since 2015, in recognition of the increasing complexity of the discipline, training has required three years of postgraduate study. The number of dentist anesthesiologists has grown with the increasing demand for anesthesia services by both the public and the profession. However, the present number of dentist anesthesiologists is not sufficient to meet the demand, so additional programs and growth in current programs are needed. Another valuable aspect of this discipline is its role as a positive example of interdepartmental collaboration since dental anesthesiology faculty, as members of a support discipline, typically work across many of the other departments in a dental school. This article reviews the history of the discipline, describes the educational goals and CODA standards for dental anesthesiology programs, using one program as an example, and discusses the needs and challenges that will shape the discipline's development in the future.

  4. Expanding dental hygiene to include dental therapy: improving access to care for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A

    2009-01-01

    Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, and the subsequent National Call to Action to Promote Oral Health contributed significantly to raising the awareness of the American public and the dental profession regarding the lack of access to oral health care by many Americans, especially minorities and low income populations, with resulting disparities in oral health. The problem is particularly acute among children. The current workforce of dentists in the United States is inadequate to meet the oral health care needs of children in terms of numbers of dentists, as well as their distribution, ethnicity, education, and practice orientation. Dental hygienists trained in an expanded scope of practice, can help address the workforce inadequacy. Dental therapists, educated in 2-year programs of postsecondary education, comparable to America's associate degree dental hygiene programs, have been used throughout the world to provide basic, primary oral health care for children. Research has documented that utilizing dental therapists is a cost effective method of improving access to care for children. Countries that have led the way in introducing dental therapists to care for their children are now integrating their separate 2-year curriculum in dental therapy and dental hygiene into a 3-year curriculum to prepare a clinician dually trained in both dental therapy and dental hygiene. This clinician is being designated an oral health therapist. Expanding the education of dental hygienists in the United States to include skills of the internationally acclaimed dental therapist can produce oral health therapists, individuals capable of addressing the basic preventive, restorative, and minor surgical needs of children, but also able to continue to address the preventive and periodontal needs of adults.

  5. Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre including abnormal dental development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørberg, M; Lauesen, S R; Daugaard-Jensen, J

    2015-01-01

    diagnostics and treatment. The SCS skin lesion affected the left side of her hairline over the forehead and nose, involving the left orbit proceeding towards the left oral region. Dental clinical/radiographic examination revealed malformed left maxillary incisors with short roots and lack of eruption. FOLLOW......-UP: The patient has been regularly controlled and treated since she was first diagnosed. A surgical and orthodontic treatment was performed to ensure optimal occlusion, space and alveolar bone development. The present age of the patient is 14 years and 10 months. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrated a patient...

  6. Including CAD/CAM dentistry in a dental school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, William D; Reifeis, Paul; Willis, Lisa; Kirkup, Michele L

    2013-01-01

    Shaping a clinical curriculum that is appropriate for novice dentists, is based on high-quality evidence of efficacy, yet reflects current practices is challenging. CAD/CAM units have been available to dentists since the late '80s. Recent improvements in the software, hardware and the clinical performance of available all-ceramic blocks have keyed a surge in interest. Based on a careful review of the systems available and, equally importantly, a review of the research regarding the longevity of reinforced glass ceramics, IUSD decided to add training on the use of the E4D CAD/CAM system to the curriculum. Students now receive lectures, preclinical hands-on training and clinical experience in fabricating all-ceramic restorations. At present any student who is interested in providing an all-ceramic restoration for his/her patient can do so using our CAD/CAM system. In a little less than one year our undergraduate dental students have provided 125 all-ceramic crowns to their patients. Clinical faculty have been impressed with the marginal fit and esthetics of the crowns. Finally, with students designing, milling, sintering and staining the restorations the CAD/CAM systems has reduced lab costs significantly.

  7. Compendium of Dental Residents’ Research Project and Literature Reviews - 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Diabetes Mellitus . (Literature Review, 1989). Kovac, RS. Osteoporosis and Dental Treatment. (Literature Review, 1990). Martin, TM. Dental Treatment of...papers in dental disciplines including General Den- tistry (9826), Periodontics (9846), Prosthodontics (9856), Orthodontics (9866), and Endodontics...second two dLgits represent the 98XX specialty discipline: 9826 - General dentistry 9836 - Oral and maxillofacial surgery 9846 - Periodontics 9856

  8. Developing new dental communication skills assessment tools by including patients and other stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wener, Mickey Emmons; Schönwetter, Dieter J; Mazurat, Nita

    2011-12-01

    Effectively using patients as teachers to provide authentic feedback is an underused strategy in dental education, but it has potential for integrating the teaching of therapeutic communication skills within the dental clinic setting. This study focuses on the absence of patient input into the design of instruments used to assess students' clinical communication skills and demonstrates how a holistic approach, with input from key stakeholders including patients, was used to produce two such instruments. The development of complementary communication assessment instruments, one for patient use and one for student use, took place in three phases. In Phase I the authors reviewed a sample of existing patient satisfaction surveys; in Phase II they captured input from stakeholders; and Phase III resulted in the generation of the patient communication assessment instrument and the student communication self-assessment instrument. This article highlights communication skill issues relevant to the education of oral health professionals and describes the rationale and process for the development of the first iteration of the patient assessment and student self-assessment clinical communication instruments.

  9. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wotman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction.Keywords: dental practice, dental practice core activities, direct observation of dental practice, Dental Davis Observation Code, dentist, hygienist patient behaviors

  10. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Wotman; Demko, Catherine A.; Kristin Victoroff; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio denta...

  11. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    OpenAIRE

    Wotman, Stephen; Demko, Catherine A.; Victoroff, Kristin; Sudano, Joseph J; Lalumandier, James A

    2010-01-01

    This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral catego...

  12. Compendium of Dental Residents’ Research Projects and Literature Reviews - 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus . (Literature Review, 1989). Martin TM. Dental Treatment of the Pregnant Patient. (Literature Review, 1989). Zapfe RW. Xerostomia...include research oapers in dental disciplines including General Dentistry (9826), Periodontics (9846), Prosthodontics (9856), Orthodontics (9866), and...the 98XX specialty discipline: 9826 - General dentistry 9836 - Oral and maxillofacial surgery 9846 - Periodontics 9856 - Prosthodontics 9866

  13. Management recommendations for invasive dental treatment in patients using oral antithrombotic medication, including novel oral anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diermen, D.E.; van der Waal, I.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims were (1) to search the scientific literature from 2007 to 2012 for guidelines and new studies on the dental management of patients using oral antithrombotic medication; (2) to summarize the articles' evidence and recommendations; and (3) to propose an updated clinical practice gui

  14. Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  15. Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Oshida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities.

  16. Discipline Admonished

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The International Relations discipline has recently witnessed a wave of stocktakings and they surprisingly often follow the narrative that the discipline once revolved around all-encompassing great debates, which, either neatly or claustrophobically depending on the stocktaker, organized the disc......The International Relations discipline has recently witnessed a wave of stocktakings and they surprisingly often follow the narrative that the discipline once revolved around all-encompassing great debates, which, either neatly or claustrophobically depending on the stocktaker, organized...

  17. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in children taking part in an oral health programme including fluoride tablet supplements from the age of 2 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersten, Charlotte; Pylvänen, Lena; Schröder, Ulla;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in children who had participated in an oral health programme between the ages 2-5 years, including fluoride tablets from the age of 2 years.......To investigate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in children who had participated in an oral health programme between the ages 2-5 years, including fluoride tablets from the age of 2 years....

  18. Extravehicular activity technology discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbon, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on extravehicular activity technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: extravehicular mobility unit; airlock and EMU support equipment; tools, mobility aids, and workstations; and telerobotic work aids interfaces.

  19. Manned systems technology discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretoi, Remus

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on manned systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: crew-systems interfaces and interactions; crew training; on-board systems maintenance and support; habitability and environment; and computational human factors.

  20. Acquiring Critical Thinking and Decision-Making Skills: An Evaluation of a Serious Game Used by Undergraduate Dental Students in Dental Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipiyaruk, K.; Gallagher, J. E.; Hatzipanagos, S.; Reynolds, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Serious gaming claims to provide an interactive and motivational approach to learning; hence, it is being increasingly used in various disciplines, including dentistry. GRAPHIC (Games Research Applied to Public Health with Innovative Collaboration)-II, a serious game for dental public health, was used by dental undergraduates at King's College…

  1. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in children taking part in an oral health programme including fluoride tablet supplements from the age of 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckersten, Charlotte; Pylvänen, Lena; Schröder, Ulla; Twetman, Svante; Wennhall, Inger; Matsson, Lars

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in children who had participated in an oral health programme between the ages 2-5 years, including fluoride tablets from the age of 2 years. The study group consisted of 135 10- to 11-year-old children who had participated in the programme, including parent education, tooth-brushing instruction and prescribed fluoride tablets (0.25 mg NaF) (2-3 years: 1 tablet/day; 3-5 years: 2 tablets/day). The prevalence of dental fluorosis in the study group was compared with that in a nonintervention reference group consisting of 129 children of the same ages. The analysis was based on photos of the permanent maxillary front teeth using the Thylstrup & Fejerskov (TF) Index. No statistically significant difference in prevalence of dental fluorosis was seen between the two groups. Forty-three percent of the children in the study group and 38% in the reference group had fluorosis, the majority of a mild nature (TF-score 1). None had a TF score above 2. The pattern was the same after correction for parent reported intake of tablets at 3 and 5 years of age. Introduction of fluoride tablets at the age of 2 years did not result in increased prevalence of dental fluorosis.

  2. Dividing Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Marcus

    2012-01-01

    International Relations (IR) has cultivated an image as a discipline with strong divisions along paradigmatic, methodological, metatheoretical, geographical, and other lines. This article questions that image analyzing the latent structures of communication in IR. It uses citation data from more...... the periphery of the network—security studies and international political economy in particular—but communication is also divided along the lines of geography and policy/theory. The article concludes that divisions notwithstanding, IR communication remains centered around American, general, and theoretical IR...

  3. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix Corporation, Including On-Site Leased...

  4. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  5. The genesis of craniofacial biology as a health science discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, G H; Sperber, S M

    2014-06-01

    The craniofacial complex encapsulates the brain and contains the organs for key functions of the body, including sight, hearing and balance, smell, taste, respiration and mastication. All these systems are intimately integrated within the head. The combination of these diverse systems into a new field was dictated by the dental profession's desire for a research branch of basic science devoted and attuned to its specific needs. The traditional subjects of genetics, embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, dental materials, odontology, molecular biology and palaeoanthropology pertaining to dentistry have been drawn together by many newly emerging technologies. These new technologies include gene sequencing, CAT scanning, MRI imaging, laser scanning, image analysis, ultrasonography, spectroscopy and visualosonics. A vibrant unitary discipline of investigation, craniofacial biology, has emerged that builds on the original concept of 'oral biology' that began in the 1960s. This paper reviews some of the developments that have led to the genesis of craniofacial biology as a fully-fledged health science discipline of significance in the advancement of clinical dental practice. Some of the key figures and milestones in craniofacial biology are identified.

  6. Moving research knowledge into dental hygiene practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobban, Sandra J; Edgington, Eunice M; Clovis, Joanne B

    2008-01-01

    Dental hygiene, as an emerging profession, needs to increase the number of intervention studies that identify improvements in oral health outcomes for clients. Historically, dental hygiene studies have typically been atheoretical, but the use of theoretical frameworks to guide these studies will increase their meaningfulness. Rogers' theory of diffusion of innovations has been used to study research utilization across many disciplines, and may offer insights to the study of research use in dental hygiene. Research use is an important component of evidence-based practice (EBP), and diffusion of research knowledge is an important process in implementing EBP. The purpose of this paper is to use diffusion of innovations theory to examine knowledge movement in dental hygiene, specifically through the example of the preventive practice of oral cancer screening by dental hygienists, considered as an innovation. Diffusion is considered to be the process by which an innovation moves through communication channels over time among a social network. We suggest diffusion theory holds promise for the study of knowledge movement in dental hygiene, but there are limitations including access to and understanding research studies as innovations. Nevertheless, using a theoretical framework such as Rogers' diffusion of innovations will strengthen the quality of intervention research in dental hygiene, and subsequently, health outcomes for clients.

  7. Practice Characteristics Among Dental Anesthesia Providers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynes, Sean G.; Moore, Paul A.; Tan, Peter M.; Zovko, Jayme

    2010-01-01

    Abstract General descriptions or “snapshots” of sedation/general anesthesia practices during dental care are very limited in reviewed literature. The objective of this study was to determine commonalities in dental sedation/anesthesia practices, as well as to accumulate subjective information pertaining to sedation/anesthesia care within the dental profession. This questionnaire-based survey was completed by participating anesthesia providers in the United States. A standardized questionnaire was sent via facsimile, or was delivered by mail, to 1500 anesthesia providers from a randomized list using an online database. Data from the returned questionnaires were entered onto an Excel spreadsheet and were imported into a JMP Statistical Discovery Software program for analyses. Quantitative evaluations were confined to summation of variables, an estimation of means, and a valid percent for identified variables. A total of 717 questionnaires were entered for data analysis (N  =  717). Data from this study demonstrate the wide variation that exists in sedation/anesthesia care and those providing its administration during dental treatment in the United States. The demographics of this randomized population show anesthesia providers involved in all disciplines of the dental profession, as well as significant variation in the types of modalities used for sedation/anesthesia care. Data from this study reveal wide variation in sedation/anesthesia care during dental treatment. These distinctions include representation of sedation/anesthesia providers across all disciplines of the dental profession, as well as variations in the techniques used for sedation/anesthesia care. PMID:20553135

  8. Practice characteristics among dental anesthesia providers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynes, Sean G; Moore, Paul A; Tan, Peter M; Zovko, Jayme

    2010-01-01

    General descriptions or "snapshots" of sedation/general anesthesia practices during dental care are very limited in reviewed literature. The objective of this study was to determine commonalities in dental sedation/anesthesia practices, as well as to accumulate subjective information pertaining to sedation/anesthesia care within the dental profession. This questionnaire-based survey was completed by participating anesthesia providers in the United States. A standardized questionnaire was sent via facsimile, or was delivered by mail, to 1500 anesthesia providers from a randomized list using an online database. Data from the returned questionnaires were entered onto an Excel spreadsheet and were imported into a JMP Statistical Discovery Software program for analyses. Quantitative evaluations were confined to summation of variables, an estimation of means, and a valid percent for identified variables. A total of 717 questionnaires were entered for data analysis (N=717). Data from this study demonstrate the wide variation that exists in sedation/anesthesia care and those providing its administration during dental treatment in the United States. The demographics of this randomized population show anesthesia providers involved in all disciplines of the dental profession, as well as significant variation in the types of modalities used for sedation/anesthesia care. Data from this study reveal wide variation in sedation/anesthesia care during dental treatment. These distinctions include representation of sedation/anesthesia providers across all disciplines of the dental profession, as well as variations in the techniques used for sedation/anesthesia care.

  9. Writing for the Discipline in the Discipline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, Olivier; Grimes, Susan; Rolls, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the issue of students' writing skills in the discipline of Engineering and beyond. It is the result of a discussion between three academics from different discipline backgrounds: Teaching and Learning, the Humanities and Engineering. We start with a review of the strategies commonly used to address problems in students'…

  10. Adopted Children and Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Adopted Children & Discipline Page Content Article Body Some parents are hesitant to discipline the child they have adopted. They may set fewer limits than they would ...

  11. Anatomical sciences: A foundation for a solid learning experience in dental technology and dental prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, Mahmoud M; Thompson, C Mark; Massadiq, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Basic science courses are extremely important as a foundation for scaffolding knowledge and then applying it in future courses, clinical situations as well as in a professional career. Anatomical sciences, which include tooth morphology, oral histology, oral embryology, and head and neck anatomy form a core part of the preclinical courses in dental technology programs. In this article, the importance and relevance of anatomical sciences to dental personnel with no direct contact with patients (dental technicians) and limited discipline related contact with patients (dental prosthetists) is highlighted. Some light is shed on the role of anatomical sciences in the pedagogical framework and its significance in the educational process and interprofessional learning of dental technicians and prosthetists using oral biology as an example in the dental curriculum. To conclude, anatomical sciences allow dental technicians and prosthetists to a gain a better insight of how tissues function, leading to a better understanding of diagnosis, comprehensive treatment planning and referrals if needed. Patient communication and satisfaction also increases as a result of this deep understanding of oral tissues. Anatomical sciences bridge the gap between basic science, preclinical, and clinical courses, which leads to a holistic approach in patient management. Finally, treatment outcomes are positively affected due to the appreciation of the macro and micro structure of oral tissues. Anat Sci Educ. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. Conscious Connections: Phenomenology and Decoding the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes how seven disciplinary bottlenecks from four diverse disciplines were analyzed using a phenomenological perspective and includes a discussion of embodied knowing and implications for educators.

  13. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  14. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  15. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  16. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... and rinsing daily. It also includes having routine dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, ...

  17. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  18. Disciplining anthropological demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Randall

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study furthers the epistemological development of anthropological demography, and its role in understanding the demography of Europe. Firstly we situate anthropological demography against the context of an evolving world of research in which boundaries between academic disciplines have become much more permeable. This is achieved via an overview of recent theoretical debates about the role and nature of disciplinarity, including interdisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. Secondly, in order to understand the current state of the art, we sketch out the evolution of anthropological demography, paying particular attention to the different knowledge claims of anthropology and demography. Finally, we flesh out some of the epistemological and theoretical debates about anthropological demography by sketching out the formative research process of our own work on low fertility in the UK.

  19. Central Dental Evacuation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    20 High-Vacuum Oral Evacuation System (HIVAC) for Oral Surgery, Periodontics, and Endodontics Treatment Rooms..................... 20...handpiece. Inlets to this system are required throughout the dental facility for all disciplines of patient treatment where coolant and irrigation liquids...System (HIVAC) for Oral Surgery, Periodontics, and Endodontics Treatment Rooms The HIVAC system is designed to build and sustain high vacuum pressures

  20. Discipline as Institutional Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Hommel, Ulrich; Cornuel, Eric

    analysis rests on a Foucauldian understanding of control emphasizing that rankings discipline (1) by enhancing the visibility of individuals’ performance, (2) by defining ‘normal’ behavior, and (3) by shaping how people understand themselves and the world around them. We show that these three disciplining...

  1. Doing Discipline Differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprick, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Reactive and exclusionary approaches to discipline are common in secondary schools but do not improve behavior or ensure safety. In this article, the author highlights two promising models that schools can combine to improve climate and discipline for all students. The combined models of PBS (positive behavior support) and RTI (response to…

  2. Classroom Discipline and Socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kayoun

    This study explored how children are socialized through discipline in the preschool classroom. Using detailed descriptions of teacher-student interactions and an interpretive method, the study mapped the process of the children's socialization and the role of discipline. The case study in one 4-year-olds' room examined early socialization…

  3. Fostering Self-Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, George G.; Duquette, Jeffrey F.

    2008-01-01

    From its inception, a primary goal of public education has been to develop self-discipline among students, best seen as them exhibiting socially and morally responsible behavior. This goal coincides with another important educational imperative, as well as an alternative meaning of the term "discipline": to correct misbehavior to create and…

  4. Prescription for Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Kathy H.

    1983-01-01

    The establishment of a code of discipline leads to better classroom management. Using behavior modification techniques discipline problems are minimized and both teachers and students are the winners. Lists seven rules for the music room and describes methods of positive reinforcement and appropriate punishment. (CS)

  5. TRICARE; Changes included in the John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007; authorization of anesthesia and other costs for dental care for children and certain other patients. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-25

    This final rule implements section 702 of the John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007, Public Law 109-364. The rule provides coverage of contracted medical care with respect to dental care beyond that care required as a necessary adjunct to medical or surgical treatment. The entitlement of institutional and anesthesia services is authorized in conjunction with non-covered dental treatment for patients with developmental, mental, or physical disabilities or for pediatric patients age 5 or under. This final rule does not eliminate any contracted medical care that is currently covered for spouses and children. The entitlement of anesthesia services includes general anesthesia services only. Institutional services include institutional benefits associated with both hospital and in-out surgery settings. Patients with developmental, mental, or physical disabilities are those patients with conditions that prohibit dental treatment in a safe and effective manner. Therefore, it is medically or psychologically necessary for these patients to require general anesthesia for dental treatment.

  6. The Discipline Styles of High School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut SAĞNAK

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the discipline styles of high school teachers. The population of this research included students of 10rd grade at central high schools in Niğde. There were 789 students at these high schools in the educational term of 2006-2007. The sample of this study was randomly selected 334 students. The data of the research were collected with an inventory called “Teacher Discipline Style Inventory” developed by Tomal (1999, 2001. The questionnaire is based upon a model consisting of five-discipline styles: Enforcing, abdicating, supporting, compromising and negotiating. There are six questions for each discipline styles with a total number of thirty questions. The data were analysed using means and standard deviation. The results of the study indicated that high school teachers most frequently used negotiating discipline style and rarely used abdicating discipline style.

  7. Medical Geology: a globally emerging discipline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunnell, J.E.; Finkelman, R.B.; Centeno, J.A.; Selinus, O. [Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Medical Geology, the study of the impacts of geologic materials and processes on animal and human health, is a dynamic emerging discipline bringing together the geoscience, biomedical, and public health communities to solve a wide range of environmental health problems. Among the Medical Geology described in this review are examples of both deficiency and toxicity of trace element exposure. Goiter is a widespread and potentially serious health problem caused by deficiency of iodine. In many locations the deficiency is attributable to low concentrations of iodine in the bedrock. Similarly, deficiency of selenium in the soil has been cited as the principal cause of juvenile cardiomyopathy and muscular abnormalities. Overexposure to arsenic is one of the most widespread Medical Geology problems affecting more than one hundred million people in Bangladesh, India, China, Europe, Africa and North and South America. The arsenic exposure is primarily due to naturally high levels in groundwater but combustion of mineralized coal has also caused arsenic poisoning. Dental and skeletal fluorosis also impacts the health of millions of people around the world and, like arsenic, is due to naturally high concentrations in drinking water and, to a lesser extent, coal combustion. Other Medical Geology issues described include geophagia, the deliberate ingestion of soil, exposure to radon, and ingestion of high concentrations of organic compounds in drinking water. Geoscience and biomedical/public health researchers are teaming to help mitigate these health problems as well as various non-traditional issues for geoscientists such as vector-borne diseases.

  8. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials. Science Committee Project 2/98--FDI World Dental Federation study design (Part I) and criteria for evaluation (Part II) of direct and indirect restorations including onlays and partial crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickel, Reinhard; Roulet, Jean-François; Bayne, Stephen; Heintze, Siegward D; Mjör, Ivar A; Peters, Mathilde; Rousson, Valentin; Randall, Ros; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tyas, Martin; Vanherle, Guido

    2007-01-01

    clinical trial designs, guidelines for design, randomization, number of subjects, characteristics of participants, clinical assessment, standards and calibration, categories for assessment, criteria for evaluation, and supplemental documentation. Part 2 of the review considers categories of assessment for esthetic evaluation, functional assessment, biological responses to restorative materials, and statistical analysis of results. The overall review represents a considerable effort to include a range of clinical research interests over the past years. As part of the recognition of the importance of these suggestions, the review is being published simultaneously in identical form in both the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry and Clinical Oral Investigations. Additionally, an extended abstract will be published in the International Dental Journal, giving a link to the web full version. This should help to introduce these considerations more quickly to the scientific community.

  9. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines can be divided in two distinct groups, including one displaying phenotypes similar to isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam eOuellet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays broad genetic diversity, giving it an astonishing capacity to adapt to a variety of environments and to infect a wide range of hosts. While many P. aeruginosa isolates of various origins have been analyzed, isolates from cystic fibrosis patients have received the most attention. Less is known about the genetic and phenotypic diversity of P. aeruginosa isolates that colonize other environments where flourishing biofilms can be found. In the present study, 29 P. aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines and cystic fibrosis patients were collected and their genetic and phenotypes profiles were compared to determine whether environmental and clinical isolates are related. The isolates were first classified using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD method. This made it possible to distribute the isolates into one clinical cluster and two environmental clusters. The isolates in the environmental cluster that were genetically closer to the clinical cluster also displayed phenotypes similar to the clinical isolates. The isolates from the second environmental cluster displayed opposite phenotypes, particularly an increased capacity to form biofilms. The isolates in this cluster were also the only ones harboring genes that encoded specific epimerases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, which could explain their increased ability to form biofilms. In conclusion, the isolates from the dental unit waterlines could be distributed into two clusters, with some of the environmental isolates resembled the clinical isolates.

  11. Dental Students' Clinical Experience Across Three Successive Curricula at One U.S. Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joel M; Jenson, Larry E; Gansky, Stuart A; Walsh, Cameron J; Accurso, Brent T; Vaderhobli, Ram M; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Walji, Muhammad F; Cheng, Jing

    2017-04-01

    As dental schools continue to seek the most effective ways to provide clinical education for students, it is important to track the effects innovations have on students' clinical experience to allow for quantitative comparisons of various curricula. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of three successive clinical curricula on students' experience at one U.S. dental school. The three were a discipline-based curriculum (DBC), a comprehensive care curriculum (CCC), and a procedural requirement curriculum plus externships (PRCE). Students' clinic experience data from 1992 to 2013 were analyzed for total experience and in five discipline areas. Clinic experience metrics analyzed were patient visits (PVs), relative value units (RVUs), and equivalent amounts (EQAs). A minimum experience threshold (MET) and a high experience threshold (HET) were set at one standard deviation above and below the mean for the DBC years. Students below the MET were designated as low achievers; students above the HET were designated as high achievers. The results showed significant differences among the three curricula in almost all areas of comparison: total PVs, total EQAs, total RVUs, RVUs by discipline, and number of high and low achievers in total clinical experience and by discipline. The comprehensive care approach to clinical education did not negatively impact students' clinical experience and in many cases enhanced it. The addition of externships also enhanced student total clinical experience although more study is needed to determine their effectiveness. The insights provided by this study suggest that the methodology used including the metrics of PVs, EQAs, and RVUs may be helpful for other dental schools in assessing students' clinical experience.

  12. Dental Age Estimation (DAE): Data management for tooth development stages including the third molar. Appropriate censoring of Stage H, the final stage of tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Graham J; McDonald, Fraser; Andiappan, Manoharan; Lucas, Victoria S

    2015-11-01

    The final stage of dental development of third molars is usually helpful to indicate whether or not a subject is aged over 18 years. A complexity is that the final stage of development is unlimited in its upper border. Investigators usually select an inappropriate upper age limit or censor point for this tooth development stage. The literature was searched for appropriate data sets for dental age estimation and those that provided the count (n), the mean (x¯), and the standard deviation (sd) for each of the tooth development stages. The Demirjian G and Demirjian H were used for this study. Upper and lower limits of the Stage G and Stage H data were calculated limiting the data to plus or minus three standard deviations from the mean. The upper border of Stage H was limited by appropriate censoring at the maximum value for Stage G. The maximum age at attainment from published data, for Stage H, ranged from 22.60 years to 34.50 years. These data were explored to demonstrate how censoring provides an estimate for the correct maximum age for the final stage of Stage H as 21.64 years for UK Caucasians. This study shows that confining the data array of individual tooth developments stages to ± 3sd provides a reliable and logical way of censoring the data for tooth development stages with a Normal distribution of data. For Stage H this is inappropriate as it is unbounded in its upper limit. The use of a censored data array for Stage H using Percentile values is appropriate. This increases the reliability of using third molar Stage H alone to determine whether or not an individual is over 18 years old. For Stage H, individual ancestral groups should be censored using the same technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroscience discipline science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past two decades, NASA's efforts in the neurosciences have developed into a program of research directed at understanding the acute changes that occur in the neurovestibular and sensorimotor systems during short-duration space missions. However, the proposed extended-duration flights of up to 28 days on the Shuttle orbiter and 6 months on Space Station Freedom, a lunar outpost, and Mars missions of perhaps 1-3 years in space, make it imperative that NASA's Life Sciences Division begin to concentrate research in the neurosciences on the chronic effects of exposure to microgravity on the nervous system. Major areas of research will be directed at understanding (1) central processing, (2) motor systems, (3) cognitive/spatial orientation, and (4) sensory receptors. The purpose of the Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the comprehensive area of neurosciences. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in the subdiscipline areas of nervous system function. It contains a general plan that will be used by NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  14. The Discipline Controversy Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1996-01-01

    Found that neither the authoritative model nor the liberal (permissive) model offers parents an efficacious model of childrearing. Each polarized model contains an element of truth, but each demonizes the other. Argues that within a responsive and supportive parent-child relationship, prudent use of punishment is a necessary tool in discipline.…

  15. The Discipline Controversy Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1996-01-01

    Found that neither the authoritative model nor the liberal (permissive) model offers parents an efficacious model of childrearing. Each polarized model contains an element of truth, but each demonizes the other. Argues that within a responsive and supportive parent-child relationship, prudent use of punishment is a necessary tool in discipline.…

  16. Tradition, Discipline, Literary History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargiotis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    In its attempt to respond to changing historical realities the university has undergone significant transformations, most of which, however, have focused on teaching material, tools, methods or practices adapted to the new demands. Taking as a case study the literary disciplines, this article focuses on the theoretical, mostly implicit,…

  17. Arbitrators, Blacks and Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Kenneth

    1975-01-01

    A discussion of the handling of disciplinary problems of black employees concludes that management should be concerned because of the effect that grievance resolution may have on the company's overall employee discipline program and the additional appeal alternatives available to the black employee. (Author/EA)

  18. Supporting Teachers, Principals--and Students--through Unified Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algozzine, Bob; Audette, Bob; Ellis, Edward; Marr, Mary Beth; White, Richard

    2000-01-01

    This article profiles Unified Discipline, a schoolwide systemic model of discipline that incorporates factors associated with best practices in teaching behavior and improving discipline. The four components of the program are described and include unified attitudes, expectations, correction, and team roles. Implications for practice are…

  19. Education and training in dental schools in Spain, Sevilla University experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, J. C.; Carrera, F.; Gomez, A.; Luis, J.; Rodriguez, M.; Herrador, M.

    2003-07-01

    The ICRP, in its publication 73 entitled Radiological Protection and Safety in Medicine states (paragraph 128) that one important need is to provide adequate resources for the education and training in radiological protection for future professional and technical staff in medical practice. The training programme should include initial training for all incoming staff and regular updating retraining. The European Directive 97/743/EURATOM on Medical Exposure (MED) lays down requirements for education and training. The document RP 116 published by the European commission give guidelines on Education and Training in Radiation Protection and in its paragraph 51 establish that Members States shall encourage the introduction of a course on radiation protection in the basic curriculum of medical and dental schools according to the EC Medical Exposure Directive (MED). In the Spanish legislation RD 815/2001 referred to the medical exposures, it is encourage the need for the introduction of Radiological Protection courses in Medicine and Dental schools with the objective of patient protection. In this study it has been analysed the actual situation of the education and training in Radiation Protection in Dental Schools in Spain. In addition it is described the experience of the University of Sevilla. The results of the study shows that only 4 from 9 dental schools have disciplines of Radiation Protection in its curriculum. In one of them the course is mandatory and has a content of 2 credits (20 hours). In the rest of dental schools the discipline has an optional character with an average of 4 credits. The discipline of Radiation Protection of the curriculum of Dental School at Sevilla university has 4 credits and it is configured as a course with the necessary requirements from the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council to obtain the Radiological Accreditation of Responsible of Dental Radiodiagnostic Installations. This diploma is given once the students have finished the Bachelor

  20. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Domb, Ivor

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  1. Operational discipline and microenterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Rosales Gómez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the elements of the operational Discipline in the business of micro-enterprises in Coatzacoalcos, Mexico. For the analysis an instrument is designed and applied to 20 companies which fulfill the suggested recommendations in research such as caution in the use of hazardous materials, use of equipment with simple specifications and easily accessible to employees, monitoring of some standard to identify risks, good environmental management, among others. We conclude that despite the findings in the application of the methodology of Operational Discipline, it is generally suffers from many important practices, and can be considered as construction companies of the city of Coatzacoalcos no mandatory environmental care this activity.

  2. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  3. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  4. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Administering Discipline Differently: A Foucauldian Lens on Restorative School Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Urban school leaders are under increasing pressure--in some cases, under threat of federal investigation (US Department of Education, 2014)--to use alternative models of non-punitive discipline, known generally as positive discipline practices such as restorative discipline (American Psychological Association, 2008; Anfinson, Autumn, Lehr,…

  6. ANÁLISE QUALITATIVA DO CONTEÚDO MINISTRADO NA DISCIPLINA DE BIOÉTICA NAS FACULDADES DE ODONTOLOGIA BRASILEIRAS ANÁLISIS CUALITATIVO DEL CONTENIDO DE LA DISCIPLINA DE BIOÉTICA EN LAS FACULTADES DE ODONTOLOGÍA BRASILEÑAS QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF CONTENT MINISTERED ON BIOETHICAL DISCIPLINE ON BRAZILIAN DENTAL SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Elaine Gonçalves

    2010-06-01

    disciplina se da generalmente en el primer año o final. Los temas principales de este curso son los dilemas bioéticos (76,3%, que tratan principalmente sobre cuestiones actuales y controversiales, como la clonación, el aborto, el trasplante de órganos, la atención de los pacientes con VIH y la historia de la bioética (65,8% , los fundamentos, principios y modelos de la bioética (57,9%. El 84,4% de los docentes encuestados mencionó que la disciplina de la bioética despierta el interés en los estudiantes, por ser actual y por redundar en la relación profesional-paciente. Se concluye que esta disciplina trata de temas actuales y polémicos que influyen en la formación del cirujano dentista, pues promueve la conciencia y la responsabilidad de su papel frente a la atención en salud bucal. Además, la misma debe ser implantada, específicamente, en primer año en todos los cursos de pregrado en Odontología.The study consists on a qualitative analysis of content ministered by Bioethical discipline on Brazilian Dental Schools. Data collect occurred by semi-structured questioners send by e-mail and correspondence. It was used content analysis by categorical analysis technique, according to Bardin. Among 182 Schools, just 57 (31.3% shows Bioethical Discipline. It was observed that the discipline is ministered on the first or last year of course generally. Principal subjects broached are bioethical dilemma (76.3% with polemics questions and others actual like abortion, clone, organs transplant, attendance of patient porter of HIV and bioethical historic (65.8%, bioethical fundaments, principles and models (57.9%. 84.4% researched professors, said that bioethical discipline awake interesting on students because it actual and it’s face to patient-professional relation too. It was possible to conclude that bioethical discipline treat in its content some actual and polemic themes that influence dental surgeon formation because promote him conscience and responsibility of

  7. Confronting shibboleths of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-10-01

    Shibboleths are common expressions presented as indisputable truths. When used in educational discussions, they reflect "motherhood and apple pie" viewpoints and tend to bring debate to a halt. Use of shibboleths may precede a desired imposition of "locksteps" in educational programming and are easily perceived as paternalistic by recipients. Nine shibboleths are presented as common beliefs of dental faculty and administrators. Evidence contradicting the veracity of the "obvious truths" is offered. The traditional "splendid isolation" of dentistry contributes to parochialism and belief in false shibboleths. Sound principles of higher and health professions education, student learning, and dental practice apply to dental education as to all health disciplines. Student passivity in dental education is not the best preparation for proficiency in dental practice. The master teacher possesses a repertoire of methodologies specific to meeting defined educational objectives. Active learning experiences bear close resemblances to professional duties and responsibilities and internally motivate future doctors of dental medicine. The difficulty in achieving curricular change leads to curricular entrenchment. Dentistry and dental education should not trade their ethical high ground for the relatively low ethical standards of the business world. Principles of professional ethics should govern relationships between dentists, whether within the dental school workplace or in practice. Suggestions are made on how to confront shibboleths in dental school settings.

  8. School Discipline: The Ongoing Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Marilyn

    1975-01-01

    The positive and negative aspects of classroom punishment were compared and the characteristics of teachers who did not experience discipline problems with their students were discussed. Additionally, programs for overcoming discipline difficulties were presented. (RK)

  9. Ethical Reasoning in STEM Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekerek, Mehmet; Karakaya, Ferhat; Tekerek, Betül

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine ethical reasoning of lecturers in STEM disciplines in terms of several independent variables (gender, working another institution, age, academic title, academic discipline, service period). This study was designed as a survey research. Lecturers in STEM disciplines in Kahramanmaras Sutçuimam University were…

  10. Discipline, Corporal Punishment, and Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Gonzalo

    Discipline is a major problem in many schools and an important issue to parents and educators alike. Discipline is commonly defined as negative reinforcement--punishment--instead of leadership and good teaching. Its definition should be expanded to relate it to the overall purposes of education. Discipline policy should be integrated with…

  11. Disciplining Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles of the current era is the divide between optimists and pessimists on the question of human rights. The prominence of human rights on the international political agenda sustains the optimist’s hopes for the future, while pessimists point to continued and widespread reports of civil, political, economic, social and cultural violations. This article looks at the tensions and apparent contradictions between these two approaches. Following a discussion on the construction of global human rights discourse(s, the article concludes that the pretensions of law act to mask the socioeconomic normative framework that acts to discipline global society.

  12. Disciplining Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles of the current era is the divide between optimists and pessimists on the question of human rights. The prominence of human rights on the international political agenda sustains the optimist’s hopes for the future, while pessimists point to continued and widespread reports of civil, political, economic, social and cultural violations. This article looks at the tensions and apparent contradictions between these two approaches. Following a discussion on the construction of global human rights discourse(s, the article concludes that the pretensions of law act to mask the socioeconomic normative framework that acts to discipline global society.

  13. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A.; Matlock, Daniel D.; Forman, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists in practice are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as “geriatric conditions” such as cognitive impairment and frailty which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine into everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a “geriatric cardiologist” may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. PMID:27476988

  14. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A; Matlock, Daniel D; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as "geriatric conditions," such as cognitive impairment and frailty, which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine to everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a "geriatric cardiologist" may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review, we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The prevalence of academic dishonesty in Texas dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhney, Kelly A; Gutmann, Marylou E; Schneiderman, Emet; DeWald, Janice P; McCann, Ann; Campbell, Patricia R

    2008-11-01

    The media has given much attention to the academic cheating crisis in America. A majority of college students believe that, in today's global environment, it is necessary to cheat in order to get ahead and to compete with their peers. The prevalence and attitudes concerning academic dishonesty of health professions students, including those in medical, dental, and nursing schools, have been extensively researched. No such studies exist in the discipline of dental hygiene. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cheating in Texas dental hygiene programs. Four hundred surveys were mailed to twenty Texas dental hygiene schools for graduating students to complete. A total of 289 usable surveys was returned for a response rate of 72.25 percent. Data were analyzed using SPSS with frequencies and chi-square tests. Findings from this study reveal that 86.5 percent of graduating Texas dental hygiene students have cheated a minimum of one time during matriculation. Students identified the demands of what they considered academic overload as the primary justification for cheating behavior.

  16. Different disciplines, different transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Leigh; Solomonides, Ian

    2008-09-01

    There is not just one mathematics taught at university level, nor is there one group of students. Mathematics is taught differently depending on the discipline and the perceived background of the student. There is engineering mathematics for the students heading towards engineering degrees, life science mathematics for those heading towards biology degrees and so on. This paper considers the phases of transitions that students experience as they embark on a course of study and then go on to professional life. We make inferences about the ways the curriculum should be designed to alleviate the difficulties of these phases as well as to take account of the capabilities that graduates will require in the workplace. It is not only where students are coming from that affects their learning but where they are heading to, in combination with their perceptions of that destination.

  17. Perceptions of Dental Hygiene Master's Degree Learners About Dental Hygiene Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumath, Ursula G M; Walsh, Margaret

    2015-08-01

    To determine perceptions about dental hygiene doctoral education among dental hygiene master's degree program enrollees. In this cross-sectional national study, all dental hygiene master degree program directors were sent an email requesting they forward an attached consent form and online-survey-link to their graduate learners. The 29-item online survey assessed their perceptions about need for, importance of and interest in applying to proposed dental hygiene doctoral degree programs. A second-request was sent 1 month later to capture non-responders. Frequencies and cross-tabulations of responses were analyzed using the online software program, Qualtrics.™ Of the 255 graduate learners enrolled in 2014 reported by dental hygiene program directors, 159 completed the survey for a 62% response rate. The majority of respondents (77%) indicated that doctoral education in dental hygiene is needed for the advancement of the dental hygiene discipline and such programs are important to the dental hygiene profession (89%). Although most respondents supported both the PhD in dental hygiene and the Doctor of Dental Hygiene Practice (DDHP) degrees, more were interested in applying to a DDHP program (62%) than to a dental hygiene PhD program (38%). In addition, 43% expressed interest in enrolling in a doctoral degree program in the next 1 to 5 years and most preferred a hybrid online/onsite program format. The most frequently reported reasons for pursing a doctoral degree were: to become a better teacher, to expand clinical practice opportunities, to become a better researcher and to increase salary. Most dental hygiene master degree learners in this study believed doctoral dental hygiene education is needed and important to the dental hygiene discipline and profession, and were interested in applying to such programs. Future research is needed in this area. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  18. The Discipline of Communication in Higher Education: Mutually Defining and Reciprocal Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesebro, James W.; Worley, David W.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews state-of-the-art reports on the discipline of communication published between 1970 and 1999. Claims the discipline of communication can begin self-definition by considering how the discipline is defined by those outside the discipline. Includes the perspective provided by the Federal Government as well as general education programs in…

  19. TBCC Discipline Overview. Hypersonics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    The "National Aeronautics Research and Development Policy" document, issued by the National Science and Technology Council in December 2006, stated that one (among several) of the guiding objectives of the federal aeronautics research and development endeavors shall be stable and long-term foundational research efforts. Nearly concurrently, the National Academies issued a more technically focused aeronautics blueprint, entitled: the "Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics - Foundations for the Future." Taken together these documents outline the principles of an aeronautics maturation plan. Thus, in response to these overarching inputs (and others), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) organized the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), a program within the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The FAP initiated foundational research and technology development tasks to enable the capability of future vehicles that operate across a broad range of Mach numbers, inclusive of the subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flight regimes. The FAP Hypersonics Project concentrates on two hypersonic missions: (1) Air-breathing Access to Space (AAS) and (2) the (Planetary Atmospheric) Entry, Decent, and Landing (EDL). The AAS mission focuses on Two-Stage-To-Orbit (TSTO) systems using air-breathing combined-cycle-engine propulsion; whereas, the EDL mission focuses on the challenges associated with delivering large payloads to (and from) Mars. So, the FAP Hypersonic Project investments are aligned to achieve mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies in the hypersonic-flight regime, which ultimately will be required for practical systems with highly integrated aerodynamic/vehicle and propulsion/engine technologies. Within the FAP Hypersonics, the technology management is further divided into disciplines including one targeting Turbine-Based Combine-Cycle (TBCC) propulsion. Additionally, to obtain expertise and support from outside

  20. Initial dental needs and a projection of needed dental capacity in the Iowa Department of Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringgenberg, Wendy J

    2011-04-01

    The dental health data for the Iowa Department of Corrections (IDOC) inmate population were analyzed to better understand dental health issues experienced by inmates and IDOC's system for responding to those dental needs. Each inmate is given a dental health assessment upon admission to Iowa's prison system. These data were analyzed for frequency of dental health needs and frequency of dental health services. In addition, emergency dental health services were analyzed. The findings show that each inmate has approximately 7.6 dental codes, including the initial exam, dental services provided, and dental needs not yet addressed. When reviewing only dental needs (and not the initial exam), 32% (5,110) identified dental needs were completed and 66% (10,572) were not.

  1. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  2. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  3. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips ... offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants ...

  4. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Dental Assistants PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary What They ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Dental Assistants Do About this section Assistants prepare and ...

  5. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  6. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  7. Charter Schools, Civil Rights and School Discipline: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losen, Daniel J.; Keith, Michael A., II; Hodson, Cheri L.; Martinez, Tia E.

    2016-01-01

    This report, along with the companion spreadsheet, provides the first comprehensive description ever compiled of charter school discipline. In 2011-12, every one of the nation's 95,000 public schools was required to report its school discipline data, including charter schools. This analysis, which includes more than 5,250 charter schools, focuses…

  8. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  9. Fiscal Discipline in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanhita SUCHARITA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study broadly attempts to analyze the role of Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management Act in restoring fiscal balance in India. It analyses the need for fiscal rules and constraints in India. The study aims at finding out the major factor behind rising fiscal imbalance in India and to examine whether there is an electoral motive towards high fiscal deficit to GDP ratio or not. It also analyzes the effectiveness of various measures undertaken at the central and state level to inculcate fiscal discipline in the fiscal management. The study also makes an attempt to do a critical in depth reviews of the Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management Act and make an attempt at examining effectiveness and suitability of FRBM Act through a quantitative analysis. It also makes an attempt to suggest improvements in the fiscal monitoring mechanism in India. We employ Ordinary Least Square (OLS method to examine the impact of Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management Act on fiscal deficit in India using the data for the period 1980-81 to 2008-09. The regression results indicates that FRBM Act does not have a significant effect on the Gross Fiscal Deficit (GFD to GDP ratio where as GDP (at factor cost growth rate has a significant negative effect on the GFD to GDP ratio.

  10. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly.

  11. Discipline Based Instruction in Business Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custin, Richard E.; Demas, John C.; Lampe, Marc; Custin, Colette L.

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate business law courses typically utilize traditional textbooks organized by topic. Individual chapters, address the usual topics including contracts, torts, the court system and ethics. An innovative approach to facilitating a business law course involves segregating sections of the course into common business disciplines. Rather than…

  12. Discipline: A Review of Selected Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsulich, Michael

    The nature of school discipline problems has changed over the past few decades. In the 1950s, teachers thought that fighting, stealing, and disrespect toward authority were the most serious forms of student misbehavior. Violent assaults on teachers and pupils, gang warfare, burglary, extortion, and destruction of school property are included among…

  13. Dental hygiene student experiences in external placements in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jane A; Hayes, Melanie J; Wallace, Linda

    2012-05-01

    While placements in external locations are being increasingly used in dental education globally, few studies have explored the student learning experience at such placements. The purpose of this study was to investigate student experiences while on external placement in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program. A self-reporting questionnaire was distributed to final-year dental hygiene students (n=77) at the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 2010. The questionnaire included questions regarding the type of placement, experiences offered, supervision, resources available, and lasting impressions. Responding students were generally positive about their external placement experience and indicated that the majority of facilities provided them with the opportunity to provide direct patient care and perform clinical tasks typical of a practicing hygienist. However, there was a statistically significant difference in their opinions about discipline-focused and community placements. Students indicated that their external placement experience provided opportunities to learn more about time and patient management, including hands-on experience with specific clinical tasks. Ongoing evaluations are necessary to ensure that external placements meet both student needs and intended learning outcomes within dental hygiene programs.

  14. Teacher Race and School Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Constance A.; Hart, Cassandra M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Does having a teacher of the same race make it more or less likely that students are subject to exclusionary school discipline? In this study, the authors analyze a unique set of student and teacher demographic and discipline data from North Carolina elementary schools to examine whether being matched to a same-race teacher affects the rate at…

  15. An Anthropological Perspective: Another Dimension to Modern Dental Wear Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Kaidonis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, research on tooth wear by dental academics has been diametrically opposite to that of anthropological research, with each discipline having a different understanding as to the nature of the wear processes. Dental focus revolved around preventive and restorative considerations while the anthropological focus was a biological understanding related to human evolution, diet, environment, form, and function and included all the craniofacial structures. Introducing the anthropological perspective into modern dentistry gives an insight into the “bigger picture” of the nature and extent of tooth wear. By combining anthropological evidence with clinical knowledge and experience, it is most likely to provide the best-informed and biologically based approach to the management of tooth wear in modern societies.

  16. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Kind discipline: Developing a conceptual model of a promising school discipline approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Jennifer L; Walsh, Michele E; de Blois, Madeleine; Maré, Jeannette; Carvajal, Scott C

    2017-02-06

    This formative evaluation develops a novel conceptual model for a discipline approach fostering intrinsic motivation and positive relationships in schools. We used concept mapping to elicit and integrate perspectives on kind discipline from teachers, administrators, and other school staff. Three core themes describing kind discipline emerged from 11 identified clusters: (1) proactively developing a positive school climate, (2) responding to conflict with empathy, accountability, and skill, and (3) supporting staff skills in understanding and sharing expectations. We mapped the identified components of kind discipline onto a social ecological model and found that kind discipline encompasses all levels of that model including the individual, relational, environmental/structural, and even community levels. This contrasts with the dominant individual-behavioral discipline approaches that focus on fewer levels and may not lead to sustained student and staff motivation. The findings illustrate the importance of setting and communicating clear expectations and the need for them to be collaboratively developed. Products of the analysis and synthesis reported here are operationalized materials for teachers grounded in a "be kind" culture code for classrooms.

  18. Learner discipline: An Australian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Stewart

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Australian schools by and large are safe schools. Nonetheless discipline problems do exist – including bullying behaviour. For this kind of problem schools should have management policies in place. As traditional behaviour-management practices – including corporal punishment – are largely prohibited in Australian schools, contemporary practices centre on management through supportive school programmes, including appropriate curricula and school-support structures. This article supports the belief that measures such as the exclusion of misbehaving learners should be treated with caution. Measures such as this might not reflect accepted international principles and practices and should only be exercised in the most extreme circumstances. The article also supports the view that it is part of the school’s role to ensure that all learners are aware of the reality that while they have rights, they also have corresponding responsibilities. This awareness is more likely to be achieved in a supportive school culture where each learner is recognised as having unique qualities that can mature and grow in an appropriate learning environment.

  19. Ethnobotany: A new discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubišić Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The beginnings of ethnobotanical investigations, viewed through the prism of time, are deemed to belong to the first explorers and adventurers of the Old Continent. They were the first to bring, from their voyages, the information about use of plants in native populations. However, the 19 century brings the precision, scrutiny and accuracy in research. It was in 1873 that the term "aboriginal botany" was used the first time in academia, and only a few years later the new term "ethno-botany" was introduced and defined. In the course of the twentieth century the interest in ethnobotany begins to rise rapidly and the scientists, besides in the use of plants, are also interested in the manner in which people notice and manage them, as well as in the mutual relation between the human community and plants which they depend on. The major basic focus of this discipline is actually the botanical lore of traditional indigenous peoples. Generations of biologists and anthropologists are trying to learn and study various aspects of the "ethno-scientific knowledge", and to establish and explain the difference between ethnobotanical evidence and the traditional knowledge. Therefore there are nowadays three main approaches in the study of traditional botanical knowledge: utilitarian, cognitive, and ecological approaches. The study of TBK is primarily based on the attempt to understand the traditional use of plants so that in co-operation with scientific knowledge of the Western civilization we could more easily collect and keep the ethnobotanical facts to be realized in various projects as a result of the integration of these Systems. The goals of such projects is to secure the rural development and preservation of traditional cultures, as well as the protection of biodiversity while also helping the Western science in discovering new drugs and raw materials invaluable to this world. Ethnobotany is the science in its infancy but it can offer much to the modem

  20. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  1. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Hygiene Care for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for dental hygiene curriculum cover the scope and definitions of care for the handicapped, interrelationships between disciplines and courses, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty, and…

  2. Flight Dynamics and Controls Discipline Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation will touch topics, including but not limited to, the objectives and challenges of flight dynamics and controls that deal with the pilot and the cockpit's technology, the flight dynamics and controls discipline tasks, and the full envelope of flight dynamics modeling. In addition, the LCTR 7x10-ft wind tunnel test will also be included along with the optimal trajectories for noise abatement and its investigations on handling quality. Furthermore, previous experiments and their complying results will also be discussed.

  3. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-06-19

    Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to identify strategies that could improve collaboration between these disciplines from the perspective of dental participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2013 and 2015 with visiting, local and regional dental practitioners (n = 12) who had provided dental services to patients from eight rural and remote Queensland communities that did not have a resident dentist. Participants were purposely recruited through a snow ball sampling technique. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis with the assistance of QSR Nvivo v.10. Four major themes emerged from the data: (1) Communication between dental practitioners and rural primary care providers; (2) Relationships between dental and primary care providers; (3) Maintenance of professional dualism; (4) Strategies to improve interprofessional relationships (with subthemes: face to face meetings; utilisation of technology; oral health training for primary care providers; and having a community based oral health contact person). Participants observed that there was a lack of communication between the dental providers who saw patients from these rural communities and the primary care providers who worked in each community. This was attributed to poor communication, the high turnover of staff and the siloed behaviours of some practitioners. Visiting dental practitioners were likely to have stronger professional relationships with hospital nursing, administrative and allied health care staff who were often long term

  4. The New Psycho-Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Patricia

    1979-01-01

    The merging of psychoanalysis with other disciplines is explored. Focus is on political psychology, psychohistory, psychogeography, and psychological anthropology. Controversies and criticisms associated with these interdisciplinary approaches are also discussed. (JMD)

  5. The New Psycho-Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Patricia

    1979-01-01

    The merging of psychoanalysis with other disciplines is explored. Focus is on political psychology, psychohistory, psychogeography, and psychological anthropology. Controversies and criticisms associated with these interdisciplinary approaches are also discussed. (JMD)

  6. Growth of a new discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Robert W Messler, Jr

    2004-01-01

    Nothing grows or lasts forever. Businesses, chemical reactions, phase transformations, new technologies, and, it is proposed, technical disciplines seem to exhibit a sigmoidal behavior in which they take time to appear (to ‘nucleate’); then grow, first at an increasing rate but before long increasingly slowly; until they flatten out. But is this saturation or exhaustion, if not death and demise, of a new technology or discipline inevitable? Chemical engineering, biomedical engineering and bio...

  7. Employee discipline: a changing paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, J L; Myaya, S N

    1993-12-01

    To increase the receptiveness of health care supervisors to a broader meaning of discipline and to simulate investigation of nontraditional methods of encouragement to employees who fail to meet minimum standards of conduct and thereby negatively affect the quality of patient care, a subjectively realistic view of the implications of the traditional punitive disciplinary paradigm is presented. Through the use of a case study, the authors present, explain, and apply the contemporary concept of discipline without punishment as first described by J. Huberman.

  8. The prevalence, causes, and relativity of dental anxiety in adult patients to irregular dental visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, Balgis O; Alagl, Adel S; Al-Ansari, Asim A

    2014-06-01

    To assess the frequency and causes of dental anxiety and their relation to irregular dental visits among adult dental patients. The Dental Anxiety Question (DAQ) included within a self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1025 patients attending the Interns' Dental Clinics in the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from March 2012 to February 2013. A cross-sectional study design was used. The questionnaire consisted of 22 closed-ended questions divided into 4 sections; 1) demographics, 2) regularity of dental visits, and related causes, 3) DAQ, cancellation of dental appointments, history of previous trauma, dental anxiety provoking factors within dental environment and procedures, and 4) patients' status in dental clinics, preferences of dentists, and perceptions regarding dental anxiety. The prevalence of dental anxiety among the study sample was 27%. Anesthetic injection was the main factor of dental fear (88.2%), while dental surgical procedures (35.7%) and extractions (23%) were the most terrifying dental procedures. Lack of time (79.5%), cost (71.5%), far-situated dental services (62.2%), and fear (57.1%) were causes listed for irregular dental visits; while 31.3% had no specific reason. Irregular dental visits were not related to dental anxiety. Dental anxiety continues to be an obstacle despite the vast improvement in dentistry; and this raises an alert regarding personal and communication factors in the patient-dentist relationship. Factors such as equal distribution of dental services, time, and cost should also be addressed.

  9. Philosophy and the Disciplines: The Borderlines | Minimah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Philosophy and the Disciplines: The Borderlines. ... the practitioners of the disciplines are concerned with mere definitions or meaning of concepts, ... greater extent than other disciplines leads to the improvement in language for the purpose of ...

  10. Dental Health Education: Rhetoric or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Alyson

    1982-01-01

    Suggestions for facilitating dental health education programs in public schools include: (1) determining who will be responsible for dental health education; (2) involving parents; (3) using community health resources; and (4) assessing the results of programs. (JN)

  11. Curriculum Guidelines for Clinical Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for clinical dental hygiene include definitions, notes on the interrelationship of courses, an overview of course objectives, and suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific objectives, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  12. Dental Forensics: Bitemark Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Forensic odontology (dental forensics can provide useful evidence in both criminal and civil cases, and therefore remains a part of the wider discipline of forensic science. As an example from the toolbox of forensic odontology, the practice and experience on bitemark analysis is reviewed here in brief. The principle of using visible bitemarks in crime victims or in other objects as evidence is fundamentally based on the observation that the detailed pattern of dental imprints tend to be practically unique for each individual. Therefore, finding such an imprint as a bitemark can bear a strong testimony that it was produced by the individual that has the matching dental pattern. However, the comparison of the observed bitemark and the suspected set of teeth will necessarily require human interpretation, and this is not infallible. Both technical challenges in the bitemarks and human errors in the interpretation are possible. To minimise such errors and to maximise the value of bitemark analysis, dedicated procedures and protocols have been developed, and the personnel taking care of the analysis need to be properly trained. In principle the action within the discipline should be conducted as in evidence-based dentristy, i.e. accepted procedures should have known error rates. Because of the involvement of human interpretation, even personal performance statistics may be required from legal expert statements. The requirements have been introduced largely due to cases where false convictions based on bitemark analysishave been overturned after DNA analysis.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i2.76

  13. Sociobiology: An Environmentalist Discipline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Charles B.; Anderson, Judith L.

    1989-01-01

    Presents some of the concepts being developed by evolutionary thinkers to explain how animals deal with varying conditions in their environments. Discusses the environmental perspective. Explains why it involves more than predetermined behavior and that evolutionary theories now include developmental and environmental variables. (Author/JS)

  14. A national econometric forecasting model of the dental sector.

    OpenAIRE

    Feldstein, P J; Roehrig, C S

    1980-01-01

    The Econometric Model of the the Dental Sector forecasts a broad range of dental sector variables, including dental care prices; the amount of care produced and consumed; employment of hygienists, dental assistants, and clericals; hours worked by dentists; dental incomes; and number of dentists. These forecasts are based upon values specified by the user for the various factors which help determine the supply an demand for dental care, such as the size of the population, per capita income, th...

  15. Dental Hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  16. Understanding Relations between Disciplines in the Information Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges of developing a shared conceptual framework for the Information Field, based on interdisciplinary theory. This paper argues that to study the Information Field, we need a multidimensional framework that includes disciplines and discipline...... is an attempt to conceptualize some of the elements that should be included in a framework, and it represents a first step towards understanding and identifying the complex underpinnings of the relations between disciplines in the Information Field. The 3-dimensional matrix offers a lens through which to view...

  17. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  18. Growth of a new discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Messler, Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Nothing grows or lasts forever. Businesses, chemical reactions, phase transformations, new technologies, and, it is proposed, technical disciplines seem to exhibit a sigmoidal behavior in which they take time to appear (to ‘nucleate’; then grow, first at an increasing rate but before long increasingly slowly; until they flatten out. But is this saturation or exhaustion, if not death and demise, of a new technology or discipline inevitable? Chemical engineering, biomedical engineering and biotechnology, and nanotechnology are given as examples of what has happened, is happening, and might happen – if we are not careful!

  19. Participatory Games: Experiential learning to bridge disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, E.; Suarez, P.; Mendler de Suarez, J.; Bachofen, C.

    2014-12-01

    While the benefits of multi-disciplinary education have been extolled, there is more to success than producing students who are able to articulate the theorems of all pertinent disciplines. Here, we will describe case studies in which participatory scenario exercises and games can make the difference between memorizing information from an "outside" discipline, and actually internalizing the priorities and complications of the issue from an alien perspective. Case studies include teaching Red Cross community-based volunteers the Probability Distribution Function of seasonal rainfall forecasts, as well as requiring students of Columbia University's Master's Program in Climate and Society to study both natural and social aspects of climate. Games create a model system of the world, in which players assume a role and make decisions with consequences, facing complex feedback loops. Taking such roles catalyzes "AHA" moments that effectively bring home the intricacies of disciplinary paradigms outside of one's own.

  20. Charter Schools, Civil Rights and School Discipline: A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Losen, Daniel J.; Keith, Michael A II; Hodson, Cheri L.; Martinez, Tia E

    2016-01-01

    This report, along with the companion spreadsheet, provides the first comprehensive description ever compiled of charter school discipline. In 2011-12, every one of the nation’s 95,000 public schools was required to report its school discipline data, including charter schools. This analysis, which includes more than 5,250 charter schools, focuses on out-of-school suspension rates at the elementary and secondary levels. The report describes the extent to which suspensions meted out by charter ...

  1. The Impact of Exclusionary Discipline on Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas G.; Goodram, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The impact of exclusionary discipline on students is clear and negative as we report herein. The impacts of exclusionary discipline have been negatively linked to the academic and social development of disciplined students. We argue that this discipline form has been disproportionately used among certain groups, particularly those students of…

  2. Transformational leadership and the employee discipline process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, C C

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses what is meant by the term "transformational leadership" and suggests a method of employee discipline consistent with the transformational leadership concept. This nonpunitive method of employee discipline, called discipline without punishment, encourages worker commitment and facilitates transformational leadership. A description of the philosophy and procedures of discipline without punishment is presented, and potential advantages to employers are outlined.

  3. The Evolution of the Dental Assisting Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracher, Connie; Breen, Carolyn; McMahon, Kim; Gagliardi, Lorraine; Miyasaki, Cara; Landsberg, Katherine; Reed, Constance

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of this article are to describe the dental assistant's role in the dental delivery system; assess the educational structure of the dental assisting profession; and project factors likely to impact the future role of the dental assistant. The article summarizes the current status and trends of the dental assisting profession including general responsibilities, credentialing, and regulation. An overview of the workforce and parameters of employment is provided with a description of the broad scope of practice, education, and licensure options, which vary by state. Existing academic models and enrollment trends in accredited dental programs are included, as are the strengths and weaknesses of the current educational system. Multiple factors may impact the future of this profession. To address the anticipated increase in the demand for and responsibilities of dental assistants, curricular revisions will be needed to prepare for implementation of interprofessional care models in which dental assistants will play a vital role. Well-educated dental assistants will be needed to support viable models of dental care and wellness in the U.S. Enhanced career opportunities and varied employment environments may increase job satisfaction and practice longevity. As protection of the public is of the utmost importance in the dental profession, this evolving dental clinician must be formally educated in all aspects of clinical practice and be permitted to perform delegated patient care, as legally allowed by their states. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  4. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  5. Market Discipline and Deposit Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Peresetsky,Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines Russian banks’ household deposit interest rates for the transition period of setting up the deposit insurance system. Monthly observations of Russian banks’ interest rates and balance sheets are used in a fixed effects panel data model. It is shown market discipline has been significantly diminished after switching to the deposit insurance.

  6. Retail design: a new discipline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, H.H.C.M.; Almendra, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper has the aim to address Retail Design as a new research and education discipline that because of its multidisciplinarity asks for a holistic approach. Although retailing as commerce is timeless, Retail Design is one of the most challenging new fields of design, embracing both design

  7. Student Discipline in Colonial America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, John R.

    The basis for the severe discipline imposed on school children in colonial America, especially in the Puritan colonies, was the belief in original sin. The child was regarded as being born in sin and thus depraved and prone to sin. The purpose of education was to enable children to read the Bible and thus change the behavior which otherwise would…

  8. Eliminating Disparities in School Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    Disparities in suspension rates for White, Black, Hispanic, and American Indian students are more often a result of inequitable disciplinary actions than differences in behavior. Exclusionary discipline undermines students' academic achievement by weakening their connection with school and removing them from the classroom. Students who experience…

  9. Alternative Discipline Can Benefit Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergler, Mary Schmid; Vargas, Karla M.; Caldwell, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Schools across the country are changing how they discipline students by implementing research- and evidence-based disciplinary practices that have yielded positive results for schools and students. These disciplinary practices--known as Restorative Justice, Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, and social and emotional learning--largely…

  10. Policy Fight Brews over Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    A new report finding that black and Hispanic students are far more likely to be kicked out of school when they break the rules adds to a growing chorus of concern over the discipline policies being used in K-12 schools. Over the past two years, an increasing number of reports and initiatives have pointed out problems with 'zero tolerance"…

  11. Retail design: a new discipline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, H.H.C.M.; Almendra, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper has the aim to address Retail Design as a new research and education discipline that because of its multidisciplinarity asks for a holistic approach. Although retailing as commerce is timeless, Retail Design is one of the most challenging new fields of design, embracing both design discip

  12. [Project Social Studies. Discipline Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    The special papers provide a definition, delineate the scope, present a conceptual framework, and identify the method of inquiry and some techniques used for explaining the body of knowledge for each of six disciplines. The background papers to Project Social Studies are: 1) "Sociology" by Caroline Rose; 2) "The Study of Geography" by Fredrick R.…

  13. The problems of discipline at secondary education

    OpenAIRE

    NÁVORKOVÁ, Miluše

    2016-01-01

    The theme of this bachelor´s thesis is Problems of discipline at secondary education. The aim of this work is to map the problems of school discipline at the students of higher secondary education. The basic terms concerned the problems of discipline, the definitions and analysis of the lack of discipline are being described in the theoretical part. This thesis also tries to find out possible reasons, preventative arrangements and remedy possibilities of the lack of discipline at the students...

  14. Management of Classes with Breaches of Discipline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海军

    2009-01-01

    As an only child is pampered and spoiled by parents, the contemporary student easily breaches class discipline. Class management appears more concerned than ever because breaches of class discipline have great impact on teaching. The author clarifies the necessity to study the management of classes with breaches of class discipline, numerates the phenomena of breaches of class discipline, precisely analyzes the causes from teachers and students and especially submits several measures to effectively prevent breaches of class discipline.

  15. Dental visits and access to dental care among Maryland schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D; Wagner, Mark L; Goodman, Harold S; Manz, Michael C; Marrazzo, Ilise D

    2005-04-01

    Regular dental visits afford an opportunity for dentists to provide preventive services and to diagnose and treat disease. Not all children, however, have equal access to these services. The authors conducted this study to describe access to and utilization of oral health care services for Maryland schoolchildren in kindergarten and third grade. They obtained data from a questionnaire filled out by parents or guardians participating in the Survey of the Oral Health Status of Maryland School Children, 2000-2001 (N = 2,642). Outcome variables included having a dental visit in the last year, prophylaxis in the last year, usual source of medical care and usual source of dental care. Descriptor variables included region, grade, race/ethnicity, eligibility for free or reduced-fee meals, parents' or guardians' education and dental insurance status. Overall, general dental visit and dental prophylaxis visit rates were similar (74.1 and 71.3 percent, respectively). Schoolchildren, however, were more likely to have had a usual source of medical care than of dental care (96.0 and 82.9 percent, respectively). Third graders, those ineligible for free or reduced-fee meals and those with some dental insurance coverage were more likely to have received a prophylaxis in the last year and were more likely to have a usual source of dental care. Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black schoolchildren also were more likely to have had a usual source of dental care than were Hispanics. Schoolchildren most likely to have received regular preventive dental care were those who had parents or guardians with financial resources. Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) provide safety nets, but these programs could be improved. Dentistry's challenge is to determine which characteristics are unique to those who visit the dentist regularly and use this information to help meet the needs of the underserved.

  16. Medicinal chemistry matters - a call for discipline in our discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Craig

    2012-06-01

    Medicinal chemistry makes a vital contribution to small molecule drug discovery, and the quality of it contributes directly to research effectiveness as well as to downstream costs, speed and survival in development. In recent years, the discipline of medicinal chemistry has evolved and witnessed many noteworthy contributions that propose and offer potential improvements to medicinal chemistry practice; however, the impact of these ideas is limited by their acceptance and deployment into every-day activity and, as a result, the quality of medicinal chemistry remains variable. For the good of the industry and the medicinal chemistry discipline, there is a need to move from retrospective learning to prospective control of medicinal chemistry practice to improve cost effectiveness, probability of success and survival rates.

  17. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  18. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  19. Toward a general ontology for digital forensic disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karie, Nickson M; Venter, Hein S

    2014-09-01

    Ontologies are widely used in different disciplines as a technique for representing and reasoning about domain knowledge. However, despite the widespread ontology-related research activities and applications in different disciplines, the development of ontologies and ontology research activities is still wanting in digital forensics. This paper therefore presents the case for establishing an ontology for digital forensic disciplines. Such an ontology would enable better categorization of the digital forensic disciplines, as well as assist in the development of methodologies and specifications that can offer direction in different areas of digital forensics. This includes such areas as professional specialization, certifications, development of digital forensic tools, curricula, and educational materials. In addition, the ontology presented in this paper can be used, for example, to better organize the digital forensic domain knowledge and explicitly describe the discipline's semantics in a common way. Finally, this paper is meant to spark discussions and further research on an internationally agreed ontological distinction of the digital forensic disciplines. Digital forensic disciplines ontology is a novel approach toward organizing the digital forensic domain knowledge and constitutes the main contribution of this paper. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. The Case for Improved Interprofessional Care: Fatal Analgesic Overdose Secondary to Acute Dental Pain during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Alice; Munz, Stephanie M.; Dabiri, Darya

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal oral health extends beyond the oral cavity, impacting the general well-being of the pregnant patient and her fetus. This case report follows a 19-year-old pregnant female presenting with acute liver failure secondary to acetaminophen overdose for management of dental pain following extensive dental procedures. Through the course of her illness, the patient suffered adverse outcomes including fetal demise, acute kidney injury, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and septic shock before eventual death from multiple organ failure. In managing the pregnant patient, healthcare providers, including physicians and dentists, must recognize and optimize the interconnected relationships shared by the health disciplines. An interdisciplinary approach of collaborative and coordinated care, the timing, sequence, and treatment for the pregnant patient can be improved and thereby maximize overall quality of health. Continued efforts toward integrating oral health into general healthcare education through interprofessional education and practice are necessary to enhance the quality of care that will benefit all patients. PMID:27847654

  1. The Case for Improved Interprofessional Care: Fatal Analgesic Overdose Secondary to Acute Dental Pain during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Y. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal oral health extends beyond the oral cavity, impacting the general well-being of the pregnant patient and her fetus. This case report follows a 19-year-old pregnant female presenting with acute liver failure secondary to acetaminophen overdose for management of dental pain following extensive dental procedures. Through the course of her illness, the patient suffered adverse outcomes including fetal demise, acute kidney injury, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and septic shock before eventual death from multiple organ failure. In managing the pregnant patient, healthcare providers, including physicians and dentists, must recognize and optimize the interconnected relationships shared by the health disciplines. An interdisciplinary approach of collaborative and coordinated care, the timing, sequence, and treatment for the pregnant patient can be improved and thereby maximize overall quality of health. Continued efforts toward integrating oral health into general healthcare education through interprofessional education and practice are necessary to enhance the quality of care that will benefit all patients.

  2. Managing learner-discipline in secondary schools / Bakang Golden Nthebe

    OpenAIRE

    Nthebe, Bakang Golden

    2006-01-01

    This research intended to explore the phenomenon of managing discipline in secondary schools. An exposition of discipline in the South African schools' context indicated the historical perspective as consisting of the use of corporal punishment in the past, the abolishment of any form of corporal punishment post 1994 through various legislation, including the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa and the South African Schools Act and the introduction of the so-called alternative to cor...

  3. 21 CFR 872.4630 - Dental operating light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental operating light. 872.4630 Section 872.4630...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4630 Dental operating light. (a) Identification. A dental operating light, including the surgical headlight, is an AC-powered device intended to illuminate...

  4. A questionnaire study regarding local anesthesia in dentistry and safety measures in dental clinics among dental students

    OpenAIRE

    オオケ, ハナコ; クドウ, マサル; シンヤ, ノボル; Hanako, OHKE; Masaru, KUDO; Noboru, SHINYA

    2005-01-01

    This reports the results of a questionnaire study of dental students on the awareness of "local anesthesia" and "use of patient monitoring systems" in dental clinics. Subjects participated in the present study included 96 sixth year dental students (D6) and 93 first year dental students (D1). The results indicate that the majority of respondents including both D6 and D1 support the notion that a "dentist" is the most suitable person to perform local anesthesia in dental treatment. With respec...

  5. Parents about disciplining their children

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrajšek, Ines

    2012-01-01

    The main topic of this undergraduate dissertation is the disciplining of children in the family. The theoretical part provides deliberations on contemporary upbringing, definitions of different upbringing styles and the presentation of effects of particular upbringing styles on the development of a child. If just a couple of decades ago the authoritarian or the repressive upbringing style with the focus on an obedient individual was predominant, experts today warn about the expansion of anoth...

  6. Disparities in unmet dental need and dental care received by pregnant women in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Garcia, A Isabel; Adams, Amy B; Cheng, Diana

    2014-09-01

    To examine prenatal dental care needs, utilization and oral health counseling among Maryland women who delivered a live infant during 2001-2003 and identify the factors associated with having a dental visit and having an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System is an ongoing population based surveillance system that collects information of women's attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to model dental visits and unmet dental need using predictor variables for Maryland 2001-2003 births. Less than half of all women reported having a dental visit and receiving oral health advice during pregnancy. Twenty-five percent of women reported a need for dental care, of which 33 % did not receive dental care despite their perceived need. Multivariate modeling revealed that racial minorities, women who were not married and those with annual income dental visit. Women who were not married, had low annual income, were older than 40 years of age, had an unintended pregnancy and received prenatal care later than desired were most likely to have an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Despite reported needs and existing recommendations to include oral health as a component of prenatal care, less than half of pregnant women have a dental visit during their pregnancy. One-third of women with a dental problem did not have a dental visit highlighting the unmet need for dental care during pregnancy.

  7. Dental Students' Perceptions of Learning Value in PBL Groups with Medical and Dental Students Together versus Dental Students Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Maryam; Zulla, Rosslynn; Gaudet-Amigo, Gisele; Patterson, Steven; Murphy, Natalie; Ross, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    At a dental school in Canada, problem-based learning (PBL) sessions were restructured from an integrated dental-medical model to a separate dental model, resulting in three groups of students available for study: those who had participated in the two-year dental and medical combined, the one-year dental and medical combined, the one-year dental alone, and the two-year dental alone. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the extent to which the PBL structure affected the dental students' perceptions of the learning value of PBL in the different models. A total of 34 first-, second-, and third-year dental students participated in six focus groups in May and June 2011 (34% of students in those total classes). Semistructured questions explored their experiences in the different PBL structures. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was employed. The results showed positive and negative perceptions for both the combined dental and medical settings and the settings with dental students alone. For students in the combined PBL groups, positive perceptions included gaining information from medical peers, motivation to learn, and interdisciplinary collaborations. The negative perceptions mainly related to irrelevant content, dominating medical students, and ineffective preceptors. Members of the separate dental groups were more positive about the content and felt a sense of belonging. They appreciated the dental preceptors but were concerned about the inadequacy of their medical knowledge. Overall, the dental students valued the combined PBL experience and appreciated the opportunity to learn with their medical colleagues. Close attention, however, must be paid to PBL content and the preceptor's role to optimize dental students' experience in combined medical and dental groups.

  8. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Feng Lin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed.

  9. Measurement Invariance of Discipline in Different Cultural Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Malone, Patrick S; Lansford, Jennifer E; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Di Giunta, Laura; Bombi, Anna Silvia; Bornstein, Marc H; Chang, Lei; Dodge, Kenneth A; Oburu, Paul; Pastorelli, Concetta; Skinner, Ann T; Sorbring, Emma; Tapanya, Sombat; Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe; Zelli, Arnaldo; Alampay, Liane; Al-Hassan, Suha M; Bacchini, Dario

    2011-07-01

    The measurement invariance of mother-reported use of 18 discipline strategies was examined in samples from 13 different ethnic/cultural groups in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). Participants included approximately 100-120 mothers and their children aged 7 to 10 years from each group. The results of exploratory factor analyses and multigroup categorical confirmatory factor analyses (MCCFA) indicated that a seven-factor solution was feasible across the cultural groups, as shown by marginally sufficient evidence for configural and metric invariance for the mother-reported frequency on the discipline interview. This study makes a contribution on measurement invariance to the parenting literature, and establishes the mother-report aspect of the discipline interview as an instrument for use in further cross-cultural research on discipline.

  10. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2016-11-25

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered.

  11. The Three C's and Discipline for Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccoby, Michael

    1971-01-01

    The discipline needed by man to live in the age of automation and the computer and how this discipline can be taught to children are discussed under the headings of Concentration, Criticism, and Communication. (DB)

  12. Threshold concepts in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, I M; Cabot, L B; Kobus, M; Woolford, M

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents a conceptual framework to inform dental education. Drawing from a vast body of research into student learning, the simple model presented here has an explanatory value in describing what is currently observed to happen and a predictive value in guiding future teaching practices. We introduce to dental education the application of threshold concepts that have a transformative role in offering a new vision of the curriculum that helps to move away from the medieval transmission model of higher education towards a dual processing model that better reflects the way in which professionals operate within the discipline. Threshold concepts give a role for the student voice in offering a novice perspective which is paradoxically something that is out of reach of the subject expert. Finally, the application of threshold concepts highlights some of the weaknesses in the competency-based training model of clinical teaching. 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  14. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    , exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental......Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  15. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  16. Developing core dental public health competencies for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Atchison, Kathryn Ann

    2015-01-01

    Dental professionals are an "underutilized" workforce, when it comes to advocating for prevention and wellness in populations. The goal of this HRSA-funded project is to develop dental public health (DPH) competencies and curriculum for US predoctoral dental and dental hygiene programs. These competencies and accompanying curriculum are designed to better prepare the oral health workforce to meet the needs of the entire population, including the chronically underserved, those challenged by poor health literacy, or communities encountering barriers to accessing oral health care. By increasing the DPH competency of all graduating dental providers, in population-based approaches to preventing oral diseases rather than the existing exclusive focus on treatment, the number of providers who can respond to a population or the public's unmet needs and challenges, both in private practices and publicly supported clinics, will increase. This paper describes the competency development process and the eight competencies that were identified.

  17. Firing temperature accuracy of four dental furnaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Per; Ciber, Edina; Dérand, Tore

    2011-01-01

    In spite of using recommended firing and displayed temperatures, low-fired dental porcelain more often demonstrates unsatisfactory results after firing than porcelain fired at higher temperatures. It could therefore be anticipated that temperatures shown on the display are incorrect, implying that the furnace does not render correct firing programs for low-fired porcelain. The purpose of this study is to investigate deviations from the real temperature during the firing process and also to illustrate the service and maintenance discipline of furnaces at dental laboratories. Totally 20 units of four different types of dental furnaces were selected for testing of temperature accuracy with usage of a digital temperature measurement apparatus, Therma 1. In addition,the staffs at 68 dental laboratories in Sweden were contacted for a telephone interview on furnace brand and on service and maintenance program performed at their laboratories. None of the 20 different dental furnaces in the study could generate the firing temperatures shown on the display, indicating that the hypothesis was correct. Multimat MCII had the least deviation of temperature compared with displayfigures. 62 out of 68 invited dental laboratories chose to participate in the interviews and the result was that very few laboratories had a service and maintenance program living up to quality standards. There is room for improving the precision of dental porcelain furnaces as there are deviations between displayed and read temperatures during the different steps of the firing process.

  18. Dental assisting experience as a predictor of dental hygiene academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, S; Goral, V

    1995-01-01

    Selecting dental hygiene students who ultimately will be successful in their formal education and board examinations is critical to dental hygiene education and the profession. This study examined prior dental assisting experience as a predictor of performance during dental hygiene education as well as on licensure examinations. The study included all 132 female students who graduated from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Dental Hygiene, from 1989 through 1993. The prior assisting group (n = 43) consisted of students with at least six months of dental assisting experience as reported by the student and/or previous dentist employers. The nonassisting group (n = 89) had no dental assisting experience prior to admission. Student records were used to compile evaluative data for each subject including: prerequisite college science grade-point average (GPA); dental hygiene GPA at the end of the first year of the program; dental hygiene GPA at the end of the second year; combined GPA for the three semesters of clinical dental hygiene coursework; quality points for specific dental hygiene courses including preclinical dental hygiene instrumentation, dental hygiene clinic I, dental anatomy, and dental materials; and National Board Dental Hygiene Examination Scores and performance on the Southern Regional Board Examination. Student's t-test analysis was used to compare the prerequisite college science GPA for the assisting and nonassisting groups. Multivariate analysis was used for all other measures of comparison. Student's t-test analysis revealed no significant differences in terms of the prerequisite college science GPA as a control for this extraneous variable. The results of multivariate analysis demonstrated that the prior dental assisting group had significantly higher cumulative clinic GPAs as well as clinic I quality points. No significant differences were noted in first-year GPA, cumulative program GPA, dental materials, preclinical

  19. 28 CFR 551.116 - Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discipline. 551.116 Section 551.116... Pretrial Inmates § 551.116 Discipline. (a) Staff shall require the pretrial inmate to abide by Bureau of Prisons rules on Inmate Discipline (see 28 CFR part 541, subpart B), subject to the limitations of §...

  20. 37 CFR 11.24 - Reciprocal discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocal discipline. 11.24... discipline. (a) Notification of OED Director. Within thirty days of being publicly censured, publicly... USPTO Director. The OED Director shall, in addition, without Committee on Discipline authorization,...

  1. School Discipline, Educational Interest and Pupil Wisdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAllister, James

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the concept of school discipline will be explored in relation to that of educational interest. Initially, Clark's account of two different kinds of school order (discipline and control) will be explained. The interest-based theory of school discipline advanced by Pat Wilson will thereafter be analysed. It will be argued that both…

  2. Nanoclusters a bridge across disciplines

    CERN Document Server

    Jena, Purusottam

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive book on Nanoclusters comprises sixteen authoritative chapters written by leading researchers in the field. It provides insight into topics that are currently at the cutting edge of cluster science, with the main focus on metal and metal compound systems that are of particular interest in materials science, and also on aspects related to biology and medicine. While there are numerous books on clusters, the focus on clusters as a bridge across disciplines sets this book apart from others. Delivers cutting edge coverage of cluster science Covers a broad range of topics in

  3. Multidisciplinary approach in the teaching of dental sculpture and anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Buchaim, Rogério Leone; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Rodrigues,Antonio de Castro; Gonçalves, Jéssica Barbosa de Oliveira; Daré, Letícia Rossi; Rosa Junior, Geraldo Marco; Buchaim, Daniela Vieira; Oliveira,José Américo de

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the Dental Sculpture and Anatomy discipline is to introduce undergraduate students to the study of the anatomic and morphological characteristics of permanent and primary human dentition, through classes, books and cognitive and psychomotor activities. This discipline supports the teaching of specific knowledge necessary for a more extensive education, involving interdisciplinarity as a means of knowledge exchange among several areas of dentistry, to achieve comprehensive profe...

  4. 76 FR 2288 - TRICARE; Changes Included in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... active duty for more than 30 days, thus providing care to the Reserve member in both military dental... dental benefits for Reserve Component members includes space available care in military dental treatment... Reserve Component members include space available care in military dental treatment...

  5. Computational Physics Across the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Vincent; Lammert, Paul; Engstrom, Tyler; Owen, Ben

    2011-03-01

    In this informal talk, I will present two case studies of the unexpected convergence of computational techniques across disciplines. First, the marriage of neutron star astrophysics and the materials theory of the mechanical and thermal response of crystalline solids. Although the lower reaches of a neutron star host exotic nuclear physics, the upper few meters of the crust exist in a regime that is surprisingly amenable to standard molecular dynamics simulation, albeit in a physical regime of density order of magnitude of orders of magnitude different from those familiar to most condensed matter folk. Computational results on shear strength, thermal conductivity, and other properties here are very relevant to possible gravitational wave signals from these sources. The second example connects not two disciplines of computational physics, but experimental and computational physics, and not from the traditional direction of computational progressively approaching experiment. Instead, experiment is approaching computation: regular lattices of single-domain magnetic islands whose magnetic microstates can be exhaustively enumerated by magnetic force microscopy. There resulting images of island magnetization patterns look essentially like the results of Monte Carlo simulations of Ising systems... statistical physics with the microstate revealed.

  6. VARIETIES OF SOCIAL DISCIPLINING, HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás A. Mantecón Movellán

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Historical thought has tended to explain social disciplining according to two main analytical perspectives: on one hand, German tradition about the so-called sozialdisziplinierung and, on the other hand, Foucault perspectives (focussed on disciplines practiced on the bodies-and/or-minds of people by the authorities. From these both viewpoints social disciplining was a dynamic ingredient of change, from traditional societies up to contemporary liberal societies; a machinery to provoke top-down changes (from above. On the bases of historical evidences, this research claims for a third viewpoint that stresses dynamics of social discipline and social disciplining from below; underlines the need of integrating this third perspective in the historical explanation of change in past societies throughout the analysis of social practices of everyday life; the values underneath them and, in the end, taking into account varieties of discipline and perspectives of social disciplining from below.

  7. Parametrically disciplined operation of a vibratory gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Peay, Chris S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Parametrically disciplined operation of a symmetric nearly degenerate mode vibratory gyroscope is disclosed. A parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope having a natural oscillation frequency in the neighborhood of a sub-harmonic of an external stable clock reference is produced by driving an electrostatic bias electrode at approximately twice this sub-harmonic frequency to achieve disciplined frequency and phase operation of the resonator. A nearly symmetric parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope that can oscillate in any transverse direction and has more than one bias electrostatic electrode that can be independently driven at twice its oscillation frequency at an amplitude and phase that disciplines its damping to zero in any vibration direction. In addition, operation of a parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope is taught in which the precession rate of the driven vibration pattern is digitally disciplined to a prescribed non-zero reference value.

  8. The Interdisciplinary Degree Based on E-I Index ——Taking Five Disciplines Including Information Science as Examples%基于E-I指数的学科交叉程度分肝——以情寺艮学等5个学科为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长玲; 纪雪梅; 支岭

    2011-01-01

    学科交叉程度的测量对于确定学科独立性、明确不同学科间的关系具有重要意义。为了对两个或多个学科间的交叉程度进行分析,引入网络分析中的E-I指数计算方法。通过对不同学科期刊互引网络的学科子群之间的分派程度进行分析,探寻不同学科之间的交叉程度。通过E-I指数对情报学、图书馆学、计算机科学、科学学、管理学5个学科之间的交叉程度进行测度。%The measurement of interdisciplinarity degree is significant to the determination of disciplinary independence and relation- ship between different disciplines. E-I index is introduced to analyze the interdisciplinary degree between two or more discipline

  9. [Dental research in the Netherlands: Ph.D theses 1956-1994].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beertsen, W; Habets, L L; Hofman, L J

    1996-08-01

    The number of PhD-theses by Dutch scientists shows a continuous increase over the last four decades, resulting in about 20 theses per year during the early nineties. They cover a wide range of subjects in all major disciplines of dental research and nowadays are usually written in English (in 80% of the cases). A substantial proportion (23%) of all dental theses comes from scientists not trained as dentist but in other disciplines like biochemistry and psychology. So far, the drastic decline in the number of Dental Schools in the Netherlands during the eighties has had little influence on the overall outcome of PhD-theses. The international impact of Dutch dental research seems to increase over the years as shown by the declining fraction of Dutch dental scientists who are never cited in the international dental literature.

  10. [Dental prostheses and dental impressions from a hygienic viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, J P

    1986-12-01

    Dentures, dental impressions, removable orthodontic appliances and all dental technical devices, which are part of any dental treatment are parts as well of a potential crosscontamination chain in dental treatment. Most of those items do not tolerate heat as a sure sterilization medium. For disinfection, chemical disinfectant solutions may be used as far as they work properly and as they are tolerated by the materials in question. Though, one can report some progress in disinfection of dentures and impressions, there are still questions open depending on safety and/or compatibility of the particular materials. For disinfection of removable dentures chlorine-yielding preparations such as Maranon can be recommended. Peracid preparations, such as Sekusept, Sekusept steril and Dentavon may be useful for disinfection of dental impressions. To do the possible means to reduce the infection risk for all persons involved in the dental treatment, patient, dentist, dental technician and all auxiliary persons. This includes both, active hygiene provisions as sterilization and disinfection, as well as possible passive self protection.

  11. Dental Training Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  12. Dental Problems in Calcium Metabolism Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rabbani M.D.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium metabolism disorders can be acute or chronic and chronic disorders can cause different disease states such as dental problems. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study done in Children's Medical Center affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences during 2005-2009, all (93 patients with hypoparathyroidism, nutritional rickets, hypophosphatemic rickets and renal osteodysthrophy from the endocrinology and nephrology departments of the Center were referred to a dentist there for orodental examination. Subsequently, the frequency of dental problems including taurodontism, enamel hypoplasia, dental abscess, dental caries and gingivitis were recorded and analyzed. Results: Nutritional rickets was the most common disorder in this study and delay in dentition was the most frequent dental problem in the patients (61.9%. Most cases of taurdontism and enamel hypoplasia were seen in patients with hypoparathyroidism (33% and 50%, respectively. Dental abscess, dental caries and gingivitis were more common in patients with renal osteodysthrophia (50%, 90% and 20%, respectively. In addition, dental caries and delay in dentition were the most prevalent disorders in this study (69.8% and 49.5%, respectively. Conclusion: According to the above findings, it seems that effective screening, regular periodic examinations, proper diagnosis and timely treatment of dental diseases are the main principles of prevention of orodental problems. Moreover, dentists as well as pediatricians should be aware of the features of the aforesaid disorders which lead to dental problems so that early intervention could prevent subsequent serious and more invasive dental problems.

  13. An Interprofessional Approach to Exploring the Social Determinants of Health with Dental Hygiene Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidos, Adrienne; Gwozdek, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The University of Michigan (U-M) Dental Hygiene Program collaborated with the U-M School of Social Work in developing a course entitled "Skills for Patient- and Family-Centered Care with Diverse Populations." Drawing upon disciplines including dentistry, social work, psychology, and sociology, this course transformed mandatory outreach rotations in safety-net dental settings from a freestanding senior-year experience to an integrated part of the dental hygiene curriculum. The course provided a space in which to discuss the interpersonal aspects of patient care, particularly those related to the social determinants of health. Among the students, a broad range of emotions, frustrations, and hopes were evident, suggesting that there is a need for forums through which students can connect their affective experiences to their practice of patient-centered care. While the course was designed for bachelor's level dental hygiene students, the content and process presented in this paper may be of interest to faculty housed within any allied health professional program, because core themes such as social justice, service-learning, and self-reflection transcend all health professions.

  14. Conflict Resolution and Peace Education: Transformations across Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Candice C., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Peace education includes lessons about conflict sources, transformation and resolution. While featuring field-based examples in multiple disciplines, including political science, anthropology, communication, psychology, sociology, counseling, law and teacher training, this book presents real cases of conflict work. Explained are concepts…

  15. Public perceptions of dental implants: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward C M

    2015-07-01

    Dental implants have become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information on dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners at various levels/disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate the public's information acquisition and their perceptions of dental implants and the effects of these on their care-seeking and decision making. A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join six focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64 years of age, had never been engaged in dentally related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, and had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered into any dental consultation regarding dental implants. All of the focus groups discussions were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following a grounded theory approach. Participants acquired information on dental implants through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected dental implants to restore the patients' appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implants as a panacea for all cases of missing teeth, overestimated their functions and longevity, and underestimated the expertise needed to carry out the clinical procedures. They were deterred from seeking dental implant treatment by the high price, invasive procedures, risks, and complications. Members of the public were exposed to information of varying quality and had some unrealistic expectations regarding dental implants. Such perceptions may shape their care-seeking behaviours and decision-making processes in one way or another. The views and experiences gathered in this qualitative study could assist clinicians to better understand the public's perspectives, facilitate constructive patient-dentist communication, and contribute

  16. Anglistics as a Dialogic Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Delanoy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In my article; dialogue is suggested as a basic direction for Anglistics. Such a perspective results from a normative notion of dialogue based on a set of particular criteria. In general terms; a case is made for (self-critical and respectful confrontation with other viewpoints within and beyond Anglistics to further develop existing positions and to create new forms of co-operation. While in the first two sections this concept is introduced and applied to the discipline of Anglistics; the final section is focussed on an area of major conflict in contemporary ELT debates. In fact; a dialogic approach will be suggested for dealing with two opposite tendencies; one aiming for standardization and the other for a humanistic form of education.

  17. Austerity, Discipline and Social Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asja Hrvatin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the manifestations of the global crisis of financial capitalism and the policies arising from it was the imposition of austerity measures, which not only resulted in privatization of the commons and general expropriation of the people, but also managed to introduce new mechanisms of discipline and punishment. Debt, being the fundament of relations in society, forced itself into the system of social security: new legislation, regulating welfare benefits, has now shifted to a method for the criminalization of poverty, deepening class differences and transforming social workers (and the system of social security as a whole into a moralizing, bureaucratic machine for disciplining the population. The new legislation also shows a lack of reflection on the changes that need to be made to the welfare state in order to create social services that meet the needs and desires of individuals. Instead of improvements that provide decent living conditions and a new system of social rights (to deal with the problems resulting from precarious working conditions, people are faced with depersonalization, humiliation and increased hate speech and other fascist practices. The effect of austerity measures on the social security system does not end with the devastation of service users’ lives and their communities, which are slowly becoming exhausted, individualized and devoid of solidarity. It also means a big step backwards for the core ethics and principles of social work. Social workers are increasingly alienated from their clients and the communities they live in. They function more in the service of the government and its policies rather than as advocates of people’s rights.

  18. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes and Oral Health > Diabetes: Dental Tips Diabetes: Dental Tips Main Content Diabetes can cause serious problems ... FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, ...

  19. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they're most treatable. When to have a dental exam Various factors might determine how frequently your ... wisdom teeth (third molars) at the appropriate age. Dental X-ray A dental X-ray (radiograph) allows ...

  20. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share with Women Dental Care in Pregnancy Why is dental care in pregnancy important? During pregnancy, you are more likely to have problems ... There are 2 major reasons women can have dental problems during pregnancy: Pregnancy gingivitis— During pregnancy, changes ...

  1. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  2. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  3. Dental anxiety: An understudied problem in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Laura D; Hovey, Joseph D; Chacon, Karina; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2017-07-01

    Dental anxiety and dental phobia typically emerge during childhood; the associated avoidance of dental care can result in oral health problems and is associated with lower quality of life. In this review, we discuss the definition of dental phobia and dental anxiety and issues related to their differentiation. We then review the literature on dental anxiety and dental phobia, including its prevalence, assessment, and sequalae. Moreover, we provide a synthesis of findings on the etiology and maintenance of dental phobia and propose a comprehensive cognitive behavioral model to guide further study. We also present a systematic qualitative and a quantitative review of the treatment literature, concluding that although we have made strides in learning how to prevent dental anxiety in youth, the methods effective in preventing anxiety may not be equally effective in treating youth with dental phobia. We propose a multidisciplinary approach, including those with expertise in pediatric anxiety as well as pediatric dentistry, is likely required to move forward. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Community dental clinics: providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Bruce B; MacEntee, Michael I; Harrison, Rosamund; Hole, Rachelle; Mitton, Craig

    2013-06-01

    Not-for-profit community dental clinics attempt to address the inequities of oral health care for disadvantaged communities, but there is little information about how they operate. The objective of this article is to explain from the perspective of senior staff how five community dental clinics in British Columbia, Canada, provide services. The mixed-methods case study included the five not-for-profit dental clinics with full-time staff who provided a wide range of dental services. We conducted open-ended interviews to saturation with eight senior administrative staff selected purposefully because of their comprehensive knowledge of the development and operation of the clinics and supplemented their information with a year's aggregated data on patients, treatments, and operating costs. The interview participants described the benefits of integrating dentistry with other health and social services usually within community health centres, although they doubted the sustainability of the clinics without reliable financial support from public funds. Aggregated data showed that 75% of the patients had either publically funded or no coverage for dental services, while the others had employer-sponsored dental insurance. Financial subsidies from regional health authorities allowed two of the clinics to treat only patients who are economically vulnerable and provide all services at reduced costs. Clinics without government subsidies used the fees paid by some patients to subsidize treatment for others who could not afford treatment. Not-for-profit dental clinics provide dental services beyond pain relief for underserved communities. Dental services are integrated with other health and community services and located in accessible locations. However, all of the participants expressed concerns about the sustainability of the clinics without reliable public revenues. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  6. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  7. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  8. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  9. U.S. Dental School Deans’ Perceptions of the Rising Cost of Dental Education and Borrowing Pressures on Dental Students: Report of Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Dora Elías; Garrison, Gwen E; Feldman, Cecile A; Anderson, Eugene L; Cook, Bryan J; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    This report presents findings from a survey of U.S. dental school deans designed to capture their perceptions regarding the rising cost of dental education and its impact on borrowing by dental students to finance their education. The survey included questions about factors influencing the cost of dental education, concerns about dental student borrowing, and financial awareness resources for students. The survey was distributed to the deans of all 63 U.S. dental schools in January 2013; 42 deans responded, for a 67% response rate. The results indicate that, according to the responding deans, new clinical technologies, technology costs, and central university taxes are the main factors that contribute to the increasing cost of dental education. Coupled with reduced state appropriations at public dental schools and declines in private giving at all dental schools, dental school deans face a perplexing set of financial management challenges. Tuition and fees are a primary source of revenue for all dental schools; however, many deans do not have total control over the cost of attending their schools since tuition and fees are often tied to mandates and policies from the parent university and the state legislature. The findings of this study indicate that U.S. dental school deans are aware of and concerned about the impact of increases in tuition and fees on dental student debt and that they are using a variety of strategies to address the growth in dental student borrowing.

  10. Thoughts about the Name of Our Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Jacqueline; Aronowitz, Teri; AbuFannouneh, AbdulMuhsen; Al Usta, Maysa'; Fraley, Hannah E; Howlett, Mary Susan L; Mtengezo, Jasintha Titani; Muchira, James Muturi; Nava, Adrianna; Thapa, Saurja; Zhang, Yuqing

    2015-10-01

    This essay addresses the name of our discipline. Discussion of the use of the term, nursology, focuses on the origin of the term, its use as a name for our discipline and its use as a research method and a practice methodology. Advantages and disadvantages of nursology as the name for our discipline are gleaned from PhD program students' responses to a question posed by Reed (1997).

  11. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Student Resources National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Transforming Dental Hygiene Education Advocacy Practice Issues Direct Access Scope ...

  12. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  13. Payment Discipline Depends on Management Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Sirk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study was to identify if management ethics have a positive impact on payment discipline. Our sample includes 273 Slovene enterprises, which represent 9.1% of 2978 Slovenian enterprises with 10 or more employees, selected from the database of the Slovenian rating agency I d.o.o. To determine management ethics, we used the Corporate Ethical Virtues measurement instrument questionnaire. The data concerning average late payments were also obtained from the database the Slovenian rating agency I d.o.o. We conducted a factor analysis using the enter method. We confirmed that the influence of management ethics have a positive impact on average payment delays expressed in days.

  14. Does the school nurse have a role to play in school discipline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfman, Mary H B

    2002-02-01

    Student discipline has become a subject of increasing concern at local, state, and national levels. This article is a discussion of current federal, state, and local school district legal requirements for student discipline in public schools with examples that illustrate several issues that could or should involve a school nurse. A brief history of the legal developments in school discipline includes key U.S. Supreme Court decisions and Acts of Congress. School district options in policy development and disciplinary procedures are discussed. Some of the discipline incidents include issues of nurse-patient confidentiality.

  15. The science of computing shaping a discipline

    CERN Document Server

    Tedre, Matti

    2014-01-01

    The identity of computing has been fiercely debated throughout its short history. Why is it still so hard to define computing as an academic discipline? Is computing a scientific, mathematical, or engineering discipline? By describing the mathematical, engineering, and scientific traditions of computing, The Science of Computing: Shaping a Discipline presents a rich picture of computing from the viewpoints of the field's champions. The book helps readers understand the debates about computing as a discipline. It explains the context of computing's central debates and portrays a broad perspecti

  16. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  17. TRICARE Dental Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Contract: Effective 1 October 2008  New Benefits – Dental Implants – 1 and 2 surface Posterior composite resins (white fillings)  Expanded Overseas...JAN 6, 2011  Follow-on Contract includes the following benefit enhancements – Composite resin fillings on posterior teeth – Increase of annual maximum...Specialists  Tendency for different materials ( amalgam , gold crowns and porcelain-fused to metal crowns (PFMs))  ADDP is Benefits Administration – no

  18. Prevalence of dental anomalies in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongudomporn, U; Freer, T J

    1998-12-01

    The prevalence of dental anomalies including agenesis, crown shape, tooth position, root shape, and invagination were examined in 111 orthodontic patients; 74.77 per cent of the patients exhibited at least one dental anomaly. Invagination was found to be the most prevalent anomaly, whereas supernumerary teeth and root dilaceration were the least frequent anomalies. Dental invagination and short or blunt roots were significantly more prevalent in females than in males. Implications for orthodontic treatment planning are discussed.

  19. Race, Exclusionary Discipline, and Connectedness to Adults in Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyon, Yolanda; Zhang, Duan; Hazel, Cynthia

    2016-06-01

    This study examines racial differences in students' connectedness to school adults and considers the possibility that disparities in exclusionary discipline practices may reduce all students' sense of connection to educators, not just those who have been disciplined or are from racial groups overrepresented in out-of-school suspensions. Data sources include a self-report survey of secondary school students (n = 29,148) linked to administrative data (n = 107 schools) from a large urban district. Multilevel modeling techniques were used to estimate the relationships between students' racial background, youths' connection to school adults, and school-level racial discipline gaps. Controlling for school racial composition, gender, grade level and other covariates, students of color were significantly less likely to feel connected to school adults than their White peers. Additionally, the racial discipline gap was significantly and negatively associated with connectedness for all students. Results indicate that strategies to improve educational outcomes for youth of color need to attend to relational dynamics between students and school adults. Research findings also suggest that efforts to reduce discipline disparities may improve all students' connectedness.

  20. Child Dental Neglect: A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazani, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Context: Child dental neglect is a terrible tragedy with a high prevalence. Dealing with this issue is important regarding psychological and physical health policies. The current review was conducted to provide health professionals insight into the different aspects of child dental neglect as reported in previous literature. Evidence Acquisition: Our review was prepared through an electronic search using Pub Med, Science Direct, Medline, Google, Cochran Library, Google Scholar and EMBASE databases. Relevant papers published since 2000 until now in English, discussing child dental neglect were retrieved. Both original and review papers were included. Eligible articles were fully read by the author. A data form was used to record useful findings. Results: Distinguishing the direct and indirect signs of dental neglect is the first step for improvement of this matter. The dental team are the main professionals who can improve parental knowledge about the consequences of child dental neglect. Victims suffer from short and long-term adverse outcomes. Collaborative attempts need to be made by different health professionals to deal with this problem. Conclusions: Child dental neglect has many long-term impacts. The main professionals who are responsible for identification, intervention and treatment of child dental neglect are dental practitioners. However, other professionals cannot ignore this task. Finally, child dental neglect, despite its derivative outcomes, may be a presentation of a broader maltreatment. PMID:25741483

  1. Age of peak performance in Olympic sports: A comparative research among disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Aldo F.; Siffredi, Carlos R.; Cardey, Marcelo L.; Aquilino, Gustavo D.; Lentini, Néstor A.

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to study the ages of peak performance in Olympic sport disciplines, and to distinguish age groups among them. The ages (in decimal years) of athletes with the best performances at the 2012 Summer Olympics were considered (n = 3548). A total of forty sport disciplines were included; the athletics events were classified in six disciplines: Sprint, Middle-distance, Long-distance, Combined, Jumping and Throwing. A full statistical summary was produced. A regression tree was pr...

  2. Exploring Current and Future Roles of Non-Dental Professionals: Implications for Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Hannah L; Farrell, Christine; Gwozdek, Anne

    2017-09-01

    The health care system is undergoing transformation in which oral health is not only valued as an aspect of overall health, but health care delivery systems are aligning to better deliver total patient care. As a result of this transformation, education for many non-dental professionals incorporates oral health content to prepare them to practice in comprehensive delivery models. While some non-dental professionals already incorporate oral health care in their service, many opportunities exist for expansion of oral health care delivery by other non-dental professionals, including radiologic technicians, nursing staff, and human services professionals. As non-dental professionals take on expanded roles in oral health care, the dental hygiene workforce must be prepared to practice in settings with new types of professionals. Dental hygiene curricula should prioritize interprofessional education to best prepare these students for practice in evolved delivery models. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  3. Cosmic Rays Astrophysics: The Discipline, Its Scope, and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the discipline surrounding cosmic ray astrophysics. It includes information on recent assertions surrounding cosmic rays, exposure levels, and a short history with specific information on the origin, acceleration, transport, and modulation of cosmic rays.

  4. Can an ethical work climate influence payment discipline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Salamon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: All European companies are faced with the lack of payment discipline, which often affects even their survival. One of the key reasons for the lack of payment discipline is poor business ethics, which is primarily introduced with the subject of ethical climate in the literature. For this reason, we wanted to determine whether a company's ethical climate influences its payment discipline.Design/methodology/approach: In the research, we used Arnaud's measurement instrument (2010 that helped us to identify six dimensions of ethical climate. The data about a company’s ethical climate were later compared with the data about its payment discipline, calculated using the Dun & Bradstreet rating agency methodology. We included in the sample 273 Slovenian companies, which represented 9.1% of all companies invited to take part in the survey (2978 Slovenian enterprises with 10 or more employees.Findings: We established that (among the six dimensions of the ethical climate the dimension “moral sensitivity – the lack of norms of empathetic concern” had statistically significant influence on the average delay of payment, and the more significant for the company the lack of norms of empathetic concern was, the longer the delay of the payment to suppliers would be. Our conclusion is that the appropriate forms of the incorporation of training and education on ethical subjects into business studies may increase the payment discipline of companies.Originality/value: The present study represents an important contribution to understanding the causes of payment defaults. The study also includes non-financial antecedents of payment discipline, which represents a new, important contribution of the research.

  5. Can an ethical work climate influence payment discipline?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, T.; Mesko, M.

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: All European companies are faced with the lack of payment discipline, which often affects even their survival. One of the key reasons for the lack of payment discipline is poor business ethics, which is primarily introduced with the subject of ethical climate in the literature. For this reason, we wanted to determine whether a company’s ethical climate influences its payment discipline. Design/methodology/approach: In the research, we used Arnaud’s measurement instrument (2010) that helped us to identify six dimensions of ethical climate. The data about a company’s ethical climate were later compared with the data about its payment discipline, calculated using the Dun & Bradstreet rating agency methodology. We included in the sample 273 Slovenian companies, which represented 9.1% of all companies invited to take part in the survey (2978 Slovenian enterprises with 10 or more employees). Findings: We established that (among the six dimensions of the ethical climate) the dimension “moral sensitivity – the lack of norms of empathetic concern” had statistically significant influence on the average delay of payment, and the more significant for the company the lack of norms of empathetic concern was, the longer the delay of the payment to suppliers would be. Our conclusion is that the appropriate forms of the incorporation of training and education on ethical subjects into business studies may increase the payment discipline of companies. Originality/value: The present study represents an important contribution to understanding the causes of payment defaults. The study also includes non-financial antecedents of payment discipline, which represents a new, important contribution of the research. (Author)

  6. Realization of Interdisciplinary Communications of Fundamental Disciplines and Disciplines of Mathematical Cycle in the Preparation of Future Programmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miсhaеl Lvov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to interdisciplinary communication in the process of preparation of the future programmers and implementation of the basic principles of these relations in the study of disciplines of professional and practical training and math courses. The article deals with the role of interdisciplinary connections, as well as their function and significance for the formation of cognitive activity, independence and positive learning motivation. The focus is on methodological aspects of realization of interdisciplinary communications at studying basic disciplines of training future programmers and disciplines of mathematical cycle. In particular, the issues of realization of interdisciplinary communications during the study such disciplines as "Computer graphics, computational geometry," "Basics of algorithms and programming", "Programming Technologies" and the course "Analytical geometry and linear algebra", which included in to normative part of the training of programmers. This article describes the theoretical aspects of the implementation of interdisciplinary connections in the study of these disciplines, as well as examples of practical tasks with which these relationships can be implemented most effectively during training

  7. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  8. The Law of Student Discipline in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Tie Fatt

    2008-01-01

    Judicial review of decisions on student discipline is limited in Malaysia. This arises because of the general presumption that in the enforcement of school discipline, educators are able to act in the best interest of the student to maintain a safe learning environment. This article examines the range of disciplinary measures in Malaysian schools…

  9. Procedural Due Process Rights in Student Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Robert; Weinstein, Susan

    To assist administrators in understanding procedural due process rights in student discipline, this manual draws together hundreds of citations and case summaries of federal and state court decisions and provides detailed commentary as well. Chapter 1 outlines the general principles of procedural due process rights in student discipline, such as…

  10. 49 CFR 1103.5 - Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discipline. 1103.5 Section 1103.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS General Information § 1103.5 Discipline. (a) A member of the...

  11. Effective Discipline in the Home and School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Genevieve; Corsini, Raymond J.

    Based originally on the work of the Austrian psychiatrist, Alfred Adler, work which was further developed by Rudolph Dreikurs, this book Dreikurs, this book offers solutions to specific child discipline problems. Part I focuses on effective discipline in the home. These topics are covered: fundamentals of practical parenting; problems of routine…

  12. School Discipline, School Uniforms and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Chris; Krskova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of school discipline in achieving academic performance. The study aims to clarify the role of permissive "vis-à-vis" authoritative teaching styles with an overarching hypothesis that better discipline leads to better academic performance. The authors also probe whether uniformed…

  13. School Discipline Inequities Become a Federal Priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Federal officials are getting the word out that addressing racial disparities in school discipline is a high priority, and they plan to use "disparate-impact analysis" in enforcing school discipline cases--a legal course of action that some civil rights lawyers contend was neglected under the administration of President George W. Bush. In…

  14. Disproportionality in School Discipline in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastic, Billie

    2017-01-01

    The racial discipline gap--the finding that Black and Latino students are more likely to be disciplined at school than White students, and often more harshly--has implications for students' academic success. This study concluded that differences in students' behavior do not fully explain the disproportionate likelihood that Black students are…

  15. School Discipline Feeds the "Pipeline to Prison"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Unsupported fears of youth violence in schools has led to an expansion of school-based policing and zero tolerance discipline. The historical reality is that America's public schools are very safe, even when located in high crime neighborhoods. Yet, school discipline is becoming increasingly punitive, moving from the schoolhouse to the courthouse.…

  16. How Can We Improve School Discipline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osher, David; Bear, George G.; Sprague, Jeffrey R.; Doyle, Walter

    2010-01-01

    School discipline addresses schoolwide, classroom, and individual student needs through broad prevention, targeted intervention, and development of self-discipline. Schools often respond to disruptive students with exclusionary and punitive approaches that have limited value. This article surveys three approaches to improving school discipline…

  17. The Teacher's Guide to Restorative Classroom Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Luanna H.; Evans, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    With restorative discipline, schools move beyond punitive approaches to shared expectations for learning and behavior. Used together with "The School Leader's Guide to Restorative Discipline," this teacher's guide shows how to create a welcoming and responsible community within your classroom, contributing to a consistent, schoolwide approach to…

  18. Student Discipline: Legal, Empirical, and Educational Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. John, III, Ed.; Bennett, Christine, Ed.

    This book presents four perspectives on student discipline: legal and historical, empirical, educational, and futuristic. Part I examines the legal history of student discipline in papers by J. John Harris III, Richard E. Fields, and A. Reynaldo Contreras (Chapter 1); Richard E. Fields (Chapter 2); and David G. Carter, Sr. and Cynthia L. Jackson…

  19. Effective Discipline in the Home and School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Genevieve; Corsini, Raymond J.

    Based originally on the work of the Austrian psychiatrist, Alfred Adler, work which was further developed by Rudolph Dreikurs, this book Dreikurs, this book offers solutions to specific child discipline problems. Part I focuses on effective discipline in the home. These topics are covered: fundamentals of practical parenting; problems of routine…

  20. Policies/Practices in Public School Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William E.; Payne, Tyrone

    1988-01-01

    A survey of 339 teachers (grades K-12) found lack of motivation and poor parental support to be the biggest discipline problems. Nearly 90 percent worked with a stated/written discipline policy. Approximately 75 percent believed that corporal punishment should continue. Verbal reprimands were the most common behavior change method used. (VW)

  1. Disciplines in the Service of Educational Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that the 20th century has been the century of the application of disciplines - philosophy, psychology, history, sociology, statistics, cognitive science, and computer science - to educational thought on an unprecedented scale. The same disciplines, in the service of the study of women by women, have led to a whole new complex of thought…

  2. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Home > Medicaid > Benefits > Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  3. 28 CFR 541.19 - Appeals from Unit Discipline Committee or Discipline Hearing Officer actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeals from Unit Discipline Committee or Discipline Hearing Officer actions. 541.19 Section 541.19 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Inmate...

  4. State Legislative Recommendations to Promote Fair and Effective School Discipline. NEPC Discipline Resource Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losen, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This document presents a summary of the larger report "Discipline Policies, Successful Schools, and Racial Justice." State legislation is an important lever for improving the equity of student discipline policies. However, states vary tremendously, and only some provide accurate public reports on school discipline, support effective programs like…

  5. Is dental practice science based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, C W

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the thesis that the changing medical needs of dental patients, advances in biomedical research, and the confluence of the financing of medical and dental care will result in closer linkages between the medical and dental care delivery systems during the next century. Five trends have been documented in support of this thesis: the increasing number of elderly and their retention of teeth means there is a greater need for restorative dental care than in previous generations; the elderly have chronic diseases and are taking more medications; younger patients are presenting more frequently with infectious, systemic diseases such as HIV/AIDS. New scientific discoveries are opening new possibilities for patient care, which generate even higher expectations on the part of future consumers of medical and dental services. The health and fitness trend is not a fad; new knowledge regarding diet, nutrition, and exercise is identifying systemic risk factors related to common oral pathologies. Medical and dental educators are paying increased attention to the application of basic sciences to patient care. HMOs are increasing their market share of medical care delivery and expanding their services with preventive care and total patient care, including dental services. Data are provided documenting that dentists see these trends occurring in their private practices. The paper concludes that the application of advances in science and technology to oral health will improve the quality of dentistry. However, only new, effective preventive agents will decrease the cost of care, while improved diagnostics and restorative technologies could increase dental care costs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Factors affecting dental service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Ravangard, Ramin; Baldacchino, Donia

    2015-01-01

    Measuring dental clinic service quality is the first and most important factor in improving care. The quality provided plays an important role in patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors affecting dental service quality from the patients' viewpoint. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study was conducted in a dental clinic in Tehran between January and June 2014. A sample of 385 patients was selected from two work shifts using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. The data were collected, a self-administered questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study, based on the Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model of service quality which consisted of two parts: the patients' demographic characteristics and a 30-item questionnaire to measure the five dimensions of the service quality. The collected data were analysed using SPSS 21.0 and Amos 18.0 through some descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, as well as analytical methods, including confirmatory factor. Results showed that the correlation coefficients for all dimensions were higher than 0.5. In this model, assurance (regression weight=0.99) and tangibility (regression weight=0.86) had, respectively, the highest and lowest effects on dental service quality. The Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model is suitable to measure quality in dental services. The variables related to dental services quality have been made according to the model. This is a pioneering study that uses Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model and CFA in a dental setting. This study provides useful insights and guidance for dental service quality assurance.

  7. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  8. Mount Sinai Hospital dental program for persons with disabilities: role in undergraduate dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Access to dental care for persons with special needs or disabilities continues to be a problem. This population is known to have a high incidence of dental disease, but unfortunately oral health is a significant unmet health need in many cases. To address this need, the Mount Sinai Hospital Dental Program for Persons with Disabilities was developed over 30 years ago by staff within the discipline of pediatric dentistry at the faculty of dentistry of the University of Toronto. Undergraduate students receive hands-on clinical training in dental management of persons with disabilities, the majority of whom have a developmental disability and could receive care in a community-based dental practice. This program has been successful, but access to community care is still an issue for the population served. Two new initiatives have been introduced in an attempt to develop personal links between persons with disabilities and future dentists, the first a series of lectures given by persons with disabilities and the second a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness of the need for dental care for persons with disabilities. Among other activities, the organization sponsors a community-based event called Sharing Smiles Day, which brings together dental students and persons with disabilities in a carnival-like setting where the emphasis is on personal interactions. Dental preventive education is also provided but is of secondary importance. These initiatives and the program as a whole represent recognition of the responsibility of educators to ensure that new graduates have both the education and the desire to provide needed dental care to persons with disabilities.

  9. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  10. Epilepsy and dental procedures. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkas, Charles K; Gopinathan, Manju K; Singh, Anuradha; Devinsky, Orrin; Lin, Louis M; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2008-03-01

    This paper is a review of the dental management of patients with epilepsy. It includes discussion of the effects anti-epileptic drugs have on dental procedures and addresses complications and side effects of these drugs. A clinical case photo is presented to show gingival hyperplasia, along with four tables on which common antiepileptic medications are enumerated.

  11. First Aid Procedures for Dental Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Nancy Happel; Londeree, Kathy

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for first aid procedures for temporary relief of dental emergencies include information on: (1) dental first aid supplies; (2) treatment of oral injuries; (3) orthodontic emergencies; (4) toothaches; and (5) prolonged bleeding due to an extraction. Consulting a dentist as soon as possible is strongly recommended. (JN)

  12. First Aid Procedures for Dental Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Nancy Happel; Londeree, Kathy

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for first aid procedures for temporary relief of dental emergencies include information on: (1) dental first aid supplies; (2) treatment of oral injuries; (3) orthodontic emergencies; (4) toothaches; and (5) prolonged bleeding due to an extraction. Consulting a dentist as soon as possible is strongly recommended. (JN)

  13. Burnout, depression and suicidal ideation in dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, George R; Braun, Sarah; Carrico, Caroline; Kinser, Patricia; Laskin, Daniel; Golob Deeb, Janina

    2017-02-27

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between burnout, depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in dental and dental hygiene students and to evaluate the influence of gender, programme type and year of study. Third- and fourth-year dental (DS) and first- and second-year hygiene students (DHS) completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and an abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory online as measures of depressive symptoms/suicidality and burnout, respectively. The statistical analyses included summary statistics and tests for intergroup comparisons (chi-square) to evaluate the influence of gender, programme type (DHS or DS) and year of study. Correlations between depression, suicidality and burnout were also conducted. A total of 32 dental hygiene and 119 dental students participated. 40% of the dental and 38% of the hygiene students met criteria for burnout. No differences were found between years or between programmes. Nine per cent of both dental and hygiene students were above the cut-off for moderate depressive symptoms, but there were no statistical differences between the third- and fourth-year dental and the first- and second-year hygiene students. Six per cent of the dental and 9% of the dental hygiene students were above the cut-off for clinically significant suicidal ideation, but there were no statistical differences between dental and hygiene students. There were no differences noted in the dental students based on gender for any of the measures. Depression was significantly associated with all three subscales of burnout. Suicidal ideation was only significantly related to the lack of personal accomplishment subscale of burnout. These findings suggest the need for introducing preventive measures for such affective states in dental and dental hygiene training programmes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Dental trauma related to general anesthesia: should the anesthesiologist perform a preanesthetic dental evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Saeed Riad; Fujimura, Kazuma; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2014-06-01

    Perioperative dental damage is one of the most common anesthesia-related adverse events and is responsible for the greatest number of malpractice claims against anesthesiologists; therefore, several dental considerations are warranted. A thorough evaluation may necessitate a dentist's help, requires that anesthesiologists receive more formal training regarding oral and dental anatomy, and enables performing the treatments necessary to minimize the risks of dental injuries. Nevertheless, this preanesthetic assessment is frequently overlooked by surgeons and anesthesiologists. The present study aimed to investigate, for both dentists and anesthesiologists, how often and under what circumstances dental trauma occurs during general anesthesia as well as isolate possible anatomical, dental, and anesthesiological risk factors, based on which suggestions for preventive measures could be made. Anesthesiologists must perform a thorough preoperative oral evaluation to help identify the dentition at risk; the evaluation should include the patient's dental history, oral/dental examination, and a specific discussion with the patient about any existing dentures or crowns. The dental examination should especially include an assessment of the patient's upper incisors--the teeth most likely to be injured during the perioperative period--for pre-existing damage. Preoperative notes should record any damages or missing teeth. In addition, anesthesiologists must take adequate intraprocedure precautions to prevent/minimize iatrogenic dental injury.

  15. The Effects of Educational Intervention & Parental Support on Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Edward J.; Behr, Mary T.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine the effectiveness of a school-based dental health education program which included a parental support component. It was hypothesized that changes in dental health attitudes would be positively affected by the outreach effort to educate parents on the importance of dental health. (JN)

  16. Evaluation of patients with oral lichenoid lesions by dental patch testing and results of removal of the dental restoration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Buket Şahin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Oral lichenoid lesions (OLL are contact stomatitis characterized by white reticular or erosive patches, plaque-like lesions that are clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from oral lichen planus (OLP. Amalgam dental fillings and dental restoration materials are among the etiologic agents. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the standard and dental series patch tests in patients with OLL in comparison to a control group and evaluate our results. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with OLL or OLP and 30 healthy control subjects, who had at least one dental restoration material and/or dental filling, were included in the study. Both groups received standard series and dental patch test and the results were evaluated simultaneously. Results: The most frequent allergens in the dental series patch test in the patient group were palladium chloride (n=4; 12.12% and benzoyl peroxide (n=2, 6.06%. Of the 33 patients with OLL; 8 had positive reaction to allergents in the standard patch test series and 8 had positive reaction in the dental patch test series. There was no significant difference in the rate of patch test reaction to the dental and standard series between the groups. Ten patients were advised to have the dental restoration material removed according to the results of the patch tests. The lesions improved in three patients [removal of all amalgam dental fillings (n=1, replacement of all amalgam dental fillings with an alternative filling material (n=1 and replacement of the dental prosthesis (n=1] following the removal or replacement of the dental restoration material. Conclusion: Dental patch test should be performed in patients with OLL and dental restoration material. Dental filling and/or prosthesis should be removed/replaced if there is a reaction against a dental restoration material-related allergen.

  17. Dental Decay Phenotype in Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, B J; Cooper, M E; Wehby, G L; Resick, J M; Nidey, N L; Valencia-Ramirez, L C; Lopez-Palacio, A M; Rivera, D; Vieira, A R; Weinberg, S M; Marazita, M L; Moreno Uribe, L M

    2017-09-01

    Although children with oral clefts have a higher risk for dental anomalies when compared with the general population, prior studies have shown conflicting results regarding their dental decay risk. Also, few studies have assessed dental decay risk in unaffected relatives of children with clefts. Thus, the question of increased risk of dental decay in individuals with oral clefts or their unaffected relatives is still open for empirical investigation. This study characterizes dental decay in the largest international cohort to date of children with nonsyndromic clefts and their relatives, as compared with controls, and it addresses whether families with oral clefts have a significantly increased risk for dental decay versus the general population. A total of 3,326 subjects were included: 639 case probands, 1,549 unaffected relatives, and 1,138 controls. Decay was identified from in-person dental examinations or intraoral photographs. Case-control differences were tested with regression analysis. No significant differences were shown in percentage decayed and filled teeth and decayed teeth in the primary dentition (dft, dt) and permanent dentition (DFT, DT) in cases versus controls. In the cleft region, no significant differences were seen in primary or permanent decay (dt, DT) when compared with controls. No difference was found with regard to cleft type and percentage dft, dt, DFT, and DT in case probands. Nonsignificant differences were found in unaffected siblings and parents versus controls (primary and permanent dentitions). Collectively, these findings indicate that individuals with nonsyndromic oral clefts and their families do not have a higher dental decay risk as compared with the general population. These results suggest that either genetic or environmental factors underlying a higher susceptibility for dental anomalies do not increase caries risk or that the seemingly higher risk for dental decay associated with increased dental anomalies in case

  18. Health promotion and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Marisa; Jardim, Juliana Jobim; Alves, Luana Severo

    2010-01-01

    The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene), among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene) should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  19. Health promotion and dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Maltz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene, among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  20. Major Differences: Variations in Undergraduate and Graduate Student Mental Health and Treatment Utilization across Academic Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Zhou, Sasha; Wagner, Blake, III; Beck, Katie; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article explores variations in mental health and service utilization across academic disciplines using a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students (N = 64,519) at 81 colleges and universities. We report prevalence of depression, anxiety, suicidality, and self-injury, and rates of help-seeking across disciplines, including results…

  1. Factors Affecting the Link between Physical Discipline and Child Externalizing Problems in Black and White Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna S.; Litrownik, Alan J.; Newton, Rae R.; Black, Maureen M.; Everson, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    We examined contextual factors that may affect the impact of physical discipline on later child behavior problems among high-risk Black and White families. We examined race, parental warmth, and early child problems as potential moderators of the discipline-behavior problem link. The sample included 442 White and Black children and their…

  2. Dental erosion: causes, diagnostics and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sosa-Puente

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a commonly studied topic, it is difficult to find studies which explain the problem of dental erosion. For this article, literature was analyzed to find information on the agents which trigger dental erosion, the main diagnosis methods, the most common treatments used nowadays and the interrelationship with dental materials. The etiology of dental erosion is multifactorial, including acids, eating disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, biological factors such as saliva or habits also play a part in the establishment of this condition. In order to establish a reliable diagnosis, clinical appearance becomes decisive. The Basic Index Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE, created in 2008, is an auxiliary diagnosis tool for assessing the status and progress of the erosion. Treatment should be linked to the eradication of the causative agent and it can range from simple observational monitoring of slightly affected teeth to the placement of total crowns in the most severe cases, but this will depend entirely on the extent, severity, symptoms and type of dentition. Regarding dental materials used in the treatment of eroded parts, there are glass ionomer and composite; the latter presents the greatest resistance to biodegradation when interacting with acids. Glass ionomers are the most vulnerable material while resin is seen as the most resistant. In conclusion, dental erosion has become an issue of great importance in the dental practice because of its serious impact on dental structures. Consequently, it is ranked among the most important dental disorders in the present day.

  3. Women's health topics in dental hygiene curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Howell, Joan C

    2010-01-01

    Minimal inclusion of women's health topics in dental and dental hygiene curricula may not prepare dental health care workers to provide comprehensive health care to females. The purposes of these surveys in 2001 and 2007 were to investigate United States dental hygiene school curricula regarding inclusion of women's health topics in differing degree programs (associate/certificate, baccalaureate, associate/baccalaureate) and course status (required or elective). The surveys also identified sources used to obtain women's health topics, assessed faculty continuing education participation in women's health, determined satisfaction with current curricula, questioned if change was anticipated and if so in what topics, identified where students apply their knowledge about women's health and in what ways and reported progress of dental hygiene curricula over the 6 year time period. Surveys were sent to dental hygiene program directors in 2001 (N=256) and in 2007 (N=288) asking them to complete the questionnaire. There was no statistically significant association between 2001 and 2007 survey results by degree or program setting. The educational issue, women's general health continuing education courses/topics completed by dental hygiene faculty in the past 2 years, showed a statistically significant difference during that time interval. No statistically significant difference existed between the survey years regarding topics on women's general health and oral health. Regardless of statistical significance, further details investigated percentage differences that may reveal relevant issues. These surveys establish a baseline of women's health topics included in dental hygiene curricula in order to assess knowledge of dental hygienists in practice.

  4. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni g

  5. Archival Discipline in Dewey Decimal Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Manzoni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper regards the ways archival discipline is treated in DDC. After a short introduction about the discipline in Italy, the essay focuses on the analysis of division 020 of DDC 23, with specific attention to section 025 and with punctual reference to section 651, concerning archival material. The aim of the paper is to point out archival discipline’s peculiarities and its differences from library science, as well as underlining the critical issues on how this discipline is handled in DDC.

  6. Informed consent in dental extractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Capote Femenías

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available When performing any oral intervention, particularly dental extractions, the specialist should have the oral or written consent of the patient. This consent includes the explanation of all possible complications, whether typical, very serious or personalized associated with the previous health condition, age, profession, religion or any other characteristic of the patient, as well as the possi.ble benefits of the intervention. This article is related with the bioethical aspects related with dental extractions, in order to determine the main elements that the informed consent should include.

  7. A Dental Education Perspective on Dental Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1985-01-01

    Two issues related to dental health policy are examined: the contribution of dental education to the process by which dental health policy is established, and the nature of dental education's response to established policies. (MLW)

  8. The emergent discipline of health web science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Joanne S; Cumming, Grant P; Wilkinson, Mark D; Kahana, Eva

    2013-08-22

    The transformative power of the Internet on all aspects of daily life, including health care, has been widely recognized both in the scientific literature and in public discourse. Viewed through the various lenses of diverse academic disciplines, these transformations reveal opportunities realized, the promise of future advances, and even potential problems created by the penetration of the World Wide Web for both individuals and for society at large. Discussions about the clinical and health research implications of the widespread adoption of information technologies, including the Internet, have been subsumed under the disciplinary label of Medicine 2.0. More recently, however, multi-disciplinary research has emerged that is focused on the achievement and promise of the Web itself, as it relates to healthcare issues. In this paper, we explore and interrogate the contributions of the burgeoning field of Web Science in relation to health maintenance, health care, and health policy. From this, we introduce Health Web Science as a subdiscipline of Web Science, distinct from but overlapping with Medicine 2.0. This paper builds on the presentations and subsequent interdisciplinary dialogue that developed among Web-oriented investigators present at the 2012 Medicine 2.0 Conference in Boston, Massachusetts.

  9. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  10. Filtering Medline for a clinical discipline: diagnostic test assessment framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iansavichus, Arthur V; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Kastner, Monika; Baier, Leslie A; Shariff, Salimah Z; Rehman, Faisal; Weir, Matthew; McKibbon, K Ann; Haynes, R Brian

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a Medline filter that allows clinicians to search for articles within a clinical discipline, rather than searching the entire Medline database. Design Diagnostic test assessment framework with development and validation phases. Setting Sample of 4657 articles published in 2006 from 40 journals. Reviews Each article was manually reviewed, and 19.8% contained information relevant to the discipline of nephrology. The performance of 1 155 087 unique renal filters was compared with the manual review. Main outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of each filter. Results The best renal filters combined two to 14 terms or phrases and included the terms “kidney” with multiple endings (that is, truncation), “renal replacement therapy”, “renal dialysis”, “kidney function tests”, “renal”, “nephr” truncated, “glomerul” truncated, and “proteinuria”. These filters achieved peak sensitivities of 97.8% and specificities of 98.5%. Performance of filters remained excellent in the validation phase. Conclusions Medline can be filtered for the discipline of nephrology in a reliable manner. Storing these high performance renal filters in PubMed could help clinicians with their everyday searching. Filters can also be developed for other clinical disciplines by using similar methods. PMID:19767336

  11. Preschool Children's Expectations for Parental Discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Angie Geertsen

    1998-01-01

    Many factors influence preschool children's expectations for parental discipline. Parent characteristics such as personality, values, social class, and disciplinary methods can affect the expectations children have for parental discipline. Children's ability to understand and interpret parental messages can also influence how they will respond. All of these factors need to be taken into consideration in order for effective communication between parents and children to occur. In this study,...

  12. Costing dental restorations in public sector dental clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairiyah, Abdul Muttalib; Razak, Ishak Abdul; Raja-Latifah, Raja Jalludin; Tan, Bee Siew; Norain, Abu Talib; Noor-Aliyah, Ismail; Natifah, Che Salleh; Rauzi, Ismail

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study is to share cost analysis methodology and to obtain cost estimates for posterior restorations in public sector dental clinics. Two urban and 2 rural dental clinics in Selangor state were selected. Only cases of 1 posterior restoration per visit by dental officers were included over 6 months. One capsulated amalgam type, 1 capsulated tooth-colored, and 1 non-capsulated tooth-colored material were selected. A clinical pathway form was formulated to collect data per patient. Annual capital and recurrent expenditures were collected per clinic. The mean cost of an amalgam restoration was RM 30.96 (sdRM 7.86); and tooth-colored restorations ranged from RM 33.00 (sdRM 8.43) to RM 41.10 (sdRM 10.61). Wherein 1 USD = RM 2.8. Restoration costs were 35% to 55% higher in clinics in rural areas than in urban areas. The findings demonstrate economy of scale for clinic operation and restoration costs with higher patient load. Costs per restoration were higher in rural than in urban dental clinics. More studies are recommended to address the dearth of dental costs data in Malaysia.

  13. Dental fluorosis, dental caries, and quality of life factors among schoolchildren in a Colombian fluorotic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, M; Santamaria, R M; Gomez, J; Martignon, S

    2012-03-01

    To assess dental fluorosis, dental caries and quality of life factors associated with dental fluorosis among schoolchildren living in a Colombian endemic dental fluorosis area. 110 12-year olds were visually examined for dental caries (ICDAS) and dental fluorosis (TF) and a self-administered quality of life and fluorosis questionnaire was applied. The prevalence of dental fluorosis reached 100% in this sample with most children falling within the TF 3 severity category. Varying degrees of severity were observed as follows for TF 1 to 6: 1%, 16%, 62%, 16%, 4%, 2%. The prevalence of caries experience (DF-S2) was 54%. The DF-S2 mean was 4.4 (sd 4.3). The principal contributor to the DF-S2 outcome was the decayed component. When initial caries lesions were included (ICDAS-scores 1-3) the mean DF-S1,2 increased to 10 (sd 5.1). The association between fluorosis and dental caries was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Children not only detected the presence of something abnormal in their teeth but also reported feeling embarrassed, and worried due to their dental appearance. Almost 60% of the children reported avoiding smiling because of their teeth's appearance. The high prevalence of dental fluorosis and dental caries combined with the schoolchildren's negative perception about their dental health reflects the need to propose effective dental public health policies to regulate multiple exposures to fluoride at an early age, and to improve health outcomes in a highly vulnerable population.

  14. Embryology and histology education in North American dental schools: the Basic Science Survey Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Dorothy T; Lee, Lisa M J; Lambert, H Wayne

    2013-06-01

    As part of the Basic Science Survey Series (BSSS) for Dentistry, members of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Anatomical Sciences Section surveyed faculty members teaching embryology and histology courses at North American dental schools. The survey was designed to assess, among other things, curriculum content, utilization of laboratories, use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI), and recent curricular changes. Responses were received from fifty-nine (88.1 percent) of the sixty-seven U.S. and Canadian dental schools. Findings suggest the following: 1) a trend toward combining courses is evident, though the integration was predominantly discipline-based; 2) embryology is rarely taught as a stand-alone course, as content is often covered in gross anatomy, oral histology, and/or in an integrated curriculum; 3) the number of contact hours in histology is decreasing; 4) a trend toward reduction in formal laboratory sessions, particularly in embryology, is ongoing; and 5) use of CAI tools, including virtual microscopy, in both embryology and histology has increased. Additionally, embryology and histology content topic emphasis is identified within this study. Data, derived from this study, may be useful to new instructors, curriculum and test construction committees, and colleagues in the anatomical sciences, especially when determining a foundational knowledge base.

  15. Evaluation of an integrative model for professional development and research in a dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditmyer, Marcia M; Mobley, Connie C; Davenport, William D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate a Research, Professional Development, and Critical Thinking Integrative Model developed for use in a dental curriculum. This article outlines strategies used in developing a competency-based pedagogical model designed to provide a tailored student learning environment with objective, measurable, and calibrated assessment outcomes. The theoretical model integrated elements of critical thinking, professionalism, and evidence-based dentistry across dental school disciplines; implementation was based on consensus of dental faculty and student representatives about course content, faculty allocation, and curriculum alignment. Changes introduced included the following: 1) conversion and integration of previously siloed course content taught in Years 1 and 2 to sequential two-year combined courses; 2) reduction of course and content redundancies; 3) delivery of courses by teams of faculty members in biomedical, behavioral, and clinical sciences; and 4) reduction of total curriculum credit/contact hours from 13.5 (201 contact hours) to 5.0 (60 contact hours), allowing the Curriculum Committee to accommodate additional courses. These changes resulted in improvement in student satisfaction.

  16. Dental anxiety and dental attendance among 25-year-olds in Norway: time trends from 1997 to 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaret Erik

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far, there are few studies considering the development of dental anxiety and dental attendance patterns across time in the general population of Norwegian adults. This study aimed to 1 determine the frequency of dental anxiety and regular dental attendance among 25-year-olds in Norway in 1997 and 2007, 2 to study the development (time trend of dental anxiety and the socio-behavioral distribution of dental anxiety from 1997 to 2007. Method Random samples of 1,190 and 8,000 25-yr-olds were drawn from the populations of three counties in Western Norway in 1997 and 2007, respectively. The eligible participants received questionnaires by mail including questions on socio-demographics, dental anxiety (DAS and dental attendance. Results In 1997, 11.5% males versus 23% females reported high dental anxiety (DAS ≥ 13. Corresponding figures in 2007 were 11.3% and 19.8%. The proportions who had attended yearly for a dental check-up during the past 5 years fell from 62% in 1997 (men 56.9% and women 66.4% to 44.6% (men 38.1% and women 48.6% in 2007. After controlling for potential confounding factors, the 25-year-olds were 1.4 times more likely to report dental anxiety in 1997 compared to 2007. The decrease was largely attributable to a lower mean DAS score among higher educated females in 2007 than in 1997. The discrepancy in dental anxiety between regular and non-regular dental attendees had decreased, largely attributable to a decline in dental anxiety among irregular dental attendees. Conclusion The study showed reduced dental anxiety and dental attendance among 25 year-olds in Norway from 1997 to 2007. This study points to the importance of controlling for possible changes in socio-demographic distributions when different cohorts are compared.

  17. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Rai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG. Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials.

  18. Infusing Sustainability Across Disciplines to Build Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; O'Connell, K.; McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Larsen, K.; Kent, M.; Manduca, C. A.; Egger, A. E.; Blockstein, D.; Mogk, D. W.; Taber, J.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing relevance and effective communication are key mechanisms for building student and community engagement in a topic and can be used to promote the importance of working across disciplines to solve problems. Sustainability, including the impacts of and responses to climate change, is an inherently interdisciplinary issue and can be infused across courses and curricula in a variety of ways. Key topics such as climate change, hazards, and food, water, and energy production and sustainability are relevant to a wide audience and can be used to build student engagement. Using real-world examples, service learning, and focusing on the local environment may further boost engagement by establishing relevance between sustainability issues and students' lives. Communication plays a key role in the exchange of information across disciplines and allows for a more holistic approach to tackling the complex climate and sustainability issues our society faces. It has the power to bridge gaps, break down disciplinary silos, and build connections among diverse audiences with a wide range of expertise, including scientists, policy-makers, stakeholders, and the general public. It also aids in planning and preparation for, response to, and mitigation of issues related to sustainability, including the impacts of climate change, to lessen the detrimental effects of unavoidable events such as sea level rise and extreme weather events. Several workshops from the InTeGrate and On the Cutting Edge projects brought together educators and practitioners from a range of disciplines including geoscience, engineering, social science, and more to encourage communication and collaboration across disciplines. They supported networking, community-building, and sharing of best practices for preparing our students for a sustainable future, both in and out of the workplace, and across disciplines. Interdisciplinary teams are also working together to author curricular materials that highlight

  19. Disciplined by the discipline: a social-epistemic fingerprint of the history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraeten, Raf; Vandermoere, Frederic

    2015-06-01

    The scientific system is primarily differentiated into disciplines. While disciplines may be wide in scope and diverse in their research practices, they serve scientific communities that evaluate research and also grant recognition to what is published. The analysis of communication and publication practices within such a community hence allows us to shed light on the dynamics of this discipline. On the basis of an empirical analysis of Isis, we show how the process of discipline-building in history of science has led its practitioners to be socialized and sensitized in relatively strong intra-disciplinary terms--with minimal interdisciplinary openness.

  20. Dental ceramics: a current review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2014-03-01

    Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed.

  1. Qualitative assessment of the dental health services provided at a dental school in Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Maryam; Haghani, Jahangir; Shahravan, Arash; Khosravifar, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Increasing the quality of the services provided in a Dental School can raise the satisfaction level of patients and consequently increase the level of their oral health. This study was conducted to evaluate the quality of dental care and services provided to patients referred to a Dental School in Kerman, Iran. In this qualitative study, face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted with 41 participants [25 patients (P), 5 nurses (N), 6 dental academic staff (AS), and 5 dental students (S)]. Then, the interviews were transcribed and analyzed, using content analysis of data. Data analysis in qualitative research involves breaking down the data and searching for codes and categories that are then reassembled to form themes. Both positive and negative themes emerged. Positive themes included: good infection control, service accessibility, patient appointments and visits were not assigned on merit, precise examinations, and comprehensive treatment plans. Negative themes included: long wait time, lack of options to pass waiting time, such as newspapers and television, an insufficient number of nurses, and not enough professors for supervision. In addition, the results of this study show that the patients and dental staff have high expectations in relation to dental services, and that implementation of these expectations would increase the overall satisfaction with and the quality of the level of services. Finally, some recommendations for improving services in the Kerman Dental School were given to the managing team of the Dental School.

  2. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  3. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  4. AUTHORITARIANISM AND DENTAL CARIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    in particular. If so, dental decay among nonauthoritarians might well progress further than among authoritarians. To determine whether or not there...is any relationship between dental decay and authoritarianism is the purpose of the present study. (Author)

  5. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  6. Smile dental journal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    "Smile dental journal is quarterly issued, peer-reviewed open access journal. Subject coverage is dentistry, dealing with all specialties of dentistry, its management, besides dental health related subjects...

  7. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  8. Dental Practice Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    the population. Private dental practices in Romania require personnel specialized in dental management. Success in dentistry depends, on the one hand, on the management of clinical aspects, and equallyon the efficient management of the dental practice. Patient satisfaction is influenced by factors related to the communication between the physicianand the patient, technical competence and by the environment provided by dental practice. The realization of the paper followed a review...

  9. Prevalence, etiology, and types of dental trauma in children and adolescents: systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Rezapour, Aziz; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Ahmad MOOSAVI; Ghertasi Oskouei, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental traumas are common among children and adolescents in many societies posing health and social problems. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on prevalence, etiology, types, and other epidemiologic aspects of dental trauma in children and adolescents (0-18 years old). Methods: In this systematic meta-analytical review, data were collected searching for key words including traumatic dental injuries, dental trauma, dental injury, dental tra...

  10. Haptic rendering for dental training system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG DangXiao; ZHANG YuRu; WANG Yong; L(U) PeiJun; ZHOU RenGe; ZHOU WanLin

    2009-01-01

    Immersion and Interaction are two key features of virtual reality systems,which are especially important for medical applications.Based on the requirement of motor skill training in dental surgery,haptic rendering method based on triangle model is investigated in this paper.Multi-rate haptic rendering architecture is proposed to solve the contradiction between fidelity and efficiency requirements.Realtime collision detection algorithm based on spatial partition and time coherence is utilized to enable fast contact determination.Proxy-based collision response algorithm is proposed to compute surface contact point.Cutting force model based on piecewise contact transition model is proposed for dental drilling simulation during tooth preparation.Velocity-driven levels of detail hapUc rendering algorithm is proposed to maintain high update rate for complex scenes with a large number of triangles.Hapticvisual collocated dental training prototype is established using half-mirror solution.Typical dental operations have been realized Including dental caries exploration,detection of boundary within dental crose-section plane,and dental drilling during tooth preparation.The haptic rendering method is a fundamental technology to improve Immersion and interaction of virtual reality training systems,which is useful not only in dental training,but also in other surgical training systems.

  11. Laser therapy in general dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbar, Arun A.

    2006-02-01

    This is a clinical presentation on the use of laser therapy in a private dental practice using a 810nm diode. A wide range of conditions involving pain management, treatment and as an adjunct to procedures to enhance patient comfort and experience. This will include cases treated for TMD (Temporo mandibular dysfunction), apthous ulcers, angular chelitis, cold sores, gingival retraction, periodontal treatment and management of failing dental implants. The case presentation will include the protocols used and some long term reviews. The results have been very positive and will be shared to enable this form of treatment to be used more frequently and with confidence within dental practice.

  12. Bioethics as a second-order discipline: who is not a bioethicist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Loretta M

    2006-12-01

    A dispute exists about whether bioethics should become a new discipline with its own methods, competency standards, duties, honored texts, and core curriculum. Unique expertise is a necessary condition for disciplines. Using the current literature, different views about the sort of expertise that might be unique to bioethicists are critically examined to determine if there is an expertise that might meet this requirement. Candidates include analyses of expertise based in "philosophical ethics," "casuistry," "atheoretical or situation ethics," "conventionalist relativism," "institutional guidance," "regulatory guidance and compliance," "political advocacy," "functionalism," and "principlism." None succeed in identifying a unique area of expertise for successful bioethicists that could serve as a basis for making it a new discipline. Rather expertise in bioethics is rooted in many professions, disciplines and fields and best understood as a second-order discipline.

  13. A classical approach to the restoration of discipline in South African schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J. Oosthuizen

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the era of civil disobedience associated with the struggle for freedom and democracy discipline in many schools has deteriorated. The persistent lack of discipline in all South African schools can only be countered by means of a wise application of discipline. Application of “discipline” according to the standard dictionary meanings of the word will, however, not be appropriate since it implies a clamp-down on disruptive behaviour, including punishment, chastisement and retribution. Discipline associated with the paideia ideal of well-educatedness and of the educator as the servant of his learners (paidagogos, though within the context of a reformational perspective of discipline on the other hand, will be more suitable.

  14. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  15. [Dental records and responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, W.G.

    2006-01-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist i

  16. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  17. Dental Assistant, Advanced. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    a jaw fracture, leukemia, dental caries, and periodontal disease. Dental diabetes mellitus , rheumatic fever, allergies, car- disease can be prevented...Dentistry ........................ 4-1 5. Oral Surgery, Endodontics, and Periodontics ................ 5-1 6. Prosthodontics...Diagnosis Periodontics Medical clinics may have branch clinics subor- Operative Dentistry Preventive Dentistry dinate to them. Although dental

  18. Reconstructing the paradigm: teaching across the disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Caroline; Pollack, Alexia

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Caroline Brown, a literature professor who focuses on American and African Diasporic writing, and Alexia Pollack, a biology professor with expertise in neuropharmacology, recount their experiences teaching across the disciplines in one another's respective classrooms, finding points of intersection and divergence, and creating classroom dialogues from the resultant encounters. Central to this process is permitting students to enter discipline-specific discourses from other disciplinary perspectives. In Caroline Brown's first year general education seminar, Examining Consciousness, a course constructed around the study of the representation of the brain through the reading of scientific writings, popular essays, personal narratives, fiction, and poetry, Alexia Pollack presented scientific lectures on neurotransmission, brain organization and structure, with an emphasis on how the brain is affected by drug addiction and organic disease. In Alexia Pollack's undergraduate and graduate courses, Neurobiology and Biology of Learning and Memory, Caroline Brown lectured on the intersection of artistry and science in American literature, tracing the depiction of learning and memory in Realistic, Modern, and Post-Modern novels, and how scientific developments influenced their representation. During these encounters the students were introduced to discipline-specific approaches, which were distinct from the perspectives of their respective classrooms. As a result, larger classroom discussions were created, allowing students to perceive intersecting dimensions of very different disciplines. This conceptual flexibility permitted students to "think outside the box" in order to develop a more complete appreciation of their particular discipline and to recognize its place in the world at large.

  19. Can Discipline Education be Culturally Sensitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ashley E; Hudnut-Beumler, Julia; Scholer, Seth J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Inappropriate discipline such as harsh physical punishment is a social determinant of health. The objective was to determine if a brief parent training intervention that teaches discipline strategies is culturally sensitive. Methods English or Spanish-speaking parents of 1-5 year old children viewed a multimedia program that teaches appropriate discipline strategies. The intervention, Play Nicely, was viewed in the exam room before the physician's visit. Parents viewed 4 of 20 discipline strategies of their choosing; the average viewing time was 7 min. Results Of 204 parents eligible to participate, 197 (96 %) completed the study; 41 % were Black, 31 % were White, and 21 % were Hispanic. At least 80 % of parents from each racial/ethnic group reported that the program built their confidence to care for their child, addressed their family needs, explained things in a way they could understand, respected their family values, and was sensitive to their personal beliefs. Overall, 80 % of parents reported that the program answered individual questions. One parent (0.5 %) reported that the program did not respect her family values. Conclusions for Practice Discipline education can be integrated into the pediatric primary care clinic in a way that is family-centered and culturally sensitive for the majority of parents. The results have implications for the development and implementation of population-based parenting programs and the primary prevention of child abuse and violence.

  20. Disciplines en studies. Vernieuwing in de geesteswetenschappen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Tollebeek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Disciplines and studies. Innovation in the humanitiesThe classic humanities disciplines took shape in the nineteenth century in a complex, contingency- driven process in which factors such as the introduction of a ‘scientific principle’ and the securing of the humanities’ position in the universities played an important role. This process resulted in flexible disciplines that lacked rigidity. For example, there was no ambitious theorising, no development of systematic methodologies and no academic monopoly. This, in turn, made renewal in the humanities a straightforward possibility, particularly when social and cultural changes called for such renewal. The liveliness that characterises teaching and research in the humanities today testifies to this. The renewed demand for cross-disciplinary approaches has led to a number of branches of study (from holocaust and genocide studies to museum studies which explicitly present themselves as contemporary, focus on a concrete social theme, and often recall a time before the humanities disciplines had emerged in the way that they are organised and function. Anyone wishing to bring stability and continuity to this uneasy pattern of development must take account the factors that reinforced the classic disciplines back then. Among other things, a sustainable policy involves monitoring the quality of the new programmes, relaxed dealings with existing institutional structures and the provision of the necessary seed capital in the field of research.

  1. The role of values in school discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. de Klerk

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the Constitution of South Africa uses language that could be described as “value-language”, our country is experiencing an intense moral crisis. There is an urgent need to establish ways of finding answers to the value crisis in South Africa. Morality has been and is part of education. In this article the relationship between values, education and discipline is addressed from a Biblically-based (in this case, reformational perspective. The teacher as secondary educator plays an important role in the establishment of values among learners. The Department of Education has made clear its intention to establish values in schools in its Manifesto on Values, Education and Democracy. The values emphasised in this document concur with the ideals of nation-building in the new democratic South Africa. Unfortunately, the absence of discipline and self-discipline among learners and educators implies that these ideals cannot be realised. The main cause of discipline problems can possibly be ascribed to the absence of a value system rooted in a specific life and worldview, for without such a perspective the management of discipline problems can only be symptomatic.

  2. Prevalence of dental resorptive lesions in Swedish cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, A; Mannerfelt, T

    2003-09-01

    Ninety-six, randomly selected Swedish cats were evaluated for the presence of dental resorptive lesions. All cats were examined while receiving general anesthesia. Diagnosis was based on oral examination and full-mouth, intraoral dental radiographs. Information concerning age, sex, vaccination status, eating habits, food type, environment (indoor or outdoor housing), oral, discomfort, dental care, and medical treatment was recorded. Hematologic samples included analysis for FeLV, FIV, and calcivirus. Of the cats examined in this study, 32% had gross or radiographic signs of dental resorptive lesions. There was a positive relationship between the occurrence of dental resorptive lesions and increasing age.

  3. Growth Trends in Dental Service Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    There are a number of factors fueling the growth of large group practices managed by corporations across the U.S., including California. These evolving trends are shaping the dental profession and practice models in a variety of ways.

  4. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology for Dental Hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Guidelines for structuring a pathology curriculum for dental hygienists include: definition of the field and its subfields; relationships with other fields; primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives; and suggestions for sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational safety. (MSE)

  5. Prerequisites in behavioral science and business: opportunities for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, David G; Lange, Brian M; Madden, Robert D; Tacha, Koko K

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing pressure on recent dental school graduates to understand and successfully utilize patient management and business management strategies to run a productive dental office. Dental schools are faced with the dilemma to either add more credit hours in their already crowded curriculum or adjust predental school requirements. All fifty-nine U.S. dental schools were assessed online to determine admission requirements in the areas of behavioral science and business education. Results show that only 11.9 percent of the schools require prerequisite course work in behavioral science and no school requires prerequisite course work in business. However, 64.4 percent and 30.5 percent of schools encouraged or recommended prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business, respectively. We suggest that the dental education community involve key stakeholders to discuss the incorporation of prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business. Additional courses in these disciplines would provide dental students better backgrounds from which the dental curriculum could build a more advanced and applied perspective to better prepare students for practice.

  6. Analysis on Factors Influencing Sustainable Development of Self-study Examination of Agricultural Science Disciplines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on existing problems in the course of development of self-study examination of agricultural science disciplines, this paper analyzes logical conditions for its sustainable development. Major logical conditions include requirement for free and comprehensive development of individuals; requirement for social institutional evolution and change; requirement for fairness and justice of education and development; as well as requirement for better-established organization system and higher social reputation. Finally, it presents basic measures for sustainable development of self-study examination of agricultural science disciplines, including carrying on reasonable core elements of self-study examination system, adjusting structure of discipline, improving social assistance system, and expanding service space.

  7. Risk factors for severe dental anxiety among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Slobodan M; Aleksić, Dragana; Bahtijari, Zulfer; Jelić, Anica; Klacar, Jelena; Kovacević, Aleksandra; Mijailović, Natasa; Milovanović, Olivera; Petrović, Aleksandra; Radovanović, Ana; Sovrlić, Miroslav; Zecević, Dejana Ruzić

    2014-01-01

    Severe dental anxiety (SDA) is the most severe form of dental anxiety, thus the aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with SDA in students of health-related disciplines. In this case-control study the cases were students with severe dental anxiety. The study was conducted at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Serbia. The participants were undergraduate students attending lectures during spring semester 2010/2011 (n = 1,812). A random sample of 800 students was assessed for the association between various risk factors and the severe dental anxiety. The main outcome measures were the data on demographics, dental anxiety, habits concerning oral hygiene, nutrition, general anxiety and (co)morbidity which were collected from the study participants by semi-structured questionnaire. Less frequent visits to the dentist (OR adjusted = 7.02 [2.65; 18.60]) and visiting the dentist only when there is a dental problem (OR adjusted = 8.08 [1.28; 50.93]) were associated with severe dental anxiety. The same was true for improper oral hygiene (OR adjusted = 4.25 [1.16; 15.60]). Factors as changing toothbrush more frequently (OR adjusted = 0.33 [0.14; 0.76]) and having chronic disease (OR adjusted = 0.01 [0.00; 0.09]) were inversely associated with severe dental anxiety. The level of education of students was not associated with severe dental anxiety. Inappropriate oral hygiene, less frequent changes of a toothbrush and less frequent visits to the dentist are important risk factors for severe dental anxiety.

  8. Risk factors for severe dental anxiety among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slobodan M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Severe dental anxiety (SDA is the most severe form of dental anxiety, thus the aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with SDA in students of health-related disciplines. Methods. In this case-control study the cases were students with severe dental anxiety. The study was conducted at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Serbia. The participants were undergraduate students attending lectures during spring semester 2010/2011 (n = 1,812. A random sample of 800 students was assessed for the association between various risk factors and the severe dental anxiety. The main outcome measures were the data on demographics, dental anxiety, habits concerning oral hygiene, nutrition, general anxiety and (comorbidity which were collected from the study participants by semi-structured questionnaire. Results. Less frequent visits to the dentist (OR adjusted = 7.02 [2.65; 18.60] and visiting the dentist only when there is a dental problem (OR adjusted = 8.08 [1.28; 50.93] were associated with severe dental anxiety. The same was true for improper oral hygiene (OR adjusted = 4.25 [1.16; 15.60]. Factors as changing toothbrush more frequently (OR adjusted = 0.33 [0.14; 0.76] and having chronic disease (OR adjusted = 0.01 [0.00; 0.09] were inversely associated with severe dental anxiety. The level of education of students was not associated with severe dental anxiety. Conclusion. Inappropriate oral hygiene, less frequent changes of a toothbrush and less frequent visits to the dentist are important risk factors for severe dental anxiety. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175007

  9. The Validity of Subjects in Korean Dental Technicians' Licensing Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong-chul Kim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study prepared a basic framework for the development and improvement of Korean Dental Technicians' Licensing Examination, based on actual test questions. A peer review was conducted to ensure relevance to current practices in dental technology. For the statistical analysis, 1000 dental laboratory technicians were selected; specialists in dental laboratory technology (laboratory owners, educators, etc. were involved in creating valid and reliable questions. Results indicated that examination subjects should be divided into three categories: basic dental laboratory theory, dental laboratory specialties, and a practical examination. To ensure relevance to current practice, there should be less emphasis on basic dental laboratory theory, including health-related laws, and more emphasis on dental laboratory specialties. Introduction to dental anatomy should be separated from oral anatomy and tooth morphology; and fixed prosthodontics should be separated from crown and bridge technology and dental ceramics technology. Removable orthodontic appliance technology should be renamed 'orthodontic laboratory technology'. There should be less questions related to health related law, oral anatomy, dental hygiene, dental materials science and inlay, while the distribution ratio of questions related to tooth morphology should be maintained. There should be a decrease in the distribution ratio of questions related to crown and bridge technology, dental ceramics technology, complete dentures and removable partial dentures technology, and orthodontic laboratory technology. In the practical examination, the current multiple choice test should be replaced with tooth carving using wax or plaster. In dental laboratory specialties, subjects related to contemporary dental laboratory technology should be included in the test items.

  10. The Correlation Between Dietary Habits and Dental Hygiene Practice with Dental Caries Among School Children at Urban Area in Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaran Ibrahim Mohammed Ali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is a major cause of tooth loss in children and young adults. Dental caries have been linked to the situation of underprivileged families, nutritional imbalance, and poor oral hygiene techniques, including lack of tooth brushing or flossing the teeth, and also have a genetic etiology. Dietary habits and dental hygiene practice can result in high caries in school children. This research aimed to reveal the correlation between dietary habits and dental hygiene practice with dental caries among school children in urban area of Semarang. The subjects of this research are the elementary student 7 – 9 years old enrolled in schools located in at urban area in Semarang in 2016 and the mother of a student who became the study sample. Data were statisically analyzed usingbivariate analysis and multivariate analysis. Based on the research result, it can be concluded that: there was no correlation between total carbohydrate intake, refined carbohydrate intake, fiber intake, dental hygiene practice with dental caries, bottle feeding and duration of bottle feeding were assosiated with dental cariest-score. Overall, def-t score in the study was very bad with high median of dental caries score and many children have dental caries t-score more than 6.How to CiteAli, O. I. M., Muis, F. & O, Oedijani. (2016. The Correlation Between Dietary Habits and Dental Hygiene Practice with Dental Caries Among School Children at Urban Area in Semarang. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(2, 178-184.

  11. Factors for determining dental anxiety in preschool children with severe dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanto, Jenny; Vidigal, Evelyn Alvarez; Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Sá, Stella Núbia Coelho de; Bönecker, Marcelo

    2017-01-16

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and socioeconomic indicators associated with dental anxiety in preschool children with severe dental caries. A total of 100 children between 3 and 5 years of age were selected during a dental screening procedure. The selection criteria were having at least one tooth with dental caries and a visible pulpal involvement, ulceration, fistula, and abscess (PUFA) index of ≥1 in primary teeth. Before the clinical examination or any treatment procedure was performed, we evaluated the children's dental anxiety using the Facial Image Scale (FIS). Parents completed a questionnaire on socioeconomic conditions, which included the family structure, number of siblings, parental level of education, and family income. A dentist blinded to FIS and socioeconomic data performed the clinical examination. Poisson regressions associate clinical and socioeconomic conditions with the outcome. Most of the children (53%) experienced extensive dental caries (dmf-t ≥ 6), and all children had severe caries lesions, with a PUFA index of ≥1 in 41% and that of ≥2 in 59%. The multivariate adjusted model showed that older children (4-5-year old) experienced lower dental anxiety levels compared with younger children (3-year old) (RR = 0.35; 95%CI: 0.17-0.72 and RR = 0.18; 95%CI: 0.04-0.76, respectively), and children with three or more siblings were associated with higher levels of dental anxiety (RR = 2.27; 95%CI: 1.06-4.87). Older age is associated with low dental anxiety, and more number of siblings is associated with high dental anxiety in preschool children, whereas the severity or extent of dental caries is not associated with dental anxiety.

  12. Parents' experience of flooding in discipline encounters: Associations with discipline and interplay with related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Michael F; Mitnick, Danielle M; Slep, Amy M Smith

    2016-06-01

    In family psychology, the term flooding refers to the feeling of being overwhelmed by a family member's behavior in a manner that undermines an organized response. In the present investigation we first aimed to clarify the role of flooding in overreactive and lax discipline. The second study aim was to more fully establish the position of parental flooding in its nomological network given the relative paucity of research on parental flooding. Maternal discipline and physiological responses, as well as child behavior, were observed in laboratory discipline encounters with 97 mother-toddler dyads. Mothers then rated the extent to which they experienced flooding in response to their children's behavior and emotion displays during the immediately preceding discipline encounters. Mothers' experience of negative emotion was assessed via video-mediated recall. Flooding was positively associated with both overreactive and lax discipline; this association did not reflect confounding by mothers' experience of negative emotion. Flooding was further associated with mothers' experienced negative emotion and heart rate reactivity, as well as child misbehavior and negative emotion displays. The flooding-overreactive discipline association was concentrated in those mothers who exhibited greater increases in heart rate and greater vagal withdrawal, and whose children misbehaved more during the discipline encounter. The present results suggest the incremental validity of flooding in predicting discipline practices, as well as the strong fit of flooding in its nomological network. Parents' self-recognition of flooding may ultimately prove useful in parenting interventions as a signal to trigger compensatory techniques. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Authorizers Are Not Monolithic on School Discipline: How Charter School Authorizers Differ in School Discipline Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, M. K.; Conlan, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    In theory, authorizers play an important role in decisions regarding charter schools and student discipline, as they are the bodies responsible for protecting the public interest, while balancing school autonomy and accountability. Within public education, a rigorous debate is occurring about student discipline practices, particularly suspensions…

  14. Zero Benefit: Estimating the Effect of Zero Tolerance Discipline Polices on Racial Disparities in School Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study estimates the effect of zero tolerance disciplinary policies on racial disparities in school discipline in an urban district. Capitalizing on a natural experiment, the abrupt expansion of zero tolerance discipline policies in a mid-sized urban school district, the study demonstrates that Black students in the district were…

  15. Utilization of Dental Services in Public Health Center: Dental Attendance, Awareness and Felt Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewa, Preksha; Garla, Bharath K; Dagli, Rushabh; Bhateja, Geetika Arora; Solanki, Jitendra

    2015-10-01

    In rural India, dental diseases occur due to many factors, which includes inadequate or improper use of fluoride and a lack of knowledge regarding oral health and oral hygiene, which prevent proper screening and dental care of oral diseases. The objective of the study was to evaluate the dental attendance, awareness and utilization of dental services in public health center. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 251 study subjects who were visiting dental outpatient department (OPD) of public health centre (PHC), Guda Bishnoi, and Jodhpur using a pretested proforma from month of July 2014 to October 2014. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect the data regarding socioeconomic status and demographic factors affecting the utilization of dental services. Pearson's Chi-square test and step-wise logistic regression were applied for the analysis. Statistically significant results were found in relation to age, educational status, socioeconomic status and gender with dental attendance, dental awareness and felt needs. p-value dental services, thereby increasing the oral health status of the population.

  16. Interrupting the Psy-Disciplines in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to influence education, both regulating and shaping behaviour and morality. The book provides insight into different educational contexts and concerns across a child’s educational lifespan; early childhood education, inclusive education, special education, educational leadership, social media, university......This book offers critical explorations of how the psy-disciplines, Michel Foucault’s collective term for psychiatry, psychology and psycho-analysis, play out in contemporary educational spaces. With a strong focus on Foucault’s theories, it critically investigates how the psy-disciplines continue......, and beyond to enable reflection and critique of the implications of psy-based knowledge and practice. With chapters by a mixture of established and emerging international scholars in the field this is an interdisciplinary and authoritative study into the role of the psy-disciplines in the education system...

  17. Separated by a Common Language: Awareness of term usage differences between languages and disciplines in biopreparedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, M.; Tomuzia, K.; Löfström, Ch.; Appel, B.; Bano, L.; Keremidis, H.; Knutsson, R.; Leijon, M.; Ekströmer Lövgren, S.; Medici, D.; Menrath, A.; Rotterdam, van B.; Wisselink, H.J.; Barker, G.C.

    2013-01-01

    Preparedness for bioterrorism is based on communication between people in organizations who are educated and trained in several disciplines, including law enforcement, health, and science. Various backgrounds, cultures, and vocabularies generate difficulties in understanding and interpretating terms

  18. Vulnerable discipline: experiences of male competitive bodybuilders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnestad, Jone; Kandal, Øyvind; Anderssen, Norman

    2014-09-01

    The aim was to understand experiences of male competitive bodybuilders from a non-pathologizing perspective. Six male Norwegian competitive bodybuilders were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using a meaning condensation procedure resulting in five themes: being proud of capacity for discipline, seeing a perfectionist attitude as a necessary evil, experiencing recognition within the bodybuilding community, being stigmatized outside the bodybuilding community and going on stage to display a capacity for willpower and discipline. We suggest that bodybuilders may be stigmatized for breaking social norms: by their distinctive appearance, by the way they handle suspected drug use and by challenging gender norms.

  19. A possible reconceptualization of food engineering discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Niranjan, Keshavan

    2016-01-01

    Food industry is critical to any nation’s health and well-being; it is also critical to the economic health of a nation, since it can typically constitute over a fifth of the nation’s manufacturing GDP. Food Engineering is a discipline that ought to be at the heart of the food industry. Unfortunately, this discipline is not playing its rightful role today: engineering has been relegated to play the role of a service provider to the food industry, instead of it being a strategic driver for the...

  20. Ancient discipline, vigorous KIZ: Aiming at frontiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Many science historians say modern zoology emerged in 1552 with the publication in Paris of Edward Wooton De differentiis animalium.Others trace it back to Aristotle (382-322 BC) and his History of Animals. But no matter how old zoology is, this traditional discipline is now facing challenges from the rapid development of a large number of new areas that have branched away from it over time. Targeting specific issues at the cutting-edge of the field via interdisciplinary approaches, a group of young researchers in Yunnan is making fresh contributions to this time-honored discipline.

  1. Space civil engineering - A new discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Willy Z.; Criswell, Marvin E.

    1991-01-01

    Space Civil Engineering is an emerging engineering discipline that focuses on extending and expanding the Civil Engineering know-how and practice to the development and maintenance of infrastructure on celestial bodies. Space Civil Engineering is presently being developed as a new discipline within the Department of Civil Engineering at Colorado State University under a recently established NASA Space Grant College Program. Academic programs geared toward creating Space Civil Engineering Options at both undergraduate and graduate levels are being formulated. Basic ideas and concepts of the curriculum in the Space Civil Engineering Option at both undergraduate and graduate levels are presented. The role of Space Civil Engineering in the Space Program is discussed.

  2. A possible reconceptualization of food engineering discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Niranjan, Keshavan

    2016-01-01

    Food industry is critical to any nation’s health and well-being; it is also critical to the economic health of a nation, since it can typically constitute over a fifth of the nation’s manufacturing GDP. Food Engineering is a discipline that ought to be at the heart of the food industry. Unfortunately, this discipline is not playing its rightful role today: engineering has been relegated to play the role of a service provider to the food industry, instead of it being a strategic driver for the...

  3. Enhancing the nursing discipline and developing nursing science in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Juan Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To improve our health care services, promote balanced development of inter-regional and inter-disciplinary medical care skills, and effectively implement public hospital reform, the former Ministry of Health, State Chinese Medicine Administration Bureau and the Ministry of Finance allocated state funds in 2010 to support a National Clinical Key Specialty Construction Project. The project supports the acquisition of key equipment, personnel training and development of clinical diagnosis technology in order to develop high-quality medical resources and improve clinical services. Because of the important role nursing plays, clinical nursing and specialty care were also included in the project. The Chinese Nursing Association was commissioned to oversee this project, which awarded 211 million RMB to nursing disciplines in 86 hospitals representing all regions of China. This funding has supported the rapid development of nursing disciplines, the results of which are outlined and described in this review.

  4. The future of dental devices is digital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Major changes are taking place in dental laboratories as a result of new digital technologies. Our aim is to provide an overview of these changes. In this article the reader will be introduced to the range of layered fabrication technologies and suggestions are made how these might be used in dentistry. Key publications in English from the past two decades are surveyed. The first digital revolution took place many years ago now with the production of dental restorations such as veneers, inlays, crowns and bridges using dental CAD-CAM systems and new improved systems appear on the market with great rapidity. The reducing cost of processing power will ensure that these developments will continue as exemplified by the recent introduction of a new range of digital intra-oral scanners. With regard to the manufacture of prostheses this is currently dominated by subtractive machining technology but it is inevitable that the additive processing routes of layered fabrication, such as FDM, SLA, SLM and inkjet printing, will start to have an impact. In principle there is no reason why the technology cannot be extended to all aspects of production of dental prostheses and include customized implants, full denture construction and orthodontic appliances. In fact anything that you might expect a dental laboratory to produce can be done digitally and potentially more consistently, quicker and at a reduced cost. Dental device manufacturing will experience a second revolution when layered fabrication techniques reach the point of being able to produce high quality dental prostheses. The challenge for the dental materials research community is to marry the technology with materials that are suitable for use in dentistry. This can potentially take dental materials research in a totally different direction. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 37 CFR 11.23 - Committee on Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committee on Discipline. 11... Committee on Discipline. (a) The USPTO Director shall appoint a Committee on Discipline. The Committee on Discipline shall consist of at least three employees of the Office. None of the Committee members...

  6. Redefining & Leading the Academic Discipline in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, Damien G.; Healy, Annah H.

    2013-01-01

    Disciplines have emerged as an alternative administrative structure to departments or schools in Australian universities. We presently investigate the pattern of discipline use and by way of case study examine a role for distributed leadership in discipline management. Over forty per cent of Australian universities currently employ disciplines,…

  7. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  8. NASA HRP Immunology Discipline - Use of Terrestrial Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the cost and operational constraints, as well as technical implementation limitations, it is desirous to perform relevant space physiology investigations first in terrestrial 'space analogs'. This is particularly true for initial investigations, which may then provide appropriate focus for subsequent flight investigations, or for mechanistic investigations that simply cannot be performed during spaceflight. Appropriate analog choice is extremely important. There are a wide variety of terrestrial space analogs, each relevant to a particular physiological discipline (or disciplines) and each with a particular fidelity (or lack thereof) to spaceflight, and each with unique operational constraints. The HRP Immunology Discipline is tasked with managing the HRP Risk concerning clinical risk for Astronaut crews related to spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation. Such dysregulation has been documented to occur during spaceflight, and found to persist for the duration of a 6-month ISS mission. Studies continue to characterize the onorbit phenomenon, but it generally consists of diminished immunocyte function, dysregulated cytokine profiles, and persistent herpesvirus reactivation. Causes are thought to synergistically include microgravity, psychological or physiological stress, radiation, and/or circadian misalignment. An appropriate terrestrial analog for immune dysregulation would replicate as many of these influences as possible. Such analogs may include clinostat or bioreactor cell culture (microgravity), hindlimb suspension (stress, fluid shifts, hypokinesis), or human deployment to remote or extreme environments (isolation, stress, circadian). Also, the laboratory setting may be used as an analog, or to augment analogs, such as sleep deprivation/misalignment or human centrifugation to replicate gravitational stress. As an appropriate example of a NASA Disciplines use of Terrestrial space analogs, this talk will discuss spaceflight associated immune

  9. Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Raman

    2013-01-01

    The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health. PMID:23863132

  10. Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Preet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health.

  11. Isolation of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in the dental operatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiba, N; Yoshida, T; Suzuki, K; Maekawa, Y; Ito, M; Matsumoto, T; Nakamura, H

    1995-01-01

    The state of contamination by methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at the conservative dentistry section of the School of Dentistry, Aichi-Gakuin University, was investigated. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) were detected in 8 (20.5%) of 39 dental staff (28 dentists, 8 dental hygienists, and 3 dental assistants), but MRSA was not detected. MRCNS was also detected in locations such as the dental chair, dental bracket, dental cabinet, and floor, as well as in airborne samples. The presence of the same strain in both the oral cavity of staff persons and the dental chair/floor locations was determined by biochemical properties, antibiotic sensitivity tests, and electrophoretic patterns.

  12. Application of fuzzy classification in modern primary dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yauheni Veryha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a framework for implementing fuzzy classifications in primary dental care services. Dental practices aim to provide the highest quality services for their patients. To achieve this, it is important that dentists are able to obtain patients' opinions about their experiences in the dental practice and are able to accurately evaluate this. We propose the use of fuzzy classification to combine various assessment criteria into one general measure to assess patients' satisfaction with primary dental care services. The proposed framework can be used in conventional dental practice information systems and easily integrated with those already used. The benefits of using the proposed fuzzy classification approach include more flexible and accurate analysis of patients' feedback, combining verbal and numeric data. To confirm our theory, a prototype was developed based on the Microsoft TM SQL Server database management system for two criteria used in dental practices, namely making an appointment with a dentist and waiting time for dental care services.

  13. Transforming Dental Technology Education: Skills, Knowledge, and Curricular Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobich, Anita M; Mitchell, Betty L

    2017-09-01

    Dental technology is one of the core allied dental health professions supporting the practice of dentistry. By definition, it is the art, science, and technologies that enable the design and fabrication of dental prostheses and/or corrective devices to restore natural teeth and supporting structures to fulfill a patient's physiological and esthetic needs. Dental technology educational programs are faced with serious challenges, including rapid changes in technology, inadequate funding for educational programs, and the need to develop curricula that reflect current industry needs. Better communications between dental technologists and practitioners are needed to gain greater recognition of the contribution that technologists make to patient health. Amid these challenges, the technology workforce is dedicated to providing patients with the best possible restorative dental prostheses. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  14. Factors that Determine Child Behavior during Dental Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajrić Elmedin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review paper we wanted to summarize all the aspects which could affect the behavior of the child patients in the dental office. At the beginning, the factors that are related to the child patients are mentioned. Various segments of child psychological, cognitive, physiological and other kinds of development are discussed. Also, the reasons for dental fear and anxiety (DFA and dental behavior problems (DBP were analyzed, and how the child dental patients could cope with them. Finally, types of patients according to their behavior in the dental office were discussed. Furthermore, the influences of child patients’ parents were studied, including parenting styles, as well as factors related to dentist, dental team and the dental office. Finally, critical evaluation of administration of assets to measure the presence of DFA and DBP is provided. Every part of the text was corroborated by the results from our own and other authors’ recent bibliography data.

  15. Dental caries: Therapeutic possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary tendencies in dentistry are based on the concept of maximal protection of healthy tooth tissues. Caries removal has been done traditionally with mechanical rotary instruments that are fast and precise. However, conventional cavity preparation has potential adverse effects to the pulp due to heat, pressure and vibrations. Moreover, drilling often causes pain and requires local anaesthesia, and these procedures are frequently perceived as unpleasant. Etiology, development and prevention of dental caries are better understood today and new restorative materials that bond micromechanically and/or chemically to dental tissues have been introduced. Thus, development of a new, less destructive caries removal technique is allowed. In the last decades, many alternative methods have been introduced in an attempt to replace rotary instruments. These are claimed to be efficient and selective for diseased tissues and to offer comfortable treatment to the patients. New methods include air abrasion, air polishing, ultrasonic, polymer burs, enzymes, systems for chemo-mechanical caries removal, and lasers. The aim of this paper was to discuss various caries removal techniques and possibilities of their use in clinical practice. Based on the literature review it can be concluded that none of the new caries removal methods can completely replace conventional rotary instruments.

  16. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  17. Dance: The Possibilities of a Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Dance has been a discipline in higher education in the UK for nearly 35 years; the first programme was introduced at the Laban Centre in 1975. The breadth of features that have come to characterise dance in the academy during this time have arguably been enriched by a permeability between the varied ideas that have come to be part of its maturing…

  18. The nature of the enterprise engineering discipline

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Vries, M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Proceedings of the 4th Enterprise Engineering Working Conference, EEWC 2014, Funchal, Madeira Island, Portugal, 5-8 May 2014 The nature of the enterprise engineering discipline Marne de Vries, Aurona Gerber, and Alta van der Merwe Abstract Enterprise...

  19. Streambeds Merit Recognition as a Scientific Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantz, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Streambeds are generally viewed as simply sediments beneath streams, sediments topping alluvial aquifers, or sediments housing aquatic life, rather than as distinct geographic features comparable to soils and surficial geologic formations within watersheds. Streambeds should be viewed as distinct elements within watersheds, e.g., as akin to soils. In this presentation, streambeds are described as central features in watersheds, cycling water between the surface and underlying portions of the watershed. Regarding their kinship to soils, soils are often described as surficial sediments largely created by atmospheric weathering of underlying geologic parent material, and similarly, streambeds should be described as submerged sediments largely created by streamflow modification of underlying geologic parent material. Thus, streambeds are clearly overdue for recognition as their own scientific discipline along side other well-recognized disciplines within watersheds; however, slowing progress in this direction, the point is often made that hyporheic zones should be considered comparable to streambeds, but this is as misguided as equating unsaturated zones to soils. Streambeds and soils are physical geographic features of relatively constant volume, while hyporheic and unsaturated zones are hydrologic features of varying volume. Expanded upon in this presentation, 'Streambed Science' is proposed for this discipline, which will require both a well-designed protocol to physically characterize streambeds as well as development of streambed taxonomy, for suitable recognition as an independent discipline within watersheds.

  20. The Counselor and Student Discipline: Suggested Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Frank; O'Neill, Maude

    1979-01-01

    Provides summary and analysis of literature on the counselor's role in school discipline. Roles are grouped into six categories: mediator, ombudsman, consultant, psychological educator, special program developer, and counselor. Counselors may find roles that satisfy the needs of their students and are appropriate to their own personalities and…

  1. Restorative Justice: Pedagogy, Praxis, and Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Brenda E.; Vaandering, Dorothy

    2012-01-01

    In the ongoing effort of designing school contexts in support of proactive discipline, a range of practices and theoretical frameworks have been advanced, from behaviorist approaches to social and emotional learning. This article describes the theory and practice of restorative justice with the aim of defining this distinctive paradigm, in…

  2. Bridging disciplines through problem based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Diana

    2011-01-01

    of how a problem based approach to learning will be implemented in the programs to support students in their engagement with the complexities of amalgamating and transgressing the disciplines of technology and anthropology. The paper is concluded by a brief discussion of problem based learning...

  3. Mapping the Discipline History of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Rita; Fontaine, Alexandre; Huitric, Solenn; Picard, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Inaugurated in 2013, this collective research programme aims to construct an international mapping of the history of education that accounts for recent developments in the field. Our goal is to create a current and retrospective assessment of the discipline's institutional grounding and of the knowledge produced by its practitioners,…

  4. Interoperable Data Sharing for Diverse Scientific Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John S.; Crichton, Daniel; Martinez, Santa; Law, Emily; Hardman, Sean

    2016-04-01

    For diverse scientific disciplines to interoperate they must be able to exchange information based on a shared understanding. To capture this shared understanding, we have developed a knowledge representation framework using ontologies and ISO level archive and metadata registry reference models. This framework provides multi-level governance, evolves independent of implementation technologies, and promotes agile development, namely adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, and rapid and flexible response to change. The knowledge representation framework is populated through knowledge acquisition from discipline experts. It is also extended to meet specific discipline requirements. The result is a formalized and rigorous knowledge base that addresses data representation, integrity, provenance, context, quantity, and their relationships within the community. The contents of the knowledge base is translated and written to files in appropriate formats to configure system software and services, provide user documentation, validate ingested data, and support data analytics. This presentation will provide an overview of the framework, present the Planetary Data System's PDS4 as a use case that has been adopted by the international planetary science community, describe how the framework is being applied to other disciplines, and share some important lessons learned.

  5. Collaborative Problem Solving Can Transform School Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Ross W.

    2011-01-01

    What we're thinking about behaviorally challenging students and what we're doing to them requires a fresh look. When schools believe that parental discipline explains a child's misbehavior, educators are less likely to consider different explanations for the misbehavior and the full range of interventions that could be implemented at school. And…

  6. Discipline and Methodology in Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tight, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Higher education research is a multidisciplinary field, engaging researchers from across the academy who make use of a wide range of methodological approaches. This article examines the relation between discipline and methodology in higher education research, analysing a database of 567 articles published in 15 leading higher education journals…

  7. Geography at QUT: Evolution of a Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Iraphne R. W.; Hastings, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The paper focuses on the constraints encountered in developing and introducing a geography discipline programme, with a distinctive regional focus, within a university of technology. Through a case study approach, the analysis relates the development of geography at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) to changes in geographical education in…

  8. La Disciplina Positiva (Positive Discipline). ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education, Urbana, IL.

    This ERIC Digest suggests methods and language that can be used in handling difficult, but common, situations involving young children. The digest explains 12 methods of disciplining children that promote children's self-worth. These methods are: (1) showing children that the reasons for their actions are understood; (2) stating reasons; (3)…

  9. A New Cross Discipline-Extenics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Wen; Yang Chunyan; Wang Guanghua

    2005-01-01

    @@ Extenics is a new discipline which solves contradiction problems. It studies the extensibility of things and the laws and methods of exploitation and innovation with formalized model. This paper briefly introduces its study objects, theoretical frame,methodological system, application, scientific significance, utility value and prospect of development.

  10. Overview of Decoding across the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Jennifer; Currie, Genevieve; MacDonald, Ron; Miller-Young, Janice; Yeo, Michelle; Zettel, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we describe the Decoding the Disciplines Faculty Learning Community at Mount Royal University and how Decoding has been used in new and multidisciplinary ways in the various teaching, curriculum, and research projects that are presented in detail in subsequent chapters.

  11. [The transformation of the dental services market and the battle over a monopoly in 19th century dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiana Leite

    2006-01-01

    The article analyzes the process by which dentistry acquired the status of a profession. The setting is the mid-nineteenth-century United States, where the West's first professional dental organizations were founded, and the focus is on some aspects of the development of a dental market and on the professional disputes among practitioners of the dental trade, who wanted a monopoly within this field of knowledge. Certain outside factors played a major role in the emergence of the profession, including changes in patterns of sugar consumption (which spread dental caries disease throughout society) as well as the expansion of the dental service market. The subsequent proliferation of distinct groups of dental practitioners--both qualified and unqualified to practice dentistry--and their competition for a place in the dental market reflect the battle waged to establish jurisdiction in this field and the emergence of dentistry as a 'modern profession'.

  12. Psychosocial impact of anterior dental esthetics on periodontal health, dental caries, and oral hygiene practices in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Deborah; Katz, Ralph V; Bush, Anneke C; Farley, Victoria K; McGerr, Trevor J; Min, Hoon; Carbonella, Anthony M; Kayne, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether the self-perceived image of a young adult's anterior dental esthetics is linked with periodontal health, dental caries, and oral hygiene practices. Two hundred subjects were assessed via a clinical examination, including intraoral photographs. The subjects were questioned about their demographics and oral hygiene practices and given the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) to measure their self-perceived variables related to dental esthetics. A high PIDAQ score indicates a negative image of one's own dental esthetics, while a low PIDAQ score indicates a positive outlook. A self-perceived negative psychosocial impact of anterior dental esthetics was detected in subjects with higher levels of dental caries and visible gingival inflammation in the anterior region of the mouth.

  13. Reconstructing the Paradigm: Teaching Across the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Caroline; Pollack, Alexia

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Caroline Brown, a literature professor who focuses on American and African Diasporic writing, and Alexia Pollack, a biology professor with expertise in neuropharmacology, recount their experiences teaching across the disciplines in one another’s respective classrooms, finding points of intersection and divergence, and creating classroom dialogues from the resultant encounters. Central to this process is permitting students to enter discipline-specific discourses from other disciplinary perspectives. In Caroline Brown’s first year general education seminar, Examining Consciousness, a course constructed around the study of the representation of the brain through the reading of scientific writings, popular essays, personal narratives, fiction, and poetry, Alexia Pollack presented scientific lectures on neurotransmission, brain organization and structure, with an emphasis on how the brain is affected by drug addiction and organic disease. In Alexia Pollack’s undergraduate and graduate courses, Neurobiology and Biology of Learning and Memory, Caroline Brown lectured on the intersection of artistry and science in American literature, tracing the depiction of learning and memory in Realistic, Modern, and Post-Modern novels, and how scientific developments influenced their representation. During these encounters the students were introduced to discipline-specific approaches, which were distinct from the perspectives of their respective classrooms. As a result, larger classroom discussions were created, allowing students to perceive intersecting dimensions of very different disciplines. This conceptual flexibility permitted students to “think outside the box” in order to develop a more complete appreciation of their particular discipline and to recognize its place in the world at large. PMID:23493654

  14. The introduction of digital dental technology into BDS curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham, C; Spencer, M H; Wood, D J; Johnson, A

    2014-12-05

    The aim of this study was to determine the degree to which digital dental technologies have been introduced into the curricula of UK dental schools. A survey was carried out of all the UK dental schools that teach undergraduate dental students. The survey contained six questions and was designed to determine if digital dental technology techniques or systems were being taught in the curricula, what these techniques were, and whether the school dental laboratories supported these techniques. Sixteen schools were surveyed and 11 replied: a response rate of 69%. Forty-five percent of the schools that replied did not teach digital dental technology in their curriculum. Of the 55% of schools who did teach digital dental technology, 50% gave lectures or demonstrations while the other 50% allowed practical involvement by the student. Two thirds of these stated that not all the students participated in practical usage. Seventy-three percent of the schools that replied had dental laboratories using some, but not all the digital dental technology techniques listed. Eighty percent of the schools that were not teaching digital dental technology said it was because it was not included in the curriculum, and 20% stated it was due to a lack of technical expertise or support.

  15. Effective Incentive and Discipline Mechanisms for Top manage ment in SOEs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费章凤

    2001-01-01

    Key to energize State-Owned-Enterprises (hereinafter SOEs) is to set up effective incentive and discipline mechanisms. First of all, the paper analyses the problems existing in the current incentive and discipline mechanism system in SOEs, including low transparency income and considerable covert income, insider control,corporate governance nominalization and so on; next,the paper explores the causes behind these problems,such as incomplete corporate governance and imperfect market mechanism; finally, the paper proposes a series of solutions from the aspects of incentive mechanism and discipline mechanism.

  16. Dental Hygienists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clinical, and classroom instruction. Areas of study include anatomy, physiology, nutrition, radiography, pathology, medical ethics, head and neck anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study ...

  17. [Association between malocclusion and dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance: study with Brazilian adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Carolina Marques; Peres, Marco Aurélio; Peres, Karen Glazer

    2010-12-01

    In spite of the high prevalence of malocclusion in adolescents reported worldwide, there are few studies that have investigated the association between normative malocclusion and self-rated dental and gingival appearance among adolescents. The aim of this study was to identify the association between normative malocclusion and dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance among Brazilian adolescents. A cross-sectional study was carried out with adolescents aged 15 to 19 years (n= 16,126) living in 250 towns of all five Brazilian regions. Dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance was the outcome. The main explanatory variable was malocclusion assessed by using the Dental Aesthetic Index - DAI. The other explanatory variables included were per capita family income, schooling delay, study conditions, sex, age, skin color, dental outcomes (untreated dental caries, missing teeth due dental caries, dental calculus, fluorosis, and dental pain) and use of dental services. Simple and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were performed. Dissatisfaction with dental appearance reached 11.4% (95%CI: 10.4-12.5) of the entire sample. All levels of malocclusion were associated with dissatisfaction with dental appearance. Adjusted multivariable analysis showed that dissatisfaction with dental appearance among individuals affected by severe or very severe malocclusion was respectively 40% and 80% higher than among those with normal occlusion. Malocclusion was associated with dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance. The results contribute to include self-rated dental appearance criteria in orthodontic treatment decision, mainly within the National Health System - SUS.

  18. CONNECTION OF FUNCTIONAL ABILITIES WITH JUMPING AND THROWING ATHLETIC DISCIPLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stanojević

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the connection between functional abilities with results of jumping and throwing athletic disciplines with athletes. The sample was taken from a population of elementary school students from Prokuplje region, 13 and 14 old, included in regular physical education classes. The sample consisted of 200 male athletes involved in the training process in sports clubs at least three times a week in addition to physical education classes. For assessment of functional abilities six functional tests were used: resting heart rate, Cooper test, heart rate in the first minute after Cooper test, heart rate in the second minute after Cooper test, systolic arterial blood pressure, diastolic arterial blood pressure. For assessment of jumping and throwing athletic disciplines four tests were used: long jump, high jump, shot put and javelin. Data analysis was performed with canonical correlation and regression analysis. The results showed a statistically significant correlation between functional abilities with all of tests in jumping and throwing athletic disciplines.

  19. Outcomes of dental hygiene baccalaureate degree education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Zul; Sunell, Susanne; Boschma, Geertje; Imai, Pauline; Craig, Bonnie J

    2011-03-01

    There is little published literature about the outcomes of dental hygiene baccalaureate degree education, particularly in Canada. Since there are various dental hygiene entry-to-practice educational models in Canada, exploring baccalaureate dental hygiene education is becoming an increasingly important subject. The purpose of this study was to explore the personal outcomes and dental hygiene practice outcomes of dental hygiene degree-completion education in Canada from the perspectives of diploma dental hygienists who have continued their education to the bachelor's degree level. This study employed a qualitative phenomenological design, using a maximum variation purposeful sampling strategy. Data generation occurred with sixteen dental hygienists across Canada through individual semistructured interviews. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim, and coded for data analysis, involving pattern recognition and thematic development. Themes that emerged included changes in self-perception, values, and knowledge base. Changes in self-perception were reflected in a reported increase in self-confidence and perceived credibility. Changes in values included a greater appreciation for lifelong learning. Advancements in knowledge strengthened the development of specific abilities that ultimately influenced participants' dental hygiene practice. These abilities included an increased ability to think critically, to make evidence-based decisions, and to provide more comprehensive care. Participants also commented on having more career opportunities available to them outside of the private clinical practice setting. These results reveal important insights into the impact of earning a dental hygiene baccalaureate degree on oneself and one's dental hygiene practice.

  20. Dental caries vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from carious lesions of which S. mutans , Lactobacillus acidophilus , and Actinomyces viscosus are the main pathogenic species involved in the initiation and development of dental caries. In India, surveys done on school children showed caries prevalence of approximately 58%. Surveys among the U.S. population showed an incidence of 45.3% in children and 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries. Huge amounts of money and time are spent in treating dental caries. Hence, the prevention and control of dental caries is the main aim of public health, eventually the ultimate objective of public health is the elimination of the disease itself. Recently, dental caries vaccines have been developed for the prevention of dental caries. These dental caries vaccines are still in the early stages.

  1. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries.

  2. Sudden hearing loss after dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansu, Leyla; Yilmaz, Ismail

    2013-08-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with impaired balance, tinnitus, sensation of blockage, and hearing loss in his left ear, which developed after dental treatment for dental pain 4 days previously. Treatment of the carious left upper second molar tooth had included pulp extirpation, canal expansion, and tooth filling under local anesthesia with articaine and epinephrine. Impaired balance decreased spontaneously within 3 days of dental treatment, but tinnitus and hearing loss persisted. Pure tone audiogram showed profound sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear, with a downslope from 40 to 100 dB, and an abnormal speech discrimination score (50%). Treatment included intravenous prednisolone, intratympanic dexamethasone, and oral betahistine and trimetazidine. The patient had improved hearing and resolution of tinnitus. Sudden hearing loss is rare after dental treatment, and awareness of this complication may prompt early referral for treatment and may improve recovery and prognosis. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  3. Osseoperception in Dental Implants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Brånemark, Per-Ingvar

    2016-04-01

    Replacement of lost teeth has significant functional and psychosocial effects. The capability of osseointegrated dental implants to transmit a certain amount of sensibility is still unclear. The phenomenon of developing a certain amount of tactile sensibility through osseointegrated dental implants is called osseoperception. The aim of this article is to evaluate the available literature to find osseoperception associated with dental implants. To identify suitable literature, an electronic search was performed using Medline and PubMed database. Articles published in English and articles whose abstract is available in English were included. The articles included in the review were based on osseoperception, tactile sensation, and neurophysiological mechanoreceptors in relation to dental implants. Articles on peri-implantitis and infection-related sensitivity were not included. Review articles without the original data were excluded, although references to potentially pertinent articles were noted for further follow-up. The phenomenon of osseoperception remains a matter of debate, so the search strategy mainly focused on articles on osseoperception and tactile sensibility of dental implants. This review presents the histological, neurophysiological, and psychophysical evidence of osseoperception and also the role of mechanoreceptors in osseoperception. The literature on osseoperception in dental implants is very scarce. The initial literature search resulted in 90 articles, of which 81 articles that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this systematic review. Patients restored with implant-supported prostheses reported improved tactile and motor function when compared with patients wearing complete dentures. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Examination of social networking professionalism among dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Molnar, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Becoming a dental professional requires one to apply ethical decision making skills and demonstrate high standards of professionalism in practice, including the way professionals present themselves to the public. With social media as an evergrowing part of personal and professional communications, this study aimed to determine the accessibility, amount, and type of unprofessional content on Facebook profiles of dental hygiene and dental students in a college of dentistry. The authors evaluated the online profiles of all 499 dental and dental hygiene students at The Ohio State University using objective measures that included existence of a profile, current privacy settings, and access to personally identifiable information. A sample of profiles were evaluated for unprofessional content including photos, comments, and wall posts. The majority of these students were found to use Facebook, with 61 percent having Facebook profiles. Dental hygiene students were more likely to have a Facebook profile than were dental students: 72.6 percent and 59.1 percent, respectively (p=0.027). The majority of the students' profiles had some form of privacy setting enabled, with only 4 percent being entirely open to the public. Fewer than 2 percent of the students allowed non-friends access to personal information. Based on in-depth analysis of the profiles, fourteen (5.8 percent) instances of unprofessionalism were recorded; the most common unprofessional content involved substance abuse. This study found that these dental and dental hygiene students frequently possessed an identifiable Facebook account and nearly half had some kind of personal information on their profile that could potentially be shared with the public. In some instances, the students gave patients, faculty, and potential employers access to content that is not reflective of a dental professional. Academic institutions should consider implementing policies that bring awareness to and address the use of social media

  5. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Luiz de Oliveira ROSA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed, Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States. Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers, synthetic resins (681 papers, dental cements (440 papers, dental alloys (392 papers and dental adhesives (361 papers. The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents, followed by dental implants (8 patents and composite resins (7 patents. Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development

  6. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROSA, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; SILVA, Tiago Machado; LIMA, Giana da Silveira; SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; PIVA, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in

  7. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet: Injury-Based Differences Among Ballet Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Francisco José; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Guillén, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Despite overuse injuries being previously described as the most frequent in ballet, there are no studies on professional dancers providing the specific clinical diagnoses or type of injury based on the discipline. Overuse injuries are the most frequent injuries in ballet, with differences in the type and frequency of injuries based on discipline. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed between January 1, 2005, and October 10, 2010, on injuries occurring in professional dancers from leading Spanish dance companies who practiced disciplines such as classical, neoclassical, contemporary, and Spanish ballet. Data, including type of injury, were obtained from specialized medical services at the Trauma Service, Fremap, Madrid, Spain. A total of 486 injuries were evaluated, a significant number of which were overuse disorders (P < .0001), especially in the most technically demanding discipline of classical ballet (82.60%). Injuries were more frequent among female dancers (75.90%) and classical ballet (83.60%). A statistically significant prevalence of patellofemoral pain syndrome was found in the classical discipline (P = .007). Injuries of the adductor muscles of the thigh (P = .001) and of the low back facet (P = .02) in the Spanish ballet discipline and lateral snapping hip (P = .02) in classical and Spanish ballet disciplines were significant. Overuse injuries were the most frequent injuries among the professional dancers included in this study. The prevalence of injuries was greater for the most technically demanding discipline (classical ballet) as well as for women. Patellofemoral pain syndrome was the most prevalent overuse injury, followed by Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, and mechanical low back pain. Specific clinical diagnoses and injury-based differences between the disciplines are a key factor in ballet.

  8. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Seymour

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. Design: In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined ‘vertical’ direct patient care training with ‘horizontal’ interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. Results: The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Conclusions: Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come.

  9. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Muhumuza, Ibra; Mumena, Chris; Isyagi, Moses; Barrow, Jane; Meeks, Valli

    2013-03-08

    Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined 'vertical' direct patient care training with 'horizontal' interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come.

  10. Pluri-Disciplinary; Against the Common Perception of Collaboration Among Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shabani Varaki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous kinds of definitions and discourses of conceptualization for the collaboration among disciplines. Examining a wide range of the related texts represents various, divergent and also contradictory discourses back to this up. Carefully and critically examining the common perception of collaboration among disciplines, in this paper, authors introduce an alternative so-called pluridisciplinary.rn rnAnd, it is argued that pluri-disciplinary could be considered as an umbrella term for all other modes of collaboration among disciplines including multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdiciplinary. It is also contended that unlike the conventional perception of collaborations between disciplines, epistemological and instrument rationales need to be seen as a continuous integration, so such a holistic approach will lead to a new so-called discipline; transdiciplinary. It is also articulated that there is a hierarchical relationship between disciplines in the alternative. In this paper, simple knowledge in pluridisciplinary studies will be replaced by super-complex knowledge, so called; trans-disciplinary, as a new-fashioned discipline, emerges.

  11. The Management of Dental Waste in Dental Offices and Clinics in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Danaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental waste can be hazardous to humans and the environment. Objective: To determine the current status of dental waste management in private and public dental clinics and private dental offices in Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from February through June 2013. A stratified random sampling method was used to study 86 private offices, 14 private clinics and 10 public clinics. Types of waste studied included mercury and amalgam, lead foil packets, sharps, infectious tissues and fluids, pharmaceuticals and domestic waste materials. Compliance with established standards by the monitored dental offices and clinics and public clinics were compared. Results: 89.1% of dental offices and clinics disposed their infectious waste with domestic waste. Only 60% of centers used standard method for sharps disposal. None of the dental centers disposed their pharmaceutical waste and x-ray fixer waste by standard methods. Less than 10% of centers recycled the amalgam and lead foil pockets waste to the manufacture. Conclusion: Government agencies should establish monitoring programs for all dental offices and clinics to identify noncompliant activity and enforce recommended regulations.

  12. Dental anxiety and personality: investigating the relationship between dental anxiety and self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, George C

    2003-09-01

    This study investigated whether personality plays a role in a condition called dental anxiety. Specifically, the study examined the relationship between dental anxiety (the negative response to the stress elicited from a dental interaction) and self-consciousness (the tendency to evaluate aspects of oneself that are subject to private and public display). The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics possessed by dentally anxious individuals who face potential health risks because of their avoidance. Sixty York University undergraduate students were recruited by convenience sampling to participate. These subjects completed Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and the Self-Consciousness Scale. The Self-Consciousness Scale consists of three subscales, including private self-consciousness, public self-consciousness, and social anxiety. Results indicated an 0.54 significant correlation between dental anxiety and self-consciousness. The public self-consciousness and social anxiety subscales correlated the most with dental anxiety. Furthermore, the data did not indicate a significant moderating relationship for gender between the two aforementioned variables. These results contribute to the establishment of personality characteristics as one of the dimensions determining dental anxiety.

  13. DOES INCREASING DENTAL EDUCATION IMPROVE THE ORAL HYGIENE STATUS OF DENTAL STUDENTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnima V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of increased knowledge acquired by the dental student in preventive aspects of dental education during his curriculum on his own health attitude, oral hygiene and gingival status. METHODS: A total of 240 students pursuing the undergraduate course (B.D.S at t he New Horizon Dental College and Research Institute, Bilaspur (Chhattisgarh were recruited for the study and divided into 4 groups based on the year of study. All participants answered a self - administered questionnaire and then this reported oral health behavior was compared to the actual clinical situation using the clinical parameters of Plaque Index, Gingival Index and Oral Hygiene Index simplified. RESULTS: The dental attitude became more positive and improved with each advancing year of education. Th ere was a statistically significant decrease in the CPI score (P=0.04 and OHI - S score (P=0.01 with each advancing year of education but plaque score was insignificant (P=0.06. Females showed better dental care than their male counterparts. CONCLUSION: T he oral health attitude and behavior of the dental students improved with increasing level of dental education. Preventive courses providing apt information on proper techniques of plaque control must be included in the first and second year curriculum of the dental students.

  14. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... the prevalence of dental caries and gingivitis among. 12-year-old children .... chemical, bacterial and mechanical irritation from dental plaque and ..... We thank the School of Dental Sciences and Colgate. Palmolive for part ...

  15. Dental hygienists' perceptions of barriers to graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda D; Bailey, Angela

    2011-08-01

    To advance the profession of dental hygiene, graduate education is necessary to support growth in research, education, administration, and practice in the discipline and to sustain credibility in a climate in which other health professions require entry-level master's and doctoral degrees. The purpose of this study was to explore what dental hygienists perceive as barriers to pursuing a graduate degree. A survey was developed based on the literature and other national surveys. Data were collected from 160 respondents to the survey: 50 percent held an entry-level baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene, while the rest held an entry-level associate degree (48 percent) or certificate (2 percent) in dental hygiene. All respondents had completed a bachelor's degree. The top five barriers these respondents identified in pursuing graduate education were as follows: 1) cost of graduate education, 2) family responsibilities are too great, 3) concerns about personal funding to pay for graduate education, 4) finding time for graduate school while working, and 5) fear of thesis research. Dental hygiene is one of the few health professions that still have entry-level degrees at the associate and baccalaureate levels. The profession needs to reduce such barriers to enable dental hygienists to pursue graduate education and thus ensure an adequate supply of future leaders, educators, and researchers.

  16. Radiopacity of Dental Materials: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekkan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature on the radiopacity of dental materials in order to emphasize its importance. Evidence Acquisition English-language literature was investigated using manual and electronic searches for the terms “radiopacity,” “dental material,” “cement,” “composite,” “ceramic,” “endodontic root canal sealer,” “bone graft,” and “acrylic resin” in the databases of Medline, google scholar, and Scopus up to April 2016. Seventy-nine selected publications, including review articles, original articles, and books, were evaluated. Results The radiopacity of different dental materials may be lower or higher than that of the replaced tissue depending on the restorative material used. The research revealed that highly-radiopaque materials should not be used in dental restorations, except as bone graft and endodontic root canal filling materials. For most of the dental restorative materials, moderate radiopacity within the range of the replaced dental tissue is recommended. However, the lower radiopacity of polymer-based restorative or prosthetic dental materials is still a significant clinical problem. Conclusions The author recommends using highly-radiopaque materials whenever possible for treatment of bone defects and root canals. For dental materials that replace clinical crowns, the radiopacity should be within the range of that of the replaced tooth structure (dentin or enamel. The radiopacity of dental cements should be much higher than that of the enamel in order to facilitate detection of the thin cement remnants.

  17. Seesaw Discipline: The Interactive Effect of Harsh and Lax Discipline on Youth Psychological Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Justin; McKee, Laura G; Forehand, Rex

    2016-02-01

    Although extant research documents the negative consequences of harsh and lax discipline for youth, little empirical attention has been devoted to understanding the impact when parents utilize both strategies. As such, the current study was designed to explore the interaction of harsh and lax discipline on youth internalizing and externalizing symptoms in three developmental periods (early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence). Participants were 615 parents (55 % female) and one of their 3-to-17 year old children (45 % female). Parents provided reports of their harsh and lax parenting tactics as well as offspring internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Multiple linear regression analyses were utilized to examine the relations between the interaction of harsh and lax parenting on youth symptoms. The interaction between harsh and lax discipline was significantly related to youth internalizing, but not externalizing, problems in the both the young and middle childhood samples and marginally significant in the adolescence sample: Seesaw discipline - a novel construct indicative of high levels of both harsh and lax discipline - was associated with the highest levels of youth internalizing problems. Parents who engage in seesaw parenting have children and adolescents who are more likely to evidence internalizing symptoms. Such findings may inform prevention and intervention efforts that target dysfunctional discipline.

  18. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  19. Dental erosion, summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  20. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...... dental pain, they expect that the dentist starts treatment at once and that the treatment should provide pain relief. In this situation many patients are fragile, anxious and nervous. If the dentist is able to manage emergency treatment of acute dental pain this will build confidence and trust between...

  1. The business of dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Widyanti Sriyono

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization including General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS and Asia Fair Trade Agreement (AFTA are a new free trade system. In globalization era, there will be an intense and free competition in looking for jobs throughout the world. This new system will affect the health services system in which health services tend to follow an industrial model. Meaning that dentistry or dental health services tend to be part of a business system, and this system has caused controversy among the community and the profession itself. The results of the discussion revealed that professional and business of dentistry is compatible and complementary. The tendency of increasing number of legal form of practice (group and a professional corporation and the worldwide advertisement of these practices supported the premise that delivering dental practice tends to follow the industrial model. Dentists should not only more focus on achieving financial success in running the business of practice but profession should have the most concern for the people who seek their services. Delivering quality of dental care depends on the high skill of the dentist and on the satisfactory income for the survival of the practice in the long run, and this make the practice will be viewed by the public and profession as being appropriate and of high quality. Facing the globalization, besides possessing high clinical skill, dentists must have a firm understanding of management concepts and apply them in their practice. In conclusion: The profession and the business of dentistry are compatible and complementary. The delivery of the dental services tends to follow the industrial model, which is a current reality. Dentist should concern more on the delivering high quality of dental services, not only focus on the business of the practice, although the satisfactory income is important for the survival growth of the practice in the long run. It is suggested for dentists to follow as

  2. Environmental adversity and children's early trajectories of problem behavior: The role of harsh parental discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, Eirini; Midouhas, Emily

    2017-03-01

    This study was performed to examine the role of harsh parental discipline in mediating and moderating the effects of environmental adversity (family socioeconomic disadvantage and adverse life events) on emotional and behavioral problems across early-to-middle childhood. The sample included 16,916 children (48% female; 24% non-White) from the U.K.'s Millennium Cohort Study. We analyzed trajectories of conduct, hyperactivity, and emotional problems, measured at ages 3, 5, and 7 years, using growth curve models. Harsh parental discipline was measured at these ages with parent-reported items on the frequency of using the physical and verbal discipline tactics of smacking, shouting at, and "telling off" the child. As expected, family socioeconomic disadvantage and adverse life events were significantly associated with emotional and behavioral problems. Harsh parental discipline was related to children's trajectories of problems, and it moderated, but did not explain, the effect of environmental risk on these trajectories. High-risk children experiencing harsh parental discipline had the highest levels of conduct problems and hyperactivity across the study period. In addition, harsh parental discipline predicted an increase in emotional symptoms over time in high-risk children, unseen in their counterparts experiencing low levels of harsh parental discipline. However, children in low-risk families were also negatively affected by harsh parental discipline concurrently and over time. In conclusion, harsh parental discipline predicted emotional and behavioral problems in high- and low-risk children and moderated the effects of family poverty and adversity on these problems. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Medical Geology : a globally emerging discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph E. Bunnell; Robert B. Finkelman; Centeno, Jose A.; Selinus, O. (Olle)

    2007-01-01

    Medical Geology, the study of the impacts of geologic materials and processes on animal and human health, is a dynamic emerging discipline bringing together the geoscience, biomedical, and public health communities to solve a wide range of environmental health problems. Among the Medical Geology described in this review are examples of both deficiency and toxicity of trace element exposure. Goiter is a widespread and potentially serious health problem caused by deficiency of iodine. In many l...

  4. Dealing with uncertainties - communication between disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeek, Bernadet; Bessembinder, Janette

    2013-04-01

    Climate adaptation research inevitably involves uncertainty issues - whether people are building a model, using climate scenarios, or evaluating policy processes. However, do they know which uncertainties are relevant in their field of work? And which uncertainties exist in the data from other disciplines that they use (e.g. climate data, land use, hydrological data) and how they propagate? From experiences in Dutch research programmes on climate change in the Netherlands we know that disciplines often deal differently with uncertainties. This complicates communication between disciplines and also with the various users of data and information on climate change and its impacts. In October 2012 an autumn school was organized within the Knowledge for Climate Research Programme in the Netherlands with as central theme dealing with and communicating about uncertainties, in climate- and socio-economic scenarios, in impact models and in the decision making process. The lectures and discussions contributed to the development of a common frame of reference (CFR) for dealing with uncertainties. The common frame contains the following: 1. Common definitions (typology of uncertainties, robustness); 2. Common understanding (why do we consider it important to take uncertainties into account) and aspects on which we disagree (how far should scientists go in communication?); 3. Documents that are considered important by all participants; 4. Do's and don'ts in dealing with uncertainties and communicating about uncertainties (e.g. know your audience, check how your figures are interpreted); 5. Recommendations for further actions (e.g. need for a platform to exchange experiences). The CFR is meant to help researchers in climate adaptation to work together and communicate together on climate change (better interaction between disciplines). It is also meant to help researchers to explain to others (e.g. decision makers) why and when researchers agree and when and why they disagree

  5. Teaching biomedical technology innovation as a discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J; Zenios, Stefanos A

    2011-07-20

    Recently, universities in the United States and abroad have developed dedicated educational programs in life science technology innovation. Here, we discuss the two major streams of educational theory and practice that have informed these programs: design thinking and entrepreneurship education. We make the case that the process of innovation for new medical technologies (medtech) is different from that for biopharmaceuticals and outline the challenges and opportunities associated with developing a discipline of medtech innovation.

  6. Doctoral dental hygiene education: insights from a review of nursing literature and program websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Elena; Walsh, Margaret M

    2014-02-01

    Because dental hygiene education has had a similar trajectory as nursing education, this critical review addressed the question "What can the dental hygiene discipline learn from the nursing experience in their development of doctoral education?" Information on admission and degree requirements, modes of instruction, and program length and cost was collected from the websites associated with 112 of 125 PhD nursing programs nationally, and 174 of 184 Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs. In addition, searches of PubMed, Cumulative Index Nursing Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Web of Science were utilized to identify key articles and books. The following 4 insights relevant to future dental hygiene doctoral education emerged from a review of nursing doctoral education: First, nursing doctoral education offers 2 main doctoral degrees, the research-focused PhD degree and the practice-focused DNP degree. Second, there is a well-documented need for doctoral prepared nurses to teach in nursing programs at all levels in managing client-care settings. Third, curricula quality and consistency is a priority in nursing education. Fourth, there are numerous templates on nursing doctoral education available. The historical background of nursing doctoral education was also reviewed, with the assumption that it can be used to inform the dental hygiene discipline when establishing doctoral dental hygiene education. The authors recommend that with the current changes toward medically and socially compromised patient populations, impending changes in health care policies and the available critical mass of master degree-prepared dental hygiene scholars ready to advance the discipline, now is the time for the dental hygiene discipline to establish doctoral education.

  7. Dental crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you. The different types of crowns include: Stainless steel crowns: Are pre-made Work well as temporary crowns, especially for young children. The crown falls off when the child loses the baby tooth. Metal crowns: Hold up to chewing and teeth ...

  8. Is Primatology an equal-opportunity discipline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Addessi

    Full Text Available The proportion of women occupying academic positions in biological sciences has increased in the past few decades, but women are still under-represented in senior academic ranks compared to their male colleagues. Primatology has been often singled out as a model of "equal-opportunity" discipline because of the common perception that women are more represented in Primatology than in similar fields. But is this indeed true? Here we show that, although in the past 15 years the proportion of female primatologists increased from the 38% of the early 1990s to the 57% of 2008, Primatology is far from being an "equal-opportunity" discipline, and suffers the phenomenon of "glass ceiling" as all the other scientific disciplines examined so far. In fact, even if Primatology does attract more female students than males, at the full professor level male members significantly outnumber females. Moreover, regardless of position, IPS male members publish significantly more than their female colleagues. Furthermore, when analyzing gender difference in scientific productivity in relation to the name order in the publications, it emerged that the scientific achievements of female primatologists (in terms of number and type of publications do not always match their professional achievements (in terms of academic position. However, the gender difference in the IPS members' number of publications does not correspond to a similar difference in their scientific impact (as measured by their H index, which may indicate that female primatologists' fewer articles are of higher impact than those of their male colleagues.

  9. [Current trends in dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Dubravka; Blazić, Larisa; Durić, Milanko; Vucinić, Predrag; Blagojević, Duska; Bajkin, Branislav

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews recent trends in basic dental disciplines and advantages of new clinical procedures over conventional. Post and core restoration is one of the most common treatment modalities applied when the remaining coronal tooth structure is not sufficient to provide the necessary retention form for restoration. Nowadays, the restoration of endodontically treated teeth is based on the use of materials with a modulus of elasticity similar to that of dentin. Polymerization contraction stress of resin based composite during light-activation process may be reduced by various illumination schemes. Successful curing depends on the calculated energy density values (spatial irradiance x irradiation period - J/cm2) rather than on light irradiance levels (mW/cm2). It is well documented that various systemic diseases have a profound effect on periodontal tissues. Recently, it has been speculated that periodontal disease may influence systemic health and represent the risk factor for cardiovascular diseases or adverse pregnancy outcomes. Computer systems, which will automatically identify relevant skeletal and soft tissue roentgencephalometric landmarks, will represent a great improvement in the field of orthodontic diagnosis. By using the Active Appearance Model, it is possible to identify most of roentgencephalometric bony landmarks with an average error well below 2 mm. Chemomechanical caries removal was introduced as an alternative to conventional mechanical procedures. Its advantages are: selective removal of carious tissue, absence of pain, reduced need for local anesthesia and less potentially negative effects on the dental pulp. The introduction of the surgical operating microscope, microsurgical instruments, ultrasonic retrotips for root-end cavity preparation and new root-end filling materials opened a new era in periapical surgery, even on multi-rooted teeth, often called endodontic microsurgery.

  10. Infant oral exam and first dental home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize general practitioners with the components of a dental home including an infant oral exam, and to the First Dental Home initiative, which is unique to the State of Texas. This article encourages the general practitioners to actively participate in providing care for young children under the age of 3. Components of an infant oral examination are described here with emphasis on knee-to-knee or lap exam, caries risk assessment, preventive treatment, age-appropriate anticipatory guidance, and parent education. The First Dental Home is uniquely designed to help pediatric clients 6 months through 35 months of age to establish a dental home. The objectives, goal and components of FDH are discussed in detail.

  11. Death in dental clinic: Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshappa, Kedarnath Nakkalahalli; Rangaswamy, Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Deaths during dental treatment or as a result of dental treatment are rare, but the unfortunate fact is that such deaths do occur. Unexpected death of a patient can be emotionally draining and even harrowing to his or her relatives. The death of a patient may bring an enormous feeling of anxiety both at the personal and professional level, stress, profound grief, damage to self-esteem, loss of self-confidence, reputation, and specter of litigation on a dental surgeon. No dentist can be guaranteed to be free of such an incident during the course of his or her practice. The dentist should respond in a compassionate and respectful manner in case of such unfortunate tragic events, and also ensure self-protection. This article emphasizes on prevention of such incidents and throws some light on how to respond in case of an unfortunate death in a dental clinic, including the medico-legal aspects.

  12. Death in dental clinic: Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedarnath Nakkalahalli Seshappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deaths during dental treatment or as a result of dental treatment are rare, but the unfortunate fact is that such deaths do occur. Unexpected death of a patient can be emotionally draining and even harrowing to his or her relatives. The death of a patient may bring an enormous feeling of anxiety both at the personal and professional level, stress, profound grief, damage to self-esteem, loss of self-confidence, reputation, and specter of litigation on a dental surgeon. No dentist can be guaranteed to be free of such an incident during the course of his or her practice. The dentist should respond in a compassionate and respectful manner in case of such unfortunate tragic events, and also ensure self-protection. This article emphasizes on prevention of such incidents and throws some light on how to respond in case of an unfortunate death in a dental clinic, including the medico-legal aspects.

  13. Emerging Dental Applications of Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G.

    Until recently, the application of Raman spectroscopy to investigate dental tissues has primarily focused on using microspectroscopy to characterize dentin and enamel structures as well as to understand the adhesive interface of various resin and bonding agents used in restorative procedures. With the advent of improved laser, imaging/mapping and fibre optic technologies, the applications have expanded to investigate various biomedical problems ranging from oral cancer, bacterial identification and early dental caries detection. The overall aim of these applications is to develop Raman spectroscopy into a tool for use in the dental clinic. This chapter presents the recent dental applications of Raman spectroscopy as well as discusses the potential, strengths and limitations of the technology in comparison with alternative techniques. In addition, a discussion and rationale about combining Raman spectroscopy with other optical techniques will be included.

  14. Clinical evaluation of postradiation dental extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusukawa, Jingo; Ohisi, Shinichiro; Kameyama, Tadamitsu; Yoshizumi, Munehiro; Hayabuchi, Naofumi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-05-01

    Twenty-one patients who had undergone postradiation dental extraction were evaluated clinically. All patients had received irradiation for primary head and neck malignancies at doses ranging from 8 to 60 Gy (mean, 51.6 Gy). Time to dental extraction after irradiation ranged from 8 to 156 months (mean, 57.9 months). Of the 21 patients (80 teeth extracted, including 33 maxillary teeth and 47 mandibular teeth), one had delayed healing after wisdom tooth extraction due to postextraction irradiation. Thus, osteoradionecrosis after dental extraction did not develop. These results suggest that dental extraction after radiation is not contraindicated. To prevent complications, patients who have received radiation and require extractions should be cared for by oral and maxillofacial surgeons in close association with radiation oncologists. (author).

  15. METHACRYLATE AND ACRYLATE ALLERGY IN DENTAL STUDENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Lyapina

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of acrylic monomers is used in dentistry, and when dental personnel, patients or students of dental medicine become sensitized, it is of great importance to identify the dental ;acrylic preparations to which the sensitized individual can be exposed. Numerous studies confirm high incidence of sensitization to (meth acrylates in dentatal professionals, as well as in patients undergoing dental treatment and exposed to resin-based materials. Quite a few studies are available aiming to evaluate the incidence of sensitization in students of dental medicineThe purpose of the study is to evaluate the incidence of contact sensitization to some (meth acrylates in students of dental medicine at the time of their education, in dental professionals (dentists, nurses and attendants and in patients, the manifestation of co-reactivity.A total of 139 participants were included in the study, divided into four groups: occupationally exposed to (methacrylates and acrylic monomers dental professionals, 3-4 year-of-education students of dental medicine, 6th year–of-education students of dental medicine and patients with suspected or established sensitization to acrylates, without occupational exposure. All of them were patch-tested with methyl methacrylate (MMA, triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TREGDMA, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA, 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy phenyl]propane (bis-GMA, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA, and tetrahidrofurfuril metacrylate. The overall sensitization rates to methacrylates in the studied population are comparative high – from 25.9% for MMA to 31.7% for TREGDMA. Significantly higher incidence of sensitization in the group of 3-4 course students compared to the one in the group of dental professionals for MMA and TREGDMA was observed. Highest was the incidence of sensitization to ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, BIS-GMA, 2-HEMA and tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate in the group of patients, with

  16. Dental Pulp Testing: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene Chen; Abbott, Paul V

    2009-01-01

    Dental pulp testing is a useful and essential diagnostic aid in endodontics. Pulp sensibility tests include thermal and electric tests, which extrapolate pulp health from sensory response. Whilst pulp sensibility tests are the most commonly used in clinical practice, they are not without limitations and shortcomings. Pulp vitality tests attempt to examine the presence of pulp blood flow, as this is viewed as a better measure of true health than sensibility. Laser Doppler flowmetry and pulse o...

  17. The significance of ecstasy use to dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, William James; Raymond, George

    2014-11-01

    3,4 Methylenedioxymethampetamine (MDMA), commonly known as ecstasy, is an illicit drug used by individuals seeking mood enhancement. Ecstasy's pharmacology, systemic, oral and dental manifestations are presented. Use of this drug is not limited to a particular socioeconomic class and, as such, all practicing dentists must be aware of both the intra-oral effects of this drug and any possible alterations to dental treatment that might become necessary. Dental manifestations include bruxism, increased incidence of caries, xerostomia and oral ulcers.

  18. Antibacterial effect of chlorine dioxide and hyaluronate on dental biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Al-bayaty, F.; Taiyeb-ali, T.; Abdulla, M. A.; Hashim, F.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate antimicrobial action of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gel and hyaluronate gel (Gengigel (R)) on dental biofilm. Pooled supra and subgingival dental biofilm were obtained from healthy individuals and incubated aerobically and anaerobically. Plaque bacteria investigated including Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus mitis, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, dental plaque pool samples (aerobic and anaerobic) and Staphylococcus aureus and ...

  19. Computer optics and photonics for students of laser engineering disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. P.

    2005-10-01

    The concept of teaching in optics and photonics for undergraduate and post-graduate students of laser engineering disciplines are discussed. The designed curriculum include as fundamental knowledge on modern mathematics, physics and computer methods as up-to-date industrial optical engineering software training. Distributed Web-server technology with Alpha cluster station background allow to support real-time training and teaching with a set of computer optical laboratories, which are used as a framework for most university special courses. Remote access to facilities of Russian Academy of Science make it possible to accumulate modern science achievements in optical education.

  20. Between fiscal discipline and economic recovery. The solutions problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Maria GHERMAN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we proposed a comparative analysis of the effect of the measures taken in seven European countries, which were aimed the fiscal consolidation, in correlation with monetary policy and economic recovery. The selected countries have been systematized into two groups: first group includes states that have signed agreements with international financial institutions (Romania, Ireland, Greece and Portugal and the second group contains countries which, even if not directly assisted in the international funding programs, have take a several adjustment measures (Italy, Spain and France. In the same time, we keep in mind during the analysis the trade-off between fiscal discipline and sustainable economic recovery.

  1. Holography And Holometry Applications In Dental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenborg, George C.

    1987-06-01

    The earliest reference to holographic applications appeared in the dental literature in 1972 when Wictorin, Bjelkhagen and Abramson described a method to study elastic deformation of defective gold solder joints in simulated fixed bridges. Their paper, published in the Swedish dental literature, offered a concise presentation of the interferometry technique which led to the development of other research applications of holographic interferometry(holometry) in dentistry. In this presentation, the development and application of the interferometry technique in the dental field will be discussed. Various interesting and potentially useful applications of holography have appeared in the dental literature over the past decade. Some of these, which will be discussed, include the use of holograms as a storage medium for dental study models, multiplexing of computer(CT) scan sections to form white light viewable holograms and the potential application of holographic training aids in the teaching of the basic courses of dental anatomy and restorative dentistry. In addition, some unique related applications will be mentioned including a laser reflection method for accurate non-contact measurement of tooth mobility/movement and a technique for contour mapping of occlusal surfaces to measure wear of restorative materials.

  2. Implications of apixaban for dental treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin and acenocoumarol. In Europe, the European Medicines Agency has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. Their advantages include: predictable pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and limited food, rapid onset of action and short half-life. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through November 2015 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Library using the keywords “apixaban”, “rivaroxaban”, “dabigatran”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “dental treatment” and “dental implications”. We included studies published in English and Spanish over the last 10 years. Results Apixaban has been recently introduced in the daily medical practices for the control of thromboembolism. The number of patients taking apixaban is increasing. Management of patients on anticoagulation therapy requires that dentists can accurately assess the patient prior to dental treatments. It is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action and management guidelines for patients taking new oral anticoagulants. Conclusions The dentist should consider carefully the management of patients on apixaban. This paper sets out a clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients. There is a need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for dental patients requiring apixaban. Key words:Apixaban, new oral anticoagulants, dental treatment. PMID:27957279

  3. Orofacial pain emerging as a dental specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, R S; Friction, J R; Okeson, J P

    2001-01-01

    The emerging field of orofacial pain was considered by the American Dental Association for full status as a new dental specialty. While the recognition of orofacial pain as a specialty was denied, the American Academy of Orofacial Pain plans to continue its efforts. Many recent advances in the neuroscience of orofacial pain have led to treatments that provide significant relief for patients with chronic orofacial pain disorders. However, access to this care has been limited, leaving many patients to suffer. Dentists are generally supportive of the efforts to develop oral pain treatment into a specialty because the field will provide benefits for both dentists and their patients. A recent survey of 805 individuals who reported having a persistent pain disorder revealed that more than four out of 10 people have yet to find adequate relief, saying their pain is out of control--despite having the pain for more than five years and switching doctors at least once. "This survey suggests that there are millions of people living with severe uncontrolled pain," says Russell Portenoy, MD, president of the American Pain Society. "This is a great tragedy. Although not everyone can be helped, it is likely that most of these patients could benefit if provided with state-of-the-art therapies and improved access to pain specialists when needed." Development of the field of orofacial pain into a dental specialty has been moved primarily by the fact that historically, patients with complex chronic orofacial pain disorders have not been treated well by any discipline of healthcare. Recent studies of chronic orofacial pain patients have found that these patients have a higher number of previous clinicians and have endured many years with pain prior to seeing an orofacial pain dentist (see Figure 1). Complex pain patients and the clinicians who see them are often confused about who they should consult for relief of the pain. Treatment for those patients within the existing structure of

  4. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  5. Challenges and Opportunities for Establishing Design as a Research Discipline in Civil and Environmental Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    faculty, research and education communities, conferences, and journals. However, design remains an emerging sub-discipline in civil and environmental engineering – practiced, valued, and taught but not subject to rigorous academic research. This paper presents some of the challenges associated...... with the establishment of design as a research discipline within civil and environmental engineering, some of the benefits and opportunities that will come from that establishment, and some evidence for the fact that this process has already begun.......There are a number of fields including architecture, industrial design, and urban planning and design, where design is the discipline upon which all research and teaching activities are based. In other fields such as aerospace and mechanical engineering, design is a sub-discipline with its own...

  6. Occupational hazards to dental staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Ayatollahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental professionals are predisposed to a number of occupational hazards. These include exposure to infections (including Human Immunodeficiency Virus and viral hepatitis; percutaneous exposure incidents, dental materials, radiation, and noise; musculoskeletal disorders; psychological problems and dermatitis; respiratory disorders; and eye insults. Percutaneous exposure incidents remain a main concern, as exposure to serious infectious agents is a virtual risk. Minimizing percutaneous exposure incidents and their consequences should continue to be considered, including sound infection control practices, continuing education, and hepatitis B vaccination. Basically, for any infection control strategies, dentists should be aware of individual protective measures and appropriate sterilization or other high-level disinfection utilities. Strained posture at work disturbs the musculoskeletal alignment and leads to stooped spine. The stooped posture also involved certain groups of muscles and joints. This may lead to diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Continuous educating and appropriate intervention studies are needed to reduce the complication of these hazards. So, it is important for dentists to remain constantly up-to-date about measures on how to deal with newer strategies and dental materials, and implicates the need for special medical care for this professional group.

  7. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  8. Market discipline and incentive problems in conglomerate banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, A.W.A.; Schmeits, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper analyzes the optimal conglomeration of bank activities. Weshow that the effectiveness of market discipline forstand-alone activities (divisions) is of crucial importance for thepotential benefits of conglomeration. We find thateffective market discipline reduces the potential benefits

  9. Market discipline and incentive problems in conglomerate banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W.A. Boot; A. Schmeits

    1998-01-01

    This paper analyzes the optimal conglomeration of bank activities. Weshow that the effectiveness of market discipline forstand-alone activities (divisions) is of crucial importance for thepotential benefits of conglomeration. We find thateffective market discipline reduces the potential benefits ofc

  10. Learning from Decoding across Disciplines and within Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Young, Janice; Boman, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This final chapter synthesizes the findings and implications derived from applying the Decoding the Disciplines model across disciplines and within communities of practice. We make practical suggestions for teachers and researchers who wish to apply and extend this work.

  11. Dental fraud: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Max H

    2003-01-01

    A manager of a dental benefits program defines fraud and abuse in the dental context. Such practices may cost as much as four billion dollars annually and have a damaging effect on the trust the profession places in the profession and on the way dentists relate to each other.

  12. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  13. Knowledge, aptitudes, and preferences in implant dentistry teaching/training among undergraduate dental students at the University of Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berástegui-Jimeno, Esther; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2017-01-01

    Background Oral implant rehabilitation should be considered a treatment option for any edentulous patient and Implant Dentistry is currently a discipline taught in the undergraduate formation. The level of knowledge acquired and how the students perceive the quality of training in Implant Dentistry could assess to know if it is necessary to improve the syllabus. Material and Methods A questionnaire was developed with 11 questions: Basic knowledge (7); Perception of training received (2); Ways in which students would receive training (2). To be responded anonymously and voluntarily for undergraduates students in the Faculty of Dentistry (University of Barcelona, Spain). Results One hundred and seven students, 76 third year (Group A) and 31 fourth year (Group B) answered the questionnaire. In Group A, 98.68% of students and in Group B 93.54% believed they were poorly informed; 100% of both groups would prefer to receive more training as part of the degree or as postgraduate training through modular courses imparted by experts (A: 71,05%, B: 70,96%) Training through postgraduate programs or training given by private businesses were the least desirable options (A: 42%, B: 64.51%). Questions about basic knowledge acquired received varying responses, which might indicate a certain level of confusion in this area. Conclusions The undergraduate syllabus must be revised to include sufficient content and training to allow the student to indicate implant-based treatments based on evidence. Students would prefer training to be included in the undergraduate syllabus. Key words:Dental implants, dental students, dental education, dental syllabus, implant dentistry. PMID:28578375

  14. The dental plaque microbiome in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott N; Snesrud, Erik; Liu, Jia; Ong, Ana C; Kilian, Mogens; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Dental decay is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases worldwide. A variety of factors, including microbial, genetic, immunological, behavioral and environmental, interact to contribute to dental caries onset and development. Previous studies focused on the microbial basis for dental caries have identified species associated with both dental health and disease. The purpose of the current study was to improve our knowledge of the microbial species involved in dental caries and health by performing a comprehensive 16S rDNA profiling of the dental plaque microbiome of both caries-free and caries-active subjects. Analysis of over 50,000 nearly full-length 16S rDNA clones allowed the identification of 1,372 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the dental plaque microbiome. Approximately half of the OTUs were common to both caries-free and caries-active microbiomes and present at similar abundance. The majority of differences in OTU's reflected very low abundance phylotypes. This survey allowed us to define the population structure of the dental plaque microbiome and to identify the microbial signatures associated with dental health and disease. The deep profiling of dental plaque allowed the identification of 87 phylotypes that are over-represented in either caries-free or caries-active subjects. Among these signatures, those associated with dental health outnumbered those associated with dental caries by nearly two-fold. A comparison of this data to other published studies indicate significant heterogeneity in study outcomes and suggest that novel approaches may be required to further define the signatures of dental caries onset and progression.

  15. The dental plaque microbiome in health and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N Peterson

    Full Text Available Dental decay is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases worldwide. A variety of factors, including microbial, genetic, immunological, behavioral and environmental, interact to contribute to dental caries onset and development. Previous studies focused on the microbial basis for dental caries have identified species associated with both dental health and disease. The purpose of the current study was to improve our knowledge of the microbial species involved in dental caries and health by performing a comprehensive 16S rDNA profiling of the dental plaque microbiome of both caries-free and caries-active subjects. Analysis of over 50,000 nearly full-length 16S rDNA clones allowed the identification of 1,372 operational taxonomic units (OTUs in the dental plaque microbiome. Approximately half of the OTUs were common to both caries-free and caries-active microbiomes and present at similar abundance. The majority of differences in OTU's reflected very low abundance phylotypes. This survey allowed us to define the population structure of the dental plaque microbiome and to identify the microbial signatures associated with dental health and disease. The deep profiling of dental plaque allowed the identification of 87 phylotypes that are over-represented in either caries-free or caries-active subjects. Among these signatures, those associated with dental health outnumbered those associated with dental caries by nearly two-fold. A comparison of this data to other published studies indicate significant heterogeneity in study outcomes and suggest that novel approaches may be required to further define the signatures of dental caries onset and progression.

  16. Career Satisfaction Among Dental Public Health Specialists in India – A Cross-sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joe; Antony, Bobby

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The satisfaction in career is an important indicator for the growth of the discipline and the profession. An empirical investigation of satisfaction in career and amendments needed in course and profession may help in growth of discipline. Aim To assess career satisfaction among Dental Public Health (DPH) specialists working in India and analyze their perspective on changes required in the profession. Materials and Methods Questionnaire for this cross-sectional survey was adapted from Minnesota Job Satisfaction Survey which included 40 enquiries to understand the reasons for choosing public health dentistry as career, competencies of public health dentists, satisfaction as a public health dentist and changes required in the profession. The questions were both open and closed end type. Updated electronic mail details of all registered public health dentists were collected from the head office of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry. Each participant was contacted by electronic mail and consent to participate were sought. Reminders were e-mailed thrice during three months. A total of 580 participants were contacted. A total of 183 responses were received, among which 179 consented. Results Nearly half of the respondents felt they are yet to achieve the accomplishment from the present career as public health dentist. Only 46.9% felt that there is advancement in the profession as career. Nearly three-fourth of respondents could not attain recognition as a public health dentist. A 45.8% of respondents were of the opinion that career in public health dentistry would provide them a steady employment and 53.1% of public health dentists would envision as satisfied in their career in next 10 years. Nearly 85% felt public health dentistry training needs a major course correction. Conclusion There has been some reservation or skepticism about the future of the specialty as the jobs are in declining stage. This information provides insight about success

  17. [Dental practice and AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, S

    1991-01-01

    In Thailand nowadays AIDS is not completely under control. This is evident from reports which show an increasing number of HIV-positive patients. Since an unknown number of HIV-infected persons who are either undiagnosed or asymptomatic come to get dental service, fears of getting infected with HIV have been developed among dental professionals. This article summarizes a number of past studies and reports on HIV transmission in dental work and discusses the possibility of AIDS infection and dental occupational risk. It also urges dental professionals to take effective safety precaution against the infection. This is for their own and their patients' well-being and hopefully for Thailand's success in controlling AIDS.

  18. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lars; Andreasen, Jens O; Day, Peter

    2012-01-01

    and group discussions. Experienced researchers and clinicians from various specialties were included in the task group. The guidelines represent the current best evidence and practice based on literature research and professionals' opinion. In cases where the data did not appear conclusive, recommendations......Avulsion of permanent teeth is one of the most serious dental injuries, and a prompt and correct emergency management is very important for the prognosis. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature...

  19. Prevalence and characteristics of dental anxiety in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Birn, H.; Kirkegaard, E.;

    1993-01-01

    Prevalence, characteristics and consequences of dental anxiety in a randomly selected sample of 645 Danish adults were explored in telephone interviews. Participation rate was 88%. Demographics, fear of specific procedures, negative dentist contacts, general fear tendency, treatment utilization...... and perceived oral conditions were explored by level of dental anxiety using a modified Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). A Seattle fear survey item and a summary item from the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) were also included for fear description comparisons. Correlation between these indices (DAS-DFS: rs = 0.72; DAS......-Seattle item: rs = 0.68) aided semantic validation of DAS anxiety intensity levels. Extreme dental anxiety (DAS > or = 15) was found in 4.2% of the sample and 6% reported moderate anxiety (DAS scores 14-12). Bivariate (B) and logistic regression (L) odds ratios (OR) showed that high dental anxiety...

  20. 29 CFR 458.37 - Prohibition of certain discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition of certain discipline. 458.37 Section 458.37... Provisions Applicable § 458.37 Prohibition of certain discipline. No labor organization or any officer, agent... discipline any of its members for exercising any right to which he is entitled under the provisions of...

  1. 8 CFR 1003.109 - Discipline of government attorneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discipline of government attorneys. 1003...-Rules and Procedures § 1003.109 Discipline of government attorneys. Complaints regarding the conduct or... be administered pursuant to the Department's attorney discipline procedures....

  2. 17 CFR 205.6 - Sanctions and discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sanctions and discipline. 205... ISSUER § 205.6 Sanctions and discipline. (a) A violation of this part by any attorney appearing and..., regardless of whether the attorney may also be subject to discipline for the same conduct in a...

  3. 46 CFR 310.10 - Discipline and dismissal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discipline and dismissal. 310.10 Section 310.10 Shipping... Minimum Standards for State, Territorial or Regional Maritime Academies and Colleges § 310.10 Discipline... Midshipman discipline and providing for a demerit system for infractions of these rules and...

  4. 8 CFR 1003.105 - Notice of Intent to Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of Intent to Discipline. 1003.105... and Procedures § 1003.105 Notice of Intent to Discipline. (a) Issuance of Notice to practitioner. (1... subject of the preliminary inquiry a Notice of Intent to Discipline. Service of this notice will be...

  5. Advancing the Communication Discipline in the Community College Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekke, Rhonda

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that community college department chairs have an imperative to advance the discipline in three major ways: (1) to fight for required speech courses; (2) to hire only those people who are trained in their discipline to teach speech courses; and (3) to supervise in a way as to advance the discipline and the cause of teaching and learning.…

  6. Gendered Views of Managing Discipline in School and Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oplatka, Izhar; Atias, Miri

    2007-01-01

    The current study explored male and female principals' views of classroom and discipline management from a gender perspective. Based on semi-structured interviews with 16 primary school principals from Israel, the study points to gendered views of school discipline, in that certain perspectives to prevent or handle discipline problems in school…

  7. Ergonomic applications to dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs," refers to musculoskeletal disorders to which the work environment contributes significantly, or to musculoskeletal disorders that are made worse or longer lasting by work conditions or workplace risk factors. In recent years, there has been an increase in reporting WMSDs for dental persons. Risk factors of WMSDs with specific reference to dentistry include - stress, poor flexibility, improper positioning, infrequent breaks, repetitive movements, weak postural muscles, prolonged awkward postures and improper adjustment of equipment. Ergonomics is the science of designing jobs, equipment and workplaces to fit workers. Proper ergonomic design is necessary to prevent repetitive strain injuries, which can develop over time and can lead to long-term disability. In this article, 20 strategies to prevent WMSDs in the dental operatory are discussed.

  8. DEALING WITH DENTAL IMPLANT FAILURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them. PMID:19089213

  9. Dealing with dental implant failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options.When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  10. Dental management of special needs patients who have epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2009-04-01

    Patients who have developmental disabilities and epilepsy can be safely treated in a general dental practice. A thorough medical history should be taken and updated at every visit. A good oral examination to uncover any dental problems and possible side effects from antiepileptic drugs is necessary. Stability of the seizure disorder must be taken into account when planning dental treatment. Specific considerations for epileptic patients include the treatment of oral soft tissue side effects of medications and damage to the hard and soft tissue of the orofacial region secondary to seizure trauma. Most patients who have epilepsy can and should receive functionally and esthetically adequate dental care.

  11. Predictive modeling of dental pain using neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Yeob; Lim, Kun Ok; Rhee, Hyun Sill

    2009-01-01

    The mouth is a part of the body for ingesting food that is the most basic foundation and important part. The dental pain predicted by the neural network model. As a result of making a predictive modeling, the fitness of the predictive modeling of dental pain factors was 80.0%. As for the people who are likely to experience dental pain predicted by the neural network model, preventive measures including proper eating habits, education on oral hygiene, and stress release must precede any dental treatment.

  12. Comparative Clinical Study of Conventional Dental Implants and Mini Dental Implants for Mandibular Overdentures: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunmeungtong, Weerapan; Kumchai, Thongnard; Strietzel, Frank P; Reichart, Peter A; Khongkhunthian, Pathawee

    2017-04-01

    Dental implant-retained overdentures have been chosen as the treatment of choice for complete mandibular removable dentures. Dental implants, such as mini dental implants, and components for retaining overdentures, are commercially available. However, comparative clinical studies comparing mini dental implants and conventional dental implants using different attachment for implant-retained overdentures have not been well documented. To compare the clinical outcomes of using two mini dental implants with Equator(®) attachments, four mini dental implants with Equator attachments, or two conventional dental implants with ball attachments, by means of a randomized clinical trial. Sixty patients received implant-retained mandibular overdentures in the interforaminal region. The patients were divided into three groups. In Groups 1 and 2, two and four mini dental implants, respectively, were placed and immediately loaded by overdentures, using Equator(®) attachments. In Group 3, conventional implants were placed. After osseointegration, the implants were loaded by overdentures, using ball attachments. The study distribution was randomized and double-blinded. Outcome measures included changes in radiological peri-implant bone level from surgery to 12 months postinsertion, prosthodontic complications and patient satisfaction. The cumulative survival rate in the three clinical groups after one year was 100%. There was no significant difference (p dental implants with Equator attachments. However, there was a significant difference in marginal bone loss and patient satisfaction between those receiving mini dental implants with Equator attachments and conventional dental implants with ball attachments. The marginal bone resorption in Group 3 was significantly higher than in Groups 1 and 2 (p dental implants can be immediately used successfully for retaining lower complete dentures, as shown after a 1-year follow up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Laura S; Dobney, Keith; Cooper, Alan

    2015-02-01

    Dental calculus (calcified tartar or plaque) is today widespread on modern human teeth around the world. A combination of soft starchy foods, changing acidity of the oral environment, genetic pre-disposition, and the absence of dental hygiene all lead to the build-up of microorganisms and food debris on the tooth crown, which eventually calcifies through a complex process of mineralisation. Millions of oral microbes are trapped and preserved within this mineralised matrix, including pathogens associated with the oral cavity and airways, masticated food debris, and other types of extraneous particles that enter the mouth. As a result, archaeologists and anthropologists are increasingly using ancient human dental calculus to explore broad aspects of past human diet and health. Most recently, high-throughput DNA sequencing of ancient dental calculus has provided valuable insights into the evolution of the oral microbiome and shed new light on the impacts of some of the major biocultural transitions on human health throughout history and prehistory. Here, we provide a brief historical overview of archaeological dental calculus research, and discuss the current approaches to ancient DNA sampling and sequencing. Novel applications of ancient DNA from dental calculus are discussed, highlighting the considerable scope of this new research field for evolutionary biology and modern medicine.

  14. Forensic odontology, Part 1. Dental identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, J

    2011-03-12

    This series is based upon fact, experience, and some personal views of the author and gives a brief glimpse of forensic odontological issues with regard to the identification of human remains (to include mass fatality incidents), biting injuries and child abuse. The aim of the first paper is to give the reader greater understanding of the role of the forensic odontologist in the identification of human remains, and emphasise the importance of keeping good quality, accurate and comprehensive dental records. Identification of the deceased greatly assists families and friends at this difficult time, as well as aiding law enforcement agencies; getting it wrong is devastating to families and unacceptable. The dental identification process must be carefully undertaken and relies upon the comparison of information from the antemortem record with findings from the postmortem examination, and the efficiency of this process is dependent on the quality and availability of the dental record. As dental team members it is our responsibility to keep and maintain accurate records of our patients. The resilience of the dental structures to postmortem assault, denture labelling, and teeth as a source of DNA, all contribute to making identification successful. Dental identification is widely used, not only in the single fatality situation, but also in mass fatality incidents and cases of missing persons.

  15. Is water in dental units microbiologically safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Michałkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water supplied to the dental units must be of sufficient quality. The article presents the results of the microbiological analysis of cold municipal water which flows into a patient’s disposable mouthwash cup, and demineralized water which flows through a waterline into the tool panel of a dental unit from the tank placed in the water group. Material and Methods: In order to assess the degree of purity (impurities of water used in dental units, 2 series of microbiological tests were carried out in 6 dental surgeries from April to June, 2013. The water samples for microbiological testing were collected into sterile microbiological bottles in accordance with the current methodology. The water for the tests was collected from a sterile cup-filling tap (municipal water and from an air/water syringe (demineralized water. The bacteria were cultured according to the Polish Standards – PN-EN ISO 6222, PN-EN ISO 9308-1, and PN-EN ISO 16266. Results: In the tested samples of water numerous psychrophilic bacteria (max 29 100 CFU/ml and mesophilic bacteria (max 24 700 CFU/ml, including single coliforms, were found. Conclusions: The results show that water delivered to a dental unit should be periodically tested bacteriologically and in terms of physical and chemical properties. Water systems of dental units should also be periodically disinfected to eliminate bacteria and biofilm. Med Pr 2015;66(6:763–770

  16. Pervasive Healthcare as a Scientific Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2008-01-01

    . Methods: The paper presents the research questions, approach, technologies, and methods of pervasive healthcare and discusses these in comparison to those of other related scientific disciplines. Results: A set of central research themes are presented; monitoring and body sensor networks; pervasive......-aware technologies for hospitals. Both projects approach the healthcare challenges in a new way, apply a new type of research method, and come up with new kinds of technological solutions. ‘Clinical proof-of-concept’ is recommended as a new method for pervasive healthcare research; the method helps design and test......, designs new types of technologies, and applies a new kind of research method. Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  17. Nursing: the ontology of the discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, P G

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to contribute to clarifying the ontology of the discipline by extending existing meanings of the term nursing to propose a substantive definition. In this definition, nursing is viewed as an inherent human process of well-being, manifested by complexity and integration in human systems. The nature of this process and theoretical implications of the new nursing are presented. Nurses are invited to continue the dialogue about the meaning of the term and explore the implications of nursing, substantively defined, for their practice and science.

  18. Entrepreneurship and the Discipline of External Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nanda, Ramana

    I confirm the finding that the propensity to start a new firm rises sharply among those in the top five per­centiles of personal wealth. This pattern is more pronounced for entrants in less capital intensive sectors. Prior to entry, founders in this group earn about 6% less compared to those who ......, these findings suggest that the spike in entry at the top end of the wealth distribution is driven by low-ability individuals who can afford to start (and sometimes continue running) weaker firms because they do not face the discipline of external finance....

  19. Chemoinformatics-an important scientific discipline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johann Gasteiger

    2005-01-01

    Chemoinformatics is the application of informatics methods to solve chemical problems. Although this term was introduced only a few years ago, this field has a long history with its roots going back more than 40 years. These different origins have now merged into a discipline of its own that is full of activities. All areas of chemistry from analytical chemistry to drug design can benefit from chemoinformatics methods. And there are still many challenging chemical problems waiting for solutions through the further development of chemoinformatics.

  20. Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Richard John

    2016-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the University of Manchester by Richard Macey for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy entitled “Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists”, February 2016.Many adult patients that attend NHS dental practices on a regular basis are asymptomatic and do not need any further treatment other than a routine dental examination (“check-up”). As the oral health of the adult population is predicted to improve further, using the General Dental Practitioner to und...

  1. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth"…

  2. Preparing dental students for careers as independent dental professionals: clinical audit and community-based clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Llewelyn, J; Ash, P J; Chadwick, B L

    2011-05-28

    Community-based clinical teaching programmes are now an established feature of most UK dental school training programmes. Appropriately implemented, they enhance the educational achievements and competences achieved by dental students within the earlier part of their developing careers, while helping students to traverse the often-difficult transition between dental school and vocational/foundation training and independent practice. Dental school programmes have often been criticised for 'lagging behind' developments in general dental practice - an important example being the so-called 'business of dentistry', including clinical audit. As readers will be aware, clinical audit is an essential component of UK dental practice, with the aims of improving the quality of clinical care and optimising patient safety. The aim of this paper is to highlight how training in clinical audit has been successfully embedded in the community-based clinical teaching programme at Cardiff.

  3. Water quality in water lines of dental units in the public dental health service in Göteborg, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Alenäs-Jarl, Elna; Hjort, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Presence of bacteria in high levels in the water lines of dental units is well known. The extent of this problem is however less well studied.This study was conducted to evaluate the water quality of all dental units within the Public Dental Health Service (Folktandvården, FTV) of the city of Göteborg, Sweden. 405 dental units in 35 clinics were tested.The evaluation included both "fast growing" (2 days incubation) and "slow growing" (7 days incubation) bacteria in 50 ml water sample from the units. The presence of potential pathogens, e.g., coliforms, Pseudomonas spp and Legionella pneumophila were also examined. Of the 405 dental units, 303 (75%) did not have acceptable (desinfection of all units of the Public Dental Health Service is needed.

  4. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  5. Anodized dental implant surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Muktadar Anand; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  6. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Della Bona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different substrates, which has offered a great challenge to dental zirconia research and development. This study characterizes zirconia as a dental biomaterial, presenting the current consensus and challenges to its dental applications.

  7. Dental pain, socioeconomic status, and dental caries in young male adults from southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos João Luiz Dornelles

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess dental pain prevalence and its association with dental caries and socioeconomic status in 18-year-old males from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a random sample (n = 414 selected from the Brazilian Army conscription list in 2003. Dental pain during the 12 months prior to the interview was recorded as the outcome. Socioeconomic data were obtained through a questionnaire. Dental caries experience was registered according to the DMFT Index. Analyses included simple and multiple non-conditional logistic regression following a hierarchical approach. Response rate was 95.6%. High rates of inter-examiner agreement were achieved (kappa > 0.83. Dental pain prevalence was 21.2% (95%CI: 17.3-25.1. After adjustment, individuals with one or more untreated caries were 3.2 times more likely (95%CI: 1.7-5.8 to have dental pain compared to caries-free subjects. Conscripts with low family income were 1.8 times more likely (95%CI: 1.0-3.3 to have dental pain than those with higher income.

  8. Dental pain, socioeconomic status, and dental caries in young male adults from southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luiz Dornelles Bastos

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess dental pain prevalence and its association with dental caries and socioeconomic status in 18-year-old males from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a random sample (n = 414 selected from the Brazilian Army conscription list in 2003. Dental pain during the 12 months prior to the interview was recorded as the outcome. Socioeconomic data were obtained through a questionnaire. Dental caries experience was registered according to the DMFT Index. Analyses included simple and multiple non-conditional logistic regression following a hierarchical approach. Response rate was 95.6%. High rates of inter-examiner agreement were achieved (kappa > 0.83. Dental pain prevalence was 21.2% (95%CI: 17.3-25.1. After adjustment, individuals with one or more untreated caries were 3.2 times more likely (95%CI: 1.7-5.8 to have dental pain compared to caries-free subjects. Conscripts with low family income were 1.8 times more likely (95%CI: 1.0-3.3 to have dental pain than those with higher income.

  9. Risk factors and prevalence of dental fluorosis and dental caries in school children of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaka, Kavita; Ravindra, Khaiwal; Mor, Suman; Gauba, Krishan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of dental fluorosis, dental caries, and associated risk factors in the school children of district Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab, India, using a cross-sectional study design. Oral health status of children aged between 8 and 15 years was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 criteria. Dental fluorosis was assessed using Dean's index, and dental caries were recorded using decayed, missing, filled/decayed, extracted, filled (DMF/def) indices. Four hundred school children were examined, of which 207 were in the 8-11-year-old group and 193 were in the 12-15-year-old group. The overall prevalence of dental fluorosis was 4.1%, which might be linked to a high concentration of fluoride in drinking water at certain locations of rural Punjab. The prevalence of dental caries was 36.5% with a mean DMF score of 0.3 and def score of 0.6. Risk factors for dental caries include oral hygiene behavior and sugar consumption patterns. The study highlights the need to increase awareness about the oral health and hygiene among the school children in India.

  10. Methods used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) dentists to diagnose dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Snyder, John; Sanderson, James L; Anderson, Mary; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To (1) identify the methods that dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) use to diagnose dental caries; (2) quantify their frequency of use; and (3) test the hypothesis that certain dentist and dental practice characteristics are significantly associated with their use. Methods A questionnaire about methods used for caries diagnosis was sent to DPBRN dentists who reported doing at least some restorative dentistry; 522 dentists participated. Questions included use of dental radiographs, dental explorer, laser fluorescence, air-drying, fiber optic devices, and magnification, as used when diagnosing primary, secondary/recurrent, or non-specific caries lesions. Variations on the frequency of their use were tested using multivariate analysis and Bonferroni tests. Results Overall, the dental explorer was the instrument most commonly used to detect primary occlusal caries as well as to detect caries at the margins of existing restorations. In contrast, laser fluorescence was rarely used to help diagnose occlusal primary caries. For proximal caries, radiographs were used to help diagnose 75-100% of lesions by 96% of the DPBRN dentists. Dentists who use radiographs most often to assess proximal surfaces of posterior teeth, were significantly more likely to also report providing a higher percentage of patients with individualized caries prevention (p = .040) and seeing a higher percentage of pediatric patients (p = .001). Conclusion Use of specific diagnostic methods varied substantially. The dental explorer and radiographs are still the most commonly used diagnostic methods. PMID:21488724

  11. Multidisciplinarity, interdisciplinarity, and transdisciplinarity in health research, services, education and policy: 3. Discipline, inter-discipline distance, and selection of discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bernard C K; Pak, Anita W P

    2008-01-01

    Multiple disciplinary efforts are increasingly encouraged in health research, services, education and policy. This paper is the third in a series. The first discussed the definitions, objectives, and evidence of effectiveness of multiple disciplinary teamwork. The second examined the promoters, barriers, and ways to enhance such teamwork. This paper addresses the questions of discipline, inter-discipline distance, and where to look for multiple disciplinary collaboration. This paper proposes a conceptual framework of the knowledge universe, based on a review of a number of key papers on the Global Brain. These key papers were identified during a literature review on multiple disciplinary teamwork, using Google and MEDLINE (1982-2007) searches. A discipline is held together by a shared epistemology. In general, disciplines that are more disparate from one another epistemologically are more likely to achieve new insight for a complex problem. The proposed conceptual framework of the knowledge universe consists of several knowledge subsystems, each containing a number of disciplines. The inter-discipline distance can guide us to select appropriate disciplines for a multiple disciplinary team. If multiple disciplinarity is called for, the proposed view of the knowledge universe as a series of knowledge subsystems and disciplines, and the place of health sciences in the knowledge universe, will help researchers, practitioners, and policy makers to identify disciplines for multiple disciplinary efforts.

  12. Human rights values or cultural values? Pursuing values to maintain positive discipline in multicultural schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro du Preez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions on discipline in education often accentuate corporal punishment or measures to infuse moral fibre. In addition, many authors argue that inculcating a particular value system can promote discipline in schools. This could however be profoundly problematic in the light of the Constitution. We argue that positive discipline in multicultural school environments needs to be based in part on human rights values that are neither solely universally interpreted nor particularistically interpreted. We report on the data generated at a research workshop held as the final dissemination process of a four-year international research project entitled "Understanding human rights through different belief systems: intercultural and interreligious dialogue". Dialogue was chosen as a form of data gathering since it is more spontaneous than conventional questioning techniques and can thus generate more naturally occurring data to strengthen the outcomes of the project. It appears that some teachers believe discipline can only be maintained through the elevation of cultural values (particularism. We argue that schools should start negotiating, at the most basic level, the values, including emancipatory, human rights values, and cultural values, which could underpin positive discipline in multicultural schools. Drawing solely on cultural values is not only unlikely to solve the problem of discipline, but could also undermine the efforts to transform our diverse, democratic society.

  13. Vulnerable Decision Points for Disproportionate Office Discipline Referrals: Comparisons of Discipline for African American and White Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolkowski, Keith; Girvan, Erik J.; McIntosh, Kent; Nese, Rhonda N. T.; Horner, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Racial disparities in rates of exclusionary school discipline are well documented and seemingly intractable. However, emerging theories on implicit bias show promise in identifying effective interventions. In this study, we used school discipline data from 1,666 elementary schools and 483,686 office discipline referrals to identify specific…

  14. Police organizational stress: the impact of negative discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violanti, John M

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that the police organization is considered a difficult work stressor by officers. Of stress factors stemming from the police organization, excessive or unfair discipline rates high among rank and file officers. The police organization may be considered a punishment centered bureaucracy, where emphasis is placed on what is wrong and not on proper or laudatory behavior Although discipline is essential in critical occupations such as police work, it is important that such discipline be properly administered in order to avoid stress and feelings of organizational abandonment. This paper provides a general overview of present police organizational discipline prescriptions, and an example of an alternative positive-based discipline program.

  15. Embedded Systems Education for Multiple Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H.E. Mousa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study described the process and experience of designing and developing an embedded systems first course that serves different disciplines at the University of Jordan together with its associated laboratory. The course serves three different departments with varying requirements and varying student initial background. The stages of the design process of the course and associated labs are explored. Emphasis is given throughout to the notion of systems design without losing track of the details involved in the design process. The design methodology used for the laboratory facilities and the learning outcomes are explored. Approach: The methodology followed in the design process was based on defining clear objectives taking into consideration the different backgrounds of students and departmental requirements. This was followed by defining the course content, designing the lab facilities and choosing the right hardware and software tools. We followed the Demonstrate, Work-to-Know and Design methodology for lab design Results: The course had been running successfully for several years now. Successful innovative projects undertaken by students and their results are reported. Due to its success, numerous senior capstone projects in many departments are now based on embedded systems ideas and notions. Conclusion: Embedded system teaching for multiple disciplines requires diligence and clear understanding of the varying requirements and backgrounds of students. Careful consideration should be given to the objectives, choice of tools and the timeline of the course and associated labs. Projects that tie the concepts together are very important for the success of the course.

  16. Ophthalmologic findings in contact sport disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrione, Paolo; Quaranta, Federico; DE Luca, Valeria; Sperandii, Fabio; Ciminelli, Emanuela; Cantera, Emilia; Fagnani, Federica; Pigozzi, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence and the incidence of ocular complications in contact sport disciplines in a large population of professional and amateur athletes over a period of 3 years. We performed a retrospective review of 694 medical records from athletes examinated from 2008 to 2011. The following data were collected during the routine visit for agonistic sports eligibility: medical history, age, weight, years of sport practice, approximate number of matches, head and eyes injuries during and beyond of the match and a through ocular history. All athletes underwent a detailed ophthalmological evaluation. The follow-up of each athlete was carried out during the following routine visit for agonistic sports eligibility. Most common disorders observed were: peripheral retinal degeneration, blepharitis, conjunctival and corneal diseases with a prevalence of 7%, 4%, 7% and 4% respectively. It was observed a positive correlation between peripheral retinal degeneration and age in amateur male boxers. Moreover, we noticed an incidence of 6% of laser therapeutic treatments as a result of retinal holes or degenerations, during the follow-up. Contact sport disciplines did not result in higher prevalence of severe ocular lesion. Both conjuntival diseases and peripheral retinal degenerations represented the ophthalmologic disorders with the higher prevalence in our sample. In particular, peripheral retinal degeneration is remarkable because of the increased risk of retinal detachment. Dyschromatopsie, even if quite rare, should be considered when analysing the reception of shots, since gloves in most cases are either red or blue.

  17. Dossier 'Cultural management, a new discipline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glòria Munilla

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, neither universities nor the other training centres have considered cultural management to be a free-standing area of knowledge, seeing it instead to be dependent on other areas classically accepted by the scientific and education community.In this dossier, three researchers and professionals bring us into closer contact with the world of cultural management in terms of their different areas of professional activity and their corresponding different perspectives: cultural management in public institutions and their approach to the university world; the impact that two institutions and their management model, Barcelona's Contemporary Art Museum (MACBA and Barcelona's Contemporary Culture Centre (CCCB, can have on a city and a neighbourhood, and how this new discipline is seen in terms of the day-to-day of managing events of international scope. All three, Alba Colombo, Joaquim Rius and Laura Solanilla, are united in their passion for this discipline; likewise, all three of them, show exactly the extent to which interdisciplinary training is vital for this 'new' (or not so new cultural profession.

  18. Comprehensive Cross-Training among STEM Disciplines in Geothermal Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, J. A.; Dutrow, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    One of the foremost areas of sustainability is society's need for energy. The US uses more energy per capita than any other country in the world with most of this energy coming from fossil fuels. With its link to climate change coupled with declining resources, renewable alternatives are being pursued. Given the high demand for energy, it is not a question of if these alternatives will be utilized but when and where. One of the "greenest" of the green technologies is geothermal energy. It is a renewable resource with a small environmental footprint. To educate advanced undergraduate and graduate students from across STEM disciplines in geothermal energy, a series of three distinct but linked and related courses are being developed and taught. Courses are focused on one of the STEM disciplines to provide students with essential discipline-specific knowledge and taught by different faculty members in the departments of geology, petroleum engineering and mathematics. These courses provide the foundation necessary for interdisciplinary research projects. The first course on Geologic Properties and Processes of Geothermal Energy was developed and taught in 2012. The class had an enrollment of 27 students including: 5 undergraduates and 4 graduate students in Geology, 12 undergraduates and two graduate students in Petroleum Engineering, and 4 non-matriculated undergraduate students. The course began with the essentials of heat and mass transfer, a common deficiency for all students, then progressed to the geologic materials of these systems: minerals, rocks and fluids. To provide students with first hand experience, two short research projects were embedded into the course. The first project involved analyses of cuttings from a well-studied geothermal system (Salton Sea, CA). Students were in teams consisting of both engineers and geologists. The first assignment was to identify minerals in the cuttings. They were then provided with XRD patterns for their cuttings to

  19. Evidence-based practice and the professionalization of dental hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobban, Sandra J

    2004-11-01

    The application of knowledge is fundamental to human problem solving. In health disciplines, knowledge utilization commonly manifests through evidence-based decision making in practice. The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of the evidence-based practice (EBP) movement in health professions in general, and dental hygiene in particular, and to examine its relationship to the professionalization agenda of dental hygiene in Canada. EBP means integrating practitioner expertise with the best available external evidence from research. Proponents of EBP believe that it holds promise for reducing a research-practice gap by encouraging clinicians to seek current research results. Both the Canadian and American Dental Hygienists Associations support practice based on current research evidence, yet recent studies show variation in practice. Professionalization refers to the developmental stages through which an organized occupation passes as it develops traits that characterize it as a profession. The status conferred by professionalization privileges a group to make and monitor its own decisions relative to practice. Dental hygiene's success in acquiring attributes of a profession suggests that transformation to a profession is occurring. This paper compares the assumptions and challenges of both movements, and argues the need for a principal focus on the development of a culture of evidence-based dental hygiene practice.

  20. Critical Thinking Skills of United States Dental Hygiene Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notgarnie, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of decision-making in dental hygienists' practice requires critical thinking skills. Interest in raising educational standards for entry into the dental hygiene profession is a response to the demand for enhanced professional skills, including critical thinking skills. No studies found in the course of literature review compared…

  1. Critical Thinking Skills of United States Dental Hygiene Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notgarnie, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of decision-making in dental hygienists' practice requires critical thinking skills. Interest in raising educational standards for entry into the dental hygiene profession is a response to the demand for enhanced professional skills, including critical thinking skills. No studies found in the course of literature review compared…

  2. Achondroplasia: Craniofacial manifestations and considerations in dental management

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Saleem,Afnan; Al-Jobair, Asma

    2010-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia dwarfism that manifests with stunted stature and disproportionate limb shortening. Achondroplasia is of dental interest because of its characteristic craniofacial features which include relative macrocephaly, depressed nasal bridge and maxillary hypoplasia. Presence of large head, implanted shunt, airway obstruction and difficulty in head control require special precautions during dental management. Craniofacial manifestations and c...

  3. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  4. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  5. The history of dental hygiene in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nancy K

    2011-01-01

    This historical narrative highlights the origin and development of the dental hygiene profession in South Korea. The legacy of early American missionaries to Korea includes profound and long-lasting contributions in medicine, education and theology. Many of Korea's top universities today have their roots in the missionary schools of the late nineteenth century, including Yonsei University, home of the first dental hygiene program in Korea. From Yonsei in Seoul, the dental hygiene profession spread throughout the country, includingtheAmerican missionary-based program in Kwangju in 1977. Contributions included clinical and didactic education, as well as professional leadership and development. American dental missionaries developed the profession of dental hygiene in Korea, and provided guidance to Korean dentists and hygienists for its growth and expansion.

  6. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  7. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  8. Feline dental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P; Williams, C A

    1986-09-01

    Periodontal disease and chronic gingivitis/stomatitis are the most common feline dental diseases. With routine dental care and increased emphasis on home oral hygiene, these diseases can be controlled. Cats can be seen with a number of other dental disorders, and improved treatment methods such as restorations of early subgingival resorptive lesions, endodontic therapy, and orthodontic therapy can be performed successfully. More study and research are necessary about the gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and subgingival resorptive lesions so that improved prevention and treatment recommendations can be made.

  9. Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment and Job Satisfaction at a Southeastern University, College of Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the American Dental Education Association 2007 Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment survey at A Southeastern University, College of Dentistry. The study examined dental faculty perceptions of academic workplace variables including culture and environment, as well as professional development…

  10. Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment and Job Satisfaction at a Southeastern University, College of Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the American Dental Education Association 2007 Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment survey at A Southeastern University, College of Dentistry. The study examined dental faculty perceptions of academic workplace variables including culture and environment, as well as professional development…

  11. 21 CFR 101.80 - Health claims: dietary noncariogenic carbohydrate sweeteners and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... development of dental caries. Risk factors include tooth enamel crystal structure and mineral content, plaque... sweeteners and dental caries. 101.80 Section 101.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Requirements for Health Claims § 101.80 Health claims: dietary noncariogenic carbohydrate sweeteners and dental...

  12. Dental visits may prevent penumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Several sources are reporting on a paper presented at IDWeek that showed people with a regular dental checkup had half the incidence of bacterial pneumonia (1. Michelle Doll and colleagues used the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS data from 2013. The researchers were able to assess participants' access to dental care and used ICD-9 codes to look for bacterial pneumonia in the previous year. The survey had data on 26,687 people, including 441 who had an episode of bacterial pneumonia. Thirty-four percent of those who developed pneumonia reported having at least two dental checkups a year, compared with 46% of those who did not. It is important to point out that this is an observational study and there were significant differences between those who developed and did not develop bacterial pneumonia. Those who got pneumonia were: more likely to be white and older, with an average age of 47 versus ...

  13. Improving teamwork between students from two professional programmes in dental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisnert, L; Karlsson, M; Franklin, I; Lindh, L; Wretlind, K

    2012-01-01

    In Sweden, the National Board of Health and Welfare forecasts a decrease in dentists with 26% and an increase in dental hygienists with 47% until the year of 2023. This, together with changes in both epidemiology, especially of dental caries, and political priorities, calls for an effective and well-developed cooperation between dentists and dental hygienists in future dentistry. Hence, the aim of this project was to investigate whether highlighting teamwork during the undergraduate studies of dental students and dental hygiene students could improve the students’ holistic view on patients as well as their knowledge of and insight into each other’s future professions. Thirty-four dental students and 24 dental hygiene students participated in the study. At the beginning of their final year in undergraduate education, a questionnaire testing the level of knowledge of the dental hygienists’ clinical competences was completed by both groups of students. In addition, activities intending to improve teamwork quality included the following: (i) a seminar with a dentist representing the Public Dental Health Services in Sweden, (ii) dental students as supervisors for dental hygiene students, (iii) planning and treatment for shared patients and (iv) students’ presentations of the treatments and their outcomes at a final seminar. The project was ended by the students answering the above-mentioned questionnaire for the second time, followed by an evaluation of the different activities included in the study. The knowledge of dental hygienists’ competences showed higher scores in almost all questions. Both groups of students considered the following aspects important: seminars with external participants, dental students acting as supervisors and planning and treating shared patients. By initiating and encouraging teamwork between dental students and dental hygiene students, it is possible to increase knowledge on dental hygienists’ competence and also to develop and

  14. Oral breathing and dental malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, A M; Albani, F; Ntrekou, P; Rugiano, A; Duse, M; Mattei, A; Marzo, G

    2009-06-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate existing correlations between oral breathing and dental malocclusions. The study was conducted on a paediatric group of 71 oral breathers selected at the Allergology and Paediatric Immunology Department of Umberto I General Hospital, University of Rome "La Sapienza" (Italy). The children were selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. Children aged 6 to 12 years with no history of craniofacial malformations or orthodontic treatment were included. The results were compared with a control group composed of 71 patient aged 6 to 12 years with nasal breathing. After their medical history was recorded, all patients underwent orthodontic/otolaryngological clinical examinations. The following diagnostic procedures were then performed: latero-lateral projection teleradiography, orthopantomogram, dental impressions, anterior rhinomanometry before and after administering a local vasoconstrictor, nocturnal home pulse oximetry (NHPO) recording, spirometry test, skin prick test, study cast evaluation and cephalometric analysis following Tweed's principles. The intraoral examination assessed: dental class type, overbite, overjet, midlines, crossbite, and presence of parafunctional oral habits such as atypical swallowing, labial incompetence, finger sucking and sucking of the inner lip. Evaluation of the study casts involved arch perimeter and transpalatal width assessment, and space analysis. The results showed a strong correlation between oral breathing and malocclusions, which manifests itself with both dentoskeletal and functional alterations, leading to a dysfunctional malocclusive pattern. According to the authors' results, dysfunctional malocclusive pattern makes it clear that the association between oral breathing and dental malocclusions represents a self-perpetuating vicious circle in which it is difficult to establish if the primary alteration is respiratory or maxillofacial. Regardless, the problem needs to be addressed and

  15. An Annotated List of Disciplines and Sub-Disciplines in the Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Brandon

    2008-01-01

    Biology has become a large and diversified science. Current biological research areas transgress academic and professional boundaries to such a degree that the biological sciences could arguably be referred to as "all encompassing." In this article, the author describes how he compiled information on currently recognised disciplines and…

  16. Federal Policy Recommendations to Promote Fair and Effective School Discipline. NEPC Discipline Resource Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losen, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation is an important lever for improving the equity and efficacy of school, district, and state discipline policies. Legislation should ensure that all students are treated fairly, regardless of race, gender, or class. This paper presents three recommendations for changing federal legislation to accomplish this goal. These…

  17. Mathematics and Other Disciplines: The Impact of Modern Mathematics in Other Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanja, Verdiana Grace

    The impact of modern mathematics and its application in other disciplines is presented from the 20th century historical perspective. In the 1930s to 1970s, mathematics became more inward looking, and the distinction between pure and applied mathematics became much more pronounced. In the 1970s, there was a return to more classical topics but on a…

  18. Assessing Interdisciplinary Education in U.S. Dental Hygiene Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Lorie; Bray, Kimberly; Mayberry, Bill; Overman, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 136 of 216 dental hygiene programs indicated that 31% included interdisciplinary activities in the curriculum; only 15% included both clinical and instructional interdisciplinary coursework. However, 74% felt that students would benefit from interdisciplinary experiences. (SK)

  19. Clinical evaluation of nonsyndromic dental anomalies in Dravidian population: A cluster sample analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamunadevi, Andamuthu; Selvamani, M.; Vinitha, V.; Srivandhana, R.; Balakrithiga, M.; Prabhu, S; Ganapathy, N

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To record the prevalence rate of dental anomalies in Dravidian population and analyze the percentage of individual anomalies in the population. Methodology: A cluster sample analysis was done, where 244 subjects studying in a dental institution were all included and analyzed for occurrence of dental anomalies by clinical examination, excluding third molars from analysis. Results: 31.55% of the study subjects had dental anomalies and shape anomalies were more prevalent (22.1%), followed b...

  20. Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source (DOSS): a collection for dental research and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swogger, Susan E; Samsky, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source from EBSCO Information Services provides indexing and full-text access to an extensive selection of dental journal literature, as well some full-text dental monographs. As stated by EBSCO, titles are chosen from those commonly held in dental school libraries. The database aims to support practitioners, researchers, and advanced dental education. This column includes sample searches from Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source as well as a discussion of its special content and features.

  1. Mozart effect on dental anxiety in 6–12 year old children

    OpenAIRE

    Arlette Suzy Setiawan; Hilnia Zidnia; Inne Suherna Sasmita

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children anxiety in dental treatment often becomes a barrier for dentist to perform optimum dental treatment procedure. Various methods to manage anxiety and fear in children have been applied including listening to classical music during dental treatment. One of the classical music usually used is music by Mozart. Purpose: This study is aimed to discover the role of classical music by Mozart in dental anxiety changes. Method: This study was a quasi experimental study using purpos...

  2. Assessing Cultural Competence among Florida's Allied Dental Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cyndi W; Su, Yu; Feng, Xiaoying; Catalanotto, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation requires that dental, dental hygiene and dental assisting schools offer educational experiences to ensure that prospective dental health care providers become culturally competent, socially responsible practitioners. To assert that these mandates are met requires that the faculty are knowledgeable and capable of providing this type of training. Currently, little is known about the cultural competence of the state of Florida allied dental faculty. The purpose of this study was to assess the cultural competence among the dental hygiene and dental assistant faculty in the state of Florida. One hundred ninety-three faculty were invited to take the Knowledge, Efficacy and Practices Instrument (KEPI), a validated measure of cultural competence. Respondents included 77 (74%) full-time and 27 (26%) part-time faculty. Data were analyzed descriptively and reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) were computed. Mean scores and internal estimates of reliability on the KEPI subscales were: knowledge of diversity 3.3 (ɑ=0.88), culture-centered practice 3.6 (ɑ=0.88) and efficacy of assessment 2.9 (ɑ=0.74). The participant's score of 3.6 on the culture-centered practice exceeds scores among dental students and faculty who participated in previous studies suggesting the allied dental faculty have a greater awareness of sociocultural and linguistically diverse dental patients' oral health needs. Participants' score on knowledge of diversity subscales suggests a need for moderate training, while their score on the efficacy of assessment subscale indicates a need for more intense training. Assessing faculty beliefs, knowledge and skills about cultural competency is critically important in ensuring that accreditation standards are being met and represents one step in the process of ensuring that faculty demonstrate the type of sensitivity and responsiveness, which characterizes behaviors associated with cultural competence. Copyright © 2016 The

  3. The discourse of dental hygiene practice in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, L; Sunell, S; Wickstrom, P

    2003-02-01

    Recently the discourse in Canada relating to dental hygiene practice has changed. While dentistry still exercises controlling power over the public's oral cavity, dental hygienists have made inroads through legislative changes. A description of Canadian dental hygiene practice is provided to set the stage for a discussion about current discourse in the dental hygiene profession. Although power is often perceived as a shifting changing set of relations, these can be frozen in abstraction. It is rather like taking a photo of a single moment or event in an ongoing activity. This moment provides a starting point, an event that can be analysed. Four such events are evident in Canadian dental hygiene practice; they include, education, recognition of dental hygienists as primary care providers, the culture of dental hygiene and self-regulation. While all the events are important, self-regulation is critical to the viability and development of the profession. It is the central event that provides the backdrop for effecting change. With self-regulation comes responsibility and accountability for professional actions. It also provides possibilities for changing the discourse in oral care. As oral health care discourse is transformed through legislation and public awareness, the public will, hopefully, be able to directly access dental hygiene services, and dental hygienists themselves might increasingly recognise their importance as contributors in the health care system.

  4. Salivary cortisol, salivary alpha amylase, and the dental anxiety scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Hana; Finkelman, Matthew; Rosenberg, Morton

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between dental anxiety, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase (sAA) levels. Furthermore, the aim was to look into individual differences such as age, race, gender, any existing pain, or traumatic dental experience and their effect on dental anxiety. This study followed a cross-sectional design and included a convenience sample of 46. Every patient was asked to complete the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and a basic demographic/dental history questionnaire. A saliva sample, utilizing the method of passive drooling, was then collected in 2-mL cryovials. Samples were analyzed for salivary cortisol and sAA levels by Salimetrics. Significant associations were observed between DAS scores and presence of pain and history of traumatic dental experience. However, no significant correlations were observed between DAS, cortisol, and sAA levels. Our study reconfirms that dental anxiety is associated with presence of pain and a history of traumatic dental experience. On the other hand, our study was the first to our knowledge to test the correlation between the DAS and sAA; nevertheless, our results failed to show any significant correlation between dental anxiety, cortisol, and sAA levels.

  5. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... should include: X-radiation production and scatter; X-ray beam quality and quantity; factors influencing... EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR AND THE CREDENTIALING OF RADIOLOGIC PERSONNEL Pt. 75, App. C Appendix C to Part 75... educational program in dental assisting. Such dental assisting education programs may be accredited by an...

  6. [Feasibility analysis on the discipline of acupuncture-moxibustion and Tuina to be the top-grade discipline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-Chun

    2012-10-01

    By reviewing the historical evolution of the major catalogue adjustment of the discipline of acupuncture-moxibustion and Tuina for the graduate students, the current situation of the development of the discipline of acupuncture-moxibustion and Tuina is analyzed deeply in this paper. Based on the basic requirements of the setup and the adjustment of the top-grade discipline in the Discipline Catalogue Setup and Administrative Measures for the Academic Degree Award and Personnel Training (Academic Degree [2009] No. 10 Document) issued by the Academic Degree Committee of the State Council and the Ministry of Education, with the strictly analysis, the author proposed that the discipline of acupuncture-moxibustion and Tuina should be set up to be the top-grade discipline. The author stated that the discipline of acupuncture-moxibustion and Tuina possessed the explicit study object and had many assignable second-grade disciplines. It could be acknowledged extensively in the academic field in terms of the setup of the top-grade discipline. The author expounded adequately the necessity of the stable and urgent requirements for the talents of the discipline of acupuncture-moxibustion and Tuina in the society, which provided the reference evidences for the adjustments of the discipline and major catalogue in the future.

  7. Identification of Disciplines and Fields. Edis Task I Report, Work Unit 1.4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard Research Co., Arlington, VA.

    This report presents the identification and definitions of subject oriented engineering and scientific disciplines and fields which are included in the EDIS Subject Categories. The discussion is extended to include the mix of subjects with other orientations, such as Item, Mission-Project, Expertise and Data Bank Categories. Sample queries are…

  8. Publications of the Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program, Neuroscience Discipline: 1980-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Katherine J.; Wallace-Robinson, Janice; Powers, Janet V.; Hess, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    A 10-year cumulative bibliography of publications resulting from research supported by the neuroscience discipline of the space physiology and countermeasures program of NASA's Life Sciences Division is provided. Primary subjects included in this bibliography are space motion sickness; vestibular performance, posture, and motor coordination; vestibular physiology; central and peripheral nervous system physiology; and general performance and methodologies. General physiology references are also included.

  9. A review of the literature: the economic impact of preventive dental hygiene services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Stull C; Connolly, Irene M; Murphree, Kellie R

    2005-01-01

    The contributions of dental hygiene as a discipline of prevention, the inception of systemic fluoride in community water systems, the continual research conducted by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), and the success of dental sealants have all contributed to the decrease in incidences of dental diseases. The prevalence of employer-based dental insurance must also be recognized as contributing to a substantial paradigm shift on the utilization of oral health preventive services. This review of the economic impact of oral health preventive services on the consumer and the private dental practice suggests that these services have had a significant impact. Dentistry's challenge remains to extend these considerable gains in oral health status to the 150 million U.S. citizens who do not have access to oral health care services identified in the 2000 Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Utilizing preventive, therapeutic, and educational aspects of dental hygiene services, reaching communities without fluoridation of the public water supply, and incorporating mass pediatric dental sealant programs analogous to immunization programs would improve the oral health status of underserved populations.

  10. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  11. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  12. LGBT Coverage in U.S. Dental Schools and Dental Hygiene Programs: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenburg, Kenneth L; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A; Kinney, Janet S; Temple, Henry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to assess curricular coverage of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) content in U.S. and Canadian dental schools and U.S. dental hygiene programs, including hours of LGBT content, pedagogy used, and assessment methods, and to determine whether respondents perceived their institution's coverage as adequate. Data were collected from academic deans at 32 U.S. and two Canadian dental schools and from program directors at 71 U.S. dental hygiene programs (response rates 49%, 20%, 23%, respectively). The results showed that 29% of responding dental schools and 48% of responding dental hygiene programs did not cover LGBT content. Among the respondents, dental schools dedicated on average 3.68 hours and dental hygiene programs 1.25 hours in required settings to LGBT content. Lectures (dental schools 68%, dental hygiene programs 45%) and small group instruction (43%, 25%) were reported as the most common methodology used in teaching this content. Most of the responding dental schools and dental hygiene programs covered HIV (85%, 53%), oral disease risk (63%, 54%), and barriers to accessing health care for LGBT people (58%, 38%). Up to a third reported no need for coverage of topics such as sexual orientation (21%, 32%), coming out (29%, 37%), transitioning (29%, 38%), and sex reassignment surgery (32%, 35%). Assessment was through written examinations (41%, 30%) and faculty-observed patient interactions (21%, 23%); some respondents (20%, 33%) reported no assessment of learning outcomes. The most frequently endorsed strategies for increasing LGBT content were receiving curricular material focusing on LGBT-related health issues and health disparities and having trained faculty to teach LGBT content.

  13. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  14. Examining dental expenditure and dental insurance accounting for probability of incurring expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, Dana; Smith, Valerie; Gnanamanickam, Emmanuel; Brennan, David

    2017-04-01

    There are few studies of dental service expenditure in Australia. Although dental insurance status is strongly associated with a higher probability of dental visiting, some studies indicate that there is little variation in expenditure by insurance status among those who attend for care. Our objective was to assess the overall impact of insurance on expenditures by modelling the association between insurance and expenditure accounting for variation in the probability of incurring expenses, that is dental visiting. A sample of 3000 adults (aged 30-61 years) was randomly selected from the Australian electoral roll. Dental service expenditures were collected prospectively over 2 years by client-held log books. Questionnaires collecting participant characteristics were administered at baseline, 12 months and 24 months. Unadjusted and adjusted ratios of expenditure were estimated using marginalized two-part log-skew-normal models. Such models accommodate highly skewed data and estimate effects of covariates on the overall marginal mean while accounting for the probability of incurring expenses. Baseline response was 39%; of these, 40% (n = 438) were retained over the 2-year period. Only participants providing complete data were included in the analysis (n = 378). Of these, 68.5% were insured, and 70.9% accessed dental services of which nearly all (97.7%) incurred individual dental expenses. The mean dental service expenditure for the total sample (those who did and did not attend) for dental care was AUS$788. Model-adjusted ratios of mean expenditures were higher for the insured (1.61; 95% CI 1.18, 2.20), females (1.38; 95% CI 1.06, 1.81), major city residents (1.43; 95% CI 1.10, 1.84) and those who brushed their teeth twice or more a day (1.50; 95% CI 1.15, 1.96) than their respective counterparts. Accounting for the probability of incurring dental expenses, and other explanatory factors, insured working-aged adults had (on average) approximately 60% higher individual

  15. Access to dental care-parents' and caregivers' views on dental treatment services for people with disabilities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prabhu, Neeta T

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this study was to elicit the views of patients or parents\\/caregivers of patients with disabilities regarding access to dental care. A questionnaire was generated both from interviews with patients\\/parents\\/caregivers already treated under sedation or general anesthesia as well as by use of the Delphi technique with other stakeholders. One hundred thirteen patients from across six community dental clinics and one dental hospital were included. Approximately, 38% of the subjects used a general dental practitioner and 35% used the community dental service for their dental care, with only 27% using the hospital dental services. Overall waiting time for an appointment at the secondary care setting was longer than for the primary care clinics. There was a high rate of parent\\/caregiver satisfaction with dental services and only five patients reported any difficulty with travel and access to clinics. This study highlights the need for a greater investment in education and training to improve skills in the primary dental care sector.

  16. Access to dental care-parents' and caregivers' views on dental treatment services for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Neeta T; Nunn, June H; Evans, D J; Girdler, N M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to elicit the views of patients or parents/caregivers of patients with disabilities regarding access to dental care. A questionnaire was generated both from interviews with patients/parents/caregivers already treated under sedation or general anesthesia as well as by use of the Delphi technique with other stakeholders. One hundred thirteen patients from across six community dental clinics and one dental hospital were included. Approximately, 38% of the subjects used a general dental practitioner and 35% used the community dental service for their dental care, with only 27% using the hospital dental services. Overall waiting time for an appointment at the secondary care setting was longer than for the primary care clinics. There was a high rate of parent/caregiver satisfaction with dental services and only five patients reported any difficulty with travel and access to clinics. This study highlights the need for a greater investment in education and training to improve skills in the primary dental care sector.

  17. The reformative discipline of the landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Esposito

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We have been granted a new season that is much too long and devastating during which an indigestible amount has been built in a very brief period. Eventually, we will have to address this with actions of either reclamation or redevelopment and architecture will have to know how to propose itself as a guiding discipline that will reform the Italian landscape, especially the urban one. It will be necessary to conceive a critical point of view with respect to the usual logic used in redevelopment building that tends to overlook collective interests. Architecture is a collective art, in its contributions and results. Design on the other hand, is a personal art, which has become closely connected to architecture in recent years, a privileged vehicle that has allowed the designer and the products of design reach commercial gains.

  18. Psychiatric rehabilitation: an emerging academic discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kenneth J; Barrett, Nora M

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation is an emerging profession and academic discipline. This paper provides an overview of the need for psychiatric rehabilitation education, the workforce challenges this field faces and an introduction to the various efforts that institutions of higher education are making to meet this need. This paper also introduces some empirical findings in this area, reviewing three previously published evaluations of academic programs, and providing preliminary results of an unpublished evaluation from an American university with a career ladder in this field. The results of these evaluations suggest positive impact on the careers of the students, who appear to be knowledgeable and competent in psychiatric rehabilitation. More detailed evaluations of this education on the service outcomes of persons with serious mental illness are warranted as are studies of the methods of instruction used to develop the needed skills and attitudes. Replication of these existing academic programs should be considered.

  19. The Dojang: School of Discipline and Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Ariel Millán

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Martial arts can be defined as history in motion. Few sport activities of international fame represent a complex symbolic and practical repertory of ethic morality and aesthetic sensuality so distinctive of a nation as the Korean martial disciplines do, especially taekwondo and gumdo. Similar to other combat sports the martial arts gym (dojang is the place where values are produced and reproduced and where the appropriation of skills, cognition and recognition – degrees, certificates, and so on – that legitimates the social and bodily devotion of an individual to a martial art takes place. This article aims to transmit the emotions generated in a neophyte by the practice of a martial art and the social and kinaesthetic strains that result from this action in modern Korean society. It also explores some of the historical factors linked to its development and rapid expansion, in barely half a century.

  20. Interrupting the Psy-Disciplines in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to influence education, both regulating and shaping behaviour and morality. The book provides insight into different educational contexts and concerns across a child’s educational lifespan; early childhood education, inclusive education, special education, educational leadership, social media, university......, and beyond to enable reflection and critique of the implications of psy-based knowledge and practice. With chapters by a mixture of established and emerging international scholars in the field this is an interdisciplinary and authoritative study into the role of the psy-disciplines in the education system....... Providing vivid illustrations from throughout the educational lifespan the book serves as an invaluable tool for reflection and critique of the implications of psy-based practice, and will be of particular interest to academics and scholars in the field of education policy and psychology....

  1. Epigenetics, an emerging discipline with broad implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Robert

    2008-11-01

    The field of epigenetics is young and quickly expanding. During the last year alone, thousands of research articles considered epigenetic mechanisms and their phenotypic consequences in different animal and plant species. Various definitions have been given, though, as to what precisely is epigenetics. Recent ones take into consideration that chromatin at genes and chromosomal regions can be structurally organised by covalent modifications and nuclear proteins, and via RNA molecules, in order to achieve defined expression states that can be perpetuated. Such somatically and meiotically heritable effects on gene function have diverse biological and medical implications. In particular, they are known to be important in development. A recent discussion meeting in Paris at the French Academy of Sciences reviewed our current understanding of 'Epigenetics and Cellular Memory' and where this novel discipline in life sciences is heading.

  2. A new discipline: Confined Areas Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Agostinis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Confined Areas Medicine is a new discipline devoted to a specific branch of the components of emergency services. In it convey the characteristics typical of behavioral intervention in hostile area peculiar of the National Fire Corps and the National Speleological and Alpine Corps. While not considering the natural events that cause the collapse of housing the Italian case reported in the last fifty years about two hundred structural collapses that are charged over a thousand deaths (source: ISTAT 2006. Analysis of the documents accessible to the public today we can say without fear of denials, that 25% of these deaths are due to relief late or ineffective treatment on the spot. In fact, the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association claims that 10% of victims trapped under the rubble can be saved with a location and an early recovery, which can significantly increase this percentage with the health care stabilization directly at the place of discovery.

  3. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    York: Plenum Pub Co, 1975:635. V ".. PROPERTIES OF DENTAL MATERIALS--WOOLSEY 11 14. Ringle RD, Webber RL, Anusavice KJ, Fairhurst CW. Thermal... Anusavice et al (8) have demonstrated in silver-palladium metals, the presence of surface nodules created by internal oxidation of tin during the...683-689. 7. Ringle RD, Webber RL, Anusavice KJ, Fairhurst CW. Thermal expansion contraction behavior of dental porcelain-alloy systems. J Dent Res

  4. Racial Discipline Disproportionality in Montessori and Traditional Public Schools: A Comparative Study Using the Relative Rate Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie E. Brown

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research from the past 40 years indicates that African American students are subjected to exclusionary discipline, including suspension and expulsion, at rates two to three times higher than their White peers (Children’s Defense Fund, 1975; Skiba, Michael, Nardo, & Peterson, 2002. Although this phenomenon has been studied extensively in traditional public schools, rates of racially disproportionate discipline in public Montessori schools have not been examined. The purpose of this study is to examine racial discipline disproportionality in Montessori public elementary schools as compared to traditional elementary schools. The Relative Rate Index (RRI is used as a measure of racially disproportionate use of out-of-school suspensions (Tobin & Vincent, 2011. Suspension data from the Office of Civil Rights Data Collection was used to generate RRIs for Montessori and traditional elementary schools in a large urban district in the Southeast. While statistically significant levels of racial discipline disproportionality are found in both the Montessori and traditional schools, the effect is substantially less pronounced in Montessori settings. These findings suggest that Montessori schools are not immune to racially disproportionate discipline and should work to incorporate more culturally responsive classroom management techniques. Conversely, the lower levels of racially disproportionate discipline in the Montessori schools suggests that further study of discipline in Montessori environments may provide lessons for traditional schools to promote equitable discipline.

  5. Pioneering Strategies for Relieving Dental Anxiety in Hearing Impaired Children: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Shalini; Madu, Ghanashyam Prasad; Ambati, Naga Radhakrishna; Suravarapu, Pavani Reddy; Uppu, Kalyani; Bolla, Deepthi

    2017-06-01

    Hearing impaired children have a problem in understanding and comprehending with dental treatments. Visual language is the sensible answer of how to improve communication with them. To evaluate the applicability of dental sign language in Hearing impaired children in relieving anxiety during stressful dental treatment by improving their means of communication. This randomized clinical trial was carried out in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry which included 40 Hearing Impaired children meeting inclusion criteria. The selected children were randomly divided into the study and control group comprising of 20 each. In the control group, initial oral examination and dental treatment (oral prophylaxis and class I restoration) were performed without the use of dental sign language. In the study group, the dental sign language specific to dental treatment was educated and during their subsequent visit to the dental clinic after dental sign language reinforcement, oral prophylaxis and class I restoration were done. Subjective and objective measurements of anxiety were recorded for both groups using facial image scale (FIS), pulse oximeter and electronic blood pressure apparatus to compare for correlation. The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. There was a statistically significant reduction in the anxiety levels (pcontrol group. Dental sign language was effective in reducing the level of anxiety in children who are hard of hearing. Dental sign language was able to improve behavior positively during dental treatment and may also aid in developing a positive dental attitude among children who are hard of hearing.

  6. Dental caries in HIV-seropositive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, J A; Mulligan, R; Nelson, E; Brunelle, J; Alves, M E A F; Navazesh, M; Greenspan, D

    2004-11-01

    Reports that compare dental caries indices in HIV-seropositive (HIV+) subjects with HIV-seronegative (HIV-) subjects are rare. The objective of this study was to determine if there was an association between HIV infection and dental caries among women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study. Subjects included 538 HIV+ and 141 HIV- women at baseline and 242 HIV+ and 66 HIV- women at year 5. Caries indices included DMFS and DFS (coronal caries) and DFSrc (root caries). Cross-sectional analysis of coronal caries data revealed a 1.2-fold-higher caries prevalence among HIV+ women compared with HIV- women. Longitudinally, DMFS increased with increasing age and lower average stimulated salivary volume. Root caries results were not significant except for an overall increased DFSrc associated with smoking. Anti-retroviral therapy was not identified as a risk factor for dental caries.

  7. Rethinking knowledge and pedagogy in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, J L; Ferguson, D J; Wells, L M; Iacopino, A M

    2000-12-01

    Dentistry as a profession has often been considered both art and science. Traditional dental education has attempted to address both; however, in many places only the science of dentistry is emphasized. The move toward competency-based curricula in dental education requires an expansion of what constitutes meaningful knowledge in the curriculum and what pedagogies best support that curriculum. The scientific and technical knowledge considered foundational to clinical practice is not sufficient to teach competencies associated with the art of dentistry. Habermas, a social scientist, offers a way of looking beyond technical knowledge to consider two other forms of knowledge: practical and emancipatory. Pedagogy that supports development of practical and emancipatory knowledge includes problem-based learning and case methods, heuristics, reflective practica, journals, storytelling, and performance-based assessment methods. These important teaching strategies are being integrated into various dental curricula including a new competency-based dental curriculum at Marquette University's School of Dentistry. It will be critical for dental educators to continue developing these methods to provide efficient and effective education for future practitioners in both the art and science of dentistry.

  8. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  9. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  10. Towards building the oral health care workforce: who are the new dental therapists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine M; Lopez, Naty

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, Minnesota Governor Pawlenty signed into law a bill approving the creation of a new dental team member: the dental therapist. The intent of this legislation was to address oral health disparities by creating a dental professional who would expand access to dental care in Minnesota. This study aimed to describe the characteristics of the first class of dental therapy students at the University of Minnesota and to ascertain the values and motivations that led them to choose a career in dental therapy. Four surveys were used to create the composite profile of the ten students in this first dental therapy class: 1) the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, 2) the Learning Type Measure, 3) the Attitudes Toward Healthcare Survey, and 4) a values and motivation survey that included demographic data. The results of the surveys revealed interacting influences of the students' background, personal self-concept, and environment leading to a career decision to pursue dental therapy.

  11. Can midlevel dental providers be a benefit to the American public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Tobias E; Galka, Audrey L; Lacy, Ernestine S; Pellegrini, August D; Sweier, Domenica G; Romito, Laura M

    2013-05-01

    The use of midlevel dental providers (MLDPs) is being debated as a means of reducing oral health disparities and increasing access to care among underserved populations. Midlevel dental providers include the advanced dental hygiene practitioner, community dental health coordinator, dental health aide therapist, and dental therapist. While midlevel providers are new to the U.S. dental profession, medicine has utilized these positions for years. Medical literature has shown mixed results as to whether midlevel providers improve access to care and increased practice efficiency, however, it has demonstrated clearly that the quality of care outcomes of these providers have been comparable to those of physicians. Studies of MLDPs suggest potential practice and public health benefits. With appropriate training, licensure, supervision, and deployment to geographical areas of significant need, we believe MLDPs could increase access to care to underserved populations and help in the prevention of deaths attributable to untreated dental disease.

  12. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  13. Interdisciplinary health promotion: a call for theory-based interventions drawing on the skills of multiple disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jonathon Timothy

    2012-10-01

    Promoting the health of populations demands the adoption of a perspective exploring the societal, political, community, family and individual determinants of health. I will argue that to develop interventions to modify health-related behaviours and health risks requires collaboration with a range of disciplines, in order to draw upon their theoretical, empirical and oftentimes political knowledge. To illustrate this thesis, I will draw upon research in three areas: improving oral health-related behaviours in individuals with periodontal disease and childhood caries; encouraging early recognition in head and neck cancer; and managing dental anxiety. Reviews of oral health education in the early 1990 s suggested that approaches based on education were largely ineffective in the absence of the provision of fluoride supplementation. More recently, high-quality research has identified simple, theory-based interventions that can improve adherence to specific oral hygiene-related behaviours. Similarly, a range of studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of motivational interviewing for targeting caries-related behaviours in targeted groups. Dental anxiety remains a significant barrier to the uptake of dental services, and again, by working in multi-disciplinary teams, a proportionate and comprehensive range of interventions can be adopted to alleviate the burden of dental fear. Finally, head and neck cancer has potentially serious effects for sufferers, but often presents late for a variety of reasons. Through developing a theoretical model of help-seeking behaviour, psychologists have been able to identify targets for interventions and work together with the healthcare team to develop these.

  14. Dental Hypotheses: Seeks to Publish Hypotheses from All Areas of Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward F. Rossomando

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting a new open access journal in a rapid growing scientific panorama is a severe challenge. However, the first issue of dental hypotheses is now history and the even skeptics can appreciate that dental hypotheses is a success - it is a journal of high quality that provides an outlet for publication of articles that encourage readers to question dental paradigms. But dental hypotheses readers might have noticed that the majority of the articles published in the first issue of dental hypotheses concern clinical dentistry. However, dental hypotheses editors recognize that there are many other areas in dentistry that present challenges and that our readers may offer suggestions for their solution. Some of these challenges relate to: dental education; digital dental technology; teledentistry and access to dental care; dental practice issues, such as, dental office design, dental office management, the slow rate of acceptance of innovative technology in the dental office; and issues related to innovation and dental entrepreneurship including intellectual property protection. Nevertheless, the dental profession faces many challenges - in many areas - and with the publication of dental hypotheses our profession has a venue for presentation of possible solutions. If you have developed a hypothesis that might help, please share it with your colleagues. As many have noted, the intellectual power of the global village in which we now live is formidable. The internet has provided the technology to bring us together and dental hypotheses has provided the venue. Please use it. New radical, speculative and non-mainstream scientific ideas are always welcome.

  15. Altmetric: Top 50 dental articles in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahi, J; Khazaei, S

    2016-06-10

    Introduction Altmetrics is a new and emerging scholarly tool that measures online attention surrounding journal articles. Altmetric data resources include: policy documents, news outlets, blogs, online reference managers (eg Mendeley and CiteULike), post-publication peer-review forums (eg PubPeer and Publons), social media (eg Twitter, Facebook, Weibo, Google(+), Pinterest, Reddit), Wikipedia, sites running Stack Exchange (Q&A), and reviews on F1000 and YouTube.Methods To identify the top 50 dental articles in 2014, PubMed was searched using the following query "("2014/1/1"[PDAT]:"2014/12/31"[PDAT]) and jsubsetd[text]" in December, 2015. Consequently, all PubMed records were extracted and sent to Altmetric LLP (London, UK) as a CSV file for examination. Data were analysed by Microsoft Office Excel 2010 using descriptive statistics and charts.Results Using PubMed searches,15,132 dental articles were found in 2014. The mean Altmetric score of 50 top dental articles in 2014 was 69.5 ± 73.3 (95% CI: -74.14 to 213.14). The British Dental Journal (48%) and Journal of Dental Research (16%) had the maximum number of top articles. Twitter (67.13%), Mendeley (15.89%) and news outlets (10.92%) were the most popular altmetric data resources.Discussion Altmetrics are intended to supplement bibliometrics, not replace them. Altmetrics is a fresh and emerging arena for the dental research community. We believe that dental clinical practitioners, research scientists, research directors and journal editors must pay more attention to altmetrics as a new and rapid tool to measure the social impact of scholarly articles.

  16. Periostin in dental science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issei Takayama

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this mini-review, we focus on periostin, a matricellular protein that is preferentially expressed in cells such as fibroblastic cells in the periodontal ligament (PDL and osteoblastic cells on the alveolar bone surfaces. Since the abnormal phenotypes of periostin-deficient mice in periodontal tissues have been reported over the last 5 years, we would like to summarize the action of this protein in the PDL, including our unpublished results. Following these results, we hypothesize the function of periostin in the PDL: (1 activation of matrix metalloproteinases for collagen remodeling, and (2 stabilization of the Notch1 protein for anti-apoptotic signaling against stress conditions through the secretion pathway from the inside to outside of the PDL cells. Furthermore, recent observations have demonstrated that periostin functions in fibrillogenesis in association with extracellular matrix molecules. Finally, for clinical applications of periostin, several translational research studies have started in respiratory and cardiovascular medicine. Such research will stimulate the study of dental application of this protein for the treatment of periodontal diseases.

  17. THERMOVISION IN DENTAL ALLERGOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to optimize the thermal imaging method for evaluation of skin patch test reactions in dental clinical allergology. A total of 30 patients without a history of allergic diseases were included in the study - 12 men and 18 women, age 21 - 32 years. Skin patch testing was performed with a set of 20 standardized allergens. The thermographic investigations were performed with the FlirT620 infrared camera with a temperature resolution of 0,06°C. Thermograms were analysed using the Flir Reporter Professional software 2013. The statistical analysis of the results revealed an average correlation between the clinical evaluation of the results according to the cheme of ICDRG and the thermal image diagnostic (rphi = 0.538, p = 0.001. Absolute matching of clinical and thermal image results was observed only for the negative ones. For the clinically positive skin patch results matching with thermal image method was observed in 60.7% of the cases. Optimization of thermal imaging as a method for evaluation of skin patch test results could serve as a safe, accurate and non-invasive method, especially to distinguish weak (+, doubtful and irritant reactions, although not standardized criteria to distinguish these reactions have been elaborated yet. Crucial factor for the accurate interpretation of results is the precise diagnosing performed by well-trained physicians in this area, with clinical relevance, to minimize the role of subjective factors.

  18. Self-speech and self-regulation of high- and low-anxious children in the dental situation: An interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.M. Prins

    1985-01-01

    Assessed 40 8-12 yr old children's self-speech and self-regulation during a dental visit. Ss, who were interviewed individually in the dental clinic, included 20 children with high, phobiclike dental fear and 20 with low dental fear. Results show that two-thirds of Ss, equally distributed over the h

  19. Factors influencing use of dental services in rural and urban communities: considerations for practitioners in underserved areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Lisa J; Smith, Timothy A; Raybould, Ted P

    2004-10-01

    Individuals' utilization of dental services depends upon an array of factors, including access to care, financial restrictions, attitudes toward dental care, and dental fear. These factors, in turn, may vary across geographic locations and demographic groups. The goals of this study were to assess the use of dental services in both rural and urban areas of Kentucky and to examine challenges facing practitioners in rural areas. Individuals sampled from a rural population and patients in rural and urban dental clinics completed questionnaires about use of dental services, self-rated dental health, and dental fear. While these variables were strongly interrelated, differences emerged across locations. Patients in the urban area reported having more dental insurance but not better dental health. Patients in more rural areas reported seeking more emergency dental treatment but not more dental fear. While these factors are important considerations across locations, dental practitioners in rural areas in particular should be aware of barriers to dental care facing individuals in these areas. They have unique opportunities to provide education to their patients regarding the importance of dental care and the role of oral health in overall physical health.

  20. A scoping review of qualitative research in peer-reviewed dental publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussy, M; Dickson-Swift, V; Adams, J

    2013-08-01

    Qualitative research designs are being used increasingly in dental research. This paper describes the extent and range of dental research in which qualitative methods have been employed as well as the techniques of data collection and analysis preferred by dental researchers. A scoping review was conducted to locate studies published in dental journals, which reported the use of qualitative methods. Data concerning the focus of the research and the reported qualitative techniques were extracted. Studies included in the review totalled 197. The majority of qualitative research captured in this scoping study focussed on three main areas: dental education, professional dental and dental educators' activities and experiences and the patient/public perceptions. Interviews and focus group discussions were the most commonly selected techniques for data collection. The majority of the studies included in the scoping review had a focus on education of dental professionals the activities of dental professionals or the reported perceptions of or experiences with dental services by patients or members of the public. Little research was located, which explored peoples' personal experience of dental conditions. Research reported in dental publications has a heavy bias towards the use of focus groups and interview data collection techniques. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.