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Sample records for dental amalgam restorations

  1. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  2. Determination of light elements in amalgam restorations. [Dental amalgam

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    Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Osborne, J.W.; Nelson, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering has been used to measure the major elemental compositions in the near-surface regions of freshly prepared and used samples of dental amalgam. A depletion from bulk stoichiometry of the major elements, which indicates an accumulation of lighter elements on the surface of the materials, has been observed. Increases in the F, Na, Cl, P, O, C, and N concentrations between freshly prepared samples and used samples were measured by observation of gamma rays produced by proton and deuteron induced reactions.

  3. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations

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    Fernanda Sardenberg; Clarissa Calil Bonifácio; Mariana Minatel Braga; José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato; Fausto Medeiros Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11) were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group -...

  4. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  5. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Sardenberg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11 were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group - the initial amalgam restorations were replaced by composite resin restorations; Flowable resin group - the ditching around the amalgam restorations was filled with flowable resin. Images of the sectioned teeth were made and the area of the cavities before and after the procedures was determined by image analysis software to assess structural loss. The data were submitted to ANOVA complemented by the Student Newman Keuls test (p < 0.05. The cavities in all the groups presented significantly greater areas after the procedures. However, the amalgam group showed more substantial dental loss. The other three groups presented no statistically significant difference in dental structure loss after the re-treatments. Thus, replacing ditched amalgam restorations by other similar restorations resulted in a significant dental structure loss while maintaining them or replacing them by resin restorations did not result in significant loss.

  6. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  7. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardenberg, Fernanda; Bonifácio, Clarissa Calil; Braga, Mariana Minatel; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11) were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group - the initial amalgam restorations were replaced by composite resin restorations; Flowable resin group - the ditching around the amalgam restorations was filled with flowable resin. Images of the sectioned teeth were made and the area of the cavities before and after the procedures was determined by image analysis software to assess structural loss. The data were submitted to ANOVA complemented by the Student Newman Keuls test (p structure loss after the re-treatments. Thus, replacing ditched amalgam restorations by other similar restorations resulted in a significant dental structure loss while maintaining them or replacing them by resin restorations did not result in significant loss.

  8. Amalgam and composite posterior restorations: curriculum versus practice in operative dentistry at a US dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenga, Marc E; Mjör, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    This study recorded the number of preclinical lecture and simulation laboratory sessions spent teaching the preparation and placement of amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations. These data were compared to the use of both materials in the operative clinic as placed by third- and fourth-year students. The number of posterior restorations inserted by the students, expressed as a function of the number of restoration surfaces, was also evaluated. The results show that the teaching of posterior restorations pre-clinically has consistently favored amalgam 2.5 to 1 during the last three years. However, clinically, resin composite is being used for posterior restorations 2.3 times more often than amalgam. The only instance that favored amalgam over composite during the last year was in the placement of four surface posterior restorations. This shift in emphasis from amalgam to composite needs to be addressed within dental educational institutions so that newly graduated dentists are prepared to place composite restorations properly.

  9. Dental amalgam: An update

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    Bharti Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations.

  10. The effect of surface treatment and position of the dental restoration on amalgam corrosion behavior

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    Mortazavi, V. [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, M.H. [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Materials Engineering Dept., Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment, clinical operations and the condition and position of the dental restoration on amalgam corrosion behavior. Commercial amalgam alloy namely Oralloy was selected. Twenty-one amalgam samples were prepared. After triturating and condensation, the samples were divided into three groups and each group was finished by using one of three surface clinical procedures; carving, carving-burnishing, carving-burnishing-polishing. A special cylindrical mold was used in order to simulation of the interproximal areas and proximal surfaces of the dental restorations. Stainless steel matrix band was laid on the internal mold surfaces and amalgam paste was compacted in the mold. Electrochemical potentiodynamic tests were performed at a temperature of 37{+-}1 {sup o}C in physiological solution in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of dental amalgam samples, as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed statistically significant differences between the mean corrosion current density values of three different groups of dental amalgam (P<0.05). The polished group possesses the lowest and the carved group shows the highest corrosion current density. The carved group shows more corrosion resistance in compare with the sample near the matrix band as an index of the proximal surfaces of restorations. It was concluded that even a simple clinical operation could effect on dental amalgam corrosion resistance. The proximal surfaces of the class II restorations are not only susceptible to concentration cell corrosion but also possess less corrosion resistance because dentist could perform no clinical surface treatment. (author)

  11. Evaluating the Reasons of Amalgam Restoration Replacement in Esthetic and Restorative Department of Babol Dental School in 2013-14

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    F Abolghasemzade

    2015-08-01

    Results: Within 263 patients, there were 81(30.8% men and 182(69.2% women. Most patients aged 30-40(42.2%, and were reported to suffer from class Ι dental occlusion(92.4%.The mean DMF was 9.7±2.4 . Lower molars were demonstrated as the most frequent teeth group for replacing amalgam restorations as well as causing secondary caries. Furthermore, secondary caries involved the major causes of amalgam restoration replacement. The most prevalent class for amalgam restoration replacement was class II restorations. It should be noted that secondary caries were most prevalent within class II MO / DO(25 cases(44.6%. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that the most common cause of the restoration replacement involved the secondary caries which was most observed in the Class II restorations.

  12. Evidence summary: which dental liners under amalgam restorations are more effective in reducing postoperative sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Mona

    2011-06-10

    Since August 2009, members of the Primary Care Dentistry Research Forum (www.dentistryresearch.org) have taken part in an online vote to identify questions in day-to-day practice that they felt most needed to be answered with conclusive research. The question that receives the most votes each month forms the subject of a critical appraisal of the relevant literature. Each month a new round of voting takes place to decide which further questions will be reviewed. Dental practitioners and dental care professionals are encouraged to take part in the voting and submit their own questions to be included in the vote by joining the website. The paper below details a summary of the findings of the ninth critical appraisal. In order to address the question raised by dentistry research forum, first a search was conducted for systematic reviews on the topic. There was one systematic review retrieved comparing bonded amalgam restorations versus non-bonded amalgam restorations. However, there was no other systematic review identified assessing the effectiveness of dental liners under amalgam restorations in general. Therefore, a search was conducted for any randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing use of a lining under amalgam restorations versus no lining or RCTs comparing differing lining materials under amalgam against each other. There were eight relevant RCTs identified. Due to the low quality, small sample sizes or lack of adequate reporting of the outcome data, the evidence is inadequate to claim or refute a difference in postoperative sensitivity between different dental liners. Further well-conducted RCTs are needed to answer this question. These RCTs would be preferably included and synthesised in a systematic review.

  13. Kondensasi Pada Dental Amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Batubara, Runi Syahriani

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam merupakan campuran dari dua atau beberapa logam (alloy) yang salah satunya adalah merkuri. Kata amalgam juga didefenisikan untuk menggambarkan kombinasi atau campuran dari beberapa bahan seperti merkuri, perak, timah, tembaga, dan lainnya. Dental amalgam sendiri adalah kombinasi alloy dengan merkuri melalui suatu proses yang disebut amalgamasi. Pemanipulasian amalgam meliputi triturasi, kondensasi, carving, dan polishing. Kondensasi merupakan penekanan amalgam setelah triturasi p...

  14. Twelve-year survival of 2-surface composite resin and amalgam premolar restorations placed by dental students.

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    Naghipur, Safa; Pesun, Igor; Nowakowski, Anthony; Kim, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Composite resin and amalgam restorations are indicated for the restoration of posterior teeth. With increased esthetic demands, long-term clinical studies are required to evaluate the restorative success and reasons for failure of these materials. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the survival and reasons for failure of directly placed 2-surface composite resin restorations and directly placed 2-surface amalgam restorations on premolars placed by Canadian dental students. Using The University of Manitoba's dental management software and paper charts, all 2-surface composite resin and 2-surface amalgam restorations placed on premolars between January 1, 2002, and May 30, 2014, were included. Short-term failure (within 2 years), long-term failure, and reasons for failure were collected. A Kaplan-Meier survival estimate with an associated P value comparing composite resin to amalgam restoration curves was performed using SPSS statistical software. Over 12 years, 1695 composite resin and 1125 amalgam 2-surface premolar restorations were placed. Of these restorations, 134 composite resins (7.9%) and 66 amalgams (5.9%) failed. Short-term failures (2 years or less) consisted of 57 composite resin (4%) and 23 amalgam (2.3%) restorations. Long-term failures (greater than 2 years) consisted of 77 composite resin (4.5%) and 43 amalgam (3.8%) restorations. After 12 years of service, the survival probability of composite resin restorations was 86% and that of amalgam restorations 91.5%. The differences in composite resin and amalgam survival curves were also found to be statistically significant (P=.009 for Log-rank test). The main reasons for failure were recurrent caries and fracture of the tooth being restored. Within the limitations of this study, both composite resin and amalgam restorations had acceptable success rates and similar failure modes. Recurrent caries was still the most common reason for failure. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for

  15. Legislation and informed consent brochures for dental patients receiving amalgam restorations.

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    Edlich, Richard F; Cochran, Amy A; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, Norway banned the use of mercury for amalgam restorations. Four states in the United States have developed Informed Consent Brochures for amalgam restorations that must be given to their dental patients. The authors describe a patient who had a large cavity in his left lower molar tooth no.18 that had to be removed by an oral surgeon. When the patient went to the oral surgeon, the surgeon told the patient that he would replace the carious tooth with a gold implant. He was not given an Informed Consent Brochure regarding dental restorative materials. The oral surgeon extracted the carious tooth, replacing the tooth with a supposed gold crown implant. On his yearly dental examination, his dentist took an x-ray of his dental implant and explained that the x-ray could not distinguish whether the implant contained either gold or mercury. Consequently, the dentist referred him to a dental clinic in which the dental implant could be removed without mercury contamination of the patient's neurologic system during the extraction of the implant from the root canal. During the removal of the dental restoration, the dentist found build up expanding into the root canal that had a black color. The crown and underlying tooth were sent to ALT BioScience for analysis. Elemental analysis of the crown and underlying tooth confirmed the presence of mercury in the restoration. The patient should have been given an Informed Consent Brochure by the dentist that described the dental restoration that was used in the dental implant.

  16. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  17. Repair or replacement of amalgam restorations: decisions at a USA and a UK dental school.

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    Setcos, James C; Khosravi, Reza; Wilson, Nairn H F; Shen, Chiayi; Yang, Mark; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    Whereas replacement of failed restorations is the major treatment for adults in dental practice, repair is an important alternative with the potential to save tooth structure and increase the longevity of restorations at a lower cost. This in vitro study recorded the choices of treatment for the same set of teeth with defective Class II amalgam restorations by students and faculty at two dental schools (University of Manchester, UK and University of Florida, USA). Treatment options (monitor, refurbish, repair and replace) and reason(s) for the choice of treatment for 24 marked amalgam restorations were selected. Overall, participants more frequently chose replacement of restorations; whereas, repair was the least favored option. The reasons cited the most to replace restorations were secondary caries including unsightly appearance, partially lost restoration and tooth fracture; for repair, the major reasons included loss of part of the restoration and marginal ditching; and for refurbishment, the major reasons included poor anatomic form and marginal ditching. There was a significant difference between the students and faculties at the two sites in their choice of treatment (p<0.0001; Chi-square test). The treatment decision to "monitor" the restorations was more frequent for the Manchester site than the Florida site. Conversely, the combined treatment decisions to "refurbish, repair and replace" were more frequently chosen in Florida than in Manchester.

  18. [The future of dental amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a comment on 'The enigma of dental amalgam' by Carl Leinfelder published in 2004 in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. In that paper a warning is stated against a too abrupt change from amalgam towards resin composite, because this will bring a lot of clinical problems

  19. [The future of dental amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a comment on 'The enigma of dental amalgam' by Carl Leinfelder published in 2004 in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. In that paper a warning is stated against a too abrupt change from amalgam towards resin composite, because this will bring a lot of clinical problems

  20. The use of amalgam powder and calcium hydroxide to recreate a radiopaque image of a lost dental restoration.

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    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2002-05-01

    Radiographs of dental restorations are highly reliable when used to identify postmortem dental remains. A problem exists if key dental restorations are missing or defective, which results in the loss of a comparative radiographic image. This article describes a simple method allowing the odontologist to quickly recreate a temporary radiopaque restoration. This article presents a method of using amalgam powder (radiopaque material) and calcium hydroxide (radiopaque material and transport medium for the amalgam powder) to recreate a radiopaque image on a tooth that has lost a dental restoration. Amalgam powder and calcium hydroxide is easily obtained (in any dental office), fairly clean, easy to manipulate, inexpensive, inert, stable, and able to be removed without damaging the dental remains. The amalgam powder/calcium hydroxide mixture can easily be re-shaped or modified to reflect the radiopaque image of the original restoration. Radiographic comparison of the "restored" dental remains to the antemortem radiographs is now possible. The use of this technique is presented in a case report.

  1. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

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    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  2. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam dental restorative material: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernavin, Igor; Hogan, Sean P.

    1996-09-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been marketed as an instrument for use on both hard and soft dental tissues. Its potential for use on hard tissues is limited but it may be the instrument of choice for use in certain soft tissue procedures. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam restorations which frequently occur on tooth surfaces adjacent to areas of soft tissue which may be subjected to the laser. The amalgam used was Tytin. The laser firing was controlled by a computer and a constant repetition rate of 40 Hz was used. Energy per pulse was altered as follows, 30 mJ, 40 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, 120 mJ and 140 mJ. Exposure times of 0.05 sec, 0.125 sec, 0.25 sec, 0.5 sec, 1 sec, 2 sec, 3 sec, 4 sec, and 5 sec were used. The width of defect was measured using a Nikon measurescope with 10x magnification and it was established that the damage threshold lies between 0.125 sec and 0.25 sec for 30 mJ per pulse. The data was analyzed using a one way ANOVA statistical test. There was a significant correlation between the width of the defect and energy per pulse setting as well as exposure time. The findings indicate that amalgam restorations are prone to damage from inadvertent laser exposure and clinicians must take measures to protect such restorations during lasing of soft tissues.

  3. Effects of mercury release from amalgam dental restorations during cremation on soil mercury levels of three New Zealand crematoria

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    Nieschmidt, A.K.; Kim, N.D. [Univ. of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    1997-05-01

    A vast amount of research has been undertaken in the last 15-20 years on the corrosion reactions occurring in dental amalgam, release of mercury from amalgam restorations, and the toxic effects of this released mercury on the human body. However, one environmental aspect of amalgam dental restorations that has not received a great deal of attention is the release of mercury during cremation. Mercury is liberated during cremation both because dental amalgams are unstable at cremation temperatures (650-700{degrees}C) and because the free mercury metal is highly volatile. In New Zealand, 58% of deaths are followed by cremation and this figure is likely to rise in the future. This increasing use of cremation as the method of corpse disposal, coupled with the fact that each amalgam restoration is approximately 50% mercury, implies that a significant amount of mercury may be emitted into the environment every year. This study examines mercury released from crematoria in New Zealand. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams.

  5. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems with amalgam and resin composite restorations: comparison of microleakage and bond strength results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, A L; Evans, D B; Maxson, B B

    2000-01-01

    A variety of laboratory tests have been developed to assist in predicting the clinical performance of dental restorative materials. Additionally, more than one methodology is in use for many types of tests performed in vitro. This project assessed and compared results derived from two specific laboratory testing methods, one for bond strength and one for microleakage. Seven multi-purpose dental adhesives were tested with the two methodologies in both amalgam and resin composite restorations. Bond strength was determined with a punch-out method in sections of human molar dentin. Microleakage was analyzed with a digital imaging system (Image-Pro Plus, Version 1.3) to determine the extent of dye penetration in Class V preparations centered at the CEJ on both the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molar teeth. There were 32 treatment groups (n = 10); seven experimental (dental adhesives) and one control (copal varnish, 37% phosphoric acid) followed by restoration with either amalgam or resin composite. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times in 5 degrees and 55 degrees C water with a one-minute dwell time. Bond strength and microleakage values were determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests demonstrated an interaction between restorative material and adhesive system with a significant difference among adhesives (p resin composite restorations than in the amalgam restorations. Bond strength testing was more discriminating than microleakage evaluation in identifying differences among materials.

  6. Dental Amalgam Exposure and Urinary Mercury Levels in Children: The New England Children’s Amalgam Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Maserejian, Nancy Nairi; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Assmann, Susan F.; Barregard, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Background Urinary mercury (U-Hg) excretion is a commonly used biomarker for mercury exposure from dental amalgam restorations. Objectives Our goal was to determine the most efficient measure of dental amalgam exposure for use in analyses concerning U-Hg in children. Methods We analyzed time-sensitive longitudinal amalgam exposure data in children randomized to amalgam restorations (n = 267) during the 5-year New England Children’s Amalgam Trial. We calculated 8 measures of amalgam, evaluatin...

  7. [Dental amalgams and mercury polemic in Abidjan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoaka-Boni, M-C; Adou-Assoumou, N M; Sinan, A A; Abouattier-Mansilla, E C

    2007-12-01

    Dental amalgam is metallic biomaterials which has raised a number of controversies in the past few years, because of mercury potential toxicity. Considering the significance of theses controversies, this study was carried out with a view to evaluating the behaviour of Abidjan-based practitioners with respect to dental amalgam. The contemplated objective is to determine the frequency in the use of dental amalgam, to identify the problems encountered using dental amalgam and to propose solutions for fighting mercury contamination. The results show that dental amalgam is used in 81.8% for posterior teeth restoration. The side effects mentioned are metallic taste, gingival tattoo, galvanic corrosion and tooth pain. This is why 21.8 % of practitioners believe that the controversy over dental amalgam has merits while 45.5% hold the contrary opinion because of lack of scientific arguments. However, considering the absence of means to treat amalgam waste, dentist practitioners and authorities have to get involved to fight against mercury contamination.

  8. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was Pamalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not affect fracture resistance of the teeth. Key words:Amalgam, composite, fracture resistance, restoration. PMID:27398176

  9. A Review on Dental Amalgam Corrosion and Its Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fathi

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam is still the most useful restorative material for posterior teeth and has been successfully used for over a century. Dental amalgam has been widely used as a direct filling material due to its favorable mechanical properties as well as low cost and easy placement. However, the mercury it contains raises concerns about its biological toxicity and environmental hazard. Although in use for more than 150 years, dental amalgam has always been suspected more or less vigorously due to its alleged health hazard. Amalgam restorations often tarnish and corrode in oral environment. Corrosion of dental amalgam can cause galvanic action. Ion release as a result of corrosion is most important. Humans are exposed to mercury and other main dental metals via vapor or corrosion products in swallowed saliva and also direct absorption into blood from oral mucosa. During recent decades the use of dental amalgam has been discussed with respect to potential toxic effects of mercury components. In this article, the mechanisms of dental amalgam corrosion are described and results of researches are reviewed. It finally covers the corrosion of amalgams since this is the means by which metals, including mercury, can be released within oral cavity. Keywords: Dental amalgam, Amalgam corrosion, Biocompatibility, Mercury release, Amalgam restoration

  10. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amalgamator is a device, usually AC-powered, intended to mix, by shaking, amalgam capsules containing mercury and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  11. DIRECT PERMANENT RESTORATIVES - AMALGAM VS COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyashree

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Dental restoration is the most commonly administered dental treatment. These restorations are subjected to dynamic conditions in oral cavity, are likely to fail and need replacement. Ideal restorative material should pass two tests - Longitivity and Esthetics. Longitivity of the restorative material depends on three major factors - first is Patient’s factors, second is Operator`s skills and last is the Restorative material itself. Dentists today have a plethora of materials to choose from. Materials like Silver Amalgam being tested over a century, other nubile but promising materials, developed recently and yet to be tested in long run. This puts a dentist in dilemma so as which material to select to ensure durable clinical p erformance after placement. Amalgam has been tested over 165 years and has fulfilled almost all desired qualities of a restorative material except esthetics. On the other hand composites have advantage in cases where esthetics is of prime importance; howev er Recent studies conclude them at par with amalgam 1 . Performance of these two materials is assessed on following criterions - Longevity, wear resistance, cost effectiveness, marginal leakage and predisposal to secondary decay, biocompatibility, pulp irri tation, tooth preparation, technique sensitivity and esthetics

  12. Increased mercury release from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields as a potential hazard for hypersensitive people and pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Ghazal; Mortazavi, S M J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the use of common sources of electromagnetic fields such as Wi-Fi routers and mobile phones has been increased enormously all over the world. There is ongoing concern that exposure to electromagnetic fields can lead to adverse health effects. It has recently been shown that even low doses of mercury are capable of causing toxicity. Therefore, efforts are initiated to phase down or eliminate the use of mercury amalgam in dental restorations. Increased release of mercury from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields such as those generated by MRI and mobile phones has been reported by our team and other researchers. We have recently shown that some of the papers which reported no increased release of mercury after MRI, may have some methodological errors. Although it was previously believed that the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam cannot be hazardous, new findings indicate that mercury, even at low doses, may cause toxicity. Based on recent epidemiological findings, it can be claimed that the safety of mercury released from dental amalgam fillings is questionable. Therefore, as some individuals tend to be hypersensitive to the toxic effects of mercury, regulatory authorities should re-assess the safety of exposure to electromagnetic fields in individuals with amalgam restorations. On the other hand, we have reported that increased mercury release after exposure to electromagnetic fields may be risky for the pregnant women. It is worth mentioning that as a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels has been found in some studies, our findings regarding the effect of exposure to electromagnetic fields on the release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings lead us to this conclusion that pregnant women with dental amalgam fillings should limit their exposure to electromagnetic fields to prevent toxic effects of mercury in their fetuses. Based on these findings, as infants

  13. Dental amalgam: is this the end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, Cristina

    Dental amalgam is a reliable and effective restorative material with a well-established role in modern dentistry. Throughout the years its mercury content and the risks posed to human health were main topics of interest for many scientists. This paper offers a review of the scientific literature on the health and environmental impact of mercury in dentistry published over the last decade. A variety of peer-reviewed, epidemiological and large-scale clinical studies on dental amalgam, as well as published reports of professional and governmental bodies, were organised thematically and analysed. The most relevant findings of the aforementioned literature are reported. No reliance has been placed on unpublished work or publicly available opinions that are not scientifically based. In order to offer an appropriate view on the topic the toxicology, health impacts and possible environmental threats are briefly presented in relation to the relevant literature published in the last ten years. It is almost unanimously accepted that dental amalgam is a safe material, with little or insignificant adverse effect on general health. However, current and mostly unfounded environmental concerns may result in the implementation of new across the board legislation that could lead to a global dental amalgam "phase out".

  14. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-04-22

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p amalgam restorations.

  15. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Simen E. Kopperud; Frode Staxrud; Ivar Espelid; Anne Bjørg Tveit

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the de...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination...

  17. The dental amalgam toxicity fear: a myth or actuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Monika; Singh, Archana; Pant, Vandana A

    2012-05-01

    Amalgam has been used in dentistry since about 150 years and is still being used due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effect. When aesthetics is not a concern it can be used in individuals of all ages, in stress bearing areas, foundation for cast-metal and ceramic restorations and poor oral hygiene conditions. Besides all, it has other advantages like if placed under ideal conditions, it is more durable and long lasting and least technique sensitive of all restorative materials, but, concern has been raised that amalgam causes mercury toxicity. Mercury is found in the earth's crust and is ubiquitous in the environment, so even without amalgam restorations everyone is exposed to small but measurable amount of mercury in blood and urine. Dental amalgam restorations may raise these levels slightly, but this has no practical or clinical significance. The main exposure to mercury from dental amalgam occurs during placement or removal of restoration in the tooth. Once the reaction is complete less amount of mercury is released, and that is far below the current health standard. Though amalgam is capable of producing delayed hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals, if the recommended mercury hygiene procedures are followed the risks of adverse health effects could be minimized. For this review the electronic databases and PubMed were used as data sources and have been evaluated to produce the facts regarding amalgam's safety and toxicity.

  18. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  19. ASSESSMENT OF MERCURY RELEASE FROM DENTAL AMALGAM: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty Aditya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to mercury from dental amalgam restoration, with possible negative health effects, has generally been considered to occur via either erosion or evaporation directly from the surface of fillings, followed by ingestion. This study aims to assess the mercury release from dental amalgam and provide a basis for comparison between mercury release in oral cavities with single and multiple amalgam restorations at different time intervals. This study was conducted in A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, and included three groups I , II and III containing one, four and eight teeth respectively. The level of mercury vapors released from dental amalgam restorations was calculated from artificial saliva and measured using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The obtained results concluded that the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations decreases as the restoration ages, after 30 days there was no significant difference between the amount of mercury released from multiple and single tooth restorations.

  20. [Functional dental anatomy and amalgam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernier, B; Colon, P

    1989-01-01

    Very often, the functional dental anatomy are reflected during the rehabilitation of posterior quadrants. However, the placement, the shaping in correct relation of the different dental components are indispensable conditions to respect, in order to achieve an adequate integration of the restoration within the neuro-muscular system. A clinical protocol is proposed in order to reconcile the anatomical and biological prerequisite and the setting time of modern alloys.

  1. A dose-dependent relationship between mercury exposure from dental amalgams and urinary mercury levels: a further assessment of the Casa Pia Children's Dental Amalgam Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, D A; Carmody, T; Kern, J K; King, P G; Geier, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Dental amalgams are a commonly used dental restorative material, and amalgams are about 50% mercury (Hg). In our study, urinary Hg levels was examined in children of age 8-18 years, with and without dental amalgam fillings, from a completed clinical trial (parent study) that was designed to evaluate the potential health consequences of prolonged exposure to Hg from dental amalgam fillings. Our study was designed to determine whether there was a significant dose-dependent correlation between increasing Hg exposure from dental amalgams and urinary Hg levels. Hg exposure depends on the size and number of teeth with dental amalgams. Overall, consistent with the results observed in the parent study, there was a statistically significant dose-dependent correlation between cumulative exposure to Hg from dental amalgams and urinary Hg levels, after covariate adjustment. Further, it was observed that urinary Hg levels increased by 18% to 52% among 8 to 18 year old individuals, respectively, with an average exposure to amalgams, in comparison to study subjects with no exposure to amalgams. The results of our study suggest that dental amalgams contribute to ongoing Hg exposure in a dose-dependent fashion.

  2. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simen E. Kopperud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%, followed by restoration fractures (25.1%. Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01, employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS (p < 0.01 and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03. There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01. Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  3. Marginal microfiltration in amalgam restorations. Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lahoud Salem, Víctor; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima. Perú.

    2014-01-01

    The present articule is review references from phenomenon of microfiltration in restorations with amalgam and yours consecuents in changes of color in the interface tooth-restorations, margin deterioted , sensitivity dentinarea postoperate, caries secondary and pulp inflamation. Besides naming the mechanicals for to reduce microfiltration, and yours effects for use of sealers dentinaries representation for the varnish cavitys and adhesive systens Conclusive indicate wath the amalgam is the ma...

  4. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  5. Optimizing the procedure for mercury recovery from dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Godoy Iano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury, as any other heavy metal, may cause environmental damages due to its accumulation and biotransformation. Dental offices, whether private or institutional, use dental amalgam as a restorative material on a daily basis. Dental amalgam is composed of mercury (50%, silver (30% and other metals. Approximately 30% of the amalgam prepared in dental offices (0.6 g per capsule are wasted and inadequately discarded without any treatment. Methods for mercury recovery have been proposed previously, using high temperatures through exposure to direct flame (650°C, long processing time, and hazardous reagents as potassium cyanide. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to replace the direct flame by an electrical mantle in the process of mercury recovery. Results showed an average mercury recovery of 90% from 2 kg of amalgam after 30 minutes of processing time, thus optimizing the procedure. The proposed modifications allowed a significant reduction in processing time and a mercury recovery with high purity. The modified process also provided minimization of operator exposure to physical, chemical and ergonomic hazards, representing a technological advance compared to the risks inherent to the original method. It also provided environmental health and economy of energy resources by replacing a finite energy source (fossil and organic by a more environmentally appropriate electric source, resulting in significant improvement of the procedure for mercury recovery from dental amalgam.

  6. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  7. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  8. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  9. Maternal-fetal distribution of mercury ( sup 203 Hg) released from dental amalgam fillings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1990-04-01

    In humans, the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations is markedly increased for prolonged periods after chewing. The present study establishes a time-course distribution for amalgam Hg in body tissues of adult and fetal sheep. Under general anesthesia, five pregnant ewes had twelve occlusal amalgam fillings containing radioactive 203Hg placed in teeth at 112 days gestation. Blood, amniotic fluid, feces, and urine specimens were collected at 1- to 3-day intervals for 16 days. From days 16-140 after amalgam placement (16-41 days for fetal lambs), tissue specimens were analyzed for radioactivity, and total Hg concentrations were calculated. Results demonstrate that Hg from dental amalgam will appear in maternal and fetal blood and amniotic fluid within 2 days after placement of amalgam tooth restorations. Excretion of some of this Hg will also commence within 2 days. All tissues examined displayed Hg accumulation. Highest concentrations of Hg from amalgam in the adult occurred in kidney and liver, whereas in the fetus the highest amalgam Hg concentrations appeared in liver and pituitary gland. The placenta progressively concentrated Hg as gestation advanced to term, and milk concentration of amalgam Hg postpartum provides a potential source of Hg exposure to the newborn. It is concluded that accumulation of amalgam Hg progresses in maternal and fetal tissues to a steady state with advancing gestation and is maintained. Dental amalgam usage as a tooth restorative material in pregnant women and children should be reconsidered.

  10. Oral lichenoid contact lesions to mercury and dental amalgam--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McParland, Helen; Warnakulasuriya, Saman

    2012-01-01

    Human oral mucosa is subjected to many noxious stimuli. One of these substances, in those who have restorations, is dental amalgam which contains mercury. This paper focuses on the local toxic effects of amalgam and mercury from dental restorations. Components of amalgam may, in rare instances, cause local side effects or allergic reactions referred to as oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs). OLLs to amalgams are recognised as hypersensitivity reactions to low-level mercury exposure. The use of patch testing to identify those susceptible from OLL is explored, and recommendations for removing amalgam fillings, when indicated are outlined. We conclude that evidence does not show that exposure to mercury from amalgam restorations poses a serious health risk in humans, except for an exceedingly small number of hypersensitivity reactions that are discussed.

  11. Minor changes in serum levels of cytokines after removal of amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Lars; Brokstad, Karl A; Moen, Ketil; Jonsson, Roland

    2012-06-01

    Dental amalgam restorations release mercury and silver which is absorbed and distributed in the body. Animal studies have shown that both elements may interfere with the host by activation of the immune system in genetically susceptible strains at exposure levels relevant to those from dental amalgam restorations. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of no change over time in concentrations of a number of immune mediators in serum after removal of all dental amalgam restorations in patients with health complaints attributed to their amalgam restorations and compare with a healthy reference group. Twenty patients previously examined at a specialty unit for health complaints attributed to dental materials were included in a clinical trial and had all amalgam restorations replaced with other dental restorative materials. Serum samples were collected before amalgam removal and 3 and 12 months after the removal was finished. Twenty blood donors matched for age and gender were used as comparison group. A fluorescent bead-based (Luminex) immunoassay kit was used to measure cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in serum. At baseline, the patient group had slightly higher values for GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-2R, IFN-alpha, IL-7, and IL-12p40/p70 compared with the reference group. After amalgam removal a decrease towards the median value of the reference group was found for GM-CSF, IL-8, and IL-7. In conclusion, removal of all dental amalgam restorations and replacement with other dental restorative materials was associated with decreased concentrations of Th1-type proinflammatory markers in serum.

  12. Proximal Contact Repair of Complex Amalgam Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zguri, M N; Casey, J A; Jessup, J P; Vandewalle, K S

    2017-01-12

    The carving of a complex amalgam restoration may occasionally result in light proximal contact with the adjacent tooth. The purpose of this study was to investigate the strength of complex amalgam restorations repaired with a proximal slot amalgam preparation. Extracted human third molars of similar coronal size were sectioned 1 mm apical to the height of the contour using a saw and were randomly distributed into 9 groups of 10 teeth each. One pin was placed at each line angle of the flattened dentinal tooth surface. A metal matrix band was placed and an admixed alloy was condensed and carved to create a full crown contour but with a flat occlusal surface. A proximal slot was prepared with or without a retention groove and repaired using a single-composition spherical amalgam 15 minutes, 24 hours, one week, or six months after the initial crown condensation. The specimens were stored for 24 hours in 37°C water before fracture at the marginal ridge using a round-ended blade in a universal testing machine. The control group was not repaired. The mean maximum force in newtons and standard deviation were determined per group. Data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance as well as Tukey and Dunnett tests (α=0.05). Significant differences were found between groups based on type of slot preparation (p=0.017) but not on time (p=0.327), with no significant interaction (p=0.152). No significant difference in the strength of the marginal ridge was found between any repair group and the unrepaired control group (p>0.076). The proximal repair strength of a complex amalgam restoration was not significantly different from an unrepaired amalgam crown. Placing a retention groove in the proximal slot preparation resulted in significantly greater fracture strength than a slot with no retention grooves. Time of repair had no significant effect on the strength of the repair.

  13. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and designated special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. The effective date of the rule was November 2, 2009. The final rule was published with an inadvertent error in the codified section. This document corrects that error. This action is being taken to ensure the accuracy of the agency's regulations.

  14. Electrochemical study of insulating properties of dental amalgam bonding polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumelin-Chemla, F; Degrange, M

    1998-06-01

    The standard techniques used for amalgam restorations often result in a lack of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. The bonding of amalgam with polymer has been suggested to improve its adaptation to dental tissues. Moreover the polymer involved in the bonding should inhibit the corrosion and the diffusion of metallic ions. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the capacity of bonded amalgam to prevent ionic diffusion and migration. In this respect, an original method employing electrochemical techniques was used to determine the leakage current of bonded amalgam restorations. The electrochemical behaviour of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations was compared using a potentiostat driven by a computerized system (Voltamaster, Radiometer Analytical) with software for specific applications such as chronoamperometry or cyclic voltammetry. Samples of recently extracted teeth of young patients were first examined, and then the results were checked by other experimental assays using protected and unprotected copper sticks. The measurements obtained with chronoamperometry (E = +300 mV/SCE) in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C showed that after polarization for 30 h the oxidation current decreased threefold for bonded samples (10 microA cm(-2)) as compared with the unprotected samples (35 microA cm(-2)). These results, as well as those obtained with the copper wires, demonstrated that even with two layers of adhesive the bonded joint is permeable to ions probably as a result of the hydrophylic properties of HEMA, a component of the adhesive. However, using five layers of adhesive reduced the ionic current by a factor as large as 10(6).

  15. Electrochemical study of insulating properties of dental amalgam bonding polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toumelin-Chemla, Florence; Degrange, Michel [Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire de Paris V, Montrouge (France)

    1998-06-01

    The standard techniques used for amalgam restorations often result in a lack of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. The bonding of amalgam with polymer has been suggested to improve its adaptation to dental tissues. Moreover the polymer involved in the bonding should inhibit the corrosion and the diffusion of metallic ions. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the capacity of bonded amalgam to prevent ionic diffusion and migration. In this respect, an original method employing electrochemical techniques was used to determine the leakage current of bonded amalgam restorations. The electrochemical behaviour of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations was compared using a potentiostat driven by a computerized system (Voltamaster, Radiometer Analytical) with software for specific applications such as chronoamperometry or cyclic voltammetry. Samples of recently extracted teeth of young patients were first examined, and then the results were checked by other experimental assays using protected and unprotected copper sticks. The measurements obtained with chronoamperometry (E=+300 mV/SCE) in Ringer's solution at 37 deg. C showed that after polarization for 30 h the oxidation current decreased threefold for bonded samples (10 {mu}A cm{sup -2}) as compared with the unprotected samples (35 {mu}A cm{sup -2}). These results, as well as those obtained with the copper wires, demonstrated that even with two layers of adhesive the bonded joint is permeable to ions probably as a result of the hydrophylic properties of HEMA, a component of the adhesive. However, using five layers of adhesive reduced the ionic current by a factor as large as 10{sup 6}. (author)

  16. Mercury exposure and risks from dental amalgam in the US population, post-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, G M; Wilson, R; Allard, D; Purtill, C; Douma, S; Gravière, J

    2011-09-15

    Dental amalgam is 50% metallic mercury (Hg) by weight and Hg vapour continuously evolves from in-place dental amalgam, causing increased Hg content with increasing amalgam load in urine, faeces, exhaled breath, saliva, blood, and various organs and tissues including the kidney, pituitary gland, liver, and brain. The Hg content also increases with maternal amalgam load in amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood, meconium, various foetal tissues including liver, kidney and brain, in colostrum and breast milk. Based on 2001 to 2004 population statistics, 181.1 million Americans carry a grand total of 1.46 billion restored teeth. Children as young as 26 months were recorded as having restored teeth. Past dental practice and recently available data indicate that the majority of these restorations are composed of dental amalgam. Employing recent US population-based statistics on body weight and the frequency of dentally restored tooth surfaces, and recent research on the incremental increase in urinary Hg concentration per amalgam-filled tooth surface, estimates of Hg exposure from amalgam fillings were determined for 5 age groups of the US population. Three specific exposure scenarios were considered, each scenario incrementally reducing the number of tooth surfaces assumed to be restored with amalgam. Based on the least conservative of the scenarios evaluated, it was estimated that some 67.2 million Americans would exceed the Hg dose associated with the reference exposure level (REL) of 0.3 μg/m(3) established by the US Environmental Protection Agency; and 122.3 million Americans would exceed the dose associated with the REL of 0.03 μg/m(3) established by the California Environmental Protection Agency. Exposure estimates are consistent with previous estimates presented by Health Canada in 1995, and amount to 0.2 to 0.4 μg/day per amalgam-filled tooth surface, or 0.5 to 1 μg/day/amalgam-filled tooth, depending on age and other factors.

  17. Recovery of silver residues from dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva Pereira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam residues are probably the most important chemical residues generated from clinical dental practice because of the presence of heavy metals among its constituents, mainly mercury and silver. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative method for the recovery of silver residues from dental amalgam. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The residue generated after vacuum distillation of dental amalgam for the separation of mercury was initially diluted with 32.5% HNO3, followed by precipitation with 20% NaCl. Sequentially, under constant heating and agitation with NaOH and sucrose, the sample was reduced to metallic silver. However, the processing time was too long, which turned this procedure not viable. In another sequence of experiments, the dilution was accomplished with concentrated HNO3 at 90ºC, followed by precipitation with 20% NaCl. After washing, the pellet was diluted with concentrated NH4OH, water and more NaCl in order to facilitate the reaction with the reducer. RESULTS: Ascorbic acid was efficiently used as reducer, allowing a fast reduction, thus making the procedure viable. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed methodology is of easy application and does not require sophisticated equipment or expensive reagents.

  18. A significant dose-dependent relationship between mercury exposure from dental amalgams and kidney integrity biomarkers: a further assessment of the Casa Pia children's dental amalgam trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, D A; Carmody, T; Kern, J K; King, P G; Geier, M R

    2013-04-01

    Dental amalgams are a commonly used dental restorative material. Amalgams are about 50% mercury (Hg), and Hg is known to significantly accumulate in the kidney. It was hypothesized that because Hg accumulates in the proximal tubules (PTs), glutathione-S-transferases (GST)-α (suggestive of kidney damage at the level of PT) would be expected to be more related to Hg exposure than GST-π (suggestive of kidney damage at the level of the distal tubules). Urinary biomarkers of kidney integrity were examined in children of 8-18 years old, with and without dental amalgam fillings, from a completed clinical trial (parent study). Our study determined whether there was a significant dose-dependent correlation between increasing Hg exposure from dental amalgams and GST-α and GST-π as biomarkers of kidney integrity. Overall, the present study, using a different and more sensitive statistical model than the parent study, revealed a statistically significant dose-dependent correlation between cumulative exposure to Hg from dental amalgams and urinary levels of GST-α, after covariate adjustment; where as, a nonsignificant relationship was observed with urinary levels of GST-π. Furthermore, it was observed that urinary GST-α levels increased by about 10% over the 8-year course of the study among individuals with an average exposure to amalgams among the study subjects from the amalgam group, in comparison with study subjects with no exposure to dental amalgams. The results of our study suggest that dental amalgams contribute to ongoing kidney damage at the level of the PTs in a dose-dependent fashion.

  19. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule classifying dental amalgam into class II, reclassifying dental mercury from class I to class II, and designating a special control to support the class II classifications of these two devices, as well as the current class II classification of amalgam alloy. The three devices are now classified in a single regulation. The special control for the devices is a guidance document entitled, "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy." This action is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls to provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for the devices.

  20. Dental composites and amalgam and physical development in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserejian, N N; Hauser, R; Tavares, M; Trachtenberg, F L; Shrader, P; McKinlay, S

    2012-11-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children's growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988).

  1. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Rangarao Pawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory.

  2. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S.; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R.; Kamble, Amit P.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory. PMID:27217647

  3. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R; Kamble, Amit P

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory.

  4. Variations in survival time for amalgam and resin composite restorations: a population based cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, S; Price, R; Andreou, P; Jones, G; Portolesi, A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the association between the restorative material used and time to further treatment across population cohorts with universal coverage for dental treatment. Cohort study of variation in survival time for tooth restorations over time and by restoration material used based on an Accelerated Failure Time model. Primary dental care clinics. Members of Canada's First Nations and Inuit population covered by the Non-Insured Health Benefits program of Health Canada for the period April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2012. Tooth restorations using resin composite or amalgam material. Survival time of restoration to further treatment. Median survival time for resin composite was 51 days longer than amalgam, for restorations placed in 1999-2000. This difference was not statistically significant (p⟩0.05). Median survival times were lower for females, older subjects. Those visiting the dentist annually, and decreased monotonically over time from 11.2 and 11.3 years for resin composite and amalgam restorations respectively placed in 1999-2000 to 6.9 and 7.0 years for those placed in 2009-10. Resin composite restorations performed no better than amalgams over the study period, but cost considerably more. With the combination of the overall decrease in survival times for both resin composite and amalgam restorations and the increase in use of resin composite, the costs of serving Health Canada's Non-Insured Health Benefits population will rise considerably, even without any increase in the incidence of caries.

  5. A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCracken, Michael S; Gordan, Valeria V; Litaker, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations....

  6. Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardsson, Lars; Björkner, Bert; Karlsteen, Magnus; Schütz, Andrejs

    2002-05-06

    A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had a contact allergy to copper, which is very rare. She had, however, had no occupational exposure to copper. The contact allergy may be caused by long-term exposure of the oral mucosa to copper from copper-rich amalgam fillings, which were frequently used in childhood dentistry up to the 1960s in Sweden. The deposition of a copper-containing coating on the dental splint may be caused by a raised copper intake from drinking water, increasing the copper excretion in saliva, in combination with release of copper due to electrochemical corrosion of dental amalgam. The greenish colour change of the surface of the splint is probably caused by deposition of a mixture of copper compounds, e.g. copper carbonates. Analysis by the X-ray diffraction technique indicates that the dominant component is copper oxide (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding greenish/bluish discoloration observed on the back of the patient's gloves may be caused by increased copper excretion in tears.

  7. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with the bonded amalgam technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias de Souza, G M; Pereira, G D; Dias, C T; Paulillo, L A

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD Class II cavity preparations restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After the restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test. Statistical analysis of the data (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed no significant differences among the three groups that were studied.

  8. The amalgam-free dental school.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, F.J.M.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To review the change in teaching of Restorative Dentistry at Nijmegen dental school over the period 1986 to the present. KEY POINTS: In 1986, class I and II resin composite restorations were included in the pre-clinical program. However, these courses still started with class I and II am

  9. 12-year survival of composite vs. amalgam restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Information about the long-term clinical survival of large amalgam and composite restorations is still lacking. This retrospective study compares the longevity of three- and four-/five-surface amalgam and composite restorations relative to patients' caries risk. Patient records from a general practi

  10. Extent of tooth decay in the mouth and increased need for replacement of dental restorations: the New England Children's Amalgam Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Felicia; Maserejian, Nancy Nairi; Tavares, Mary; Soncini, Jennifer Ann; Hayes, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between baseline caries experience and the restoration replacement rate in children. The 5-year New England Children's Amalgam Trial recruited 534 6- to 10-year-old children with 2 or more carious posterior teeth. The association between decoy and longevity of restorations was assessed. Restorations with no follow-up (N = 391) were excluded from analysis. The average follow-up was 3.0 +/- 1.6 years in 489 children. Restorations with follow-up (N = 3,604) were placed in mouths with a median of 15 dfs/DFS and 8 dft/DFT. The need for replacement increased significantly (P or = 14 dfs/DFS needed replacement, compared to 9% for 2 to 5 dfs/DFS. Comparing dft/DFT after 5 years of follow-up, there was a 23% replacement rate for > or = 12 dft/DFT compared to 10% for 2 to 3 dft/DFT. Decoy in the mouth had a greater association with the need for replacement due to new caries compared to replacement due to recurrent caries. Children with more decoy at the time of restoration placement were at higher risk for replacement of restorations.

  11. [Management of wastes from dental amalgam by dentists in Burkina Faso and Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chala, S; Sawadogo, A; Sakout, M; Abdallaoui, F

    2012-12-01

    Dental amalgam is a metallic restorative material that is used for direct filling of carious lesions since many years. The use of this material generates solid and particulate wastes that present potential challenges to the environment. This study was carried out to assess amalgam use and waste management protocols practiced by Moroccan and Burkinabe dentists. A cross-sectional study was made of 79 in Rabat, Sale and Temara in Morocco and 56 in Ouagadougou, Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina-Faso. The results showed that 69.5% of dental amalgam waste in Morocco vs 49.9% in Burkina-Faso was disposed with household waste which is a problem for both the environment and a risk to human being. Proper methods of dental amalgam waste disposal should be carried out to prevent indirect mercury poisoning for human.

  12. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: A microleakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Araújo Veloso Popoff

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  13. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  14. High-Field MRI and Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMJ Mortazavi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0 and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0, and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices, 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration,was significant (p=0.046. These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic fieldand release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  15. High-field MRI and mercury release from dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S M J; Neghab, M; Anoosheh, S M H; Bahaeddini, N; Mortazavi, G; Neghab, P; Rajaeifard, A

    2014-04-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0) and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0), and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices), 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration),was significant (p=0.046). These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic field)and release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  16. [Experience with amalgams manufactured by Southern Dental Industries (Australia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarján, I; Gábris, K; Balaton, P; Dénes, J

    1990-09-01

    The gamma 2 phaseless amalgam of the firm Southern Dental Industries (SDI) was tested. None of the 205 fillings showed level deviations, unevenness, secondary caries and breakage. A minimum size gap was found in 2 cases.

  17. Influence of dental biofilm on release of mercury from amalgam exposed to carbamide peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Doron; Blank, Ori; Rotstein, Ilan

    2003-10-15

    Tooth bleaching is a popular procedure in modern aesthetic dentistry. Bleaching agents may affect amalgam restorations by altering the release of mercury. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of biofilm-coated amalgam restorations on the release of mercury in the presence of carbamide peroxide. Samples of SDI and Valliant amalgams were submerged for either 14 days or 7 months in buffered KCl after which they were coated with saliva, bacteria, and polysaccharides. The samples were exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) for 24 h. The amount of mercury released was examined for 120 h. Results showed that most of mercury release occurred within the first 24 h, after which the release rate decreased sharply. After 120 h the release of mercury from the tested samples was minimal and similar to the control group. The presence of biofilm coating on the amalgam samples did not induce the release of mercury but tended to reduce mercury release into the surrounding environment. CP induces the release of mercury from amalgam samples. However, the presence of biofilm did not prevent large amounts of mercury release from amalgam coated with biofilms and exposed to CP. This study indicates that dental biofilm may retard the release of mercury from amalgam restorations.

  18. Aggravated neuromuscular symptoms of mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbal, Ayla; Yılmaz, Hınç; Tutkun, Engin; Köş, Durdu Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Dental amalgam fillings are widely used all over the world. However, their mercury content can lead to various side effects and clinical problems. Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause several side effects on the central nerve system, renal and hepatic functions, immune system, fetal development and it can play a role on exacerbation of neuromuscular diseases. In this case, we will present a patient with vacuolar myopathy whose symptoms were started and aggravated with her dental amalgam fillings.

  19. Amalgam and ART restorations in children: a controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorim, R.G. de; Leal, S.C.; Mulder, J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to compare 2-year cumulative survival rates of amalgam and atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations in primary molars and to investigate the determinants of the survival rate of restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A controlled clinical trial using

  20. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  1. Micro-PIXE study of metal loss from dental amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Guibert, Edouard; Wang, Liping; Chappuis, Thibault; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2017-08-01

    Mercury amalgams have been a topic of controversy ever since their introduction over 150 years ago as a dental material. An interesting question is if metals are released from the amalgam into the enamel and dentine tissue. To elucidate this PIXE mapping was used to investigate metal redistribution in an extracted molar tooth with a ∼30 year old high-Cu content amalgam filling. The tooth was sectioned and polished, and elemental mapping carried out on the amalgam/enamel, bulk amalgam and the wear surface of the amalgam. As expected, the amalgam was multiphase amalgam comprising of Cu-rich and Ag-rich grains with non-uniform distribution of Hg. The amalgam/dentine interface was clearly defined with amalgam elements on one side and C and P from hydroxyapatite on the other side with evidence of only slight interface corrosion. The peaks for Cu Hg and Zn were isolated from interfering signals with concentrations in the enamel tissue, observed to be at, or below the method detection limit. The proximity in energy of the Sn L α and Ca K α , peaks and the background on the Hg M α gave signal overlap which increased the MDL for these elements. Remarkably, a course grain texture in the amalgam was observed just below the biting surface of the amalgam which might be associated with tribochemical processes from mastication. This coupled with the clear absence of the amalgam metals from tooth tissue, even in close proximity to the interface, suggests that for this sample, release of Hg occurred via erosion or dissolution in saliva.

  2. Mercury (Hg) burden in children: The impact of dental amalgam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, Iman, E-mail: iman@kfshrc.edu.sa [Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, PO Box: 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Sedairi, Al anoud [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, PO Box: 24452, Riyadh 11495 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-15

    The risks and benefits of using mercury (Hg) in dental amalgam have long been debated. This study was designed to estimate Hg body burden and its association with dental amalgam fillings in 182 children (ages: 5-15 years) living in Taif City. Hg was measured in urine (UHg), hair (HHg) and toenails (NHg) by the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Vapor Generator Accessory system. Urinary Hg levels were calculated as both micrograms per gram creatinine ({mu}g/g creatinine) and micrograms per liter ({mu}g/L). We found that children with amalgam fillings (N = 106) had significantly higher UHg-C levels than children without (N = 76), with means of 3.763 {mu}g/g creatinine versus 3.457 {mu}g/g creatinine, respectively (P = 0.019). The results were similar for UHg (P = 0.01). A similar pattern was also seen for HHg, with means of 0.614 {mu}g/g (N = 97) for children with amalgam versus 0.242 {mu}g/g (N = 74) for those without amalgam fillings (P = 0). Although the mean NHg was higher in children without amalgam (0.222 {mu}g/g, N = 61) versus those with (0.163 {mu}g/g, N = 101), the relationship was not significant (P = 0.069). After adjusting for many confounders, the multiple logistic regression model revealed that the levels of UHg-C and HHg were 2.047 and 5.396 times higher, respectively, in children with dental amalgam compared to those without (P < 0.01). In contrast, a significant inverse relationship was seen between NHg levels and dental amalgam fillings (P = 0.003). Despite the controversy surrounding the health impact of dental amalgam, this study showed some evidence that amalgam-associated Hg exposure might be related with symptoms of oral health, such as aphthous ulcer, white patches, and a burning-mouth sensation. Further studies are needed to reproduce these findings. The present study showed that significant numbers of children with or without amalgam had Hg levels exceeding the acceptable reference limits. The detrimental neurobehavioral and

  3. Mercury (Hg) burden in children: the impact of dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Al-Sedairi, Al Anoud

    2011-07-15

    The risks and benefits of using mercury (Hg) in dental amalgam have long been debated. This study was designed to estimate Hg body burden and its association with dental amalgam fillings in 182 children (ages: 5-15 years) living in Taif City. Hg was measured in urine (UHg), hair (HHg) and toenails (NHg) by the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Vapor Generator Accessory system. Urinary Hg levels were calculated as both micrograms per gram creatinine (μg/g creatinine) and micrograms per liter (μg/L). We found that children with amalgam fillings (N=106) had significantly higher UHg-C levels than children without (N=76), with means of 3.763 μg/g creatinine versus 3.457 μg/g creatinine, respectively (P=0.019). The results were similar for UHg (P=0.01). A similar pattern was also seen for HHg, with means of 0.614 μg/g (N=97) for children with amalgam versus 0.242 μg/g (N=74) for those without amalgam fillings (P=0). Although the mean NHg was higher in children without amalgam (0.222 μg/g, N=61) versus those with (0.163 μg/g, N=101), the relationship was not significant (P=0.069). After adjusting for many confounders, the multiple logistic regression model revealed that the levels of UHg-C and HHg were 2.047 and 5.396 times higher, respectively, in children with dental amalgam compared to those without (Pdental amalgam fillings (P=0.003). Despite the controversy surrounding the health impact of dental amalgam, this study showed some evidence that amalgam-associated Hg exposure might be related with symptoms of oral health, such as aphthous ulcer, white patches, and a burning-mouth sensation. Further studies are needed to reproduce these findings. The present study showed that significant numbers of children with or without amalgam had Hg levels exceeding the acceptable reference limits. The detrimental neurobehavioral and/or nephrotoxic effects of such an increased Hg on children should be a cause of concern, and further investigation is warranted. Our

  4. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of amalgam restorations in oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennoju Sai Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mercury a popular heavy metal used in dentistry in the form of amalgam is a known clastogen. The assessment of micronuclei in cells is a promising tool for studying the genotoxic effect of mercury on them. Hence, a study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated buccal cells of subjects with amalgam restorations. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 subjects (age and gender-matched sample of 30 study group and 30 control group were included in this study. Smears were obtained with moistened wooden spatula from buccal mucosa in close contact with amalgam restoration and fixed with 100% ethyl alcohol. After staining with Papanicolaou stain, all the slides were examined under ×40 and 1,000 cells were counted for the presence of micronuclei. The data were entered into a spread sheet and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: A statistically significant increase in the number of micronuclei containing cells was observed in the study group when compared to control group (P < 0.05. A positive correlation was observed between the duration of restoration and frequency of micronuclei (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed a definite genotoxic effect of amalgam restorations on the oral cavity which can be attributed to the clastogenic action of mercury in amalgam restorations.

  5. Costing dental restorations in public sector dental clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairiyah, Abdul Muttalib; Razak, Ishak Abdul; Raja-Latifah, Raja Jalludin; Tan, Bee Siew; Norain, Abu Talib; Noor-Aliyah, Ismail; Natifah, Che Salleh; Rauzi, Ismail

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study is to share cost analysis methodology and to obtain cost estimates for posterior restorations in public sector dental clinics. Two urban and 2 rural dental clinics in Selangor state were selected. Only cases of 1 posterior restoration per visit by dental officers were included over 6 months. One capsulated amalgam type, 1 capsulated tooth-colored, and 1 non-capsulated tooth-colored material were selected. A clinical pathway form was formulated to collect data per patient. Annual capital and recurrent expenditures were collected per clinic. The mean cost of an amalgam restoration was RM 30.96 (sdRM 7.86); and tooth-colored restorations ranged from RM 33.00 (sdRM 8.43) to RM 41.10 (sdRM 10.61). Wherein 1 USD = RM 2.8. Restoration costs were 35% to 55% higher in clinics in rural areas than in urban areas. The findings demonstrate economy of scale for clinic operation and restoration costs with higher patient load. Costs per restoration were higher in rural than in urban dental clinics. More studies are recommended to address the dearth of dental costs data in Malaysia.

  6. Mercury from dental amalgam: exposure and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koral, Stephen M

    2013-02-01

    There has long been an undercurrent within the dental profession of anti-amalgam sentiment, a "mercury-free" movement. To assess whether anything is or is not scientifically wrong with amalgam, one must look to the vast literature on exposure, toxicology, and risk assessment of mercury. The subject of risk assessment goes straight to the heart of the debate over whether a malgam is safe, or not, for unrestricted use in dentistry in the population at large.

  7. Dental amalgam: few proven harmful effects but many ongoing concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    (1) Dental amalgam is one of the main sources of exposure to mercury in industrialised countries; (2) At high doses, mercury is both neurotoxic and nephrotoxic. A suspected link exists between chronic exposure to low doses of mercury derived from dental amalgam and renal, neurodegenerative or neurobehavioural disorders, but it has not been established; (3) Some individual cases are troubling, but epidemiological studies show no major effects in the general population. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain why some people may be more sensitive than others to the effects of low-dose mercury; (4) More and more countries, especially Sweden, recommend that the use of amalgam should be restricted, particularly in pregnant women and children; (5) As part of a global strategy to eliminate mercury, the European Parliament has asked the Commission to draft legislation limiting the use of mercury in dental amalgam; (6) Evaluation of the risk-benefit balances of alternatives to dental amalgam does not provide sufficient data on which to base an informed choice between available options.

  8. Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in children exposed prenatally to maternal dental amalgam: the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gene E; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Love, Tanzy M T; McSorley, Emeir M; Bonham, Maxine P; Mulhern, Maria S; Yeates, Alison J; Davidson, Philip W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Strain, J J; Thurston, Sally W; Harrington, Donald; Zareba, Grazyna; Wallace, Julie M W; Myers, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Limited human data are available to assess the association between prenatal mercury vapor (Hg⁰)) exposure from maternal dental amalgam restorations and neurodevelopment of children. We evaluated the association between maternal dental amalgam status during gestation and children's neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS). Maternal amalgam status was determined prospectively in a longitudinal cohort study examining the associations of prenatal exposure to nutrients and methylmercury (MeHg) with neurodevelopment. A total of 236 mother-child pairs initially enrolled in the SCDNS in 2001 were eligible to participate. Maternal amalgam status was measured as number of amalgam surfaces (the primary metric) and number of occlusal points. The neurodevelopmental assessment battery was comprised of age-appropriate tests of cognitive, language, and perceptual functions, and scholastic achievement. Linear regression analysis controlled for MeHg exposure, maternal fatty acid status, and other covariates relevant to child development. Maternal amalgam status evaluation yielded an average of 7.0 surfaces (range 0-28) and 11.0 occlusal points (range 0-40) during pregnancy. Neither the number of maternal amalgam surfaces nor occlusal points were associated with any outcome. Our findings do not provide evidence to support a relationship between prenatal exposure to Hg⁰ from maternal dental amalgam and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children at 5 years of age.

  9. Influence of cavity depth on marginal degradation of amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, A

    1991-04-01

    In a 5-year clinical trial it was observed that the marginal degradation of class-II amalgam restorations could be related to the bulk of the restoration. The association between the occlusal cavity depth and the marginal degradation was observed after 6 months and varied for the different types of alloy. Ridit scores of the marginal degradation were correlated to various indices of the cavity sizes, to assess the possible reason for this association. The possibilities of the relationship being an indirect effect caused by longer condensation times or by poorer condensation due to the use of larger condenser sizes were rejected. Furthermore, the possibility that the association was the result of potential buildup of stresses on the restoration margins caused by flexible cusps and axial walls was not apparent. A possible mechanism may be that marginal degradation is the result of short-term or long-term expansion, or even extrusion of amalgam. Expansion may theoretically be caused over short periods by temperature changes or over long periods by corrosion or phase shifts in the amalgam. The theory does not exclude the role of creep or corrosion and may furthermore explain the lack of correlation between in-vitro tests and in-vivo performance of amalgam restorations.

  10. Comparison of wear and clinical performance between amalgam, composite and open sandwich restorations: 2-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeo, A; Gray, Gordon B; Sulieman, M A; Jagger, Daryll C

    2004-03-01

    There has been some disquiet over the use of mercury containing restorative materials. The most commonly used alternative is composite resin but this has the potential disadvantage associated with wear and marginal leakage, which in turn, has proven to result in secondary caries and sensitivity. To overcome the shortcomings of a directly placed composite restoration, the glass-ionomer/composite open sandwich technique was introduced followed by the subsequent introduction of compomer systems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the wear and clinical performance of a control group of amalgam restorations compared with that of a group of posterior composite resin restorations fillings and a group of compomer/composite open sandwich restorations placed by a single general dental practitioner. The duration of the study was 2 years. One hundred and thirty three (71.4%) patients were successfully recalled and the wear and clinical performance of each restoration after 6, 12 and 24 months was measured, indirectly. There was no statistically significant difference recorded between the groups at 6 months or 1 year (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the 2-year study, there was a significantly lower rate of wear recorded for the control amalgam restorations compared with other two groups (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference in wear recorded between the two groups of tooth-coloured restorations (p > 0.05). With regards to clinical performance of the restorations, occlusal and proximal contacts in each group of restoration remained satisfactory throughout the study.

  11. Restoration of posterior teeth in clinical practice: evidence base for choosing amalgam versus composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the current use of amalgam versus resin composite in posterior restorations and the evidence-base for choosing between these two treatment options. While much research has been published on the issue of the clinical use of amalgam versus resin composite, there are several issues that limit the true evidence-base on the subject. Furthermore, while the majority of published studies on posterior composites would seem to indicate equivalent clinical performance of resin composite to amalgam restorations, the studies that should be weighted much more heavily (randomized controlled trials) do not support the slant of the rest of the literature. As part of an evidence-based approach to private practice, clinicians need to be aware of the levels of evidence in the literature and need to properly inform patients of the true clinical outcomes that are associated with the use of amalgam versus resin composite for posterior restorations, so that patients are themselves making informed decisions about their dental care.

  12. Comparison of release of mercury from three dental amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, C L; Soh, G; Lee, A S; Yeoh, T S

    1989-07-01

    Mercury release from dental amalgams has generated considerable concern in recent years and is the subject of this study. Specimens of one admixed high-copper amalgam (Contour), one lathe-cut low-copper amalgam (SDI), and a new tin- and copper-free amalgam claimed to be non-mercury-releasing (Composil) were evaluated for release of mercury when incubated in purified water at 37 degrees C. Measurement of mercury was done by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and the amount released was expressed as micrograms/cm2/24 hr. Study was conducted over a four-week period. Results show that Contour and SDI released similar insignificant amounts (mean release of less than 0.1 microgram/cm2/24 hr) compared with Composil (mean release of 41.0 micrograms/cm2/24 hr). The difference in release by Composil compared with that by Contour and SDI is highly significant (P less than 0.001). The implications of chronic release of mercury from dental amalgams are discussed. Long-term release studies are in progress.

  13. Dentin Pre-Treatment to Suppress Microleakage of Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosi Kusuma Eriwati Arianto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diminished microleakage of amalgam-to-dentin preparations would benefit large populations in public health facilities. Prior studies demonstrated less microleakage for bonded amalgams than similarly bonded advanced composites among 30 different composite/bonding agent/storage conditions, Haller et al. showed that a combination of formaldehyde pre-treatment and glutaraldehyde-containing Syntac adhesive minimized microleakage. In the current study, CLass V restorations (groups of 10 formaldehyde-treated non carious human molars were filled with Valiant (Ivoclar NA amalgam after application of one of three liners: Copalite varnish; Amalagambond Plus with microfiber; and Syntac/Variolink. The control group used no liner material. After 24 hours at 37°C/100% RH, samples were thermocycled (1000 eyeles in water at 5°C and 60°C (15 second dwell time in each. Samples were immersed in 5% methylene blue solution (4 hrs and observed under a stereomicroscope; interfaces also were examined by SEM. Krsukal Wallis ANOVA by ranks (P<0.01 and Mann Whitney U Tests (P<0.05 of the data indicate improvements (equivalent among the 3 different liners tested here over unlined amalgam preparations. Liner/aldehyde-crosslinked dentin interphases, without technique-sensitive composites, may minimize microleakage by improving amalgam contact (physical bonding.

  14. Effect of Surface Polishing on Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam After Treatment 16% Carbamide Peroxide Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Khamverdi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of surface polishing on mercury release from dental amalgam after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide gel.Materials and Methods: Ninety-six samples from two different amalgam brands were prepared in truncated cone-shaped PVC polymer molds with an external surface area of 195 mm². Half of the specimens were polished with green and red rubber, a brush and tin oxide paste at low speed. Samples were treated with 16% carbamide peroxide gel intubes containing 3 mL of carbamide peroxide gel and 0.1 mL of distilled water for 14 and 28 hours. Subsequently, carbamide peroxide gel on the sample surfaces was rinsed away with 7.0 mL of distilled water until the volume of each tube increased to 10 mL. Themercury level of each solution was measured using the VAV–440 mercury analyzer system.Considering the surface area of each amalgam disc, mercury amounts were calculated in μg ⁄mm². Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA.Results: There were significant differences between the mean levels of mercury release from polished vs. unpolished amalgam surfaces after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide.Increasing the storage time from 14 to 28 hours did not result in significant changes in the amount of mercury release. There was no significant interaction effect between amalgam surface polish and storage time statistically.Conclusion: Polished amalgam restorations release less mercury after treatment with carbamide peroxide bleaching gel in comparison with unpolished amalgam restorations.

  15. Effect of radiofrequency radiation from Wi-Fi devices on mercury release from amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Maryam; Mortazavi, S M J; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Mortazavi, Ghazal; Haghani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Dental amalgam is composed of approximately 50% elemental mercury. Despite concerns over the toxicity of mercury, amalgam is still the most widely used restorative material. Wi-Fi is a rapidly using local area wireless computer networking technology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates the effect of exposure to Wi-Fi signals on mercury release from amalgam restorations. Standard class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 20 non-carious extracted human premolars. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 10). The control group was stored in non-environment. The specimens in the experimental groups were exposed to a radiofrequency radiation emitted from standard Wi Fi devices at 2.4 GHz for 20 min. The distance between the Wi-Fi router and samples was 30 cm and the router was exchanging data with a laptop computer that was placed 20 m away from the router. The concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva in the groups was evaluated by using a cold-vapor atomic absorption Mercury Analyzer System. The independent t test was used to evaluate any significant differences in mercury release between the two groups. The mean (±SD) concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva of the Wi-Fi exposed teeth samples was 0.056 ± .025 mg/L, while it was only 0.026 ± .008 mg/L in the non-exposed control samples. This difference was statistically significant (P =0.009). Exposure of patients with amalgam restorations to radiofrequency radiation emitted from conventional Wi-Fi devices can increase mercury release from amalgam restorations.

  16. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-01

    fillings in posterior teeth is difficult. Apart from the difficulties in conducting a randomized, controlled long-term study comparing the longevity of direct fillings, the fact that composites and adhesives used in a study have often already been replaced by the next generation of the product at the time of study publication presents an additional problem. Not only the filling material, but also patient parameters and local, intraoral factors (e. g. localisation of the filling as well as the treating dentist have an impact on the longevity of dental fillings. In evaluating economic studies, one has to refer to the heterogeneity of data on longevity in the medical evaluation. The only effect parameter used in the studies is longevity, other aspects (e. g. long-term functionality are only referred to in discussions. Extensive counselling of patients regarding the selection of the appropriate filling material is important. Conclusions: Amalgam fillings show a longer longevity than composite fillings. Two out of six systematic reviews conclude that the expected survival time of composite fillings can be comparable to amalgam fillings. However, these conclusions are based on the results of short-term studies which usually overestimate the longevity of filling materials. From an economic standpoint, amalgam is the more economic filling material compared to direct composite fillings in posterior teeth when considering longevity as the only result parameter. Other aspects than longevity need to be considered in individually choosing the appropriate dental filling material. For future studies aiming to compare the longevity of amalgam and composite fillings, a sufficient sample size and study period, preferably in the setting of a private dental practice, should be aimed for. An evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings should take the functionality of teeth over a longer time period into account, as well as patients’ preferences. The rapid

  17. [Black or white--Which choice for the molars? Part 2. Which does one choose for the restoration of posterior teeth: amalgam or composite?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, Roeland; Delmé, Katleen

    2008-01-01

    The two direct dental restorative materials most commonly used today are silver-mercury amalgam and resin-based composite. The survival of dental amalgam restorations is twice as high than for composite fillings: polymerisation shrinkage, deficient marginal adaptation, higher wear rates, defective contact points leading to food impaction, insufficiently converted composite at the bottom of the cavity are problems that cannot be underestimated when using resin-composite. This does not imply that there is no weakness for amalgam: the need for retentive cavities at the cost of healthy tooth substance, weakening of the tooth's strength by cutting through the tooth crown's ridges, the risk of fracture of remaining tooth substance (mostly buccal and lingual surfaces) as the result of the cavity design, and the lack of adhesion between amalgam and tooth substance. Retaining a tooth's strength by the replacement of amalgam by resin-composites is not always the correct solution. In this respect, it can be questioned whether it is not appropriate to repair failing (extensive) amalgam restorations as to replace them with resin-composites. Research in this respect has demonstrated that dentists still are not convinced of this treatment option. Restoring a tooth in its original build-up or structure and function within the oral cavity is the basis of the biomimetic principle: the use of composite appears to be more obvious than restoring with amalgam. In the present survey pro's and con's of amalgams and resin-composites for the restoration of posterior teeth are weighted. The conclusion demonstrates that there is still a place for dental amalgam in modern restorative dentistry when plastic filling materials are used for the direct tooth repair or restoration.

  18. A prospective study of prenatal mercury exposure from maternal dental amalgams and autism severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, David A; Kern, Janet K; Geier, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    Dental amalgams containing 50% mercury (Hg) have been used in dentistry for the last 150 years, and Hg exposure during key developmental periods was associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This study examined increased Hg exposure from maternal dental amalgams during pregnancy among 100 qualifying participants born between 1990-1999 and diagnosed with DSM-IV autism (severe) or ASD (mild). Logistic regression analysis (age, gender, race, and region of residency adjusted) by quintile of maternal dental amalgams during pregnancy revealed the ratio of autism:ASD (severe:mild) were about 1 (no effect) for or =6 amalgams. Subjects with > or =6 amalgams were 3.2-fold significantly more likely to be diagnosed with autism (severe) in comparison to ASD (mild) than subjects with < or =5 amalgams. Dental amalgam policies should consider Hg exposure in women before and during the child-bearing age and the possibility of subsequent fetal exposure and adverse outcomes.

  19. Microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations using different adhesive agents with dye under vacuum: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Parolia

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Significance: Bonded amalgam restorations prevent over-preparation and reduce the tooth flexure. GIC type I under amalgam provides chemical bonding in between amalgam and tooth structure and thus reduces the microleakage.

  20. Hg, Bi, Cu and Zn distribution in human teeth treated by dental amalgam measured by synchrotron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Marques, J. P.; Brito, J.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.

    2002-11-01

    Human teeth restored with dental amalgam were analysed by a synchrotron microprobe to evaluate the diffusion of its major constituents, Cu, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. We measured the elemental distribution inside the tooth from the root to the enamel, specially the region around the amalgam, after its total removal. Hg is present only in restored teeth and concentration profiles show strongly increased levels of this element close to the amalgam region, reaching 500 μg g -1 in one or two cases, decreasing strongly to the inner part of the tooth. Pb concentration profiles do not seem to be affected by metallic amalgam. Very high concentrations of Bi were found in one of the restored teeth, reaching more than 2000 μg g -1, decreasing sharply to the outer regions. The distribution of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn was also determined in order to evaluate elemental influences by amalgam components. No significant changes in elemental concentrations were detected for Mn and Fe between healthy and restored teeth. However, the levels of Zn and Cu are increased in restored teeth. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, 100 μm of spatial resolution and an energy of 18 keV, installed at LURE synchrotron (France) was used.

  1. Hg, Bi, Cu and Zn distribution in human teeth treated by dental amalgam measured by synchrotron microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, M.L. E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.pt; Marques, J.P.; Brito, J.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A.S

    2002-11-01

    Human teeth restored with dental amalgam were analysed by a synchrotron microprobe to evaluate the diffusion of its major constituents, Cu, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. We measured the elemental distribution inside the tooth from the root to the enamel, specially the region around the amalgam, after its total removal. Hg is present only in restored teeth and concentration profiles show strongly increased levels of this element close to the amalgam region, reaching 500 {mu}g g{sup -1} in one or two cases, decreasing strongly to the inner part of the tooth. Pb concentration profiles do not seem to be affected by metallic amalgam. Very high concentrations of Bi were found in one of the restored teeth, reaching more than 2000 {mu}g g{sup -1}, decreasing sharply to the outer regions. The distribution of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn was also determined in order to evaluate elemental influences by amalgam components. No significant changes in elemental concentrations were detected for Mn and Fe between healthy and restored teeth. However, the levels of Zn and Cu are increased in restored teeth. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, 100 {mu}m of spatial resolution and an energy of 18 keV, installed at LURE synchrotron (France) was used.

  2. Microleakage in primary teeth restored by conventional or bonded amalgam technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myaki, S I; Rodrigues, C R; Raggio, D P; Flores, T A; Matson, M R

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate marginal leakage in class V restorations in primary teeth restored with amalgam, using three different techniques. Thirty maxillary anterior primary teeth, clinically sound and naturally exfoliated, were used. In group 1 (n = 10), two thin layers of a copal varnish (Cavitine) were applied. In group 2 (n = 10), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, a dual adhesive system, was used according to manufacturer instructions. In group 3 (n = 10), One-Step adhesive system in combination with a low-viscosity resin (Resinomer) were used according to manufacturer instructions. All samples were restored with a high-copper dental amalgam alloy (GS 80, SDI). After restoration, the samples were stored in normal saline at 37 degrees C for 72 h. The specimens were polished, thermocycled (500 cycles, 5 degrees and 55 degrees C, 30-s dwell time) and impermeabilized with fingernail polish to within 1.0 mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were then placed in 0.5% methylene blue for 4 h. Finally, the samples were sectioned and evaluated for marginal leakage. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the filled adhesive resin (group 3) had the least microleakage. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2.

  3. Management of Class I and Class II Amalgam Restorations with Localized Defects: Five-Year Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of dental restorations has been the traditional treatment for defective restorations. This five-year prospective clinical trial evaluated amalgam restorations with localized defects that were treated by means of repair or refurbishing. Fifty-two patients (50% female and 50% male, mean age 28.3±18.1 years, range 18–80 with 160 class I and class II defective restorations were included. The study focused on the application of two minimally invasive treatments for localized restoration defects and compared these with no treatment and total replacement as negative and positive controls, respectively. Restorations were assessed by two calibrated examiners according to modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria, including marginal adaptation, anatomic form, secondary caries, and roughness. At five years, recall was examined in 45 patients with 108 restorations (67.5%. The results suggest that repair treatment is as effective as total replacement of restorations with localized defects, reducing biological costs to the patient and providing new tools to the clinician. Refinishing restoration is a useful treatment for localized anatomic form defects.

  4. Class I and Class II silver amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations: teaching approaches in Canadian faculties of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Dorothy

    2005-06-01

    A 10-question survey was mailed to the 10 Canadian faculties of dentistry to determine current approaches to teaching undergraduates about silver amalgam and resin composite for posterior restorations in adults and children. Responses were received from all 10 pedodontic programs and from 8 of the 10 operative and restorative programs. The use of silver amalgam and posterior composite for restorations of primary and permanent teeth is covered in the curricula of all dental schools, but the relative emphasis on the 2 materials varies. In the operative and restorative programs, curriculum time devoted to silver amalgam is either greater than or equal to that devoted to posterior composite. Five of the 8 schools reported greater educational emphasis on silver amalgam for the permanent dentition; however, course directors noted that the preference among patients seen in clinics is tending toward composite restorations. Curricula appear designed to educate students about the optimal use of both materials. Requirements for performance of restorations during training generally do not specify the type of material; these requirements range from 60 restorations to 250 surfaces. Five of the 8 schools conduct clinical competency tests with both materials. The responses from the pedodontic programs were more diverse. The proportion of curriculum time devoted to each type of material in these programs ranged from less than 25% to more than 75%. Five schools reported more emphasis on silver amalgam, 3 schools reported equal emphasis, and 2 schools reported more emphasis on posterior composite. No clinical requirements were specified in any of the undergraduate pedodontic programs. Within some of the faculties, there were differences between the operative and restorative program and the pedodontic program with respect to emphasis on different materials for the posterior dentition.

  5. [Amount of mercury from dental amalgam filling released into the atmosphere by cremation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, M; Kishimoto, T; Yamamura, Y; Tabuse, M; Akama, Y; Satoh, H

    1994-07-01

    Mercury in dental amalgam filling is released into the atmosphere by cremation and is a suspected source of mercury pollution. The amount of mercury released was measured at three crematoriums. First, mercury levels in the atmosphere were measured. Mercury existed mainly in the gaseous form in ambient air. The concentration of atmospheric mercury at the three crematoriums (S, T and M) ranged from 4.3 to 19.7ng/m3, which was nearly identical to levels in our university surveyed as the control area and also to the levels of atmospheric mercury in general in Japan. Secondly, the amount of mercury release from T crematorium was estimated using official published statistical data in Japan and calculated as follows: sigma[(age specific number of dead that were cremated) x (the number of restored teeth by age category) x (mercury content per amalgam filling (0.6 g))] x (prevalence rate of restoration with amalgam). The amount of mercury released from this crematorium was estimated to be approximately 9.4 kg per year, or a daily release of 26 g into the ambient air. These results indicate that mercury release by cremation is similar to that from other man-made sources.

  6. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-12-19

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  7. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3(rd) year, overall "Bravo" rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3(rd) year evaluation (P resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities.

  8. Fracture Resistance of Pulpotomized Primary Molar Restored with Extensive Class II Amalgam Restorations

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    F. Mazhari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate fracture resistance of pulpoto-mized primary molar teeth restored with extensive multisurface amalgam restorations.Materials and Methods: Eighty extracted carious human primary molar teeth were se-lected forpresent study. Teeth were divided in to eight groups of ten. Mesio- or disto-occlusal and Mesio-occluso-distal cavities with different cavity wall thickness (1.5 or 2.5mm were prepared in both first and second primary molar teeth. After restoring teeth with amalgam, all specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Then samples were thermocycled for 1000 cycles from 5°C to 55°C. The specimens then were subjected to a compressive load in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min-1. ANOVA and t-test were used for statistical analysis.Results: Mean fracture resistance of first and second molar teeth were 975.5 N (SD=368.8 and 1049.2 N (SD=540.1 respectively. In the first molar group, fracture resis-tance of two-surface cavities was significantly more than three-surface cavities (P<0.001, however this difference was not statistically significant in the second molar group. In both first and second molar group, fracture resistance incavities with 2.5 mm wall thickness, was significantly more than the group with 1.5 mm wall thickness.Conclusion: The mean fracture resistance in pulpotomized primary molar restored with amalgam restorations was higher than reported maximum bite force in primary teeth even in extensive multi-surface restorations. Therefore, the teeth with large proximal carious lesions in schoolchildren could be restored with amalgam.

  9. Reasons for Retreatment of Amalgam and Composite Restorations among the Patients Referring to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry

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    Siavash Savadi Oskoee

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Retreatment of existing restorations not only requires a lot of money and time but also there is a danger of weakening tooth structure and irritating the pulp. Since awareness of the reasons for the retreatment of teeth will save the teeth from possible future failure, the aim of this study was to assess the reasons for retreatment of amalgam and composite restorations in patients referring to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry.

    Materials and methods. In this descriptive study, the subjects had previously received an amalgam or a composite restoration in the Operative Department by dental students and were judged to need retreatment in their second visit. A total of 300 defective teeth were selected by simple random sampling method. The data was collected through examination and questionnaires and analyzed using chi-square test.

    Results. There was a statistically significant association between the type of the restorative material and the reason for retreatment (p=0.001.

    Conclusion. Although the reasons for the retreatment of amalgam and composite restorations were different, recurrent caries was the main reason for the retreatment for both restorative materials.

  10. Evaluation of patients with oral lichenoid lesions by dental patch testing and results of removal of the dental restoration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Buket Şahin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Oral lichenoid lesions (OLL are contact stomatitis characterized by white reticular or erosive patches, plaque-like lesions that are clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from oral lichen planus (OLP. Amalgam dental fillings and dental restoration materials are among the etiologic agents. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the standard and dental series patch tests in patients with OLL in comparison to a control group and evaluate our results. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with OLL or OLP and 30 healthy control subjects, who had at least one dental restoration material and/or dental filling, were included in the study. Both groups received standard series and dental patch test and the results were evaluated simultaneously. Results: The most frequent allergens in the dental series patch test in the patient group were palladium chloride (n=4; 12.12% and benzoyl peroxide (n=2, 6.06%. Of the 33 patients with OLL; 8 had positive reaction to allergents in the standard patch test series and 8 had positive reaction in the dental patch test series. There was no significant difference in the rate of patch test reaction to the dental and standard series between the groups. Ten patients were advised to have the dental restoration material removed according to the results of the patch tests. The lesions improved in three patients [removal of all amalgam dental fillings (n=1, replacement of all amalgam dental fillings with an alternative filling material (n=1 and replacement of the dental prosthesis (n=1] following the removal or replacement of the dental restoration material. Conclusion: Dental patch test should be performed in patients with OLL and dental restoration material. Dental filling and/or prosthesis should be removed/replaced if there is a reaction against a dental restoration material-related allergen.

  11. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Pulpotomized Primary Molars Restored with Stainless Steel Crown and Amalgam

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    Haghgoo R.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Pulpotomy is the most common pulp treatment in primary teeth. Final restoration of the pulpotomized primary molar can affect the success rate of treatment. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the success rate of formocresol pulpotomy in primary molars restored with stainless steel crowns as compared to those restored with amalgam.Materials and Method: In this randomized clinical trial study, 110 primary molars to be treated with pulpotomy were treated by a conventional pulpotomy technique. Then these teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups: amalgam and crown. 55 teeth were restored by stainless steel crown and 55 by amalgam. The clinical and radiographic evaluation was done at 6-12-24 months. The data were analyzed by Exact Fisher test.Results: During the 6 months of evaluation, no clinical and radiographic failure was seen. In the 12 months of follow up in the amalgam group, 1 case showed swelling and furcal radiolucency. During the 24 months of evaluation, mobility was seen in 2 teeth in the crown group, and in the amalgam group radiolucency was seen in 1 case, mobility in 1 case, and internal resorption in 1 tooth. Exact Fisher test showed that there was no significant difference in the success rate of pulpotomized molars restored by stainless steel crown and amalgam.Conclusion: If the tooth is selected correctly for pulpotomy, SSC and amalgam restoration can be used as the final restoration.

  12. Process Optimization for Valuable Metal Recovery from Dental Amalgam Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Parra–Mesa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the methodology used for optimizing leaching in a semi pilot plant is presented. This leaching process was applied to recover value metals from dental amalgam residues. 23 factorial design was used to characterize the process during the first stage and in the second one, a central compound rotational design was used for modeling copper percentage dissolved, a function of the nitric acid concentration, leaching time and temperature. This model explained the 81% of the response variability, which is considered satisfactory given the complexity of the process kinetics and, furthermore, it allowed the definition of the operation conditions for better copper recovery, which this was of 99.15%, at a temperature of 55°C, a concentration of 30% by weight and a time of 26 hours.

  13. Investigation of the mechanism of mercury removal from a silver dental amalgam alloy

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    M. DJURDJEVIC

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of silver dental amalgam decomposition and the mercury removal mechanism was performed. The decomposition process was analysed during thermal treatment in the temperature interval from 400 °C to 850 °C and for times from 0.5 to 7.5 h. The chemical compositions of the silver dental amalgam alloy and the treated alloy were tested and microstructure analysis using optical and scanning electron microscopy was carried out. The phases were identified using energy disperse electron probe microanalysis. A mechanism for the mercury removal process from silver dental amalgam alloy is suggested.

  14. Streptococcus mutans-induced secondary caries adjacent to glass ionomer cement, composite resin and amalgam restorations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Teixeira, Adriana; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzeti; Elian, Silvia Nagib; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define, in vitro, the potential to inhibit secondary caries of restorative materials currently used in dental practice. Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of fifty extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups, each one restored with one of the following materials: glass ionomer cement (GIC); amalgam; light-cured composite resin; ion-releasing composite; and light-cured, fluoride-containing composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled, sterilized with gamma irradiation, exposed to a cariogenic challenge using a bacterial system using Streptococcus mutans, and then prepared for microscopic observation. The following parameters were measured in each lesion formed: extension, depth, and caries inhibition area. The outer lesions developed showed an intact surface layer and had a rectangular shape. Wall lesions were not observed inside the cavities. After Analysis of Variance and Component of Variance Models Analysis, it was observed that the GIC group had the smallest lesions and the greatest number of caries inhibition areas. The lesions developed around Amalgam and Ariston pHc restorations had an intermediate size and the largest lesions were observed around Z-100 and Heliomolar restorations. It may be concluded that the restorative materials GIC, amalgam and ion-releasing composites may reduce secondary caries formation.

  15. Comparison of tarnish level in two types of high- copper dental amalgams with lathe-cut and spherical particles produced in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosavi-nasab SM.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available "nAbstract: There are two types of high-copper dental amalgams produced in Iran; Cinalloy (lathe-cut particles and Cinalux (spherical particles. Tarnish is one of the disadvantages of dental amalgam, which precedes corrosion, and in fact it means real destruction of restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of tarnish in Cinalux and Cinalloy amalgams. 32 patients, with at least two carious or poorly restored teeth were selected. Then, each tooth was restored with one of these two types of dental amalgams. The restorations were polished after 24 hours and patients were followed up after 9 months. The restorations were categorized in four groups of no change, one plus (1-30%, two plus (30-60% and three plus (more than 60% according to the level of discoloration. The results showed that the level of tarnish in Cinalux group was significantly less than Cinalloy group. The mean of tarnish for Cinalloy and Cinalux was 2.09±0.59 and 1.72±0.68 respectively. In addition, statistical analysis showed that there was no significant relationship between tarnish and Oral hygiene, smoking, operator or type and place of restoration.

  16. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

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    F. Sharafeddin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO and disto-occlusal (DO Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity (MO, Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 and in the disto-occlusal (DO cavity, Prompt-L-Pop + Z250 were applied. As for group B, in the MO and DO cavities, Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX, and varnish + amalgam (In box + Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX were used respectivelywhile in group C; the teeth were restored with amalgam and varnish mesio-occlusally and with amalgam only disto-occlusally. As for group D, varnish + amalgam (in box + Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 were applied mesio-occlusally and Varnish + Amalgam (in box + Prompt–L–Pop + Z250 disto-occlusally.Marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration into various sections of the restored teeth. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for data analysis.Results: Microleakage in gingival margin was more than that in occlusal margin (P<0.05 and microleakage of combined amalgam-composite restorations was significantly lower than that of conventional composite and amalgam restorations.Conclusion: Marginal microleakage decreased by using amalgam at the base of the box in Class II composite restorations.

  17. Cracked mercury dental amalgam as a possible cause of fever of unknown origin: a case report

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    Bamonti Fabrizia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sudden fever of unknown origin is quite a common emergency and may lead to hospitalization. A rise in body temperature can be caused by infectious diseases and by other types of medical condition. This case report is of a woman who had fever at night for several days and other clinical signs which were likely related to cracked dental mercury amalgam. Case presentation A healthy women developed fever many days after had cracked a mercury dental amalgam filling. Blood tests evidenced increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anemia and elevated white cell count; symptoms were headache and palpitations. Blood tests and symptoms normalized within three weeks of removal of the dental amalgam. Conclusion This case highlights the possible link between mercury vapor exposure from cracked dental amalgam and early activation of the immune system leading to fever of unknown origin.

  18. MOBILITY OF MERCURY OF THE DENTAL AMALGAM IN REDUCTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Dalla Costa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The dental wastewater can contribute to the total daily mercury load on environment. Factorial design of experiments is useful to analysis of factors that influence in this mobility. The aim of the present study was to design experiments to examine the effects of operational variables – temperature, pH and contact time - which may affect the mobility of mercury in form of dental amalgam residue in reduction process in the sediments of the Pirapó River. Based on the factorial design of experiments and the analysis of variance, the temperature was the most significant factor in this process, followed by the pH and contact time. The parameters affecting the mobility of total mercury showed that when the temperature and contact time increases and pH decreases there is an important increase of mercury concentration in process. For the tested conditions, the high total mercury concentration was obtained using the temperature = 35oC, pH = 4.0 and contact time = 10 days.

  19. Organic leachables from resinbased dental restorative : characterization by use of combined gas chromatographymass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Michelsen, Vibeke Barman

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade resin-based dental restorative materials have replaced amalgam as the first choice dental filling material. Resin-based dental restorative materials are complex polymers containing a variety of monomers and filler particles, as well as initiators, activators, stabilizers, plasticizers and other additives. Several studies have shown that many of the ingredients are leaching from the materials, even after adequate polymerization. It is known from in vitro s...

  20. Patients' experiences of changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjursen, Therese T; Binder, Per-Einar; Lygre, Gunvor B; Helland, Vigdis; Dalen, Knut; Björkman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how patients with health complaints attributed to dental amalgam experienced and gave meaning to changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of all amalgam fillings. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with 12 participants from the treatment group in a Norwegian amalgam removal trial. Interviews took place within a couple months of the final follow-up 5 years after amalgam removal. Using the NVivo9 software, we conducted an explorative and reflective thematic analysis and identified the following themes: Something is not working: betrayed by the body, You are out there on your own, Not being sure of the importance of amalgam removal, The relief experienced after amalgam removal, and To accept, to give up, or to continue the search. We discuss the findings in the context of patients' assigning meaning to illness experiences.

  1. Patients’ experiences of changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese T. Sjursen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we explore how patients with health complaints attributed to dental amalgam experienced and gave meaning to changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of all amalgam fillings. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with 12 participants from the treatment group in a Norwegian amalgam removal trial. Interviews took place within a couple months of the final follow-up 5 years after amalgam removal. Using the NVivo9 software, we conducted an explorative and reflective thematic analysis and identified the following themes: Something is not working: betrayed by the body, You are out there on your own, Not being sure of the importance of amalgam removal, The relief experienced after amalgam removal, and To accept, to give up, or to continue the search. We discuss the findings in the context of patients’ assigning meaning to illness experiences.

  2. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    OpenAIRE

    Mummolo Stefano; Tecco Simona; Gallusi Gianni; Farini Donatella; Klinger Francesca G; Marzo Giuseppe; Libonati Antonio; De Felici Massimo; Campanella Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mo...

  3. Marginal behaviour of self-etch adhesive/composite and combined amalgam-composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kournetas, Nikos; Kakaboura, Afrodite; Giftopoulos, Dimitrios; Chakmachi, Magdad; Rahiotis, Christos; Geis-Gerstorfer, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the marginal and internal adaptation in self-etching adhesive (SEA)/composite restorations with combined amalgam-resin-based composite restorations in the proximal box with and without bonding agent beneath amalgam both before and after load-cycling. Class II restorations, were manufactured as following a) Bonding agent (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray) beneath amalgam (Tytin, SDS Kerr) and resin-based composite (Clearfil APX, Kuraray) with SEA, b) Amalgam without bonding agent and resin-based composite with SEA and c) Resin-based composite with SEA. Each group divided into two equal subgroups (n=8). Marginal and internal adaptation of first subgroup evaluated after 7-day water storage and of the second after load-cycling in chewing simulator for 1.2 x 10(6) cycles. Marginal and internal adaptation at cervical and amalgam-composite sites evaluated by videomicroscope and ranked as "excellent"/"non-excellent". Slices of restorations examined under optical microscope to determine the quality of bonding layer. Defects in cervical adaptation observed in the three restorative techniques examined prior loading. Amalgam-composite combination in proximal surface provided comparable marginal and internal adaptation results at cervical wall, to self-etching-composite combination. Portion (25-37.5%) of amalgam-resin-based composite interfaces in proximal box presented no perfect sealing. The application of bonding agent beneath amalgam resulted in relatively inferior cervical adaptation. Loading resulted in fewer excellent restorations in all three restorative techniques but not in a statistically significant level.

  4. New science challenges old notion that mercury dental amalgam is safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homme, Kristin G; Kern, Janet K; Haley, Boyd E; Geier, David A; King, Paul G; Sykes, Lisa K; Geier, Mark R

    2014-02-01

    Mercury dental amalgam has a long history of ostensibly safe use despite its continuous release of mercury vapor. Two key studies known as the Children's Amalgam Trials are widely cited as evidence of safety. However, four recent reanalyses of one of these trials now suggest harm, particularly to boys with common genetic variants. These and other studies suggest that susceptibility to mercury toxicity differs among individuals based on multiple genes, not all of which have been identified. These studies further suggest that the levels of exposure to mercury vapor from dental amalgams may be unsafe for certain subpopulations. Moreover, a simple comparison of typical exposures versus regulatory safety standards suggests that many people receive unsafe exposures. Chronic mercury toxicity is especially insidious because symptoms are variable and nonspecific, diagnostic tests are often misunderstood, and treatments are speculative at best. Throughout the world, efforts are underway to phase down or eliminate the use of mercury dental amalgam.

  5. Comparison of microleakage in high copper spherical amalgam restorations using three different dentin bondin systems

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    Yasini E.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Amalgam is one of the mostly used restorative materials, but has some disadvantages. Microleakage is one of the short comings of amalgam which may lead to sensitivity and recurrent caries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three dentin bonding systems on reduction of microleakage in amalgam restorations. "nMaterials and Methods: Class II amalgam restorations were made in 40 noncarious molar and premolar teeth. Then the specimens were divided into four equal groups. Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, Single bond, "niBond, were used as liner in groups one to three respectively and in group four no liner was used. The teeth were restored with high copper spherical amalgam. After thermocycling for 500 cycles at 50C and 550C, the specimens were immersed in basic fuchsin for 24 hours, bisectioned mesiodistally and evaluated under stereomicroscope at X25 for dye penetration. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-wallis and Scheffe. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. "nResults: The groups showed significant difference (p=0.003. The group four had significantly less microleakage than the first and second groups (p<0.05. The second and third groups showed significantly different microleakage (p=0.038. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this investigation applying dentin bonding agents has no effect on reducing microleakage in amalgam restorations, however more studies are recommended.

  6. Evaluation of patients with oral lichenoid lesions by dental patch testing and results of removal of the dental restoration material

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Buket Şahin; Fatma Çetinözman; Nihal Avcu; Ayşen Karaduman

    2016-01-01

    Background and Design: Oral lichenoid lesions (OLL) are contact stomatitis characterized by white reticular or erosive patches, plaque-like lesions that are clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from oral lichen planus (OLP). Amalgam dental fillings and dental restoration materials are among the etiologic agents. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the standard and dental series patch tests in patients with OLL in comparison to a control group and evaluate our result...

  7. Evidence-based Update of Pediatric Dental Restorative Procedures: Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V; Hsu, K L; Coll, J A; Ginsberg, E; Ball, B M; Chhibber, S; Johnson, M; Kim, M; Modaresi, N; Tinanoff, N

    2015-01-01

    The science of dental materials and restorative care in children and adolescent is constantly evolving, and the ongoing search for ideal restorative materials has led to plethora of research. To provide an evidence base to assist dental practitioners choose appropriate restorative care for children and adolescents. This evidence-based review appraises this literature, primarily between the years 1995-2013, for efficacy of dental amalgam, composites, glass ionomer cements, compomers, preformed metal crowns and anterior esthetic restorations. The assessment of evidence for each dental material was based on a strong evidence, evidence in favor, expert opinion, and evidence against by consensus of the authors. There is varying level of evidence for the use of restorative materials like amalgam, composites, glass ionomers, resin-modified glass-ionomers, compomers, stainless steel crowns and anterior crowns for both primary and permanent teeth. A substantial amount data is available on restorative materials used in pediatric dentistry; however, there exists substantial evidence from systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials and clinicians need to examine and understand the available literature evidence carefully to aid them in clinical decision making.

  8. Uptake and accumulation of mercury from dental amalgam in the common goldfish, Carassius auratus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.J

    2003-03-01

    Exposure of fish to concentrations of dental amalgam typically found in waste discharge leads to mercury accumulation in tissues. - In this study, the bioavailability and accumulation of mercury from external environmental exposure to mixed, cured, milled, sieved and proportioned dental amalgam was examined in the common goldfish, Carassius auratus. Fish were exposed to dental amalgam (particle size range from <0.10 to 3.15 mm) in order to represent the particle size and distribution of that found within the typical dental office wastewater discharge stream. Experimental amalgam water loadings were 0 g/l, 0.5 g/l and 1 g/l in glass aquaria at 15 deg. C for 28 days. Fish tissues were sampled at 5 min and 28 days of exposure, and the liver, brain, muscle and whole body analyzed for total mercury using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. Mercury was found in several tissues examined and generally increased with exposure to higher amounts of dental amalgam. The highest levels were found in the whole body (17.68{+-}5.73 {mu}g/g) followed by the liver (0.80{+-}0.16 {mu}g/g) and muscle (0.47{+-}0.16 {mu}g/g). The lowest concentrations were seen in the brain (0.28{+-}0.19 {mu}g/g). Compared to controls, concentrations in the whole body, muscle and liver in fish exposed for 28 days to the highest concentration of amalgam were 200-, 233-, and 40-fold higher, respectively. This study shows that mercury from an environmental exposure to representative samples of dental amalgam typically found within the dental wastewater discharge stream is bioavailable to fish and may accumulate in internal tissues.

  9. British Society of Prosthodontics Debate on the Implications of the Minamata Convention on Mercury to Dental Amalgam--Should our Patients be Worried?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Rupert; Eliyas, Shiyana; Burke, F J Trevor; Taylor, Phil; Toner, James; Briggs, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Minamata Convention on Mercury called for a global phase-down of amalgam use, with a view to reduce environmental mercury pollution. This will significantly impact UK dentistry, given the still extensive use of amalgam in U.K. general dental practice. However, until now there has been little national discussion or debate. In Spring 2015, The British Society of Prosthodontics dedicated a significant part of its Annual Conference to debating the implications of this issue. Clinical case examples were discussed with audience interaction and voting facilitated using innovative Audience Response System Technology. A remarkable range of concerns and opinions were given. The debate elicited specific concerns amongst clinicians regarding the suitability of mercury-free alternatives to amalgam; particularly where cavities are large and extend beneath the gingival anatomy. There are also anecdotal reports of Dental Foundation (DF) dentists not being adequately taught the use of dental amalgam in undergraduate dental schools. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many clinicians, especially those treating patients for whom moisture control is challenging, feel that amalgam should remain available for clinicians to choose in certain clinical circumstances for the restoration of posterior teeth, even in the event of a complete phase-down.

  10. Effect of dental restorative materials on total antioxidant capacity and calcium concentration of unstimulated saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Mona-Momeni; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Asatourian, Armen; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Scarbecz, Mark; Sheibani, Nader

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of dental amalgam and composite restorations on total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and calcium (Ca) ion concentration of unstimulated saliva. Material and Methods Forty-eight children aged 6-10 years selected and divided into three groups of sixteen (8 males, 8 females). In group A and B, samples consisted of two class II dental composite or amalgam restorations, while in group C samples were caries-free (control group). Unstimulated saliva from all samples was collected and TAC was measured by spectrophotometry using an adaptation of 2, 2’-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) assay. The Ca ion level was estimated by an auto- analyzer. Data were analyzed with one- and two-way ANOVA test, at a p<.05 level of significance. Results Composite samples showed significantly higher TAC and lower Ca ion levels compared to amalgam and caries-free samples (p<.05). The TAC values showed only significant difference between groups (p<.05), while the Ca ion results showed significant differences within and between groups (p<.05). Conclusions Dental composite restorations increased TAC and decreased Ca ion levels more than amalgam restorations in saliva. Gender is an effective factor in changes induced in oral cavity as females showed more emphatic reaction to dental filling materials than males. Statement of Clinical Relevance Patients who have dental restorations, especially dental composites, should pay more attention to their dental hygiene, because dental restorations can increase oxidative stress and decrease Ca ion level in saliva, which might jeopardize remineralization process of tooth structures after demineralization. Key words:Amalgam, caries, composite, saliva, total antioxidant capacity. PMID:28149467

  11. Replacing Amalgam Restorations: A Standardized Protocol Based on Analyzing Tissue Physicochemical Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decup, Franck; Epaillard, Alexandre; Chemla, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Almost 60% of operative dentistry is devoted to replacing restorations. When practitioners have to replace an amalgam restoration, they tend to opt for an adhesive restoration, as it is conservative of tooth tissues and mimics the natural appearance of teeth. Based on a literature review, the aim of this article is to determine the best tissue approach when replacing an old amalgam by a new adhesive restoration. After analyzing and understanding tissue alterations due to the amalgam corrosion process, the authors propose an analytical approach to managing the situation. Both tissue orientated and specific mechanical approaches are developed and should be implemented to carry out the optimal clinical procedure and achieve the most conservative and durable treatment.

  12. Survival of ART and amalgam restorations in permanent teeth of children after 6.3 years.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Taifour, D.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2006-01-01

    The null hypothesis tested was that there is no difference in the survival percentages of all restorations placed through the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach, with high-viscosity glass ionomer, and those produced through the traditional approach, with amalgam (TA), in the permanent d

  13. Association between History of Dental Amalgam Fillings and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Chuang; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Hsin-Lin; Chuang, Chuan-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Li, Wan-Yun; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Fu, Earl

    2016-01-01

    The impact of dental amalgam on the development of Parkinson's disease (PD) is still uncertain, although a positive association between dental amalgam and PD has been found in a few case-control studies. The patients with amalgam fillings restored between 2000 and 2008 were identified by using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The same number of patients who had no new amalgam filling restored was matched by sex, age, and treatment date. Both cohorts were followed up from the treatment date until the date of diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of the year 2008. The individuals who received amalgam fillings had a significantly higher risk of PD afterward (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=1.583, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.122-2.234, p=0.0089) than those who did not. In the individuals who received amalgam fillings, being diagnosed with diabetes or hyperlipidemia demonstrated a significantly lower HR of PD occurrence than in the patients without diabetes or hyperlipidemia (HR=0.449, 95% CI=0.254-0.794, p=0.0059; HR=0.445, 95% CI=0.260-0.763, p=0.0032) after adjusting for comorbidities and Charlson-Deyo Comorbidity Index (CCI) scores. Meanwhile, hypertension increased the hazard risk of PD (HR=1.645, 95% CI=1.098-2.464, p=0.0159). The patients exposed to dental amalgam fillings were 1.583 times more likely to have PD afterward compared to their non-exposed counterparts after adjusting for comorbidities and CCI scores.

  14. Association between History of Dental Amalgam Fillings and Risk of Parkinson’s Disease: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Chuang; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Hsin-Lin; Chuang, Chuan-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Li, Wan-Yun; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Fu, Earl

    2016-01-01

    The impact of dental amalgam on the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still uncertain, although a positive association between dental amalgam and PD has been found in a few case-control studies. The patients with amalgam fillings restored between 2000 and 2008 were identified by using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The same number of patients who had no new amalgam filling restored was matched by sex, age, and treatment date. Both cohorts were followed up from the treatment date until the date of diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of the year 2008. The individuals who received amalgam fillings had a significantly higher risk of PD afterward (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=1.583, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.122–2.234, p=0.0089) than those who did not. In the individuals who received amalgam fillings, being diagnosed with diabetes or hyperlipidemia demonstrated a significantly lower HR of PD occurrence than in the patients without diabetes or hyperlipidemia (HR=0.449, 95% CI=0.254–0.794, p=0.0059; HR=0.445, 95% CI=0.260–0.763, p=0.0032) after adjusting for comorbidities and Charlson-Deyo Comorbidity Index (CCI) scores. Meanwhile, hypertension increased the hazard risk of PD (HR=1.645, 95% CI=1.098–2.464, p=0.0159). The patients exposed to dental amalgam fillings were 1.583 times more likely to have PD afterward compared to their non-exposed counterparts after adjusting for comorbidities and CCI scores. PMID:27906991

  15. Secondary caries formation in vitro around glass ionomer-lined amalgam and composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, P; Kotsanos, N; Papadogianis, Y

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro secondary caries study was to examine the glass-ionomer liner's effect on wall-lesion inhibition when a conventional and a light-cured glass ionomer liner was placed under amalgam and composite resin restorations. Class V preparations in extracted upper premolars were used and ten restorations were used for each of the following groups: (i) two layers of copal varnish and amalgam; (ii) conventional glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iii) light-cured glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iv) bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (v) conventional glass-ionomer, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (vi) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 0.3 mm short of the enamel margin bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; and (vii) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 1 mm short of the enamel margin, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled and artificial caries were created using an acid-gel. The results of this study showed that artificial recurrent caries can be reduced significantly (P amalgam restorations. The results also showed that when the light-cured glass-ionomer liner was placed 0.3 mm from the cavosurface margin under composite resin restoration, the artificial recurrent caries reduced significantly (P < 0.05).

  16. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  17. Monte carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zahri Abdul Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC. On the other hand, computed tomography (CT images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  18. Clinical longevity of extensive direct composite restorations in amalgam replacement : Up to 3.5 years follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This prospective clinical trial evaluated the longevity of direct resin composite (DRC) restorations made on stained dentin that is exposed upon removal of existing amalgam restorations in extensive cavities with severely reduced macro-mechanical retention for amalgam replacement. Method

  19. A Comparison of US and Japanese Dental Restorative Care Present on Service Members Recovered from the WWII Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2017-02-20

    The documentation of dental materials used in the USA during the WWII era is readily available, while references for the Japanese are minimal. It was therefore important to build a photographic database of Japanese restorative care which could be utilized as a comparison tool for the deployed odontologist. The dental restorative care of approximately 400 US and 100 Japanese sets of remains was evaluated. Both countries share many similar restorative techniques to include collared crowns, full-coverage restorations, cantilever bridge/pontics to close spaces; restorative materials such as amalgam, gold, and zinc phosphate (temporary) restorations; and removable prostheses. The dental restorative materials most commonly used by US dentists include the amalgam and silicate cement, while the full-coverage crown was the type of restoration most frequently seen on the Japanese remains. Silicates, porcelain and replaceable crowns, and partial-coverage prepared crowns were not observed on the recovered Japanese remains.

  20. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  1. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  2. Long-term evaluation of extensive restorations in permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwenhuysen, J.-P. van; D'hoore, W.D.; Carvalho, J.;

    2003-01-01

    Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry......Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry...

  3. A retrospective clinical study on longevity of posterior composite and amalgam restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the longevity of class I and II amalgam and composite resin restorations placed in a general practice. METHODS: Patient records of a general practice were used for collecting the data for this study. From the files longevity and r

  4. Risk in the management of dental amalgam in dental medium and small entities in the department of Antioquia, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo A. Ruiz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the applied research “Environmental Management of the Dental Amalgam in Antioquia, Colombia”, which was financed by the company New Stetic S. A. and the University of Antioquia. The research was carried out between 2005 and 2007 by the following groups: Biomedical Science and Technology, Precious Materials, and Pyrometallurgical and Materials Researches, and the Research and Development Division of the mentioned company. Objetive: to describe and characterize the activities about handling mercury, dental amalgam and its waste in 107 dental offices defined as medium and small, that is to say those with less than five dental chairs in the same workplace. Methodology: a poll was made in each institution filling a questionnaire about personal details of the interviewee, mercury and amalgam handling, occupational health, training, environmental conditions, and waste management. Each dental office was visited by a research engineer and an advanced engineering student who were trained in advance in order to collect the information. Results: a reflection aimed to establish integral actions and safe methodologies in the short term to promote a better quality service and a minimum risk for the people exposed to mercury and the ecosystem must be encouraged by dental and administrative staff, as well as by surveillance and control institutions and the educational institutions devoted to the formation of dental professionals.

  5. An In Vitro Evaluation of the Use of Resin Liners to Reduce Microleakage and Improve Bond Strength of Amalgam Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    of amalgam, gutta percha, and zinc oxide- eugenol , found that the dyes possessed many of the advantages noted by other researchers. The ability of...Clin North Am 1985;29:341-58. 4. Glassman MD, Miller IJ. Antibacterial properties of one conventional and three high-copper dental amalgams. J Prosthet

  6. The effect of rebonding and liner type on microleakage of Class V amalgam restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi H.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Application of varnish and dentin bonding agents can effectively reduce microleakage under amalgam restorations. Also rebonding may show some effects on microleakage and its complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of liner/ adhesives on microleakage of Class V amalgam restoration with or without rebonding. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study Class V cavities were prepared on sixty sound human maxillary premolars with the gingival floor 1mm below the CEJ. Cases were divided into six groups of ten teeth each. Specimens in group 1 and 2 were lined with Copalite and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP respectively. In the third group (control no liner was applied. The teeth were then restored with spherical amalgam. Specimens in group 4 to 6 received the same treatments but after filling, the interfaces of restorations and teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel, rinsed and dried. Adhesive resin of SBMP was applied over amalgam and tooth margins and polymerized (rebonding. Specimens were thermocycled, exposed to dye and sectioned. Microleakage was graded (0-3 using a stereomicroscope at X40 magnification. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon pair wise statistical tests. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: The groups lined with SBMP showed the lowest and the groups without liner the highest microleakage (p= 0.001. Significant difference was observed in microleakage mean rank of enamel and dentin margins (p=0.048. Rebonding with resin did not improve the seal (p> 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, total etch adhesive system had significant effect on microleakage of Class V amalgam restorations especially in cervical margin. Rebonding did not show a significant effect on microleakage.

  7. Chemical characterization of selected high copper dental amalgams using XPS and XRD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, E. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)]. E-mail: talik@us.edu.pl; Babiarz-Zdyb, R. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Dziedzic, A. [Medical University of Silesia, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, Akademicki 17 Sqr., 41-209 Bytom (Poland)

    2005-08-02

    The study was carried out to analyze some dependencies between the composition of seven high copper dental amalgams and mercury release behavior, as well as oxygen reactivity of metallic elements. Chemical comparative analysis of selected dental amalgams was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The X-ray powder diffraction measurements revealed two main phases for measured amalgams: {gamma}{sub 1}-(Ag{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}) and {eta}'-(Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5}). The amount of mercury obtained by the XPS method was lower than the value quoted in the manufacturer's literature, which suggested evaporation of mercury under the UHV conditions. A linear decrease of oxygen and carbon contamination with the growing amount of Cu and Ag was observed. The XPS analysis showed that a high Sn concentration caused less resistance to oxidation. Some of the amalgams contained some extra elements, such as Bi, In, and Zn. All samples contained lead in metallic state and oxides. The amount of Ag, Cu, Sn ingredients determines the main properties of high copper amalgams and plays an important role in mercury evaporation. High tin concentration combined with the presence of smaller amounts of silver and copper (high Sn/Ag ratio) may influence the increase of mercury vaporization.

  8. Dental restoration induced orofacial pain and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuxin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental procedure induced pain may develop into a chronic condition that accompanied with functional or neuropathy changes in the nerve system. In this case, severe persistent pain gradually developed after repeatedly placing a subgingival amalgam restoration in the right second molar. Hyperalgesia and allodynia were present at the affected region. A provisional diagnosis of chronic orofacial pain with peripheral and central sensitization was considered. After re-contouring, local debridement and occlusal adjustment the pain disappeared. The underlying mechanism in this case is neuronal sensitization and peripheral Aβ-fiber mechanoreceptor activation. Its diagnosis and management depend on identification and treatment of the cause for pain generation and sensitization.

  9. Mercury and Amalgam Dental: Implications for Public Health

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution and occupational exposures by Mercury have been associated with many health problems since the fetal life. Since amalgam is widely used in dentistry due to its ease use and lower cost, the objective of this work was to elaborate a review regarding Mercury pollution and environmental, occupational and health aspects. A review covering 2010 to 2014 period using Medline, ISI, and LILACS databases were done. Mercury is associated with reduction of physical growth and cogni...

  10. Role of dental restoration materials in oral mucosal lichenoid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental restorative materials containing silver-mercury compounds have been known to induce oral lichenoid lesions. Objectives: To determine the frequency of contact allergy to dental restoration materials in patients with oral lichenoid lesions and to study the effect of removal of the materials on the lesions. Results: Forty-five patients were recruited in three groups of 15 each: Group A (lesions in close contact with dental materials, Group B (lesions extending 1 cm beyond the area of contact and Group C (no topographic relationship. Thirty controls were recruited in two groups of 15 individuals each: Group D (oral lichenoid lesions but no dental material and Group E (dental material but no oral lichenoid lesions. Patch tests were positive in 20 (44.5% patients. Mercury was the most common allergen to elicit a positive reaction in eight patients, followed by nickel (7, palladium (5, potassium dichromate (3, balsam of Peru, gold sodium thiosulphate 2 and tinuvin (2 and eugenol (1, cobalt chloride (1 and carvone (1. Seven patients elicited positive response to more than one allergen. In 13 of 20 patients who consented to removal of the dental material, complete healing was observed in 6 (30%, marked improvement in 7 (35% and no improvement in 7 (35% patients. Relief of symptoms was usually observed 3 months after removal. Limitations: Limited number of study subjects and short follow up after removal/replacement of dental restoration materials are the main limitations of this study. Conclusion: Contact allergy to amalgam is an important etiologic factor in oral lichenoid lesions and removal of restorative material should be offered to patients who have lesions in close proximity to the dental material.

  11. A comparison between new dentinal adhesives (fifth generation) and traditional varnish in microleakage reduction of amalgam restorations in primary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Mortazavi M. Associate Professor; Bahrololoomi Z. Assistant Professor

    2003-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Microleakage presents the major cause for restorations failure in the oral cavity resulting in postoperative sensitivity, pulp irritation and secondary caries formation."nAim: The aim of this study was to compare two dentinal adhesive systems of fifth generation and copalite varnish in reducing microleakage of amalgam restorations in primary teeth."nMaterials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 100 class V amalgam restorations were prepared on the buccal or li...

  12. Clinical Success Rate of Compomer and Amalgam Class II Restorations in First Primary Molars: A Two-year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Faezeh; Mardani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The majority of failures in Class II amalgam restorations occur in the first primary molar teeth; in addition, use of compomer instead of amalgam for primary molar teeth restorations is a matter of concern. The aim ofthe present study was to compare the success rate of Class II compomer and amalgam restorations in the first primary molars. Materials and methods. A total of 17 amalgams and 17 compomer restorations were placed in 17 children based on a split-mouth design. Restorations were assessed at 12- and 24-month intervals for marginal integrity, the anatomic form and recurrent caries. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11. Chi-squared test was applied for the analysis. Statistical significance was set at Pamalgam restorations. Cumulative success rate at 24-month interval was significantlyhigher in compomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. There was no statistically significant difference inanatomic form between the two materials. Conclusion. Compomer appears to be a suitable alternative to amalgam for Class II restorations in the first primary mo-lars.

  13. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by dental restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2014-06-01

    We report herein on 5 patients with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration (caries cutting, cavity preparation, inlay restoration). Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis was noted following dental restoration. Even though the pulp cavity and dental pulp were intact, the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis occurred caused by an apical lesion. Infection by way of the dentinal tubules was suggested to be a cause of the pathophysiology. Endoscopic sinus surgery was indicated in patients with intractable odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by the dental restoration. Cone-beam x-ray CT was useful for the accurate diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration. Physicians should thus be aware of the possibility that a tooth, which has undergone dental restoration, may cause odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

  14. Mercury in dental amalgam: Are our health care workers at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, M; Sulaiman, N S; Tan, B S; Yahya, N A; Anual, Z F; Mahiyuddin, W R Wan; Khan, M F; Muttalib, K A

    2016-11-01

    Dental amalgam in fillings exposes workers to mercury. The exposure to mercury was investigated among 1871 dental health care workers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of mercury exposure among dental compared to nondental health care workers and to determine other risk factors for mercury exposure. Respondents answered questionnaires to obtain demographic, personal, professional, and workplace information and were examined for their own amalgam fillings. Chronic mercury exposure was assessed through urinary mercury levels. In total, 1409 dental and 462 nondental health care workers participated in the study. Median urine mercury levels for dental and nondental health care workers were 2.75 μg/L (interquartile range [IQR] = 3.0175) and 2.66 μg/L (IQR = 3.04) respectively. For mercury exposure, there were no significant risk factor found among the workers involved within the dental care. The Mann-Whitney test showed that urine mercury levels were significantly different between respondents who eat seafood more than 5 times per week compared to those who eat it less frequently or not at all (p = 0.003). The urinary mercury levels indicated significant difference between dental workers in their practice using squeeze cloths (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.03). Multiple logistic regression showed that only the usage of cosmetic products that might contain mercury was found to be significantly associated with the urinary mercury levels (odds ratio [OR] = 15.237; CI: 3.612-64.276). Therefore, mean urinary mercury levels of health care workers were low. Exposure to dental amalgam is not associated with high mercury exposure. However, usage of cosmetic products containing mercury and high seafood consumption may lead to the increase of exposure to mercury.

  15. Mercury exposure in the work place and human health: dental amalgam use in dentistry at dental teaching institutions and private dental clinics in selected cities of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Mahmood A; Nawaz, Sadaf; Ali, Saeed Waqar

    2016-03-01

    During the past two decades, mercury has come under increasing scrutiny with regard to its safety both in the general population and in occupationally exposed groups. It's a growing issue of global concern because of its adverse environmental and health impacts. Very few investigations on mercury amalgam use in the dentistry sector have been carried out in South Asia and there is little data reported on mercury contamination of indoor/outdoor air at dental sites. According to an earlier SDPI study, reported in 2013, alarmingly high mercury levels were observed in air (indoor as well as outdoor) at 11 of the 34 visited dental sites (17 dental teaching institutions, 7 general hospitals & 10 dental clinics) in five main cities of Pakistan. 88% of the sites indicated indoor mercury levels in air above the USA EPA reference level of 300 ng/m3. According to our study, carried out at 38 dental teaching institutions in 12 main cities (in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces) of Pakistan, respondents were of the opinion that the currently offered BDS curriculum does not effectively guide outgoing dental professionals and does not provide them adequate knowledge and training about mercury/mercury amalgam and other mercury related human health and mercury waste issues. 90% of respondents supported the review and revision of the present dental curriculum offered at dental teaching institutions in the country, at the earliest. A study has also been conducted to assess the status of mercury amalgam use in private dental clinics in Gilgit, Hunza, Peshawar, Rawalpindi and Islamabad. More than 90 private dental clinics were visited and dental professionals/private clinics in-charge were interviewed during June-July, 2015. The focus areas of the study were Hg amalgam toxicity, its waste management practices and safety measures practiced among the dental practitioners. In the light of the findings described and discussed in this brief report, to safeguard public health and

  16. Periapical status of non-root-filled teeth with resin composite, amalgam, or full crown restorations: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Victoria; Petersson, Kerstin; Wolf, Eva; Akerman, Sigvard

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies show that dental pulp cells respond unfavorably to contact with resin composite restorative material. Hypothetically, in a random population, the frequency of apical periodontitis should be higher for teeth restored with resin composite than with amalgam. Therefore, the aim was to compare the periapical status of non-root-filled teeth restored with resin composite, amalgam, or laboratory-fabricated crowns in an adult Swedish population. The subjects comprised 440 individuals from a randomly selected sample of 1,000 adult residents of a Swedish county. The type, material, and quality of the restorations were recorded for all non-root-filled teeth by clinical examination and intraoral clinical photographs. Periapical status was evaluated on panoramic radiographs. The association between periapical status and type, material, and quality of the restorations was analyzed using the chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. There was no significant difference in the frequency of apical periodontitis (AP) between teeth restored with resin composite or amalgam (1.3% and 1.1%, respectively). The frequency of AP for teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns was significantly higher (6.3%). Regression analysis showed no association between AP and resin composite restorations but a significant association with laboratory-fabricated crowns. The results indicate that the risk of damage to the pulp-dentin complex from exposure to resin composite material and dentin bonding agents shown in experimental studies is not reflected in the clinical setting. However, in the study sample, AP was diagnosed in a significantly higher proportion of teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of mercury (Hg) dental amalgam fillings on renal and oxidative stress biomarkers in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Al-Sedairi, Al anoud; Elkhatib, Rola

    2012-08-01

    We examined the effect of mercury (Hg) associated with dental amalgam fillings on biomarkers of renal and oxidative stress in children between the ages of 5-15.5 years. Urine samples were analyzed for N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), α(1)-microglobulin (α(1)-MG), β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)-MG), retinol binding protein (RBP), albumin (ALB), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA). The level of urinary Hg (UHg-C) was calculated as μg/g creatinine. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the excretion of urinary NAG was significantly associated with the presence of dental amalgam fillings (β=0.149, P=0.03) and the levels of UHg-C (β=0.531, P=0), with an interaction between the two (P=0). The increase in urinary NAG in relation to UHg-C levels had a dose-effect pattern. The lowest observed effect was seen at UHg-C levels above 1.452 μg/g creatinine, which is lower than previously reported. In contrast, α(1)-MG was negatively associated with the presence of dental amalgam fillings (β=-0.270, P=0), but positively with UHg-C levels (β=0.393, P=0). There were 7 children without, and one child with, dental amalgam fillings with urinary α(1)-MG levels above the reference limit of >7 mg/g creatinine. Even though α(1)-MG seems to be a reliable biomarker for early changes in renal functions, it might exert its effect only at a higher level of exposure. An inverse relationship was also observed between urinary 8-OHdG levels and the presence of dental amalgam fillings. This might suggest that the dental amalgam does not increase DNA damage but reduces the capacity to repair DNA, leading to lower urinary excretion of 8-OHdG. On the other hand, we found that Hg affected the excretion of urinary 8-OHdG in a dose-related pattern that was mostly associated with long-term exposure to low Hg levels. Urinary NAG levels were positively associated with urinary MDA levels (β=0.516, P=0) but not with 8-OHdG (β=0.134, P=0.078) after adjustment for

  18. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Alireza; Samani, Mahdi Jafarzadeh; Najafi, Naghme Feyzi; Hajiahmadi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: General anesthesia (GA) allows dental treatment to be rendered under optimal conditions, theoretically ensuring ideal outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of restorative dental procedures performed under GA. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 305 pediatric patients who had been treated under GA 6 to 24 months before our survey at Isfahan's hospitalized dentistry center were examined. The examination was performed on dental chair with oral mirror and dental probe. The results were recorded in a special form for each patient for statistical analysis and evaluation of restorations to be successful or failed. Statistical analysis was performed by chi-square and fisher exact tests for comparison between success rates of restorations and Kendall's tau-b test for evaluating the effect of time on success rates of them (P < 0.05). Results: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs class I and class II amalgam and class I and class II tooth color restorations. All types of posterior tooth color restorations had statistically same results with amalgam restorations. Anterior composite resin build-up represented significantly low success rates. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up (P = 0.344 and P = 0.091, respectively). Conclusion: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs other posterior restorations. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up in comparison of other restorations. PMID:23162592

  19. Theoretical models of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams in neutral and acidic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keanini, Russell G.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Okabe, Toru

    2001-06-01

    This article reports an experimental and theoretical investigation of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams immersed in neutral (noncorrosive) and acidic (corrosive) flows. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric measurements of Hg loss indicate that in neutral flow, surface oxide films formed in air prior to immersion persist and effectively suppress significant mercury release. In acidic (pH 1) flows, by contrast, oxide films are unstable and dissolve; depending on the amalgam’s material composition, particularly its copper content, two distinct mercury release mechanisms are initiated. In low copper amalgam, high initial mercury release rates are observed and appear to reflect preferential mercury dissolution from unstable Sn8Hg ( γ 2) grains within the amalgam matrix. In high copper amalgam, mercury release rates are initially low, but increase with time. Microscopic examination suggests that this feature reflects corrosion of copper from grains of Cu6Sn5 ( η') and consequent exposure of Ag2Hg3 ( γ 1) grains; the latter serve as internal mercury release sites and become more numerous as corrosion proceeds. Three theoretical models are proposed in order to explain observed dissolution characteristics. Model I, applicable to high and low copper amalgams in neutral flow, assumes that mercury dissolution is mediated by solid diffusion within the amalgam, and that a thin oxide film persists on the amalgam’s surface and lumps diffusive in-film transport into an effective convective boundary condition. Model II, applicable to low copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that the amalgam’s external oxide film dissolves on a short time scale relative to the experimental observation period; it neglects corrosive suppression of mercury transport. Model III, applicable to high copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that internal mercury release sites are created by corrosion of copper in η' grains and that corrosion proceeds via an oxidation-reduction reaction

  20. Comparison of chlorine and chloramine in the release of mercury from dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mark E; Scott, John W; Schultz, Stephen T; Berry, Denise L; Wilcoxon, Monte; Piwoni, Marv; Panno, Brent; Bordson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the ability of chlorine (HOCl/OCl(-)) and monochloramine (NH(2)Cl) to mobilize mercury from dental amalgam. Two types of amalgam were used in this investigation: laboratory-prepared amalgam and samples obtained from dental-unit wastewater. For disinfectant exposure simulations, 0.5 g of either the laboratory-generated or clinically obtained amalgam waste was added to 250 mL amber bottles. The amalgam samples were agitated by end-over-end rotation at 30 rpm in the presence of 1 mg/L chlorine, 10 mg/L chlorine, 1 mg/L monochloramine, 10 mg/L monochloramine, or deionized water for intervals of 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h for the clinically obtained amalgam waste samples and 4 h and 24 h for the laboratory-prepared samples. Chlorine and monochloramine concentrations were measured with a spectrophotometer. Samples were filtered through a 0.45 microm membrane filter and analyzed for mercury with USEPA standard method 245.7. When the two sample types were combined, the mean mercury level in the 1 mg/L chlorine group was 0.020 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.008). The 10 mg/L chlorine group had a mean mercury concentration of 0.59 mg/L (n=25, SD=1.06). The 1 mg/L chloramine group had a mean mercury level of 0.023 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.010). The 10 mg/L chloramine group had a mean mercury level of 0.024 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.011). Independent samples t-tests showed that there was a significant difference between the natural log mercury measurements of 10 mg/L chlorine compared to those of 1 mg/L and 10 mg/L chloramine. Changing from chlorine to chloramine disinfection at water treatment plants would not be expected to produce substantial increases in dissolved mercury levels in dental-unit wastewater.

  1. In vitro evaluation of the marginal microleakage of class II amalgam restoration associated with dentin adhesive

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    OLIVEIRA Fabiana Sodré de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The marginal microleakage of class II amalgam restorations (Dispersalloy associated with copal varnish (Copalite and with two dentin bonding agents (Scotchbond Multi-uso Plus and Multi Bond Alpha was evaluated in vitro and compared by two methods: scores and linear measurements. Forty-five sound premolars were used, on which two separated class II cavities were prepared on the M and D surfaces. After the restoration, the specimens were thermocycled and stored in a solution of 0.5% basic fuchsin during 24 hours. The analysis allowed to conclude that none of the three restorative systems were able to eliminate the marginal microleakage. Nevertheless, the leakage was significantly smaller on the restorations associated with dentin bonding agents when compared to copal varnish. The linear measurement method was more sensitive than the score criteria.

  2. Teaching of direct posterior resin composite restorations in UK dental therapy training programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2010-05-08

    With the numbers of dental therapists involved in the delivery of dental care within the UK on the increase, and the trend towards the use of direct resin composites (composites) for the restoration of posterior teeth, this study was undertaken to describe the teaching of posterior composites in dental therapy training programmes in the UK. A secondary aim was to identify differences in techniques for posterior composites taught within these dental therapy training programmes. In 2008/9, a questionnaire seeking information on the teaching of posterior composites was distributed by email to 13 centres with dental therapy training programmes in the UK. This questionnaire sought information relating to the teaching of direct posterior composites to dental therapy students, including the amounts of preclinical and clinical teaching in respect of deciduous and permanent teeth, numbers of restorations placed, contraindications to placement, and details in respect of operative techniques. Ten completed responses were received (response rate = 77%). In ten programmes, student dental therapists received clinical training in the placement of composite restorations in the occlusal surfaces of premolar and permanent molar teeth, and nine programmes included such training for two and three surface occlusoproximal restorations. The mean proportions of posterior restorations placed clinically by the trainee dental therapists in permanent teeth using dental amalgam and composite were 52% and 46% respectively (range: amalgam = 20-95%; composite = 5-70%). With the exception of one programme, the teaching of posterior composites is a well established element of dental therapy training. Some variations were noted in the teaching of clinical techniques between respondent training centres. It is suggested that to ensure harmony in approaches to treatments provided by graduated therapists that training centres look to relevant consensus documents, such as those of the British Association

  3. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  4. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

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    Mummolo Stefano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mothers was also evaluated. Results The results show that while the culture in media conditioned by amalgams did not affect blastocyst development, the medium conditioned by composites caused blastocyst degeneration and apoptosis. The development of blastocysts in a medium containing serum obtained from animals after transplantation was, however, without effect. Finally, inconsistent reduction in the implantation rate in transplanted mothers was observed. Conclusions In this study, we provide examples of in vitro and in vivo tests that may be used to evaluate embryotoxicity for dental materials. Our results show that leached components from our composite-material induced embryotoxicity in vitro, however, no toxicity was observed when subcutaneously implanted in vivo. This highlights the necessity of integrated in vitro and in vivo tests for valuable predictive estimation of embryotoxicity for complex materials.

  5. Progression of radiopacities and radiolucencies under amalgam restorations on bite-wing radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolphy, M P; Gorter, Y; van Loveren, C; Poorterman, J H; van Amerongen, J P

    1997-01-01

    Radiolucent and radiopaque areas in the dentine under amalgam fillings represent demineralized tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caries progresses in radiolucent and radiopaque areas under amalgam fillings, by assessing their enlargement longitudinally on bite-wing radiographs. Bite-wings from dentitions of persons aged 17, 20 and 23 years were compared. For a 3-year evaluation, 365 teeth with class I and class II amalgam restorations were available on bite-wings; 16 radiopacities, 46 radiolucencies and 28 combinations could be followed longitudinally. All radiopacities remained the same size, 14 radiolucencies enlarged and 8 combinations enlarged. For a 6-year evaluation, 236 filled teeth were available; 10 radiopacities, 30 radiolucencies and 11 combinations could be compared longitudinally. All radiopacities remained the same size, 12 radiolucencies enlarged and 6 combinations enlarged. Because the radiopaque areas had not enlarged visibly on bite-wing radiographs over 3 or even 6 years, it was concluded that radiopacities may be non-progressing caries. A substantial number of radiolucent areas, with or without concomitant radiopacities, did not enlarge while radiolucent areas are considered as progressing caries.

  6. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and attribu

  7. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and

  8. Long-term cost-effectiveness of single indirect restorations in selected dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P G; Smales, R J

    2004-05-22

    To determine the relative cost-effectiveness of alternative methods for restoring large tooth substance loss in adults. Long-term survival estimates and discounted costs for 245 large indirect restorations were used to calculate their incremental cost-effectiveness over 15 years when compared with direct placement Class II cusp-overlay amalgams and Class IV multisurface resin composites, placed in 100 patients from three private dental practices. The direct placement restorations were more cost-effective than the indirect restorations at all time intervals over the 15-year study period. The full gold crown and the ceramometal crown were the most cost-effective indirect posterior and anterior restorations respectively. The cast gold onlay and the porcelain jacket crown were the least cost-effective indirect posterior and anterior restorations respectively. When clinically practicable, large direct placement restorations should be placed initially in preference to indirect restorations.

  9. In vivo assessment of secondary caries and dentin characteristics after traditional amalgam restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assunção Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; de Lima, Kenio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of secondary caries and dentin characteristics in permanent molars after traditional amalgam restorations, by means of clinical visual examination, radiographs and laser-induced fluorescence (LF) (DIAGNOdent). Methods: Thirty first permanent molars of 30 schoolchildren in the 7 to14 year-old age group were included. Caries was removed by hand. Thus, indirect pulp capping was performed with glass-ionomer cement (GIC), the cavity was varnished and amalgam filled. LF was measured before and after cavity preparation and after a 12-month observation period. Dentin color after cavity preparation and after the 12-month observation period was recorded. Recurrent caries was also investigated by visual clinical and radiographic examinations, in addition to dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping. Data was analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measurements, paired “t” test and descriptive statistic. Results: There were statistically significant differences (P<.05) among LF scores for dentin in all periods evaluated, with the lowest scores shown after 12 month of observation. There was no statistical difference between dentin color after cavity preparation and following 12 months of observation. Moreover, there was no recurrent caries attack at 12-month follow-up; dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping was similar between baseline and final observation periods. It was concluded that the clinical restorative procedure using hand caries removal, indirect pulp capping with GIC, varnishing and amalgam filling the cavity did not provide secondary caries and increased dentin mineral content after 12 months. PMID:22904654

  10. Discrimination of tooth layers and dental restorative materials using cutting sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Vahid; Arzanpour, Siamak; Chehroudi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Dental restoration begins with removing carries and affected tissues with air-turbine rotary cutting handpieces, and later restoring the lost tissues with appropriate restorative materials to retain the functionality. Most restoration materials eventually fail as they age and need to be replaced. One of the difficulties in replacing failing restorations is discerning the boundary of restorative materials, which causes inadvertent removal of healthy tooth layers. Developing an objective and sensor-based method is a promising approach to monitor dental restorative operations and to prevent excessive tooth losses. This paper has analyzed cutting sounds of an air-turbine handpiece to discriminate between tooth layers and two commonly used restorative materials, amalgam and composite. Support vector machines were employed for classification, and the averaged short-time Fourier transform coefficients were selected as the features. The classifier performance was evaluated from different aspects such as the number of features, feature scaling methods, classification schemes, and utilized kernels. The total classification accuracies were 89% and 92% for cases included composite and amalgam materials, respectively. The obtained results indicated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Urinary mercury levels in females: influence of skin-lightening creams and dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Saleh, I; Shinwari, N

    1997-10-01

    The influence of application of skin-lightening creams and dental amalgam fillings on the urinary mercury (Hg) level was evaluated in 225 females (ages 17 to 58 years) living in Riyadh, capital of Saudi Arabia. The arithmetic mean of the urinary Hg level was 6.96 +/- 20.43 micrograms 1(-1), in the range 0 to 204.8 micrograms 1(-1). The mean urinary Hg level adjusted by creatinine (Cr) was 11.22 +/- 37.23 micrograms g-1 Cr, in the range 0 to 459.37 micrograms g-1. No significant difference in urinary Hg was noted between the females regarding the use of skin-lightening creams. On the other hand, results showed that urinary Hg concentration was influenced by the use and number of dental amalgam fillings. No women were identified with symptoms or signs that could be attributed to Hg intoxication. Urine analyses for creatinine, urea, uric acid, phosphorus, magnesium, glucose and calcium showed significant correlation with urinary Hg. This suggests that chronic exposure to Hg may be associated with a deterioration of renal function.

  12. Seal, replacement or monitoring amalgam restorations with occlusal marginal defects? Results of a 10-year clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, G; Fernández, E; Mena, K; Martin, J; Vildósola, P; De Oliveira Junior, O B; Estay, J; Mjör, I A; Gordan, V V

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this prospective and blind clinical trial was to assess the effectiveness of sealing localized marginal defects of amalgam restoration that were initially scheduled to be replaced. A cohort of twenty six patients with 60 amalgam restorations (n=44Class I and n=16Class II), that presented marginal defects deviating from ideal (Bravo) according to USPHS criteria, were assigned to either sealing or replacement groups: A: sealing n=20, Replacement n=20, and no treatment (n=20). Two blind examiners evaluated the restorations at baseline (K=0.74) and after ten years (K=0.84) according with USPHS criteria, in four parameters: marginal adaptation (MA), secondary caries (SC), marginal staining (MS) and teeth sensitivity (TS). Multiple comparison of restorations degradation/upgrade was analyzed by Friedman test and the comparisons within groups were performed by Wilcoxon test. After 10 years, 44 restorations were assessed (73.3%), Group A: n=14 and Group B: n=16; and Group C: n=14 sealing and replacement amalgam restorations presented similar level of quality in MA (p=0.76), SC (p=0.25) and TS (p=0.52), while in MS (p=0.007) presented better performance in replacement group after 10-years. Most of the occlusal amalgam restorations with marginal gaps showed similar long term outcomes than the restorations were sealed, replaced, or not treated over a 10-year period. Most of the restorations of the three groups were clinically acceptable, under the studied parameters. All restorations had the tendency to present downgrade/deterioration over time.

  13. Factors affecting the placement or replacement of direct restorations in a dental school

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    Samara Silvani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The knowledge of the reasons for the placement of direct restorations makes possible to trace an epidemiological profile of a specific population and to direct the teaching of dentistry to techniques that are commonly used today and will be continued performed in the future. Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations in patients treated in the Dental Clinic of the Uberaba University - Brazil. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 306 restorative procedures carried out on 60 patients. During the treatment planning, a form that contained information about the patient′s gender, tooth number, the classification of restorations, the reasons for placement and replacement of amalgam and tooth-colored restorations, the material that had to be removed and the new material used to fill the cavities was filled for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test (α = 0.05. Results: The data showed that most of the patients were female (66.7%. Of all the restorations placed, 60.45% were 1 st -time placements, while 39.55% were replacements. For 1 st -time restorations, the main reason for placement was primary caries (76.76%, followed by non-carious cervical lesions (15.14%. The amalgam restorations were replaced more frequently (67.77%. The primary reason for replacements was the presence of secondary caries (for both previous amalgam (42.68% and composite (66.67% restorations (P < 0.05. The resin composite was the most indicated material for the new restorations (98.04% (P < 0.05. Conclusions: The main reason for placement of direct restorations was primary caries, while secondary caries was the main reason for replacements. In almost all cases, the material used to fill the cavities was the resin composite.

  14. The Minamata Convention on Mercury: attempting to address the global controversy of dental amalgam use and mercury waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Contreras, John T; Liang, Bryan A

    2014-02-15

    In October 2013, a new international binding treaty instrument called the Minamata Convention on Mercury opened for signature in Minamata City, Japan, the site of arguably the worst public health and environmental disaster involving mercury contamination. The treaty aims to curb the significant health and environmental impacts of mercury pollution and includes provisions addressing the mining, export and import, storage, and waste management of products containing mercury. Importantly, a provision heavily negotiated in the treaty addresses the use of dental fillings using mercury amalgam, an issue that has been subject to decades of global controversy. Though use of dental amalgam is widespread and has benefits, concerns have been raised regarding the potential for human health risk and environmental damage from emissions and improper waste management. While the Minamata Convention attempts to address these issues by calling for a voluntary phase-down of dental amalgam use and commitment to other measures, it falls short by failing to require binding and measurable targets to achieve these goals. In response, the international community should begin exploring ways to strengthen the implementation of the dental amalgam treaty provisions by establishing binding phase-down targets and milestones as well as exploring financing mechanisms to support treaty measures. Through strengthening of the Convention, stakeholders can ensure equitable access to global oral health treatment while also promoting responsible environmental stewardship.

  15. Human brain mercury levels related to exposure to amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertaş, E; Aksoy, A; Turla, A; Karaarslan, E S; Karaarslan, B; Aydın, A; Eken, A

    2014-08-01

    The safety of dental amalgam as the primary material in dental restoration treatments has been debated since its introduction. It is widely accepted that amalgam restorations continuously release elemental mercury (Hg) vapor, which is inhaled and absorbed by the body and distributed to tissues, including the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the presence of amalgam fillings is correlated with brain Hg level. The Hg levels in the parietal lobes of the brains of 32 cadavers were analyzed with an atomic absorption spectrometer with the mercury hydride system. A total of 32 brain samples were tested; of these, 10 were from cadavers with amalgam fillings, while 22 of them were amalgam free. Hg was detected in 60.0% (6 of 10) of the samples in the amalgam group and in 36.3% (8 of 22) in the amalgam-free group. The average Hg level of the amalgam group was 0.97 ± 0.83 µg/g (minimum: 0.3 µg/g and maximum: 2.34 µg/g), and in the amalgam-free group, it was 1.06 ± 0.57 µg/g (minimum: 0.17 µg/g and maximum: 1.76 µg/g). The results of the present study showed no correlation between the presence of amalgam fillings and brain Hg level.

  16. Indicators of the risk mechanics for Class-I and Class-II amalgam and composite resin restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Eduardo; Arroyo, Erik Dreyer; Pardo, Claudia Letelier; OLIVEIRA JUNIOR,Osmir Batista de; Cortés, Gustavo Moncada [UNESP; Casielles,Javier Martín

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine indicators of prognosis for mechanical risks of amalgam and composite resin restorations in permanent teeth. METHODS: Thirty-nine adult patients with direct clinical, photographic, radiographic and model examinations. A total of 256 restorations were classified as "not satisfactory," with Bravo or Charlie values according to the modified Ryge /USPHS criteria. The total "n" was divided into Bravo and Charlie groups according to the value obtained in the "marginal adaptation" ...

  17. Comparison of the composition of Cinalux amalgam with ADA standard

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    Moosavi Nasab M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam is one of the oldest restorative materials, used in dentistry, which has undergone a lot of quality changes since its advent. Copper is one of the major elements in dental amalgam. Dental amalgam is classified as low and high cooper group based on the percentage of this element. Cinaluy is an Iranian product, a product of Shahid Faghihi's factory and its particles are spherical with high copper and it does not contain any zinc and gama II phase. The goal of this study was to identify the type and percentage of its ingredients and to analyze this dental amalgam by muclear reactor. The products of the factory, at two different times, were compared with each other and also with the percentages presented by the factory, regarding their ingredients. They were also compared with two standardized amalgams called: Sybralloy and Tytin. Three typical Cinalux amalgam capsules, produced on different dates, were selected. The contents of capsules were enveloped in plastic bags and then sealed and placed in a miniature reactor to undergo nuclear radiation for 10 days. After this period, the elements in amalgam became activated and converted into radioisotopes of the same elements, and began to radiate. Then gama spectrometer system accumulated these radiations and transferred them to Span software. This software, aided by reference standards, shows the intensity and the wave length of the received radiation, and consequently identifies the type and percentage of the elements in amalgam. The results demonstrated that the Cinalux amalgam samples, regarding the type and percentage of their elements, were identical and also met the factory standards. The differences were not significant. There was also no significant difference between Cinalux amalgam and the standardized amalgam Sybralloy, regarding the percentage of their elements, but comparing this amalgam with the standardized amalgam Tytin, a significant difference was not observed.

  18. Cytotoxicity of dental composite (co)monomers and the amalgam component Hg(2+) in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Simon, Sabine; Esters, Magalie; Seiss, Mario; Kehe, Kai; Kleinsasser, Norbert; Hickel, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    Unpolymerized resin (co)monomers or mercury (Hg) can be released from restorative dental materials (e.g. composites and amalgam). They can diffuse into the tooth pulp or the gingiva. They can also reach the gingiva and organs by the circulating blood after the uptake from swallowed saliva. The cytotoxicity of dental composite components hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (Bis-GMA) as well as the amalgam component Hg(2+) (as HgCl(2)) and methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) was investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) at two time intervals. To test the cytotoxicity of substances, the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay were used. The test substances were added in various concentrations and cells were incubated for 24 or 48 h. The EC(50) values were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC(50) values were found [BrdU: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 8.860 (0.440)/6.600(0.630), TEGDMA 1.810(0.130)/1.220(0.130), UDMA 0.120(0.010)/0.140(0.010), BisGMA 0.060(0.004)/0.040(0.002), HgCl(2) 0.015(0.001)/0.050(0.006), and MeHgCl 0.004(0.001)/0.005(0.001). Following EC(50) values were found [LDH: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 9.490(0.300)/7.890(1.230), TEGDMA 2.300(0.470)/1.950(0.310), UDMA 0.200(0.007)/0.100(0.007), BisGMA 0.070(0.005)/0.100(0.002), and MeHgCl 0.014(0.006)/0.010(0.003). In both assays, the following range of increased toxicity was found for composite components (24 and 48 h): HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA. In both assays, MeHgCl was the most toxic substance. In the BrdU assay, Hg(2+) was about fourfold less toxic than MeHgCl but Hg(2+) was about fourfold more toxic than BisGMA. In the BrdU test, a significantly (P<0.05) decreased toxicity was observed for Hg(2+) at 48 h, compared to the 24 h Hg(2+)-exposure. A time depending

  19. Effects of high temperature on different restorations in forensic identification: Dental samples and mandible

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    Kalpana A Patidar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The forensic odontologist strives to utilize the charred human dentition throughout each stage of dental evaluation, and restorations are as unique as fingerprints and their radiographic morphology as well as the types of filling materials are often the main feature for identification. The knowledge of detecting residual restorative material and composition of unrecovered adjacent restoration is a valuable tool-mark in the presumptive identification of the dentition of a burned victim. Gold, silver amalgam, silicate restoration, and so on, have a different resistance to prolonged high temperature, therefore, the identification of burned bodies can be correlated with adequate qualities and quantities of the traces. Most of the dental examination relies heavily on the presence of the restoration as well as the relationship of one dental structure to another. This greatly narrows the research for the final identification that is based on postmortem data. Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine the resistance of teeth and different restorative materials, and the mandible, to variable temperature and duration, for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 72 extracted teeth which were divided into six goups of 12 teeth each based on the type of restorative material. (Group 1 - unrestored teeth, group 2 - teeth restored with Zn 3 (Po 4 2 , group 3 - with silver amalgam, group 4 with glass ionomer cement, group 5 - Ni-Cr-metal crown, group 6 - metal ceramic crown and two specimens of the mandible. The effect of incineration at 400°C (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins and 1100°C (15 mins was studied. Results: Damage to the teeth subjected to variable temperatures and time can be categorized as intact (no damage, scorched (superficially parched and discolored, charred (reduced to carbon by incomplete combustion and incinerated (burned to ashes.

  20. Effects of high temperature on different restorations in forensic identification: Dental samples and mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar; Wanjari, Sangeeta

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The forensic odontologist strives to utilize the charred human dentition throughout each stage of dental evaluation, and restorations are as unique as fingerprints and their radiographic morphology as well as the types of filling materials are often the main feature for identification. The knowledge of detecting residual restorative material and composition of unrecovered adjacent restoration is a valuable tool-mark in the presumptive identification of the dentition of a burned victim. Gold, silver amalgam, silicate restoration, and so on, have a different resistance to prolonged high temperature, therefore, the identification of burned bodies can be correlated with adequate qualities and quantities of the traces. Most of the dental examination relies heavily on the presence of the restoration as well as the relationship of one dental structure to another. This greatly narrows the research for the final identification that is based on postmortem data. Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine the resistance of teeth and different restorative materials, and the mandible, to variable temperature and duration, for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 72 extracted teeth which were divided into six goups of 12 teeth each based on the type of restorative material. (Group 1 - unrestored teeth, group 2 - teeth restored with Zn3(PO4)2, group 3 - with silver amalgam, group 4 with glass ionomer cement, group 5 - Ni-Cr-metal crown, group 6 - metal ceramic crown) and two specimens of the mandible. The effect of incineration at 400°C (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins) and 1100°C (15 mins) was studied. Results: Damage to the teeth subjected to variable temperatures and time can be categorized as intact (no damage), scorched (superficially parched and discolored), charred (reduced to carbon by incomplete combustion) and incinerated (burned to ashes). PMID:21189989

  1. Validity and reliability of methods for the detection of secondary caries around amalgam restorations in primary teeth

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    Mariana Minatel Braga

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary caries has been reported as the main reason for restoration replacement. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the performance of different methods - visual inspection, laser fluorescence (DIAGNOdent, radiography and tactile examination - for secondary caries detection in primary molars restored with amalgam. Fifty-four primary molars were photographed and 73 suspect sites adjacent to amalgam restorations were selected. Two examiners evaluated independently these sites using all methods. Agreement between examiners was assessed by the Kappa test. To validate the methods, a caries-detector dye was used after restoration removal. The best cut-off points for the sample were found by a Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC analysis, and the area under the ROC curve (Az, and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the methods were calculated for enamel (D2 and dentine (D3 thresholds. These parameters were found for each method and then compared by the McNemar test. The tactile examination and visual inspection presented the highest inter-examiner agreement for the D2 and D3 thresholds, respectively. The visual inspection also showed better performance than the other methods for both thresholds (Az = 0.861 and Az = 0.841, respectively. In conclusion, the visual inspection presented the best performance for detecting enamel and dentin secondary caries in primary teeth restored with amalgam.

  2. A comparison between new dentinal adhesives (fifth generation and traditional varnish in microleakage reduction of amalgam restorations in primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi M. Associate Professor

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Microleakage presents the major cause for restorations failure in the oral cavity resulting in postoperative sensitivity, pulp irritation and secondary caries formation."nAim: The aim of this study was to compare two dentinal adhesive systems of fifth generation and copalite varnish in reducing microleakage of amalgam restorations in primary teeth."nMaterials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 100 class V amalgam restorations were prepared on the buccal or lingual surfaces of primary molar and canine teeth. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (25 samples each. No liner was used for the first group and the second group restorations were lined with copalite varnish. Two dentin adhesives, called Syntac C and Single Bond, were used for the third and fourth groups, respectively. At the next stage, the samples were immersed in 5% fuschin solution for 24 hours, then sectioned buccolingually, and examined under a stereomicroscope for microleakage evaluation."nResults: There was a significant difference between four groups statistically (PO.000I, Comparing"nfour groups, the first and fourth ones, demonstrated the most and the least microleakage, respectively."nConclusion: The present study showed that new dentinal adhesive systems caused microleakage"nreduction in amalgam restorations of primary teeth.

  3. Oral Lichenoid Contact Lesions to Mercury and Dental Amalgam—A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Helen McParland; Saman Warnakulasuriya

    2012-01-01

    Human oral mucosa is subjected to many noxious stimuli. One of these substances, in those who have restorations, is dental amalgam which contains mercury. This paper focuses on the local toxic effects of amalgam and mercury from dental restorations. Components of amalgam may, in rare instances, cause local side effects or allergic reactions referred to as oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs). OLLs to amalgams are recognised as hypersensitivity reactions to low-level mercury exposure. The use of patc...

  4. Mercury release during autoclave sterilization of amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsell, D E; Karns, L; Buchanan, W T; Johnson, R B

    1996-05-01

    Natural teeth are an invaluable teaching tool for preclinical instruction in operative dentistry and endodontic techniques. Cavity preparation in teeth containing amalgam restorations is a realistic simulation of an often experienced clinical situation. As various pathogens are contained in saliva, teeth must be disinfected before use by students. The purpose of this study is to indirectly evaluate whether mercury vapor is released from amalgam restorations in such teeth during steam autoclave sterilization. Mercury vapor detection, sample mass changes and x-ray fluorescence data were collected from experimental steam autoclave sterilization of amalgam samples sealed in autoclave bags. All of the data showed evidence of mercury vapor generation coincident to steam autoclave sterilization. Mercury vapor levels within the room where amalgam was exposed to steam autoclave sterilization reached levels that constitute an unnecessary health risk to dental personnel. The volume of amalgam tested simulated that contained in 175 amalgam restored teeth. Initial venting of the autoclave chamber produced mercury vapor concentrations significantly in excess of OSHA vapor concentration ceiling levels. Thus, the use of a steam autoclave for sterilization of amalgam containing teeth for use in preclinical laboratory exercises may be harmful to personnel involved.

  5. Study of the short-term release of the ionic fraction of heavy metals from dental amalgam into synthetic saliva, using anodic stripping voltammetry with microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Gavino; Pilo, Maria I; Piu, Paola C; Spano, Nadia; Tapparo, Andrea; Campus, Guglielmo G; Seeber, Renato

    2002-11-12

    The present paper describes a fast and reproducible procedure, employing differential pulse stripping analysis technique with graphite microelectrodes, for the quantitative evaluation of the ionic fraction of heavy metals (namely Hg, Cu, and Zn) released from dental amalgams into synthetic saliva during 6-90 h contact between amalgam and saliva, after completion of the dental restoration (short-term release). The Zn(2+) concentration was evaluated by linear calibration, whereas Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) contents were estimated by the standard additions method. While the concentration of Zn(2+) ion does not increase significantly anymore after a 6-h contact (values from 288+/-12 to 346+/-12 mugdm(-3) at time of contact from 6 to 90 h, respectively), in the same time interval the concentration of both Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) ions progressively increases (from 38+/-6 to 197+/-4 mugdm(-3) and from 15+/-3 to 101+/-2 mugdm(-3), respectively). The results of the release tests reveal that Hg concentration is at the highest level of risk (HBM III), as identified by the three human biomonitoring categories suggested by the Institut für Wasser-, Boden- und Lufthygiene des Umweltbundesamtes (Germany) for the estimation of potential harmful effects on health due to exposure to heavy metals.

  6. Handling characteristics of gallium alloy for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, L K; Miller, B H; Nakajima, H; Collard, S M; Guo, I Y; Okabe, T

    1993-12-01

    The handling characteristics of a gallium alloy (Gallium Alloy GF) were compared to those of a spherical high-copper amalgam (Tytin). Ten dentists each restored four identical MO preparations in acrylic typodont teeth (no. 30), two with amalgam and two with gallium alloy. Each restoration was evaluated immediately following completion by the operator for six clinically relevant criteria. Each criterion was scored between 1 and 5, where 1 = very poor, 2 = poor, 3 = fair, 4 = good, and 5 = very good. Three two-sided Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare the median scores for significant differences (P < 0.05). The first test indicated no significant difference between scores for the first- and second-placed restorations, within criteria and within alloy type (n = 10). The second test indicated a significant difference between amalgam and gallium alloy, within criteria and within restoration sequence (n = 10), for each criterion except resistance to fracture during removal of the matrix band. The third test indicated a significant difference between amalgam and gallium alloy, within each criteria, combining scores for first- and second-placed restorations (n = 20). During simulated clinical placement, amalgam was rated significantly higher than gallium alloy in each handling characteristic evaluated.

  7. Zirconia-reinforced dental restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Chen

    2013-01-01

    The series of studies conducted in this thesis showed that there are several ways to enhance the performance of fixed restorations regarding the application of zirconia. One possible way is to change the sintering procedure of zirconia, so that the physical properties of zirconia such BFS, density o

  8. 牙科银汞合金安全性问题的现状%Dental Amalgam: Update on Safety Concerns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李一鸣

    2001-01-01

    由于牙科银汞合金性能优良,使用方便,以及费用低廉,在近150多年来已成为最常用的补牙材料。然而长期以来,对于银汞合金的安全性问题一直有所争议。本文将重点分析和讨论近年来发表的有关银汞合金安全性的主要文献。现有的科学资料表明,使用操作不当是银汞合金对牙科专业人员健康的主要危险因素;应用新技术现已可测出银汞合金修复体在口腔内释放的微量汞。但至今尚未有任何证据能确定这些来自银汞合金修复体的微量汞会对人体健康造成伤害。因此,银汞合金仍可被认为是安全和有效的补牙材料,除非今后有新的不同的研究结果,目前似无必要停止使用牙科银汞合金。%This paper reviews and discusses recent studies concerning thesafety of dental amalgam, with an emphasis on studies that have been published since the 1993 review of dental amalgam by the U.S. Public Health Service Committee to Coordinate Environmental Health and Related Programs. Based on currently available scientific information, it is concluded that amalgam continues to be a safe and effective restorative material.

  9. Contact hypersensitivity to mercury in amalgam restorations may mimic oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisa, C; Taylor, J S; Bernat, J R; Helm, T N

    1999-03-01

    Oral lichenoid lesions caused by hypersensitivity to mercury in amalgam fillings may mimic oral lichen planus on clinical and histologic examination. A positive patch test reaction to more than one mercurial allergen increases confidence in the diagnosis and justifies the removal and replacement of all amalgam fillings with those made of other materials. A complete remission may be expected about 3 months after the last amalgam filling is removed.

  10. Bacteriology of deep carious lesions underneath amalgam restorations with different pulp-capping materials - an in vivo analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Neelakantan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms remaining in dentin following cavity preparation may induce pulp damage, requiring the use of pulp-capping agents with antimicrobial activity underneath permanent restorations. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to analyze the bacteriological status of carious dentin and to assess the efficacy of different base underneath silver amalgam restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was conducted on 50 patients aged 13 to 30 years. Sterile swabs were used to take samples after cavity preparation, which was assessed by microbiological culture to identify the microorganisms present. Following this, cavities were restored with silver amalgam, using one of the materials being investigated, as the base: calcium hydroxide (Group II, polyantibiotic paste (Group III, a novel light-cured fluoride-releasing hydroxyapatite-based liner (Group IV and mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (Group V. In Group I, the cavities were restored with silver amalgam, without any base. After 3 months, the amalgam was removed and samples taken again and analyzed for the microbial flora. RESULTS: Lactobacilli were the most commonly isolated microorganisms in the samples of carious dentin. Groups IV and V showed negative culture in the 3-month samples. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups I, II and III. There was no significant difference between Groups IV and V (p>0.05. Both Groups IV and V showed significantly better results when compared to Groups I, II and III (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The hydroxyapatite-based liner and MTA performed significantly better in terms of antibacterial activity than the other materials.

  11. Bacteriology of deep carious lesions underneath amalgam restorations with different pulp-capping materials - an in vivo analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEELAKANTAN, Prasanna; RAO, Chandragiri Venkata Subba; INDRAMOHAN, Jamuna

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms remaining in dentin following cavity preparation may induce pulp damage, requiring the use of pulp-capping agents with antimicrobial activity underneath permanent restorations. Objective The aims of this study were to analyze the bacteriological status of carious dentin and to assess the efficacy of different base underneath silver amalgam restorations. Material and Methods This study was conducted on 50 patients aged 13 to 30 years. Sterile swabs were used to take samples after cavity preparation, which was assessed by microbiological culture to identify the microorganisms present. Following this, cavities were restored with silver amalgam, using one of the materials being investigated, as the base: calcium hydroxide (Group II), polyantibiotic paste (Group III), a novel light-cured fluoride-releasing hydroxyapatite-based liner (Group IV) and mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (Group V). In Group I, the cavities were restored with silver amalgam, without any base. After 3 months, the amalgam was removed and samples taken again and analyzed for the microbial flora. Results Lactobacilli were the most commonly isolated microorganisms in the samples of carious dentin. Groups IV and V showed negative culture in the 3-month samples. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups I, II and III. There was no significant difference between Groups IV and V (p>0.05). Both Groups IV and V showed significantly better results when compared to Groups I, II and III (p<0.05). Conclusions The hydroxyapatite-based liner and MTA performed significantly better in terms of antibacterial activity than the other materials. PMID:22666827

  12. Poor quality evidence suggests that failure rates for atraumatic restorative treatment and conventional amalgam are similar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Dominic

    2012-06-01

    The Medline, Cochrane CENTRAL, Biomed Central, Database of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), OpenJ-Gate, Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia (BBO), LILACS, IndMed, Sabinet, Scielo, Scirus (Medicine), OpenSIGLE and Google Scholar databases were searched. Hand searching was performed for journals not indexed in the databases. References of included trials were checked. Prospective clinical trials with test and control groups with a follow up of at least one year were included. Data abstraction was conducted independently and clinical and methodologically homogeneous data were pooled using a fixed-effects model. Eighteen trials were included. From these 32 individual dichotomous datasets were extracted and analysed. The majority of the results show no differences between both types of intervention. A high risk of selection-, performance-, detection- and attrition bias was identified. Existing research gaps are mainly due to lack of trials and small sample size. The current evidence indicates that the failure rate of high-viscosity GIC/ART restorations is not higher than, but similar to that of conventional amalgam fillings after periods longer than one year. These results are in line with the conclusions drawn during the original systematic review. There is a high risk that these results are affected by bias, and thus confirmation by further trials with suitably high numbers of participants is needed.

  13. An elementary study of deformation of molar teeth during amalgam restorative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J G

    1977-06-01

    A technique using an optical comparator was employed to examine the dimensional changes resulting from cavity preparation, application of the matrix and packing with amalgam in three extracted molar teeth. The changes have been reported and the nature of the change discussed. A modification in the use of the matrix and amalgam packing technique is suggested.

  14. Biofilm formation on dental restorative and implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, H J; Rinastiti, M; Siswomihardjo, W; van der Mei, H C

    2010-07-01

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on smooth surfaces. Oral biofilms mostly consist of multiple bacterial strains, but Candida species are found on acrylic dentures. Biofilms on gold and amalgam in vivo are thick and fully covering, but barely viable. Biofilms on ceramics are thin and highly viable. Biofilms on composites and glass-ionomer cements cause surface deterioration, which enhances biofilm formation again. Residual monomer release from composites influences biofilm growth in vitro, but effects in vivo are less pronounced, probably due to the large volume of saliva into which compounds are released and its continuous refreshment. Similarly, conflicting results have been reported on effects of fluoride release from glass-ionomer cements. Finally, biomaterial-associated infection of implants and devices elsewhere in the body is compared with oral biofilm formation. Biomaterial modifications to discourage biofilm formation on implants and devices are critically discussed for possible applications in dentistry. It is concluded that, for dental applications, antimicrobial coatings killing bacteria upon contact are more promising than antimicrobial-releasing coatings.

  15. Dental amalgam - the effect of the technology of alloy powder preparation on the corrosion behaviour and the release of mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joska, L.; Bystriansky, J.; Novak, P. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Institute of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2003-03-01

    Dental amalgams are based on a broad spectrum of materials differing in their chemical composition, metallurgical treatment, and in the way the initial alloys powders are prepared. In addition to their chemical composition, amalgams based on various powders differ in both their microstructure and the amount of mercury needed for preparation. All these facts may affect electrochemical processes occurring during their interaction with oral fluids, and also mercury release. While verifying the effect of the technology used for the preparation of the high-copper ternary alloy powder on the properties of resulting amalgams, this study aimed at the mechanism of their interaction with a model saliva solution as well as mercury release was included. Measurements were done in a model saliva solution using standard electrochemical methods and exposition measurements. The interaction of individual types of amalgams with artificial saliva did not reveal any significant differences. The free corrosion potential of all these amalgams in an aerated solution settled in the range of values in which tin oxidation, resulting in a layer of insoluble corrosion products, turned out to be the dominant anodic process. The rate of mercury release was the lowest for amalgams based on a gas-atomized alloy. The highest rate of mercury release, and also its dependence on time, was exhibited by lathe-cut powder based amalgam. In addition to different volume fraction of the Ag-Hg phase and the level of its tin alloying, this different behaviour may be explained by differences in the rate at which a layer of tin corrosion products acting as a barrier to mercury release is formed. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Dentalamalgame basieren auf einem breitem Spektrum von Werkstoffen, die sich in ihrer chemischen Zusammensetzung, der metallurgischen Behandlung und der Art, wie die Ausgangslegierungspulver hergestellt werden, unterscheiden. Zusaetzlich zu ihrer chemischen

  16. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from wear (attrition and abrasion) of gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, G Mark; Clemow, Scott R; Peters, Rachel E; James, Kyle J; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Little has been published on the chemical exposures and risks of dental restorative materials other than from dental amalgam and composite resins. Here we provide the first exposure and risk assessment for gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. Based on the 2001-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we assessed the exposure of US adults to the components of Au alloy and ceramic dental restorations owing to dental material wear. Silver (Ag) is the most problematic component of Au alloy restorations, owing to a combination of toxicity and proportional composition. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of four tooth surfaces restored with Au alloy before exceeding, on average, the reference exposure level (REL) for Ag. Lithium (Li) is the most problematic component of dental ceramics. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of 15 tooth surfaces restored with ceramics before exceeding the REL for Li. Relative risks of chemical exposures from dental materials decrease in the following order: Amalgam>Au alloys>ceramics>composite resins.

  17. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Mickenautsch

    Full Text Available A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i similar effect direction and (ii similar effect magnitude.7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph.Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected.Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials.

  18. Cytotoxicity of dental composite (co)monomers and the amalgam component Hg{sup 2+} in human gingival fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Simon, Sabine; Esters, Magalie; Seiss, Mario [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kehe, Kai [Bundeswehr Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kleinsasser, Norbert [University of Regensburg, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Regensburg (Germany); Hickel, Reinhard [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Unpolymerized resin (co)monomers or mercury (Hg) can be released from restorative dental materials (e.g. composites and amalgam). They can diffuse into the tooth pulp or the gingiva. They can also reach the gingiva and organs by the circulating blood after the uptake from swallowed saliva. The cytotoxicity of dental composite components hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (Bis-GMA) as well as the amalgam component Hg{sup 2+} (as HgCl{sub 2}) and methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) was investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) at two time intervals. To test the cytotoxicity of substances, the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay were used. The test substances were added in various concentrations and cells were incubated for 24 or 48 h. The EC{sub 50} values were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC{sub 50} values were found [BrdU: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 8.860 (0.440)/6.600(0.630), TEGDMA 1.810(0.130)/1.220(0.130), UDMA 0.120(0.010)/0.140(0.010), BisGMA 0.060(0.004)/0.040(0.002), HgCl{sub 2} 0.015(0.001)/0.050(0.006), and MeHgCl 0.004(0.001)/0.005(0.001). Following EC{sub 50} values were found [LDH: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 9.490(0.300)/7.890(1.230), TEGDMA 2.300(0.470)/1.950(0.310), UDMA 0.200(0.007)/0.100(0.007), BisGMA 0.070(0.005)/0.100(0.002), and MeHgCl 0.014(0.006)/0.010(0.003). In both assays, the following range of increased toxicity was found for composite components (24 and 48 h): HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA. In both assays, MeHgCl was the most toxic substance. In the BrdU assay, Hg{sup 2+} was about fourfold less toxic than MeHgCl but Hg{sup 2+} was about fourfold more toxic than BisGMA. In the BrdU test, a significantly (P<0.05) decreased toxicity was observed for Hg{sup 2+} at 48 h, compared to the 24 h

  19. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair.

  20. Occlusal considerations for dental implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Ranier H

    2014-01-01

    When placed, dental implants are put into an ever-changing oral environment in which teeth can continue to migrate. Yet, the implants themselves are ankylosed. This can lead to occlusal instability. Teeth may continue to erupt, leaving the implants in infraocclusion. Teeth may move mesially away from an implant, requiring modification to close an open contact point. Friction in the connection between teeth and implants can lead to intrusion of teeth and damage to the periodontal attachment apparatus. Implant occlusion with shallow incisal guidance minimizes lateral and tipping forces. Cross-arch stabilization allows the best distribution of occlusal forces. The choice of restorative materials influences long-term occlusal stability.

  1. Modelling the Longevity of Dental Restorations by means of a CBR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio J. Aliaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network.

  2. Strength Pada Amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Handayani

    2008-01-01

    Amalgam didefinisikan sebagai campuran dari dua atau beberapa logam (alloy) yang salah satunya adalali merkuri. Dental amalgam sendiri merupakan campuran dari merkuri (Hg), perak (Ag), timah (Sn), tembaga (Cu) dan bahan-bahan lain yang memiliki fungsinya masing-masing, dimana sebagian diantaranya akan saling mengatasi kekurangan yang ditimbulkan logam lain, jika logam tersebut dikombinasikan dengan perbandingan yang tepat. Amalgam mempunyai strength (kekuatan) yang cukup besar sehingga dap...

  3. Interactions of liposomes with dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sanko; Adamczak, Malgorzata; Hiorth, Marianne; Smistad, Gro; Kopperud, Hilde Molvig

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro adsorption and retention of liposomes onto four common types of dental restorative materials (conventional and silorane-based resin composites as well as conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC)) have been investigated due to their potential use in the oral cavity. Uncoated liposomes (positively and negatively charged) and pectin (low- and high-methoxylated) coated liposomes were prepared and characterized in terms of particle size and zeta potential. The adsorption of liposomes was performed by immersion, quantified by fluorescence detection, and visualized by fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy. Positive liposomes demonstrated the highest adsorption on all four types of materials likely due to their attractive surface charge. They also retained well (minimum 40% after 60 min) on both conventional resin composite and GIC even when exposed to simulated salivary flow. Although an intermediate initial level of adsorption was found for the pectin coated liposomes, at least 70% high methoxylated-pectin coated liposomes still remained on the conventional resin composite after 60 min flow exposure. This indicates significant contribution of hydrophobic interactions in the prolonged binding of liposomes to resin composites. Based on these results, the present paper suggests two new possible applications of liposomes in the preservation of dental restorations.

  4. Marginal ditching and staining as a predictor of secondary caries around amalgam restorations: a clinical and microbiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, E A; Joyston-Bechal, S; Beighton, D

    1995-05-01

    Caries at the margins of restorations is difficult to diagnose. In particular, the relevance of both marginal ditching and staining around amalgam restorations is unclear. This clinical study questions the relevance of marginal ditching and color change to the level of infection of the dentin beneath the margins of amalgam restorations. Clinically visible sites (330) on the tooth/restoration margin were selected on 175 teeth. The enamel adjacent to each site was noted as stained (a grey discoloration) or stain-free. One hundred and seventy-eight sites were clinically intact, 83 sites had narrow ditches (ditches were present (> 0.4 mm). Twenty sites with frankly carious lesions were also included. Plaque was sampled at the tooth-restoration margin, and the dentin was sampled at the enamel-dentin junction below each site. Samples were vortexed, diluted, and cultured for total anaerobic counts, mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, and yeasts. Plaque samples showed that margins with wide ditches (> 0.4 mm) harbored significantly more bacteria, mutans streptococci, and lactobacilli than did clinically intact margins and margins with narrow ditches. There were no significant differences in the degree of infection of the dentin beneath clinically intact restorations and those with narrow ditches, but samples associated with wide ditches and carious lesions yielded significantly more bacteria, mutans streptococci, and lactobacilli. The color of the enamel adjacent to the sample site was irrelevant to the level of infection of the dentin beneath the filling margin, provided a frankly carious lesion was not present.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Mercury concentration in maternal serum, cord blood, and placenta in patients with amalgam dental fillings: effects on fetal biometric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedir Findik, Rahime; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ersoy, Ali Ozgur; Tasci, Yasemin; Moraloglu, Ozlem; Karakaya, Jale

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to determine the extent to which mercury is transmitted from the mother to fetus via the umbilical cord in patients with amalgam dental fillings, and its effect on fetal biometric measurements. Twenty-eight patients as the study group with amalgam fillings, and 32 of them as the control group were included in this prospective case-control study. The mercury levels were measured in the maternal and cord venous sera, and the placental samples. Two groups were compared in terms of these and the fetal/neonatal biometric measurements. In the study group, the maternal and umbilical cord mercury levels were found to be significantly higher than those from the control group (p = 0.006 and p = 0.010, respectively). These high levels did not affect the fetal biometric measurements. The presence of high serum mercury levels in pregnant women with amalgam fillings is important, and warrants further long-term studies in order to investigate the fetal neurological effects as well.

  6. Randomized clinical comparison of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam or with fiber posts and resin composite: five-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Francesco; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Worthington, Helen V; Watson, Timothy F; Pitt Ford, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Prospective clinical studies comparing the results of different types of restorations of endodontically treated teeth are lacking. This study compared the clinical success rate of endodontically treated premolars restored with fiber posts and direct composite to the restorations of premolars using amalgam. Premolars with Class II carious lesions were selected and randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (1) restoration with amalgam or (2) restoration with fiber posts and composite. One hundred and nine teeth were included in Group 1 and 110 in Group 2. Patients were recalled after 1, 3 and 5 years. No statistically significant difference was found between the proportion of failed teeth in the two experimental groups. Significant differences were observed between the proportion of root fractures (p=0.029) and caries (p=0.047), with more root fractures and less caries observed in the teeth restored with amalgam at the five-year recall. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that restorations with fiber posts and composite were found to be more effective than amalgam in preventing root fractures but less effective in preventing secondary caries.

  7. Evaluation of Microleakage in Composite-Composite and Amalgam-Composite Interfaces in Tooth with Preventive Resin Restoration (Ex-viva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Afshar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study addresses the question of whether conservative methods of restoration may be applied efficaciously in permanent posterior teeth with proximal lesions and intact occlusal preventive resin restoration (PRR. The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage at amalgam-composite interface and composite-composite interface in permanent tooth with PRR.Materials and Methods: Thirty-five premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were selected. The occlusal surfaces were sealed as preventive resin restoration. Then the teeth were stored in incubator for 6 months. After this period, two single boxes were prepared in mesial and distal surfaces in each tooth and filled with amalgam. Another class I composite restoration was prepared in occlusal surface in contact with the first PRR. Then samples were thermocycled and marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration on sections of the restored teeth.Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests served for statistical analyses.Results: In 51.4% of amalgam-composite interfaces the dye reached the pulpal wall. The corresponded figures for amalgam-tooth and composite-composite interfaces were 31.4% and 14.3%, respectively. The differences in microleakage among the three interfaces were statistically significant (P<0.05.Conclusion: In the teeth restored with PRR technique, restoring proximal lesions with a conservative technique may lead to favorable results concerning microleakage.

  8. In-situ measurements of low-level mercury vapor exposure from dental amalgam with zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Stefan; Welzl, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    Alongside food, emissions from amalgam fillings are an essential contribution to man's mercury burden. Previous methods for the determination of intraoral mercury vapor (Hg degrees ) release used principally some form of preconcentration of Hg on gold (film or wool), allowing relatively few measurements with unknown precision and sensitivity at selected times. Recently available computer-controlled Hg detectors operating on Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy (ZAAS) facilitate the direct real-time measurement of Hg degrees concentrations. It was the aim to adapt this method for a comparative investigation of emission processes from fillings in situ and from amalgam specimens in vitro. In addition to the ZAAS instrument, the apparatus consisted of a pump, magnetic valves, an electronic flow controller and a handle with a disposable mouth piece for aspiration of oral air. A programmable timer integrated the computer-controlled instrument operation and the data collection into a standard sampling protocol. A fast exponential decay of the emission was found after stimulation of amalgam specimens and of fillings in situ (halftimes 8.6 and 10.7 min). Precision was evaluated by a series of measurements on a single patient which indicated a consistently low coefficient of variation between 18% and 25%. After insertion of a few new fillings, sensitivity was high enough to detect a significant increase in emission against the background emission from the majority of old fillings. Zeeman-AAS in connection with a semi-automated sampling protocol and data storage provides precise in-situ measurements of Hg degrees emission from dental amalgam with real-time resolution. This facilitates the detailed exploration of the Hg degrees release kinetics and the applicability to large-scale studies.

  9. Novel glass-ceramics for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollington, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    There are many different ceramic systems available on the market for dental restorations. Glass-ceramics are a popular choice due to their excellent esthetics and ability to bond to tooth structure allowing a more conservative approach. However, at present, these materials have insufficient strength to be used reliably in posterior regions of the mouth. The aim of this review article is to discuss the types of novel glass-ceramic currently be investigated including composition, microstructure and properties. Current research in glass-ceramics focuses on the quest for a highly esthetic material along with sufficient strength to enable crowns and bridgework to be reliably placed in these areas. There is a gap in the market for a machinable resin bonded glass-ceramic with sufficient strength as well as excellent esthetics.

  10. Influence of the temperature, volume and type of solution in the mercury vaporization of dental amalgam residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Raquel dalla [Department of Chemical Engineering, State University of Maringa, Maringa - PR (Brazil)], E-mail: raqueldc_eng@yahoo.com.br; Cossich, Eneida Sala; Tavares, Celia Regina Granhen [Department of Chemical Engineering, State University of Maringa, Maringa - PR (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    One of the qualitative methods for the identification of mercury vapor is what it occurs as a way of chemical reaction between palladium chloride and metallic mercury. Palladium chloride ribbons with yellowish coloration put in contact with the vaporized mercury of dental amalgam residue, liberates palladium and forms mercury chloride in your surface, and starts to have black coloration; this form identify the presence of the mercury vapor in the system. This work studies the influence of temperature, volume and type of barrier-solution in the vaporization of mercury during the period of storage of dental amalgam residues, aiming to establish the best conditions for storage of these residues. It was found that for all tested solutions, the longest storage times without any occurrence of mercury vaporization were obtained in the lowest temperatures tested and the largest solution volumes of barrier-solution. The radiographic effluent presented bigger efficacy in the reduction of the volatilization, increasing the period when the residue was stored, however the analysis of this solution after the vaporization test showed the presence of organic mercury. These results show that water is the most efficient barrier against the vaporization of mercury, since it did not result in organic mercury formation in the effluent solution from the storage process.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of...

  12. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  13. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Thamer AlShahrani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  14. Managing the phase-down of amalgam: Part I. Educational and training issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2013-08-01

    Following the recently agreed Minamata Convention, a phase-down in the use of dental amalgam will become a priority for the profession. With a lead-in period of a number of years, important changes in the mind-set of the profession are required to ensure that patient safety is not compromised. Posterior composites have been a viable, and in many cases preferable, alternative to amalgam for many years. However, notwithstanding considerable developments in dental school teaching on the application and placement of posterior composites, growing evidence to support the use of composites in the restoration of posterior teeth and advances in composite systems, many practitioners remain reluctant to place composite rather than amalgam. This paper considers the present and future use of posterior composites and highlights ways in which dental school teaching and continuing professional development (CPD) may contribute to the successful phase-down, and now inevitable discontinuation, in the use of dental amalgam.

  15. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  16. Mechanical behaviour of dental composite filling materials using digital holography

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, J.M.; Lopes, H.; M. A. P. Vaz; Campos, J.C. Reis

    2010-01-01

    One of the most common clinical problems in dentistry is tooth decay. Among the dental filling materials used to repair tooth structure that has been destroyed by decay are dental amalgam and composite materials based on acrylics. Dental amalgam has been used by dentists for the past 150 years as a dental restorative material due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effects. However its safety as a filling material has been questioned due to th...

  17. No Evidence of Genotoxic Damage in a Group of Patients with Titanium Dental Implants and Different Metal Restorations in the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Sánchez-Siles, Mariano; Gilbel-del Águila, Osmundo

    2015-08-01

    Titanium is the most widely used metal in implant dentistry. In spite of its biocompatibility, when it is released into the oral environment, it can have local negative biological effects. The aims of this study were to detect the concentration of metal ions in patients with dental implants, to evaluate whether or not their release might be influenced by the presence of other metals, and to assay whether these ions might provoke genotoxic damage in oral mucosa cells. One hundred five patients with a total of 180 dental implants were included. The sample was divided into seven groups (n = 15 per group). Group 1 consisted of patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants; Group 2, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth; Group 3, patients with dental amalgams; Group 4, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants and metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth; Group 5, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants and dental amalgams; and Group 6, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants, metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth, and dental amalgams. Group 7 was the control group, without any dental treatment. The concentration of metal ions was detected using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; genotoxicity was measured using the buccal micronucleus cytome assay protocol. Group 5 displayed the highest concentration of metal ions in parts per billion (Ti, Co, Ni, Zn, Pd, Sn, and Pb). Group 6 was characterized by the highest presence of Hg. No signs of genotoxic damage were found in any of the study groups. Patients with titanium dental implants combined with other metal restorations presented higher concentrations of metal ions, but no genotoxic damage was observed in oral mucosal epithelial cells. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Survey on the teaching and use in dental schools of resin-based materials for restoring posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Zunliang; Nguyen, Edward; Stella, Rita; Thong, Irene; Yip, Natalia; Zhang, Felix; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2011-02-01

    A survey was conducted of 100 dental schools worldwide to investigate the current teaching of posterior resin composite restorations. A 20 multi-part question questionnaire was emailed to the selected schools. Schools were selected by ability to understand and respond in English. The questionnaire consisted of four open-ended questions and 16 closed questions on topics such as material selection for restoring posterior teeth, preclinical teaching of resin composite for posterior teeth, restoration size, contraindications, matrix placement methods, lining use, adhesive selection and finishing. Forty-six schools responded. The outcomes showed all schools included the teaching of resin composite for posterior restorations but varied. The majority of schools (63%) no longer taught amalgam as the preferred posterior restorative material. Half of the schools surveyed set numerical clinical requirements for restoration placement. Australian schools had no requirements whilst 92% of Asian schools did. There was a consensus that larger restorations were less suitable for resin composite. Selection of adhesives depended on region. Generally, the schools surveyed showed minor variations philosophically in teaching of the use and placement of resin composite restorations. © 2011 FDI World Dental Federation.

  19. Forensic or archaeological issue: is chemical analysis of dental restorations helpful in assessing time since death and identification of skeletonized human remains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelic, Ksenija; Djonic, Danijela; Neskovic, Olivera; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Nikolic, Slobodan; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Djuric, Marija

    2013-09-01

    In 2011, small mass grave with completely skeletonized remains was discovered in Belgrade suburb. An eyewitness claimed that skeletons belonged to German soldiers killed in WWII. Anthropologists were engaged to investigate whether the skeletal remains correspond to the indicated German group or represent more recent case requiring court trial. Numerous dental restorations were noticed. Owing to the fact that different dental materials were used in dental practice at certain times, the aim of this study was to explore whether analysis of dental restorations could help in identification and estimation of time since death. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed that dental fillings corresponded to copper amalgam, conventional silver amalgam, silicophosphate cement, and zinc phosphate cement. Chemical results combined with anthropological and historical facts suggest that the individuals lived before the 1960s in country with well-developed dental service at that time. Therefore, chemical analysis of dental fillings was useful to distinguish between skeletal remains that are too old to be of forensic interest and the remains relevant to legal investigations. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Radiographic diagnosis of dental restoration misfit: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedke, G S; Spin-Neto, R; da Silveira, H E D; Wenzel, A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfit in dental prostheses and restorations. The MEDLINE bibliographic database was searched from 1950 to February 2014 for reports on the radiographic diagnosis of misfits. The search strategy was limited to English-language publications using the following combined MeSH terms in the search strategy: (Dental Restoration OR Dental Prosthesis OR Crown OR Inlays OR Dental Abutments) and (Dental Leakage OR Prosthesis Fitting OR Dental Marginal Adaptation OR Surface Properties) and (Radiography, Dental OR Radiography, Dental, Digital OR Cone-Beam Computed Tomography). Twenty-eight publications were identified and read in full text, and 14 studies fulfilled criteria for inclusion. Information regarding the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfits in dental prosthesis and restorations, and in which the methodology/results comprised information regarding how the sample was collected/prepared, the method, imaging protocol, presence of a reference test and the outcomes were evaluated. QUADAS criteria was used to rate the studies in high, moderate or low quality. The evidence supporting the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfits in dental prosthesis and restorations is limited to low-/moderate-quality studies. The well-established intra-oral orthogonal projection is still under investigation and considered the most appropriate method, both when evaluating the relation between dental restoration to tooth and abutment to implant. Studies using digital radiographs have not evaluated the effect of image post-processing, and tomography has not been evaluated.

  1. Components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, Joseph L; Gordan, Valeria V; Rindal, D Brad;

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify components of patient satisfaction with restorative dental care and to test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient and procedure factors are associated with patient satisfaction.......The authors conducted a study to identify components of patient satisfaction with restorative dental care and to test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient and procedure factors are associated with patient satisfaction....

  2. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasmas in Dental Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Liu, Q; Yu, Q S; Wang, Y

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the service life of contemporary composite restoration is unsatisfactory, and longevity of dentin bonding is one of the major culprits. Bonding is essentially a hybridization process in which dental substrate and adhesive resin interact with each other through an exchange process. Thus, the longevity of dentin bonding can only be improved with enhanced qualities in substrate, adhesive resin, and their interaction within the hybridization zone. This review aims to collect and summarize recent advances in utilizing nonthermal atmospheric plasmas (NTAPs)-a novel technology that delivers highly reactive species in a gaseous medium at or below physiologic temperature-to improve the durability of dentin bonding by addressing these 3 issues simultaneously. Overall, NTAP has demonstrated efficacies in improving a number of critical properties for dentin bonding, including deactivation of oral pathogens, modification of surface chemistry/properties, resin polymerization, improvement in adhesive-dentin interactions, and establishment of auxiliary bonding mechanism. While a few preliminary studies have indicated the benefit of NTAP to bond strength and stability, additional researches are warranted to employ knowledge acquired so far and to evaluate these properties in a systematic way.

  3. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasmas in Dental Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Q.; Yu, Q.S.; Wang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the service life of contemporary composite restoration is unsatisfactory, and longevity of dentin bonding is one of the major culprits. Bonding is essentially a hybridization process in which dental substrate and adhesive resin interact with each other through an exchange process. Thus, the longevity of dentin bonding can only be improved with enhanced qualities in substrate, adhesive resin, and their interaction within the hybridization zone. This review aims to collect and summarize recent advances in utilizing nonthermal atmospheric plasmas (NTAPs)—a novel technology that delivers highly reactive species in a gaseous medium at or below physiologic temperature—to improve the durability of dentin bonding by addressing these 3 issues simultaneously. Overall, NTAP has demonstrated efficacies in improving a number of critical properties for dentin bonding, including deactivation of oral pathogens, modification of surface chemistry/properties, resin polymerization, improvement in adhesive-dentin interactions, and establishment of auxiliary bonding mechanism. While a few preliminary studies have indicated the benefit of NTAP to bond strength and stability, additional researches are warranted to employ knowledge acquired so far and to evaluate these properties in a systematic way. PMID:26848068

  4. Mercury Amalgam Diffusion in Human Teeth Probed Using Femtosecond LIBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Liciane Toledo; da Ana, Patricia Aparecida; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José; Zezell, Denise Maria; Vieira, Nilson Dias; Samad, Ricardo Elgul

    2017-01-01

    In this work the diffusion of mercury and other elements from amalgam tooth restorations through the surrounding dental tissue (dentin) was evaluated using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fs-LIBS). To achieve this, seven deciduous and eight permanent extracted human molar teeth with occlusal amalgam restorations were half-sectioned and analyzed using pulses from a femtosecond laser. The measurements were performed from the amalgam restoration along the amalgam/dentin interface to the apical direction. It was possible to observe the presence of metallic elements (silver, mercury, copper and tin) emission lines, as well as dental constituent ones, providing fingerprints of each material and comparable data for checking the consistence of the results. It was also shown that the elements penetration depth values in each tooth are usually similar and consistent, for both deciduous and permanent teeth, indicating that all the metals diffuse into the dentin by the same mechanism. We propose that this diffusion mechanism is mainly through liquid dragging inside the dentin tubules. The mercury diffused further in permanent teeth than in deciduous teeth, probably due to the longer diffusion times due to the age of the restorations. It was possible to conclude that the proposed femtosecond-LIBS system can detect the presence of metals in the dental tissue, among the tooth constituent elements, and map the distribution of endogenous and exogenous chemical elements, with a spatial resolution that can be brought under 100 µm.

  5. Performance of a gaseous detector based energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging system: Analysis of human teeth treated with dental amalgam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.L.M. [I3N, Physics Dept, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Figueroa, R.; Jaramillo, A. [Physics Department, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco (Chile); Carvalho, M.L. [Atomic Physics Centre, University of Lisbon, 1649-03 Lisboa (Portugal); Veloso, J.F.C.A., E-mail: joao.veloso@ua.pt [I3N, Physics Dept, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2013-08-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) imaging systems are of great interest in many applications of different areas, once they allow us to get images of the spatial elemental distribution in the samples. The detector system used in this study is based on a micro patterned gas detector, named Micro-Hole and Strip Plate. The full field of view system, with an active area of 28 × 28 mm{sup 2} presents some important features for EDXRF imaging applications, such as a position resolution below 125 μm, an intrinsic energy resolution of about 14% full width at half maximum for 5.9 keV X-rays, and a counting rate capability of 0.5 MHz. In this work, analysis of human teeth treated by dental amalgam was performed by using the EDXRF imaging system mentioned above. The goal of the analysis is to evaluate the system capabilities in the biomedical field by measuring the drift of the major constituents of a dental amalgam, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. The elemental distribution pattern of these elements obtained during the analysis suggests diffusion of these elements from the amalgam to teeth tissues. - Highlights: • Demonstration of an EDXRF imaging system based on a 2D-MHSP detector for biological analysis • Evaluation of the drift of the dental amalgam constituents, throughout the teeth • Observation of Hg diffusion, due to hydroxyapatite crystal defects that compose the teeth tissues.

  6. Nanotechnology-based restorative materials for dental caries management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary A S; Guedes, Sarah F F; Xu, Hockin H K; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A

    2013-08-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to dental materials as an innovative concept for the development of materials with better properties and anticaries potential. In this review we discuss the current progress and future applications of functional nanoparticles incorporated in dental restorative materials as useful strategies to dental caries management. We also overview proposed antimicrobial and remineralizing mechanisms. Nanomaterials have great potential to decrease biofilm accumulation, inhibit the demineralization process, to be used for remineralizing tooth structure, and to combat caries-related bacteria. These results are encouraging and open the doors to future clinical studies that will allow the therapeutic value of nanotechnology-based restorative materials to be established.

  7. The demand for preventive and restorative dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhoefer, Chad D; Zuvekas, Samuel H; Manski, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Chronic tooth decay is the most common chronic condition in the United States among children ages 5-17 and also affects a large percentage of adults. Oral health conditions are preventable, but less than half of the US population uses dental services annually. We seek to examine the extent to which limited dental coverage and high out-of-pocket costs reduce dental service use by the nonelderly privately insured and uninsured. Using data from the 2001-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and an American Dental Association survey of dental procedure prices, we jointly estimate the probability of using preventive and both basic and major restorative services through a correlated random effects specification that controls for endogeneity. We found that dental coverage increased the probability of preventive care use by 19% and the use of restorative services 11% to 16%. Both conditional and unconditional on dental coverage, the use of dental services was not sensitive to out-of-pocket costs. We conclude that dental coverage is an important determinant of preventive dental service use, but other nonprice factors related to consumer preferences, especially education, are equal if not stronger determinants. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  9. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  10. Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

  11. In situ effects of restorative materials on dental biofilm and enamel demineralisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, R P; Zanin, I C J; Lima, J P M; Vasconcelos, S M L C; Melo, M A S; Beltrão, H C P; Rodrigues, L K A

    2009-01-01

    Since secondary caries is one of the main reasons for replacing restorations, this study assessed the effects of different restorative materials on the microbiological composition of dental biofilm and on enamel demineralisation around the restoration. A randomized, double-blind, split-mouth in situ design was conducted in one phase of 14 days, during which, 20 volunteers wore palatal devices containing five human dental enamel slabs. Each slab was randomly restored with one of the following materials: Filtek-Z-250/Single Bond, control group (composite resin), Permite (amalgam), Fuji II (encapsulated resin-modified glass ionomer), Vitremer (resin-modified glass ionomer) and Ketac Molar (conventional glass ionomer). The volunteers used fluoride dentifrice, 3x/day and a 20% sucrose solution was dripped onto the slabs 8x/day. The biofilm formed on the slabs was analyzed to determine the counts of total streptococci, mutans streptococci and lactobacilli. Enamel demineralisation was determined by cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH) at 20 and 70 microm from the margin of the restoration. Kruskal-Wallis and analysis of variance, followed by least mean squares (LMS) test, were used to evaluate microbiota and CSMH among the groups. The significance level used was 5%. No statistically significant differences were found in the cariogenic microbiota grown on the slabs. At a 20-mum distance, only Fuji II statistically differed from the other groups, showing the lowest demineralisation. At 70 microm, Fuji II significantly inhibited demineralisation when compared to Permite, Filtek-Z-250 and Ketac Molar. In the context of fluoride dentifrice and under the cariogenic exposure conditions of this study, only the encapsulated resin-modified glass ionomer material provided additional protection against secondary caries.

  12. Amalgam tattoo (amalgam pigmentation) of the oral mucosa: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, A

    2004-07-01

    Amalgam tattoo is an iatrogenic lesion caused by traumatic implantation of dental amalgam into soft tissue. Amalgam tattoo is the most common localized pigmented lesion in the mouth. In a study of a mass screening oral examination in the United States, it was found in about 0.4-0.9% of the adult population and in Sweden in about 8%. Clinically, amalgam tattoo presents as a dark gray or blue, flat macule located adjacent to a restored tooth. Most are located on the gingiva and alveolar mucosa followed by the buccal mucosa and the floor of the mouth. Microscopic examination reveals that amalgam is present in the tissues in two forms: as irregular dark, solid fragments of metal or as numerous, discrete fine, brown or black granules dispersed along collagen bundles and around small blood vessels and nerves. In most lesions, it is presented in both forms. The biologic response to the amalgam is related to particle size, quantity and elemental composition of the amalgam. Large fragments often become surrounded by dense fibrous connective tissue. Smaller particles are associated with mild to moderate chronic inflammatory response with individual macrophages engulfing small amalgam particles. Occasionally, the reaction takes the form of foreign body granuloma in which macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are present. Some of the multinucleated giant cells also contain amalgam particles. Diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is usually obvious from the location and clinical appearance. A radiograph is recommended to confirm the presence of metallic particles, but absence of radiographic evidence does not rule out the possibility, since particles are often too fine or widely dispersed to be visible on radiographs. When there is no radiographic evidence or an adjacent restored tooth, biopsy is recommended to rule out an early melanoma. Once the diagnosis of amalgam tattoo has been established, no additional treatment is necessary except for cosmetic reasons. If the pigmentation

  13. Recent developments in restorative dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1993-02-01

    Since the introduction of porcelain jacket crowns in the early 1900s, dental ceramics have been praised for their esthetic appearance. But there's more to consider: other benefits, longevity, limitations. This review addresses major developments in modern dental ceramics and metal-ceramics.

  14. Use of Mercury in Dental Silver Amalgam: An Occupational and Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Nadia; Ilyas, Samar; Qadir, Abdul; Arslan, Muhammad; Salman, Muhammad; Ahsan, Naveed; Zahid, Hina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the occupational exposure to mercury in dentistry and associated environmental emission in wastewater of Lahore, Pakistan. A total of ninety-eight blood samples were collected comprising 37 dentists, 31 dental assistants, and 30 controls. Results demonstrate that the dentistry personnel contained significantly higher mean concentration of mercury in their blood samples (dentists: 29.835 µg/L and dental assistants: 22.798 µg/L) compared to that of the controls (3.2769 µg/L). The mean concentration of mercury was found maximum in the blood samples of older age group (62.8 µg/L) in dentists and (44.3 µg/L) in dental assistants. The comparison of mercury concentration among dentists, dental assistants, and controls (pairing based on their ages) revealed that the concentration increased with the age and experience among the dentists and dental assistants. Moreover, the mercury concentration in all the studied dental wastewater samples, collected from twenty-two dental clinics, was found to be exceeding the recommended discharge limit of 0.01 mg/L. Therefore, we recommend that immediate steps must be taken to ensure appropriate preventive measures to avoid mercury vapors in order to prevent potential health hazards to dentistry personnel. Strong regulatory and administrative measures are needed to deal with mercury pollution on emergency basis. PMID:27446955

  15. Validity of staining and marginal ditching as criteria for diagnosis of secondary caries around occlusal amalgam restorations: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Claudia Silami; Freitas, Amanda Beatriz Dahdah Aniceto de; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    This study determined the validity of marginal ditching and staining as criteria for the diagnosis of secondary caries around amalgam restorations. One hundred and twenty-four Class I amalgam restorations on extracted human teeth were submitted to standardized clinical examinations. A calibrated examiner recorded the presence of ditching in the tooth/restoration interface, the occurrence of bluish-grey staining on the occlusal surface, and their relationship with the presence and severity of secondary carious lesions. Examinations were repeated after 4 days to calculate the intra-examiner reliability. Stereomicroscopic inspection of the serial tooth sections was used as the gold-standard. Six teeth were lost during the study. Of the 118 remaining teeth, 19 (16%) showed occlusal bluish-grey staining and 26 showed more than 0.20 mm wide marginal ditches. Of the latter, 14 presented narrow ditches (0.20-0.45 mm), while 12 presented wide ditches (0.45 mm). The evaluation criteria presented low sensitivity and positive predictive values. Positive and negative likelihood ratios showed that the criteria exhibited, indistinctly, the same odds to determine a positive or negative result for a diseased or healthy tooth. It was concluded that marginal ditching and staining were not valid criteria for the diagnosis of secondary caries around occlusal amalgam restorations.

  16. Effect of restored meiso-occlusal cavity of molars with inlay and amalgam%嵌体修复磨牙邻牙合面洞的疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车道闯; 车坚本

    2001-01-01

    AIM:To compare the effect of restored molars meiso-occlusal cavity of filling with inlay and amalgam. METHODS: 30 selected mandibular molars with meiso-occlusal cavity were restored with inlay and amalgam respectively, observing closely for two years and comparing the effect. RESULTS: The successful restorations with inlay have 28 cases(93.33%), failure in 2 cases(6.67%). The successful restorations with amalgam have 21 cases (70.00%), failure in 9 cases (30.00%). CONCLUSION: The effect of restored mandibular molars meiso-occlusal cavity with inlay is clearly higher than the amalgam.%目的:比较嵌体与银汞合金充填修复磨牙邻牙合面洞的疗效。方法:选取下颌磨牙因龋病需要制备近中邻牙合面洞者,分别以嵌体或银汞合金修复,各30牙,跟踪观察2年,比较其效果。结果:用嵌体修复成功28牙(93,33%),失败2牙(6.67%);用银汞合金修复成功21牙(70.00%),失败9牙(30.00%)。结论:用嵌体修复下颌磨牙近中邻牙合面洞的疗效明显高于用银汞合金修复者。

  17. Management of periodontal destruction caused by overhanging dental restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misnova Misnova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal tissue inflammations are occasionally caused by positions of restoration margins, particularly if they are placed subgingivally. A 44-year old male was referred to the Dental and Mouth Hospital of Dentistry Faculty Hasanuddin University with the chief complaint of severe pain at right posterior maxillary. Clinical examinations demonstrate a 7-mm periodontal pocket at buccal aspect of 16 teeth with tooth mobility °2. Overhanging dental composite restorations of Class V were detected at the subgingival areas of 15, 16, and 17. Radiographic results show vertically and horizontally alveolar bone loss. This case report is aimed to describe the management of periodontal tissue destruction as a result of overhanging dental composite restorations. Scaling and root planing were conducted as the initial therapy. The periodontal surgery was performed a week after the initial therapy. A full-thickness flap design with sulcular incision from 14 to 18 was made before the pocket curretage and necrotic tissue debridement along with restoration recontouring. The flap was sutured with simple suture technique. Periodontal dressing was packed for a week. Antibiotics, analgetics and antiinflammatory drugs were prescribed per orally. There was no history of pain a week after the surgical procedure. Tooth mobility was decreased to °1 and the periodontal pocket was reduced to 3 mm. Overhanging dental restorations may lead to periodontal tissue destruction. The subgingivally placement of those restorations should consider the health of periodontal tissues.

  18. Penetration of amalgam constituents into dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Amalgam restorations are replaced by adhesively placed composite resin restorations at an increasing rate. After the removal of amalgam dentine often shows marked dark discoloration that is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from overlying amalgams. it is questioned whet

  19. Penetration of amalgam constituents into dentine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Ozcan, M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Amalgam restorations are replaced by adhesively placed composite resin restorations at an increasing rate. After the removal of amalgam dentine often shows marked dark discoloration that is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from overlying amalgams. It is questioned whet

  20. Effects of high temperatures on different dental restorative systems: Experimental study to aid identification processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Moreno; Giuseppe Merlati; Liliana Marin; Caterina Savio; Freddy Moreno

    2009-01-01

    This "in vitro" study was to observe the effects of high temperatures on teeth restored by (1) amalgam overlaying glass ionomer bases, (2) composite/adhesive system overlaying glass ionomer bases, (3) ZnO modified temporary filling material vs. unrestored teeth. Fifty un-restored teeth (control group), 50 teeth with class I amalgam restorations and glass ionomer bases, 50 teeth with class I composite/adhesive system restorations and glass ionomer bases and 50 teeth with class I ZnO modifi...

  1. Effect of Smokeless Tobacco on Surface Roughness of Dental Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    influence of surface structure and composition of  dental  restorative materials on bacterial  adhesion . ​  The overall conclusion from these 16 studies is...Effect of Smokeless Tobacco on Surface Roughness of  Dental  Restorations                  Shani O. Thompson    B.S. The United States Military...Smokeless Tobacco on Surface Roughness of  Dental  Restorations    MAJ Shani O. Thompson, D.D.S., M.S., Gerald D. Griffin, PhD, Ms. Nicole Meyer, LTC

  2. Amalgam tattoo mimicking mucosal melanoma: a diagnostic dilemma revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K; Schmidt, G; Bonde, C

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare but highly aggressive neoplasm. However, the clinicians need to be aware of the other and more frequent etiologies of intraoral pigmentation, such as amalgam tattoos. As amalgam has been extensively used for dental restorations and can cause pigmentations in the oral mucosa, this is a differential diagnosis not to be forgotten. We describe the characteristics of these two phenomena and present a case vignette illustrating the differential diagnostic issues. Other causes of intraoral pigmentation are summarized.

  3. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goro Nishigawa

    Full Text Available Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials.We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength.For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group.Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials.

  4. Resin composites : Sandwich restorations and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s resin composite has been used for Class II restorations in stress-bearing areas as an alternative to amalgam. Reasons for this were the patients’ fear of mercury in dental amalgam and a growing demand for aesthetic restorations. During the last decades, the use of new resin composites with more optimized filler loading have resulted in reduced clinical wear. Improved and simplified amphiphilic bonding systems have been introduced. However, one of the main problems with res...

  5. Qualitative Analysis of Teeth and Evaluation of Amalgam Elements Penetration into Dental Matrix Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazmeh, Meisam; Bahreini, Maryam; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Asnaashari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for qualitative analysis of healthy and carious teeth. The technique of laser ablation is receiving increasing attention for applications in dentistry, specifically for the treatment of teeth such as drilling of micro-holes and plaque removal. Methods: A quality-switched (Q-switched) Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser operating at wavelength of 1064 nm, pulse energy of 90 mJ/pulse, repetition rate of 2Hz and pulse duration of 6 ns was used in this analysis. In the process of ablation a luminous micro-plasma is normally generated which may be exploited for on-line elemental analysis via laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy as a rapid, in situ and easy method for monitoring drilling process. Results: The results of elemental analysis show the presence of some trace elements in teeth including P, Ca, Mg, Zn, K, Sr, C, Na, H, O and the permeability of some amalgam (teeth filling materials) elements including Hg, Ag, Cu and Sn into dental matrix. Conclusion: This study addresses the ability of LIBS in elemental analysis of teeth and its feasibility in acute identification of healthy and carious teeth during drilling process for future clinical applications. PMID:25987971

  6. [Dental restoration materials in pediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C L

    1997-02-01

    Restorative materials in pediatric dentistry have to fulfill special requirements. They should be easy to handle and applicable in a not always dry mouth. They should potentially be adhesive in order to avoid too much mechanical preparation. They do not have to be extremely wear resistant as the dwell time of the restorations is relatively short. Glass-ionomer cements and in particular the resin modified types possess properties which make them almost ideal for the required purpose.

  7. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  8. Regression of oral lichenoid lesions after replacement of dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårell, L; Tillberg, A; Widman, L; Bergdahl, J; Berglund, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prognosis and to evaluate the regression of lichenoid contact reactions (LCR) and oral lichen planus (OLP) after replacement of dental restorative materials suspected as causing the lesions. Forty-four referred patients with oral lesions participated in a follow-up study that was initiated an average of 6 years after the first examination at the Department of Odontology, i.e. the baseline examination. The patients underwent odontological clinical examination and answered a questionnaire with questions regarding dental health, medical and psychological health, and treatments undertaken from baseline to follow-up. After exchange of dental materials, regression of oral lesions was significantly higher among patients with LCR than with OLP. As no cases with OLP regressed after an exchange of materials, a proper diagnosis has to be made to avoid unnecessary exchanges of intact restorations on patients with OLP.

  9. What constitutes an ideal dental restorative material?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekow, E D; Bayne, S C; Carvalho, R M; Steele, J G

    2013-11-01

    Intense environmental concerns recently have prompted dentistry to evaluate the performance and environmental impact of existing restoration materials. Doing so entices us to explore the 'what if?' innovation in materials science to create more ideal restorative materials. Articulating a specification for our design and evaluation methods is proving to be more complicated than originally anticipated. Challenges exist not only in specifying how the material should be manipulated and perform clinically but also in understanding and incorporating implications of the skill of the operator placing the restoration, economic considerations, expectations patients have for their investment, cost-effectiveness, influences of the health care system on how and for whom restorations are to be placed, and global challenges that limit the types of materials available in different areas of the world. The quandary is to find ways to actively engage multiple stakeholders to agree on priorities and future actions to focus future directions on the creation of more ideal restorative materials that can be available throughout the world.

  10. Oral Lichenoid Contact Lesions to Mercury and Dental Amalgam—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen McParland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human oral mucosa is subjected to many noxious stimuli. One of these substances, in those who have restorations, is dental amalgam which contains mercury. This paper focuses on the local toxic effects of amalgam and mercury from dental restorations. Components of amalgam may, in rare instances, cause local side effects or allergic reactions referred to as oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs. OLLs to amalgams are recognised as hypersensitivity reactions to low-level mercury exposure. The use of patch testing to identify those susceptible from OLL is explored, and recommendations for removing amalgam fillings, when indicated are outlined. We conclude that evidence does not show that exposure to mercury from amalgam restorations poses a serious health risk in humans, except for an exceedingly small number of hypersensitivity reactions that are discussed.

  11. CERAMICS FOR DENTAL RESTORATIONS - AN INTRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTIAGO ARANGO SANTANDER

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Las cerámicas dentales son el material de elección para restauración oral debido a características como adecuada estética, elevada resistencia a la fractura y gran estabilidad química.En la actualidad, los profesionales de la Odontología tienen a su disposición una gran cantidad de sistemas cerámicos de restauración que presentan pequeñas o grandes diferencias en términos químicos, temperatura de procesamiento, resistencia mecánica y aplicación clínica, lo que lleva a sistemas de clasificación de las cerámicas que son poco útiles para profesionales ajenos a la odontología. El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo hacer una revisión de los sistemas cerámicos de uso dental y presentarlos desde una perspectiva composicional para favorecer el entendimiento de profesionales ajenos a la Odontología. Se hizo un importante esfuerzo para evadir la clasificación que han impuesto las casas comerciales y tener así una rápida compilación de información disponible en la literatura que permita tener una visión general completa, pero no intensiva, del estado del arte de las cerámicas dentales.

  12. The use of amalgam in pediatric dentistry: new insights and reappraising the tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, Anna B

    2015-01-01

    The debate on amalgam led to its being phased out in some countries. Results of clinical trials report failure rates of amalgams ranging from 12 percent to over 70 percent. Treatment of caries should meet the needs of each particular patient, based on his/her caries risk. In general, for small occlusal lesions, a conservative preventive resin restoration would be more appropriate than the classic Class I amalgam preparation. For proximal lesions, amalgam would be indicated for two-surface Class II preparations that do not extend beyond the line angles of primary teeth. This recommendation might not be appropriate for high-risk patients or restoring primary first molars in children four years old and younger where stainless steel crowns have demonstrated better longevity. Currently, amalgam demonstrates the best clinical success for Class II restorations that extend beyond the proximal line angles of permanent molars. The need to reduce the use of amalgam as a mercury-containing material is inevitable when aiming to reduce environmental contamination. It is important always to praise prevention and constantly search for biologically safe materials regarding health, clinical work, and environment. The purpose of this report was to summarize several factors that affect the effectiveness, advantages, and disadvantages of using dental amalgam in primary teeth.

  13. Performance of a gaseous detector based energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging system: Analysis of human teeth treated with dental amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A. L. M.; Figueroa, R.; Jaramillo, A.; Carvalho, M. L.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2013-08-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) imaging systems are of great interest in many applications of different areas, once they allow us to get images of the spatial elemental distribution in the samples. The detector system used in this study is based on a micro patterned gas detector, named Micro-Hole and Strip Plate. The full field of view system, with an active area of 28 × 28 mm2 presents some important features for EDXRF imaging applications, such as a position resolution below 125 μm, an intrinsic energy resolution of about 14% full width at half maximum for 5.9 keV X-rays, and a counting rate capability of 0.5 MHz. In this work, analysis of human teeth treated by dental amalgam was performed by using the EDXRF imaging system mentioned above. The goal of the analysis is to evaluate the system capabilities in the biomedical field by measuring the drift of the major constituents of a dental amalgam, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. The elemental distribution pattern of these elements obtained during the analysis suggests diffusion of these elements from the amalgam to teeth tissues.

  14. Comparison of chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations 08 years after the irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos, E-mail: mfmaio@ipen.b, E-mail: asantos@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marcosrf@salesiano-ata.b [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on the materials commonly used in dental restorations (amalgam, composite resin and Compomer), to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, observed when the teeth are restored within the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to the beam of radiation from a source of cobalt-therapy, and analyzed by a X-ray fluorescence technique, by comparing the chemical composition of samples before and after irradiation. Gamma spectrometry was performed with detector of NaI and HPGe in the same samples. Then, the samples were kept in an appropriate place and after 08 years is repeated the same analysis. With these tests, it was possible to verify small changes in the composition of bodies of evidence due to the interaction 08 years after exposure to gamma radiation beams, simulating a patient who develops deleterious effects of radiation after the end radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  15. MOBILITY OF MERCURY OF THE DENTAL AMALGAM IN REDUCTION PROCESS IN THE SEDIMENTS: FACTORIAL DESIGN ANALISYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Dalla Costa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The dental wastewater can contribute to the total daily mercury load on environment. Factorial design of experiments is useful toanalysis of factors that influence in this mobility. The aim of the present study was to design experiments to examine the effects ofoperational variables – temperature, pH and contact time - which may affect the mobility of mercury in form of dental amalgamresidue in reduction process in the sediments of the Pirapó River. Based on the factorial design of experiments and the analysis ofvariance, the temperature was the most significant factor in this process, followed by the pH and contact time. The parametersaffecting the mobility of total mercury showed that when the temperature and contact time increases and pH decreases there is animportant increase of mercury concentration in process. For the tested conditions, the high total mercury concentration was obtainedusing the temperature = 35oC, pH = 4.0 and contact time = 10 days.

  16. Preparation of dental amalgam and spectral diagnosis of mercury in plasmas-laser in the region of 250 nm - 850 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Ossa, A.; Pacheco, P.; Sarmiento, R.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we presents results of the spectral study of plasmas-laser of dental amalgam by technique Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Plasmas were generated focusing the beam of a Nd: YAG laser on the matrix of the mixture Ag-Sn-Cu and on amalgams with different proportions of mercury (3:2, 5:2, 6:2). Based on the spectral results and reported atomic parameters, became estimation of electron temperature plasmas- laser and their behavior with the concentration of Hg. The estimated values of the electron temperature for the respective proportions were 20 846 K, 19 139 K and 16 872 K, using the distribution of population of Boltzmann energy levels associated with spectral lines, considering conditions Local Thermodinamic Equilibrium (LTE) of plasmas.

  17. Discoloration of gingiva in the presence of fixed dental restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Ljubiša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the frequency of discoloration of gingiva in the presence of fixed dental restorations, regarding the type of alloy of which restorations were made, and to show histopathological changes of discolored gingiva. Methods. One hundred and eighty four patients of both sexes were examined. The average age of the examinees was 52. They were divided into four groups according to the alloys from which their restorations were made. Standardized history questionnaires and clinical examination procedures were developed for this study. In ten examinees, whose teeth were indicated for extraction and who had a discoloration of gingiva, the samples of tissue were taken from the discolored gingiva for histopathological examination. Results. Our results showed the presence of discolored gingiva in all four groups. It was most frequent in the examinees with fixed restorations made of Ni-Cr alloy (43,5% and less frequent in those with fixed dental restorations made of gold alloy (26,5%. Histopathological examination showed the presence of tissue foreign body granulomas with giant cells in which the metal particles were found, partially as small and partially as large particles. Conclusion. Results suggested that grayish discoloration of gingiva was present in all four groups of examinees. The highest number of examinees with discolored gingiva was in the group with restorations made of Ni-Cr alloy. Grayish discoloration of gingiva was a consequence of incorporation of metal particles into gingival tissue.

  18. Chemical or microbiological models of secondary caries development around different dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Maristela M; Gonçalves, Reginaldo B; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria B; Pimenta, Luiz André F

    2005-08-01

    This study evaluated artificial secondary caries around restorative materials, induced by means of chemical or microbiological models. The following materials were used randomly to restore 130 dental blocks: (1) zinc-oxide eugenol-free temporary filling: Coltosol (Coltène/Whaledent Inc.; n = 30), (2) silver amalgam: Permite C (SDI Limited, n = 20), (3) composite resin: Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE; n = 20), (4) glass-ionomer cement: Fuji II (GC America Inc.; n = 20), (5) resin-modified glass ionomer: Vitremer (3M ESPE; n = 20), and (6) polyacid modified resin: Dyract AP (Dentsply; n = 20). Ten specimens of Group 1 were kept in humidity, and had no carious formation (NC). Ten specimens of each group were submitted to pH cycling (CG, n = 60), and the others were immersed in a medium containing Streptococcus mutans and sucrose (BG, n = 60). Mineral content was determined by microhardness assessment, and lesion depth was measured in polarized light photomicrographs. In the chemical model (CG), mineral content values in the vicinities of restoration were high for Groups 5 (75.7 +/- 11.9), 4 (70.8 +/- 14.2), and NC (95.4 +/- 3.8); intermediate for Groups 1 (55.8 +/- 18.5), 6 (45.6 +/- 11.0), and 2 (44.3 +/- 11.2); and reduced for Group 3 (34.7 +/- 9.7). In the microbiological model (BG), results were similar to CG, although there was less demineralization. The highest lesion depths were found for Groups 3 (182.3 +/- 33.2) in CG and 6 (126.5 +/- 42.8) in BG, when compared to Group 5 (114.6 +/- 26.0 and 56.2 +/- 33.2, respectively). In both models of caries induction, ionomeric materials showed a superior cariostatic effect when compared to the other restorative materials.

  19. Forenzic significance of composite restorations radiopacity: Assessment by dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barac Radomir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to forensic use, dental materials should be sufficiently radiopaque to be detected against enamel/dentin, resulting in correct evaluation of restorations contours, detection of secondary caries, marginal defects, etc. Radiopacity of contemporary composites has been improved by inserting of filler-particles containing heavy metals: aluminum, barium, strontium, zirconium, ytterbium. Tetric composite group (Te-econom, Ceram, EvoCeram has the most suitable radiopacity; T-econom has highest radiopacity (4.78mm aluminum when exposure-0.6'. The aim of this study was to comparison of MOD composite restorations (T-Econom, Ivoclar, Vivadent radiographs in molar models and to assess their role in forensic identification, by dental students. Two sets of identical radiographs of molars models (that were previously filled with cement base and composite were made by standardized technique (exposure-time 0.2ms, amperage-10mA, voltage-70kV. One of the sets consists a few radiographs that did not have their pairs in the second set. Equality of composite restorations on the 'ante-mortem' and 'post-mortem' radiographs were assessed by dental students. Statistical analysis was performed using the kappa test. Results showed (k.t.=0.82 that there is a high correlation of correct answers although estimates are made by students who have no experience in forensic identification and forensic evidence, neither enough knowledge in dental radiology. Although the forensic identification should not be based only on the appearance of the one restoration, or the assessment of non-professional forensic scientists, this study indicates that radiopacity of composites may have a major forensic importance, because 'ante-mortem' and 'post-mortem' radiographs were showed exactly match certain morphological characteristics of composite restorations.

  20. A panorama of dental CAD/CAM restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Perng-Ru

    2005-07-01

    In the last 2 decades, exciting new developments in dental materials and computer technology have led to the success of contemporary dental computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. Several highly sophisticated chairside and laboratory CAD/CAM systems have been introduced or are under development. This article provides an overview of the development of various CAD/CAM systems. Operational components, methodologies, and restorative materials used with common CAD/CAM systems are discussed. Research data and clinical studies are presented to substantiate the clinical performance of these systems.

  1. Panorama of dental CAD/CAM restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Perng-Ru; Essig, Milton E

    2008-10-01

    In the past two decades, exciting new developments in dental materials and computer technology have led to the success of contemporary dental computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology. Several highly sophisticated in-office and laboratory CAD/CAM systems have been introduced or are under development. This article provides an overview of the development of various CAD/CAM systems. Operational components, methodologies, and restorative materials used with common CAD/CAM systems are discussed. Research data and clinical studies are presented to substantiate the clinical performance of these systems.

  2. Increased Zn/Glutathione Levels and Higher Superoxide Dismutase-1 Activity as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Women with Long-Term Dental Amalgam Fillings: Correlation between Mercury/Aluminium Levels (in Hair) and Antioxidant Systems in Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaña-Muñoz, María Eugenia; Parmigiani-Izquierdo, José María; Bravo-González, Luis Alberto; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Merino, José Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Background The induction of oxidative stress by Hg can affect antioxidant enzymes. However, epidemiological studies have failed to establish clear association between dental fillings presence and health problems. Objectives To determine whether heavy metals (in hair), antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1) and glutathione levels could be affected by the chronic presence of heavy metals in women who had dental amalgam fillings. Materials and Methods 55 hair samples (42 females with amalgam fillings and 13 female control subjects) were obtained. All subjects (mean age 44 years) who had dental amalgam filling for more than 10 years (average 15 years). Certain metals were quantified by ICP-MS (Mass Spectrophotometry) in hair (μg/g: Al, Hg, Ba, Ag, Sb, As, Be, Bi, Cd, Pb, Pt, Tl, Th, U, Ni, Sn, Ti) and SOD-1 and Glutathione (reduced form) levels in plasma. Data were compared with controls without amalgams, and analyzed to identify any significant relation between metals and the total number of amalgam fillings, comparing those with four or less (n = 27) with those with more than four (n = 15). As no significant differences were detected, the two groups were pooled (Amlgam; n = 42). Findings Hg, Ag, Al and Ba were higher in the amalgam group but without significant differences for most of the heavy metals analyzed. Increased SOD-1 activity and glutathione levels (reduced form) were observed in the amalgam group. Aluminum (Al) correlated with glutathione levels while Hg levels correlated with SOD-1. The observed Al/glutathione and Hg/SOD-1 correlation could be adaptive responses against the chronic presence of mercury. Conclusions Hg, Ag, Al and Ba levels increased in women who had dental amalgam fillings for long periods. Al correlated with glutathione, and Hg with SOD-1. SOD-1 may be a possible biomarker for assessing chronic Hg toxicity. PMID:26076368

  3. Increased Zn/Glutathione Levels and Higher Superoxide Dismutase-1 Activity as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Women with Long-Term Dental Amalgam Fillings: Correlation between Mercury/Aluminium Levels (in Hair and Antioxidant Systems in Plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Cabaña-Muñoz

    Full Text Available The induction of oxidative stress by Hg can affect antioxidant enzymes. However, epidemiological studies have failed to establish clear association between dental fillings presence and health problems.To determine whether heavy metals (in hair, antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1 and glutathione levels could be affected by the chronic presence of heavy metals in women who had dental amalgam fillings.55 hair samples (42 females with amalgam fillings and 13 female control subjects were obtained. All subjects (mean age 44 years who had dental amalgam filling for more than 10 years (average 15 years. Certain metals were quantified by ICP-MS (Mass Spectrophotometry in hair (μg/g: Al, Hg, Ba, Ag, Sb, As, Be, Bi, Cd, Pb, Pt, Tl, Th, U, Ni, Sn, Ti and SOD-1 and Glutathione (reduced form levels in plasma. Data were compared with controls without amalgams, and analyzed to identify any significant relation between metals and the total number of amalgam fillings, comparing those with four or less (n = 27 with those with more than four (n = 15. As no significant differences were detected, the two groups were pooled (Amlgam; n = 42.Hg, Ag, Al and Ba were higher in the amalgam group but without significant differences for most of the heavy metals analyzed. Increased SOD-1 activity and glutathione levels (reduced form were observed in the amalgam group. Aluminum (Al correlated with glutathione levels while Hg levels correlated with SOD-1. The observed Al/glutathione and Hg/SOD-1 correlation could be adaptive responses against the chronic presence of mercury.Hg, Ag, Al and Ba levels increased in women who had dental amalgam fillings for long periods. Al correlated with glutathione, and Hg with SOD-1. SOD-1 may be a possible biomarker for assessing chronic Hg toxicity.

  4. Ceramics for dental restorations – an introduction

    OpenAIRE

    SANTIAGO ARANGO SANTANDER; ALEJANDRO PELÁEZ VARGAS; JORGE SALDARRIAGA ESCOBAR; FERNANDO JORGE MONTEIRO; LUIS FELIPE RESTREPO TAMAYO

    2011-01-01

    Las cerámicas dentales son el material de elección para restauración oral debido a características como adecuada estética, elevada resistencia a la fractura y gran estabilidad química.En la actualidad, los profesionales de la Odontología tienen a su disposición una gran cantidad de sistemas cerámicos de restauración que presentan pequeñas o grandes diferencias en términos químicos, temperatura de procesamiento, resistencia mecánica y aplicación clínica, lo que lleva a sistemas de clasificació...

  5. The influence of a packable resin composite, conventional resin composite and amalgam on molar cuspal stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, J D; Diefenderfer, K E; Strother, J M

    2002-01-01

    Packable resin composites may offer improved properties and clinical performance over conventional resin composites or dental amalgam. This in vitro study examined the cuspal stiffness of molars restored with a packable resin composite, a conventional posterior microfilled resin composite and amalgam. Forty-eight intact caries-free human third molars were distributed into four treatment groups (n=12) so that the mean cross-sectional areas of all groups were equal. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were made and specimens restored using one of four restorative materials: (1) a spherical particle amalgam (Tytin); (2) Tytin amalgam with a dentin adhesive liner (OptiBond Solo); (3) a conventional microfilled posterior resin composite (Heliomolar); (4) a packable posterior resin composite (Prodigy Posterior). Cuspal stiffness was measured using a Bionix 200 biomaterials testing machine (MTS). Specimens were loaded vertically to 300 N at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Stiffness was measured at 10 intervals: (1) prior to cavity preparation (intact); (2) following cavity preparation, but before restoration; (3) seven days after restoration; then (4) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 12 months after restoration. All specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in deionized water throughout the study and thermocycled (5 degrees/55 degrees C; 2000 cycles) monthly for 12 months. Repeated Measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among treatment groups over time (presin composite increased cuspal stiffness over that of amalgam.

  6. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  7. Design and Validity of Randomized Controlled Dental Restorative Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Göstemeyer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evidence stemming from trials on restorative materials is shaped not only by trial findings, but also trial design and validity. We aimed to evaluate both aspects in randomized controlled dental restorative trials published from 2005–2015. Methods: Using systematic review methodology, we retrieved trials comparing restorative or adhesive dental materials. Two authors independently assessed design, risk of bias, registration status, and findings of trials. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: 114 studies on 15,321 restorations placed mainly in permanent teeth of 5232 patients were included. Per trial, the median number of patients was 37 (25th/75th percentiles: 30/51. Follow-up was 24 (20/48 months. Seventeen percent of trials reported on sample size calculations, 2% had been registered. Most trials (90% used US Public Health Service (USPHS criteria, and had a high risk of bias. More recent trials were more likely to have been registered, to have reported on sample size calculations, to be of low risk of bias, and to use other than USPHS-criteria. Twenty-three percent of trials yielded significant differences between groups. The likelihood of such differences was significantly increased in older studies, studies with potential reporting bias, published in journals with high impact factor (>2, longer follow-up periods, and not using USPHS-criteria. Conclusions: The majority of dental restorative trials published from 2005–2015 had limited validity. Risk of bias decreased in more recent trials. Future trials should aim for high validity, be registered, and use defined and appropriate sample sizes, follow-up periods, and outcome measures.

  8. Methylmercury and inorganic mercury in serum -- correlation to fish consumption and dental amalgam in a cohort of women born in 1922

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergdahl, I.A.; Schuetz, A. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine; Ahlqwist, M. [Medicinargatan 12, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oral Diagnostic Radiology; Bengtsson, C. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Vasa Hospital; Lissner, L. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Vasa Hospital]|[Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Lapidus, L.; Hulten, B. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1998-04-01

    Methylmercury in serum (S-MeHg) was assessed from serum concentrations of total (S-TotHg) and inorganic mercury (S-InoHg), determined by cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were collected from 135 women on two occasions, in 1968--1969 and 1980--1981. In a subgroup of 29 women, an association was found between S-MeHg and the amount of fish consumed in 1968--1969. The association was stronger when the individuals` mean S-MeHg from 1968--19659 and 1980--1981 were plotted vs fish consumption 1968--1969. In the group, as a whole, there was an association between S-InoHg and number of dental amalgam surfaces, in both 1968--1969 and 1980--1981. The S-InoHg increased by approximately 0.1 nmol/L per amalgam tooth surface, corresponding to an uptake of approximately 0.2 {micro}g/day per amalgam surface, but with considerable interindividual differences. The levels were lower in 1980--1981 than in 1968--1969 for both MeH and InoHg.

  9. [Exploration of basic restorative dental materials teaching in the field of dental technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan-ting

    2012-12-01

    This study was to compare the difference of the existing course materials of basic restorative dental with the past materials, found out the weakness of teaching mode before the reform, and explored the reform in education through teaching content, method and evaluation, in order to improve the teaching quality.

  10. Phase down of amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Rabab’ah, Mohammad A.; Bustani, Mohammad A.; Khraisat, Ameen S.; Sawair, Faleh A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the knowledge of Jordanian dentists toward phase down of dental amalgam as recommended by the Minamata Convention, and their training and competency in placing posterior composites. Methods This study was conducted through structured questionnaire interviews with randomly selected cohort of dentists in Jordan between March 2015 and June 2015. Out of 230 dentists who were invited, 196 (85.2%) agreed to participate. Dentists were asked if they know about the Minamata Convention. They were also asked about their training in placement of posterior composite. Results Out of the 196 interviewed, only 13.8% know about Minamata Convention and 17% had an undergraduate training in favor of placing composites in posterior teeth. Approximately 50% of those dentists were not trained in using rubber dam when placing posterior composites, while only 38.3% had training in sectional matrix placement. Undergraduate training did not influence (p=0.00) the dentists’ decision to remove old amalgam based on patient’s demands. Only 28.1% were of the opinion of discontinuing the use of amalgam due to its alleged health and environmental hazards. There was no general agreement on the type of composite, liner, and bonding strategy when placing posterior composites. Conclusion Dentists are not well informed on the Minamata Convention and the phase down of amalgam. Training in posterior composite placement should be given more room in undergraduate curriculum and continuous dental education. PMID:27874155

  11. How dentists diagnose and treat defective restorations: evidence from the dental practice-based research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Richman, Joshua S;

    2009-01-01

    not intervene surgically when the restoration in the scenario was amalgam. Dentists participating in a solo or small private practice (SPP) chose surgical intervention more often than dentists participating in large group practices (LGP) or in public health practices (PHP) (p

  12. Rubber dam may increase the survival time of dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, William; Carson, Susan J

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health's Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, LILACS, SciELO, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, VIP, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, OpenGrey and Sciencepaper Online databases. Handsearches in a number of journals.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials, including split-mouth studies assessing the effects of rubber dam isolation for restorative treatments in dental patients.Data extraction and synthesisTwo review authors independently screened the results of the electronic searches, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies.ResultsFour studies involving a total of 1,270 patients were included. The studies were at high risk of bias. One trial was excluded from the analysis due to inconsistencies in the presented data. Restorations had a significantly higher survival rate in the rubber dam isolation group compared to the cotton roll isolation group at six months in participants receiving composite restorative treatment of non-carious cervical lesions (risk ratio (RR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.37, very low-quality evidence). The rubber dam group had a lower risk of failure at two years in children undergoing proximal atraumatic restorative treatment in primary molars (hazard ratio (HR) 0.80, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.97, very low-quality evidence). One trial reported limited data showing that rubber dam usage during fissure sealing might shorten the treatment time. None of the included studies mentioned adverse effects or reported the direct cost of the treatment, or the level of patient acceptance/satisfaction. There was also no evidence evaluating the effects of rubber dam usage on the quality of the restorations.ConclusionsWe found some very low-quality evidence, from single studies, suggesting that rubber dam usage in dental direct

  13. Effects of high temperatures on different dental restorative systems: Experimental study to aid identification processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Moreno

    2009-01-01

    Our observations showed that the class I restorations made of amalgam on glass ionomer bases as far as the class I restorations made of ZnO modified temporary filling material can be identified till 1200°C because they maintain their shape despite the disintegration of the crowns, whilst the class I composite/adhesive system and the underplayed glass ionomer bases remained in place in an altered shape.

  14. Amalgam tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hien T; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Soldano, Anthony C

    2008-05-15

    A 53-year-old woman with a history of melanoma status-post excision two years prior presented with a 4-month history of 4, dark-brown macules on the inferior surface of her tongue. A biopsy specimen showed a squamous mucosa with chronic submucosal inflammation and brown pigment. The clinical and histopathologic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of amalgam tattoo. Amalgam tattoos are common, oral pigmented lesions that clinically present as isolated, blue, grey, or black macules on the gingivae, the buccal and alveolar mucosae, the palate, and/or the tongue. They are due to deposition of a mixture of silver, tin, mercury, copper, and zinc, which are components of an amalgam filling, into the oral soft tissues. Amalgam tattoos can either be treated surgically or with a Q-switched ruby laser. In the case of our patient with the history of melanoma, her oral lesions proved not to be the more dire diagnosis of malignant melanoma.

  15. Gold and palladium burden from dental restoration materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasch, G; Muss, C; Roider, G

    2000-06-01

    From 81 volunteers (16 without dental restorations, 65 with gold crowns or inlays) samples of saliva before and after chewing gum, blood, serum, urine and faeces were taken and analysed for gold (Au) and palladium (Pd). The Au concentration in all analysed biomonitors correlates significantly to the number of teeth with gold restorations. For Pd the correlations were still significant, but weaker than for Au. Persons with gold restorations show maximal Au and Pd concentrations, 10(2)-10(3) higher than the background burden. The calculated maximal daily Au load in saliva (1.38 mg Au per day) reaches the range of an oral Au therapy for rheumatoid arthritis with 6 mg Auranofin (= 1.74 mg Au per day). During this therapy severe and frequent side effects are reported. In contrast, the Au concentration in serum maximally reached from Au restorations, amounts to only approximately 1/20 of the Au level during arthritis therapy. But even under subtherapeutic doses of 1 mg Auranofin/day severe side effects have been reported (4 out of 56 cases). The mean Au blood concentration from 1 mg Auranofin daily was only 3 times higher than our maximum value. A toxicological classification of the Pd values is difficult, because no toxicological threshold limit has been established, especially for the low-level long-term burden with Pd.

  16. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Biomaterials for Dental Restorative Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2013-08-01

    The physical understanding of the optical properties of dental biomaterials is mandatory for their final success in restorative applications.Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function,the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). We have employed the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method to combine transmittance and reflectance measurements performed using an integrating-sphere setup with the results of the previous scattering-anisotropygoniometric measurements. This has led to the determination of the absorption and the scattering coefficients. The aim was to optically characterize two different dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and one type of zirconia ceramic, and comparatively study them. The experimental procedure was conducted under repeatability conditions of measurement in order to determine the uncertainty associated to the optical properties of the biomaterials. Spectral variations of the refraction index and the scattering anisotropy factor were also considered. The whole experimental procedure fulfilled all the necessary requirements to provide optical-property values with lower associated uncertainties. The effective transport coefficient presented a similar spectral behavior for the two composites but completely different for the zirconia ceramic. The results demonstrated that the scattering anisotropy exerted a clearly distinct impact on the optical properties of the zirconia ceramic compared with those of the dental-resin composites.

  17. Five-year clinical performance of posterior resin composite restorations placed by dental students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the survival over a five-year period of posterior resin composite restorations placed by students. METHODS: Class I and II resin composite restorations placed by second-fourth year dental students were evaluated. Patients attended the dental school every 6 months for a reg

  18. Dental Therapy Assistant: Quality of Restorations Placed and Finished.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U.S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a new concept of dental care delivery, formally identified as the Improved Dental Care Delivery System. The concept is based on the conservation of professional manpower resources through the use of dental treatment teams employing expanded duty dental assistants. Dental Therapy Assistant (DTA) is the…

  19. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and phosphor storage plate to detect simulated occlusal secondary caries under amalgam restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Shoaleh; Zadeh, Nahal Kazerooni; Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Shahab, Shahriar; Bahrampour, Ehsan; Hamedani, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy and feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with phosphor storage plate (PSP) in detection of simulated occlusal secondary caries. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro descriptive-comparative study, a total of 80 slots of class I cavities were prepared on 80 extracted human premolars. Then, 40 teeth were randomly selected out of this sample and artificial carious lesions were created on these teeth by a round diamond bur no. 1/2. All 80 teeth were restored with amalgam fillings and radiographs were taken, both with PSP system and CBCT. All images were evaluated by three calibrated observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of two systems. SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was adopted for statistical analysis. The difference between Az value of bitewing and CBCT methods were compared by pairwise comparison method. The inter- and intra-operator agreement was assessed by kappa analysis (P < 0.05). Results: The mean Az value for bitewings and CBCT was 0.903 and 0.994, respectively. Significant differences were found between PSP and CBCT (P = 0.010). The kappa value for inter-observer agreement was 0.68 and 0.76 for PSP and CBCT, respectively. The kappa value for intra-observer agreement was 0.698 (observer 1, P = 0.000), 0.766 (observer 2, P = 0.000) and 0.716 (observer 3, P = 0.000) in PSP method, and 0.816 (observer 1, P = 0.000), 0.653 (observer 2, P = 0.000) and 0.744 (observer 3, P = 0.000) in CBCT method. Conclusion: This in vitro study, with a limited number of samples, showed that the New Tom VGI Flex CBCT system was more accurate than the PSP in detecting the simulated small secondary occlusal caries under amalgam restoration. PMID:25878682

  20. Dentalni amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Galić, Nada; Šutalo, Jozo; Prpić-Mehičić, Goranka; Anić, Ivica

    1994-01-01

    Dentalni amalgam je bio materijal izbora za ispune na stražnjim zubima tijekom proteklih 150 godina. U radu je prikazan p o vijesni razvoj amalgama, njegov obvezni sastav, te podjela dentalnih amalgama prema količinskom udjelu bakra i prema obliku čestica. Navedena su svojstva amalgama s posebnim osvrtom na njegovu toksičnost. Poznato je da se posljednjih godina pojačao napad na amalgam i u znanstvenoj i u popularnoj literaturi, a u svezi s njegovim navodnim patološkim djelovanjem ...

  1. Fabrication of Inorganic–Organic Composites for Dental Restorative Materials—A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI; Bencang; YANG; Qing; LI; Jing; WANG; Huining; LIN; Yuanhua; SHEN; Yang; LI; Ming; DENG; Xuliang; NAN; Cewen

    2015-01-01

    The paper is to review recent developments on composite dental restorative materials in terms of filler dimensions. The mechanical properties, biocompatibility and aesthetic performance are determined by fillers morphology, contents and chemical composition. We mainly summarized the 0-, 1-, and 2-dimensional fillers of composites used in dental restoration and their effects on the performance, especially the mechanical properties, which imply desirable applications for dental composites designed with these fillers.

  2. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    OpenAIRE

    Eshghi, Alireza; Samani, Mahdi Jafarzadeh; Najafi, Naghme Feyzi; Hajiahmadi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: General anesthesia (GA) allows dental treatment to be rendered under optimal conditions, theoretically ensuring ideal outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of restorative dental procedures performed under GA. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 305 pediatric patients who had been treated under GA 6 to 24 months before our survey at Isfahan's hospitalized dentistry center were examined. The examination was performed on dental ...

  3. SU-E-T-365: Dosimetric Impact of Dental Amalgam CT Image Artifacts On IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, N; Young, L; Parvathaneni, U; Liao, J; Richard, P; Ford, E; Sandison, G [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of high density dental amalgam in patient CT image data sets causes dose calculation errors for head and neck (HN) treatment planning. This study assesses and compares dosimetric variations in IMRT and VMAT treatment plans due to dental artifacts. Methods: Sixteen HN patients with similar treatment sites (oropharynx), tumor volume and extensive dental artifacts were divided into two groups: IMRT (n=8, 6 to 9 beams) and VMAT (n=8, 2 arcs with 352° rotation). All cases were planned with the Pinnacle 9.2 treatment planning software using the collapsed cone convolution superposition algorithm and a range of prescription dose from 60 to 72Gy. Two different treatment plans were produced, each based on one of two image sets: (a)uncorrected; (b)dental artifacts density overridden (set to 1.0g/cm{sup 3}). Differences between the two treatment plans for each of the IMRT and VMAT techniques were quantified by the following dosimetric parameters: maximum point dose, maximum spinal cord and brainstem dose, mean left and right parotid dose, and PTV coverage (V95%Rx). Average differences generated for these dosimetric parameters were compared between IMRT and VMAT plans. Results: The average absolute dose differences (plan a minus plan b) for the VMAT and IMRT techniques, respectively, caused by dental artifacts were: 2.2±3.3cGy vs. 37.6±57.5cGy (maximum point dose, P=0.15); 1.2±0.9cGy vs. 7.9±6.7cGy (maximum spinal cord dose, P=0.026); 2.2±2.4cGy vs. 12.1±13.0cGy (maximum brainstem dose, P=0.077); 0.9±1.1cGy vs. 4.1±3.5cGy (mean left parotid dose, P=0.038); 0.9±0.8cGy vs. 7.8±11.9cGy (mean right parotid dose, P=0.136); 0.021%±0.014% vs. 0.803%±1.44% (PTV coverage, P=0.17). Conclusion: For the HN plans studied, dental artifacts demonstrated a greater dose calculation error for IMRT plans compared to VMAT plans. Rotational arcs appear on the average to compensate dose calculation errors induced by dental artifacts. Thus, compared to VMAT, density

  4. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function

    OpenAIRE

    Øilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne Dybdahl; Ulsund, Amanda Hembre; Gjerdet,Nils Roar

    2014-01-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based res...

  5. Evaluation of the Effect of Bonding Silver-amalgam Alloy Post-core Technique for Restoration Residual Molar Crown%黏结银汞桩核磨牙残冠修复临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察和评价黏结银汞桩核修复磨牙残冠的临床效果.方法:对50例磨牙残冠进行黏结银汞桩核修复,观察疗效,随访时间12个月.结果:随访检查束发现修复体松动、折裂、脱落,X线牙片显示银汞桩与根管壁之间结合紧密.结论:黏结银汞桩核用于磨牙残冠修复具有明显技术优势,临床应用效果良好.%Objective:To evaluate the clinical effect of bonding silver-amalgam alloy post-core technique in restoration of molar crown.Methods: 50 teeth in 50 cases, apply with bonding silver-amalgam alloy post-core technique.The patients were followed up for 12 months.Results: The effect of bonding silver-amalgam alloy post-core technique for restoration residual molar crown was satisfied Conclusion:Bonding silver-amalgam alloy post-core technique could effectively in restoration residual molar crown.

  6. Adjunctive role of dental restorations in personal identification of burnt victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrangi, Sameer Kumar; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Reshma, V; Sudhakara, M; Hosthor, Sreelatha S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fire remains one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world and identification of a body from the fatal fire remains a daunting task. Several forensic cases involve interpretation of burnt human bodies from airline and automobile accidents, bombings and unlawful cremation. Fire is also involved in homicides, suicides, accidental death, arson and in attempts to destroy forensic evidence in criminal cases. Soft tissue destruction from fire can be so extensive that conventional methods of identification may be impossible. However, teeth survive even high temperatures due to their resistant composition and so, obviously, the restorative material housed in the teeth are even more secure and can yield valuable information in personal identification. Aim: To assess the usefulness of most common restorations in personal identification in burnt cases. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 40 extracted teeth which were divided into four groups (Group 1 - Unrestored teeth, Group 2 - Amalgam restored, Group 3 - Glass ionomer restored and Group 4 - Composite resin restored teeth. The effect of incineration at 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C, 1000°C for 15 min at each target temperature followed by subsequent cooling was studied. Results: Amalgam restoration was resistant and intact even at 1000°C, whereas GIC and composite restoration are identifiable till 600°C, the residual cavity preparation leaves a clue for narrowing down the spectrum of identification. PMID:27194881

  7. Adjunctive role of dental restorations in personal identification of burnt victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Kumar Vandrangi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fire remains one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world and identification of a body from the fatal fire remains a daunting task. Several forensic cases involve interpretation of burnt human bodies from airline and automobile accidents, bombings and unlawful cremation. Fire is also involved in homicides, suicides, accidental death, arson and in attempts to destroy forensic evidence in criminal cases. Soft tissue destruction from fire can be so extensive that conventional methods of identification may be impossible. However, teeth survive even high temperatures due to their resistant composition and so, obviously, the restorative material housed in the teeth are even more secure and can yield valuable information in personal identification. Aim: To assess the usefulness of most common restorations in personal identification in burnt cases . Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 40 extracted teeth which were divided into four groups (Group 1 - Unrestored teeth, Group 2 - Amalgam restored, Group 3 - Glass ionomer restored and Group 4 - Composite resin restored teeth. The effect of incineration at 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C, 1000°C for 15 min at each target temperature followed by subsequent cooling was studied. Results: Amalgam restoration was resistant and intact even at 1000°C, whereas GIC and composite restoration are identifiable till 600°C, the residual cavity preparation leaves a clue for narrowing down the spectrum of identification.

  8. Amalgam Contact Hypersensitivity Lesion: An Unusual Presentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contact allergic reactions due to hypersensitivity to dental materials in professionals and .... it, incisional biopsy was done under local anesthesia and the specimen was sent ... minimal technique sensitivity, amalgam for long has been used for ...

  9. Accident dosimetry using the TL from dental restoration porcelains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauricio, C.L.P.; Rosa, L.A.R.; Cunha, P.G. (Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1985-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of dental restorative porcelain were investigated with the aim of using this material as a TL dosemeter to estimate high doses in radiological accidents. The irradiations were carried out with a /sup 60/Co gamma source and X rays with effective energies from 29 to 95 keV. The porcelain glow curve presents three peaks at about 393,463 and 543K. The samples have a limit of detection at about 1.29 x 10/sup -2/ C.kg/sup -1/(50 R) and their reproducibility is better than 15%. Linearity was observed from 1.29 x 10/sup -2/ to 12.9 C.kg/sup -1/(50 to 50,000 R). Over this exposure range, the dental porcelain TL response presents a maximum pre-dose sensitisation factor of 2.33. The porcelain TL sensitivity, normalised to /sup 60/Co, has a maximum of 4.8 at 29 keV due to its energy dependence.

  10. High Copper Amalgam Alloys in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam Restoration is an example of the material giving its name to the process. Amalgam fillings are made up of mercury, powdered silver and tin. They are mixed and packed into cavities in teeth where it hardens slowly and replaces the missing tooth substance. The high copper have become material of choice as compared to low copper alloys nowadays because of their improved mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, better marginal integrity and improved performance in clinical trial. The high copper amalgam was used as a restorative material. The application of high copper amalgam was found to be much more useful than low copper amalgam. High copper had much more strength, corrosion resistance, durability and resistance to tarnish as compared to low copper amalgams. No marked expansion or condensation was noted in the amalgam restoration after its setting after 24 hrs. By using the high copper alloy, the chances of creep were also minimized in the restored tooth. No discomfort or any kind of odd sensation in the tooth was noted after few days of amalgam restoration in the tooth.

  11. The comparative evaluation of fracture resistance and microleakage in bonded amalgam, amalgam, and composite resins in primary molars

    OpenAIRE

    H S Vanishree; B M Shanthala; W Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Background : The intense development of adhesive restorative materials and parents′ preferences for esthetic restorations prompt clinicians to use alternative restorative materials for primary molars. Amalgam, however, is the choice of material when it comes to occlusal stress bearing areas, either in primary or permanent molars. To overcome the drawbacks of amalgam and restorative adhesive materials, the bonded amalgam technique is employed. Aims: To evaluate microleakage and fracture re...

  12. The Copper concentration variation to physical properties of high copper amalgam alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminatun Aminatun

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The function of copper (Cu inside amalgam is to increase hardness and impact force and to decrease thermal expansion coefficient. In general, amalgam which is used in dentistry and available in the market is contain Cu 22%, while the maximum Cu concentration is 30%. It is necessary to determine the concentration Cu does generate the best physical properties to be used as dental restorative agent. Amalgam is made by mixing blended-metal Ag-Sn-Cu (with Cu concentration of 13%, 21%, 22%, and 29% and Hg, stirred manually in a bowl for 15 minutes,leave it in temperature 27°C for 24 hours to become hardened. The result of X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD, analyzed by Rietveld method and Rietica program, shows amalgam with Cu 29% concentration for Cu3Sn compound density is 31.790 sma/Å3, for Ag2Hg3 compound is 41.733 sma/ Å3, a Cu3Sn relative weight percentage of 43.23%, Ag2Hg3 of 54.54%, Cu 7Hg6 of 2.23% and hardness of Cu 29% is 90.700 ± 0.005 kgf/mm2. These numbers are the highest values on Cu 29% concentrations compared to other copper concentration variants. Whereas amalgam thermal expansion coefficient on Cu 29% is (2.17 ± 0.9110-3 mm/°C is the lowest value compared to other Cu concentration. The conclution is that adding Cu concentration into amalgam will increase density value, Cu3Sn relative weight percentage, hardness level and will decrease amalgam thermal expansion coefficient. Amalgam 29% Cu concentration has better physical properties compared to amalgam Cu 22% concentration.

  13. A three-dimensional finite element model of the polymerization process in dental restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barink, M.; Mark, P.C. van der; Fennis, W.M.M.; Kuys, R.H.; Kreulen, C.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    Restoration of dental restorations with resin composite is hampered by shrinkage of the material during the polymerization process. In this study, we simulated the polymerization process in a detailed three-dimensional finite element model of a human upper premolar with a cusp-replacing restoration.

  14. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  15. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations - dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. Part A: chairside milling machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The dental milling machine is an important device in the dental CAD/CAM chain. Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental surgeries (chairside solution). This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dentists understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. First, some technical concepts and definitions associated with NC milling machines are described from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. The technical and economic criteria of four chairside dental NC milling machines that are available on the market are then described. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of these milling machines to mill both prosthetic materials and types of shape restorations. The economic criteria are focused on investment costs and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is assessed in terms of the accuracy and integrity of the restoration.

  16. Irregular amalgams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Stewart

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available The amalgam of Lp and ℓq consists of those functions for which the sequence of Lp-norms over the intervals [n,n+1 is in ℓq. These spaces (Lp,ℓq have been studied in several recent papers. Here we replace the intervals [n,n+1 by a cover α={In;n∈Z} of the real line consisting of disjoint half-open intervals In each of the form [a,b, and investigate which properties of (Lp,ℓq carry over to these irregular amalgams (Lp,ℓqα. In particular, we study how (Lp,ℓqα varies as p, q, and α vary and determine conditions under which translation is continuous.

  17. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-12-01

    The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 μg. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  18. Contemporary teaching of direct posterior composite restorations in Saudi dental schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Moustafa Awad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of posterior composites has undergone considerable assessment and refinement in well-developed countries in recent years. However, little information exists on this teaching in Arab countries. Aim of this study: The aim of this study was to investigate the teaching of direct posterior composite restorations to undergraduate dental students in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Method: An online survey was developed and distributed to 17 Saudi dental schools. The topic of the survey sought information related to current teaching of direct posterior composite restorations in undergraduate teaching programs. Results: Responses were received from 13 schools (response rate = approximately 76%. All respondent dental schools taught the same types of restorations, however there were some variations regarding contraindications of such restorations. In certain dental schools, outdated knowledge was taught related to cavity specifications such as beveling of occlusal margins, the use of clear plastic matrix band and light reflecting wedges. There was shortening of knowledge related to light curing technologies as well as different adhesive systems. Nano-filled dental composite was not taught in approximately half of the respondent schools. Also, the rush into teaching of bulk-fill placement technique was noted. Conclusions: Among Saudi dental schools, there may be some degree of variation in the teaching of posterior composite restorations. Although, some teaching shortcomings were noted, the overall extent and content taught to dental students in KSA may provide enough knowledge that may be essential for preclinical and clinical practice of the direct posterior composite restorations.

  19. Repair or replacement of defective restorations by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Riley, Joseph L; Geraldeli, Saulo

    2012-01-01

    The authors aimed to determine whether dentists in practices belonging to The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) were more likely to repair or to replace a restoration that they diagnosed as defective; to quantify dentists' specific reasons for repairing or replacing restorations......; and to test the hypothesis that certain dentist-, patient- and restoration-related variables are associated with the decision between repairing and replacing restorations....

  20. Multi-material laser densification (MMLD) of dental restorations: Process optimization and properties evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan

    This Ph.D. thesis proposes to investigate the feasibility of laser-assisted dental restoration and to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between laser beam and dental materials. Traditional dental restorations are produced by the porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) process, in which a dental restoration is cast from a metallic alloy and then coated with dental porcelains by multiple furnace-firing processes. PFM method is labor-intensive and hence very expensive. In order to fabricate dental restoration units faster and more cost-effectively, the Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technique has been employed in this study. In particular, a Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process has been investigated for its potential to fabricate artificial teeth automatically from 3-D computer dental tooth files. Based on the principle of SFF, the MMLD process utilizes a micro-extruder system to deliver commercial dental alloy and porcelain slurry in a computer-controlled pattern line by line and layer by layer. Instead of firing the artificial tooth/teeth in a furnace, the extruded dental materials are laser scanned to convert the loose powder to a fully dense body. Different laser densification parameters including the densification temperature, laser output power, laser beam size, line dimension, ratio of the beam size to line width, beam scanning rate, processing atmosphere and pressure, dental powder state (powder bed or slurry), powder particle size, etc. have been used to evaluate their effects on the microstructures and properties of the laser densified dental body, and hence to optimize MMLD conditions. Furthermore, laser-scanning induced phase transformations in dental porcelains have been studied because the transformations have great impact on coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of dental porcelains, which should match that of dental alloy substrate. Since a single dental material line delivered by the MMLD system functions as a "construction

  1. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  2. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  3. Increased Release of Mercury from Dental Amalgam Fillings due to Maternal Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields as a Possible Mechanism for the High Rates of Autism in the Offspring: Introducing a Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Gh; Haghani, M; Rastegarian, N; Zarei, S; Mortazavi, S M J

    2016-03-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), factors such as growing electricity demand, ever-advancing technologies and changes in social behaviour have led to steadily increasing exposure to man-made electromagnetic fields.  Dental amalgam fillings are among the major sources of exposure to elemental mercury vapour in the general population. Although it was previously believed that low levels are mercury (i.g. release of mercury from dental amalgam) is not hazardous, now numerous data indicate that even very low doses of mercury cause toxicity. There are some evidence indicating that perinatal exposure to mercury is significantly associated with an increased risk of developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, mercury can decrease the levels of neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, noreprenephrine, and acetylcholine in the brain and cause neurological problems. On the other hand, a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels is found in some studies. We have previously shown that exposure to MRI or microwave radiation emitted by common mobile phones can lead to increased release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings. Moreover, when we investigated the effects of MRI machines with stronger magnetic fields, our previous findings were confirmed. As a strong association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and mercury level has been found in our previous studies, our findings can lead us to this conclusion that maternal exposure to electromagnetic fields in mothers with dental amalgam fillings may cause elevated levels of mercury and trigger the increase in autism rates. Further studies are needed to have a better understanding of the possible role of the increased mercury level after exposure to electromagnetic fields and the rate of autism spectrum disorders in the offspring.

  4. Increased Release of Mercury from Dental Amalgam Fillings due to Maternal Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields as a Possible Mechanism for the High Rates of Autism in the Offspring: Introducing a Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Gh.; Haghani, M.; Rastegarian, N.; Zarei, S.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), factors such as growing electricity demand, ever-advancing technologies and changes in social behaviour have led to steadily increasing exposure to man-made electromagnetic fields.  Dental amalgam fillings are among the major sources of exposure to elemental mercury vapour in the general population. Although it was previously believed that low levels are mercury (i.g. release of mercury from dental amalgam) is not hazardous, now numerous data indicate that even very low doses of mercury cause toxicity. There are some evidence indicating that perinatal exposure to mercury is significantly associated with an increased risk of developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, mercury can decrease the levels of neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, noreprenephrine, and acetylcholine in the brain and cause neurological problems. On the other hand, a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels is found in some studies. We have previously shown that exposure to MRI or microwave radiation emitted by common mobile phones can lead to increased release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings. Moreover, when we investigated the effects of MRI machines with stronger magnetic fields, our previous findings were confirmed. As a strong association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and mercury level has been found in our previous studies, our findings can lead us to this conclusion that maternal exposure to electromagnetic fields in mothers with dental amalgam fillings may cause elevated levels of mercury and trigger the increase in autism rates. Further studies are needed to have a better understanding of the possible role of the increased mercury level after exposure to electromagnetic fields and the rate of autism spectrum disorders in the offspring. PMID:27026954

  5. The teaching of all-ceramic restorations in Scandinavian dental schools: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, A; Mjör, I A; Frazier, K B

    1996-06-01

    The study was designed to survey the curricular requirements, types of clinical experience, and materials/ techniques used in teaching programs for all-ceramic restorations in Scandinavian dental schools. All 13 dental schools responded. Ten offered some clinical experience to pre-doctoral students, but only one required one all-ceramic restoration. The departments of fixed prosthodontics had the main teaching responsibility. All-ceramic crowns were taught at 9, veneers at 7, and inlays/onlays at 10 dental schools. A wide range of different teaching concepts, materials, and views on indications and contraindications was reported. It appears as if all-ceramic restorations are regarded as experimental by the teaching institutions, although the dental industry and some practitioners strongly recommend these types of restorations.

  6. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoki, M., E-mail: hosoki@tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H. [General Dentistry, Tokushima University Hospital, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Asaoka, K. [Department of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method for the microanalysis of dental alloys is beneficial for patients with allergies to dental materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This metal sample is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method can be also be used in general dental clinics. - Abstract: The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 {mu}g. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  7. Evaluation of effects of ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations;Avaliacao dos efeitos da radiacao ionizante em materiais utilizados em restauracoes dentarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio

    2009-07-01

    This work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations (Titanium, Amalgam, Resin Composite and Glass Ionomer) aiming the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, arising when the teeth are restored within in the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to X-ray beams of 6 MV from a linear accelerator, VARIAN 2100C model. The samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence techniques to compare the chemical composition before and after the irradiation. The sample were submitted to Geiger-Mueller detectors and the ionization chambers in order to verify any residual radiation in the samples. The samples were also analyzed by gamma spectrometry by a Germanium detector. These tests were performed to determine small changes in the composition in the samples due to the radiation interaction. The results of this study may encourage the development of new research for alternative materials in dental restorations that can contribute to improve the quality of life of those patients with tumors of the mouth. (author)

  8. Restoration of noncarious tooth defects by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons.......The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons....

  9. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  10. Characteristics Identified for Success by Restorative Dental Science Department Chairpersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Alvin G; Weiss, Robert O; Wichman, Christopher S; Sukotjo, Cortino; Brundo, Gerald C

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the characteristics that current chairpersons in restorative dentistry, general dentistry, prosthodontics, and operative dentistry departments in U.S. dental schools feel are most relevant in contributing to their success. The secondary aim was to determine these individuals' rankings of the importance of a listed set of characteristics for them to be successful in their position. All 82 current chairs of the specified departments were invited to respond to an electronic survey. The survey first asked respondents to list the five most essential characteristics to serve as chair of a department and to rank those characteristics based on importance. Participants were next given a list of ten characteristics in the categories of management and leadership and, without being aware of the category of each individual item, asked to rank them in terms of importance for their success. A total of 39 chairpersons completed the survey (47.6% response rate; 83.3% male and 16.2% female). In section one, the respondents reported that leadership, vision, work ethic, integrity, communication, and organization were the most essential characteristics for their success. In section two, the respondents ranked the leadership characteristics as statistically more important than the management characteristics (p<0.0001) for being successful in their positions.

  11. Elimination of mercury from amalgam in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, N. [Dept. of Dental Pathology, School of Dentistry, Zagreb (Croatia); Prpic-Mehicic, G.; Prester, Lj.; Blanusa, M. [Inst. for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb (Croatia); Krnic, Z.; Erceg, D. [Pliva Pharmaceutical Co., Biomedicine Research Inst. ' ' Pliva' ' , Zagreb (Croatia)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the urinary mercury excretion in rats exposed to amalgam over a two months period. Animals were either exposed to mercury from 4 dental amalgams or fed the diet containing powdered amalgams. The results showed significantly higher mercury amount in urine of both exposed groups than in control. Even two months after the amalgam had been placed in rats teeth, the amount of mercury in the urine remained 4-5 times higher than in control, and 4 times higher than in rats exposed to diet containing powdered amalgam. The elevated urinary Hg amount was accompanied by an increased level of total protein in urine. In the same exposure period the excretion of total protein in urine of rats with amalgam fillings was 2 times higher than in control and 1.5 times higher than in rats exposed to amalgam through diet. Concentrations of mercury in the sera of all groups were below the detection limit of the method. The results show that amount of mercury and protein in the urine of rats were related to the mercury release from dental amalgam. (orig.)

  12. Metallothionein in human gingival amalgam tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, J C; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Wysocki, G P; Cherian, M G

    2001-11-01

    Amalgam tattoos occur when small particles of dental amalgam, composed largely of silver (Ag) and mercury (Hg), are inadvertently implanted into oral soft tissues during dental procedures. Metallothioneins (MTs) are ubiquitous, low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, metal-binding proteins that are inducible by many agents including metals and may be involved in the detoxification of toxic metals such as Hg. In this study, the correlation between MT expression and amalgam tattoos in human gingiva was investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and immunohistochemical techniques. Light microscopically, amalgam tattoos presented as either fine granular particles or larger discrete opaque globular particles in connective tissues. EDX revealed the smaller particles to be silver sulphide (Ag(2)S), while the larger particles exhibited a shell of Ag(2)S that contained irregularly distributed masses of Ag and Hg. Particles of tin (Sn) were also found. No MT staining was observed in collagen, fibroblasts or blood vessels in areas exhibiting abundant amounts of embedded fine granular Ag(2)S particles. Blood vessels exhibiting relatively few amalgam particles stained positively for MT. Cells with the morphological features of histiocytes located directly adjacent to larger pieces of amalgam showed intense MT staining. These results indicate that amalgam tattoos contain no Hg or free Ag except in large globular pieces of amalgam, which still contain Hg and which induce MT expression in adjacent histiocytes. This suggests that Hg leaching from impacted dental amalgam particles induces MT, while residual Ag(2)S and Sn particles do not. MT may therefore act to reduce Hg exposure in patients with amalgam tattoos.

  13. Evaluation of radiation effects on dental enamel hardness and dental restorative materials; Avaliacao do efeito da irradiacao na dureza do esmalte dental e de materiais odontologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Supervisao de Radioquimica; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Protese

    2000-07-01

    This research presents the results of the microhardness of human dental enamel and of the following dental restorative materials: three dental porcelains - Ceramco II, Finesse and Noritake, and two resin restorative materials - Artglass and Targis, for materials submitted to different times of irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear reactor under a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 12}n cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} . The results obtained indicated that there is a decrease of the surface microhardness when the enamel is irradiated for 1 h and when dental materials are irradiated for 3 h. However, enamels irradiated for 30 min. did not show significant change of their surface hardness. Therefore, the selection of irradiation time is an important factor to be considered when irradiated teeth or dental materials are used in the investigations of their properties. (author)

  14. Atraumatic restorative treatment and dental anxiety in outpatients attending public oral health clinics in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Frencken, Jo E; van't, Hof Martin A

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypotheses that using the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach results in lower patient anxiety and that lower anxiety leads to higher restoration/extraction ratios. The test group of dental operators (n = 9) was trained in ART The control group (n = 11) was not, and did not apply ART The Short Form of the Dental Subscale of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-SF) and Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) were used to assess patient anxiety after ART (test group) and after traditional restorations (control group). The restoration/extraction ratio calculated for primary (children) and permanent dentitions (adults) per operator was based on 12-month treatment statistics. Dental anxiety assessments were analysed using ANOVA. Differences were compared using the t-test and corrected for confounding factors (ANCOVA). The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure the correlation between dental anxiety levels and restoration/extraction ratios. The mean CFSS-SF score for test-group children was statistically significantly lower than for the control-group children. The mean DAS score for test-group adults was statistically significant lower than the control. No significant correlation was observed between dental anxiety level and restoration/extraction ratio per operator for both dentitions in both groups. The first hypothesis was accepted; the second, rejected. Although dental anxiety scores were lower both in child and in adult patients treated by ART than in those who received traditional restorative treatments, this positive effect had not resulted in higher restoration/extraction ratios.

  15. Atraumatic restorative treatment and dental anxiety in outpatients attending public oral health clinics in South Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickenautsch, S.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to test the hypotheses that using the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach results in lower patient anxiety and that lower anxiety leads to higher restoration/extraction ratios. METHODS: The test group of dental operators (n = 9) was trained in ART

  16. Atraumatic restorative treatment and dental anxiety in outpatients attending public oral health clinics in South Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickenautsch, S.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to test the hypotheses that using the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach results in lower patient anxiety and that lower anxiety leads to higher restoration/extraction ratios. METHODS: The test group of dental operators (n = 9) was trained in ART Th

  17. Teaching of direct composite restoration repair in undergraduate dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, I R; Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2012-02-01

    To investigate aspects of the teaching of restoration repair as a minimally invasive alternative to the replacement of defective direct composite restorations in teaching programmes in undergraduate curricula in dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland. An online questionnaire which sought information in relation to the current teaching of composite restoration repair was developed and distributed to the 17 established UK and Irish dental schools with undergraduate teaching programmes in Spring 2010. Completed responses were received from all 17 schools (response rate= 100%). Fifteen schools reported that they included teaching of repair techniques for defective direct composite restorations in their programme. Of the two remaining schools, one indicated that it would introduce teaching of repair techniques during the next five years. The most common indication for a composite repair was that of 'tooth substance preservation' (15 schools). The defects in restorations considered appropriate for repair rather than replacement by the largest number of schools included partial loss of restoration (13 schools) and marginal defects (12 schools). The most commonly taught surface treatment when performing a repair was mechanical roughening of the existing composite with removal of the surface layer (14 schools). Thirteen schools taught etching and the application of an adhesive bonding agent to the prepared surfaces, while the most commonly taught material for completing the repair was a hybrid composite resin (12 schools). Popular finishing implements included diamond finishing instruments (13 schools) and finishing discs (11 schools). Not withstanding reluctance amongst general dental practitioners, the teaching of repair of a defective composite restoration, rather than total restoration replacement, is firmly established within UK and Irish dental school programmes. Repair techniques have clear advantages for patients, not least including a minimally invasive

  18. Compressive fatigue limit of four types of dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Öhman, Caroline; Jefferies, Steven R; Gray, Holly; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quasi-static compressive strength and the compressive fatigue limit of four different dental restorative materials, before and after aging in distilled water for 30 days. A conventional glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP; IG), a zinc-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Chemfil rock; CF), a light curable resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC; LC) and a resin-based composite (Quixfil; QF) were investigated. Cylindrical specimens (4mm in diameter and 6mm in height) were prepared according to the manufacturer׳s instructions. The compressive fatigue limit was obtained using the staircase method. Samples were tested in distilled water at 37°C, at a frequency of 10Hz with 10(5) cycles set as run-out. 17 fatigue samples were tested for each group. Two-way ANOVA and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey׳s post-hoc test were used to analyze the results. Among the four types of materials, the resin-based composite exhibited the highest compressive strength (244±13.0MPa) and compressive fatigue limit (134±7.8MPa), followed by the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement (168±8.5MPa and 92±6.6MPa, respectively) after one day of storage in distilled water. After being stored for 30 days, all specimens showed an increase in compressive strength. Aging showed no effect on the compressive fatigue limit of the resin-based composite and the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement, however, the conventional glass ionomer cements showed a drastic decrease (37% for IG, 31% for CF) in compressive fatigue limit. In conclusion, in the present study, resin modified GIC and resin-based composite were found to have superior mechanical properties to conventional GIC.

  19. Reasons for placement of restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke;

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify and quantify the reasons used by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials they used in doing so....

  20. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--the digital workflow from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapie, L; Lebon, N; Mawussi, B; Fron Chabouis, H; Duret, F; Attal, J-P

    2015-01-01

    As digital technology infiltrates every area of daily life, including the field of medicine, so it is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Apart from chairside practice, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental solutions can be considered a chain of digital devices and software for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use the technology often do not have the time or knowledge to understand it. A basic knowledge of the CAD/CAM digital workflow for dental restorations can help dentists to grasp the technology and purchase a CAM/CAM system that meets the needs of their office. This article provides a computer-science and mechanical-engineering approach to the CAD/CAM digital workflow to help dentists understand the technology.

  1. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Chen; Gang Xia; Xin-Ming Cao; Jue Wang; Bi-Yao Xu; Pu Huang; Yue Chen; Qing-Wu Jiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of 〈 1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of 〈1, 1 to 〈3 and 3 to 〈6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  2. The history and clinical application of a chairside CAD/CAM dental restoration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutes, Richard D

    2006-10-01

    Since its introduction by Sirona Dental Systems (Charlotte, North Carolina, USA and Bensheim, Germany) in 1985, the CEREC Chairside CAD/CAM restoration system has steadily earned a loyal following among dentists. This article describes the history and evolution of the CEREC System, its clinical application and treatment modality, the restorative materials used to fabricate the restorations and an overview of clinical findings regarding the in vivo performance of the materials.

  3. Thermal-lens study of semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in restorative dental resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Leandro P.; Pilla, Viviane; Iwazaki, Adalberto N.; Barja, Paulo R.; Munin, Egberto

    2013-02-01

    Thermal Lens (TL) and spectroscopic characterizations were performed in CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) embedded into two commercial dental resin composites. The thermal-optical studies were performed in CdSe/ZnS QDs (core size Φ= 4.1 nm) and PMMA-encapsulated CdSe/ZnS (Φ= 3.7 nm) embedded in restorative dental resins at concentration of 0.025 and 0.42 % in mass, respectively. The thermal diffusivity (D) results are characteristics of the dental resin composites studied. Photoacoustic (PA) technique results for the dental resin composites support the TL results.

  4. Complex layered dental restorations: Are they recognizable and do they survive extreme conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Alistair S; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has shown that restorative dental materials can be recognized by microscopy and elemental analysis (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence; SEM/EDS and XRF) and that this is possible even in extreme conditions, such as cremation. These analytical methods and databases of dental materials properties have proven useful in DVI (disaster victim identification) of a commercial plane crash in 2009, and in a number of other victim identification cases. Dental materials appear on the market with ever expanding frequency. With their advent, newer methods of restoration have been proposed and adopted in the dental office. Methods might include placing multiple layers of dental materials, where they have different properties including adhesion, viscosity, or working time. These different dental materials include filled adhesives, flowable resins, glass ionomer cements, composite resins, liners and sealants. With possible combinations of different materials in these restorations, the forensic odontologist is now confronted with a new difficulty; how to recognize each individual material. The question might be posed if it is even possible to perform this task. Furthermore, an odontologist might be called upon to identify a victim under difficult circumstances, such as when presented with fragmented or incinerated remains. In these circumstances the ability to identify specific dental materials could assist in the identification of the deceased. Key to use of this information is whether these new materials and methods are detailed in the dental chart. Visual or radiographic inspection may not reveal the presence of a restoration, let alone the possible complex nature of that restoration. This study demonstrates another scientific method in forensic dental identification.

  5. Estudo comparativo da resistência à fratura de pré-molares superiores íntegros e restaurados com amálgama aderido Comparative study of the fracture resistance of sound upper premolars and upper premolars restored with bonded amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Marcelo Peruchi Minto

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo avaliou-se, in vitro, a resistência à fratura de pré-molares superiores preparados com cavidades de classe II compostas (conservadoras e extensas restauradas com amálgama aderido a dois tipos diferentes de sistemas adesivos. Setenta dentes foram divididos em 4 grupos: grupo 1 ou controle com 10 dentes íntegros; grupo 2 com 20 dentes, sendo 10 cavidades conservadoras e 10 extensas restauradas com amálgama sem qualquer tipo de forramento. O grupo 3 e o grupo 4 foram compostos da mesma forma que o grupo 2, sendo que o primeiro recebeu cimento de ionômero de vidro (Vitrebond - 3M e o segundo, adesivo dental (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus - 3M, antes de serem restaurados. Os dentes haviam sido incluídos anteriormente em cilindros de PVC e fixados com resina acrílica. Após serem restaurados e termociclados, foram submetidos à fratura por força de compressão em uma máquina universal de testes EMIC-MEM 2000. Após análise de variância e aplicação do teste complementar de Tukey, concluiu-se que os sistemas adesivos utilizados condicionaram o aumento da resistência à fratura da estrutura dental nas cavidades convencionais, sendo os dentes com cavidades conservadoras mais resistentes em qualquer condição experimental.The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the fracture resistance of upper premolars which had received class II preparations (conservative and extensive and were restored with bonded amalgam, with two different adhesive systems. Seventy teeth were divided in four groups: group 1 (control, with ten sound teeth; group 2, with twenty prepared teeth (10 teeth received conservative cavities and 10, extensive cavities restored with amalgam without any kind of liner; groups 3 and 4, similar to group 2, though with linings of glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond - 3M (group 3 and dental adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus - 3M (group 4. The teeth were previously fixed in PVC cylinders with acrylic

  6. Preparation and corrosion behavior evaluation of amalgam/titania nano composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Bahremandi Tolou

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: By adding nano particles of titania and preparing amalgam/titania nano composite as a dental amalgam, corrosion behavior and mercury release during the 2 st h after preparation could be improved.

  7. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Saurabh K Gupta; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies h...

  8. Preparation and corrosion behavior evaluation of amalgam/titania nano composite

    OpenAIRE

    Neda Bahremandi Tolou; Mohammadhossein Fathi; Ahmad Monshi; Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Farzaneh Shirani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many attempts have been performed and continued for improvement of dental amalgam properties during last decades. The aim of present research was fabrication and characterization of amalgam/titania nano composite and evaluation of its corrosion behavior. Materials and Methods: In this experimental research, nano particles of titania were added to initial amalgam alloy powder and then, dental amalgam was prepared. In order to investigate the effect of nano particle amounts on p...

  9. [Despite all--do we have an appropriate substitute for amalgam?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, L; Samorodnitzky-Naveh, G; Coval, M; Geiger, S B

    2008-04-01

    The ultimate success or failure of a restored tooth is largely dependent on clinical management. Clinicians may choose from a number of restorative materials, different clinical techniques and cavity preparation procedures. Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. The use of this material has recently increased as a result of patients' demands for esthetic restorations. Failure of dental restorations is a major concern in dental practice. Replacement of failed restorations constitutes the majority of operative work. Clinicians should be aware of the longevity of, and likely reasons for the failure of, direct posterior restorations. Higher failure rates were observed in resin-based composite restorations as compares amalgam restorations. Secondary caries was the main reason for failure. Posterior interproximal resin-based composite restorations should be considered with caution, and their limited long-term performance should be kept in mind. Patients should be informed about the potential longevity of restorative treatment for posterior teeth as they make decisions about treatment for their oral restorative needs.

  10. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method. PMID:28294188

  11. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method.

  12. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method.

  13. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen, E-mail: abderrahmen_merghni@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Kammoun, Dorra [Laboratoire de Biomatériaux et Biotechnologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Monastir (Tunisia); Hentati, Hajer [Laboratoire de Recherche en Santé Orale et Réhabilitation Bucco-Faciale (LR12ES11), Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Janel, Sébastien [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Popoff, Michka [Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Lafont, Frank [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Aouni, Mahjoub [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Mastouri, Maha [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Microbiologie, CHU Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  14. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-06-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation.

  15. Blood Mercury Level and Its Determinants among Dental Practitioners in Hamadan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vahedi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exposure to mercury can occur in occupational and environmental settings.During clinical work with dental amalgam, the dental personnel are exposed to both metallic mercury and mercury vapor. The aim of the present study was to investigate bloodmercury level (BML and its determinants among dentists practicing in Hamadan city,Iran.Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was done on all dental practitioners of Hamadan (n=43. Dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire, and then 5 ml bloodsamples were obtained from them. After preparation, mercury concentration of each sample was measured by cold vapor atomic absorption device. Pearson correlation test and regression models served for statistical analysis.Results: The mean blood concentration of mercury was 6.3 μg/l (SD=1.31 range 4.15-8.93. BML was positively associated with age, years in practice, working hours per day,number of amalgam restorations per day, number of amalgam removal per week, sea foodconsumption, working years in present office, using amalgam powder, using diamond bur for amalgam removal, dry sterilization of amalgam contaminated instruments, and deficient air ventilation.Conclusion: BML of dentists in Hamadan was higher than standards. Working hours and number of amalgam restorations per day were significantly correlated with blood mercury.

  16. The management of defective resin composite restorations: current trends in dental school teaching in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Hayashi, M; Seow, L L; Blum, I R; Wilson, N H F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the contemporary teaching of the management of defective direct resin composite restorations in dental schools in Japan. A questionnaire relating to the teaching of the management of defective resin composite restorations was developed and e-mailed to 29 dental schools in Japan in 2010. Completed responses were received from 19 of the 29 invited schools (response rate = 66%). Eighteen schools (95%) report that they included the teaching of repair of direct defective resin composite restorations in their dental school programs. Thirteen schools reported that they included both clinical and didactic instruction on the repair of direct resin composite restorations. Fourteen schools did not teach any mechanical roughening of the exposed resin composite restoration surface before undertaking a repair. The most commonly reported treatment was acid etching with phosphoric acid (12 schools). The most commonly taught material for completing repairs was a flowable resin composite (16 schools). The teaching of repair of defective resin composite restorations is well established within many Japanese dental schools, to a greater extent than in some other regions of the world. The impact of this teaching on subsequent clinical practices in Japan should be investigated. Furthermore, it is concluded that there is a need for much stronger leadership in operative and conservative dentistry, ideally at the global level, to resolve differences in key aspects of operative procedures such as repairs.

  17. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray micro-computed tomography reveals dental bur debris under dental composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Assem; Nagy, Nicole; Packota, Garnet; Monteith, Judy; Allen, Darcy; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Zhu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Dental burs are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for restorations (fillings), yet little has been reported on the bur debris left behind in the teeth, and whether it poses potential health risks to patients. Here it is aimed to image dental bur debris under dental fillings, and allude to the potential health hazards that can be caused by this debris when left in direct contact with the biological surroundings, specifically when the debris is made of a non-biocompatible material. Non-destructive micro-computed tomography using the BioMedical Imaging & Therapy facility 05ID-2 beamline at the Canadian Light Source was pursued at 50 keV and at a pixel size of 4 µm to image dental bur fragments under a composite resin dental filling. The bur's cutting edges that produced the fragment were also chemically analyzed. The technique revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the dentinal tubules and the dentinal fluid circulating within them. Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis of the dental bur edges revealed that the fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible.

  18. Classifying dental ceramics: numerous materials and formulations available for indirect restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvey, Gregg A

    2014-01-01

    Because there are numerous ceramic systems available to clinicians for all types of indirect restorations, deciding which system works best for a given clinical situation can be a challenge. Understanding the different classifications of ceramic restoratives can be helpful not only to the clinician but also the dental technician. Manufacturers are constantly introducing newer ceramic materials and improving their existing systems, which has resulted in an increase in all-ceramic restorations and fewer porcelain-to-metal restorations. The classification of ceramic materials remains mostly constant; however, it is subject to change based on newer materials and formulations. The classifications of ceramics are described using several different methods.

  19. Functional results of dental restoration with osseointegrated implants after mandible reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürlek, A; Miller, M J; Jacob, R F; Lively, J A; Schusterman, M A

    1998-03-01

    We reviewed the cases of 20 cancer patients (mean age 47.4 years) in whom osseointegrated implants were used for dental restoration after mandibular reconstruction between January of 1988 and December of 1994. Seventy-one implants were placed into bone flaps (n = 60) or native mandible (n = 11), an average of 3.55 per patient (range, 2 to 5). Successful integration occurred in 91.5 percent (65 of 71); there were five early failures and one late failure, with no significant difference between the number lost in microvascular flaps (5 of 60) and native mandible (1 of 11) (as determined by Fisher's exact test). Functional evaluation included assessments of diet, speech, and cosmesis. Based on our review, we concluded that (1) implants enhance dental restoration in selected patients, and (2) microvascular bone flaps, including the fibula and iliac crest, are well suited for dental implant restoration.

  20. Stress management for dental students performing their first pediatric restorative procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza-Waggoner, Carrie A; Cohen, Lindsey L; Kohli, Kavita; Taylor, Brandie K

    2003-05-01

    Research has demonstrated that dental students experience considerable stress during their training. Students' anxiety is likely to be especially high when they perform their first pediatric restorative procedure. The aims of this study were to provide a description of dental students' level of anxiety and typical coping strategies and to evaluate the use of a distress management intervention for reducing anxiety around their first pediatric restorative procedure. Dental students were randomly assigned to either an Anxiety Management or an Attention Control group. The management group received training on relaxation strategies (i.e., deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation). The control group attended a lecture on the relation among stress, anxiety, and health. No significant differences were found between group levels of anxiety related to their first pediatric restorative procedure. Information is provided on students' reported level of anxiety and general coping strategies. Limitations of the current study and suggestions for future research are provided.

  1. Amino acid derivative-mediated detoxification and functionalization of dual cure dental restorative material for dental pulp cell mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are only used to fill the defect of hard tissues, such as dentin and enamel, because of their cytotoxicity. Therefore, exposed dental pulp tissues in deep cavities must be first covered by a pulp capping material like calcium hydroxide to form a layer of mineralized tissue. However, this tissue mineralization is based on pathological reaction and triggers long-lasting inflammation, often causing clinical problems. This study tested the ability of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), amino acid derivative, to reduce cytotoxicity and induce mineralized tissue conductivity in resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), a widely used dental restorative material having dual cure mechanism. Rat dental pulp cells were cultured on untreated or NAC-supplemented RMGI. NAC supplementation substantially increased the percentage of viable cells from 46.7 to 73.3% after 24-h incubation. Cell attachment, spreading, proliferative activity, and odontoblast-related gene and protein expressions increased significantly on NAC-supplemented RMGI. The mineralization capability of cells, which was nearly suppressed on untreated RMGI, was induced on NAC-supplemented RMGI. These improved behaviors and functions of dental pulp cells on NAC-supplemented RMGI were associated with a considerable reduction in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and with the increased level of intracellular glutathione reserves. These results demonstrated that NAC could detoxify and functionalize RMGIs via two different mechanisms involving in situ material detoxification and antioxidant cell protection. We believe that this study provides a new approach for developing dental restorative materials that enables mineralized tissue regeneration.

  2. Has resin-based composite replaced amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-02-01

    The major health organizations in the world continue to accept amalgam use, but the "amalgam war" of the 1800s is still going on. The end is not in sight. There is little disagreement that amalgam serves well and, although controversial, it appears to have minimal to no health hazards. There is a wide variation in the relative amount of amalgam placed in developed countries, and many dentists in North America do not use it. However, amalgam is still being used at least some of the time by the majority of practitioners in North America, and most of those practitioners also place resin-based composite in Class II locations. The evolution from amalgam to tooth-colored restorations has been a slow and tumultuous journey. The acceptability of resin-based composite in Class II locations continues to be a question for some dentists, while others have concluded that amalgam is "dead." It would be highly desirable if some of dentists using the alleged poisonous properties of amalgam as a "practice building" ploy would find more legitimate methods to increase their practice activity.

  3. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--accuracy from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapie, Laurent; Lebon, Nicolas; Mawussi, Bernardin; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    As is the case in the field of medicine, as well as in most areas of daily life, digital technology is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available not only for chairside practice but also for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental practice can be considered as the handling of devices and software processing for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use dental CAD/CAM systems often do not have enough information to understand the variations offered by such technology practice. Knowledge of the random and systematic errors in accuracy with CAD/CAM systems can help to achieve successful restorations with this technology, and help with the purchasing of a CAD/CAM system that meets the clinical needs of restoration. This article provides a mechanical engineering viewpoint of the accuracy of CAD/ CAM systems, to help dentists understand the impact of this technology on restoration accuracy.

  4. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  5. Dependence of kinetic variables in the short-term release of Hg2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions into synthetic saliva from an high-copper dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campus, Guglielmo; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gaspa, Leonardo; Panzanelli, Angelo; Piu, Paola C; Micera, Giovanni; Lugliè, Pierfranca; Sanna, Gavino

    2007-08-01

    The short term (up to 14 days after restoration) release of selected ions (i.e., Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+)) from Dispersalloy into artificial saliva has been evaluated in regards to the nature of the saliva (Fusayama and McCarty and Shklar's solutions), the amount of amalgam, the time of contact and the periodical renewal (every 48 h interval) of artificial saliva. The evaluation of the ionic fraction of such metals has been accomplished by using anodic stripping methods (i.e., Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry, DPASV) with a 7 microm graphite disk microelectrode as a working electrode. Data obtained in this work are almost unprecedented in the literature due the fact that such analytical method exclude metals in non-ionic forms (e.g., metals or organometallic compounds). The high concentrations measured in every experimental condition confirm the concern for the short-term release of metals from amalgam into saliva.

  6. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu CH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Hung Chu1, May L Mei,1 Chloe Cheung,1 Romesh P Nalliah2 1Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials Sciences, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot preparation includes being more conservative and increasing tooth integrity and strength by preserving the marginal ridge. However, tunnel restoration is technique-sensitive and can be particularly challenging for inexperienced restorative dentists. Recent advances in technology, such as the contemporary design of dental handpieces with advanced light-emitting diode (LED and handheld comfort, offer operative dentists better vision, illumination, and maneuverability. The use of magnifying loupes also enhances the visibility of the preparation. The advent of digital radiographic imaging has improved dental imaging and reduced radiation. The new generation of restorative materials has improved mechanical properties. Tunnel restoration can be an option to restore proximal caries if the dentist performs proper case selection and pays attention to the details of the restorative procedures. This paper describes the clinical technique of tunnel restoration and reviews the studies of tunnel restorations. Keywords: operative, practice, tunnel preparation, composite, amalgam, glass ionomer

  7. Optimal restoration of dental esthetics and function with advanced implant-supported prostheses: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulen, Peter van der; Linden, Wynand van der; Eeden, Ronnie van

    2012-07-01

    For more than 25 years, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used in implant restorative dentistry. Today this technology offers a means of milling titanium frameworks that fit dental implants accurately. This report presents a restoratively driven protocol employing advanced implant restorative and surgical techniques. Treatment of a patient with advanced periodontitis with extensive loss of hard and soft tissues is presented. After extraction of the patient's remaining hopeless teeth, dental implants were placed, along with interim, fixed-margin abutments and abutment protection caps. Two days later, acrylic resin fixed-interim prostheses restored the patient's esthetics and partial masticatory function. After implant osseointegration, maxillary, and mandibular frameworks for definitive prostheses were milled from Ti alloy, using one specific CAD/CAM technology. The benefits of this technology are also discussed.

  8. Informatics systems to assess and apply clinical research on dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    2003-12-01

    Dental biomaterials are used clinically for one or more of the following purposes: to restore function, to enhance esthetics, and to prevent or arrest demineralization of tooth structure. Studies of the clinical performance of restorations and prostheses made from these materials have generally focused on quality assessment and survival statistics. Data from these studies should provide probabilities of specific treatment outcomes that are useful for practicing dentists. However, the utility of these data is limited by the lack of national and international standards for assessing these clinical outcomes. Standardized approaches toward clinical informatics and treatment-decision analysis are urgently needed to minimize the variability of clinical outcomes reported in publications associated with direct and indirect restorative materials used for dental restorations and prostheses.

  9. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  10. Fractography and Mechanical Properties of Urethane Dimethacrylate Dental Composites Reinforced with Glass Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Monfared M; Bahrololoom ME

    2016-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Dental resin composites are becoming prevalent in restorative dentistry and have almost replaced amalgam nowadays. Consequently, their mechanical properties and durability are critical. Objectives: The aim of this study was to produce Pyrex glass nano-particles by wet milling process and use them as reinforcement in dental resins for anterior restorations and then examination of fractographic properties of these composites. Materials and Methods: The glass nano-par...

  11. Dental Implant Supported Restorations Improve Quality of Life in Osteoporotic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine DeBaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study is to compare the quality of life (QoL in partially edentulous osteoporotic women who have missing teeth restored with dental implant retained restorations with those who do not and, secondarily, to report the rate of osteonecrosis in this sample. Methods. 237 participants completed the Utian QoL survey, a 23-question document measuring across psychosocial domains of well-being including occupational, health, emotional, and sexual domains which together contribute to an overall score. The subset of participants having dental implant supported prosthesis (64 was compared to the subset having nonimplant supported fixed restorations (47, the subset having nonimplant supported removable restorations (60, and the subset having no restoration of missing teeth (66. Results. ANOVA showed significant difference in all QoL domains between the four subsets (p<0.05. Although 134 reported oral bisphosphonate and 51 reported IV bisphosphonate use, no signs of ONJ were identified in any participants. Conclusion. These findings show implant retained oral rehabilitation has a statistically significant impact over nonimplant and traditional fixed restorations, removable restorations, and no restoration of missing teeth in far reaching areas including occupational, health, emotional, sexual, and overall QoL. These findings also support future examination of psychosocial outcomes associated with oral rehabilitation and the incorporation of oral health into women’s health promotion.

  12. Survey of United States dental schools on cementation protocols for implant crown restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarica, Diane Yoshinobu; Alvarado, Veronica M; Truong, Samantha T

    2010-02-01

    With conflicting results in the literature and various manufacturer recommendations, it is not known what cementation protocols are currently being used for implant restorations in US dental schools. The purpose of this survey was to determine what dental cementation protocols are taught and recommended by 62 US dental schools and postgraduate programs. From February to September 2008, 96 questionnaires consisting of 8 questions were sent to the chairperson or director of restorative departments, advanced prosthodontics programs, and implant programs. The questionnaire asked recipients which implant manufacturers provided the products used at their dental schools. Additionally, recipients were queried as to the choice of material and techniques for abutment and restoration preparations prior to definitive cementation. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. A total of 68 (71%) surveys were returned, and 52 (84%) of the 62 predoctoral and postgraduate programs were represented. After deleting duplicate responses, 31 surveys were returned from restorative department chairpersons, 29 from advanced prosthodontic program directors, and 2 from implant program directors. Frequency of responses to each question was tabulated, and results are presented in 3 sections. For all 3 types of programs, Nobel Biocare was reported to be the most widely used implant system, followed by Biomet 3i, Straumann, Astra Tech, and Zimmer Dental systems. The most commonly used technique prior to definitive cementation is to airborne-particle abrade the intaglio surface of the restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer is the most frequently used luting agent for cementing implant restorations. The 5 most commonly used materials to fill screw access openings are cotton pellets, composite resin, rubber-based material, gutta-percha, and light-polymerized provisional composite resin. Most predoctoral and postgraduate programs teach students to fill the screw access opening completely to

  13. Characterization of dentin-bonding-amalgam interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, S B; Mazor, Y; Klein, E; Judes, H

    2001-01-01

    Applying a bonding agent and a resinous adhesive layer before amalgam condensation has become a common clinical procedure. However, interactions between the different interfaces formed, and the extent of sealing obtained, have not been extensively studied. This study characterized the interfaces formed in the bonded amalgam restoration. Specifically, the individual contributions of the bonding agent (One-Step) and the adhesive resin (Resinomer) were examined, along with their mode of application on the prevention of microleakage and the formation of a tight, continuous adhesion to amalgam. To this end, a dye penetration assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used, including high resolution elemental analysis, for the characterization of the sealing properties and the interface structure obtained following various procedures of applying amalgam adhesives. Results indicated that placing bonding material under the amalgam restoration is essential to preventing microleakage. When condensed against uncured or cured adhesive material, the adhesive resinous glass layer creates a thick interface with protrusions and inclusions in the amalgam, though microleakage studies indicate that condensation over the uncured adhesive results in a better seal than that of the cured adhesive. SEM combined with elemental analysis indicates that the adhesion between amalgam and adhesive material is mainly of mechanical character and is formed by interdigitations of the adhesive material protruding into the amalgam. Gaps formed at the various interfaces in the different modalities could be localized. In addition, resinous glass composite alone, without bonding, was found to provide an unacceptable degree of sealing between the tooth and amalgam. The clinical significance of these findings is further discussed.

  14. Inequalities in preventive and restorative dental services in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, J; Sabbah, W

    2016-09-09

    Aims The objective of this study is to assess socioeconomic inequalities in the use of selected dental procedures.Methods Data is from the Adult Dental Health Survey 2009, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of England, Northern Ireland and Wales. Overall, 6,279 participants were included in the analysis. Occupational classification and education were used to assess variations in the use of preventive, restorative services and tooth extraction using a series of logistic regression models, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, DMFT, self-reported oral health, dental visits and country.Results There were clear socioeconomic variations in the utilisation of preventive and restorative services. In the fully adjusted model those with no educational qualification were less likely to report ever having preventive services than those with a degree (OR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.36,0.65). Similarly, individuals in routine/manual occupation were significantly less likely to report ever having preventive services than those in managerial/professional occupation (OR 0.58, 95%CI: 0.46,0.74) in the fully adjusted model.Conclusion The findings imply that despite relatively equitable access and higher use of dental services in UK, the least educated and those at the bottom of social hierarchy are less likely to have preventive and restorative dental services.

  15. Genotoxicity evaluation of dental restoration nanocomposite using comet assay and chromosome aberration test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Marahaini; Thirumulu Ponnuraj, Kannan; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Rahman, Ismail Ab

    2013-01-01

    Nanocomposite is used as a dental filling to restore the affected tooth, especially in dental caries. The dental nanocomposite (KelFil) for tooth restoration used in this study was produced by the School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia and is incorporated with monodispersed, spherical nanosilica fillers. The aim of the study was to determine the genotoxic effect of KelFil using in vitro genotoxicity tests. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of KelFil was evaluated using MTT assay, comet assay and chromosome aberration tests with or without the addition of a metabolic activation system (S9 mix), using the human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Concurrent negative and positive controls were included. In the comet assay, no comet formation was found in the KelFil groups. There was a significant difference in tail moment between KelFil groups and positive control (p < 0.05). Similarly, no significant aberrations in chromosomes were noticed in KelFil groups. The mitotic indices of treatment groups and negative control were significantly different from positive controls. Hence, it can be concluded that the locally produced dental restoration nanocomposite (KelFil) is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions.

  16. Monoenergetic computed tomography reconstructions reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzmann, Paul; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Schwendener, Nicole; Alkadhi, Hatem; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of monoenergetic computed tomography (CT) images to reduce beam hardening artifacts in comparison to standard CT images of dental restoration on dental post-mortem CT (PMCT). Thirty human decedents (15 male, 58 ± 22 years) with dental restorations were examined using standard single-energy CT (SECT) and dual-energy CT (DECT). DECT data were used to generate monoenergetic CT images, reflecting the X-ray attenuation at energy levels of 64, 69, 88 keV, and at an individually adjusted optimal energy level called OPTkeV. Artifact reduction and image quality of SECT and monoenergetic CT were assessed objectively and subjectively by two blinded readers. Subjectively, beam artifacts decreased visibly in 28/30 cases after monoenergetic CT reconstruction. Inter- and intra-reader agreement was good (k = 0.72, and k = 0.73 respectively). Beam hardening artifacts decreased significantly with increasing monoenergies (repeated-measures ANOVA p < 0.001). Artifact reduction was greatest on monoenergetic CT images at OPTkeV. Mean OPTkeV was 108 ± 17 keV. OPTkeV yielded the lowest difference between CT numbers of streak artifacts and reference tissues (-163 HU). Monoenergetic CT reconstructions significantly reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations and improve image quality of post-mortem dental CT.

  17. Computed tomography evidence of dental restoration as aetiological factor for maxillary sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, S E; Chavda, S V; Pahor, A L

    2000-07-01

    Maxillary sinusitis due to dental causes is usually secondary to periodontal disease or periapical infection and is commonly associated with mucosal thickening of the floor of the maxillary antrum. Computed tomography (CT) is currently the modality of choice for evaluating the extent of disease and any predisposing factors in patients with symptoms of chronic maxillary sinusitis, but it is unable to diagnose dental disease reliably. The presence of restorative dentistry is, however, easily seen at CT and is associated with both periapical and periodontal disease. We aimed to determine whether its presence at CT may predispose to maxillary sinusitis, and in particular to focal mucosal thickening of the sinus floor characteristic of dental origin. Three hundred and thirty maxillary sinus CT images in 165 patients were reviewed for the presence of restorative dentistry in the adjacent teeth, focal maxillary sinus floor mucosal thickening, any maxillary sinus disease (including complete opacification, air fluid levels, diffuse mucosal thickening, focal mucosal thickening) and evidence of a rhinogenic aetiology (osteomeatal complex pathology, mucosal thickening in other sinuses). One hundred and ninety two sinuses adjacent to restorative dentistry and 178 sinuses not adjacent to restorative dentistry were analysed. Focal floor thickening both with, and without, evidence of a rhinogenic aetiology, was significantly more common adjacent to restorative dentistry. Maxillary sinus disease overall was no more common adjacent to restorative dentistry. This work demonstrated that the presence of restorative dentistry predisposes to focal mucosal thickening in the floor of the maxillary sinus and its presence should prompt clinical and radiographical assessment to exclude dental disease as a source of chronic maxillary sinusitis.

  18. A Difference Contour-Mapping System For The Measurement Of Wear In Dental Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Frans H. M.; Janssen, Huub L. M. M.; Lambrechts, Paul; Vanherle, Guido

    1986-07-01

    A real-time moire contouring system, which is insensitive to specular reflections, has enlarged depth of field and is used in conjunction with a micropositioning relocation device, has been built for the measurement of wear in dental restorations. Measurements are carried out on accurate polyvinyl siloxane replicas.

  19. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  20. Calculation of the shrinkage-induced residual stress in a viscoelastic dental restorative material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    A procedure able to describe the curing process of a particulate composite material used in a dental restoration is developed in the ANSYS environment. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restoration, activated by visible light. The model accounts for the dependence of the viscoelastic functions on temperature and degree of cure. Three geometries have been considered in the analysis that are representative of three different classes of dental restoration and mainly differ by the C (constrained)-factor, (i.e. the bounded to unbounded surface ratio). It was found that the temperature could give a necrosis in the vicinity of the tooth nerve and that the average stress at the interface between the composite and the tooth scales exponentially with the C-factor. The residual stress at the dental restoration interface is also compared with the uniaxial tensile strength of twelve commercially available composite materials: it clearly appears that the level of residual stress may overcome the strength of the composite, especially at high C-factors.

  1. [Intra-oral restoration and correction of single- and multi-unit dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, F.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    In cases of a fracture of the porcelain or non-aesthetic margin of a correctly functioning single- or multi-unit dental prosthesis, an intra-oral restoration or correction using a resin composite can generally be chosen. To establish adhesion to metal, porcelain, resin and composite,

  2. Effects of erbium-and chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet and diode lasers on the surfaces of restorative dental materials: a scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, M; Barutcigil, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential effects of laser irradiation, which is commonly performed in periodontal surgery, on the surfaces of restorative materials. Five different restorative dental materials were used in this study, as follows: (1) Resin composite, (2) poly acid-modified resin composite (compomer), (3) conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC), (4) resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and (5) amalgam. Four cylindrical samples (8 mm diameter, 2 mm height) were prepared for each restorative material. In addition, four freshly extracted, sound human incisors teeth were selected. Two different laser systems commonly used in periodontal surgery were examined in this study: A 810 nm diode laser at a setting of 1 W with continuous-phase laser irradiation for 10 s, and an erbium-and chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser at settings of 2.5 W, 3.25 W, and 4 W with 25 Hz laser irradiation for 10 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed to evaluate the morphology and surface deformation of the restorative materials and tooth surfaces. According to the SEM images, the Er, Cr: YSGG laser causes irradiation markings that appear as demineralized surfaces on tooth samples. The Er, Cr: YSGG laser also caused deep defects on composite, compomer, and RMGIC surfaces because of its high power, and the ablation was deeper for these samples. High-magnification SEM images of GIC samples showed the melting and combustion effects of the Er, Cr: YSGG laser, which increased as the laser power was increased. In amalgam samples, neither laser left significant harmful effects at the lowest power setting. The diode laser did cause irradiation markings, but they were insignificant compared with those left by the Er, Cr: YSGG laser on the surfaces of the different materials and teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that Er, Cr: YSGG laser irradiation could cause distortions of the surfaces

  3. Impact of Technique-Specific Operative Videos on First-Year Dental Students' Performance of Restorative Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shalizeh A; Barros, Juliana A; Clark, Christina M; Frey, Gary N; Streckfus, Charles F; Quock, Ryan L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of psychomotor operative video demonstrations on first-year dental students who are performing specific procedures for the first time in a preclinical setting. The class was randomly divided into two groups, and three restorative procedures were selected. On the date on which each procedure was to be performed in the preclinical laboratory for the first time, one group (experimental, n=50) was shown a technique video for that specific procedure immediately before commencing the exercise; the control cohort (n=50) did not view the video. Technical performance on procedures was evaluated by students and two calibrated and blinded examiners. The students' perceptions of the experience were also collected in a survey. All first-year students participated in the study, for a 100% response rate. A Mann-Whitney U test did not show any group differences in technical performance (mean values on preparation: 77.1 vs. 77.8; amalgam: 82.7 vs. 82.8; composite: 79.7 vs. 78.0). A Spearman rho test revealed a significantly higher correlation in 13 out of 25 evaluation categories between student self-assessment and blinded examiner assessment for the experimental group. A chi-square test of questionnaire responses revealed a positive student perception of administering these videos for the preparation (X(2)=4.8, pstudent performance on preclinical operative procedures, but they were well received by students and augmented self-assessment ability. These findings suggest that videos can be a useful teaching aid in a preclinical environment, especially regarding comprehension of concepts.

  4. A technical report on repair of amalgam-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Salihoğlu-Yener, E

    2011-01-01

    This clinical report describes a repair protocol for cusp fracture of a failed amalgam-dentin complex. A maxillary right first premolar with an amalgam restoration presented a buccal cusp fracture. Chairside repair has been undertaken by conditioning the existing amalgam restoration with silica coating (30 μm CoJet®-Sand), phosphoric acid etching the beveled enamel surface, priming dentin, and application of a bonding agent on both enamel and dentin. Thereafter, the amalgam was silanized (ESPE®-Sil), and opaque resin was applied and polymerized to mask the amalgam. The fractured buccal cusp was modeled using resin composite (Clearfil Photo Posterior) and photo-polymerized. Finally, the amalgam was refinished and refurbished and the composite was finished and polished.

  5. Influence of dental restorative material properties on bond interface reliability: a finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-tao; ZHANG Yu-mei; HOU Shu-xun; KONG Liang; LIN Jun; ZHAO Yi-min; HUO Na

    2013-01-01

    Background Varieties of restorative materials are widely used in dentistry.The aim of this study is to explore the influence of different dental restorative materials on bond interface reliability.Methods A two-dimensional finite element analysis method was adopted to simulate the shear-bond efficacy test.The influence of elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio were investigated separately.Several dental restorative materials including resins,metals,and ceramics were analyzed in this study.Results The deformation and peak equivalent stress level of the dentin-adhesive interface rose sharply following a decrease in the elasticity of restorative materials,especially those with a low elastic modulus range.The influence of the Poisson's coefficient was not significant.Ceramics and gold alloy were preferred to resin composite in restorations bearing extensive shear load during service.Conclusions Restorative materials with an elastic modulus similar to that of teeth are not always the best clinical choice.This research provides a helpful guide for the application of different restorative materials in clinical practice.

  6. Mechanical benefits of conservative restoration for dental fissure caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zheng, Keke; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    The principle of minimal intervention dentistry (MID) is to limit removal of carious tooth tissue while maximizing its repair and survival potential. The objective of this study is to explore the fracture resistance of a permanent molar tooth with a fissure carious lesion along with three clinical restoration procedures, namely one traditional and two conservative approaches, based upon MID. The traditional restoration employs extensive surgical removal of enamel and dentine about the cavity to eliminate potential risk of further caries development, while conservative method #1 removes significantly less enamel and infected dentine, and conservative method #2 only restores the overhanging enamel above the cavity and leaves the infected and affected dentine as it was. An extended finite element method (XFEM) is adopted here to analyze the fracture behaviors of both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of these four different scenarios. It was found that the two conservative methods exhibited better fracture resistance than the traditional restorative method. Although conservative method #2 has less fracture resistance than method #1, it had significantly superior fracture resistance compared to other restorations. More important, after cavity sealing it may potentially enhance the opportunity for remineralization and improved loading bearing capacity and fracture resistance.

  7. Utilizing optical coherence tomography for CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chityala, Ravishankar; Vidal, Carola; Jones, Robert

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has seen broad application in dentistry including early carious lesion detection and imaging defects in resin composite restorations. This study investigates expanding the clinical usefulness by investigating methods to use OCT for obtaining three-dimensional (3D) digital impressions, which can be integrated to CAD/CAM manufacturing of indirect restorations. 3D surface topography `before' and `after' a cavity preparation was acquired by an intraoral cross polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) system with a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) scanning mirror. Image registration and segmentation methods were used to digitally construct a replacement restoration that modeled the original surface morphology of a hydroxyapatite sample. After high resolution additive manufacturing (e.g. polymer 3D printing) of the replacement restoration, micro-CT imaging was performed to examine the marginal adaptation. This study establishes the protocol for further investigation of integrating OCT with CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations.

  8. Concordance between Responses to Questionnaire Scenarios and Actual Treatment to Repair or Replace Dental Restorations in the National Dental PBRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Tim J.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the agreement between treatment recommended during hypothetical clinical scenarios and actual treatment provided in comparable clinical circumstances. Methods A total of 193 practitioners in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network participated in both a questionnaire and a clinical study. The questionnaire included three hypothetical scenarios about treatment of existing restorations. Clinicians then participated in a clinical study about repair or replacement of existing restorations. We quantified the overall concordance between their questionnaire responses and what they did in actual clinical treatment. Results Practitioners who recommended repair (instead of replacement) of more scenario restorations also had higher repair percentages in clinical practice. Additionally, for each of the three hypothetical scenario restorations, practitioners who recommended repair had higher repair percentages in clinical practice. Conclusions The questionnaire scenarios were a valid measure of clinicians’ tendency to repair or replace restorations in actual clinical practice. Clinical implications Although there was substantial variation in practitioners’ tendency to repair or replace restorations, responses to questionnaire scenarios by individual practitioners were concordant with what they did in actual clinical practice. PMID:25998565

  9. Effect of pellicle on galvanic corrosion of amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, R I

    1984-02-01

    Galvanic corrosion of amalgam, induced by contact with a type IV dental casting gold alloy, was determined under simulated oral conditions in an electrochemical cell. The effect of a pellicle layer formed by 1 h exposure to saliva in the oral cavity was determined. Pellicle on the amalgam had no effect on the maximum corrosion rate or the 2 h corrosion charge, whereas pellicle on the gold alloy substantially reduced both these parameters of the conventional low-copper amalgam; the corrosion of the high-copper amalgam was less and was not influenced by pellicle formation.

  10. Restorative treatment thresholds for interproximal primary caries based on radiographic images: findings from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Heft, Marc W

    2009-01-01

    with restorative intervention in lesions that have penetrated only the enamel surface. This study surveyed dentists from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) who had reported doing at least some restorative dentistry (n = 901). Dentists were asked to indicate the depth at which they would restore...

  11. Biofilm Formation on Dental Restorative and Implant Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H. J.; Rinastiti, M.; Siswomihardjo, W.; van der Mei, H. C.

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on

  12. An update on glass fiber dental restorative composites: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Samad; Azam, Maria Tahir; Khan, Maria; Mian, Salman Aziz; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham

    2015-02-01

    Dentistry is a much developed field in the last few decades. New techniques have changed the conventional treatment methods as applications of new dental materials give better outcomes. The current century has suddenly forced on dentistry, a new paradigm regarding expected standards for state-of-the-art patient care. Within the field of restorative dentistry, the incredible advances in dental materials research have led to the current availability of esthetic adhesive restorations. The chemistry and structure of the resins and the nature of the glass fiber reinforced systems in dental composites are reviewed in relation to their influence and properties including mechanical, physical, thermal, biocompatibility, technique sensitivity, mode and rate of failure of restorations on clinical application. It is clear that a deeper understanding of the structure of the polymeric matrix and resin-based dental composite is required. As a result of ongoing research in the area of glass fiber reinforced composites and with the development and advancement of these composites, the future prospects of resin-based composite are encouraging. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Influence of metal-ceramic fixed dental restorations on the occurrence of discoloration of gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Ljubiša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse effects of dental cast alloys on the health of patients are the problem in clinical practice. The aim of this paper was to describe the case of a patient with discolorated gingivae in the presence of fixed dental restorations and used diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Case report. A 30-year old patient, presented with the complaints about unsatisfactory esthetic of his fixed dental restorations. He complained about the greyish discoloration of gingivae, inappropriate color of the crowns, and a larger space between the central incisors. Both discolorated and normal gingivae around the fixed dental restorations were taken by excision and the samples of gingivae were examined histopathologically, and by using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry test (AAS. Histopathological examination of the discolorated gingivae showed the presence of non-specific inflammation with a foreign body. AAS revealed the presence of various metals in the samples and the higher metal contents in the samples of discolorated gingivae as compared with the samples of normal gingivae. New metal-ceramic crowns were made for the patient. Conclusion. A main cause of greyish discoloration of gingivae was presence of a metal in gingival tissue. After the excision of discolorated gingivae old metalceramic crowns should be replaced with new crowns.

  14. Evaluation of the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide gel (Nite White on mercury release from Iranian and foreign spherical and admixed amalgams by cold vapor atomic absorption method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasraie Sh.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nowadays, esthetic dentistry has become an important part of modern dentistry. Bleaching is considered as a conservative, safe and effective way for treatment of discolored teeth. Although bleaching is commonly used on anterior teeth, the bleaching gel may come into contact with patient's former amalgam restorations and result in corrosive effects, dissolution of amalgam phases and increasing release of mercury. Mercury released from dental amalgam during mouthguard bleaching can be absorbed and increase the total mercury body burden. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of mercury released from Iranian and foreign brands of amalgams with spherical and admixed particles, polished and unpolished, after 16%carbamide peroxide gel application.Materials and Methods: This experimental in vitro study was performed on 256 Iranian and foreign amalgam samples with spherical and admixed particles. The provided samples were put in distilled water and classified according to the type of amalgam, shape of particles and quality of surface polishing. The test samples were placed in Nite White 16% carbamid peroxide gel and control samples were put in phosphate buffer (Ph=6.5 for 14 and 28 hours. The amount of released mercury was calculated using AVA-440 Mercury Analysis System (Thermo Jarrell Ash model SH/229 with cold-vapor atomic absorption. Data were analyzed using t-test, four way and three way ANOVA tests with P<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: 16% Nite White carbamide peroxide gel caused a significant increase in amount of mercury released from amalgams in all groups (P<0.05. Mercury release from Iranian amalgam was higher than that from the foreign brands (P<0.05. There was no significant difference in mercury released from spherical and admixed amalgams (P>0.05. The amount of mercury released from Iranian and foreign amalgams was time dependent (P<0.05. Furthermore, the amount of mercury released from

  15. Imagistic evaluation of direct dental restoration: en face OCT versus SEM and microCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negruţiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Marcauteanu, Corina; Petrescu, Emanuela L.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2011-06-01

    There are several methods known which are used to assess the quality of direct dental restorations, but most of them are invasive. These lead to the destruction of the probes and often no conclusion could be drawn in respect to the existence of any microleakage in the investigated areas of interest. Optical tomographic techniques are of particular importance in the medical imaging field, because these techniques can provide non-invasive diagnostic images. Using an en-face version of OCT, we have recently demonstrated real time thorough evaluation of quality of dental fillings. The purpose of this in vitro study was to validate the en face OCT imagistic evaluation of direct dental restoration by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microcomputer tomography (μCT). Teeth after several treatment methods are imaged in order to detect material defects and to asses the marginal adaptation at the dental hard tissue walls. SEM investigations evidenced the nonlinear aspect of the interface between the filling material and the buccal and lingual walls in some samples. The results obtained by μCT revealed also some material defects inside the fillings and at the interfaces with the rootcanal walls. The advantages of the OCT method consist in non-invasiveness and high resolution. En face OCT investigations permit to visualize a more complex stratificated structure at the interface filling material/dental hard tissue and in the apical region.

  16. Determination of optical properties in dental restorative biomaterials using the inverse-adding-doubling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function, the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). By means of the inverse-adding-doubling (IAD) method, transmittance and reflectance measurements lead to the determination of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient. The additional measurement of the phase function performed by goniometry allows the separation of the reduced scattering coefficient into the scattering coefficient and the scattering anisotropy factor. The majority of techniques, such as the one utilized in this work, involve the use of integrating spheres to measure total transmission and reflection. We have employed an integrating sphere setup to measure the total transmittance and reflectance of dental biomaterials used in restorative dentistry. Dental biomaterials are meant to replace dental tissues, such as enamel and dentine, in irreversibly diseased teeth. In previous works we performed goniometric measurements in order to evaluate the scattering anisotropy factor for these kinds of materials. In the present work we have used the IAD method to combine the measurements performed using the integrating sphere setup with the results of the previous goniometric measurements. The aim was to optically characterize the dental biomaterials analyzed, since whole studies to assess the appropriate material properties are required in medical applications. In this context, complete optical characterizations play an important role in achieving the fulfillment of optimal quality and the final success of dental biomaterials used in restorative dentistry.

  17. Reliability and properties of core materials for all-ceramic dental restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Ban

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Various core materials have been used as all-ceramic dental restorations. Since many foreign zirconia product systems were introduced to the Japanese dental market in the past few years, the researches and the papers on zirconia for ceramic biomaterials have immediately drawn considerable attention. Recently, most of the manufactures supply zirconia blocks available to multi-unit posterior bridges using CAD/CAM, because zirconia has excellent mechanical properties comparable to metal, due to its microstructures. The properties of conventional zirconia were further improved by the composite in nano-scale such as zirconia/alumina nanocomposite (NANOZR. There are many interesting behaviors such as long-term stability related to low temperature degradation, effect of sandblasting and heat treatment on the microstructure and the strength, bonding to veneering porcelains, bonding to cement, visible light translucency related to esthetic restoration, X-ray opacity, biocompatibility, fracture load of clinical bridge as well as lifetime and clinical survival rates of the restoratives made with zirconia. From the recent material researches on zirconia not only in Japan but also in the world, this review takes into account these interesting properties of zirconia and reliability as core material for all-ceramic dental restorations.

  18. Testing adhesion of direct restoratives to dental hard tissue - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-10-01

    This articles concerns itself with the testing of adhesion between direct restoratives and dental hard tissue, ie, enamel and dentin. The aim is to survey available methods for adhesion testing and influential parameters affecting experimental outcome. The testing of adhesion to indirect restorative materials, eg, ceramics and metals, is beyond the scope of this article and shall be discussed elsewhere. The longevity and success of modern dental restorations very often relies on potent dental adhesives to provide durable bonds between the dental hard substance and the restorative composite. To predict the clinical outcome of such restorative treatment, a large variety of in vitro laboratory tests and clinical in vivo experiments have been devised, analyzed, and published. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of bond strength testing methods and their applicability to the characterization of dental adhesives. Regardless of the method employed, subtle variations in sample preparation may already severely impact test results, usually necessitating at least co-testing of a well-known internal reference to allow conclusive interpretation. This article attempts to list and discuss the most influential parameters, such as substrate nature, age, health status, storage, clinically relevant pre-treatment, and sample preparation. Special attention is devoted to the last aspect, as numerous publications have stressed the tremendous influence of preparatory parameters on the validity and scope of obtained data. Added to the large variety of such factors, an equally large diversity of load-applying procedures exists to actually quantify adhesion between composites and dental hard substance. This article summarizes the basics of macro and micro approaches to shear and tensile bond strength testing, as well as push- and pull-out tests. The strengths and weaknesses inherent to each method and influential test parameters are reviewed and methods for

  19. Molecular Toxicology of Substances Released from Resin–Based Dental Restorative Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Bakopoulou

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resin-based dental restorative materials are extensively used today in dentistry. However, significant concerns still remain regarding their biocompatibility. For this reason, significant scientific effort has been focused on the determination of the molecular toxicology of substances released by these biomaterials, using several tools for risk assessment, including exposure assessment, hazard identification and dose-response analysis. These studies have shown that substances released by these materials can cause significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, leading to irreversible disturbance of basic cellular functions. The aim of this article is to review current knowledge related to dental composites’ molecular toxicology and to give implications for possible improvements concerning their biocompatibility.

  20. Molecular Toxicology of Substances Released from Resin–Based Dental Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, Athina; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos; Garefis, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    Resin-based dental restorative materials are extensively used today in dentistry. However, significant concerns still remain regarding their biocompatibility. For this reason, significant scientific effort has been focused on the determination of the molecular toxicology of substances released by these biomaterials, using several tools for risk assessment, including exposure assessment, hazard identification and dose-response analysis. These studies have shown that substances released by these materials can cause significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, leading to irreversible disturbance of basic cellular functions. The aim of this article is to review current knowledge related to dental composites’ molecular toxicology and to give implications for possible improvements concerning their biocompatibility. PMID:19865523

  1. The impact of the global budget system on dynamics of dental manpower and utilization of dental services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yueh-Guey Huang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study has demonstrated a stabilizing effect of the global budget system on dynamics of dental manpower in Taiwan. A relationship between HHI and dentists′ move-out rate has been found. The relationship between municipal socioeconomic status and the density of dentists has also been confirmed. In addition, reduced utilization of amalgam restorations was accompanied by increased utilization of tooth-colored material restorations. Further investigations are indicated.

  2. New layer-based imaging and rapid prototyping techniques for computer-aided design and manufacture of custom dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M-Y; Chang, C-C; Ku, Y C

    2008-01-01

    Fixed dental restoration by conventional methods greatly relies on the skill and experience of the dental technician. The quality and accuracy of the final product depends mostly on the technician's subjective judgment. In addition, the traditional manual operation involves many complex procedures, and is a time-consuming and labour-intensive job. Most importantly, no quantitative design and manufacturing information is preserved for future retrieval. In this paper, a new device for scanning the dental profile and reconstructing 3D digital information of a dental model based on a layer-based imaging technique, called abrasive computer tomography (ACT) was designed in-house and proposed for the design of custom dental restoration. The fixed partial dental restoration was then produced by rapid prototyping (RP) and computer numerical control (CNC) machining methods based on the ACT scanned digital information. A force feedback sculptor (FreeForm system, Sensible Technologies, Inc., Cambridge MA, USA), which comprises 3D Touch technology, was applied to modify the morphology and design of the fixed dental restoration. In addition, a comparison of conventional manual operation and digital manufacture using both RP and CNC machining technologies for fixed dental restoration production is presented. Finally, a digital custom fixed restoration manufacturing protocol integrating proposed layer-based dental profile scanning, computer-aided design, 3D force feedback feature modification and advanced fixed restoration manufacturing techniques is illustrated. The proposed method provides solid evidence that computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies may become a new avenue for custom-made fixed restoration design, analysis, and production in the 21st century.

  3. Dentists' restorative decision-making and implications for an 'amalgamless' profession. Part 2: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G; Hopcraft, M S; Tyas, M J; Wong, R H K

    2014-12-01

    In some countries the use of amalgam has been restricted, and the dental profession may be forced into using alternatives to amalgam by a combination of public opinion and legislation, including the proposal that the material be 'phased-down'. The limited research that exists as to restorative decision-making is quantitative in nature and focuses on 'when' a restoration is placed. There is little qualitative research exploring 'why' a material is chosen. Purposive sampling of a representative group of dentists registered in Australia was carried out in two phases; initially six interviews followed by a focus group of six different participants who were audio-recorded. Qualitative data were analysed using computer aided qualitative data analysis software. The findings suggest that dentists' restorative decision-making is a complex interplay of factors. These may be categorized as 'clinical', 'knowledge', 'patient', 'practice type', 'biological' and 'environmental'. Use of amalgam is influenced by each of these to varying degrees. Quantitative analysis of the influences on restorative decision-making is recommended. While the potential future 'phase-down' of amalgam as a restorative material was of concern, there was a general sense of resignation or apathy to the matter. The implications for public health authorities, dental organizations and educators are noted. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Dental cavity liners for Class I and Class II resin-based composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Andrew B; Peltz, Ivy; Veitz-Keenan, Analia

    2016-10-25

    Resin-based composite (RBC) is currently accepted as a viable material for the restoration of caries for posterior permanent teeth requiring surgical treatment. Despite the fact that the thermal conductivity of the RBC restorative material closely approximates that of natural tooth structure, postoperative hypersensitivity is sometimes still an issue. Dental cavity liners have historically been used to protect the pulp from the toxic effects of some dental restorative materials and to prevent the pain of thermal conductivity by placing an insulating layer between restorative material and the remaining tooth structure. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of using dental cavity liners in the placement of Class I and Class II resin-based composite posterior restorations in permanent teeth in children and adults. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 25 May 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 4) in the Cochrane Library (searched 25 May 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 25 May 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 25 May 2016) and LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database; 1982 to 25 May 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of the use of liners under Class I and Class II posterior resin-based composite restorations in permanent teeth (in both adults and children). We included both parallel and split-mouth designs. We utilized standard methodological procedures prescribed by Cochrane for data collection and analysis. Two review authors screened the search results and assessed the eligibility of studies for

  5. Advanced Esthetic Management of Dental Implants: Surgical and Restorative Considerations to Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barry P; Rubinstein, Sergio; Rose, Louis F

    2015-01-01

    Successful dental implant therapy in the maxillary anterior dentition requires meticulous attention to surgical and prosthodontic measures. Proper diagnosis, extraction technique, implant selection, and placement significantly impact outcomes. Respect of hard and soft tissue physiology following tooth loss and implant placement requires specific steps be taken. Management tissue contours properly, via regenerative therapy, results in successful framing of the restoration. Provisionalization and definitive restorative therapy also impacts the level of esthetic success. The contours of the temporary abutment and crown develop soft tissue contours for the final restoration. Overcontouring can lead to soft tissue recession and mucosal asymmetry. Design of the definitive crown(s) is crucial for long-term maintenance of esthetically acceptable results. Visualizing the outcome of treatment prior to its inception, following specific surgical and restorative guidelines, increases the likelihood of success. This article demonstrates the importance of proper surgical and prosthetic principles in achieving esthetic implant results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Survey of currently selected dental implants and restorations by prosthodontists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Richard C; Gerngross, Peter J; Dominici, John T; Kiat-amnuay, Sudarat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the prosthodontists of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) and the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics (AAMP) to identify the most commonly used implant both during their training and currently in practice, and to evaluate overall restorative preference. Participants were asked to rank criteria that make an implant company desirable and important features when selecting an implant. An electronic survey was emailed to 1,739 members of the ACP and AAMP. The majority of respondents (79%) were trained using Nobel Biocare brand implants, which was also the brand most often selected by participants for use in all regions of the oral cavity (34% to 39%, location dependent). Abutment preferences varied by area: incisors and canines (29%) and highly esthetic areas (53%) were more likely to be restored with custom milled zirconia abutments, while prefabricated titanium abutments were preferred for premolars and molar areas. Conventional loading was most often applied, ranging from 95% in medically compromised patients to 55% in esthetic areas. The majority of participants (86%) used Locator attachments for complete overdenture restorations. Also, respondents selected an implant company based on features and literature support versus cost and customer service. The implant features deemed most important were the design of the internal connection and ease of finding replacement parts; thread design and variety of abutments were deemed least important. Respondents reported that while implant planning software was used, they rarely/never order the concurrent surgical guide. Within the study's limitations, the majority of prosthodontists select implants based on training, features, and literature support.

  7. Initial in vitro bacterial adhesion on dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Young; Yeo, In-Sung; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun; Kim, Dae-Joon; Han, Jung-Suk

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial bacterial adhesion on several restorative materials with similar roughness. Sixty cylindrical slabs were prepared from four restorative materials: zirconia (Zr), alumina-toughened zirconia (Al-Zr), type III gold alloy (Au), and cp-titanium (Ti). All the materials were polished until a mirror-like shine was achieved. The average surface roughness and topography were determined by atomic force microscopy. Contact angles were measured to calculate surface free energy by the sessile drop technique. After the formation of a salivary pellicle, S. sanguinis, S. gordonii, and S. oralis were inoculated onto the specimens and incubated for 4 h. Quantification of the adherent bacteria was performed by crystal violet staining technique and resazurin reduction assay. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test were adopted for statistical analysis. The level of significance was 0.05. The Ra values determined with atomic force microscopy for all specimens were lower than 5 nm. Surface free energy increased in the order of Al-Zr, Zr, Ti, and Au. Differences were significant between the investigated materials in both crystal violet absorbance and fluorescence intensities. Gold alloy showed the highest values for all bacterial strains (padhesion and subsequent advance of peri-implantitis.

  8. Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative dental material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Lawaf

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the colonization and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative material. Materials and methods. In this experimental study adherence of Candida albicans strains was studied with and without human whole saliva. First, glass ionomer fragments were prepared; then yeast cells were inoculated and incubated with different incubation times. After incubation, the fragments were removed from the wells and stained with 0.1% calcofluor white. Adhesion was quantified by counting the total number of cells at 40, 80 and 120 minutes. The analysis of variance and Student's test were used to assess the significance of differences between the means. Results. In the absence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans showed an increase, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes. However, in the presence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer significantly decreased. Conclusion. The presence of human whole saliva is an important factor in the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer restorative material.

  9. Gingival and dental parameters in the evaluation of aesthetic characteristics of fixed restorations (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a continuing evaluation of dental and facial parameters in the estimation of aesthetic characteristic of fixed restorations. First of all, attention is paid to the phenomenon describing the tooth tissue's characteristics (transiucency, opalescence, and transparency. The paper also discusses tooth color as a special occurrence, the position of the lower lip line as well as the symmetry of the smile. In addition to these fundamental objective criteria, the paper also deals with subjective criteria (tooth arrangement and position, variation in tooth form, and relative crown length, which play a part in the successful aesthetic integration of fixed restorations.

  10. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. Part B: labside milling machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental laboratories (labside solution) and dental production centers. This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dental technicians understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. The technical and economic criteria are described for four labside and two production center dental NC milling machines available on the market. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of milling machines to mill prosthetic materials and various restoration shapes. The economic criteria are focused on investment cost and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is discussed through the accuracy and integrity of the restoration. It can be asserted that dental production center milling machines offer a wider range of materials and types of restoration shapes than labside solutions, while labside solutions offer a wider range than chairside solutions. The accuracy and integrity of restorations may be improved as a function of the embedded technologies provided. However, the more complex the technical solutions available, the more skilled the user must be. Investment cost and interoperability with third-party software increase according to the quality of the embedded technologies implemented. Each private dental practice may decide which fabrication option to use depending on the scope of the practice.

  11. NDE of the internal hole defect of dental composite restoration using infrared lock in thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Ja Uk; Choi, Nak Sam [Hanyang Univ., Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to detect the pin hole defect of dental composite restoration using lock in thermography method. Amplitude and phase images of the composite resin specimens were analyzed according to the lock in frequency and the diameter of defect area. Through the amplitude image analysis, at lock in frequency of 0.05 Hz, defect diameters 2-5 mm exhibited the highest amplitude contrast value between defective area and sound area. The lock in frequency range of 0.3-0.5 Hz provided good phase angle contrast for contrast value. It is concluded that the infrared lock in thermography method verified the effectiveness for detecting the pin hole defect of dental composite restoration.

  12. Priorities for future innovation, research, and advocacy in dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T; Fox, C H; Rekow, E D

    2013-11-01

    Innovations in materials science, both within and outside of dentistry, open opportunities for the development of exciting direct restorative materials. From rich dialog among experts from dental and non-dental academic institutions and industry, as well as those from policy, research funding, and professional organizations, we learned that capitalizing on these opportunities is multifactorial and far from straightforward. Beginning from the point when a restoration is needed, what materials, delivery systems, and skills are needed to best serve the most people throughout the world's widely varied economic and infrastructure systems? New research is a critical element in progress. Effective advocacy can influence funding and drives change in practice and policy. Here we articulate both research and advocacy priorities, with the intention of focusing the energy and expertise of our best scientists on making a difference, bringing new innovations to improve oral health.

  13. Chipping fracture resistance of dental CAD/CAM restorative materials: Part 2. Phenomenological model and the effect of indenter type

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A.A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    The edge chipping resistances of six CAD/CAM dental restoration materials are analyzed and correlated to other mechanical properties. A new quadratic relationship that is based on a phenomenological model is presented.

  14. Substitution of amalgam restorations: participative training to standardize criteria Substituição de restaurações de amálgama: um treinamento participativo para padronização de critérios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Toledo Pitanga Fernandes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the variations on clinical judgment with respect to replacement of restorations are a problem which affects dentistry, the aim of this study was to elaborate, implement and evaluate a programme of participative training to standardize criteria for the evaluation of amalgam restorations. Five professors of Integrated Clinic of the School of Dentistry of the University of Vale do Rio Doce (UNIVALE, Brazil, visually and radiographically evaluated 28 extracted permanent teeth presenting amalgam restorations. The research was developed in four distinct phases: first - the teeth were evaluated according to individual criteria to determine whether restorations should be replaced or not; second - the examiners participated in a training programme with the objective of standardizing the evaluation criteria; third - soon after the training, the teeth were re-evaluated using the adopted standardized criteria; fourth - five months after the training, the procedures on third phase were repeated. For each restoration the examiners registered the main reason for considering the restoration: satisfactory, requiring total substitution, requiring partial substitution or requiring finishing/polishing. After participating in the training programme the examiners presented a statistically significant reduction (sign test: Z = 0.4989, p = 0.0022 in indicating the need to substitute restorations, result which was maintained five months after training. This programme of participative training can be organized and implemented to standardize the criteria to evaluate amalgam restorations achieving satisfactory results with an impact on clinical practice.Considerando que variação no julgamento clínico de substituição das restaurações é um problema que afeta a maioria dos profissionais, objetivou-se neste trabalho elaborar, implementar e avaliar um programa de treinamento participativo para padronização de critérios na avaliação de restaura

  15. Sensitivity analysis of bi-layered ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V

    2012-02-01

    The reliability and longevity of ceramic prostheses have become a major concern. The existing studies have focused on some critical issues from clinical perspectives, but more researches are needed to address fundamental sciences and fabrication issues to ensure the longevity and durability of ceramic prostheses. The aim of this paper was to explore how "sensitive" the thermal and mechanical responses, in terms of changes in temperature and thermal residual stress of the bi-layered ceramic systems and crown models will be with respect to the perturbation of the design variables chosen (e.g. layer thickness and heat transfer coefficient) in a quantitative way. In this study, three bi-layered ceramic models with different geometries are considered: (i) a simple bi-layered plate, (ii) a simple bi-layer triangle, and (iii) an axisymmetric bi-layered crown. The layer thickness and convective heat transfer coefficient (or cooling rate) seem to be more sensitive for the porcelain fused on zirconia substrate models. The resultant sensitivities indicate a critical importance of the heat transfer coefficient and thickness ratio of core to veneer on the temperature distributions and residual stresses in each model. The findings provide a quantitative basis for assessing the effects of fabrication uncertainties and optimizing the design of ceramic prostheses. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Adhesion of oral streptococci to all-ceramics dental restorative materials in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R; Hauser-Gerspach, I; Lüthy, H; Meyer, J

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, patients have benefited from the development of better and more esthetic materials, including all-ceramics dental restorative materials. Dental plaque formation on teeth and restorative materials plays an important role in the pathogenesis of oral diseases. This study investigates initial adhesion of stationary phase streptococcal species to different all-ceramics dental restorative materials. The saliva-coated materials were incubated with the bacteria for 1 h in an in vitro flow chamber which mimics environmental conditions in the oral cavity. Number and vitality of adhering bacteria were determined microscopically after staining. Surface roughness and the composition of the materials had no distinctive influence on bacterial adhesion. However, S. mutans and S. sobrinus adhered about tenfold less numerous to all materials than the other streptococcal species. Further, there was a correlation between bacterial vitality and materials' glass content. The results showed that early plaque formation was influenced predominantly by the presence of the salivary pellicle rather than by material dependent parameters whereas the composition of the all-ceramics appeared to have influenced the percentage of viable cells during the adhesion process. This presented in vitro technique may provide a useful model to study the influence of different parameters on adherence of oral streptococcal species.

  17. Intraoral treatment of veneering porcelain chipping of fixed dental restorations: a review and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmich, Magdalena; Stappert, Christian F J

    2013-01-01

    Every dental ceramic system can experience failure of the veneering porcelain. However, the increasing popularity of all-ceramic crowns and fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) seems to have led to an increasing need to repair chipped veneering porcelain. The authors compared different methods to repair fractured ceramic restorations (porcelain-fused-to-metal and all-ceramic) and explain the basic principles of adhesion in these systems. They also evaluated the frequency and causes of failure in dental ceramic systems. This review is based on the results of PubMed and Google Scholar searches, as well as on a hand search of the scientific literature, resulting in 300 articles from 1977 to 2012. The authors used multiple key words (ceramic, repair, bonding, hydrofluoric acid, air abrasion, silane, phosphates, silicon dioxide) and different strategies (connecting different key words with OR, NOR and AND and truncation of the stem of words) to search the databases. Because of differences in the material composition of ceramic systems (composed of metal, alumina or zirconia, glass-ceramics and feldspathic ceramics), different treatments are required for the exposed material surfaces after chipping. Use of hydrofluoric acid etching, air abrasion, tribochemical coating, silanization and metal primers or zirconia primers seem to be the most successful conditioning methods for durable bonding and repair. Intraoral repair of a restoration offers a satisfying option for the patient when the restoration cannot be removed or replaced. Its success depends largely on the conditioning methods used for the fractured surfaces.

  18. Reliability and strength of all-ceramic dental restorations fabricated by direct ceramic machining (DCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filser, F; Kocher, P; Weibel, F; Lüthy, H; Schärer, P; Gauckler, L J

    2001-04-01

    All-ceramic dental bridges for the molar region are not yet available at reasonable costs. The novel direct ceramic machining (DCM) process allows an easy, reliable and rapid fabrication for all-ceramic dental restorations with high mechanical strength and good biocompatibility. In DCM, an enlarged framework is easily milled out of a pre-fabricated porous ceramic blank made of zirconia. After sintering to full density, no further time-consuming hard machining with diamond tools is needed. For individual esthetical requirements, the framework is coated with a veneer porcelain. Compared to the commercially available In-Ceram Alumina and IPS Empress2 restorations, the mechanical strength of zirconia frameworks is twice as high, allowing the restorations to bear the high mastication forces in the molar region. In terms of reliability, zirconia bridges fabricated by the DCM process are also superior to In-Ceram Alumina and IPS Empress2. A clinical study of three-unit dental bridges in the molar region found no problems after the first year of observation.

  19. Factors influencing the dimensional accuracy of 3D-printed full-coverage dental restorations using stereolithography technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alharbi, N.; Osman, R.B.; Wismeijer, D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the build angle and the support configuration (thick versus thin support) on the dimensional accuracy of 3D-printed full-coverage dental restorations. Materials and Methods: A full-coverage dental crown was digitally designed and

  20. Restoration of Non-carious Tooth Defects by Dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network - DPBRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Qvist, Vibeke; Bader, James D.; Rindal, D. Brad; Williams, O. Dale; Gewartowski, Daniel; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Litaker, Mark S.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify the reasons for placing restorations on non-carious tooth defects (NCTD) by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) dentists, and associated tooth, patient and dentist characteristics. Methods Data were collected on placement of 1,301 restorations due to NCTD by 178 DPBRN dentists. Information included: (1) main clinical occurrence or reason, other than dental caries, for restoring previously un-restored permanent tooth surfaces, (2) characteristics of patients who received treatment, (3) dentists’ and dental practices’ characteristics, (4) tooth and surfaces restored, and (5) restorative materials employed. Results Restorations were most often placed to treat abrasion, abfraction, and erosion (AAE) lesions (46%) and tooth fracture (31%). Patients older than 40 years received restorations mainly due to AAE (pcarious tooth surfaces among DPBRN practices. Premolar and anterior teeth of patients older than 40 years are most likely to receive restorations due to AAE; molars are most likely to receive restorations due to tooth fracture. Both types of NCTD are most often restored with RBC. PMID:22130438

  1. System for the pH-dependent release of a dye in model dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C; Sarrett, D; Batich, C D; Anusavice, K J

    1994-12-01

    We are developing a system for detecting recurrent caries under dental restorations. The controlled release of dyes under conditions of likely demineralization will alert the dentist to potential secondary caries. Production of acidic species is a characteristic of caries activity; hence, the system uses pH-sensitive polymers to release markers when the pH at the cavity wall of the restored tooth is below 6.5. The objectives of this investigation were to test the hypotheses that (1) the proposed system can be designed to release detectable marker continuously for at least six months in a simulated carious environment, and (2) the transient pH changes in the oral cavity caused by simulated dietary intake will not induce premature marker release from the pH-sensitive polymer placed beneath restorations. Two types of dye-loaded microspheres based on styrene, vinylpyridine, and divinylbenzene were prepared and placed on the floor of model cavity preparations made from an acrylic rod. Each model cavity was restored with a hybrid dental composite, placed in a vial with 5 mL of sodium-lactate/lactic-acid base buffer solution, and stored at 37 degrees C. Solutions of three different pH values were used: 2.86, 4.73, and 6.39. The dye release into storage media was monitored periodically with a UV/VIS spectrophotometer. Results showed that the duration could extend beyond six months for pH > 4.73, and that transient oral pH changes are not likely to result in premature dye release. The data indicate that it would take approximately 21 days for the acidic agent external to the restoration to initiate dye release from restored sites.

  2. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  3. The teaching of all-ceramic restorations in North American dental schools: materials and techniques employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, K B; Mjör, I A

    1997-01-01

    North American dental schools were surveyed to determine the types of clinical experiences and the extent of material use that predoctoral students encounter with restorative procedures that employ all-ceramic materials. The results were based on an overall response rate of 80% from the 64 surveyed schools. The majority (96%) of the 51 schools responding to the survey did offer an opportunity to become experienced with all-ceramic restorations. The selection of bases and liners for all-ceramic restorations included dentin adhesive agents, glass ionomer materials, and calcium hydroxide products, by a ratio of 5:4:1, respectively. The most commonly used impression material types were addition silicone and polyether. One or both of these materials were used by every school. Dicor glass ceramic and alumina core ceramic were the most commonly used materials by the responding schools for veneers, onlays, and crowns. Dicor glass ceramic and CAD/CAM ceramic were most commonly used for inlays. Crowns were made of more different all-ceramic material types than the other restoration classes. Fabrication of all-ceramic restorations was primarily by commercial laboratories and school technicians. Students have hands-on experience in the fabrication of all-ceramic restorations in 6% of the responding schools. Luting agents for all-ceramic restorations include dual-cured resin, in 96% of the responding schools, light-cured resin, 43%, and glass ionomer cement, 33%. Zinc phosphate, chemical-cured composite, and polycarboxylate were used by less than one fourth of the respondents. Only resin-based composite materials were used to lute ceramic veneers. Rubber dam was applied primarily during luting procedures involving all-ceramic inlays and onlays. Crowns and veneers were isolated by this method in less than 30% of the responding schools. Finishing procedures with all-ceramic restorations were accomplished with three or more instruments by 89% of the schools.

  4. Swept source optical coherence tomography for quantitative and qualitative assessment of dental composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Mayoral, Juan Ricardo; Hariri, Ilnaz; Bakhsh, Turki A.; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the utility of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for quantitative evaluation of dental composite restorations. The system (Santec, Japan) with a center wavelength of around 1300 nm and axial resolution of 12 μm was used to record data during and after placement of light-cured composites. The Fresnel phenomenon at the interfacial defects resulted in brighter areas indicating gaps as small as a few micrometers. The gap extension at the interface was quantified and compared to the observation by confocal laser scanning microscope after trimming the specimen to the same cross-section. Also, video imaging of the composite during polymerization could provide information about real-time kinetics of contraction stress and resulting gaps, distinguishing them from those gaps resulting from poor adaptation of composite to the cavity prior to polymerization. Some samples were also subjected to a high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) assessment; it was found that differentiation of smaller gaps from the radiolucent bonding layer was difficult with 3D μCT. Finally, a clinical imaging example using a newly developed dental SS-OCT system with an intra-oral scanning probe (Panasonic Healthcare, Japan) is presented. SS-OCT is a unique tool for clinical assessment and laboratory research on resin-based dental restorations. Supported by GCOE at TMDU and NCGG.

  5. Children's stress during a restorative dental treatment: assessment using salivary cortisol measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, S; Pince, S; Hekin, N

    1996-01-01

    Dental environment may be a source of stress for the young patient. Such stressful conditions may provoke fear in anxious children. It is well known that stress produces an activation adrenal steroid secretion. Among the methods for assessing child dental fear, measurement of salivary cortisol level is a simple method, because especially in children, sampling of saliva is easy, and cortisol levels in saliva closely mirror serum free cortisol levels, independent of salivary flow rate. For this study, the salivary cortisol levels of 8 children (mean age 5.6 yr) were measured receiving initial dental treatment. Saliva samples were collected via cotton rolls placed to the floor of the mouth at four stages; prior to treatment, during cavitation, placement of the liner and the restoration. Statistical comparison of the results were done by Student-t test. The increase in salivary cortisol levels during cavitation at the first and secondary appointments were significant (p0.05). The results of this study suggest that in restorative procedures, mostly it is the cavitation step that creates stress and anxiety in children. Knowledge of the most stressful condition may be helpful for the dentist to prepare the child to treatment steps.

  6. State-of-the-art techniques in operative dentistry: contemporary teaching of posterior composites in UK and Irish dental schools.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, C D

    2010-08-14

    Advances of composite systems and their application have revolutionised the management of posterior teeth affected by caries, facilitating a minimally invasive approach. Previous surveys have indicated that the teaching of posterior composites within dental schools was developing, albeit not keeping pace with clinical evidence and the development of increasingly predictable techniques and materials. Concurrently, surveys of dental practice indicate that dental amalgam still predominates as the \\'material of choice\\' for the restoration of posterior teeth within UK general dental practice. In light of such considerations, the aim of this study was to investigate current teaching of posterior composites in Irish and UK dental schools.

  7. Influence of immediate loading on provisional restoration in dental implant stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikbal, M.; Odang, R. W.; Indrasari, M.; Dewi, R. S.

    2017-08-01

    The success of dental implant treatment is determined by the primary stability at placement. One factor that could influence this stability is occlusal loading through provisional restoration. Two types of loading protocols are usually used: immediate and delayed loading. However, some controversies remain about the influence of occlusal loading on implant stability. Therefore, the influence of immediate loading on implant stability must be studied. An animal study was conducted by placing nine dental implants in the mandibular jaw of three Macaca fascicularis. Provisional restorations with various occlusal contacts (no, light, and normal contact) were placed on the implant. The implant stability was measured using the Ostell ISQ three times: immediately (baseline) and at the first and second months after implant placement. The implant stability between implants with no and normal occlusal contact as well as light and normal occlusal contact showed significant differences (p 0.05) in implant stability was seen at the baseline and the first and second months after implant placement for all occlusal contact groups. Immediate loading influenced the implant stability, and provisional restoration of implant without occlusal contact showed the highest implant stability.

  8. Fabrication of superhydrophobic coating for preventing microleakage in a dental composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Danfeng; Zhang, Yingchao; Li, Yao; Shi, Xiaoyu; Gong, Haihuan; Feng, Dan; Guo, Xiaowei; Shi, Zuosen; Zhu, Song; Cui, Zhanchen

    2017-09-01

    Superhydrophobic coatings were successfully fabricated by photo-crosslinked polyurethane (PU) and organic fluoro group-functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles (F-SiO2 NPs), and were introduced for preventing microleakage in a dental composite restoration. The F-SiO2 NPs possessed low surface energy and the PU can not only improve the mechanical stability but also promote F-SiO2 NPs to form multiscale structure, which could facilitate the properties of the as-prepared superhydrophobic coating by synergetic effect. The morphology and properties of the resulted superhydrophobic coatings with different PU/F-SiO2 ratios were studied using (1)H NMR spectrum, fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The results showed that the superhydrophobic coatings with low PU/F-SiO2 ratio (1:3) possessed excellent hierarchical papillae structure with trapped air pockets, high contact angle (160.1°), low sliding angle (superhydrophobic property, the as-prepared superhydrophobic coatings effectively prevented water permeation in resin composite restoration evaluation. This research may provide an effective method to solve the problem of microleakage and will efficiently increase the success rate of dental composite restorations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Optical properties of zirconia ceramics for esthetic dental restorations: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmiri, Reza; Standard, Owen Christopher; Hart, Judy N; Sorrell, Charles Christopher

    2017-09-16

    Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal has been used as a dental biomaterial for several decades because the fracture toughness and bend strength are increased by a stress-induced transformation-toughening mechanism. However, its esthetics are compromised by its poor translucency and grayish-white appearance. The purpose of the present systematic review was to assess information on the mechanical, chemical, and optical requirements of monolithic zirconia dental restorations. The following databases (2010 to 2015) were electronically searched: ProQuest, EMBASE, SciFinder, MRS Online Proceedings Library, Medline, Compendex, and Journal of the American Ceramic Society. The search was limited to English-language publications, in vitro studies, experimental reports, and modeling studies. The data from 57 studies were considered in order to review the intrinsic and extrinsic characteristics of zirconia and their effects on the optical properties. The materials and microstructural issues relevant to the esthetics and long-term stability of zirconia have been considered in terms of monolithic restorations, while there also are restorations specifically for esthetic applications. Although zirconia-toughened lithium silicate offers the best esthetic outcomes, transformation-toughened zirconia offers the best mechanical properties and long-term stability; cubic stabilized zirconia offers a potential compromise. The properties of these materials can be altered to some extent through the appropriate application of intrinsic (such as, annealing) and extrinsic (such as, shade-matching) parameters. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Translucency of human teeth and dental restorative materials and its clinical relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to review the translucency of human teeth and related dental materials that should be considered for the development of esthetic restorative materials. Translucency is the relative amount of light transmission or diffuse reflection from a substrate surface through a turbid medium. Translucency influences the masking ability, color blending effect, and the degree of light curing through these materials. Regarding the translucency indices, transmission coefficient, translucency parameter, and contrast ratio have been used, and correlations among these indices were confirmed. Translucency of human enamel and dentine increases in direct proportion to the wavelength of incident light in the visible light range. As for the translucency changes by aging, limited differences were reported in human dentine, while those for enamel proved to increase. There have been studies for the adjustment of translucency in dental esthetic restorative materials; the size and amount of filler and the kind of resin matrix were modified in resin composites, and the kind of ingredient and the degree of crystallization were modified in ceramics. Based on the translucency properties of human enamel and dentine, those of replacing restorative materials should be optimized for successful esthetic rehabilitation. Biomimetic simulation of the natural tooth microstructure might be a promising method.

  11. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. Method From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Results Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants. PMID:26696528

  12. Adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to dental implant and restorative materials in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser-Gerspach, Irmgard; Kulik, Eva M; Weiger, Roland; Decker, Eva-Maria; Von Ohle, Christiane; Meyer, Jürg

    2007-05-01

    Bacterial adhesion to tooth surfaces or dental materials starts immediately upon exposure to the oral environment. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to saliva-coated human enamel and dental materials - during a one-hour period - using an in vitro flow chamber system which mimicked the oral cavity. After fluorescent staining, the number of adhered cells and their vitality were recorded. The dental materials used were: titanium (Rematitan M), gold (Neocast 3), ceramic (Vita Omega 900), and composite (Tetric Ceram). The number of adherent bacterial cells was higher on titanium, gold, and ceramic surfaces and lower on composite as compared to enamel. As for the percentage of adherent vital cells, it was higher on enamel than on the restorative materials tested. These results suggested that variations in the number and vitality of the adherent pioneer oral bacteria, S. sanguinis, in the in vitro system depended on the surface characteristics of the substratum and the acquired salivary pellicle. The in vitro adhesion model used herein provided a simple and reproducible approach to investigate the impact of surface-modified dental materials on bacterial adhesion and vitality.

  13. Eighteenth and nineteenth century dental restoration, treatment and consequences in a British nobleman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, M; Chandler, J; Boyle, A; Kneller, P; Haslam, R

    2000-12-01

    This paper examines unusual eighteenth and nineteenth century dental treatment and its consequences, in a nobleman excavated from beneath St. Nicholas' Church, Sevenoaks, Kent, UK in the early 1990s. This rare archaeological case exhibits erosion of dental enamel on the labial surface of all the anterior dentition. A programme of historical research suggests that this might be attributed to the application of an acid-based dental tincture or the use of an abrasive substance to whiten the teeth. Palliative treatment for the consequence of this application was prescribed by Dr Robert Blake of Dublin. Further, it bears witness to three dental restorations, two of gold and one tin. The two gold (foil) fillings are an occlusal in the upper-right second molar and a cervical on the labial surface of the upper left canine. The tin filling is an occlusal in the upper left second molar. Excavation of the carious tissue appears to have been undertaken using a spoon shaped implement.

  14. The effect of oxidizing water on metallic restorations in the mouth: in vitro reduction behavior of oxidizing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, T

    1997-03-01

    Mouth-rinsing with oxydized water which contains electrolytically generated chlorine is known to hinder dental plaque formation and growth, but it also accelerates the deterioration of metallic restorations in the mouth. The present work consists of an in vitro study to elucidate the electrochemical reactions involved in the reduction of oxydized water on dental alloys through a systematic investigation of the potentiostatic polarization behavior of dental alloy electrodes. The five dental alloys selected for investigation were gold alloy, gold alloy containing platinum, silver-palladium-gold alloy, conventional amalgam and high copper amalgam. The corrosion potentials of all dental alloy electrodes were shown to be more noble in oxydized water than in 0.1N sodium chloride solution. The potential differences between the corrosion potentials were relatively small in the case of amalgam electrodes. The polarization curves for all of the dental alloy electrodes in oxydized water revealed reduction currents of chlorine, hypochlorous acid, dissolved oxygen and oxonium ion. The reduction of chlorine and hypochlorous acid started at a more noble potential than that of dissolved oxygen. The dental alloys studied, except the amalgams, did not dissolve excessively at the corrosion potentials in oxydized water.

  15. [Black or white--is amalgam 'out'? Part 1. Amalgam or composite: which of these 2 materials is the most deleterious?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, Roeland; Delmé, Katleen

    2008-01-01

    Dental amalgam containing mercury has been condemned because of its toxicity and hence to be damaging of harmful to the general health. It must be clear that many sensational, confusing and misleading reports have been published. Today there is evidence that dental amalgam in the oral cavity does not harm anyone's health. For those who are condemning amalgam there an abundant number of alarming reports taking into consideration the biologic effects of resin composites: methacrylate allergy for dentists and dental technicians, the three-finger-syndrome due to contact with liquid resin, allergic reactions at the level of the airways and breathing problems caused by dust particles (esp. composite particles after polishing procedures) have been described. It can be concluded that dental amalgam is not more toxic than resin composite in light of both patients' and dental care providers' health. Recent investigations demonstrated higher than expected health risks with resin composites.

  16. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient’s caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth–restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth–restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration–tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth. PMID:23750102

  17. Improving smile and dental esthetics: A comprehensive periodontal and restorative approach after orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eros Chaves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The esthetic demands in smile are continually rising, being thus, critical factors such as; dental midline, smile line, incisal embrasures, tooth position, width to length crown ratio, symmetry of contra-lateral gingival margins, and gingival display need to be taken into consideration. The aim of this case report is to describe the improvement of smile esthetics in a patient that after orthodontic therapy, presented excessive gingival display, asymmetric gingival margins, and shape altered upper right and left lateral incisors, which in turn compromised dental esthetics. The present clinical case required comprehensive treatment process, including proper diagnosis and excellent communication between the prosthodontist and periodontist in order to carry out successful esthetic crown lengthening and restorative dentistry. Results were followed-up for 2 years after the case completion. A pleasant smile was obtained, showing stability over time.

  18. Effects of titanium-dental restorative alloy galvanic couples on cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgardner, J D; Johansson, B I

    1998-01-01

    The potential exists for titanium and amalgams to become galvanically coupled in the oral cavity. While low galvanic corrosion rates have been measured in vivo for titanium-amalgam or mercury-free alloy couples, concerns exist over released corrosion products and adverse tissue responses. It was hypothesized in this study that coupling titanium to amalgams or gallium alloys increased the release of metallic corrosion products and decreased cellular activity and function. The effects of titanium coupled and uncoupled to a conventional amalgam, palladium-enriched spherical high copper amalgam, a dispersed type high copper amalgam, and a mercury-free gallium alloy were evaluated in 24-h cell culture tests. Viability, proliferation, and collagen synthesis were evaluated by the uptake of neutral red, 3H-thymidine, and immunoassay of procollagen, respectively, and compared to cells not exposed to any test material. The gallium alloy-titanium couple resulted in significant decreases in cellular viability, proliferation, and collagen synthesis as compared to the other coupled and uncoupled samples. Few differences in the cellular responses of the other coupled and uncoupled samples were observed. Atomic absorption analyses indicated increased release of metal ions from the amalgam and gallium alloy samples coupled to titanium as compared to their uncoupled condition, although the differences were not always significant. Galvanic corrosion of amalgam-titanium couples in the long term may become significant, and further research is needed. Coupling the gallium alloy to titanium may result in increased galvanic corrosion and cytotoxic responses.

  19. In vitro comparison of the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using two bonding agents--lutting glass ionomer and 4-META.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheela K; Sudeep P; Hegde V; Francis R; Bhat K

    1998-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth structure using 4-META has become an accepted clinical procedure. Glass ionomer cements possess the ability to bind to tooth structure as well as to the components of dental amalgam. The present in vitro study evaluates the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using luting glass ionomer as a bond mediating agent, and compares with that obtained using 4-META. Results indicate that it is possible to bond amalgam to tooth structure using a thin layer ...

  20. Dental trauma: restorative procedures using composite resin and mouthguards for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Filho, Paulo César de Freitas; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Simamoto, Paulo Cézar; Soares, Carlos José

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a step-by-step protocol for emergency care of a patient with a dentoalveolar injury in the anterior region of the mouth as well as the fabrication of a mouthguard to prevent future trauma. Dental trauma is one of the most serious oral health problems in active children and adolescents. Care of traumatized patients requires immediate initial emergency treatment followed by integrated procedures to restore damaged oral structures along with a subsequent trauma prevention strategy. Dentoalveolar injuries in the anterior region of the mouth are often characterized by tooth avulsion and coronal fracture. They are managed using procedures such as dental splinting, endodontic therapy with its unique characteristics, and restorative techniques to re-establish function and esthetics as well as protective mouthguards. A 16-year-old male presented with avulsion of his maxillary central incisors as a result of a direct, unintentional impact with an opponent during a basketball game. The teeth had been stored in physiological serum immediately following the injury and the patient received immediate care. On clinical examination, the right central incisor was fractured at the incisal third of the crown but no bone fractures were found. The teeth were reimplanted and splinted. The fractured right central incisor was restored following endodontic treatment and a mouthguard was fabricated for the patient. The dentist must be knowledgeable about the most efficient and suitable treatment for each traumatic scenario in order to provide appropriate care for dental injuries. Coordinated multi-disciplinary action is fundamental in the successful treatment of these injuries. The dental mouthguard is an effective device for protecting the teeth and supportive structures during physical activities and must be part of the protective equipment used by athletes. It is the responsibility of the dental professional to make parents, trainers, and athletic

  1. An estimation of fluoride release from various dental restorative materials at different pH: In vitro study

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    R N Bahadure

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the mid of 1980s, the cariostatic effect of fluoride ions on enamel caries had been demonstrated in many studies. The use of fluoride releasing dental restorative materials has seen increasing from many years for the specific purpose of leaching of fluoride into the surrounding tissues to inhibit secondary dental caries as well as prevention of caries in the newly erupted tooth. In the dental caries, acidic environment causes the demineralization of tooth structure and also affect the restorative margins of dental restoration. Aim: various restorative materials show different behavior in different pH conditions of oral cavity. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of the various restorative materials at different pH. Design: In this in vitro study, 30 samples of each dental restorative material were prepared and grouped into five with six samples in each group as per the pH of the solution 4.3, 4.6, 5.0, 5.5, and 6.2. All the samples were subjected to alternate cycling of the demineralizing solution (6 h and remineralizing solution (18 h for 15 days. Results: the fluoride release was measured by using fluoride ion specific electrode and digital ion analyzer. The result showed that the fluoride release rate was significantly higher in first day and reduced after third day to nearly constant level. At pH 4.3, the fluoride release was highest and lowest at pH 6.2. Conclusion: the Amalgomer CR showed the highest fluoride release among all the experimental dental restorative materials.

  2. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams

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    Saied Mostafa Moazzami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs. Materials and Method: Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR/ liner/ None (No, on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No. In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB, Clearfil S3 (S3, Single Bond (SB and Varnish (V. Each main group (n=6 was divided into two subgroups (n=3 according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA or spherical Tytin (Tyt. The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP, and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. Results: The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates. Conclusion: Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams. Keywords ● Electrochemical Test ● Dental Amalgam ● Corrosion ● Self-etch adhesive;

  3. Behaviour of general dental practitioners in Germany regarding posterior restorations with flowable composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Rainer; Pfefferkorn, Frank; Hickel, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Because the recommendation to use flowables for posterior restorations is still a matter of debate, the objective of this study was to determine in a nationwide survey in Germany how frequently, for what indications, and for what reasons, German dentists use flowable composites in posterior teeth. In addition, the acceptance of a simplified filling technique for posterior restorations using a low stress flowable composite was evaluated. Completed questionnaires from all over Germany were returned by 1,449 dentists resulting in a response rate of 48.5%; 78.6% of whom regularly used flowable composites for posterior restorations. The most frequent indications were cavity lining (80.1%) and small Class I fillings (74.2%). Flowables were less frequently used for small Class II fillings (22.7%) or other indications (13.6%). Most frequent reasons given for the use of flowables in posterior teeth were the prevention of voids (71.7%) and superior adaptation to cavity walls (72.9%), whereas saving time was considered less important (13.8%). Based on the subjective opinion of the dentists the simplified filling technique seemed to deliver advantages compared to the methods used to date particularly with regard to good cavity adaptation and ease of use. In conclusion, resin composites are the standard material type used for posterior restorations by general dental practitioners in Germany and most dentists use flowable composites as liners.

  4. Defective dental restorations: to repair or not to repair? Part 2: All-ceramics and porcelain fused to metal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Igor R; Jagger, Daryll C; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2011-04-01

    With the increasing use of ceramics in restorative dentistry, and trends to extend restoration longevity through the use of minimal interventive techniques, dental practitioners should be familiar with the factors that may influence the decision either to repair or replace fractured metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations and, also, the materials and techniques available to repair these restorations. This second of two papers addresses the possible modes of failure of ceramic restorations and outlines indications and techniques in this developing aspect of restoration repair in clinical practice. The repair of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations is a reliable low-cost, low-risk technique that may be of value for the management of loss or fracture of porcelain from a crown or bridge in clinical practice.

  5. Dental materials for primary dentition: are they suitable for occlusal restorations? A two-body wear study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, D; Belli, R; Krämer, N; Petschelt, A; Lohbauer, U

    2015-04-01

    This was to evaluate the wear resistance of different materials, compomers, resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs), glass ionomer cements (GICs), used for posterior restorations in primary teeth and to compare the results with the reference material, amalgam. Eight specimens of each material were subjected to two-body wear test, using a chewing simulator. The wear region of each material was examined under a profilometer, measuring the vertical loss (μm) and the volume loss (mm(3)) of the materials. The results showed significant differences of vertical loss and volume loss of the test materials (p < 0.001). Amalgam had the highest wear resistance. Twinky Star (compomer) had the lowest vertical loss and volume loss. There was no significant difference of vertical loss among compomers, Dyract Extra, Dyract Flow and Dyract Posterior. Riva Self Cure (GIC) had no statistically significant difference compared with the compomers (except Twinky Star). No statistically significant difference was found also between Equia (GIC) and Ketac Moral (GIC) with Dyract Extra (Compomer). RMGICs were found to have the lowest wear resistance. For the statistical analysis, the PASW 20.0 (SPSS Statistics, IBM, Chicago) package was used. Means and standard deviations were measured with descriptive statistics and analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Compomers and some GICs, that have moderate wear resistance, may be sufficient for occlusal restorations in primary dentitions.

  6. Determining Optimal Fluorescent Agent Concentrations in Dental Adhesive Resins for Imaging the Tooth/Restoration Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bim Júnior, Odair; Cebim, Marco A; Atta, Maria T; Machado, Camila M; Francisconi-Dos-Rios, Luciana F; Wang, Linda

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent dyes like Rhodamine B (RB) have been used to identify the spatial distribution of adhesive restorative materials in the tooth/restoration interface. Potential effects of the addition of RB to dental adhesives were addressed in the past, but no further information is available on how to determine suitable concentrations of RB in these bonding agents for imaging in the confocal laser scanning microscope. This study provides systematical strategies for adding RB to viscous dental adhesive resins, focusing on the determination of the lowest range of dye concentrations necessary to achieve an acceptable image of the dentin/adhesive interface. It was demonstrated that optimized images of the resin distribution in dentin can be produced with 0.1-0.02 mg/mL of RB in the (tested) adhesives. Our approaches took into account aspects related to the dye concentration, photophysical parameters in different host media, specimen composition and morphology to develop a rational use of the fluorescent agent with the resin-based materials. Information gained from this work can help optimize labeling methods using dispersions of low-molecular-weight dyes in different monomer blend systems.

  7. Education-related inequality in restorative dental treatment need over 11 years in two areas of Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raittio, Eero; Vehkalahti, Miira M; Helminen, Sari; Suominen, Anna L

    2017-09-11

    This study aimed to analyse education-related inequality in restorative dental treatment need among adults aged 30 years and older living in Northern and Southern Finland in 2000 and 2011. Data were taken from the Health 2000 and 2011 population-based follow-up surveys, including information gathered by interviews and clinical dental examination. Final effective sample sizes were 2423 people in 2000 and 1192 people in 2011. Restorative dental treatment need was measured with number of decayed and/or fractured teeth (DT + FrT). Education-related inequality in number of DT + FrT and factors explaining it were analysed using the Poisson regression analysis, relative index of inequality and slope index of inequality. Average number of DT + FrT decreased from 2000 to 2011. Absolute and relative education-related inequalities in them decreased approximately 50% and 25% from 2000 to 2011, respectively. Tooth brushing frequency and time since last dental visit explained approximately 30%-40% of the education-related inequality. The contribution of time since last dental visit to the education-related inequality was smaller in 2011 than in 2000. It seems that, from 2000 to 2011, the need for restorative dental treatment decreased simultaneously with the education-related inequality in it among adults aged 30 years and older living in Northern and Southern Finland. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mercury contamination: occupational risk of the dental surgeon

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    Cristiane K. KAMETANI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Mercury is a widely used material in dental practice. However, it is one of the most dangerous environmental and occupational pollutants. Thus, the aim of this study is to analyze several aspects of mercury contamination, based on a literature review, in order to demonstrate the risks related to mishandling of mercury. Literature review: Some recommendations are stated regarding the handling and application of mercury in the dental office environment, once aesthetic materials have been replacing a large number of amalgam restorations. This could lead to mercury vapor exposure, a chemical risk to the health that many dental professionals do not always consider. Conclusion: Mercury can produce local or systemic toxic effects on the organism through vapor inhalation during amalgam preparation or during its replacement.

  9. Significant mercury deposits in internal organs following the removal of dental amalgam, & development of pre-cancer on the gingiva and the sides of the tongue and their represented organs as a result of inadvertent exposure to strong curing light (used to solidify synthetic dental filling material) & effective treatment: a clinical case report, along with organ representation areas for each tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Y; Shimotsuura, Y; Fukuoka, A; Fukuoka, H; Nomoto, T

    1996-01-01

    Because of the reduced effectiveness of antibiotics against bacteria (e.g. Chlamydia trachomatis, alpha-Streptococcus, Borrelia burgdorferi, etc.) and viruses (e.g. Herpes Family Viruses) in the presence of mercury, as well as the fact that the 1st author has found that mercury exists in cancer and pre-cancer cell nuclei, the presence of dental amalgam (which contains about 50% mercury) in the human mouth is considered to be a potential hazard for the individual's health. In order to solve this problem, 3 amalgam fillings were removed from the teeth of the subject of this case study. In order to fill the newly created empty spaces in the teeth where the amalgams had formerly existed, a synthetic dental-filling substance was introduced and to solidify the synthetic substance, curing light (wavelength range reportedly between 400-520 nm) was radiated onto the substance in order to accelerate the solidifying process by photo-polymerization. In spite of considerable care not to inhale mercury vapor or swallow minute particles of dental amalgam during the process of removing it by drilling, mercury entered the body of the subject. Precautions such as the use of a rubber dam and strong air suction, as well as frequent water suctioning and washing of the mouth were insufficient. Significant deposits of mercury, previously non-existent, were found in the lungs, kidneys, endocrine organs, liver, and heart with abnormal low-voltage ECGs (similar to those recorded 1-3 weeks after i.v. injection of radioisotope Thallium-201 for Cardiac SPECT) in all the limb leads and V1 (but almost normal ECGs in the precordial leads V2-V6) the day after the procedures were performed. Enhanced mercury evaporation by increased temperature and microscopic amalgam particles created by drilling may have contributed to mercury entering the lungs and G.I. system and then the blood circulation, creating abnormal deposits of mercury in the organs named above. Such mercury contamination may then

  10. An experimental bioactive dental ceramic for metal-ceramic restorations: Textural characteristics and investigation of the mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Manda, Marianthi; Kavouras, Panagiotis; Triantafyllidis, Konstantinos S; Stefanidou, Maria; Koidis, Petros; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the textural characteristics of an experimental sol-gel derived feldspathic dental ceramic, which has already been proven bioactive and the investigation of its flexural strength through Weibull Statistical Analysis. The null hypothesis was that the flexural strength of the experimental and the commercial dental ceramic would be of the same order, resulting in a dental ceramic with apatite forming ability and adequate mechanical integrity. Although the flexural strength of the experimental ceramics was not statistically significant different compared to the commercial one, the amount of blind pores due to processing was greater. The textural characteristics of the experimental ceramic were in accordance with the standard low porosity levels reported for dental ceramics used for fixed prosthetic restorations. Feldspathic dental ceramics with typical textural characteristics and advanced mechanical properties as well as enhanced apatite forming ability can be synthesized through the sol-gel method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of dental bleaching on marginal leakage of Class V restorations

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    Andréia Cristina Ramos Dorini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the in vitro effect of bleaching performed in the dental office and waiting time on the degree of microleakage in class V cavities with margins in enamel, restored with resin composite. Methods: Forty-five human third molars were used, in which the vestibular faces were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated with LED and the palatine faces were not bleached (control. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups with 15 teeth in each: Group 1, restored immediately after bleaching; Group 2, seven days after bleaching; and Group 3, fourteen days after bleaching. After cavity preparation, 35% phosphoric acid, Adper Single Bond 2 adhesive (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Mn, USA, and resin composite Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA were applied. The teeth were thermal cycled and sealed with red nail polish on the bleached faces and blue on the non bleached faces, except for 1mm around the restored region. The samples were classified according to the following scores: 0 = no leakage, 1 = minimum leakage (less than 1 / 3 the length of the wall, 2 = moderate leakage (1/3 to 2/3 of the wall and 3 = extensive leakage (over 2/3 of the wall. The data were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test at a level of significance of 5%. Results: The restorative procedure immediately after bleaching resulted in statistically higher microleakage values (p 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results, it is advisable to wait at least 7 days after bleaching to make the definitive restoration.

  12. Accuracy of intraoral and extraoral digital data acquisition for dental restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Rudolph

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The computer-aided design (CAD and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM process chain for dental restorations starts with taking an impression of the clinical situation. For this purpose, either extraoral digitization of gypsum models or intraoral digitization can be used. Despite the increasing use of dental digitizing systems, there are only few studies on their accuracy. Objective This study compared the accuracy of various intraoral and extraoral digitizing systems for dental CAD/CAM technology. Material and Methods An experimental setup for three-dimensional analysis based on 2 prepared ceramic master dies and their corresponding virtual CAD-models was used to assess the accuracy of 10 extraoral and 4 intraoral optical non-contact dental digitizing systems. Depending on the clinical procedure, 10 optical measurements of either 10 duplicate gypsum dies (extraoral digitizing or directly of the ceramic master dies (intraoral digitizing were made and compared with the corresponding CAD-models. Results The digitizing systems showed differences in accuracy. However, all topical systems were well within the benchmark of ±20 µm. These results apply to single tooth measurements. Conclusions Study results are limited, since only single teeth were used for comparison. The different preparations represent various angles and steep and parallel opposing tooth surfaces (incisors. For most digitizing systems, the latter are generally the most difficult to capture. Using CAD/CAM technologies, the preparation angles should not be too steep to reduce digitizing errors. Older systems might be limited to a certain height or taper of the prepared tooth, whereas newer systems (extraoral as well as intraoral digitization do not have these limitations.

  13. Matching the optical properties of direct esthetic dental restorative materials to those of human enamel and dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragain, James Carlton, Jr.

    One of the goals of the restorative dentist is to restore the appearance of the natural dentition. Clinical matching of teeth and restorative materials are seldom accurate and shade selection techniques are subjective. The first specific aim of this research was to characterize the optical absorption and scattering that occurs within enamel, dentin, and composite resin and compomer restorative materials and to relate those phenomena to translucency and color. The second aim was to evaluate small color differences among composite restorative materials which would be detectable by humans. The last aim was to lay the foundation for developing an improved model of specifying layers of dental restorative materials in order to match the translucency and color to those of human enamel. The Kubelka-Munk theory was validated for enamel, dentin, and the restorative materials. These tissues and materials were then characterized in terms of their color parameters. Tooth cores were also characterized in terms of color space parameters. Human subjects were evaluated for their abilities to discriminate small color differences in the dental composite resin materials. The following conclusions were derived from this study: (1) Kubelka-Munk theory accurately predicts the diffuse reflectance spectra of enamel, dentin, and the direct esthetic dental restorative materials studied. (2) Scattering and absorption coefficients of the dental tissues and esthetic restorative materials can be directly calculated from diffuse reflectance measurements of a uniformly thick slab of tissue/material using black and white backings and the appropriate refractive index. (3) For tooth cores, there is a positive correlation between L* and b* and a negative correlation between L* and a*. (4) The range of translucency parameters for the restorative materials studied does not match those of enamel and dentin. (5) None of the shades of the dental composite resin restorative materials studied fit into the

  14. [High-frequency dental surgery near metal reconstructions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, H; Mausberg, R; Fastenmeier, K; Lohr, G

    1994-01-01

    Dental electrosurgery carries the risk of incidental contact between the active electrode and metallic restorations. So far, on-line measurements of basic physical parameters during dental electrosurgery have not been performed under realistic conditions. The aim of our experimental study in pig jaws was to describe the physical phenomena more closely. 86 teeth in the jaws of freshly slaughtered pigs received occlusal amalgam fillings. Using 3 different units electrosurgical procedures were performed adjacent to the fillings. Voltage, current, impedance and power output were registered using a computer-controlled measuring system with high temporal resolution and broad dynamic range. The impedances of the amalgam fillings ranged from 0.5 to 9 k omega, with half of them being in the lower range of 0.5 to 1.5 k omega. During contact to amalgam fillings the dental electrosurgical unit had a high power output. Contact to fillings with low impedance yielded a power output up to 50 W. The other two electrosurgical units were equipped with different power output control systems thus preventing high power output during contact to metallic restorations. In conclusion, dental electrosurgery should be improved by units with dynamic power output control.

  15. New approach in paediatric dentistry: ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of restorative dental materials. Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzano, G F; Cantile, T; Coda, M; Ingenito, A

    2015-09-01

    The ultrasonic inspection is a non invasive method which is very developed in the industrial field, for the non-destructive evaluation of materials, and in the medical field, for the ultrasound diagnostic analysis. In paediatric dentistry the most widely used non- destructive evaluation is the X-ray technique. Radiographs are valuable aids in the oral health care of infants, children, adolescents, allowing dentists to diagnose and treat oral diseases that cannot be detected during a visual clinical examination. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyse the ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (UT-NDE) technique to inspect both dental materials internal structure and the form and position of internal defects in order to obtain a diagnostic method, free of ionising radiations, in paediatric dentistry. Moreover the ultrasonic inspection (UT) could be a rapid method of diagnosis in uncooperative paediatric patients. Study Design: Experimental samples were manufactured with the characteristics of a large composite or glass ionomer cement paediatric dental restoration, in terms of either size or operative technique used. Characteristics of the common restorations were analysed and reproduced in vitro, using the same operative conditions, also adding operative defects into some samples. All the samples were subjected to an innovative UT test using the pulse echo immersion scanning technique. Both C-scans and full volume scans were carried out during the experimental programme. To enhance the data obtained from the UT scan, a digital system (Ecus Inspection software) for signal detection, archiving, processing and displaying was used. UT images showed the presence of internal defects in the dental materials. It was also possible to inspect very thin discontinuity such as the one represented by the fluid resin. In order to execute the statistical analysis, the values of electric voltage measured in five higher white points and in five higher grey points of the pictures

  16. Success of Dental Treatments under Behavior Management, Sedation and General Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Sigalit; Costa, Liora; Peretz, Benjamin

    To present comparative study aims to assist the practitioner to choose between behavior modification (BM) techniques, pharmacologic sedation (N2O-O2 alone or combined with midazolam 0.5 mg/ kg) or routine general anesthesia (GA) for the most successful approach in enabling pediatric dental care. Dental records of 56 children treated in a university dental clinic between 2006-2016 were reviewed, and data on age, gender, required treatment (amalgam restorations, composite restorations, pulpotomy, and stainless steel crowns [SSC]), treatment approaches and therapeutic success at final follow-up were retrieved. Treatment under GA had the best success rates compared to both BM and pharmacologic sedation. N2O-O2 alone had a 6.1-fold greater risk of failure compared to N2O-O2+midazolam (p- <0.008). Amalgam restorations had a 2.61-fold greater risk of failure than SSC (p- <0.008). The GA mode yielded significantly greater success than the N2O-O2 mode alone. There were no significant differences in success rates between GA and combined midazolam 0.5 mg/kg+N2O-O2. When choosing restoration material, it is important to remember the high success rate of SSC compared to amalgam restoration.

  17. [Microleakage of four different amalgam binding systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, T G; Grobler, S R; Rossouw, R J; van Wyk Kotze, T J; Grobler-Rabie, A

    2001-02-01

    This-study was undertaken to evaluate and compare microleakage in class V cavities in human teeth which were lined with Amalgambond Plus with HPA (Parkell, USA), Optibond Solo (Kerr, U.S.A.), Fuji Plus (GC Corporation, Japan) and Prime & Bond 2.1 (Dentsply, Switzerland), and then restored with Logic amalgam (SDI Australia). The restored teeth were thermocycled in basic fuchsin dye, sectioned, and evaluated for dye penetration. The interdiffusion zones were viewed in a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The results showed that no bonding system could totally eliminate microleakage. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between Amalgambond Plus with HPA and Prime & Bond 2.1, Fuji Plus as well as Optibond Solo, for both the enamel and dentine sides. No significant differences were found between Prime & Bond 2.1, Fuji Plus and Optibond Solo, for both the enamel and dentine sides. Amalgambond Plus showed significantly more leakage at dentine sides while Prime & Bond 2.1 showed significantly more leakage at enamel sides. The CLSM revealed hybrid layers of different thicknesses, resin penetration into tubules, as well as resin incorporation within the spherical particles of the amalgam. Optibond Solo, Fuji Plus and Prime & Bond 2.1 can serve to improve the marginal seal of amalgam restorations.

  18. Contraction behaviors of dental composite restorations--finite element investigation with DIC validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Fen; Chang, Chih-Han; Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of cavity configuration on the polymerization shrinkage and stress of light-cured composite restorations by combining local strain measurement and a finite element analysis (FEA). Dental mesio-occluso-distal cavities of various widths and depths (each for 2 vs. 4 mm), representing different configuration factors, were prepared on extracted molars. The displacements of the bonded tooth cusps and cavity floors, caused by polymerization shrinkage of composite restorations, were assessed utilizing a digital-image-correlation (DIC) technique. The cervical marginal microleakage was investigated by examining the resin replicas of these restorations under SEM. The local material properties of the polymerized composite along the curing depth were defined by the nanoindentation test and applied in the subsequent FEA. In the FEA, four models were generated to correspond with the experimental restorations. In the DIC measurement results, the 4(w)×4(D) mm cavity presented the greatest values of inward displacements at the cusp and floor. The cavity depth, rather than the cavity width, was found to significantly correlate to the floor deformation, the location of shrinkage centers, and also the cervical microleakage ratio. The FEA simulation results showed that the 2(w)×4(D) mm cavity presented the maximal von Mises and principal stress located respectively on the cervical margins and cavity floor. Additional safety factor analysis showed a high risk of bond failure over the cavity floor in the 4-mm deep cavity. With the experimental validation, the simulation revealed that the cavity depth was significant to the formation of contraction stress and the incidence of interfacial debonding.

  19. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-11-01

    Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers' instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P ceramic restorations, clinicians should try to minimize marginal gaps in order to reduce restoration failure. In situations where there are doubts about perfect marginal adaptation, the use of Fuji Plus cement may be helpful.

  20. Effects of build direction on the mechanical properties of 3D-printed complete coverage interim dental restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alharbi, N.; Osman, R.; Wismeijer, D.

    2016-01-01

    Statement of problem. The application of 3-dimensional printing technology is emerging in dentistry and is being increasingly used to fabricate dental restorations. To date, scientific evidence is lacking regarding the effect of different factors on the mechanical properties of the printed restorati

  1. Effects of build direction on the mechanical properties of 3D-printed complete coverage interim dental restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alharbi, N.; Osman, R.; Wismeijer, D.

    2016-01-01

    Statement of problem. The application of 3-dimensional printing technology is emerging in dentistry and is being increasingly used to fabricate dental restorations. To date, scientific evidence is lacking regarding the effect of different factors on the mechanical properties of the printed

  2. Improving the strength of amalgams by including steel fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Calvin T. [Hendrix College, Conway, AR 72032 (United States); Van Hoose, James R. [Siemens, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); McGill, Preston B. [Marshall Space Flight Center, EM20, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Grugel, Richard N., E-mail: richard.n.grugel@nasa.gov [Marshall Space Flight Center, EM30, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A room temperature liquid Ga-In alloy was successfully substituted for mercury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physically sound amalgams with included steel fibers can be made. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small volume fraction inclusion of fibers increased strength by {approx}20%. - Abstract: Mercury amalgams, due to their material properties, are widely and successfully used in dental practice. They are, however, also well recognized as having poor tensile strength. With the possibility of expanding amalgam applications it is demonstrated that tensile strength can be increased some 20% by including a small amount of steel fibers. Furthermore, it is shown that mercury can be replaced with a room temperature liquid gallium-indium alloy. Processing, microstructures, and mechanical test results of these novel amalgams are presented and discussed in view of means to further improve their properties.

  3. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  4. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined.

  5. Surface Morphology and Tooth Adhesion of a Novel Nanostructured Dental Restorative Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salerno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel dental restorative composite based on nanostructured micro-fillers of anodic porous alumina has been proposed. While its bulk properties are promising thanks to decreased aging and drug delivery capabilities, its surface properties are still unknown. Here we investigated the surface morphology and the adhesion to tooth dentin of this composite as prepared. For comparison, we used two commercial composites: Tetric EVO Flow (Ivoclar and Enamel HRi Plus (Micerium. The surface morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy and the adhesion strength by tensile tests. The experimental composite is rougher than the commercial composites, with root mean square roughness of ~549 nm against 170–511 nm, and presents an adhesion strength of ~15 MPa against 19–21 MPa. These results show at the same time some proximity to the commercial composites, but also the need for optimization of the experimental material formulation.

  6. Amalgam tattoo: a cause of sinusitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizi, José Luiz Santos; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the toxicity of silver amalgam fillings, which have been used over the centuries in Dentistry. Amalgam particles may accidentally and/or traumatically be embedded into the submucosal tissue during placement of a restoration and perpetuate in such area. This article presents a case of amalgam tattoo and investigates whether it is related to the patient's repeated episodes of sinusitis. The patient was a 46-year-old woman with a 2 mm diameter radiopaque lesion in the right oral mucosa detected on a panoramic radiograph and presented as a black macula clinically. A complete surgical resection was carried out. The histopathological examination revealed deposits of dark-brownish pigments lining the submucosal tissue with adjacent lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate and multinucleated giant cells phagocyting pigments. There was a negative staining for both iron and melanin. One year after lesion removal, the patient reported that the sinusitis crises had ceased after repeated episodes for years. It may be speculated that the inflammatory process related to amalgam tattoo seems to lead to a local immune response that causes sinusitis because it enhances the human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) tissue expression.

  7. Amalgam tattoo: a cause of sinusitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Santos Parizi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been paid to the toxicity of silver amalgam fillings, which have been used over the centuries in Dentistry. Amalgam particles may accidentally and/or traumatically be embedded into the submucosal tissue during placement of a restoration and perpetuate in such area. This article presents a case of amalgam tattoo and investigates whether it is related to the patient's repeated episodes of sinusitis. The patient was a 46-year-old woman with a 2 mm diameter radiopaque lesion in the right oral mucosa detected on a panoramic radiograph and presented as a black macula clinically. A complete surgical resection was carried out. The histopathological examination revealed deposits of dark-brownish pigments lining the submucosal tissue with adjacent lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate and multinucleated giant cells phagocyting pigments. There was a negative staining for both iron and melanin. One year after lesion removal, the patient reported that the sinusitis crises had ceased after repeated episodes for years. It may be speculated that the inflammatory process related to amalgam tattoo seems to lead to a local immune response that causes sinusitis because it enhances the human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR tissue expression.

  8. Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: improved resin adhesive penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentine. Prepared dentine surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6mA, treatment time 30s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5s, and light-cured for 20s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentine, adhesive/dentine interface, and adhesive layer at 1-μm spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentine interfacial morphology. The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentine interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentine interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentine has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to optimize adhesion between tooth substrate and

  9. Effect of curing with a plasma light on the properties of polymerizable dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, B J; Nicholson, J W

    2001-06-01

    Specimens of light-curable dental restoratives have been prepared using either a conventional dental curing lamp (for 20 or 30 s) or a plasma light (for 1 or 2 s). The specimens were then stored in water until their mass equilibrated, then dried to constant mass. Most specimens lost material in this process but the losses in all specimens cured with the plasma light were significantly greater than those cured with the conventional lights (P cure times gave slightly reduced losses in water in most cases. The specimens were then returned to water and allowed to re-equilibrate and their equilibrium water uptake determined. There was no simple trend in this latter property because elution of loosely bound hydrophilic species may have resulted in a less hydrophilic specimen, whose equilibrium water content was therefore correspondingly lower. Overall, the losses through dissolution in water suggest that plasma curing is less effective for these materials than conventional light curing, as it probably results in material with lower molar mass. The losses for the resin-modified glass-ionomer were much greater than for other materials, and it was concluded that the more rapid polymerization with plasma light caused a significant inhibitation of the acid-base part of the setting process. These findings suggest that long-term durability of materials may be compromised by employing plasma light cure rather than a conventional cure system and further studies of this point are recommended.

  10. The role of the ionomer glass component in polyacid-modified composite resin dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusei, Gabriel O; Deb, Sanjukta; Nicholson, John W

    2004-07-01

    In order to model the processes that occur within polyacid-modified composite resin ("compomer") dental restoratives, a series of experiments has been carried out with silanated and silane-free ionomer glass G338, and silanated and silane-free unreactive glass (Raysorb T-4000). In an acid-base reaction with dental grade aqueous maleic acid-acrylic acid copolymer solution, the setting time of the silanted G338 was found to be 9 min, compared with 5 min for the silane-free glass. Inclusion of each glass in an experimental composite resin system showed that the formulations which contained G338 absorbed more water than the formulations which contained Raysorb T-4000, regardless of whether or not the glass was silanted. Biaxial flexure strength was superior for experimental composites containing Raysorb T-4000, with highest results being obtained with the silanated glass. Overall these results demonstrate that silanation of the filler is essential for optimal physical properties but that, for the ionomer glass, it inhibits the acid-base reaction. The presence of ionomer glass led to an increase in water uptake compared with the unreactive glass, regardless of the presence of silane.

  11. Oral and dental restoration of wide alveolar cleft using distraction osteogenesis and temporary anchorage devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmiel, Adi; Emodi, Omri; Gutmacher, Zvi; Blumenfeld, Israel; Aizenbud, Dror

    2013-12-01

    Closure of large alveolar clefts and restoration by a fixed bridge supported by implants is a challenge in cleft alveolus treatment. A major aesthetic concern with distraction osteogenesis is obtaining a predictable position of the implant in relation to the newly generated bony alveolar ridge. We describe the treatment of a large cleft alveolus and palate reconstruction by distraction osteogenesis utilizing temporary anchorage devices (TADs) followed by a fixed implant-supported bridge. The method consists of segmental bone transport by distraction osteogenesis using a bone-borne distractor to minimize the alveolar cleft, followed by closure of the residual small defect by bone grafting three months later. During the active transport distraction, TADs were used exerting multidirectional forces to control the distraction vector forward and laterally for better interarch relation. A vertical alveolar distraction of the newly reconstructed bone of 15 mm facilitated optimal implant placement. The endosseous implants were osteointegrated and supported a fixed dental prosthesis. In conclusion, the large cleft alveolus defect was repaired in three dimensions by distraction osteogenesis assisted by TADs, and the soft tissues expanded simultaneously. Endosseous implants were introduced in the newly reconstructed bone for a fixed dental prosthesis enabling, rehabilitation of aesthetics, eating and speaking.

  12. Systematic approach to preparing ceramic-glass composites with high translucency for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Humberto N; Chimanski, Afonso; Cesar, Paulo F

    2015-10-01

    Ceramic composites are promising materials for dental restorations. However, it is difficult to prepare highly translucent composites due to the light scattering that occurs in multiphase ceramics. The objective of this work was to verify the effectiveness of a systematic approach in designing specific glass compositions with target properties in order to prepare glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency. First it was necessary to calculate from literature data the viscosity of glass at the infiltration temperature using the SciGlass software. Then, a glass composition was designed for targeted viscosity and refractive index. The glass of the system SiO2-B2O3-Al2O3-La2O3-TiO2 prepared by melting the oxide raw materials was spontaneously infiltrated into porous alumina preforms at 1200°C. The optical properties were evaluated using a refractometer and a spectrophotometer. The absorption and scattering coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model. The light transmittance of prepared composite was significantly higher than a commercial ceramic-glass composite, due to the matching of glass and preform refractive indexes which decreased the scattering, and also to the decrease in absorption coefficient. The proposed systematic approach was efficient for development of glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency, which benefits include the better aesthetic performance of the final prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  14. Retrospective analysis of dental implants placed and restored by advanced prosthodontic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barias, Pamela A; Lee, Damian J; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Campbell, Stephen D; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2013-02-01

    The purposes of this retrospective clinical review were to: (1) describe the demographics of implant patients, types of implant treatment and implant-supported prostheses in an Advanced Education in Prosthodontic Program, (2) evaluate the survival rate of dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents from 2006 to 2008, and (3) analyze the relationship between resident year of training and implant survival rate. All patients who received dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents from January 2006 to October of 2008 in the Advanced Prosthodontic Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry were selected for this study. Age, gender, implant diameter, length, implant locations, surgical and restorative detail, and year of prosthodontic residency training were collected and analyzed. Life-table and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed based on implants overall, locations, year of training, and use of a computer-generated surgical guide. A Logrank statistic was performed between implant survival and year of prosthodontic residency training, location, and use of computer-generated surgical guide (α= 0.05). Three hundred and six implants were placed, and of these, seven failed. Life-table and Kaplan-Meier analyses computed a cumulative survival rate (CSR) of 97% for overall implants and implants placed with a computer-generated surgical guide. No statistical difference was found in implant survival rates as a function of year of training (P= 0.85). Dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents had a CSR comparable to previously published studies by other specialties. The year of prosthodontic residency training and implant failure rate did not have any significant relationship. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Restorative treatment thresholds for interproximal primary caries based on radiographic images: findings from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Heft, Marc W

    2009-01-01

    with restorative intervention in lesions that have penetrated only the enamel surface. This study surveyed dentists from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) who had reported doing at least some restorative dentistry (n = 901). Dentists were asked to indicate the depth at which they would restore...... that they would restore a proximal enamel lesion, while 24% would do so once the lesion had reached into the outer third of the dentin. For a low caries risk patient, 39% of respondents reported that they would restore an enamel lesion, and 54% would do so once the lesion had reached into the outer third...... of the dentin. In multivariate analyses that accounted for dentist and practice characteristics, dentists in large group practices were less likely to intervene surgically for enamel caries, regardless of patient's caries risk....

  16. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs other posterior restorations. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up in comparison of other restorations.

  17. State-of-the-art techniques in operative dentistry: contemporary teaching of posterior composites in UK and Irish dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Frazier, K B; McConnell, R J; Blum, I R; Wilson, N H F

    2010-08-14

    Advances of composite systems and their application have revolutionised the management of posterior teeth affected by caries, facilitating a minimally invasive approach. Previous surveys have indicated that the teaching of posterior composites within dental schools was developing, albeit not keeping pace with clinical evidence and the development of increasingly predictable techniques and materials. Concurrently, surveys of dental practice indicate that dental amalgam still predominates as the 'material of choice' for the restoration of posterior teeth within UK general dental practice. In light of such considerations, the aim of this study was to investigate current teaching of posterior composites in Irish and UK dental schools. An online questionnaire which sought information in relation to the current teaching of posterior composites was developed and distributed to the 17 established Irish and UK dental schools with undergraduate teaching programmes in late 2009. Completed responses were received from all 17 schools (response rate = 100%). All 17 schools taught the placement of occlusal and two-surface occlusoproximal composites in premolar and permanent molar teeth. Two schools did not teach placement of three-surface occlusoproximal composites in either premolars or molars. In their preclinical courses, ten schools taught posterior composites before teaching dental amalgams. Fifty-five percent of posterior restorations placed by dental students were of composite (range = 10-90%) and 44% amalgam (range = 10-90%), indicating an increase of 180% in the numbers of posterior composites placed over the past five years. Diversity was noted in the teaching of clinical techniques and students at different schools are trained with different composites and bonding systems. Some cause for concern was noted in the teaching of certain techniques that were not in keeping with existing best evidence, such as the teaching of transparent matrix bands and light

  18. Information system analysis of an e-learning system used for dental restorations simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Crenguţa M; Popovici, Dorin M

    2012-09-01

    The goal of using virtual and augmented reality technologies in therapeutic interventions simulation, in the fixed prosthodontics (VirDenT) project, is to increase the quality of the educational process in dental faculties, by assisting students in learning how to prepare teeth for all-ceramic restorations. Its main component is an e-learning virtual reality-based software system that will be used for the developing skills in grinding teeth, needed in all-ceramic restorations. The complexity of the domain problem that the software system dealt with made the analysis of the information system supported by VirDenT necessary. The analysis contains the following activities: identification and classification of the system stakeholders, description of the business processes, formulation of the business rules, and modelling of business objects. During this stage, we constructed the context diagram, the business use case diagram, the activity diagrams and the class diagram of the domain model. These models are useful for the further development of the software system that implements the VirDenT information system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi S; Bahman S; Arghavan A; Fatemeh M

    2008-01-01

    Amalgam′s non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior te...

  20. 银粉玻璃离子和银汞合金用于治疗老年根面龋的疗效观察%Clinical effect of glass ionomer silver reinforced restorative and amalgam on the treatment of aged posterior root caries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀清

    2012-01-01

      Objective To observe the clinical efficacy of filling posterior root caries with glass ionomer silver reinforced restorative and amalgam for elderly patients. Methods 325 teeth with posterior root caries were divided into two groups randomly and filled with glass ionomer silver reinforced restorative, amalgam respectively, followling up for two years. Results The success rate of glass ionomer silver reinforced restorative group reached 91.41%, which of amalgam restorative group is 67.28%. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant(P<0.05). Conclusion Filling posterior root caries with glass ionomer silver reinforced restorative for elders achieved a better effect.%  目的观察银粉玻璃离子和银汞合金治疗老年患者后牙根面龋的临床疗效.方法将325颗根面龋坏后牙随机分为两组,分别采用银粉玻璃离子、银汞合金两种材料进行充填,随访观察2年.结果银粉玻璃离子填充组的成功率达91.41%,高于银汞合金填充组的7.28%,组间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论银粉玻璃离子治疗老年后牙根面龋疗效较好.

  1. [Pulp response to restorative materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advokaat, J G

    1990-03-01

    Restorations may affect the pulp negatively, rather due to microleakage than to toxic properties of the materials used. Hyperalgesia occurs more frequently after restoration with composite resins than with amalgam, though the resins in contrast to amalgam may be bonded to the enamel margins. A number of recommendations are presented in order to minimize the marginal gap between cavity walls and amalgam and to prevent marginal fracture.

  2. Behavioural and physiological outcomes of biofeedback therapy on dental anxiety of children undergoing restorations: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeepya, P; Nuvvula, S; Kamatham, R; Nirmala, S V S G

    2014-04-01

    To explore the efficacy of biofeedback as possible alternative means of psychological behaviour guidance in children receiving dental restorations. Randomised clinical trial with a cross over design carried out on 40 children (19 boys and 21 girls) to determine the efficacy of biofeedback in reducing the dental anxiety through subjective and objective measures during restorative treatments under cotton roll isolation without administration of local analgesia. Highly anxious children with a minimum of five carious lesions were trained to lower their anxiety using biofeedback in five sessions within a 4-week interval, each session lasting for 45 min. After initial training, children were randomly divided into two groups and restorations were placed in four sequential therapeutic sessions with a 1-week interval and a follow-up visit 3 months later. First group received biofeedback in the second and third sessions; whereas the second group received biofeedback in the first and third sessions. Biofeedback therapy in children led to lower levels of anxiety in the initial appointments when assessed objectively, however the subjective methods of evaluation could not depict any statistically significant difference. Biofeedback can be used in the initial visits for dentally anxious children and the usage of simpler biofeedback machines for these appointments in dental setup is suggested.

  3. Evaluation of various concentrations of alkaline surface treatment on interfacial bond strengths of amalgam bonded to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Asaad Javaid; Ahmad, Asif; Mohammad, Taqi; Khan, Zahid Akhter

    2013-09-01

    This study was done to assess the influence of alkaline surface modification on interfacial bond strength of existing fractured (old) amalgam restoration bonded to fresh amalgam. Old and Fresh amalgam interfaced samples were prepared by applying a 4-methacryloyloxyethy trimellitate anhydride (4-META) containing adhesive. The adhesive used was Amalgabond (Parkell, Farmingdale, NY 11735, USA). Four concentrations of calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 solutions were used as a surface modifiers for old amalgam to increase the pH of the amalgam surfaces. The concentrations used were 2.5, 5, 10 and 15%. Direct measurement of the interfacial bond strength was carried out using an electromechanical universal tensile testing machine at crosshead speed of 10mm per minute. Results show that all the calcium hydroxide modified samples produced the increased tensile bond strength (TBS) as compared to their control group. The highest values of bond strength were achieved using 15% Ca(OH)2 solution as surface modifier. Pretreatment of fractured amalgam with calcium hydroxide improves the bond strength of 4-META adhesives. Its use in repair of amalgam may therefore be considered.

  4. An in vitro study of dental enamel wear by restorative materials using radiometric method; Estudo in vitro do desgaste do esmalte dental pelos materiais restauradores utilizando metodo radiometrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa

    2000-07-01

    There is an increasing demand and interest to study the dental materials wear as well as about the abrasion effect on antagonistic teeth. Due to the fact that the existent restorative materials have no specifications about their abrasiveness, it is necessary the establishment of degrees of comparison among them to support clinical application. In this work, the radiometric method was applied to study the enamel wear caused by another enamel and by restorative materials (Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse porcelains, Artglass and Targis). The dental enamel made radioactive by irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear research reactor under a thermal neutron flux was submitted to wear in a machine which allows sliding motion of an antagonistic surface in contact with this radioactive enamel. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of {sup 32}P transferred to water from this irradiated tooth. Results obtained indicated that dental porcelains cause pronounced enamel wear when compared with that provoked by another enamel or by resin materials. Resin materials caused less enamel wear than another enamel. Vickers microhardness data obtained for antagonistic materials showed a correlation with the wear caused to the enamel. This study allowed to conclude that the radiometric method proposed can be used satisfactorily in the evaluation of enamel wear by restorative materials. This method presents advantages due to quick responses and ease of analyses There is (author)

  5. Staining of dentin from amalgam corrosion is induced by demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; van der Hoorn, Wietske; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.; Roeters, Joost F. M.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Feilzer, Albert J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of artificial demineralization upon color change of dentin in contact with dental amalgam. Methods: Sound human molars (n= 34) were embedded in resin and coronal enamel was removed. Dentin was exposed to artificial caries gel (pH 5.5) at 37 degrees C for 12 weeks (n=

  6. Staining of dentin from amalgam corrosion is induced by demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; van der Hoorn, Wietske; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.; Roeters, Joost F. M.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Feilzer, Albert J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of artificial demineralization upon color change of dentin in contact with dental amalgam. Methods: Sound human molars (n= 34) were embedded in resin and coronal enamel was removed. Dentin was exposed to artificial caries gel (pH 5.5) at 37 degrees C for 12 weeks (n=

  7. Staining of dentin from amalgam corrosion is induced by demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; van der Hoorn, W.; Özcan, M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Roeters, J.F.M.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of artificial demineralization upon color change of dentin in contact with dental amalgam. METHODS: Sound human molars (n = 34) were embedded in resin and coronal enamel was removed. Dentin was exposed to artificial caries gel (pH 5.5) at 37 degrees C for 12 weeks (n

  8. Staining of dentin from amalgam corrosion is induced by demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; van der Hoorn, Wietske; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.; Roeters, Joost F. M.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Feilzer, Albert J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of artificial demineralization upon color change of dentin in contact with dental amalgam. Methods: Sound human molars (n= 34) were embedded in resin and coronal enamel was removed. Dentin was exposed to artificial caries gel (pH 5.5) at 37 degrees C for 12 weeks (n=

  9. Clinical analysis of biocompatibility of different dental restorative materials and 3 kinds of materials to ifll the proximal dental caries of accessional teeth%不同牙科修复材料生物相容性及3种材料充填恒磨牙邻面龋的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马海英

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo analyze the clinical effect of different dental restorative materials on the proximal dental caries of accessional teeth.MethodA retrospective analysis of clinical data of 444 patients with proximal dental caries of accessional teeth treated in our hospital from May 2010 to May 2012 was performed, according to the different iflling materials, the patients were divided into group A (glass-ionomer cement), group B (light-cured composite resin) and group C (silver amalgam), analyzed the success rate of different dental restorative materials.ResultFollowed-up 1 and 3 years respectively, the success rate of group A was signiifcantly lower than that of group B and group C (P0.05); after 3 years of restoration, the success rate of group B was higher than group C (P<0.05).ConclusionLight-cured composite resin is helpful to improve the success rate of proximal dental caries of accessional teeth, and it is worth to be popularized in clinic.%目的:研究并分析不同牙科修复材料充填恒磨牙邻面龋的临床效果。方法回顾性分析2010年5月至2012年5月收治的444例恒磨牙邻面龋患者的临床资料。按照充填材料不同将入选患者分为A组(玻璃离子水门汀充填)、B组(光固化复合树脂充填)、C组(银汞合金充填),分析不同牙科修复材料对患牙的修复成功率。结果修复后1年和3年复诊,A组患牙修复成功率明显低于B组和C组(P<0.05)。修复后1年,B组与C组患牙修复成功率比较差异无显著性(P>0.05);修复后3年,B组患牙修复成功率高于C组(P<0.05)。结论光固化复合树脂有助于提高恒磨牙邻面龋的修复成功率,值得临床推广。

  10. 2种粘接剂应用于银汞合金粘接修复的临床应用评价%Clinical Evaluation of Bonded Amalgam Restorations Using Two Adhesive Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 王文梅; 江卫民

    2013-01-01

    目的:比较2种粘接剂粘接银汞合金修复的粘接效果.方法:选择80颗有后牙龋坏者,其近中及远中均有邻牙存在,充填物在1年内有脱落史者,随机分为A、B组(A组:树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀组;B组:树脂型银汞粘接剂组)进行充填,随访1年,观察其临床效果.结果:卡方检验2组疗效无显著差异.结论:用2种粘接剂粘接银汞合金修复在1年内达到了同样的效果,而树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀组较树脂粘接剂组操作简单,为临床治疗提供了新的思路.%Objective: To compare the clinical efficacy of two adhesive materials used for bonding amalgam restorations.Methods: 80 molars with caries that had been treated but the filling sheded off in one year were selected.Then the control and experiment groups were both randomly divided into A, B groups.Glass - ionomer cement bonding and composite resin bonding were used respectively.Clinical efficacy were compared after one year.Results: The clinical efficacy in two groups showed no significantly different.Conclusion: The manipulation and placement of glass-ionomer cement were easy and it was benefit for clinical application.

  11. Bacterial adhesion on direct and indirect dental restorative composite resins: An in vitro study on a natural biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derchi, Giacomo; Vano, Michele; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Both direct and indirect techniques are used for dental restorations. Which technique should be preferred or whether they are equivalent with respect to bacterial adhesion is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the affinity of bacterial biofilm to dental restorative composite resins placed directly and indirectly. Five direct composite resins for restorations (Venus Diamond, Adonis, Optifil, Enamel Plus HRi, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic) and 3 indirect composite resins (Gradia, Estenia, Signum) were selected. The materials were incubated in unstimulated whole saliva for 1 day. The biofilms grown were collected and their bacterial cells counted. In parallel, the composite resin surface morphology was analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Both bacterial cell count and surface topography parameters were subjected to statistical analysis (α=.05). Indirect composite resins showed significantly lower levels than direct composite resins for bacterial cell adhesion, (P.05). However, within the indirect composite resins a significantly lower level was found for Gradia than Estenia or Signum (Padhesion when the second and particularly the third-order statistical moments of the composite resin height distributions were considered. Indirect dental restorative composite resins were found to be less prone to biofilm adhesion than direct composite resins. A correlation of bacterial adhesion to surface morphology exists that is described by kurtosis; thus, advanced data analysis is required to discover possible insights into the biologic effects of morphology. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparative evaluation of microleakage of restorations using silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavities: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jambai Sampath Kumar Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the microleakage of restorations using low shrinkage silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavity at the occlusal and gingival margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular molars were collected and divided into three experimental groups and one negative control group. Class II slot cavity was prepared on the mesial surface. Experimental groups were restored with Group I: silorane-based microhybrid composite, Group II: methacrylate-based nanohybrid composite, and Group III: Methacrylate-based microhybrid composite, respectively. Group IV: negative control. The samples were thermocycled, root apices were sealed with sticky wax and coated with nail varnish except 1 mm around the restoration. This was followed by immersion in 2% Rhodamine-B dye solution under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h. Then, the samples were sectioned longitudinally in the mesiodistal direction and evaluated under stereomicroscope ×40 magnification. Scoring was done according to the depth of dye penetration in to the cavity. Statistical analysis of the data was done. Results: The results were that no statistically significant difference in the microleakage at the occlusal margin for all the restorative materials, whereas at the gingival margin, silorane-based microhybrid composite showed less microleakage than the methacrylate-based nano- and micro-hybrid composites. Conclusion: In general, silorane-based microhybrid composite had less microleakage among the other materials used in this in vitro study.

  13. Mechanical fatigue degradation of ceramics versus resin composites for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Geinzer, Eva; Muschweck, Anna; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    For posterior partial restorations an overlap of indication exists where either ceramic or resin-based composite materials can be successfully applied. The aim of this study was to compare the fatigue resistance of modern dental ceramic materials versus dental resin composites in order to address such conflicts. Bar specimens of five ceramic materials and resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and stored for 14 days in distilled water at 37°C. The following ceramic materials were selected for testing: a high-strength zirconium dioxide (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar), a machinable lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar), a pressable lithium disilicate ceramic (e-max Press, Ivoclar), a fluorapatite-based glass-ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar), and a machinable color-graded feldspathic porcelain (Trilux Forte, Vita). The composite materials selected were: an indirect machinable composite (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) and four direct composites with varying filler nature (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kuraray; GrandioSO, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar-Vivadent; and CeramX Duo, Dentsply). Fifteen specimens were tested in water for initial strength (σin) in 4-point bending. Using the same test set-up, the residual flexural fatigue strength (σff) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz (n=25). Weibull parameters σ0 and m were calculated for the σin specimens, whereas the σff and strength loss in percentage were obtained from the fatigue experiment. The zirconium oxide ceramic showed the highest σin and σff (768 and 440 MPa, respectively). Although both lithium disilicate ceramics were similar in the static test, the pressable version showed a significantly higher fatigue resistance after cyclic loading. Both the fluorapatite-based and the feldspathic porcelain showed equivalent initial and cyclic fatigue properties. From the composites, the highest filled direct material Clearfil Majesty Posterior showed superior fatigue performance

  14. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service: a prospective 8 years follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette; Hallonsten, Anna-Lena; Höigaard, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service. All posterior RC placed, in the PDHS clinics in the cities of Copenhagen and Frederiksberg in Denmark between November 1998 and December 2002, in permanent teeth of children and adolescents up to 18 years, were evaluated in an up to 8 years follow up. The endpoint of each restoration was defined, when repair or replacement was performed. Survival analyses were performed between subgroups with Kaplan-Meier analysis. The individual contribution of different cofactors to predict the outcome was performed with Cox regression analysis. Totally 2881 children with a mean age of 13.7 years (5-18) received 4355 RC restorations placed by 115 dentists. Eighty percent were placed in molars and 49% were Class I. Two percent of restorations with base material and 1% of the restorations without base material showed postoperative sensitivity (n.s.). Replacements were made in 406 and repairs in 125 restorations. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a cumulative survival at 8 years of 84.3%, resulting in an annual failure rate of 2%. Lower patient age, more than one restoration per patient, placement of a base material and placement of RC: in molars, in cavities with high number of surfaces, in lower jaw teeth, showed all significant higher failure rates. Five variables had significant importance for the end point, replacement/repair of the resin composite restorations: age of patient, age of operator, jaw, tooth type and cavity size. Posterior RC restorations placed in children and adolescents in Public Dental Health clinics showed an acceptable durability with annual failure rates comparable with those of randomized controlled RC studies in adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fracture resistance of premolars with bonded class II amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias de Souza, Grace Mendonça; Pereira, Gisele Damiana Silveira; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD cavity preparation and simulated periodontal ligament. The teeth were restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test in the Universal Testing Machine (Instron). The statistical analysis of the results (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed that the fracture resistance of group 2 (G2=105.720 kgF) was superior to those of groups 1 (G1=72.433 kgF) and 3 (G3=80.505 kgF) that did not differ between them.

  16. Advancements in all-ceramics for dental restorations and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Misbahuddin, Syed; Kazmi, Murtaza Raza; Qureshi, Sameer; Uddin, Muhammad Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a process that is usually a result of tooth to tooth and/or tooth and restoration contact. The process of wear essentially becomes accelerated by the introduction of restorations inside the oral cavity, especially in case of opposing ceramic restorations. The newest materials have vastly contributed toward the interest in esthetic dental restorations and have been extensively studied in laboratories. However, despite the recent technological advancements, there has not been a valid in vivo method of evaluation involving clinical wear caused due to ceramics upon restored teeth and natural dentition. The aim of this paper is to review the latest advancements in all-ceramic materials, and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition. The descriptive review has been written after a thorough MEDLINE/PubMed search by the authors. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of recent advancements and that they should always consider the type of ceramic restorative materials used to maintain a stable occlusal relation. The ceramic restorations should be adequately finished and polished after the chair-side adjustment process of occlusal surfaces. PMID:28042280

  17. Advancements in all-ceramics for dental restorations and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Misbahuddin, Syed; Kazmi, Murtaza Raza; Qureshi, Sameer; Uddin, Muhammad Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a process that is usually a result of tooth to tooth and/or tooth and restoration contact. The process of wear essentially becomes accelerated by the introduction of restorations inside the oral cavity, especially in case of opposing ceramic restorations. The newest materials have vastly contributed toward the interest in esthetic dental restorations and have been extensively studied in laboratories. However, despite the recent technological advancements, there has not been a valid in vivo method of evaluation involving clinical wear caused due to ceramics upon restored teeth and natural dentition. The aim of this paper is to review the latest advancements in all-ceramic materials, and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition. The descriptive review has been written after a thorough MEDLINE/PubMed search by the authors. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of recent advancements and that they should always consider the type of ceramic restorative materials used to maintain a stable occlusal relation. The ceramic restorations should be adequately finished and polished after the chair-side adjustment process of occlusal surfaces.