WorldWideScience

Sample records for density wave formation

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic shock wave formation: Effect of area and density variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujith, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear steepening of finite amplitude magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field is investigated. The nonlinear evolution of a planar fast magnetosonic wave in a homentropic flow field is understood well through simple waves. However, in situations where the wave is moving through a variable area duct or when the flow field is nonhomentropic, the concept of simple waves cannot be used. In the present paper, the quasi-one-dimensional MHD equations that include the effect of area variation and density gradients are solved using the wave front expansion technique. The analysis is performed for a perfectly conducting fluid and also for a weakly conducting fluid. Closed form solutions are obtained for the nonlinear evolution of the slope of the wave front in the limits of infinitely large and small conductivity. A general criterion for a compression wave to steepen into a shock is obtained. An analytical expression for the location of shock formation is derived. The effect of area variation and density gradient on shock formation is studied and examples highlighting the same are presented

  2. Charge density wave formation in R2Te5 (R=Nd, Sm, and Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, K. Y.; Laverock, J.; Wu, Y. Q.; Condron, C.; Toney, M.; Dugdale, S.; Kramer, M.; Fisher, I.

    2008-04-01

    The rare earth (R) tellurides R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have a crystal structure intermediate between that of RTe{sub 2} and RTe{sub 3}, consisting of alternating single and double Te planes sandwiched between RTe block layers. We have successfully grown single crystals of Nd{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, Sm{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, and Gd{sub 2}Te{sub 5} from a self-flux and we describe here evidence for charge density wave formation in these materials. The superlattice patterns for all three compounds are relatively complex, consisting at room temperature of at least two independent wave vectors. Consideration of the electronic structure indicates that, to a large extent, these wave vectors are separately associated with sheets of the Fermi surface which are principally derived from the single and double Te layers.

  3. Charge Density Wave Formation in R(2)Te(5) (R=Nd, Sm, And Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, K.Y.; Laverock, J.; Wu, Y.Q.; Condron, C.L.; Toney, M.F.; Dugdale, S.B.; Kramer, M.J.; Fisher, I.R.

    2009-05-27

    The rare earth (R) tellurides R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have a crystal structure intermediate between that of RTe{sub 2} and RTe{sub 3}, consisting of alternating single and double Te planes sandwiched between RTe block layers. We have successfully grown single crystals of Nd{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, Sm{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, and Gd{sub 2}Te{sub 5} from a self-flux and we describe here evidence for charge density wave formation in these materials. The superlattice patterns for all three compounds are relatively complex, consisting at room temperature of at least two independent wave vectors. Consideration of the electronic structure indicates that, to a large extent, these wave vectors are separately associated with sheets of the Fermi surface which are principally derived from the single and double Te layers.

  4. Straw Formation and Enhanced Damping of Strong Density Waves in Saturn’s Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2017-06-01

    High resolution Cassini images of strong density waves in Saturn’s rings often show kilometer-scale structures in the wave troughs that are sometimes described as straw-like structures. These structures are likely formed by transient gravitational instabilities within the density wave and have the potential to greatly enhance the local viscous angular momentum transport and thereby limit the maximum amplitude of the density wave. A Hamiltonian theory for density waves has been developed that can describe the rate of local gravitational instabilities in the wave train. The Hamiltonian for single particle motion in the vicinity of an inner Lindblad resonance with a Saturnian satellite can be formulated such that the angle variable conjugate to the radial action is the resonant argument for the resonance. The density wave can then be derived using Hamiltonian perturbation methods to remove the satellite perturbation such that the transformed radial action and conjugate angles include the usual solution for self-gravitating density waves. Local gravitational instabilities in the density wave can now be formulated using a linearized collisionless Boltzmann equation that is expressed in terms of the transformed action-angle variables that contain the density wave solution. The gravitational potential of the linearized perturbation is found to be enhanced by a factor of ten or more in strong density waves, which likely explains the observation of kilometer-scale structures in these waves. The Hamiltonian formalism can also be used to derive an enhanced effective viscosity that results from these straw-like structures.

  5. Holographic magnetisation density waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donos, Aristomenis [Centre for Particle Theory and Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,Stockton Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Pantelidou, Christiana [Departament de Fisica Quantica i Astrofisica & Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona,Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-10-10

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of D=4 Einstein theory coupled to a scalar and two U(1) gauge fields. The solutions are holographically dual to d=3 CFTs in a constant external magnetic field along one of the U(1)’s. Below a critical temperature the system’s magnetisation density becomes inhomogeneous, leading to spontaneous formation of current density waves. We find that the transition can be of second order and that the solutions which minimise the free energy locally in the parameter space of solutions have averaged stressed tensor of a perfect fluid.

  6. Isochoric heating and strong blast wave formation driven by fast electrons in solid-density targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. J.; Vauzour, B.; Touati, M.; Gremillet, L.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Ceccotti, T.; Bouillaud, R.; Deneuville, F.; Floquet, V.; Fourment, C.; Hadj-Bachir, M.; Hulin, S.; Morace, A.; Nicolaï, Ph; d'Oliveira, P.; Reau, F.; Samaké, A.; Tcherbakoff, O.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Veltcheva, M.; Batani, D.

    2017-10-01

    We experimentally investigate the fast (metallic foils and subsequent high-pressure hydrodynamics induced by energetic electrons driven by high-intensity, high-contrast laser pulses. The early-time temperature profile inside the target is measured from the streaked optical pyrometry of the target rear side. This is further characterized from benchmarked simulations of the laser-target interaction and the fast electron transport. Despite a modest laser energy (laser-based platform dedicated to high-energy-density physics studies.

  7. Charge density waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor'kov, LP

    2012-01-01

    The latest addition to this series covers a field which is commonly referred to as charge density wave dynamics.The most thoroughly investigated materials are inorganic linear chain compounds with highly anisotropic electronic properties. The volume opens with an examination of their structural properties and the essential features which allow charge density waves to develop.The behaviour of the charge density waves, where interesting phenomena are observed, is treated both from a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The role of impurities in statics and dynamics is considered and an

  8. Flashing coupled density wave oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Zhang Youjie

    1997-07-01

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The phenomenon and mechanism of different kinds of two-phase flow instabilities, namely geyser instability, flashing instability and flashing coupled density wave instability are described. The especially interpreted flashing coupled density wave instability has never been studied well, it is analyzed by using a one-dimensional non-thermo equilibrium two-phase flow drift model computer code. Calculations are in good agreement with the experiment results. (5 refs.,5 figs., 1 tab.)

  9. Critical Role of the Exchange Interaction for the Electronic Structure and Charge-Density-Wave Formation in TiSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, Maria; Baima, Jacopo; Bianco, Raffaello; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco; Wirtz, Ludger

    2017-10-01

    We show that the inclusion of screened exchange via hybrid functionals provides a unified description of the electronic and vibrational properties of TiSe2 . In contrast to local approximations in density functional theory, the explicit inclusion of exact, nonlocal exchange captures the effects of the electron-electron interaction needed to both separate the Ti -d states from the Se -p states and stabilize the charge-density-wave (CDW) (or low-T ) phase through the formation of a p -d hybridized state. We further show that this leads to an enhanced electron-phonon coupling that can drive the transition even if a small gap opens in the high-T phase. Finally, we demonstrate that the hybrid functionals can generate a CDW phase where the electronic bands, the geometry, and the phonon frequencies are in agreement with experiments.

  10. Agglomeration processes sustained by dust density waves in Ar/C2H2 plasma: From C2H2 injection to the formation of an organized structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dap, Simon; Hugon, Robert; Poucques, Ludovic de; Briancon, Jean-Luc; Bougdira, Jamal; Lacroix, David

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation of dust particle agglomeration in a capacitively coupled RF discharge is reported. Carbonaceous particles are produced in an argon plasma using acetylene. As soon as the particle density becomes sufficient, dust density waves (DDWs) are spontaneously excited within the cathode sheath. Recently, it was proven that DDWs can significantly enhance the agglomeration rate between particles by transferring them a significant kinetic energy. Thus, it helps them to overcome Coulomb repulsion. The influence of this mechanism is studied from acetylene injection to the formation of very large agglomerates forming an organized structure after a few dozens of seconds. For this purpose, three diagnostic tools are used: extinction measurements to probe nanometer-sized particles, fast imaging for large agglomerates and a dust extraction technique developed for ex-situ analysis.

  11. Fast wave current drive above the slow wave density limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, R.; Sheehan, D.P.; Wolf, N.S.; Edrich, D.

    1989-01-01

    Fast wave and slow wave current drive near the mean gyrofrequency were compared in the Irvine Torus using distinct phased array antennae of similar principal wavelengths, frequencies, and input powers. The slow wave current drive density limit was measured for 50ω ci ≤ω≤500ω ci and found to agree with trends in tokamaks. Fast wave current drive was observed at densities up to the operating limit of the torus, demonstrably above the slow wave density limit

  12. Six Decades of Spiral Density Wave Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Frank H.

    2016-09-01

    The theory of spiral density waves had its origin approximately six decades ago in an attempt to reconcile the winding dilemma of material spiral arms in flattened disk galaxies. We begin with the earliest calculations of linear and nonlinear spiral density waves in disk galaxies, in which the hypothesis of quasi-stationary spiral structure (QSSS) plays a central role. The earliest success was the prediction of the nonlinear compression of the interstellar medium and its embedded magnetic field; the earliest failure, seemingly, was not detecting color gradients associated with the migration of OB stars whose formation is triggered downstream from the spiral shock front. We give the reasons for this apparent failure with an update on the current status of the problem of OB star formation, including its relationship to the feathering substructure of galactic spiral arms. Infrared images can show two-armed, grand design spirals, even when the optical and UV images show flocculent structures. We suggest how the nonlinear response of the interstellar gas, coupled with overlapping subharmonic resonances, might introduce chaotic behavior in the dynamics of the interstellar medium and Population I objects, even though the underlying forces to which they are subject are regular. We then move to a discussion of resonantly forced spiral density waves in a planetary ring and their relationship to the ideas of disk truncation, and the shepherding of narrow rings by satellites orbiting nearby. The back reaction of the rings on the satellites led to the prediction of planet migration in protoplanetary disks, which has had widespread application in the exploding data sets concerning hot Jupiters and extrasolar planetary systems. We then return to the issue of global normal modes in the stellar disk of spiral galaxies and its relationship to the QSSS hypothesis, where the central theoretical concepts involve waves with negative and positive surface densities of energy and angular

  13. Charge density wave states in tantalum dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Duxbury, Phillip M.

    2018-01-01

    Using density functional theory, we explore a range of charge density wave states (CDWs) in tantalum-based transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers. The high-symmetry states of the 1 H phases of Ta X2 (X = S, Se, Te) are lower in total energy compared to the 1 T variants, while the 1 T phases exhibit a much stronger tendency for CDW formation. The stability of several CDWs is found to be stronger as the chalcogenide is changed in the sequence (S, Se, Te), with the tellurium-based systems exhibiting several CDWs with binding energy per formula unit in the range of 100 meV . These 1 T CDW phases are lower in energy than the corresponding 1 H CDW phases. The diversity of CDWs exhibited by these materials suggests that many "hidden" states may occur on ultrafast excitation or photodoping. Changes in electronic structure across the Ta X2 series are also elucidated.

  14. Sound waves and shock waves in high-density deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuko; Ariyasu, Tomio

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of compressing the cryogenic hollow pellet of inertial confinement nuclear fusion with multiple adiabatic shock waves is discussed, on the basis of the estimation of the properties of a high-density deuterium plasma (10 24 -10 27 cm -3 , 10 -1 -10 4 eV), such as the velocity and the attenuation constant of the adiabatic sound wave, the width of the shock wave, and the surface tension. It is found that in the course of compression the wavelength of the adiabatic sound wave and the width of the weak shock wave sometimes become comparable to or exceed the fuel shell width of the pellet, and that the surface tension is negative. These results show that it is rather difficult to compress stably the hollow pellet with successive weak shock waves. (author)

  15. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  16. On Density Waves in Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbol, P.; Patsis, P. A.

    The spiral structure of five ordinary spiral galaxies was studied using deep BVIK' surface photometry maps obtained at the 2.2m ESO/MPI telescope. The detailed shape of the arms was analyzed in terms of the spiral density wave theory. Grand design spirals were found on the K' maps in all five galaxies although at least two would be classified as flocculent on the blue images. In several of the galaxies, bulges with weak oval distortion (~10%) were observed. Dust spirals also continue, in some cases, inside the ILR where the stellar arms terminate. This emphasizes the strong bias of morphological classifications of spiral galaxies based on blue image due to dust and young stars. The 2--armed spirals were systematically found to be wound tighter on I than on K' maps suggesting the existence of a density wave. Locations of the ILR and the 4/1 resonance were estimated based on the arm morphology and the amplitude ratio between the m = 2,4 Fourier components. The wavenumber of the stellar 2--armed pattern is increasing towards the ILR which could suggest that the density wave is associated to the long waved branch of the dispersion relation. A possible scenario is discussed.

  17. Brave new world of unconventional density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, K.; Dora, B.; Korin-Hamzic, B.; Basletic, M.; Virosztek, A.; Kartsovnik, M.V.

    2003-10-01

    Recently many people have discussed unconventional density wave (i.e. UCDW and USDW). Unlike in conventional density waves, the quasiparticle excitations in these systems are gapless. The appearance of these systems suggests paradigm shift from quasi 1D system to quasi 2D and 3D systems. Here we limit ourselves to the angular dependent magnetoresistance (ADMR) observed in the low temperature phase (LTP) of α-(BEDT-TTF) 2 KHg(SCN) 4 . Here we show that UCDW describes successfully many features of ADMR as manifestation of the Landau quantization of the quasiparticle spectrum in magnetic field. Indeed ADMR will provide a unique window to access UDW like the AF phase in URu 2 Si 2 , the pseudogap phase in high T c cuprates and the glassy phase in organic superconductor k-(ET) 2 salts. (author)

  18. ULF Wave Associated Density Irregularities and Scintillation at the Equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents independent multi-instrument observations that addresses the physical mechanisms of how ULF wave associated electric fields initiate ionospheric density fluctuations and scintillation at the equator. Since the magnetic field at the equator is entirely embedded in a relatively high collision and high conductivity medium, the condition may not be possible for the geomagnetic field to fluctuate due to the damped/penetrated ULF wave. This implies the fluctuating electric field at the equator may not be produced through equatorial dynamo action due to fluctuating magnetic fields. Instead the oscillating field penetrates from high-latitudes through the TM0 (zero order transverse magnetic) mode and produce fluctuating induced magnetic field, and thus modulate the vertical drift to oscillate. We estimated the ULF associated electric field at high-latitudes and equatorial region, and demonstrated that only 15% of the fluctuating electric field from the auroral region can make to the equatorial region. We also calculated the corresponding vertical drift that oscillate with nearly identical periodicity (6-9 min) as the ULF waves in the Pc5 band. Because of its large amplitude and long periods compared to other ULF wave frequency bands, the Pc5 wave associated electric field can easily penetrate to the lower latitude region. The oscillating vertical drift at the equator has an amplitude of 2.5 - 7.0 m/s, which is 25 -50% of the typical quiet time dayside maximum value of the vertical drift at the equator, which is strong enough fluctuation to easily produce significant ionospheric density fluctuations and trigger scintillation at the equatorial region. In this paper, we present multi-instrument observations that clearly confirm the role of ULF wave penetration for the formation of density irregularities and scintillation at the equator.

  19. Investigation of microalgae with photon density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankovitch, Christine; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2007-09-01

    Phototropic microalgae have a large potential for producing valuable substances for the feed, food, cosmetics, pigment, bioremediation, and pharmacy industries as well as for biotechnological processes. Today it is estimated that the microalgal aquaculture worldwide production is 5000 tons of dry matter per year (not taking into account processed products) making it an approximately $1.25 billion U.S. per year industry. For effective observation of the photosynthetic growth processes, fast on-line sensor systems that analyze the relevant biological and technical process parameters are preferred. The optical properties of the microalgae culture influence the transport of light in the photobioreactor and can be used to extract relevant information for efficient cultivation practices. Microalgae cultivation media show a combination of light absorption and scattering, which are influenced by the concentrations and the physical and chemical properties of the different absorbing and scattering species (e.g. pigments, cell components, etc.). Investigations with frequency domain photon density waves (PDW) allow for the examination of absorption and scattering properties of turbid media, namely the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. The reduced scattering coefficient can be used to characterize physical and morphological properties of the medium, including the cell concentration, whereas the absorption coefficient correlates with the pigment content. Nannochloropsis oculata, a single-cell species of microalgae, were examined in a nutrient solution with photon density waves. The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were experimentally determined throughout the cultivation process, and applied to gain information about the cell concentration and average cell radius.

  20. Diffuse Waves and Energy Densities Near Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Rodriguez-Castellanos, A.; Campillo, M.; Perton, M.; Luzon, F.; Perez-Ruiz, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Green function can be retrieved from averaging cross correlations of motions within a diffuse field. In fact, it has been shown that for an elastic inhomogeneous, anisotropic medium under equipartitioned, isotropic illumination, the average cross correlations are proportional to the imaginary part of Green function. For instance coda waves are due to multiple scattering and their intensities follow diffusive regimes. Coda waves and the noise sample the medium and effectively carry information along their paths. In this work we explore the consequences of assuming both source and receiver at the same point. From the observable side, the autocorrelation is proportional to the energy density at a given point. On the other hand, the imaginary part of the Green function at the source itself is finite because the singularity of Green function is restricted to the real part. The energy density at a point is proportional with the trace of the imaginary part of Green function tensor at the source itself. The Green function availability may allow establishing the theoretical energy density of a seismic diffuse field generated by a background equipartitioned excitation. We study an elastic layer with free surface and overlaying a half space and compute the imaginary part of the Green function for various depths. We show that the resulting spectrum is indeed closely related to the layer dynamic response and the corresponding resonant frequencies are revealed. One implication of present findings lies in the fact that spatial variations may be useful in detecting the presence of a target by its signature in the distribution of diffuse energy. These results may be useful in assessing the seismic response of a given site if strong ground motions are scarce. It suffices having a reasonable illumination from micro earthquakes and noise. We consider that the imaginary part of Green function at the source is a spectral signature of the site. The relative importance of the peaks of

  1. Energy density of relic gravity waves from inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahni, V.

    1990-01-01

    We evaluate both the spectral energy density and the total energy density for relic gravity waves produced during the transition from an early inflationary phase to a matter-dominated Friedmann-Robertson-Walker-type expansion: a∼t c (c μν =8πG left-angle T μν right-angle. In the case of power-law and quasiexponential inflation we find that the ratio of the energy density of gravity waves to the background matter density increases with time, as gravity waves with longer wavelengths and larger amplitudes enter the horizon at successively later epochs. This could lead to the energy density of gravity waves becoming comparable to the energy density of matter at late times, if inflation commenced at Planckian energies

  2. An investigation on density wave oscillations in helical coiled tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-long, Z.; Tin-Kuan, C.; Xue-jun, C.; Veziroglu, T.N.

    1990-01-01

    Density wave instability in helical coiled tubes has been systematically observed using high pressure ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 Mpa, mass velocity from 400 to 1200 kg/sm 2 , inlet subcooling from 10 to 120 degrees C and heat flux up to 450 kw/m 2 . In the experimental research the effects of system pressure, mass velocity, heat flux, inlet subcooling, inlet resistence and exit resistence have been studied. The experimental results show that the density wave oscillation occurred at positive slope part to mass velocity versus total pressure drop curve, the phase difference of the density wave oscillation between the inlet and exit flow rate is approximately 180 degrees. Increasing heat flux, the periods of density wave oscillation decreased. The periods are about 1-2 times the residence time of fluid in the heater, about 3-14s. System presure, inlet subcooling, mass velocity, inlet resistance and exit resistence affected the threshold of density wave oscillation. Increasing the system pressure, mass velocity and inlet resistence, the limit heat flux of density wave oscillation increased. Increasing exit resistence, the limit heat flux decreased. The stability boundary diagrams of the system have been found. In this paper the empirical correlations for predicting the threshold of density wave oscillations are presented

  3. Continuous Dependence on the Density for Stratified Steady Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    There are two distinct regimes commonly used to model traveling waves in stratified water: continuous stratification, where the density is smooth throughout the fluid, and layer-wise continuous stratification, where the fluid consists of multiple immiscible strata. The former is the more physically accurate description, but the latter is frequently more amenable to analysis and computation. By the conservation of mass, the density is constant along the streamlines of the flow; the stratification can therefore be specified by prescribing the value of the density on each streamline. We call this the streamline density function. Our main result states that, for every smoothly stratified periodic traveling wave in a certain small-amplitude regime, there is an L ∞ neighborhood of its streamline density function such that, for any piecewise smooth streamline density function in that neighborhood, there is a corresponding traveling wave solution. Moreover, the mapping from streamline density function to wave is Lipschitz continuous in a certain function space framework. As this neighborhood includes piecewise smooth densities with arbitrarily many jump discontinues, this theorem provides a rigorous justification for the ubiquitous practice of approximating a smoothly stratified wave by a layered one. We also discuss some applications of this result to the study of the qualitative features of such waves.

  4. Experimental Evidence for Static Charge Density Waves in Iron Oxypnictides

    KAUST Repository

    Martinelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this Letter we report high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscope analysis of Mn-substituted LaFeAsO samples, demonstrating that a static incommensurate modulated structure develops across the low-temperature orthorhombic phase, whose modulation wave vector depends on the Mn content. The incommensurate structural distortion is likely originating from a charge-density-wave instability, a periodic modulation of the density of conduction electrons associated with a modulation of the atomic positions. Our results add a new component in the physics of Fe-based superconductors, indicating that the density wave ordering is charge driven.

  5. Nonlinear density waves in a marginally stable gravitating disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchagin, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of short nonlinear density waves in a disk at the stability limit is studied for arbitrary values of the radial wave number k/sub r/. For waves with wave numbers that do not lie at the minimum of the dispersion curve, the behavior of the amplitude is described by a nonlinear parabolic equation; however, stationary soliton solutions cannot exist in such a system since there is no dispersion spreading of a packet. For wave numbers lying at the minimum of the dispersion curve, soliton structures with determined amplitude are possible. In stable gravitating disks and in a disk at the stability limit, two physically different types of soliton can exist

  6. Dust acoustic shock wave at high dust density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Sarkar, Susmita; Khan, Manoranjan; Avinash, K.; Gupta, M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Dust acoustic (DA) shock wave at high dust density, i.e., the dust electroacoustic (DEA) or dust Coulomb (DC) shock wave has been investigated incorporating the nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The nonlinear DEA (DC) shock wave is seen to be governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation, in which the Burger term is proportional to the nonadiabaticity generated dissipation. It is seen that the shock strength decreases but after reaching minimum, it increases as the dust space charge density |q d n d | increases and the shock strength of DA wave is greater than that of DEA (DC) wave. Moreover the DEA (DC) shock width increases appreciably with increase mass m i of the ion component of the dusty plasma but for DA shock wave the effect is weak

  7. Enhancement of electric and magnetic wave fields at density gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reiniusson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We use Freja satellite data to investigate irregular small-scale density variations. The observations are made in the auroral region at about 1000-1700 km. The density variations are a few percent, and the structures are found to be spatial down to a scale length of a few ion gyroradii. Irregular density variations are often found in an environment of whistler mode/lower hybrid waves and we show that at the density gradients both the electric and magnetic wave fields are enhanced.

  8. Imperfect nesting and scattering effect in spin density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaozhou; Maki, Kazumi

    1992-01-01

    We study the impurity scattering in spin and charge density wave (SDW/CDW) with imperfect nesting. The impurity scattering suppresses both the SDW (or CDW) order parameter and the transition temperature like the pair-breaking effect in superconductor. Here we analyze the order parameter and the density of states of SDW (or CDW)

  9. Scattering of lower-hybrid waves by density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, P.L.; Perkins, F.W.

    1981-07-01

    The investigation of the scattering of lower-hybrid waves by density fluctuations in tokamaks is distinguished by the presence in the wave equation of a large, random, derivative-coupling term. Assuming the fluctuations to be of long wavelength compared to the incident wave the similarity of the wave equation to the Schroedinger equation for a particle in a random magnetic field is used to derive a two-way diffusion equation for the wave energy density. The diffusion constant found disagrees with earlier findings and the source of the discrepancy is pointed out. When the correct boundary conditions are imposed this equation can be solved by separation of variables. However most of the important features of the solution are apparent without detailed algebra

  10. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated usi...

  11. Mixing and Formation of Layers by Internal Wave Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossmann, Yvan; Pollet, Florence; Odier, Philippe; Dauxois, Thierry

    2017-12-01

    The energy pathways from propagating internal waves to the scales of irreversible mixing in the ocean are not fully described. In the ocean interior, the triadic resonant instability is an intrinsic destabilization process that may enhance the energy cascade away from topographies. The present study focuses on the integrated impact of mixing processes induced by a propagative normal mode-1 over long-term experiments in an idealized setup. The internal wave dynamics and the evolution of the density profile are followed using the light attenuation technique. Diagnostics of the turbulent diffusivity KT and background potential energy BPE are provided. Mixing effects result in a partially mixed layer colocated with the region of maximum shear induced by the forcing normal mode. The maximum measured turbulent diffusivity is 250 times larger than the molecular value, showing that diapycnal mixing is largely enhanced by small-scale turbulent processes. Intermittency and reversible energy transfers are discussed to bridge the gap between the present diagnostic and the larger values measured in Dossmann et al. (). The mixing efficiency η is assessed by relating the BPE growth to the linearized KE input. One finds a value of Γ=12-19%, larger than the mixing efficiency in the case of breaking interfacial wave. After several hours of forcing, the development of staircases in the density profile is observed. This mechanism has been previously observed in experiments with weak homogeneous turbulence and explained by Phillips (1972) argument. The present experiments suggest that internal wave forcing could also induce the formation of density interfaces in the ocean.

  12. Resonantly driven nonlinear density waves in protostellar disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chi; Cassen, Pat

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations of binary, pre-main-sequence, solar-type stars provide evidence that such systems may coexist with circumstellar disks. The binary disk systems, besides being of general interest for the study of star formation, potentially provide useful tests of companion-disk interaction theories prominent in current hypotheses of planet formation. In this paper, we apply an asymptotic analysis of the nonlinear, resonant interaction of a stellar companion with a disk to understand the dependence of such interactions on the properties of the system: the binary mass ratio, the physical properties of the disk, and the effective dissipation (treated herein as viscosity). The method is based on a WKBJ approximation and exploits the conditions that the disk is thin and much less massive than the primary, but does not require that the companion-induced disturbance be small. Both isothermal and adiabatic responses are treated. Only circular orbit resonances are considered in this paper. It is demonstrated that the temperature of the disk as well as the relative mass of the companion affects the degree of nonlinearity, and that nonlinearity promotes high wave compression ratios, long wavelengths, and increased propagation distances. Nevertheless, the total torque exerted between the companion and the disk is well represented by linear theory. The amplitudes of density disturbances are reduced by viscosity and nonisothermality. Because resonant interactions are generally strong and capable of driving rapid evolution, one might expect observations of systems undergoing strong, resonant-driven evolution to be rare. In this connection, it is pointed out that the m = 1 resonance is distinguished by being anomalously weaker than the others and is therefore of observational interest. It is speculated that, in conditions of intrinsically small dissipation, the propagation of resonant-driven density waves is limited by the tendency of their wavelength to diminish with distance

  13. Viscosity and attenuation of sound wave in high density deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuko; Ariyasu, Tomio

    1985-01-01

    The penetration of low frequency sound wave into the fuel deuterium is discussed as for laser fusion. The sound velocity and the attenuation constant due to viscosity are calculated for high density (n = 10 24 -- 10 27 cm -3 , T = 10 -1 -- 10 4 eV) deuterium. The shear viscosity of free electron gas and the bulk viscosity due to ion-ion interaction mainly contribute to the attenuation of sound wave. The sound wave of the frequency below 10 10 Hz can easily penetrate through the compressed fuel deuterium of diameter 1 -- 10 3 μm. (author)

  14. The impact of crustal density variations on seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plonka, A.; Fichtner, A.

    2014-12-01

    Lateral density variations are the source of mass transport in the Earth at all scales, acting as drivers of convective motion. However, the density structure of the Earth remains largely unknown since classic seismic observables and gravity provide only weak constraints with strong trade-offs. Current density models are therefore often based on velocity scaling, making strong assumptions on the origin of structural heterogeneities, which may not necessarily be correct.We propose to develop a seismic tomography technique that directly inverts for density, using complete seismograms rather than arrival times of certain waves only. The first task in this challenge is to systematically study the imprints of density on synthetic seismograms.To compute the full seismic wavefield in a 3D heterogeneous medium without making significant approximations, we usenumerical wave propagation based on a spectral-element discretization of the seismic wave equation. We consider a 2000 by 1000 km wide and 500 km deep spherical section, with the 1D Earth model PREM (with 40 km crust thickness) as a background. Onto this (in the uppermost 40 km) we superimpose 3D randomly generated velocity and density heterogeneities of various magnitudes and correlation lenghts. We use different random realizations of heterogeneity distribution.We compare the synthetic seismograms for 3D velocity and density structure with 3D velocity structure and with the 1D background, calculating relative amplitude differences and timeshifts as functions of time and frequency.Our analyses indicate that reasonably sized density variations within the crust can leave a strong imprint on both traveltimes and amplitudes. This suggests (1) that crustal tomography can be significantly biased when density heterogeneities are not properly accounted for, and (2) that the solution of the seismic inverse problem for density may become feasible.

  15. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated using...... a Redlich-Kister type of expression with temperature-independent parameters and the data for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate with temperature-dependent parameters. The viscosities have furthermore been compared to values predicted by means of the GC...

  16. Pressure induced Superconductivity in the Charge Density Wave Compound Tritelluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlin, J.J.; Zocco, D.A.; Sayles, T.A.; Maple, M.B.; /UC, Davis; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    A series of high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of TbTe{sub 3} reveal a complex phase diagram involving the interplay of superconducting, antiferromagnetic and charge density wave order. The onset of superconductivity reaches a maximum of almost 4 K (onset) near {approx} 12.4 GPa.

  17. Gate effect in charge-density wave nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, E.; Holst, M.A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated transport characteristics of charge-density wave nanowires with a few hundred parallel chains. At temperatures below50K, these samples show power-law behavior in temperature and voltage, characteristic for one-dimensional transport. In this regime, gate dependent transport has

  18. On Internal Waves in a Density-Stratified Estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1991-01-01

    In this article some field observations, made in recent years, of internal wave motions in a density-stratified estuary are presented, In order to facilitate the appreciation of the results, and to make some quantitative comparisons, the relevant theory is also summarized. Furthermore, the origins

  19. Charge density wave dynamics from ultrafast XUV ARPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frassetto F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast angle–resolved XUV photoemission reveals the time- and momentum-dependent electronic structure of 1T–TaS2, a hybrid Mott and charge-density-wave insulator. Both electronic orderings melt well before the lattice responds, suggesting that electronic correlations play a role not just in the Mott localization but in the CDW ordering as well.

  20. Observations of ULF wave related equatorial electrojet and density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Biouele, C. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Boudouridis, A.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Anad, F.; Pfaff, R. F.; Hartinger, M.

    2013-10-01

    We report on Pc5 wave related electric field and vertical drift velocity oscillations at the equator as observed by ground magnetometers for an extended period on 9 August 2008. We show that the magnetometer-estimated equatorial E×B drift oscillates with the same frequency as ULF Pc5 waves, creating significant ionospheric density fluctuations. We also show ionospheric density fluctuations during the period when we observed ULF wave activity. At the same time, we detect the ULF activity on the ground using ground-based magnetometer data from the African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and the South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA). From space, we use magnetic field observations from the GOES 12 and the Communication/Navigation Outage and Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellites. Upstream solar wind conditions are provided by the ACE spacecraft. We find that the wave power observed on the ground also occurs in the upstream solar wind and in the magnetosphere. All these observations demonstrate that Pc5 waves with a likely driver in the solar wind can penetrate to the equatorial ionosphere and modulate the equatorial electrodynamics. While no direct drift measurements from equatorial radars exist for the 9 August 2008 event, we used JULIA 150 km radar drift velocities observed on 2 May 2010 and found similar fluctuations with the period of 5-8 min, as a means of an independent confirmation of our magnetometer derived drift dynamics.

  1. Spontaneous K-Complex Density in Slow-Wave Sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Dilshad Manzar

    Full Text Available To study spontaneous K-complex (KC densities during slow-wave sleep. The secondary objective was to estimate intra-non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep differences in KC density.It is a retrospective study using EEG data included in polysomnographic records from the archive at the sleep research laboratory of the Centre for Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, India. The EEG records of 4459 minutes were used. The study presents a manual identification investigation of KCs in 17 healthy young adult male volunteers (age = 23.82±3.40 years and BMI = 23.42±4.18 kg/m2.N3 had a higher KC density than N2 (Z = -2.485, p = 0.013 for all of the probes taken together. Four EEG probes had a higher probe-specific KC density during N3. The inter-probe KC density differed significantly during N2 (χ2 = 67.91, p < .001, N3 (χ2 = 70.62, p < .001 and NREM (χ2 = 68.50, p < .001. The percent distribution of KC decreased uniformly with sleep cycles.The inter-probe differences during N3 establish the fronto-central dominance of the KC density regardless of sleep stage. This finding supports one local theory of KC generation. The significantly higher KC density during N3 may imply that the neuro-anatomical origin of slow-wave activity and KC is the same. This temporal alignment with slow-wave activity supports the sleep-promoting function of the KC.

  2. Spontaneous K-Complex Density in Slow-Wave Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Md Dilshad; Rajput, Mohammad Muntafa; Zannat, Wassilatul; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; BaHammam, Ahmed S; Hussain, M Ejaz

    2016-01-01

    To study spontaneous K-complex (KC) densities during slow-wave sleep. The secondary objective was to estimate intra-non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep differences in KC density. It is a retrospective study using EEG data included in polysomnographic records from the archive at the sleep research laboratory of the Centre for Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, India. The EEG records of 4459 minutes were used. The study presents a manual identification investigation of KCs in 17 healthy young adult male volunteers (age = 23.82±3.40 years and BMI = 23.42±4.18 kg/m2). N3 had a higher KC density than N2 (Z = -2.485, p = 0.013) for all of the probes taken together. Four EEG probes had a higher probe-specific KC density during N3. The inter-probe KC density differed significantly during N2 (χ2 = 67.91, p < .001), N3 (χ2 = 70.62, p < .001) and NREM (χ2 = 68.50, p < .001). The percent distribution of KC decreased uniformly with sleep cycles. The inter-probe differences during N3 establish the fronto-central dominance of the KC density regardless of sleep stage. This finding supports one local theory of KC generation. The significantly higher KC density during N3 may imply that the neuro-anatomical origin of slow-wave activity and KC is the same. This temporal alignment with slow-wave activity supports the sleep-promoting function of the KC.

  3. Spin-density wave state in simple hexagonal graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoyan, K. S.; Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    Simple hexagonal graphite, also known as AA graphite, is a metastable configuration of graphite. Using tight-binding approximation, it is easy to show that AA graphite is a metal with well-defined Fermi surface. The Fermi surface consists of two sheets, each shaped like a rugby ball. One sheet corresponds to electron states, another corresponds to hole states. The Fermi surface demonstrates good nesting: a suitable translation in the reciprocal space superposes one sheet onto another. In the presence of the electron-electron repulsion, a nested Fermi surface is unstable with respect to spin-density-wave ordering. This instability is studied using the mean-field theory at zero temperature, and the spin-density-wave order parameter is evaluated.

  4. Novel charge density wave transition in crystals of R 5 Ir 4 Si 10

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review the observation of novel charge density wave (CDW) transitions in ternary R5Ir4Si10 compounds. A high quality single crystal of Lu5Ir4Si10 shows the formation of a commensurate CDW along -axis below 80 K in the (ℎ, 0, ) plane that coexists with BCS type superconductivity below 3.9 K. However, in a single ...

  5. Formation of transverse waves in oblique detonations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreault, J.; Higgins, A.J.; Stowe, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of oblique detonation waves stabilized on a hypersonic wedge in mixtures characterized by a large activation energy is investigated via steady method of characteristics (MoC) calculations and unsteady computational flowfield simulations. The steady MoC solutions show that, after the

  6. Density Functional Calculations of Solid State Heats of Formation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Politzer, Peter

    1999-01-01

    It is now feasible to compute quite accurate gas phase heats of formation for relatively small molecules by means of ab initio or density functional techniques and one of several possible approaches...

  7. Learning about Black-Hole Formation from Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesden, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    The first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) discovered gravitational waves from two binary black-hole mergers. Although astrophysical black holes are simple objects fully characterized by their masses and spins, key features of binary black-hole formation such as mass transfer, natal kicks, and common-envelope evolution can misalign black-hole spins with the orbital angular momentum of the binary. These misaligned spins will precess as gravitational-wave emission causes the black holes to inspiral to separations at which the waves are detectable by observatories like LIGO. Spin precession modulates the amplitude and frequency of the gravitational waves observed by LIGO, allowing it to not only test general relativity but also reveal the secrets of black-hole formation. This talk will briefly describe those elements of binary black-hole formation responsible for initial spin misalignments, how spin precession and radiation reaction in general relativity determine how spins evolve from formation until the black holes enter LIGO’s sensitivity band, and how spin-induced gravitational-wave modulation in band can be used as a diagnostic of black-hole formation.

  8. System for gamma-gamma formation density logging while drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paske, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The patent relates to a system for logging subterranean formations for the determination of formation density by using gamma radiation. Gamma ray source and detection means are disposed within a housing adapted for positioning within a borehole for the emission and detection of gamma rays propagating through earth formations and borehole drilling fluid. The gamma ray detection means comprises first and second gamma radiation sensors geometrically disposed within the housing, the same longitudinal distance from the gamma ray source and diametrically opposed in a common plane. A formation matrix density output signal is produced in proportion to the output signal from each of the gamma ray sensors and in conjunction with certain constants established by the geometrical configuration of the sensors relative to the gamma ray source and the borehole diameter. Formation density is determined without regard to the radial position of the logging probe within the borehole in a measuring while drilling mode. 6 figs

  9. Linear density response function in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Jun; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2011-01-01

    We present an implementation of the linear density response function within the projector-augmented wave method with applications to the linear optical and dielectric properties of both solids, surfaces, and interfaces. The response function is represented in plane waves while the single...... functions of Si, C, SiC, AlP, and GaAs compare well with previous calculations. While optical properties of semiconductors, in particular excitonic effects, are generally not well described by ALDA, we obtain excellent agreement with experiments for the surface loss function of graphene and the Mg(0001......) surface with plasmon energies deviating by less than 0.2 eV. Finally, the method is applied to study the influence of substrates on the plasmon excitations in graphene....

  10. Linear and nonlinear analysis of density wave instability phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, Walter

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the mechanism of density-wave oscillations in a boiling channel with uniform and constant heat flux is analysed by linear and nonlinear analytical tools. A model developed on the basis of a semi-implicit numerical discretization of governing partial differential equations is used to provide information on the transient distribution of relevant variables along the channel during instabilities. Furthermore, a lumped parameter model and a distributed parameter model developed in previous activities are also adopted for independent confirmation of the observed trends. The obtained results are finally put in relation with the picture of the phenomenon proposed in classical descriptions. (author)

  11. Charge density wave in hydrogen at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdău, Ioan B.; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2017-10-01

    We present extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations investigating numerous candidate crystal structures for hydrogen in conditions around the present experimental frontier (400 GPa). Spontaneous phase transitions in the simulations reveal a new structure candidate comprising twofold coordinated chains of hydrogen atoms. We explain the electronic structure of this phase in terms of a charge density wave and calculate its experimental signature. In detailed tests of the accuracy of our calculation, we find that k-point sampling is far more important in MD than in static calculations, because of the freedom it give the atoms to rearrange themselves optimally for the given sampling.

  12. Investigation of density-wave oscillation in parallel boiling channels under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Xiao; Xuejun Chen; Mingyuan Zhang

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on density-wave instability in parallel boiling channels. Experiments have been done in a high pressure steam-water loop. Different types of two-phase flow instabilities have been observed, including density-wave oscillation, pressure-drop type oscillation, thermal oscillation and secondary density-wave oscillation. The secondary density-wave oscillation appears at very low exit steam quality (less than 0.1) and at the positive portion of Δ P-G curves with both channels' flow rate oscillating in phase. Density-wave oscillation can appear at pressure up to 192 bar and disappear over 207 bar. (6 figures) (Author)

  13. Incommensurate Phonon Anomaly and the Nature of Charge Density Waves in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, H.; Ishikawa, D.; Heid, R.; Le Tacon, M.; Fabbris, G.; Meyers, D.; Gu, G. D.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Dean, M. P. M.

    2018-01-01

    While charge density wave (CDW) instabilities are ubiquitous to superconducting cuprates, the different ordering wave vectors in various cuprate families have hampered a unified description of the CDW formation mechanism. Here, we investigate the temperature dependence of the low-energy phonons in the canonical CDW-ordered cuprate La1.875 Ba0.125 CuO4 . We discover that the phonon softening wave vector associated with CDW correlations becomes temperature dependent in the high-temperature precursor phase and changes from a wave vector of 0.238 reciprocal lattice units (r.l.u.) below the ordering transition temperature to 0.3 r.l.u. at 300 K. This high-temperature behavior shows that "214"-type cuprates can host CDW correlations at a similar wave vector to previously reported CDW correlations in non-214-type cuprates such as YBa2 Cu3 O6 +δ . This indicates that cuprate CDWs may arise from the same underlying instability despite their apparently different low-temperature ordering wave vectors.

  14. Shock-wave structure formation in a dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popel', S.I.; Golub', A.P.; Loseva, T.V.; Bingkhem, R.; Benkadda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Nonstationary problem on evolution perturbation and its transformation into nonlinear wave structure is considered. The method developed permits finding solution to the system of nonlinear evolution equations describing dust particles with variable charge, Boltzmann electron and inertia ions. An accurate stationary solution as ion-sonic wave structures explained by anomalous dissipation due to electric discharge of dust particles was found. Evolution of two types of initial perturbations was studied, i.e.: soliton and immobile region with increased density of ions - a step. Soliton evolution in plasma with variable charge of dust particles results in the appearance on nonstationary shock-wave structure, whereas the step evolution gives rise to appearance of a shock wave similar to the stationary one along with rarefaction wave [ru

  15. Internal wave energy flux from density perturbations in nonlinear stratifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank M.; Allshouse, Michael R.; Swinney, Harry L.; Morrison, P. J.

    2017-11-01

    Tidal flow over the topography at the bottom of the ocean, whose density varies with depth, generates internal gravity waves that have a significant impact on the energy budget of the ocean. Thus, understanding the energy flux (J = p v) is important, but it is difficult to measure simultaneously the pressure and velocity perturbation fields, p and v . In a previous work, a Green's-function-based method was developed to calculate the instantaneous p, v , and thus J , given a density perturbation field for a constant buoyancy frequency N. Here we extend the previous analytic Green's function work to include nonuniform N profiles, namely the tanh-shaped and linear cases, because background density stratifications that occur in the ocean and some experiments are nonlinear. In addition, we present a finite-difference method for the general case where N has an arbitrary profile. Each method is validated against numerical simulations. The methods we present can be applied to measured density perturbation data by using our MATLAB graphical user interface EnergyFlux. PJM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-FG05-80ET-53088. HLS and MRA were supported by ONR Grant No. N000141110701.

  16. Electrostatic lower hybrid waves excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves scattering from planar magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, T.F.; Ngo, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    Recent satellite observations demonstrate that high amplitude, short wavelength (5 m ≤ λ ≤ 100 m) electrostatic waves are commonly excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves propagating in regions of the magnetosphere and topside ionosphere where small-scale magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities are thought to exist. A new theoretical model of this phenomenon is presented, based upon passive linear scattering in a cold magnetoplasma. In this model the electrostatic waves are excited by linear mode coupling as the incident electromagnetic whistler mode waves scatter from the magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities. The excited short wavelength waves are quasi-electrostatic whistler mode waves, a type of lower hybrid wave, whose wave normal lies near the whistler mode resonance cone where the wave refractive index becomes very large. The amplitude of the excited electrostatic lower hybrid waves is calculated for a wide range of values of input electromagnetic wave frequency, wave normal direction, electron plasma frequency, gyrofrequency, ion composition, and irregularity scale and density enhancement. Results indicate that high amplitude lower hybrid waves can be excited over a wide range of parameters for irregularity density enhancements as low as 5% whenever the scale of the irregularity is of the same order as the lower hybrid wavelength

  17. Formation of rarefaction waves in origami-based metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, H; Chong, C; Charalampidis, E G; Kevrekidis, P G; Yang, J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the nonlinear wave dynamics of origami-based metamaterials composed of Tachi-Miura polyhedron (TMP) unit cells. These cells exhibit strain softening behavior under compression, which can be tuned by modifying their geometrical configurations or initial folded conditions. We assemble these TMP cells into a cluster of origami-based metamaterials, and we theoretically model and numerically analyze their wave transmission mechanism under external impact. Numerical simulations show that origami-based metamaterials can provide a prototypical platform for the formation of nonlinear coherent structures in the form of rarefaction waves, which feature a tensile wavefront upon the application of compression to the system. We also demonstrate the existence of numerically exact traveling rarefaction waves in an effective lumped-mass model. Origami-based metamaterials can be highly useful for mitigating shock waves, potentially enabling a wide variety of engineering applications.

  18. Gravity Wave Relations in Density Coordinates and Application to Constant Density Balloon Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Gelinas, L.; Mechoso, C. R.; Schubert, G.

    2008-12-01

    Super pressure balloons that are constrained to float on constant density surfaces have been used in a number of campaigns for gathering data for studies of stratospheric dynamics. The natural coordinate system for analyzing data from balloons that float at constant density is one where density, rather than geometrical height or pressure is the vertical coordinate. We show the equations of motion derived for constant density coordinates and show the gravity wave relations derived from them. Using these relations, we analyze data from the CNES VORCORE campaign, in which a total of 27 balloons circulated in the Antarctic polar stratospheric vortex during the late summer and spring of 2005. For this campaign, horizontal wind and pressure data were suitable for gravity wave analysis and we give relations for deducing the quantities (e.g., temperature and vertical wind fluctuations) required to calculate the momentum, heat and energy fluxes. We apply these relations to VORCORE data and show the results of flux calculations for balloon trajectories in various regions of the vortex.

  19. Probing Extreme-density Matter with Gravitational-wave Observations of Binary Neutron Star Merger Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, David [Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Bernuzzi, Sebastiano [Department of Mathematical, Physical and Computer Sciences, University of Parma, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Pozzo, Walter Del [Dipartimento di Fisica “Enrico Fermi,” Università di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Roberts, Luke F. [NSCL/FRIB and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 640 S Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    We present a proof-of-concept study, based on numerical-relativity simulations, of how gravitational waves (GWs) from neutron star merger remnants can probe the nature of matter at extreme densities. Phase transitions and extra degrees of freedom can emerge at densities beyond those reached during the inspiral, and typically result in a softening of the equation of state (EOS). We show that such physical effects change the qualitative dynamics of the remnant evolution, but they are not identifiable as a signature in the GW frequency, with the exception of possible black hole formation effects. The EOS softening is, instead, encoded in the GW luminosity and phase and is in principle detectable up to distances of the order of several megaparsecs with advanced detectors and up to hundreds of megaparsecs with third-generation detectors. Probing extreme-density matter will require going beyond the current paradigm and developing a more holistic strategy for modeling and analyzing postmerger GW signals.

  20. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY ON GAS SURFACE DENSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkert, Andreas; Hartmann, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Studies by Lada et al. and Heiderman et al. have suggested that star formation mostly occurs above a threshold in gas surface density Σ of Σ c ∼ 120 M ☉ pc –2 (A K ∼ 0.8). Heiderman et al. infer a threshold by combining low-mass star-forming regions, which show a steep increase in the star formation rate per unit area Σ SFR with increasing Σ, and massive cores forming luminous stars which show a linear relation. We argue that these observations do not require a particular density threshold. The steep dependence of Σ SFR , approaching unity at protostellar core densities, is a natural result of the increasing importance of self-gravity at high densities along with the corresponding decrease in evolutionary timescales. The linear behavior of Σ SFR versus Σ in massive cores is consistent with probing dense gas in gravitational collapse, forming stars at a characteristic free-fall timescale given by the use of a particular molecular tracer. The low-mass and high-mass regions show different correlations between gas surface density and the area A spanned at that density, with A ∼ Σ –3 for low-mass regions and A ∼ Σ –1 for the massive cores; this difference, along with the use of differing techniques to measure gas surface density and star formation, suggests that connecting the low-mass regions with massive cores is problematic. We show that the approximately linear relationship between dense gas mass and stellar mass used by Lada et al. similarly does not demand a particular threshold for star formation and requires continuing formation of dense gas. Our results are consistent with molecular clouds forming by galactic hydrodynamic flows with subsequent gravitational collapse

  1. Multiple charge density wave states at the surface of TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ling; Kraft, Aaron M.; Sharma, Bishnu; Singh, Manoj; Walmsley, Philip; Fisher, Ian R.; Boyer, Michael C.

    2016-11-01

    We studied TbT e3 using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the temperature range of 298-355 K. Our measurements detect a unidirectional charge density wave (CDW) state in the surface Te layer with a wave vector consistent with that of the bulk qCDW=0.30 ±0.01 c* . However, unlike previous STM measurements, and differing from measurements probing the bulk, we detect two perpendicular orientations for the unidirectional CDW with no directional preference for the in-plane crystal axes (a or c axis) and no noticeable difference in wave vector magnitude. In addition, we find regions in which the bidirectional CDW states coexist. We propose that observation of two unidirectional CDW states indicates a decoupling of the surface Te layer from the rare-earth block layer below, and that strain variations in the Te surface layer drive the local CDW direction to the specific unidirectional or, in rare occurrences, bidirectional CDW orders observed. This indicates that similar driving mechanisms for CDW formation in the bulk, where anisotropic lattice strain energy is important, are at play at the surface. Furthermore, the wave vectors for the bidirectional order we observe differ from those theoretically predicted for checkerboard order competing with stripe order in a Fermi-surface nesting scenario, suggesting that factors beyond Fermi-surface nesting drive CDW order in TbT e3 . Finally, our temperature-dependent measurements provide evidence for localized CDW formation above the bulk transition temperature TCDW.

  2. Probe initial parton density and formation time via jet quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2002-01-01

    Medium modification of jet fragmentation function due to multiple scattering and induced gluon radiation leads directly to jet quenching or suppression of leading particle distribution from jet fragmentation. One can extract an effective total parton energy loss which can be related to the total transverse momentum broadening. For an expanding medium, both are shown to be sensitive to the initial parton density and formation time. Therefore, one can extract the initial parton density and formation time from simultaneous measurements of parton energy loss and transverse momentum broadening. Implication of the recent experimental data on effects of detailed balance in parton energy loss is also discussed

  3. Vison Condensation and Bond Density Wave Order in the Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aavishkar; Allais, Andrea; Chowdhury, Debanjan; Sachdev, Subir

    We consider Z2 spin liquids on the square lattice. These can undergo a confinement transition to a valence bond solid (VBS) phase via the condensation of vortex excitations carrying Z2 magnetic flux (visons). The resulting condensed phase is described by a fully frustrated Ising model (FFIM) on the dual square lattice, with additional couplings allowed by symmetries. We argue that such a model can also apply to confinement transitions out of the fractionalized Fermi liquid (FL*) states of doped antiferromagnets. We study the low energy states of such a model and discuss their implications for the incommensurate d-form factor bond density wave order observed in several recent experiments on the cuprate superconductors.

  4. Shock wave velocity and shock pressure for low density powders : A novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new

  5. SHOCK-WAVE VELOCITY AND SHOCK PRESSURE FOR LOW-DENSITY POWDERS - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKEN, DK; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new

  6. De Haas-van Alphen oscillations in the charge-density wave compound lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Borzi, R.A.; Rost, A.; Mackenzie, A.P.; /St. Andrews U., Phys. Astron.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; /Bristol U.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    De Haas-van Alphen oscillations were measured in lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe{sub 3}) to probe the partially gapped Fermi surface resulting from charge density wave (CDW) formation. Three distinct frequencies were observed, one of which can be correlated with a FS sheet that is unaltered by CDW formation. The other two frequencies arise from FS sheets that have been reconstructed in the CDW state.

  7. Density-waves instability and a skyrmion lattice on the surface of strong topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Yuval; Stern, Ady

    2012-11-01

    In this work we analyze the instability conditions for spin-density-wave (SDW) formation on the surface of strong topological insulators. We find that for a certain range of Fermi energies and strength of interactions the SDW state is favored compared to the unmagnetized and the uniform-magnetization states. We also find that the SDWs are of spiral nature and, for a certain range of parameters, a Skyrmion lattice may form on the surface. We show that this phase may have a nontrivial Chern number even in the absence of an external magnetic field.

  8. Formation of black hole and emission of gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-12-01

    Numerical simulations were performed for the formation process of rotating black holes. It is suggested that Kerr black holes are formed for wide ranges of initial parameters. The nature of gravitational waves from a test particle falling into a Kerr black hole as well as the development of 3D numerical relativity for the coalescing binary neutron stars are discussed.

  9. Sand ripples under sea waves. Part 4. Tile ripple formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Pieter C.; Blondeaux, P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the formation of small-scale three-dimensional bedforms due to interactions of an erodible bed with a sea wave that obliquely approaches the coast, being partially reflected at the beach. In this case the trajectories of fluid particles at the top of the bottom boundary layer are

  10. MILLIMETER WAVE SPECTRUM AND ASTRONOMICAL SEARCH FOR VINYL FORMATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E. R.; Kolesniková, L.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Área de Química-Física, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Parque Científico UVa, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J. [Grupo de Astrofísica Molecular, ICMM-CSIC, C/Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, E-28049 Cantoblanco (Spain); Guillemin, J.-C. [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, 11 Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, F-35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France)

    2016-11-20

    Previous detections of methyl and ethyl formate make other small substituted formates potential candidates for observation in the interstellar medium. Among them, vinyl formate is one of the simplest unsaturated carboxylic ester. The aim of this work is to provide direct experimental frequencies of the ground vibrational state of vinyl formate in a large spectral range for astrophysical use. The room-temperature rotational spectrum of vinyl formate has been measured from 80 to 360 GHz and analyzed in terms of Watson’s semirigid rotor Hamiltonian. Two thousand six hundred transitions within J = 3–88 and K {sub a} = 0–28 were assigned to the most stable conformer of vinyl formate and a new set of spectroscopic constants was accurately determined. Spectral features of vinyl formate were then searched for in Orion KL, Sgr B2(N), B1-b, and TMC-1 molecular clouds. Upper limits to the column density of vinyl formate are provided.

  11. Formation of ice supersaturation by mesoscale gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spichtinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the formation and evolution of an ice-supersaturated region (ISSR that was detected by means of an operational radiosonde sounding launched from the meteorological station of Lindenberg on 21 March 2000, 00:00 UTC. The supersaturated layer was situated below the local tropopause, between 320 and 408 hPa altitude. Our investigation uses satellite imagery from METEOSAT and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR and analyses of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. Mesoscale simulations reveal that the ISSR was formed by a temporary vertical uplift of upper tropospheric air parcels by 20 to 40 hPa in 1 to 2 h. This resulted in a significant local increase of the specific humidity by the moisture transport from below. The ascent was triggered by the superposition of two internal gravity waves, a mountain wave induced by flow past the Erzgebirge and Riesengebirge south of Lindenberg, and an inertial gravity wave excited by the anti-cyclonically curved jet stream over the Baltic Sea. The wave-induced ISSR was rather thick with a depth of about 2 km. The wave-induced upward motion causing the supersaturation also triggered the formation of a cirrus cloud. METEOSAT imagery shows that the cirrus cloud got optically thick within two hours. During this period another longer lasting thin but extended cirrus existed just beneath the tropopause. The wave-induced ISSR disappeared after about half a day in accordance with the decaying wave activity.

  12. Helicon wave propagation and plasma equilibrium in high-density hydrogen plasma in converging magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses Marin, Juan Francisco

    In this thesis, we investigate wave propagation and plasma equilibrium in MAGPIE, a helicon based linear plasma device constructed at the Australian National University, to study plasma-material interactions under divertor-relevant plasma conditions. We show that MAGPIE is capable of producing low temperature (1–8 eV) high density hydrogen plasma (2–3x10. 19 m-3) with 20 kW of RF power when the confining magnetic field is converging. The original research herein described comprises: (1) Characterization of hydrogen plasma in MAGPIE, (2) Analysis of the RF compensation of double Langmuir probes, (3) Excitation, propagation and damping of helicon waves in uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields and (4) Steady-state force balance and equilibrium profiles in MAGPIE. We develop an analytical model of the physics of floating probes to describe and quantify the RF compensation of the DLP technique. Experimental validation for the model is provided. We show that (1) whenever finite sheath effects are important, overestimation of the ion density is proportional to the level of RF rectification and suggest that (2) electron temperature measurements are weakly affected. We develop a uniform plasma full wave code to describe wave propagation in MAGPIE. We show that under typical MAGPIE operating conditions, the helical antenna is not optimized to couple waves in the plasma; instead, the antenna’s azimuthal current rings excites helicon waves which propagate approximately along the whistler wave ray direction, constructively interfere on-axis and lead to the formation of an axial interference pattern. We show that helicon wave attenuation can be explained entirely through electron-ion and electron-neutral collisions. Results from a two-dimensional full wave code reveal that RF power deposition is axially non-uniform with both edge and on-axis components associated with the TG and helicon wave respectively. Finally, force balance analysis in MAGPIE using a two-fluid

  13. Persistent Charge-Density-Wave Order in Single-Layer TaSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyejin; Chen, Yi; Kim, Heejung; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Tang, Shujie; Jiang, Juan; Liou, Franklin; Kahn, Salman; Jia, Caihong; Omrani, Arash A; Shim, Ji Hoon; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Kim, Kyoo; Min, Byung Il; Hwang, Choongyu; Crommie, Michael F; Mo, Sung-Kwan

    2018-02-14

    We present the electronic characterization of single-layer 1H-TaSe 2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. We demonstrate that 3 × 3 charge-density-wave (CDW) order persists despite distinct changes in the low energy electronic structure highlighted by the reduction in the number of bands crossing the Fermi energy and the corresponding modification of Fermi surface topology. Enhanced spin-orbit coupling and lattice distortion in the single-layer play a crucial role in the formation of CDW order. Our findings provide a deeper understanding of the nature of CDW order in the two-dimensional limit.

  14. Interference effects in the nonlinear charge density wave dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelcic, D.; Batistic, I.; Bjelis, A.

    1987-12-01

    The main features of the nonlinear charge density wave transport in the external dc-ac field are shown to be the natural consequences of resonant phase slip diffusion. This process is treated numerically within the time dependent Landau-Ginzburg model, developed by Gor'kov. The resonances in the ac field are manifested as Shapiro steps in I-V characteristics, present at all rational ratios of internal frequency of current oscillations and external ac frequency. The origin of Shapiro steps, as well as their forms and heights, are cosidered in detail. In particular, it is shown that close to resonances the phase slip voltage acquires a highly nonsinusoidal modulation which leads to the appearance of low frequency and satellite peaks in the Fourier spectrum. Taking into account the interference of adjacent phase slips and the segment or domain structure of physical samples, we interpret the finite width of steps, side wings, synchronization, incomplete and complete mode locking and some other effects observed in numerous experiments on NbSe 3 and other CDW materials. (author). 36 refs, 12 figs

  15. Internal wave patterns in enclosed density-stratified and rotating fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, A.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stratified fluids support internal waves, which propagate obliquely through the fluid. The angle with respectto the stratification direction is contrained: it is purely determined by the wave frequency and the strength of the density stratification (internal gravity waves) or the rotation rate

  16. Far-Infrared Study of the Charge Density Wave in Tetrathiofulvalene Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, D. B.; Cummings, K. D.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1981-01-01

    Detailed far-infrared measurements at temperatures from 25 to 300 K provide strong support for a charge-density-wave mechanism for the dc conductivity and microwave dielectric constant of tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ). At low temperatures the charge-density wave is pinned...... at 40 cm-1 while at higher temperatures it appears at zero frequency. Values are obtained for the effective mass (20m*) and lifetime (1.6×10-12 sec at 60 K) of the charge-density wave.......Detailed far-infrared measurements at temperatures from 25 to 300 K provide strong support for a charge-density-wave mechanism for the dc conductivity and microwave dielectric constant of tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ). At low temperatures the charge-density wave is pinned...

  17. Nonlinear Wave Propagation and Solitary Wave Formation in Two-Dimensional Heterogeneous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Luna, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    Solitary wave formation is a well studied nonlinear phenomenon arising in propagation of dispersive nonlinear waves under suitable conditions. In non-homogeneous materials, dispersion may happen due to effective reflections between the material interfaces. This dispersion has been used along with nonlinearities to find solitary wave formation using the one-dimensional p-system. These solitary waves are called stegotons. The main goal in this work is to find two-dimensional stegoton formation. To do so we consider the nonlinear two-dimensional p-system with variable coefficients and solve it using finite volume methods. The second goal is to obtain effective equations that describe the macroscopic behavior of the variable coefficient system by a constant coefficient one. This is done through a homogenization process based on multiple-scale asymptotic expansions. We compare the solution of the effective equations with the finite volume results and find a good agreement. Finally, we study some stability properties of the homogenized equations and find they and one-dimensional versions of them are unstable in general.

  18. Studies on the propagation of relativistic plasma waves in high density plasmas produced by hypersonic ionizing shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.; Johnson, J.A. III

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using an ionizing shock wave to produce high density plasmas suitable for the propagation large amplitude relativistic plasma waves is being investigated. A 20 kv arc driven shock tube of coaxial geometry produces a hypersonic shock wave (10 p > 10 17 cm -3 ). The shock can be made to reflect off the end of the tube, collide with its wake, and thus increase the plasma density further. After reflecting, the plasma is at rest. The shock speed is measured using piezoelectric pressure probes and the ion density is measured using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques on argon 488.0 nm and 422.8 nm lines. The future plans are to excite large amplitude relativistic plasma waves in this plasma by either injecting a short pulse laser (Laser Wake Field Scheme), two beating lasers (Plasma Beat Wave Scheme), or a short bunch of relativistic electrons (Plasma Wake Field Scheme). Results of recent computational and theoretical studies, as well as initial experimental measurements on the plasma using LIF, are reported. Implications for the application of high density plasmas produced in this way to such novel schemes as the plasma wave accelerator, photon accelerator, plasma wave undulator, and also plasma lens, are discussed. The effect of plasma turbulence is also discussed

  19. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  20. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. III. Density and Magnetically Regulated Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Christie, Duncan; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Van Loo, Sven; Collins, David

    2017-06-01

    We study giant molecular cloud (GMC) collisions and their ability to trigger star cluster formation. We further develop our three-dimensional magnetized, turbulent, colliding GMC simulations by implementing star formation subgrid models. Two such models are explored: (1) “Density-Regulated,” I.e., fixed efficiency per free-fall time above a set density threshold and (2) “Magnetically Regulated,” I.e., fixed efficiency per free-fall time in regions that are magnetically supercritical. Variations of parameters associated with these models are also explored. In the non-colliding simulations, the overall level of star formation is sensitive to model parameter choices that relate to effective density thresholds. In the GMC collision simulations, the final star formation rates and efficiencies are relatively independent of these parameters. Between the non-colliding and colliding cases, we compare the morphologies of the resulting star clusters, properties of star-forming gas, time evolution of the star formation rate (SFR), spatial clustering of the stars, and resulting kinematics of the stars in comparison to the natal gas. We find that typical collisions, by creating larger amounts of dense gas, trigger earlier and enhanced star formation, resulting in 10 times higher SFRs and efficiencies. The star clusters formed from GMC collisions show greater spatial substructure and more disturbed kinematics.

  1. Formation energies of rutile metal dioxides using density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We apply standard density functional theory at the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) level to study the stability of rutile metal oxides. It is well known that standard GGA exchange and correlation in some cases is not sufficient to address reduction and oxidation reactions. Especially......, Ge, Ti, Cr, Nb, W, Mo, and V, using the electrochemical series as reference. The mean absolute error of the formation energy is 0.29 eV using the revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) GGA functional. We believe that the reason for the success is due to the reference level being H-2 and H2O and not O-2...

  2. Evolution of the SOL plasma background at density shoulder formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Isa, Federico Antonio; Carralero, Daniel; Lunt, Tilmann

    2016-01-01

    One of the main problems of our age is the ever increasing demand of energy. This prompts the search for new energy sources which should have the advantages of being nearly inexhaustible and usable to produce a predictable amount of energy. A possible solution is to build a reactor based on nuclear fusion. ITER will be the first divertor Tokamak to reach fusion break even and it will pave the way to a commercial use of fusion to produce sustainable and clean energy. One of the biggest obstacles to the construction of a commercial fusion reactor is represented by the heat and particle flux toward the main chamber plasma facing components and the divertor targets. A fusion reactor will likely experience power loads and erosion on the verge of the technical limits of available plasma facing materials. To predict properly the distribution of those fluxes between the divertor and the main chamber, a better understanding of the physics in the open field lines region (called Scrape-off layer or SOL) is required. This thesis, being developed in partnership with the Max-Planck-institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Garching bei Muenchen, DE), is framed in this context. In the SOL of L-mode (low confinement) discharges, qualitatively two kinds of density profiles can be distinguished. The first one is characterized by a strong density gradient in the vicinity of the separatrix, followed by a flat region towards the far SOL. The second profile lacks such a strong gradient and displays an almost linear decay in the whole SOL. The latter kind of density profile is characterized by stronger fluxes toward the first wall with respect to the first kind. This my be a threat for the ITER unlike the divertor targets which are made of tungsten, the first wall will be made beryllium which can suffer damage from sputtering. This work is focused on understanding the physics behind the transition between those two profiles, the so-called density shoulder formation. After the shoulder formation it is

  3. 3D High Density mmWave Interconnects, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuvotronics has developed and optimized the PolyStrataTM process for the fabrication of intricate microwave and millimeter-wave devices. These devices have primarily...

  4. 3D High Density mmWave Interconnects Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuvotronics has developed and optimized the PolyStrataTM process for the fabrication of intricate microwave and millimeter-wave devices. These devices have primarily...

  5. 3D High Density Wave Interconnects, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuvotronics has developed and optimized the PolyStrataTM process for the fabrication of intricate microwave and millimeter-wave devices. These devices have primarily...

  6. GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L; Grand, S P

    2010-03-30

    GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are

  7. Optimization of sources for focusing wave energy in targeted formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C

    2010-06-08

    We discuss a numerical approach for identifying the surface excitation that is necessary to maximize the response of a targeted subsurface formation. The motivation stems from observations in the aftermath of earthquakes, and from limited field experiments, whereby increased oil production rates were recorded and were solely attributable to the induced reservoir shaking. The observations suggest that focusing wave energy to the reservoir could serve as an effective low-cost enhanced oil recovery method. In this paper, we report on a general method that allows the determination of the source excitation, when provided with a desired maximization outcome at the targeted formation. We discuss, for example, how to construct the excitation that will maximize the kinetic energy in the target zone, while keeping silent the neighbouring zones. To this end, we cast the problem as an inverse-source problem, and use a partial-differential- equation-constrained optimization approach to arrive at an optimized source signal. We seek to satisfy stationarity of an augmented functional, which formally leads to a triplet of state, adjoint and control problems. We use finite elements to resolve the state and adjoint problems, and an iterative scheme to satisfy the control problem to converge to the sought source signal. We report on one-dimensional numerical experiments in the time domain involving a layered medium of semi-infinite extent. The numerical results show that the targeted formation\\'s kinetic energy resulting from an optimized wave source could be several times greater than the one resulting from a blind source choice, and could overcome the mobility threshold of entrapped reservoir oil. © 2010 Nanjing Geophysical Research Institute.

  8. Interstellar electron density fluctuations due to cosmic-ray acceleration at supernova remnant shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, C.E.; Zachary, A.; Arons, J.

    1988-01-01

    We have performed computer simulations to investigate whether sizeable electron density fluctuations might be produced in the process of cosmic-ray acceleration at supernova remnant shock waves. The hypothesis is the following: Cosmic-ray acceleration via a Fermi I mechanism leads to large-amplitude Alfven waves upstream of a supernova remnant shock wave. If the Alfven waves reach a large enough amplitude, they can drive sound waves in the interstellar medium. The fluctuations in the electron density due to these sound waves will then contribute to the observed interstellar scintillation. Our simulations suggest that this mechanism may be a plausible one. Issues remaining to be addressed include the resulting filling factor, and the integrated strength C 2 /sub n/ to be expected for the turbulence

  9. VG1 J PLASMA WAVE SPECTROMETER DENSITY 1S V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electron plasma density data set for Jupiter's outer magnetosphere derived from high-resolution wideband measurements of low-frequency radio and plasma waves...

  10. VG2 J PLASMA WAVE SPECTROMETER DENSITY 1S V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electron plasma density data set for Jupiter's outer magnetosphere derived from high-resolution wideband measurements of low-frequency radio and plasma waves...

  11. Plasma mass density, species mix and fluctuation diagnostics using fast Alfven wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezi, H.; deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Snider, R.T.

    1996-06-01

    The authors propose to employ a fast Alfven wave interferometer and reflectometer as a tokamak diagnostic to measure the plasma mass density, D-T species mix profile, and density fluctuations. Utilize the property that the phase velocity of the fast wave propagating across the magnetic field is the Alfven speed with thermal correction, this fast wave interferometer on the DIII-D tokamak was successfully used to obtain the line integrated density. Since the position of the ion-ion hybrid cut-off in tokamaks is uniquely determined by the species mix ratio and the wave frequency, the reflectometer arrangement finds the species mix profile. The inversion method of reflectometry is discussed. The multiple chord interferometer also measures the mass density fluctuation profile

  12. Damping-Growth Transition for Ion-Acoustic Waves in a Density Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    A damping-growth transition for ion-acoustic waves propagating in a nonuniform plasma (e-folding length for the density ln) is observed at a wavelength λ∼2πln. This result supports calculations performed in connection with the problem of heating of the solar corona by ion-acoustic waves generated...... in the solar photosphere....

  13. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear dynamics of packets of spiral density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchagin, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    In a numerical experiment, the behavior of nonlinear packets of spiral density waves in a gas disk has been investigated for different initial wave amplitudes. If the amplitude of the density perturbations is small (<5%), the wave packet is drawn toward the center or toward the periphery of the disk in accordance with the linear theory. The behavior of linear packets of waves with wavelength comparable to the disk radius (R/sub d//lambda = 4) exhibits good agreement with the conclusions of the linear theory of tightly wound spiral waves. The dynamics of wave packets with initial density amplitudes 16, 30, 50% demonstrates the nonlinear nature of the behavior. THe behavior is governed by whether or not the nonlinear effects of higher than third order in the wave amplitude play a part. If the wave packet dynamics is determined by the cubic nonlinearity, the results of the numerical experiment are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the nonlinear theory of short waves, although the characteristic scale of the packet and the wavelength are of the order of the disk radius. In the cases when the nonlinear effects of higher orders in the amplitude play an important part, the behavior of a packet does not differ qualitatively from the behavior predicted by the theory of cubic nonlinearity, but the nonlinear spreading of the packet takes place more rapidly

  14. Energy density and energy flow of surface waves in a strongly magnetized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2018-01-01

    General expressions for the energy density and energy flow of plasmonic waves in a two-dimensional massless electron gas (as a simple model of graphene) are obtained by means of the linearized magneto-hydrodynamic model and classical electromagnetic theory when a strong external magnetic field perpendicular to the system is present. Also, analytical expressions for the energy velocity, wave polarization, wave impedance, transverse and longitudinal field strength functions, and attenuation length of surface magneto-plasmon-polariton waves are derived, and numerical results are prepared.

  15. High density nuclear Mach shock waves in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, H.; Hofmann, J.; Scheid, W.; Greiner, W.

    1976-01-01

    The occurrence of high density nuclear Mach shock waves in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and related phenomena, as density isomers, highly isobaric and hot nuclear matter, pionization and granulation of dense matter, compressibility and soundwaves in nuclear matter, are discussed

  16. Conversion of localized lower hybrid oscillations and fast magnetosonic waves at a plasma density cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.O.

    2004-01-01

    Analytic expressions are presented for conversion of localized lower hybrid oscillations and magnetosonic waves by scattering off a small scale density cavity. The governing equations are solved in slab geometry with wave vectors perpendicular to both the ambient magnetic field and the density gradient associated with density cavity using a scale length separation method. The theory predicts strong excitation of localized lower hybrid oscillations for a set of frequencies between the lower hybrid frequency of the ambient plasma and the minimum lower hybrid frequency inside the cavity. The theory is relevant for the lower hybrid solitary structures observed in space plasmas

  17. On the energy-momentum density of gravitational plane waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dereli, T; Tucker, R W

    2004-01-01

    By embedding Einstein's original formulation of general relativity into a broader context, we show that a dynamic covariant description of gravitational stress-energy emerges naturally from a variational principle. A tensor T G is constructed from a contraction of the Bel tensor with a symmetric covariant second degree tensor field Φ and has a form analogous to the stress-energy tensor of the Maxwell field in an arbitrary spacetime. For plane-fronted gravitational waves helicity-2 polarized (graviton) states can be identified carrying non-zero energy and momentum

  18. Unidirectional spin density wave state in metallic (Sr1−xLax)2IrO4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang; Schmehr, Julian L.; Islam, Zahirul; Porter, Zach; Zoghlin, Eli; Finkelstein, Kenneth; Ruff, Jacob P. C.; Wilson, Stephen D.

    2018-01-09

    Materials that exhibit both strong spin–orbit coupling and electron correlation effects are predicted to host numerous new electronic states. One prominent example is the Jeff = 1/2 Mott state in Sr2IrO4, where introducing carriers is predicted to manifest high temperature superconductivity analogous to the S=1/2 Mott state of La2CuO4. While bulk super- conductivity currently remains elusive, anomalous quasiparticle behaviors paralleling those in the cuprates such as pseudogap formation and the formation of a d-wave gap are observed upon electron-doping Sr2IrO4. Here we establish a magnetic parallel between electron-doped Sr2IrO4 and hole-doped La2CuO4 by unveiling a spin density wave state in electron-doped Sr2IrO4. Our magnetic resonant X-ray scattering data reveal the presence of an incom- mensurate magnetic state reminiscent of the diagonal spin density wave state observed in the monolayer cuprate (La1−xSrx)2CuO4. This link supports the conjecture that the quenched Mott phases in electron-doped Sr2IrO4 and hole-doped La2CuO4 support common competing electronic phases.

  19. Energy density and velocity of electromagnetic waves in lossy chiral medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyev, O B

    2014-01-01

    The average energy density of the macroscopic quasimonochromatic electromagnetic field U ts (t,r) in a linear passive chiral lossy medium described by the constitutive E–H relations is determined using a microscopic model. According to the model, U ts (t,r) is equal to the sum of the average energy densities of the electromagnetic field in free space U t0 (t,r) and electromagnetic oscillations in structural elements U s (t,r) induced by the electromagnetic wave. Making use of the Poynting theorem, the energy density U ts (t,r)≥U t0 (t,r) and power density of losses are derived as functions of the Poynting vector, polarization of the electromagnetic waves, phase shift between the field vectors and refractive index of a chiral medium. The exact energy velocity of the quasimonochromatic electromagnetic waves satisfying relativistic causality is determined using U ts (t,r). The approximate energy velocities of the quasimonochromatic electromagnetic wave are determined using energy density components approximating U ts (t,r) (e.g., the sum of the positive energy densities of the macroscopic electric and magnetic fields as well as the energy density of magnetoelectric cross-coupling). Comparison of the exact and approximate energy velocities with the group velocity in the case of a chiral lossy medium with a single-resonant frequency clarifies the concept of the electromagnetic energy and demonstrates the fundamental significance of the exact energy velocity. (paper)

  20. Suspended liquid particle disturbance on laser-induced blast wave and low density distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, Takahiro; Zare-Behtash, Hossein; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2017-12-01

    The impurity effect of suspended liquid particles on the laser-induced gas breakdown was experimentally investigated in quiescent gas. The focus of this study is the investigation of the influence of the impurities on the shock wave structure as well as the low density distribution. A 532 nm Nd:YAG laser beam with an 188 mJ/pulse was focused on the chamber filled with suspended liquid particles 0.9 ± 0.63 μm in diameter. Several shock waves are generated by multiple gas breakdowns along the beam path in the breakdown with particles. Four types of shock wave structures can be observed: (1) the dual blast waves with a similar shock radius, (2) the dual blast waves with a large shock radius at the lower breakdown, (3) the dual blast waves with a large shock radius at the upper breakdown, and (4) the triple blast waves. The independent blast waves interact with each other and enhance the shock strength behind the shock front in the lateral direction. The triple blast waves lead to the strongest shock wave in all cases. The shock wave front that propagates toward the opposite laser focal spot impinges on one another, and thereafter a transmitted shock wave (TSW) appears. The TSW interacts with the low density core called a kernel; the kernel then longitudinally expands quickly due to a Richtmyer-Meshkov-like instability. The laser-particle interaction causes an increase in the kernel volume which is approximately five times as large as that in the gas breakdown without particles. In addition, the laser-particle interaction can improve the laser energy efficiency.

  1. Structured mass density slab as a waveguide of fast magnetoacoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.

    Coronal loops are waveguides for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. These loops are expected to be structured. Therefore, in the present paper, we numerically studied the propagation of the fast MHD waves in the structured density slab (composed from a broad density slab with one axisymmetric narrow sub-slab superposed), and analysed the wave signals. Then, this structured slab was divided into its components, i.e., to simple broad and narrow slabs and the same analysis was made. We compared results of both these cases. For the calculations we adopted a two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solved a full set of ideal time-dependent MHD equations using the FLASH code, applying the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. To initiate the fast sausage magnetoacoustic waves, we used axisymmetric Gaussian velocity perturbation. Wave signals were detected in different locations along the slab and as a diagnostic tool of these waves, the wavelet analysis method has been used. We found that for the structured density slab with sufficiently sharp boundaries, i.e., for good quality waveguides (without an energy leakage), the guided waves in the structured slab behave similarly as in its separated (simple slab) components.

  2. Millimeter-wave Line Ratios and Sub-beam Volume Density Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Gallagher, Molly [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Usero, Antonio [Observatorio Astronmico Nacional (IGN), C/Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Schruba, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bigiel, Frank [Institute für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Schinnerer, Eva [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstraße 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kepley, Amanda [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Bolatto, Alberto D. [Department of Astronomy, Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, and Joint Space Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Cormier, Diane; Jiménez-Donaire, Maria J. [Max Planck Institute für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Hughes, Annie [CNRS, IRAP, 9 av. du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2017-02-01

    We explore the use of mm-wave emission line ratios to trace molecular gas density when observations integrate over a wide range of volume densities within a single telescope beam. For observations targeting external galaxies, this case is unavoidable. Using a framework similar to that of Krumholz and Thompson, we model emission for a set of common extragalactic lines from lognormal and power law density distributions. We consider the median density of gas that produces emission and the ability to predict density variations from observed line ratios. We emphasize line ratio variations because these do not require us to know the absolute abundance of our tracers. Patterns of line ratio variations have the potential to illuminate the high-end shape of the density distribution, and to capture changes in the dense gas fraction and median volume density. Our results with and without a high-density power law tail differ appreciably; we highlight better knowledge of the probability density function (PDF) shape as an important area. We also show the implications of sub-beam density distributions for isotopologue studies targeting dense gas tracers. Differential excitation often implies a significant correction to the naive case. We provide tabulated versions of many of our results, which can be used to interpret changes in mm-wave line ratios in terms of adjustments to the underlying density distributions.

  3. The influence of the edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beam propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelli, N.; Balakin, A.A.; Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the electron cyclotron (EC) wave beam propagation in the presence of edge density fluctuations by means of a quasi-optical code [Balakin A. A. et al, Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 065003] is presented. The effects of the density fluctuations on the wave beam propagation...... are estimated in a vacuum beam propagation between the edge density layer and the EC resonance absorption layer. Consequences on the EC beam propagation are investigated by using a simplified model in which the density fluctuations are described by a single harmonic oscillation. In addition, quasi......-optical calculations are shown by using edge density fluctuations as calculated by two-dimensional interchange turbulence simulations and validated with the experimental data [O. E. Garcia et al, Nucl. Fusion 47 (2007) 667]...

  4. Optical Properties of the Charge-Density-Wave Polychalcogenide Compounds R2Te5 (R=Nd, Sm and Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuner, F.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate the rare-earth polychalcogenide R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (R = Nd, Sm and Gd) charge-density-wave (CDW) compounds by optical methods. From the absorption spectrum we extract the excitation energy of the CDW gap and estimate the fraction of the Fermi surface which is gapped by the formation of the CDW condensate. In analogy to previous findings on the related RTe{sub n} (n = 2 and 3) families, we establish the progressive closing of the CDW gap and the moderate enhancement of the metallic component upon chemically compressing the lattice.

  5. Glass transition in the spin-density wave phase of (TMTSF)2PF6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasjaunias, J.C.; Biljakovic, K.; Nad, F.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of low frequency dielectric measurements and a detailed kinetic investigation of the specific heat anomaly in the spin-density wave phase of (TMTSF)(2)PF6 in the temperature range between 2 and 4 K. The dielectric relaxation shows a critical slowing down towards a ''static'......'' glass transition around 2 K. The jump in the specific heat in different controlled kinetic conditions shows all the characteristics of freezing in supercooled liquids. Both effects give direct evidence of a glass transition in the spin-density wave ground state.......We present the results of low frequency dielectric measurements and a detailed kinetic investigation of the specific heat anomaly in the spin-density wave phase of (TMTSF)(2)PF6 in the temperature range between 2 and 4 K. The dielectric relaxation shows a critical slowing down towards a ''static...

  6. Chiral anomaly, charge density waves, and axion strings from Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    We study dynamical instability and chiral symmetry breaking in three-dimensional Weyl semimetals, which turns Weyl semimetals into “axion insulators.” Charge density waves (CDWs) are found to be the natural consequence of chiral symmetry breaking. The phase mode of this charge density wave state is identified as the axion, which couples to an electromagnetic field in the topological θE·B term. One of our main results is that “axion strings” can be realized as the (screw or edge) dislocations in the charge density wave, which provides a simple physical picture for the elusive axion strings. These axion strings carry gapless chiral modes, therefore they have important implications for dissipationless transport properties of Weyl semimetals with broken symmetry.

  7. Statistical characteristics of a stochastic background of gravitational waves from neutron star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, David; Burman, Ron; Blair, David [Department of Physics, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2002-04-07

    By using a recent model for the evolving star formation rate, we investigate the statistical distribution of gravitational wave amplitudes due to supernovae that result in neutron star formation in the Einstein-de Sitter cosmology. To account for the uncertainty in gravitational wave emission for this source type, we use a random mixture of three simulated waveform types computed by Zwerger and Mueller. We investigate statistical parameters of the resulting gravitational wave amplitude distribution in our frame.

  8. Density waves in Saturn's rings probed by radio and optical occultation - Observational tests of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Thomas G.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A parallel examination is conducted of Voyager radio and photopolarimeter occultation observations of the Saturn A ring's density waves. The radio instrument waves exhibit an average -90 deg offset from the dynamical phase. A warping height of about 100-m amplitude can qualtitatively reproduce this phase shift, while preserving the overall model wave shape. These results may be profoundly relevant for satellite-ring torque calculations in Saturn's rings, given the deposition of all of the net torque of the standard model in the first wavelength.

  9. Lagrangian analysis of two-phase hydrodynamic and nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1974-01-01

    The mathematical technique known as the ''method of characteristics'' has been used to construct an exact, analytical solution to predict the onset of density-wave oscillations in diabatic two-phase systems, such as Boiling Water Nuclear Reactors (BWR's). Specifically, heater wall dynamics, boiling boundary dynamics and nuclear kinetics have been accounted for in this analysis. Emphasis is placed on giving the reader a clear physical understanding of the phenomena of two-phase density-wave oscillations. Explanations are presented in terms of block diagram logic, and phasor representations of the various pressure drop perturbations are given. (U.S.)

  10. Charge-density waves studied at the surface and at the atomic scale in NbSe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Christophe; Wang, Zhao-Zhong; Monceau, Pierre; Brazovskii, Serguei

    2012-01-01

    We have studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the two charge-density wave (CDW) transitions in NbSe 3 on in situ cleaved (b,c) plane. We could identify the three types of chains existing inside a single unit cell as well as characterize how both CDWs are distributed on these elementary chains. We also followed between 5 and 140 K the temperature dependence of first-order CDW satellite spots, obtained from the Fourier transform of the STM images, to extract the surface critical temperatures (T s ). Whereas the high-temperature CDW appears to have comparable critical temperature to the bulk one, the low-T CDW transition occurs at T 2s =70–75K, more than 15 K above the bulk T 2b =59K while at exactly the same wave number. A reasonable mechanism for such an unusually high surface enhancement is a softening of transverse phonon modes involved in the CDW formation.

  11. Phase transitions to dipolar clusters and charge density waves in high T{sub c} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarela, M., E-mail: Mikko.Saarela@oulu.fi [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Kusmartsev, F.V. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    We show that doping of hole charge carriers leads to formation of electric dipolar clusters in cuprates. They are created by many-body interactions between the dopant ion outside and holes inside the CuO planes. Because of the two-fold degeneracy holes in the CuO plane cluster into four-particles resonance valence bond plaquettes bound with dopant ions. Such dipoles may order into charge-density waves (CDW) or stripes or form a disordered state depending on doping and temperature. The lowest energy of the ordered system corresponds to a local anti-ferroelectric ordering. The mobility of individual disordered dipoles is very low at low temperatures and they prefer first to bind into dipole-dipole pairs. Electromagnetic radiation interacts strongly with electric dipoles and when the sample is subjected to it the mobility changes significantly. This leads to a fractal growth of dipolar clusters. The existence of electric dipoles and CDW induce two phase transitions with increasing temperature, melting of the ordered state and disappearance of the dipolar state. Ferroelectricity at low doping is a natural consequence of such dipole moments. We develop a theory based on two-level systems and dipole-dipole interaction to explain the behavior of the polarization as a function of temperature and electric field.

  12. Coexistence of superconductivity and density waves in quasi-two-dimensional metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismer, Jan-Peter

    2011-06-03

    This dissertation deals with the high-temperature superconductivity in the hole- and electron-doped copper superconductors. In the first part, superconducting phases are investigated on a background of different types of density waves. Singlet superconductivity is studied with s- and d-wave symmetry on a background of spin, charge or D-density waves with respect to stability as well as phase structure and impulse dependence of the gap function. In the second part, the dynamic spin susceptibility for different phases is calculated and compared with experimental data extracted from results of inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The observed phases are d-wave superconductivity, D-density wave, and coexistence of the two. For d-wave superconductivity, the influence of a magnetic field parallel to the copper oxide layer and the temperature development of the susceptibility when for T >> T{sub c} a spin density wave phase is present are investigated. [German] Diese Dissertation beschaeftigt sich mit der Hochtemperatursupraleitung in den loch- und elektron-dotierten Kuprat-Supraleitern. Im ersten Teil der Arbeit werden supraleitende Phasen auf einem Hintergrund verschiedener Typen von Dichtewellen untersucht. Es wird Singlett-Supraleitung mit s- und d-Wellen-Symmetrie auf einem Hintergrund von Spin-, Ladungs- oder D-Dichtewelle hinsichtlich Stabilitaet sowie Phasenstruktur und Impulsabhaengigkeit der Gapfunktion untersucht. Im zweiten Teil wird die dynamische Spinsuszeptibilitaet fuer verschiedene Phasen berechnet und mit experimentellen Daten verglichen, die aus Ergebnissen von Inelastischen Neutronenstreuungsexperimenten extrahiert wurden. Die betrachteten Phasen sind d-Wellen-Supraleitung, D-Dichtewelle und Koexistenz der beiden. Fuer d-Wellen-Supraleitung werden der Einfluss eines Magnetfelds parallel zur Kupferoxidschicht und die Temperaturentwicklung der Suszeptibilitaet, wenn fuer T >> T{sub c} eine Spin-Dichtewelle-Phase vorliegt, untersucht.

  13. Computational analysis of hot-spot formation by quasi-steady deformation waves in porous explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, John; Chakravarthy, Sunada; Gonthier, Keith A.

    2013-05-01

    The impact and shock sensitivity of porous (granular) high-explosives is related to the formation of small mass regions of elevated temperature within the material called hot-spots by dissipative mechanisms such as plastic and friction work. Because of their small size, hot-spots are difficult to experimentally interrogate, particularly for high volumetric strain rates (ɛ˙V>10,000 s-1). In this study, simulations are performed for large ensembles of deformable particles (≈4000 particles) using a combined finite and discrete element technique to characterize statistical distributions of hot-spot intensity, geometry, and spatial proximity within and behind quasi-steady, piston supported uniaxial waves in granular HMX (C4H8N8O8). Emphasis is placed on examining how the material's initial particle packing density, characterized by its effective solid volume fraction ϕ¯s ,0, affects hot-spot statistics for pressure dominated waves corresponding to piston speeds within the range 300≤Up≤500 m /s. Predictions indicate that hot-spot intensity is only marginally affected by initial porosity (1-ϕ¯s ,0) for all piston speeds, whereas hot-spot size, number density, volume fraction, and volume specific surface area appreciably increase with porosity and exponentially increase with piston speed. Minor variations in particle shape are predicted to be largely inconsequential. Joint distributions of hot-spot intensity and size are combined with thermal explosion data to identify and examine critical hot-spots that quickly react behind waves. These results indicate that the observed increase in sensitivity with initial porosity for sustained loading is likely due to an increase in hot-spot size and number rather than intensity.

  14. DENSITY PERTURBATION BY ALFVÉN WAVES IN MAGNETO-PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.; Moon, Y.-J. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi, 110016 (India)

    2016-12-20

    In this article, we attempt to investigate the density perturbations along magnetic field by ponderomotive effects due to inertial Alfvén waves (AWs) in auroral ionosphere. For this study, we take high-frequency inertial AWs (pump) and their nonlinear interactions with low-frequency slow modes of AWs in that region. The dynamical equations representing these wave modes are known as the Zakharov like equation, and are solved numerically. From the results presented here, we notice the density perturbations in the direction of background magnetic fields. We also find that the deepest density cavity is associated with the strongest magnetic fields. The main reason for these nonlinear structures could be the ponderomotive effects due to the pump waves. The amplitude of these density structures varies with time until the modulation instability saturates. From our results, we estimate the amplitude of most intense cavity as ∼15% of the unperturbed plasma number density n {sub 0}, which is consistent with the observations. These density structures could be the locations for particle energizations in this region.

  15. Instability of spiral and scroll waves in the presence of a gradient in the fibroblast density: the effects of fibroblast-myocyte coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimik, Soling; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast-myocyte coupling can modulate electrical-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue. In diseased hearts, the distribution of fibroblasts is heterogeneous, so there can be gradients in the fibroblast density (henceforth we call this GFD) especially from highly injured regions, like infarcted or ischemic zones, to less-wounded regions of the tissue. Fibrotic hearts are known to be prone to arrhythmias, so it is important to understand the effects of GFD in the formation and sustenance of arrhythmic re-entrant waves, like spiral or scroll waves. Therefore, we investigate the effects of GFD on the stability of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in a state-of-the-art mathematical model for cardiac tissue in which we also include fibroblasts. By introducing GFD in controlled ways, we show that spiral and scroll waves can be unstable in the presence of GFDs because of regions with varying spiral- or scroll-wave frequency ω, induced by the GFD. We examine the effects of the resting membrane potential of the fibroblast and the number of fibroblasts attached to the myocytes on the stability of these waves. Finally, we show that the presence of GFDs can lead to the formation of spiral waves at high-frequency pacing.

  16. Universal formula for quasi-static density perturbation by a magnetoplasma wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, A.N.; Cary, J.R.; Pereira, N.R.

    1979-01-01

    The general expression for the ponderomotive Hamiltonian is used to obtain the quasi-static quasi-neutral density change caused by the ponderomotive force of a cold magnetoplasma wave of arbitrary frequency and polarization: deltan (x) =-[vertical-barE(x) vertical-bar 2 -vertical-barB(x) vertical-bar 2 ] /4π

  17. Density wave instabilities of tilted fermionic dipoles in a multilayer geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Block, Jens; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Bruun, Georg

    2012-01-01

    We consider the density wave instability of fermionic dipoles aligned by an external field and moving in equidistant layers at zero temperature. Using a conserving Hartree–Fock approximation, we show that correlations between dipoles in different layers significantly decrease the critical coupling...

  18. Electrical transport through constrictions in the charge-density wave conductor NbSe3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O´Neill, K.; Slot, E.; Thorne, R.; Van der Zant, H.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the electrical transport properties of insulating and metallic constrictions of dimensions 100nm-10_m in the charge-density wave (CDW) conductor NbSe3. The constrictions are made in a variety of ways: focused ion beam, reactive ion etching through a resist mask, and in a

  19. Probability density of wave function of excited photoelectron: understanding XANES features

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šipr, Ondřej

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2001), s. 232-234 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/0404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A02/98:Z1-010-914 Keywords : XANES * PED - probability density of wave function Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.519, year: 2001

  20. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  1. Resonant soft x-ray scattering and charge density waves in correlated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusydi, Andrivo

    2006-01-01

    Summary This work describes results obtained on the study of charge density waves (CDW) in strongly correlated systems with a new experimental method: resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS). The basic motivation is the 1986 discovery by Bednorz and Müler of a new type of superconductor, based on Cu

  2. Ferroelectricity Induced by Acentric Spin-Density Waves in YMn2O5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapon, L.C.; Radaelli, P.G.; Blake, G.R.; Park, S.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2006-01-01

    The commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures of the magnetoelectric system YMn2O5, as determined from neutron diffraction, were found to be spin-density waves lacking a global center of symmetry. We propose a model, based on a simple magnetoelastic coupling to the lattice, which enables

  3. Coexistence of density wave and superfluid order in a dipolar Fermi gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Zhigang; Block, Jens Kusk; Bruun, Georg M.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the coexistence of superfluid and density wave (stripe) order in a quasi-two-dimensional gas of dipolar fermions aligned by an external field. Remarkably, the anisotropic nature of the dipolar interaction allows for such a coexistence in a large region of the zero temperature phase...

  4. Interplay between pair density waves and random field disorders in the pseudogap regime of cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheung

    To capture various experimental results in the pseudogap regime, we propose a four-component pair density wave (PDW) state in which all components compete with each other. Without random field disorders (RFD), globally the PDW components are phase separated and only one of the component survives locally. If the RFD is included, this state becomes a phase separated state with short range PDW stripes, and induces charge density waves (CDW) and loop current order as secondary composite orders. We call this phase-separated pair nematic (PSPN) state. This state could capture a number of important experimental features in the pseudogap, in particular, the predominantly d-wave CDW with spatial dependent charge smecticity, the unusual ARPES quasiparticle spectrum, and the time reversal symmetry breaking order in polarized neutron diffraction and polar Kerr rotation. We also discuss how the various temperature scales arisen in the pseudogap can be understood in terms of the interplay with the RFD and fluctuating orders.

  5. The influence of oxidation on space charge formation in gamma-irradiated low-density polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, G; Xie, H K; Banford, H M; Davies, A E

    2003-01-01

    The research presented in this paper investigates the role of oxidation in the formation of space charge in gamma-irradiated low-density polyethylene after being electrically stressed under dc voltage. Polyethylene plaques both with and without antioxidant were irradiated up to 500 kGy using a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma source and space charge distributions were measured using the piezoelectric induced pressure wave propagation method. It has been found that a large amount of positive charge evolved adjacent to the cathode in the sample without antioxidant and was clearly associated with oxidation of the surface. The amount of charge formed for a given applied stress increased with the dose absorbed by the material. A model has been proposed to explain the formation of space charge and its profile. The charge decay after the removal of the external applied stress is dominated by a process being controlled by the cathode interfacial stress (charge injection) rather than a conventional RC circuit model. On the other ...

  6. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Evaporation of targets and formation of absorption waves in air under the influence of ultraviolet laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, E. O.; Danilychev, V. A.; Dolgikh, V. A.; Zvorykin, V. D.; Zemskov, M. E.; Kerimov, O. M.; Metreveli, G. E.; Tamanyan, G. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An investigation was made of gasdynamic regimes of interaction of KrF laser radiation pulses with a graphite target in air at various pressures. At radiation flux densities up to 1 GW/cm2 the dominant process was target evaporation initiating a shock wave in the surrounding air. Formation of an optical detonation wave partly absorbing laser radiation was observed at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Experimental study of the formation of steep waves and breakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanis³aw R. Massel

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Breaking waves (whitecaps are one of the most important and least understood processes associated with the evolution of the surface gravity wave field in the open sea. This process is the principal means by which energy and momentum are transferred away from a developing sea. However, an estimation of the frequency of breaking waves or the fraction of sea surface covered by whitecaps and the amount of dissipated energy induced by breaking is very difficult to carry out under real sea conditions. A controlled experiment, funded by the European Commission under the Improving Human Potential Access Infrastructures programme, was carried out in the Ocean Basin Laboratory at MARINTEK, Trondheim (Norway. Simulation of random waves of the prescribed spectra by wave makers provided a very realistic pattern of the sea surface. The number of breaking waves was estimated by photographing the sea surface and recording the noise caused by the breaking waves. The experimental data will serve for calibration of the theoretical models of the sea surface fraction related to the whitecaps.

  8. An analytical solution for stationary distribution of photon density in traveling-wave and reflective SOAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totović, A R; Crnjanski, J V; Krstić, M M; Gvozdić, D M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze two semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) structures, traveling-wave and reflective, with the active region made of the bulk material. The model is based on the stationary traveling-wave equations for forward and backward propagating photon densities of the signal and the amplified spontaneous emission, along with the stationary carrier rate equation. We start by introducing linear approximation of the carrier density spatial distribution, which enables us to find solutions for the photon densities in a closed analytical form. An analytical approach ensures a low computational resource occupation and an easy analysis of the parameters influencing the SOA’s response. The comparison of the analytical and numerical results shows high agreement for a wide range of the input optical powers and bias currents. (paper)

  9. Internal density waves of shock type induced by chemoconvection in miscible reacting liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsun, D. A.

    2017-10-01

    A theoretical explanation of the phenomenon of spontaneous emergence of density waves experimentally observed recently in bilayered systems of miscible liquids placed in a narrow vertical gap of the Hele-Shaw cell in the gravitational field is provided. Upper and lower layers represent aqueous solutions of acids and bases, respectively, whose contact leads to the beginning of a neutralization reaction. The process is accompanied by a strong dependence of the reagent's diffusion coefficients on their concentrations, giving rise to the generation of local density pockets, in which convection develops. The cavities collapse under certain conditions, causing a density jump, which moves faster than typical perturbations in a medium and takes the form of a shock wave. A mathematical model of the phenomenon is proposed, which can be formally reduced to equations of motion of a compressible gas under certain assumptions. Numerical calculations are given and compared with the experimental data.

  10. High-density QCD phase transitions inside neutron stars: Glitches and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A. M.; Bagchi, P.; Das, A.; Layek, B.

    2017-10-01

    We discuss physics of exotic high baryon density QCD phases which are believed to exist in the core of a neutron star. This can provide a laboratory for exploring exotic physics such as axion emission, KK graviton production etc. Much of the physics of these high-density phases is model-dependent and not very well understood, especially the densities expected to occur inside neutron stars. We follow a different approach and use primarily universal aspects of the physics of different high-density phases and associated phase transitions. We study effects of density fluctuations during transitions with and without topological defect production and study the effect on pulsar timings due to changing moment of inertia of the star. We also discuss gravitational wave production due to rapidly changing quadrupole moment of the star due to these fluctuations.

  11. Galactic Dynamos and Density Wave Theory - Part Two - an Alternative Treatment for Strong Non-Axisymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, K.; Mestel, L.

    1993-12-01

    A steady density wave in a disc-like galaxy could lead to a spiral form for the crucial α-effect term in standard dynamo theory. We had earlier studied this problem under the thin-disc approximation and by effecting an approximate separation of variables between the z-dependence and the r, φ-dependences of the magnetic field. We return to this problem by making an alternative approximation of our equations, which allows a better treatment of the case of strong departures from axisymmetry, albeit with a cruder treatment of the z-dependence. The numerical solution of the equations reveals, as in our earlier work, the existence of rapidly growing, global, bisymmetric magnetic modes, corotating with the density wave. The modes extend several kiloparsecs around the radius r_c_ where the wave corotates with the gas. The magnetic spiral is closely aligned with the density wave in regions where it has maximum strength; leading within r_c_ and trailing outside. These results are remarkably similar to that obtained in our earlier work, under a very different approximation scheme, encouraging belief in the robustness of the results obtained in both papers.

  12. Mapping the energy density of shaped waves in scattering media onto a complete set of diffusion modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi Stephen; Mosk, Allard; Vellekoop, Ivo Micha; Lagendijk, Aart; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the energy density of shaped waves inside a quasi-1D disordered waveguide. We find that the spatial energy density of optimally shaped waves, when expanded in the complete set of eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation, is well described by considering only a few of the lowest

  13. Self-Calibrating Wave-Encoded Variable-Density Single-Shot Fast Spin Echo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyu; Taviani, Valentina; Tamir, Jonathan I; Cheng, Joseph Y; Zhang, Tao; Song, Qiong; Hargreaves, Brian A; Pauly, John M; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2018-04-01

    It is highly desirable in clinical abdominal MR scans to accelerate single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) imaging and reduce blurring due to T 2 decay and partial-Fourier acquisition. To develop and investigate the clinical feasibility of wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE imaging for improved image quality and scan time reduction. Prospective controlled clinical trial. With Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, the proposed method was assessed on 20 consecutive adult patients (10 male, 10 female, range, 24-84 years). A wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE sequence was developed for clinical 3.0T abdominal scans to enable high acceleration (3.5×) with full-Fourier acquisitions by: 1) introducing wave encoding with self-refocusing gradient waveforms to improve acquisition efficiency; 2) developing self-calibrated estimation of wave-encoding point-spread function and coil sensitivity to improve motion robustness; and 3) incorporating a parallel imaging and compressed sensing reconstruction to reconstruct highly accelerated datasets. Image quality was compared pairwise with standard Cartesian acquisition independently and blindly by two radiologists on a scale from -2 to 2 for noise, contrast, confidence, sharpness, and artifacts. The average ratio of scan time between these two approaches was also compared. A Wilcoxon signed-rank tests with a P value under 0.05 considered statistically significant. Wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE significantly reduced the perceived noise level and improved the sharpness of the abdominal wall and the kidneys compared with standard acquisition (mean scores 0.8, 1.2, and 0.8, respectively, P variable-density sampling SSFSE achieves improved image quality with clinically relevant echo time and reduced scan time, thus providing a fast and robust approach for clinical SSFSE imaging. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 6 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:954-966. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. The Inhomogeneous Energy-Density Driven Instability: New Milestones for Ion-Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, M. E.

    1997-11-01

    The Inhomogeneous Energy-Density Driven (IEDD) instability has been investigated in detail, theoretically and experimentally. From this basic work, important aspects of the instability mechanism have been documented and specific applications in space plasmas have been recognized. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves due to the IEDD instability arise when the y-direction flow of ions and electrons is structured in the x-direction, perpendicular to the magnetic field in the z-direction, thus resulting in an inhomogeneous wave energy density. This instability is distinct from the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Current-Driven Electrostatic Ion-Cyclotron (CDEIC) instabilities. We have observed in the laboratory the following remarkable properties of IEDD waves: mode frequency as low as 30% of the ion gyrofrequency, (2) Doppler upshifts and downshifts in a wide range from 30% to 160% of the ion gyrofrequency, (3) multiple, simultaneous eigenmodes of the plasma-flow inhomogeneity that are unrelated to the radial, azimuthal, or axial extent of the plasma column, (4) broadband, large-amplitude spectra extending above and below the ion gyrofrequency and having widths that exceed 50% of the center frequency, and (5) axial propagation along and against the magnetic-field-aligned electron drift, which means current is absolutely unnecessary to drive this mode. These results are obtained in a cylidrically symmetric, sodium Q-machine plasma, far below the excitation threshold for CDEIC and ion-acoustic waves. The adjustable radial electric field profile responsible for the inhomogeneous E x B flow profile is controlled by a segmented disk electrode at the plasma-column end. The experimental results are reinforced with numerical results from a nonlocal, linear model. This model predicts that this instability mechanism can destabilize ion-acoustic waves and drift waves as well. These results establish an expanded understanding regarding the generation and propagation of

  15. Ultrashort laser pulse filamentation from spontaneous X-Wave formation in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccio, Daniele; Averchi, Alessandro; Lotti, Antonio; Di Trapani, Paolo; Couairon, Arnaud; Papazoglou, Dimitris; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2008-02-04

    The description of ultrashort laser pulse filamentation in condensed media as a spontaneous formation of X waves is shown to apply also to filaments generated in air. Within this framework, a simple explanation is brought for several features of the filament such as the subdiffractive propagation and the energy flux from the weakly localized tails of the X-waves to the intense core.

  16. High density plasmas formation in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Val, J. M.; Minguez, E.; Velarde, P.; Perlado, J. M.; Velarde, G.; Bravo, E.; Eliezer, S.; Florido, R.; Garcia Rubiano, J.; Garcia-Senz, D.; Gil de la Fe, J. M.; Leon, P. T.; Martel, P.; Ogando, F.; Piera, M.; Relano, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Garcia, C.; Gonzalez, E.; Lachaise, M.; Oliva, E.

    2005-01-01

    In inertially confined fusion (ICF), high densities are required to obtain high gains. In Fast Ignition, a high density, low temperature plasma can be obtained during the compression. If the final temperature reached is low enough, the electrons of the plasma can be degenerate. In degenerate plasmas. Bremsstrahlung emission is strongly suppressed an ignition temperature becomes lower than in classical plasmas, which offers a new design window for ICF. The main difficulty of degenerate plasmas in the compression energy needed for high densities. Besides that, the low specific heat of degenerate electrons (as compared to classical values) is also a problem because of the rapid heating of the plasma. Fluid dynamic evolution of supernovae remnants is a very interesting problem in order to predict the thermodynamical conditions achieved in their collision regions. Those conditions have a strong influence in the emission of light and therefore the detection of such events. A laboratory scale system has been designed reproducing the fluid dynamic field in high energy experiments. The evolution of the laboratory system has been calculated with ARWEN code, 2D Radiation CFD that works with Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Results are compared with simulations on the original system obtained with a 3D SPH astrophysical code. New phenomena at the collision plane and scaling of the laboratory magnitudes will be described. Atomic physics for high density plasmas has been studied with participation in experiments to obtain laser produced high density plasmas under NLTE conditions, carried out at LULI. A code, ATOM3R, has been developed which solves rate equations for optically thin plasmas as well as for homogeneous optically thick plasmas making use of escape factors. New improvements in ATOM3R are been done to calculate level populations and opacities for non homogeneous thick plasmas in NLTE, with emphasis in He and H lines for high density plasma diagnosis. Analytical expression

  17. Solid density, low temperature plasma formation in a capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.; Jones, L.A.; Maestas, M.D.; Shepherd, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    This work discusses the ability of the authors to produce solid density, low temperature plasmas in polyurethane capillary discharges. The initial capillary diameter is 20 μm. The plasma is produced by discharging a one Ohm parallel plate waterline and Marx generator system through the capillary. A peak current of 340 kA in 300 ns heats the inner wall of the capillary, and the plasma expands into the surrounding material. The authors studied the evolution of the discharge using current and voltage probes, axial and radial streak photography, axial x-ray diode array and schlieren photography, and have estimated the peak temperature of the discharge to be approximately 10 eV and the density to be near 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/. This indicates that the plasma may approach the strongly coupled regime. They discuss their interpretation of the data and compare their results with theoretical models of the plasma dynamics

  18. The importance of microjet vs shock wave formation in sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolloch, Lior; Kost, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Low-frequency ultrasound application has been shown to greatly enhance transdermal drug delivery. Skin exposed to ultrasound is affected in a heterogeneous manner, thus mass transport through the stratum corneum occurs mainly through highly permeable localized transport regions (LTRs). Shock waves and microjets generated during inertial cavitations are responsible for the transdermal permeability enhancement. In this study, we evaluated the effect of these two phenomena using direct and indirect methods, and demonstrated that the contribution of microjets to skin permeability enhancement is significantly higher than shock waves. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Computational studies on scattering of radio frequency waves by density filaments in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, Zisis C.; Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Tigelis, Ioannis G.

    2017-10-01

    In modern magnetic fusion devices, such as tokamaks and stellarators, radio frequency (RF) waves are commonly used for plasma heating and current profile control, as well as for certain diagnostics. The frequencies of the RF waves range from ion cyclotron frequency to the electron cyclotron frequency. The RF waves are launched from structures, like waveguides and current straps, placed near the wall in a very low density, tenuous plasma region of a fusion device. The RF electromagnetic fields have to propagate through this scrape-off layer before coupling power to the core of the plasma. The scrape-off layer is characterized by turbulent plasmas fluctuations and by blobs and filaments. The variations in the edge density due to these fluctuations and filaments can affect the propagation characteristics of the RF waves—changes in density leading to regions with differing plasma permittivity. Analytical full-wave theories have shown that scattering by blobs and filaments can alter the RF power flow into the core of the plasma in a variety of ways, such as through reflection, refraction, diffraction, and shadowing [see, for example, Ram and Hizanidis, Phys. Plasmas 23, 022504 (2016), and references therein]. There are changes in the wave vectors and the distribution of power-scattering leading to coupling of the incident RF wave to other plasma waves, side-scattering, surface waves, and fragmentation of the Poynting flux in the direction towards the core. However, these theoretical models are somewhat idealized. In particular, it is assumed that there is step-function discontinuity in the density between the plasma inside the filament and the background plasma. In this paper, results from numerical simulations of RF scattering by filaments using a commercial full-wave code are described. The filaments are taken to be cylindrical with the axis of the cylinder aligned along the direction of the ambient magnetic field. The plasma inside and outside the filament is

  20. Stress wave propagation on standing trees. Part 2, Formation of 3D stress wave contour maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Su; Houjiang Zhang; Xiping Wang

    2009-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of wood quality in standing trees is an important procedure in the forest operational value chain worldwide. The goal of this paper is to investigate how a stress wave travel in a tree stem as it is introduced into the tree through a mechanical impact. Experimental stress wave data was obtained on freshly cut red pine logs in the...

  1. Incommensurate spin density wave in metallic V2-yO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, W.; Broholm, C.; Carter, S.A.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Aeppli, G.; Trevino, S.F.; Metcalf, P.; Honig, J.M.; Spalek, J.

    1993-01-01

    We show by neutron diffraction that metallic V 2-7 O 3 develops a spin density wave below T N ∼9 K with incommensurate wave vector q∼1.7c * and an ordered moment of 0.15μ B . The weak ordering phenomenon is accompanied by strong, nonresonant spin fluctuations with a velocity c=67(4) meV A. The spin correlations of the metal are very different from those of the insulator and place V 2-y O 3 in a distinct class of Motte-Hubbard systems where the wave vector for magnetic order in the metal is far from a high symmetry commensurate reciprocal lattice point

  2. Incommensurate charge-density-wave state in α-uranium: A high-resolution x-ray and neutron-scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruebel, G.; Axe, J.D.; Gibbs, D.; Lander, G.H.; Marmeggi, J.C.; Brueckel, T.

    1991-01-01

    The incommensurate charge-density-wave state, which develops in α-uranium below 47 K, was studied in high-resolution x-ray and neutron-scattering experiments. Lock-in transitions of the incommensurate modulation wave vector were observed at 38 K (q x =1/2) and 22 K (q y =1/6,q z = 2) / 11 ) and explained in terms of a Landau theory. The simultaneous lock-in transformation of both the q y and q z components is accompanied by the formation of a phase-discommensuration lattice along the z axis

  3. The "JK-only" approximation in density matrix functional and wave function theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmar, Christian

    2004-12-15

    Various energy functionals applying the "JK-only" approximation which leads to two-index two-electron integrals instead of four-index two-electron integrals in the electron-electron interaction term of the electronic energy are presented. Numerical results of multiconfiguration self-consistent field calculations for the best possible "JK-only" wave function are compared to those obtained from the pair excitation multiconfiguration self-consistent (PEMCSCF) method and two versions of density matrix functional theory. One of these is derived making explicit use of some necessary conditions for N representability of the second-order density matrix. It is shown that this method models the energy functional based on the best possible "JK-only" wave function with good accuracy. The calculations also indicate that only a minor fraction of the total correlation energy is incorporated by "JK-only" approaches for larger molecules. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  4. Negative Longitudinal Magnetoresistance in the Density Wave Phase of Y_{2}Ir_{2}O_{7}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juyal, Abhishek; Agarwal, Amit; Mukhopadhyay, Soumik

    2018-03-02

    The ground state of nanowires of single-crystalline pyrochlore Y_{2}Ir_{2}O_{7} is a density wave. The application of a transverse magnetic field increases the threshold electric field for the collective depinning of the density wave state at a low temperature, leading to colossal magnetoresistance for voltages around the depinning threshold. This is in striking contrast to the case where even a vanishingly small longitudinal magnetic field sharply reduces the depinning threshold voltage, resulting in negative magnetoresistance. Ruling out several other possibilities, we argue that this phenomenon is likely to be a consequence of the chiral anomaly in the gapped out Weyl semimetal phase in Y_{2}Ir_{2}O_{7}.

  5. Negative Longitudinal Magnetoresistance in the Density Wave Phase of Y2Ir2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juyal, Abhishek; Agarwal, Amit; Mukhopadhyay, Soumik

    2018-03-01

    The ground state of nanowires of single-crystalline pyrochlore Y2Ir2O7 is a density wave. The application of a transverse magnetic field increases the threshold electric field for the collective depinning of the density wave state at a low temperature, leading to colossal magnetoresistance for voltages around the depinning threshold. This is in striking contrast to the case where even a vanishingly small longitudinal magnetic field sharply reduces the depinning threshold voltage, resulting in negative magnetoresistance. Ruling out several other possibilities, we argue that this phenomenon is likely to be a consequence of the chiral anomaly in the gapped out Weyl semimetal phase in Y2Ir2O7 .

  6. Quantum time crystal by decoherence: Proposal with an incommensurate charge density wave ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsugawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Tanda, S.

    2017-09-01

    We show that time translation symmetry of a ring system with a macroscopic quantum ground state is broken by decoherence. In particular, we consider a ring-shaped incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW ring) threaded by a fluctuating magnetic flux: the Caldeira-Leggett model is used to model the fluctuating flux as a bath of harmonic oscillators. We show that the charge density expectation value of a quantized ICDW ring coupled to its environment oscillates periodically. The Hamiltonians considered in this model are time independent unlike "Floquet time crystals" considered recently. Our model forms a metastable quantum time crystal with a finite length in space and in time.

  7. Theoretical analysis of the density wave in a new continuum model and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ling-Ling; Cheng, Rong-Jun; Li, Zhi-Peng; Ge, Hong-Xia

    2014-05-01

    Considered the effect of traffic anticipation in the real world, a new anticipation driving car following model (AD-CF) was proposed by Zheng et al. Based on AD-CF model, adopted an asymptotic approximation between the headway and density, a new continuum model is presented in this paper. The neutral stability condition is obtained by applying the linear stability theory. Additionally, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived via nonlinear analysis to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line. The numerical simulation and the analytical results show that the new continuum model is capable of explaining some particular traffic phenomena.

  8. Propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a gravitating or non-gravitating dusty gas with exponentially varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a dusty gas with or without self-gravitational effects is investigated in the case of isothermal and adiabatic flows. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas. The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained, and the density of the mixture is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law. Non-similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of variations of the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, and the presence of self-gravitational field on the flow variables are investigated at given times. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effects surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable differences are found in the distribution of flow variables. An increase in time also, increases the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that the consideration of isothermal flow increases the shock strength, and removes the singularity in the density distribution. Also, the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the inner contact surface and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in self-gravitating dusty gas can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, star formation and shocks in stellar explosion, nuclear explosion, in industry, rupture of a pressurized vessel and explosion in the ionosphere. Other potential applications of this study include analysis of data from exploding wire experiments and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or re-entry of vehicles etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating media. The obtained solutions are applicable for

  9. Soliton formation at critical density in laser-irradiated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.; Bondeson, A.; Lisak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The generation of Langmuir solitons at the resonance layer in a plasma irradiated by a strong high-frequency pump is investigated. The process is modelled by the nonlinear Schrodinger equation including an external pump, a density gradient and linear damping. The evolution equation is reformulated as an exact variational principle and the one-soliton generation process is studied by substituting various trial solutions. The applicability conditions for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation are re-examined and found to be more restrictive than previously stated. (author)

  10. Convective cell excitation by inertial Alfven waves in a low density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhotelov, O.A.; Onishchenko, O.G.; Sagdeev, R.Z.; Srenflo, L.; Balikhin, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The parametric interaction of inertial Alfven waves with large-scale convective cells in a low-density plasma is investigated. It is shown that, in plasmas where the Alfven velocity is comparable to or exceeds the speed of light, the parametric interaction is substantially suppressed. A compact expression for the optimal scale and instability growth rate of the fastest growing mode is obtained [ru

  11. Supersonic flow with shock waves. Monte-Carlo calculations for low density plasma. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almenara, E.; Hidalgo, M.; Saviron, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    This Report gives preliminary information about a Monte Carlo procedure to simulate supersonic flow past a body of a low density plasma in the transition regime. A computer program has been written for a UNIVAC 1108 machine to account for a plasma composed by neutral molecules and positive and negative ions. Different and rather general body geometries can be analyzed. Special attention is played to tho detached shock waves growth In front of the body. (Author) 30 refs

  12. Photonic sensing in highly concentrated biotechnical processes by photon density wave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Roland; Sandmann, Michael; Reich, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Photon Density Wave (PDW) spectroscopy is introduced as a new approach for photonic sensing in highly concentrated biotechnical processes. It independently quantifies the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient calibration-free and as a function of time, thus describing the optical properties in the vis/NIR range of the biomaterial during their processing. As examples of industrial relevance, enzymatic milk coagulation, beer mashing, and algae cultivation in photo bioreactors are discussed.

  13. Renormalization-group decimation technique for spectra, wave-functions and density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiecko, C.; Roman, E.

    1983-09-01

    The Renormalization Group decimation technique is very useful for problems described by 1-d nearest neighbour tight-binding model with or without translational invariance. We show how spectra, wave-functions and density of states can be calculated with little numerical work from the renormalized coefficients upon iteration. The results of this new procedure are verified using the model of Soukoulis and Economou. (author)

  14. Supersonic flow with shock waves. Monte-Carlo calculations for low density plasma. Part. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almenara, E.; Hidalgo, M.; Saviron, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary information about a Monte Carlo procedure to simulate supersonic flow past a body of a low density plasma in the transition regime is gived. A computer program has been written for a Univac 1108 machine to account for a plasma composed by neutral molecules and positive and negative ions. Different and rather general body geometries can be analyzed. Special attention is payed to the detached shock waves growth in front of the body. (author)

  15. Alfvén wave filamentation and dispersive phase mixing in a high-density channel: Landau fluid and hybrid simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Borgogno

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of dispersive Alfvén waves in a low-beta collisionless plasma with a high-density channel aligned with the ambient magnetic field, is studied in three space dimensions. A fluid model retaining linear Landau damping and finite Larmor radius corrections is used, together with a hybrid particle-in-cell simulation aimed to validate the predictions of this Landau-fluid model. It is shown that when the density enhancement is moderate (depending on the pump wavelength and the plasma parameters, the wave energy concentrates into a filament whose transverse size is prescribed by the dimension of the channel. In contrast, in the case of a stronger density perturbation, the early formation of a magnetic filament is followed by the onset of thin helical ribbons and the development of strong gradients. This "dispersive phase mixing" provides a mechanism permitting dissipation processes (not included in the present model to act and heat the plasma.

  16. Experimental Study on Colliding Shock Waves and Mach Stem Formation in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibo; Zhang, Chongyu; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Yongtao; Tang, Tiegang; Laboratory for Shock Wave; Detonation Physics Research Team

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic behavior of different metals under sliding detonation loading and head-on colliding shock waves is studied by using small spot multi-channel PDV. The free surface velocity data have shown different responses of Cu, Pb and W near the colliding surface including the regular reflection and the formation of Mach stem of two colliding shock waves when shock waves comes out from inside on free surface. These experimental data can be used to give more detailed interpretation of the phenomena recorded by high speed frame photography and radiography of the high speed mass spiking in the collision region of two shock waves.

  17. Loop formation of microtubules during gliding at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lynn; Ross, Jennifer L; Tuezel, Erkan

    2011-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton, including the associated proteins, forms a complex network essential to multiple cellular processes. Microtubule-associated motor proteins, such as kinesin-1, travel on microtubules to transport membrane bound vesicles across the crowded cell. Other motors, such as cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-5, are used to organize the cytoskeleton during mitosis. In order to understand the self-organization processes of motors on microtubules, we performed filament-gliding assays with kinesin-1 motors bound to the cover glass with a high density of microtubules on the surface. To observe microtubule organization, 3% of the microtubules were fluorescently labeled to serve as tracers. We find that microtubules in these assays are not confined to two dimensions and can cross one other. This causes microtubules to align locally with a relatively short correlation length. At high density, this local alignment is enough to create 'intersections' of perpendicularly oriented groups of microtubules. These intersections create vortices that cause microtubules to form loops. We characterize the radius of curvature and time duration of the loops. These different behaviors give insight into how crowded conditions, such as those in the cell, might affect motor behavior and cytoskeleton organization.

  18. A framework for assessing the uncertainty in wave energy delivery to targeted subsurface formations

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.

    2016-02-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Stress wave stimulation of geological formations has potential applications in petroleum engineering, hydro-geology, and environmental engineering. The stimulation can be applied using wave sources whose spatio-temporal characteristics are designed to focus the emitted wave energy into the target region. Typically, the design process involves numerical simulations of the underlying wave physics, and assumes a perfect knowledge of the material properties and the overall geometry of the geostructure. In practice, however, precise knowledge of the properties of the geological formations is elusive, and quantification of the reliability of a deterministic approach is crucial for evaluating the technical and economical feasibility of the design. In this article, we discuss a methodology that could be used to quantify the uncertainty in the wave energy delivery. We formulate the wave propagation problem for a two-dimensional, layered, isotropic, elastic solid truncated using hybrid perfectly-matched-layers (PMLs), and containing a target elastic or poroelastic inclusion. We define a wave motion metric to quantify the amount of the delivered wave energy. We, then, treat the material properties of the layers as random variables, and perform a first-order uncertainty analysis of the formation to compute the probabilities of failure to achieve threshold values of the motion metric. We illustrate the uncertainty quantification procedure using synthetic data.

  19. Fast wave experiments in LAPD: RF sheaths, convective cells and density modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, T. A.; van Compernolle, B.; Martin, M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; van Eester, D.; Crombe, K.; Perkins, R.; Lau, C.; Martin, E.; Caughman, J.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    An overview is presented of recent work on ICRF physics at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The LAPD has typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV and B 1000 G. A new high-power ( 150 kW) RF system and fast wave antenna have been developed for LAPD. The source runs at a frequency of 2.4 MHz, corresponding to 1 - 7fci , depending on plasma parameters. Evidence of rectified RF sheaths is seen in large increases ( 10Te) in the plasma potential on field lines connected to the antenna. The rectified potential scales linearly with antenna current. The rectified RF sheaths set up convective cells of local E × B flows, measured indirectly by potential measurements, and measured directly with Mach probes. At high antenna powers substantial modifications of the density profile were observed. The plasma density profile initially exhibits transient low frequency oscillations (10 kHz). The amplitude of the fast wave fields in the core plasma is modulated at the same low frequency, suggesting fast wave coupling is affected by the density rearrangement. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, supported jointly by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  20. Diagnosis of tropical cyclone activity through gravity wave energy density in the southwest Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, C.; Chane-Ming, F.; Barthe, C.; Kuleshov, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) activity is diagnosed through convective gravity waves (GWs) observed in the upper troposphere (UT)/lower stratosphere (LS) above Tromelin island (15.53°S, 54.31°E) in the tropical southwest Indian Ocean. Monthly and weekly GW total energy densities derived from daily GPS windsonde data are compared with Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) and TC hours in the vicinity of Tromelin. A relationship between GW energy density and TC activity is observed in the LS, for the TC season 2001/2002. Moreover TCs (local convection) produce GWs with total energy density mostly higher (lower) than 12 J kg-1. A 10-season climatology (1997/1998-2006/2007) confirms that large values of GW total energy density in the LS are associated with weak values of OLR during the TC passage. Monthly total, kinetic and potential GW energy densities within 2000 km radius of Tromelin can be estimated using linear relationships with TC hours for a threshold of above 6 TC days per month. A linear relationship also exists between weekly GW total energy density in the LS and the activity of intense TCs above a threshold of 2 TC days per week within 1000 km radius of Tromelin. GW energy density in the LS could be used as a possible index to investigate TC activity in the UT/LS.

  1. Ion hole formation and nonlinear generation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: THEMIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Masafumi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Katoh, Yuto; Keika, Kunihiro; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Kasahara, Satoshi; Asamura, Kazushi; Nakamura, Satoko; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2017-09-01

    Electromagnetic plasma waves are thought to be responsible for energy exchange between charged particles in space plasmas. Such an energy exchange process is evidenced by phase space holes identified in the ion distribution function and measurements of the dot product of the plasma wave electric field and the ion velocity. We develop a method to identify ion hole formation, taking into consideration the phase differences between the gyromotion of ions and the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Using this method, we identify ion holes in the distribution function and the resulting nonlinear EMIC wave evolution from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations. These ion holes are key to wave growth and frequency drift by the ion currents through nonlinear wave-particle interactions, which are identified by a computer simulation in this study.

  2. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    OpenAIRE

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-01-01

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporat...

  3. Analysis of the Effect of Electron Density Perturbations Generated by Gravity Waves on HF Communication Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, M.; Elias, A. G.; Chum, J.; Cabrera, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, ray tracing of high frequency (HF) signals in ionospheric disturbed conditions is analyzed, particularly in the presence of electron density perturbations generated by gravity waves (GWs). The three-dimensional numerical ray tracing code by Jones and Stephenson, based on Hamilton's equations, which is commonly used to study radio propagation through the ionosphere, is used. An electron density perturbation model is implemented to this code based upon the consideration of atmospheric GWs generated at a height of 150 km in the thermosphere and propagating up into the ionosphere. The motion of the neutral gas at these altitudes induces disturbances in the background plasma which affects HF signals propagation. To obtain a realistic model of GWs in order to analyze the propagation and dispersion characteristics, a GW ray tracing method with kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity was applied. The IRI-2012, HWM14 and NRLMSISE-00 models were incorporated to assess electron density, wind velocities, neutral temperature and total mass density needed for the ray tracing codes. Preliminary results of gravity wave effects on ground range and reflection height are presented for low-mid latitude ionosphere.

  4. Influence of nanoparticle formation on the time and the space resolved metastable density in argon-acetylene plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, I.; Sadeghi, N.; Winter, J.; Sikimić, B.

    2017-06-01

    Different diagnostic techniques are used to monitor the dynamics of electrons and Ar*(1s5) metastable atoms in the active plasma phase and in the afterglow of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) discharge operated in different gas mixtures and at different input powers. Diode laser absorption at 772.38 nm is used to measure the time resolved density of Ar*(1s5) atoms in either continuous-wave mode or pulsed RF discharges with 100 Hz pulsing frequency. Simultaneously, microwave interferometry recorded the time dependence of the electron density. Different plasma conditions, namely: (1) pure argon, (2) argon +5.9% acetylene before nanoparticle formation, (3) argon +5.9% acetylene after dust particles have been formed and (4) argon with dust particles remaining in the plasma volume but without acetylene are studied. The measured steady-state Ar*(1s5) density in the middle of the reactor is several times larger in the dusty argon plasma than in the pure argon discharge for the same discharge powers. At the same time, the electron density is several times less in the dusty plasma. These changes are caused by dust formation: the electric field in the bulk plasma is enhanced and thus consequently the electron temperature increases. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is used to measure the time and space resolved Ar*(1s5) axial distribution. In the pure argon discharge, the axial Ar*(1s5) metastable distribution has a characteristic saddle-like shape with maxima in the region of the sheaths. With dust particles inside, the axial distribution changes dramatically with the maximum at the discharge mid-plane, revealing an α-γ‧ transition. The spatial distribution and absolute density of metastable atoms are influenced by the formation of a void in the cloud of nanoparticles. Depending on the size of the void, the Ar*(1s5) density reduction inside the void is between 30% and 50%. The high Ar*(1s5) metastable density in the dusty plasma afterglow strongly influences

  5. Active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: formation, density, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Presynaptic active zones are synaptic vesicle release sites that play essential roles in the function and pathology of mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The molecular mechanisms of active zone organization use presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in NMJs as scaffolding proteins. VDCCs interact extracellularly with the muscle-derived synapse organizer, laminin β2 and interact intracellularly with active zone-specific proteins, such as Bassoon, CAST/Erc2/ELKS2alpha, ELKS, Piccolo, and RIMs. These molecular mechanisms are supported by studies in P/Q- and N-type VDCCs double-knockout mice, and they are consistent with the pathological conditions of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and Pierson syndrome, which are caused by autoantibodies against VDCCs or by a laminin β2 mutation. During normal postnatal maturation, NMJs maintain the density of active zones, while NMJs triple their size. However, active zones become impaired during aging. Propitiously, muscle exercise ameliorates the active zone impairment in aged NMJs, which suggests the potential for therapeutic strategies. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Power spectral density analysis of optical substrates for gravitational-wave interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, C J; Leistner, A J; Oreb, B F

    1999-08-01

    The power spectral density of surface-relief variations on polished optical surfaces across microscopic through to macroscopic spatial scales is calculated from measurements on substrates that are being produced for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). These spectra give a guide to the scattering properties of the surface, which in turn critically influence the performance of LIGO. Measurements obtained by use of a full-aperture interferometer and an interference microscope with two different objectives are combined to produce one-dimensional power spectral density representations of the surfaces across spatial frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 8000 cm(-1). These measurements from different instruments are in good agreement with an analytic power spectrum that varies as nu(-1.5), where nu is the spatial frequency. Some anomalies in the power spectral density spectra can be related to aspects of the polishing process.

  7. Probing a dusty magnetized plasma with self-excited dust-density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadsen, Benjamin; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    A cloud of nanodust particles is created in a reactive argon-acetylene plasma. It is then transformed into a dusty magnetized argon plasma. Plasma parameters are obtained with the dust-density wave diagnostic introduced by Tadsen et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 113701 (2015), 10.1063/1.4934927]. A change from an open to a cylindrically enclosed nanodust cloud, which was observed earlier, can now be explained by a stronger electric confinement if a vertical magnetic field is present. Using two-dimensional extinction measurements and the inverse Abel transform to determine the dust density, a redistribution of the dust with increasing magnetic induction is found. The dust-density profile changes from being peaked around the central void to being peaked at an outer torus ring resulting in a hollow profile. As the plasma parameters cannot explain this behavior, we propose a rotation of the nanodust cloud in the magnetized plasma as the origin of the modified profile.

  8. Disordered cellular automaton traffic flow model: phase separated state, density waves and self organized criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourrate, K.; Loulidi, M.

    2006-01-01

    We suggest a disordered traffic flow model that captures many features of traffic flow. It is an extension of the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) stochastic cellular automata for single line vehicular traffic model. It incorporates random acceleration and deceleration terms that may be greater than one unit. Our model leads under its intrinsic dynamics, for high values of braking probability pr, to a constant flow at intermediate densities without introducing any spatial inhomogeneities. For a system of fast drivers pr→0, the model exhibits a density wave behavior that was observed in car following models with optimal velocity. The gap of the disordered model we present exhibits, for high values of pr and random deceleration, at a critical density, a power law distribution which is a hall mark of a self organized criticality phenomena.

  9. Ducting of the Whistler-Mode Waves by Magnetic Field-Aligned Density Enhancements in the Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Bengtson, M.; English, D.; Miller, M.; Turco, L.

    2017-12-01

    Whistler-mode waves (or whistlers) are the right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves with a frequency in the range above the lower hybrid frequency and below the electron cyclotron frequency. They can efficiently interact with energetic electrons in the equatorial magnetosphere and remediate them from the earth's radiation belt. These interactions are non-linear, they depend on the wave amplitude, and for them to be efficient the wave power needs to be delivered from the transmitter to the interaction region without significant losses. The main physical mechanism which can solve this problem is ducting/guiding of whistlers by magnetic field-aligned density inhomogeneities or ducts. We present results from a modeling of whistler-mode waves observed by the NASA Van Allen Probes satellites inside the ducts formed by density enhancements (also known as, high-density ducts or HDD). Our previous studies suggest that HDD can confine without leakage only waves with some particular parameters (frequency, perpendicular and parallel wavelength) connected with the parameters of the duct (like duct's "width" and "depth"). Our numerical results confirm that 1) the high-density ducts with amplitudes and perpendicular sizes observed by the RBSP satellites can indeed guide whistlers over significant distances along the ambient magnetic field with small leakage, and 2) the quality of the ducting indeed depends on the wave perpendicular and parallel wavelengths and, therefore, the fact that the wave is ducted by HDD can be used to determine parameters of the wave.

  10. Pattern formation and traveling waves in myxobacteria: Theory and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Mogilner, Alex; Welch, Roy D.; Kaiser, Dale; Oster, George

    2001-01-01

    Recent experiments have provided new quantitative measurements of the rippling phenomenon in fields of developing myxobacteria cells. These measurements have enabled us to develop a mathematical model for the ripple phenomenon on the basis of the biochemistry of the C-signaling system, whereby individuals signal by direct cell contact. The model quantitatively reproduces all of the experimental observations and illustrates how intracellular dynamics, contact-mediated intercellular communication, and cell motility can coordinate to produce collective behavior. This pattern of waves is qualitatively different from that observed in other social organisms, especially Dictyostelium discoideum, which depend on diffusible morphogens. PMID:11752439

  11. Estimation of femoral bone density from trabecular direct wave and cortical guided wave ultrasound velocities measured at the proximal femur in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkmann, Reinhard; Dencks, Stefanie; Bremer, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    and of guided waves through cortical bone could be used to estimate BMD. In two centres, Kiel and Odense, we measured time-of-flight (TOF) of waves through the trabecular greater trochanter and cortical intertrochanter as well as a wave through soft tissue only. TOF was adjusted for leg width using ultrasound......Bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur is a predictor of hip fracture risk. We developed a Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) scanner for measurements at this site with similar performance (FemUS). In this study we tested if ultrasound velocities of direct waves through trabecular bone...

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo studies of a metallic spin-density wave transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Max Henner

    2017-01-20

    Plenty experimental evidence indicates that quantum critical phenomena give rise to much of the rich physics observed in strongly correlated itinerant electron systems such as the high temperature superconductors. A quantum critical point of particular interest is found at the zero-temperature onset of spin-density wave order in two-dimensional metals. The appropriate low-energy theory poses an exceptionally hard problem to analytic theory, therefore the unbiased and controlled numerical approach pursued in this thesis provides important contributions on the road to comprehensive understanding. After discussing the phenomenology of quantum criticality, a sign-problem-free determinantal quantum Monte Carlo approach is introduced and an extensive toolbox of numerical methods is described in a self-contained way. By the means of large-scale computer simulations we have solved a lattice realization of the universal effective theory of interest. The finite-temperature phase diagram, showing both a quasi-long-range spin-density wave ordered phase and a d-wave superconducting dome, is discussed in its entirety. Close to the quantum phase transition we find evidence for unusual scaling of the order parameter correlations and for non-Fermi liquid behavior at isolated hot spots on the Fermi surface.

  13. Propagation of the lower hybrid wave in a density fluctuating scrape-off layer (SOL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madi, M; Peysson, Y; Decker, J; Kabalan, K Y

    2015-01-01

    The perturbation of the lower hybrid wave (LH) power spectrum by fluctuations of the plasma in the vicinity of the antenna is investigated by solving the full wave equation in a slab geometry using COMSOL Multiphysics®. The numerical model whose generality allows to study the effect of various types of fluctuations, including those with short characteristic wavelengths is validated against a coupling code in quiescent regimes. When electron density fluctuations along the toroidal direction are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the LH wave propagates. The diffraction effect by density fluctuations leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions and the averaged perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength. This highlights that fast toroidal inhomogeneities with short characteristics length scales in front of the grill may change significantly the initial LH power spectrum used in coupled ray-tracing and Fokker–Planck calculations. (paper)

  14. Enhanced sensitive love wave surface acoustic wave sensor designed for immunoassay formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-05-05

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications.

  15. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Puiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT applications.

  16. Spin density waves predicted in zigzag puckered phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The pursuit of controlled magnetism in semiconductors has been a persisting goal in condensed matter physics. Recently, Vene (phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene has been predicted as a new class of 2D-semiconductor with suitable band gap and high carrier mobility. In this work, we investigate the edge magnetism in zigzag puckered Vene nanoribbons (ZVNRs based on the density functional theory. The band structures of ZVNRs show half-filled bands crossing the Fermi level at the midpoint of reciprocal lattice vectors, indicating a strong Peierls instability. To remove this instability, we consider two different mechanisms, namely, spin density wave (SDW caused by electron-electron interaction and charge density wave (CDW caused by electron-phonon coupling. We have found that an antiferromagnetic Mott-insulating state defined by SDW is the ground state of ZVNRs. In particular, SDW in ZVNRs displays several surprising characteristics:1 comparing with other nanoribbon systems, their magnetic moments are antiparallelly arranged at each zigzag edge and almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; 2 comparing with other SDW systems, its magnetic moments and band gap of SDW are unexpectedly large, indicating a higher SDW transition temperature in ZVNRs; 3 SDW can be effectively modified by strains and charge doping, which indicates that ZVNRs have bright prospects in nanoelectronic device.

  17. Spin density waves predicted in zigzag puckered phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Xianlong [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zeng, Zhi, E-mail: zzeng@theory.issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-04-15

    The pursuit of controlled magnetism in semiconductors has been a persisting goal in condensed matter physics. Recently, Vene (phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene) has been predicted as a new class of 2D-semiconductor with suitable band gap and high carrier mobility. In this work, we investigate the edge magnetism in zigzag puckered Vene nanoribbons (ZVNRs) based on the density functional theory. The band structures of ZVNRs show half-filled bands crossing the Fermi level at the midpoint of reciprocal lattice vectors, indicating a strong Peierls instability. To remove this instability, we consider two different mechanisms, namely, spin density wave (SDW) caused by electron-electron interaction and charge density wave (CDW) caused by electron-phonon coupling. We have found that an antiferromagnetic Mott-insulating state defined by SDW is the ground state of ZVNRs. In particular, SDW in ZVNRs displays several surprising characteristics:1) comparing with other nanoribbon systems, their magnetic moments are antiparallelly arranged at each zigzag edge and almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; 2) comparing with other SDW systems, its magnetic moments and band gap of SDW are unexpectedly large, indicating a higher SDW transition temperature in ZVNRs; 3) SDW can be effectively modified by strains and charge doping, which indicates that ZVNRs have bright prospects in nanoelectronic device.

  18. Density Convection near Radiating ICRF Antennas and its Effect on the Coupling of Lower Hybrid Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mailloux, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Tuccillo, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined operation of Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore Supra and JET tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in JET indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k//-spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum

  19. Density convection near radiating ICRF antennas and its effect on the coupling of lower hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Tuccillo, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined operation of lower hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore-Supra and Jet tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore-Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in Jet indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k / spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore-Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum. (authors)

  20. Energy density and energy flow of plasmonic waves in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2017-07-01

    The propagation of plasmonic waves in bilayer graphene is studied based on the classical electrodynamics. The interactions between conduction electrons confined to move on the surface of each layer are taken into account via the two-dimensional linearized hydrodynamic model. The energy theorem of electrodynamics is cast in a form which yields expressions for energy density and energy flow of p-polarized surface plasmon polariton waves in bilayer graphene. Numerical results show that the presence of two layers causes the appearance of two branches in the dispersion relation that introduce alterations in the physical behavior of the energy, power flow and the energy transport velocity, in comparison with the results of monolayer graphene.

  1. On new traveling wave solutions and conserved densities for the 2D Ricci flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpoiasu, Rodica

    2018-01-01

    In this paper some travelling wave solutions and conservation laws for the 2D Ricci flow model in conformal gauge are investigated. A guideline able to classify the types of solutions according to the values of some parameters is provided by making use of two versions of the auxiliary equation method. The key feature of these approaches is to take a second order linear ordinary differential equation (ODE), respectively a first order nonlinear ODE with at most an eighth-degree nonlinear term as auxiliary equations. Conserved forms of the travelling wave equation for the Ricci flow are derived through three specific approaches, namely the variational approach, the Ibragimov method for nonlinear self-adjoint differential equations and the one based upon a relationship between conserved forms and their associated symmetries. The former two methods generated similar results, while the latter one has revealed new conserved densities.

  2. Numerical simulation of soliton and kink density waves in traffic flow with periodic boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H. B.; Dai, S. Q.

    2008-07-01

    The soliton and kink-antikink density waves are simulated with periodic boundaries, by adding perturbation in the initial condition on single-lane road based on a car-following model. They are reproduced in the form of the space-time evolution of headway, both of which propagate backwards. It is found that the solitons appear only near the neutral stability line regardless of the boundary conditions, and they exhibit upward form when the initial headway is smaller than the safety distance, otherwise they exhibit downward form. Comparison is made between the numerical and analytical results about the amplitude of kink-antikink wave, and the underlying mechanism is analyzed. Besides, it is indicated that the maximal current of traffic flow increases with decreasing safety distance. The numerical simulation shows a good agreement with the analytical results.

  3. Study of gravity waves propagation in the thermosphere of Mars based on MAVEN/NGIMS density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vals, M.

    2017-09-01

    We use MAVEN/NGIMS CO2 density measurements to analyse gravity waves in the thermosphere of Mars. In particular the seasonal/latitudinal variability of their amplitude is studied and interpreted. Key background parameters controlling the activity of gravity waves are analysed with the help of the Mars Climate Database (MCD). Gravity waves activity presents a good anti-correlation to the temperature variability retrieved from the MCD. An analysis at pressure levels is ongoing.

  4. Beyond Kohn-Sham Approximation: Hybrid Multistate Wave Function and Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiali; Grofe, Adam; Ren, Haisheng; Bao, Peng

    2016-12-15

    A multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) is presented in which the energies and densities for the ground and excited states are treated on the same footing using multiconfigurational approaches. The method can be applied to systems with strong correlation and to correctly describe the dimensionality of the conical intersections between strongly coupled dissociative potential energy surfaces. A dynamic-then-static framework for treating electron correlation is developed to first incorporate dynamic correlation into contracted state functions through block-localized Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT), followed by diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian to include static correlation. MSDFT can be regarded as a hybrid of wave function and density functional theory. The method is built on and makes use of the current approximate density functional developed in KSDFT, yet it retains its computational efficiency to treat strongly correlated systems that are problematic for KSDFT but too large for accurate WFT. The results presented in this work show that MSDFT can be applied to photochemical processes involving conical intersections.

  5. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  6. Propagation of sound wave in high density deuterium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuko; Ariyasu, Tomio

    1986-01-01

    The velocity and the attenuation constant of sound wave have been calculated for high density (10 24 ∼ 10 27 /cm 3 ) deuterium at high temperatures (10 -1 ∼ 10 4 eV). This calculation was made to understand the fuel properties in inertial confinement fusion and to obtain the basic data for pellet design. The isentropic sound wave which propagates in deuterium in plasma state at temperature T i = T e , is dealt with. The velocity is derived using the modulus of bulk elasticity of the whole system and the modulus of shear elasticity due to ion-ion interaction. For the calculation of attenuation constant, the bulk and shear viscosity due to ion-ion interaction, the shear viscosity of free electron gas, and the thermal conductivity due to free electrons are considered. The condition of frequency for the existence of such isentropic sound wave is discussed. The possibility of penetration into the fuel pellet in inertial confinement fusion is also discussed. The followings have been found: (1) The sound velocity is determined mainly from the bulk elasticity. The contribution of the shear elasticity is small. The velocity ranges from 2.8 x 10 6 to 1.5 x 10 8 cm/s in the above mentioned temperature and density regions. (2) The coefficient of attenuation constant with respect to ω 2 /2ρu 3 plotted versus temperature with the parameter of density shows a minimum. At temperatures below this minimum, the attenuation comes mainly from the bulk viscosity due to ion-ion interaction and the shear viscosity due to free electron gas. At temperatures above this minimum, the sound is attenuated mainly by the thermal conductivity due to electrons. (3) The condition for the existence of such adiabatic sound wave, is satisfied with the frequency less than 10 10 Hz. But, as for the pellet design, the wave length of sound with frequency less than 10 10 Hz is longer than the diameter of pellet when compressed highly. (author)

  7. Spin wave mediated interaction as a mechanism of pairs formation in iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Leonardo S.

    2018-03-01

    The spin wave mediated interaction between electrons has been proposed as mechanism to formation of electron pairs in iron-based superconductors. We employe the diagrammatic expansion to calculate the binding energy of electrons pairs mediated by spin wave. Therefore, we propose the coupling of electrons in high-temperature superconductors mediated by spin waves, since that is well known that this class of superconductors materials if relates with spin-1/2 two-dimensional antiferromagnets, where it is well known there be an interplay between antiferromagnetism 2D and high-temperature superconductivity.

  8. Origin of the charge density wave in 1T-TiSe2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2012-06-27

    All-electron ab initio calculations are used to study the microscopic origin of the charge density wave (CDW) in 1T-TiSe2. A purely electronic picture is ruled out as a possible scenario, indicating that the CDW transition in the present system is merely a structural phase transition. The CDW instability is the result of a symmetry lowering by electron correlations occurring with electron localization. Suppression of the CDW in pressurized and in Cu-intercalated 1T-TiSe2 is explained by a delocalization of the electrons, which weakens the correlations and counteracts the symmetry lowering.

  9. Density wave oscillations of a boiling natural circulation loop induced by flashing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Inada, Fumio; Yasuo, Akira [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Experiments are conducted to investigate two-phase flow instabilities in a boiling natural circulation loop with a chimney due to flashing in the chimney at lower pressure. The test facility used in this experiment is designed to have non-dimensional values which are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR. Stability maps in reference to the heat flux, the inlet subcooling, the system pressure are presented. This instability is suggested to be density wave oscillations due to flashing in the chimney, and the differences from other phenomena such as flow pattern oscillations and geysering phenomena are discussed by investigating the dynamic characteristics, the oscillation period, and the transient flow pattern.

  10. Nonuniversal critical behaviour in a model for charge density wave dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritala, R.K.; Hertz, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied short range fluctuations around the infinite-range model of charge density wave (CDW) dynamics. We find that the inhomogeneity of the local field, which is neglected in the infinite-range approximation has a dramatic effect on the transition. In the Bethe approximation the critical behaviour is nonuniversal. In particular, the current exponent is ζ = 3/2 log(z-1)/[log(z)]+log(1+f/J)], where z is the number of neighbors, f the pinning strength, and J the elastic coupling. (orig.)

  11. Interchain interaction and fractionally charged solitons in a commensurate charge-density-wave system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Lomdahl, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the effect of interchain interaction on thermally excited solitons in a charge-density wave for a Peierls system of commensurability 3. In such a system solitons with charges ±2e / 3 are expected. It is shown that the interchain coupling in some cases will generate solitons...... with lower and higher charge than ±2e / 3. The effect of discreteness is taken into account and gives rise to chaotic deformed solitons as the interchain coupling increases. The model may be applied to tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) under 19-kbar pressure....

  12. Density profile in shock wave fronts of partially ionized xenon plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Reinholz, H; Morozov, I; Mintsev, V; Zaparoghets, Y; Fortov, V; Wierling, A

    2003-01-01

    Results for the reflection coefficient of shock-compressed dense xenon plasmas at pressures of 1.6-20 GPa and temperatures around 30 000 K are interpreted. In addition to former experiments using laser beams with lambda = 1.06 mu m, measurements at lambda = 0.694 mu m have been performed recently. Reflectivities typical for metallic systems are found at high densities. Besides free carriers, the theoretical description also takes into account the influence of the neutral component of the plasma on the reflectivity. A consistent description of the measured reflectivities is achieved only if a finite width of the shock wave front is considered.

  13. Metal-charge density wave coexistence in TTF[Ni(dmit){sub 2}]{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaddour, W. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Campus Universitaire, Université de Tunis El-Manar, Tunis 2092 (Tunisia); Auban-Senzier, P.; Raffy, H.; Monteverde, M.; Pouget, J.-P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Pasquier, C.R., E-mail: pasquier@lps.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Alemany, P. [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Canadell, E. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Valade, L. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination, Route de Narbonne F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2015-03-01

    We have established a new pressure–temperature phase diagram of TTF[Ni(dmit){sub 2}]{sub 2} based on longitudinal and transverse resistivity measurements under pressure up to 30 kbar. We were able to identify three different charge density wave (CDW) states which all coexist with a metallic state in a wide temperature range and superconductivity at the lowest temperatures. At low pressure, two successive CDW transitions have been clearly identified. These two transitions merge into a single one at 12 kbar. A maximum of this unique CDW transition temperature is observed at 19 kbar.

  14. Quantum phase slips in charge-density waves: the system-size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Noriyuki; Shiobara, Masato; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Tanda, Satoshi

    1998-03-01

    We present a phenomenological model for quantum phase slips of charge-density waves that takes into account the system-size effect. The process of quantum nucleation leading to the phase slip changes from vortex pair to vortex ring creations as the external electric field increases, which is analogous to the evolution of a ripple in a rectanglar water tank. The clossover field is determined by the system size. The present model describes a number of features observed in the nonohmic conductivity in TsS3 at low temperature.

  15. Dimensional crossover of quantum nucleation processes in charge-density-wave phase slips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Noriyuki; Shiobara, Masato; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Tanda, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    A phenomenological model for quantum phase slips of charge-density waves that takes into account the system-size effect is presented. The process of quantum nucleation leading to the phase slip changes from vortex-pair to vortex-ring creations as the external electric field increases, which is analogous to the evolution of a ripple in a rectangular water tank. The crossover field is determined by the system size. The present model describes a number of features observed in the nonohmic conductivity in TaS3 at low temperature.

  16. Feasibility study of the plasma electron density measurement by electromagnetic radiation from the laser-driven plasma wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, D G; Kim, J J; Suk, H; Hur, M S

    2012-01-01

    When an intense laser beam is focused in a plasma, a plasma wake wave is generated and the oscillatary motion of the plasma electrons produces a strong electromagnetic wave by a Cherenkov-like process. Spectrum of the genetated electromagnetic wave has dependence on the plasma density. In this paper, we propose to use the emitted electromagnetic radiation for plasma diagnostic, which may provide an accurate information for local electron densities of the plasma and will be very useful for three-dimensional plasma density profiles by changing the focal point location of the laser beam. Two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is used to study the correlation between the spectrum of the emitted radiation and plasma density, and the results demonstrate that this method is promising for the electron density measurement in the plasma.

  17. The role of internal waves in the formation of layered structure at exchange flows between two closed basins (Middle and southern basins of the Caspian sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bidokhti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available  Layered structures in the oceans have always attracted the attention of oceanographers. The formation of these structures have been attributed to phenomena such as double – diffusive convection, internal waves and turbulent modulated mixing .In this paper, the vertical structures of temperature, salinity, density and the layered structure in the middle parts of Caspian Sea have been studied. Counters of iso-quantities of these physical properties, show the existence of regular structures, which indicate that internal waves which are produced by exchanging flow between two basins, as a result of horizontal density gradients (usually from north basin to south basin may generate these layers. Froude number of this flow is about one. The length of wave of the internal waves is found to be about 200 km and the flow velocity associated with this gravity drive flow is about 0.2 m/s, the frequency of these waves is of order of inertial frequency. The normal modes of these waves have a near steady structure and can fold the inflow front from the North Caspian sea to South Caspian Sea basins, then the layered structure are formed. The thickness of these layers so formed is found to be about 10-20 m. These are in agreement with the values predicted by the model of Wong et al, (2001. In these waters density ratio is negative. Thus, double – diffusive convection does not often happen and cannot produce these layered structures.

  18. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  19. Molecular hydrodynamics: Vortex formation and sound wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Changho; Talkner, Peter; Karniadakis, George Em; Lee, Eok Kyun

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, quantitative feasibility tests of the hydrodynamic description of a two-dimensional fluid at the molecular level are performed, both with respect to length and time scales. Using high-resolution fluid velocity data obtained from extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we computed the transverse and longitudinal components of the velocity field by the Helmholtz decomposition and compared them with those obtained from the linearized Navier-Stokes (LNS) equations with time-dependent transport coefficients. By investigating the vortex dynamics and the sound wave propagation in terms of these field components, we confirm the validity of the LNS description for times comparable to or larger than several mean collision times. The LNS description still reproduces the transverse velocity field accurately at smaller times, but it fails to predict characteristic patterns of molecular origin visible in the longitudinal velocity field. Based on these observations, we validate the main assumptions of the mode-coupling approach. The assumption that the velocity autocorrelation function can be expressed in terms of the fluid velocity field and the tagged particle distribution is found to be remarkably accurate even for times comparable to or smaller than the mean collision time. This suggests that the hydrodynamic-mode description remains valid down to the molecular scale.

  20. On the reversal of star formation rate-density relation at z = 1: Insights from simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue

    2014-01-01

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h –3 Mpc 3 region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h –1 Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h –1 Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  1. Dimensional Crossover in a Charge Density Wave Material Probed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Berthod, C.; Puppin, M.; Berger, H.; Wolf, M.; Hoesch, M.; Monney, C.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal evidence of a crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior in the prototypical charge density wave (CDW) material NbSe3 . In the low-temperature 3D regime, gaps in the electronic structure are observed due to two incommensurate CDWs, in agreement with x-ray diffraction and electronic-structure calculations. At higher temperatures we observe a spectral weight depletion that approaches the power-law behavior expected in one dimension. From the warping of the quasi-1D Fermi surface at low temperatures, we extract the energy scale of the dimensional crossover. This is corroborated by a detailed analysis of the density of states, which reveals a change in dimensional behavior dependent on binding energy. Our results offer an important insight into the dimensionality of excitations in quasi-1D materials.

  2. Collective mode contributions to the Meissner effect: Fulde-Ferrell and pair-density wave superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyack, Rufus; Wu, Chien-Te; Anderson, Brandon M.; Levin, K.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the necessity of including the generally omitted collective-mode contributions in calculations of the Meissner effect for nonuniform superconductors. We consider superconducting pairing with nonzero center-of-mass momentum, as is possibly relevant to high transition temperature cuprates, cold atoms, and color superconductors in quantum chromodynamics. For the concrete example of the Fulde-Ferrell phase we present a quantitative calculation of the superfluid density, showing not only that the collective-mode contributions are appreciable but also that they derive from the amplitude mode of the order parameter. This latter mode is generally viewed as being invisible in conventional superconductors. However, our analysis shows that it is extremely important in pair-density-wave-type superconductors, where it destroys stable superfluidity well before the mean-field order parameter vanishes.

  3. Guided wave propagation in a honeycomb composite sandwich structure in presence of a high density core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Shirsendu; Banerjee, Sauvik

    2016-09-01

    A coordinated theoretical, numerical and experimental study is carried out in an effort to interpret the characteristics of propagating guided Lamb wave modes in presence of a high-density (HD) core region in a honeycomb composite sandwich structure (HCSS). Initially, a two-dimensional (2D) semi-analytical model based on the global matrix method is used to study the response and dispersion characteristics of the HCSS with a soft core. Due to the complex structural characteristics, the study of guided wave (GW) propagation in HCSS with HD-core region inherently poses many challenges. Therefore, a numerical simulation of GW propagation in the HCSS with and without the HD-core region is carried out, using surface-bonded piezoelectric wafer transducer (PWT) network. From the numerical results, it is observed that the presence of HD-core significantly decreases both the group velocity and the amplitude of the received GW signal. Laboratory experiments are then conducted in order to verify the theoretical and numerical results. A good agreement between the theoretical, numerical and experimental results is observed in all the cases studied. An extensive parametric study is also carried out for a range of HD-core sizes and densities in order to study the effect due to the change in size and density of the HD zone on the characteristics of propagating GW modes. It is found that the amplitudes and group velocities of the GW modes decrease with the increase in HD-core width and density. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Diverging probability-density functions for flat-top solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Avner; Chung, Yeojin; Dohnal, Tomáš; Nguyen, Quan M.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the statistics of flat-top solitary wave parameters in the presence of weak multiplicative dissipative disorder. We consider first propagation of solitary waves of the cubic-quintic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (CQNLSE) in the presence of disorder in the cubic nonlinear gain. We show by a perturbative analytic calculation and by Monte Carlo simulations that the probability-density function (PDF) of the amplitude η exhibits loglognormal divergence near the maximum possible amplitude ηm , a behavior that is similar to the one observed earlier for disorder in the linear gain [A. Peleg , Phys. Rev. E 72, 027203 (2005)]. We relate the loglognormal divergence of the amplitude PDF to the superexponential approach of η to ηm in the corresponding deterministic model with linear/nonlinear gain. Furthermore, for solitary waves of the derivative CQNLSE with weak disorder in the linear gain both the amplitude and the group velocity β become random. We therefore study analytically and by Monte Carlo simulations the PDF of the parameter p , where p=η/(1-ɛsβ/2) and ɛs is the self-steepening coefficient. Our analytic calculations and numerical simulations show that the PDF of p is loglognormally divergent near the maximum p value.

  5. Exact density functional and wave function embedding schemes based on orbital localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hégely, Bence; Nagy, Péter R.; Kállay, Mihály; Ferenczy, György G.

    2016-01-01

    Exact schemes for the embedding of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function theory (WFT) methods into lower-level DFT or WFT approaches are introduced utilizing orbital localization. First, a simple modification of the projector-based embedding scheme of Manby and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A507 (2014)] is proposed. We also use localized orbitals to partition the system, but instead of augmenting the Fock operator with a somewhat arbitrary level-shift projector we solve the Huzinaga-equation, which strictly enforces the Pauli exclusion principle. Second, the embedding of WFT methods in local correlation approaches is studied. Since the latter methods split up the system into local domains, very simple embedding theories can be defined if the domains of the active subsystem and the environment are treated at a different level. The considered embedding schemes are benchmarked for reaction energies and compared to quantum mechanics (QM)/molecular mechanics (MM) and vacuum embedding. We conclude that for DFT-in-DFT embedding, the Huzinaga-equation-based scheme is more efficient than the other approaches, but QM/MM or even simple vacuum embedding is still competitive in particular cases. Concerning the embedding of wave function methods, the clear winner is the embedding of WFT into low-level local correlation approaches, and WFT-in-DFT embedding can only be more advantageous if a non-hybrid density functional is employed.

  6. Carbon loaded Teflon (CLT): a power density meter for biological experiments using millimeter waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stewart J; Ross, James A

    2007-01-01

    The standard technique for measurement of millimeter wave fields utilizes an open-ended waveguide attached to a HP power meter. The alignment of the waveguide with the propagation (K) vector is critical to making accurate measurements. Using this technique, it is difficult and time consuming to make a detailed map of average incident power density over areas of biological interest and the spatial resolution of this instrument does not allow accurate measurements in non-uniform fields. For biological experiments, it is important to know the center field average incident power density and the distribution over the exposed area. Two 4 ft x 4 ft x 1/32 inch sheets of carbon loaded Teflon (CLT) (one 15% carbon and one 25% carbon) were procured and a series of tests to determine the usefulness of CLT in defining fields in the millimeter wavelength range was initiated. Since the CLT was to be used both in the laboratory, where the environment was well controlled, and in the field, where the environment could not be controlled, tests were made to determine effects of change in environmental conditions on ability to use CLT as a millimeter wave dosimeter. The empirical results of this study indicate CLT to be an effective dosimeter for biological experiments both in the laboratory and in the field.

  7. Secondary instability in drift wave turbulence as a mechanism for avalanche and zonal flow formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Champeaux, S.; Malkov, M.

    2001-01-01

    We report on recent developments in the theory of secondary instability in drift-ITG turbulence. Specifically, we explore secondary instability as a mechanism for avalanche formation. A theory of radially extended streamer cell formation and self-regulation is presented. Aspects of streamer structure and dynamics are used to estimate the variance of the drift-wave induced flux. The relation between streamer cell structures and the avalanche concept is discussed, as are the implications of our results for transport modeling. (author)

  8. A New Method for Simulating Power Flow Density Focused by a Silicon Lens Antenna Irradiated with Linearly Polarized THz Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Apriono

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A terahertz system uses dielectric lens antennas for focusing and collimating beams of terahertz wave radiation. Linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation has been widely applied in the terahertz system. Therefore, an accurate method for analyzing the power flow density in the dielectric lens antenna irradiated with the linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation is important to design the terahertz systems. In optics, ray-tracing method has been used to calculate the power flow density by a number density of rays. In this study, we propose a method of ray-tracing combined with Fresnel’s transmission, including transmittance and polarization of the terahertz wave radiation to calculate power flow density in a Silicon lens antenna. We compare power flow density calculated by the proposed method with the regular ray-tracing method. When the Silicon lens antenna is irradiated with linearly polarized terahertz wave radiation, the proposed method calculates the power flow density more accurately than the regular ray-tracing.

  9. Formation of ion beam with high current density for micro irradiation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanenko, A.V.; Ponomarev, A.G.

    2015-04-01

    The paper describes a study of the ion beam formation for irradiation of microareas of construction materials with individual grains. A numerical simulation of the microbeam formation was performed with profiles of current density distribution close to rectangular to obtain uniform dose. Ion beams with the total current on the target 10–100 nA were considered. An approach for beam focusing with energy variation without moving a sample was considered. The ability to create current density distributions close to uniform in the target plane was experimentally validated.

  10. Subshell fitting of relativistic atomic core electron densities for use in QTAIM analyses of ECP-based wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Todd A; Frisch, Michael J

    2011-11-17

    Scalar-relativistic, all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations were done for free, neutral atoms of all elements of the periodic table using the universal Gaussian basis set. Each core, closed-subshell contribution to a total atomic electron density distribution was separately fitted to a spherical electron density function: a linear combination of s-type Gaussian functions. The resulting core subshell electron densities are useful for systematically and compactly approximating total core electron densities of atoms in molecules, for any atomic core defined in terms of closed subshells. When used to augment the electron density from a wave function based on a calculation using effective core potentials (ECPs) in the Hamiltonian, the atomic core electron densities are sufficient to restore the otherwise-absent electron density maxima at the nuclear positions and eliminate spurious critical points in the neighborhood of the atom, thus enabling quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses to be done in the neighborhoods of atoms for which ECPs were used. Comparison of results from QTAIM analyses with all-electron, relativistic and nonrelativistic molecular wave functions validates the use of the atomic core electron densities for augmenting electron densities from ECP-based wave functions. For an atom in a molecule for which a small-core or medium-core ECPs is used, simply representing the core using a simplistic, tightly localized electron density function is actually sufficient to obtain a correct electron density topology and perform QTAIM analyses to obtain at least semiquantitatively meaningful results, but this is often not true when a large-core ECP is used. Comparison of QTAIM results from augmenting ECP-based molecular wave functions with the realistic atomic core electron densities presented here versus augmenting with the limiting case of tight core densities may be useful for diagnosing the reliability of large-core ECP models in

  11. The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeder, Michael J. [Monash University; Lane, Todd P. [University of Melbourne; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen [Monash University

    2013-09-27

    All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection

  12. High dark matter densities and the formation of extreme dwarf galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, G.

    1990-01-01

    The extreme dwarfs of the Local Group, GR 8, Draco, and Ursa Minor have high densities of dark matter. If the dark matter is dissipationless, then there is a simple relation between the redshift of turnaround z(turn) and its current mean density. Three alternatives for the dSphs are discussed. If the dark matter follows the light, then z(turn) is greater than 30. If a density profile is adopted so that the mean density becomes low enough to be barely consistent with the standard density fluctuation spectrum of cold dark matter, then the mass-to-light ratios are greater than 1000 solar mass/solar luminosity. The last alternative is dissipational dark matter. In this case, the additional collapse factor owing to dissipation allows a later epoch of formation. 39 refs

  13. Time-dependent density-functional theory in the projector augmented-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Michael; Häkkinen, Hannu; Lehtovaara, Lauri

    2008-01-01

    We present the implementation of the time-dependent density-functional theory both in linear-response and in time-propagation formalisms using the projector augmented-wave method in real-space grids. The two technically very different methods are compared in the linear-response regime where we fo...... surfaces for a set of atoms and molecules with the linear-response method and by calculating nonlinear emission spectra using the time-propagation method....... found perfect agreement in the calculated photoabsorption spectra. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods as well as their convergence properties. We demonstrate different applications of the methods by calculating excitation energies and excited state Born–Oppenheimer potential...

  14. Breakdown of the Fermi arcs in underdoped cuprates by incommensurate charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, L. P.

    2014-11-01

    Interactions between the coherent excitations on disconnected arcs along a "bare" Fermi surface (the socalled Fermi arcs FAs) seen by angle-resolved photo emission spectroscopy (ARPES) in several underdoped (UD) cuprates and incommensurate charge density wave (IC CDW) ordering at lowering of the temperature have been studied. The carriers on FAs scatter strongly on the short-wavelength potential of CDW. The large momentum transfer relates FAs with the electronic states lying deeply under the chemical potential thus involving into consideration the Fermi liquid interactions. At low temperatures IC CDW may fully destroy low lying excitations on the Fermi arcs, leaving electrons on the pocket at the Γ point as the only charged elementary excitations in the CDW phase in UD cuprates. The results infer competition between superconducting and CDW order parameters.

  15. Fermi Surface Evolution Across Multiple Charge Density Wave Transitions in ErTe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.G.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Brouet, V.; /Orsay, LPS; He, R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Lu, D.H.; /SLAC, SSRL; Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    The Fermi surface (FS) of ErTe{sub 3} is investigated using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Low temperature measurements reveal two incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) gaps created by perpendicular FS nesting vectors. A large {Delta}{sub 1} = 175 meV gap arising from a CDW with c* - q{sub CDW1} {approx} 0.70(0)c* is in good agreement with the expected value. A second, smaller {Delta}{sub 2} = 50 meV gap is due to a second CDW with a* - q{sub CDW2} {approx} 0.68(5)a*. The temperature dependence of the FS, the two gaps and possible interaction between the CDWs are examined.

  16. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Weile; Fu, Jiyun; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP

  17. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S.; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (pdiabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  18. Local Atomic Structure and Discommensurations in the Charge Density Wave of CeTe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Tomic, A.T.; Tessmer, S.H.; Billinge, S.J.L.; Malliakas, C.D.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    The local structure of CeTe 3 in the incommensurate charge density wave (IC-CDW) state has been obtained using atomic pair distribution function analysis of x-ray diffraction data. Local atomic distortions in the Te nets due to the CDW are larger than observed crystallographically, resulting in distinct short and long Te-Te bonds. Observation of different distortion amplitudes in the local and average structures is explained by the discommensurated nature of the CDW, since the pair distribution function is sensitive to the local displacements within the commensurate regions, whereas the crystallographic result averages over many discommensurated domains. The result is supported by STM data. This is the first quantitative local structural study within the commensurate domains in an IC-CDW system

  19. Spectroscopic study of the charge density wave order in 2H[ -TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Wijayaratne, K.; Malliakas, C. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Chung, D. Y.; Gu, G.; Chatterjee, U.

    2017-09-01

    We conduct Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation on 2H-TaS2, a prototypical incommensurate Charge Density Wave (CDW) material. A comparative study of the low-energy electronic structures of 2H-TaS2 and two other related compounds, 2H-TaSe2 and 2H-NbSe2, identifies several generic features of their CDW orders. Firstly, Fermi surface (FS) nesting alone doesn't seem to give rise to the CDW instability in these compounds. Secondly, partial gapping of the underlying FS surface in the CDW state is common to each of these materials. Finally, the CDW energy gap, unlike the energy gap in a superconductor, is not symmetric with respect to the chemical potential.

  20. Monte Carlo studies of diamagnetism and charge density wave order in the cuprate pseudogap regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward Sierens, Lauren; Achkar, Andrew; Hawthorn, David; Melko, Roger; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-03-01

    The pseudogap regime of the hole-doped cuprate superconductors is often characterized experimentally in terms of a substantial diamagnetic response and, from another point of view, in terms of strong charge density wave (CDW) order. We introduce a dimensionless ratio, R, that incorporates both diamagnetic susceptibility and the correlation length of CDW order, and therefore reconciles these two fundamental characteristics of the pseudogap. We perform Monte Carlo simulations on a classical model that considers angular fluctuations of a six-dimensional order parameter, and compare our Monte Carlo results for R with existing data from torque magnetometry and x-ray scattering experiments on YBa2Cu3O6+x. We achieve qualitative agreement, and also propose future experiments to further investigate the behaviour of this dimensionless ratio.

  1. Origin of Superconductivity and Latent Charge Density Wave in NbS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Christoph; Poncé, Samuel; Lambert, Henry; Schlipf, Martin; Margine, Elena R.; Giustino, Feliciano

    2017-08-01

    We elucidate the origin of the phonon-mediated superconductivity in 2 H -NbS2 using the ab initio anisotropic Migdal-Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions. We demonstrate that superconductivity is associated with Fermi surface hot spots exhibiting an unusually strong electron-phonon interaction. The electron-lattice coupling is dominated by low-energy anharmonic phonons, which place the system on the verge of a charge density wave instability. We also provide definitive evidence for two-gap superconductivity in 2 H -NbS2 , and show that the low- and high-energy peaks observed in tunneling spectra correspond to the Γ - and K -centered Fermi surface pockets, respectively. The present findings call for further efforts to determine whether our proposed mechanism underpins superconductivity in the whole family of metallic transition metal dichalcogenides.

  2. Transmission and reflection of charge-density wave packets in a quantum Hall edge controlled by a metal gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Masahiro; Mano, Takaaki; Noda, Takeshi; Shibata, Naokazu; Hotta, Masahiro; Yusa, Go

    2018-02-01

    Quantum energy teleportation (QET) is a proposed protocol related to quantum vacuum. The edge channels in a quantum Hall system are well suited for the experimental verification of QET. For this purpose, we examine a charge-density wave packet excited and detected by capacitively coupled front gate electrodes. We observe the waveform of the charge packet, which is proportional to the time derivative of the applied square voltage wave. Further, we study the transmission and reflection behaviors of the charge-density wave packet by applying a voltage to another front gate electrode to control the path of the edge state. We show that the threshold voltages where the dominant direction is switched in either transmission or reflection for dense and sparse wave packets are different from the threshold voltage where the current stops flowing in an equilibrium state.

  3. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpel, Michael, E-mail: himpel@physik.uni-greifswald.de; Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Ole Menzel, Kristoffer [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research Center, 5405 Dättwil (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  4. Gravimetric and density profiling using the combination of surface acoustic waves and neutron reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolan, Daniel T W; Barker, Robert; Gough, Tim; Topham, Paul D; Howse, Jonathan R; Glidle, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    A new approach is described herein, where neutron reflectivity measurements that probe changes in the density profile of thin films as they absorb material from the gas phase have been combined with a Love wave based gravimetric assay that measures the mass of absorbed material. This combination of techniques not only determines the spatial distribution of absorbed molecules, but also reveals the amount of void space within the thin film (a quantity that can be difficult to assess using neutron reflectivity measurements alone). The uptake of organic solvent vapours into spun cast films of polystyrene has been used as a model system with a view to this method having the potential for extension to the study of other systems. These could include, for example, humidity sensors, hydrogel swelling, biomolecule adsorption or transformations of electroactive and chemically reactive thin films. This is the first ever demonstration of combined neutron reflectivity and Love wave-based gravimetry and the experimental caveats, limitations and scope of the method are explored and discussed in detail. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Charge density waves and local states in quasi-one-dimensional mixed valence inorganic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradson, S.D.; Stroud, M.A.; Zietlow, M.H.; Swanson, B.I.; Baeriswyl, D.; Bishop, A.R.

    1987-10-01

    The ground state structures and local states associated with chemical defects in quasi-one-dimensional halogen (X) bridged transition metal (M) mixed valence solids of MX and MMX type have been studied. An adiabatic Hartree-Fock theoretical framework is presented and representative members are classified. The MX materials provide a class whose strong electron-phonon coupling usually favors a charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state. However, the coupling strength can be chemically tuned (e.g., by extension to MMX systems) or altered by pressure, driving the ground state structures towards, e.g., a bond-order-wave (BOW) phase. Electron-phonon driven self-trapped states are expected in both the CDW or BOW regimes. Resonance Raman spectra of the MMX solid K 4 (Pt 2 (P 2 O 5 H 2 ) 4 Cl)·H 2 O show, in addition to the homogeneous ground state modes, sharp new features with excitation profiles shifted to the red of the intervalence-charge-transfer (IVCT) band. We attribute these new bands to a local polaron state formed by oxidation of the Pt 2 Cl chain by a chemical defect. The observed spectral characteristics of this local state are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. (author). 28 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  6. Capillary wave Hamiltonian for the Landau–Ginzburg–Wilson density functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacón, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We study the link between the density functional (DF) formalism and the capillary wave theory (CWT) for liquid surfaces, focused on the Landau–Ginzburg–Wilson (LGW) model, or square gradient DF expansion, with a symmetric double parabola free energy, which has been extensively used in theoretical studies of this problem. We show the equivalence between the non-local DF results of Parry and coworkers and the direct evaluation of the mean square fluctuations of the intrinsic surface, as is done in the intrinsic sampling method for computer simulations. The definition of effective wave-vector dependent surface tensions is reviewed and we obtain new proposals for the LGW model. The surface weight proposed by Blokhuis and the surface mode analysis proposed by Stecki provide consistent and optimal effective definitions for the extended CWT Hamiltonian associated to the DF model. A non-local, or coarse-grained, definition of the intrinsic surface provides the missing element to get the mesoscopic surface Hamiltonian from the molecular DF description, as had been proposed a long time ago by Dietrich and coworkers. (paper)

  7. Analysis of the Nonlinear Density Wave Two-Phase Instability in a Steam Generator of 600MWe Liquid Metal Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong O

    2011-01-01

    A 600 MWe demonstration reactor being developed at KAERI employs a once-through helically coiled steam generator. The helically coiled steam generator is compact and is efficient for heat transfer, however, it may suffer from the two-phase instability. It is well known that the density wave instability is the main source of instability among various types of instabilities in a helically coiled S/G in a LMR. In the present study a simple method for analysis of the density wave two phase instability in a liquid metal reactor S/G is proposed and the method is applied to the analysis of density wave instability in a S/G of 600MWe liquid metal reactor

  8. Polarization study of non-resonant X-ray magnetic scattering from spin-density-wave modulation in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    We present a polarization study of non-resonant X-ray magnetic scattering in pure chromium. Satellite reflections are observed at +/-Q and +/-2Q, where Q is the modulation wave vector of an itinerant spin-density-wave. The first and second harmonics are confirmed to have magnetic and charge origin, respectively, by means of polarimetry without using an analyzer crystal. This alternative technique eliminates intolerable intensity loss at an analyzer by utilizing the sample crystal also as an analyzer crystal

  9. Generation of gravitational waves during early structure formation between cosmic inflation and reheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedamzik, Karsten; Lemoine, Martin; Martin, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    In the pre-reheating era, following cosmic inflation and preceding radiation domination, the energy density may be dominated by an oscillating massive scalar condensate, such as is the case for V = m 2 φ 2 /2 chaotic inflation. We have found in a previous paper that during this period, a wide range of sub-Hubble scale perturbations are subject to a preheating instability, leading to the growth of density perturbations ultimately collapsing to form non-linear structures. We compute here the gravitational wave signal due to these structures in the linear limit and present estimates for emission in the non-linear limit due to various effects: the collapse of halos, the tidal interactions, the evaporation during the conversion of the inflaton condensate into radiation and finally the ensuing turbulent cascades. The gravitational wave signal could be rather large and potentially testable by future detectors

  10. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: A high density EEG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T; Goldstein, Michael R; Cook, Jesse D; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M; Peterson, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly anisotropic quasiparticle interference patterns in the spin-density wave state of the iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Majumdar, Pinaki

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the impurity-scattering-induced quasiparticle interference in the (π ,0 ) spin-density wave phase of the iron pnictides. We use a five-orbital tight-binding model and our mean-field theory in the clean limit captures key features of the Fermi surface observed in angle-resolved photoemission. We use a t -matrix formalism to incorporate the effect of doping-induced impurities on this state. The impurities lead to a spatial modulation of the local density of states about the impurity site, with a periodicity of ˜8 aFe -Fe along the antiferromagnetic direction. The associated momentum space quasiparticle interference pattern is anisotropic, with major peaks located at ˜(±π /4 ,0 ) , consistent with spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy. We trace the origin of this pattern to an elliptical contour of constant energy around momentum (0,0), with major axis oriented along the (0,1) direction, in the mean-field electronic structure.

  12. Effect of plasma density on diffusion rates due to wave particle interactions with chorus and plasmaspheric hiss: extreme event analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sicard-Piet

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wave particle interactions play an important role in controlling the dynamics of the radiation belts. The purpose of this study is to estimate how variations in the plasma density can affect diffusion rates resulting from interactions between chorus waves and plasmaspheric hiss with energetic particles and the resulting evolution of the energetic electron population. We perform a statistical analysis of the electron density derived from the plasma wave experiment on the CRRES satellite for two magnetic local time sectors corresponding to near midnight and near noon. We present the cumulative probability distribution of the electron plasma density for three levels of magnetic activity as measured by Kp. The largest densities are seen near L* = 2.5 while the smallest occur near L* = 6. The broadest distribution, corresponding to the greatest variability, occurs near L* = 4. We calculate diffusion coefficients for plasmaspheric hiss and whistler mode chorus for extreme values of the electron density and estimate the effects on the radiation belts using the Salammbô model. At L* = 4 and L* = 6, in the low density case, using the density from the 5th percentile of the cumulative distribution function, electron energy diffusion by chorus waves is strongest at 2 MeV and increases the flux by up to 3 orders of magnitude over a period of 24 h. In contrast, in the high density case, using the density from the 95th percentile, there is little acceleration at energies above 800 keV at L* = 6, and virtually no acceleration at L* = 4. In this case the strongest energy diffusion occurs at lower energies around 400 keV where the flux at L* = 6 increases 3 orders of magnitude.

  13. Mapping the energy density of shaped waves in scattering media onto a complete set of diffusion modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi S; Mosk, Allard P; Vellekoop, Ivo M; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L

    2016-08-08

    We study the energy density of shaped waves inside a quasi-1D disordered waveguide. We find that the spatial energy density of optimally shaped waves, when expanded in the complete set of eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation, is well described by considering only a few of the lowest eigenfunctions. Taking into account only the fundamental eigenfunction, the total internal energy inside the sample is underestimated by only 2%. The spatial distribution of the shaped energy density is very similar to the fundamental eigenfunction, up to a cosine distance of about 0.01. We obtain the energy density of transmission eigenchannels inside the sample by numerical simulation of the scattering matrix. Computing the transmission-averaged energy density over all transmission channels yields the ensemble averaged energy density of shaped waves. From the averaged energy density, we reconstruct its spatial distribution using the eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. The results of our study have exciting applications in controlled biomedical imaging, efficient light harvesting in solar cells, enhanced energy conversion in solid-state lighting, and low threshold random lasers.

  14. Strain Tuning of the Charge Density Wave in Monolayer and Bilayer 1T-TaS2

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Liyong

    2015-12-07

    By first-principles calculations, we investigate the strain effects on the charge density wave states of monolayer and bilayer 1T-TaS2. The modified stability of the charge density wave in the monolayer is understood in terms of the strain dependent electron localization, which determines the distortion amplitude. On the other hand, in the bilayer the effect of strain on the interlayer interaction is also crucial. The rich phase diagram under strain opens new venues for applications of 1T-TaS2. We interpret the experimentally observed insulating state of bulk 1T-TaS2 as inherited from the monolayer by effective interlayer decoupling.

  15. Evaluation of magnetic helicity density in the wave number domain using multi-point measurements in space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We develop an estimator for the magnetic helicity density, a measure of the spiral geometry of magnetic field lines, in the wave number domain as a wave diagnostic tool based on multi-point measurements in space. The estimator is numerically tested with a synthetic data set and then applied to an observation of magnetic field fluctuations in the Earth foreshock region provided by the four-point measurements of the Cluster spacecraft. The energy and the magnetic helicity density are determined in the frequency and the wave number domain, which allows us to identify the wave properties in the plasma rest frame correcting for the Doppler shift. In the analyzed time interval, dominant wave components have parallel propagation to the mean magnetic field, away from the shock at about Alfvén speed and a left-hand spatial rotation sense of helicity with respect to the propagation direction, which means a right-hand temporal rotation sense of polarization. These wave properties are well explained by the right-hand resonant beam instability as the driving mechanism in the foreshock. Cluster observations allow therefore detailed comparisons with various theories of waves and instabilities.

  16. Shock formation in small-data solutions to 3D quasilinear wave equations

    CERN Document Server

    Speck, Jared

    2016-01-01

    In 1848 James Challis showed that smooth solutions to the compressible Euler equations can become multivalued, thus signifying the onset of a shock singularity. Today it is known that, for many hyperbolic systems, such singularities often develop. However, most shock-formation results have been proved only in one spatial dimension. Serge Alinhac's groundbreaking work on wave equations in the late 1990s was the first to treat more than one spatial dimension. In 2007, for the compressible Euler equations in vorticity-free regions, Demetrios Christodoulou remarkably sharpened Alinhac's results and gave a complete description of shock formation. In this monograph, Christodoulou's framework is extended to two classes of wave equations in three spatial dimensions. It is shown that if the nonlinear terms fail to satisfy the null condition, then for small data, shocks are the only possible singularities that can develop. Moreover, the author exhibits an open set of small data whose solutions form a shock, and he prov...

  17. Sourceless formation evaluation. An LWD solution providing density and neutron measurements without the use of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, R.; Reichel, N. [Schlumberger, Sungai Buloh (Malaysia)

    2013-08-01

    For many years the industry has been searching for a way to eliminate the logistical difficulties and risk associated with deployment of radioisotopes for formation evaluation. The traditional gamma-gamma density (GGD) measurement uses the scattering of 662-keV gamma rays from a 137Cs radioisotopic source, with a 30.17-year half-life, to determine formation density. The traditional neutron measurement uses an Am-Be source emitting neutrons with an energy around 4 MeV, with a half-life of 432 years. Both these radioisotopic sources pose health, security, and environmental risks. Pulsed-neutron generators have been used in the industry for several decades in wireline tools and more recently in logging-while-drilling tools. These generators produce 14-MeV neutrons, many of which interact with the nuclei in the formation. Elastic collisions allow a neutron porosity measurement to be derived, which has been available to the industry since 2005. Inelastic interactions are typically followed by the emission of a variety of high-energy gamma rays. Similar to the case of the GGD measurement, the transport and attenuation of these gamma rays is a strong function of the formation density. However, the gamma-ray source is now distributed over a volume within the formation, where gamma rays have been induced by neutron interactions and the source can no longer be considered to be a point as in the case of a radioisotopic source. In addition, the extent of the induced source region depends on the transport of the fast neutrons from the source to the point of gamma-ray production. Even though the physics is more complex, it is possible to measure the formation density if the fast neutron transport is taken into account when deriving the density answer. This paper briefly reviews the physics underlying the sourceless neutron porosity and recently introduced neutron-gamma density (SNGD) measurement, demonstrates how they can be used in traditional workflows and illustrates their

  18. Proximity effects on the spin density waves in X/Cr(001) multilayers (X = Sn, V, and Mn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amitouche, F.; Bouarab, S.; Tazibt, S.; Vega, A.; Demangeat, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present ab initio density functional calculations of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of X 2 /Cr 36 (001) and X 1 /Cr 37 (001) multilayers, with X = Sn, V and Mn, to investigate the impact of the proximity effects of the X layers on the spin density waves of the Cr slab. We find different magnetic profiles corresponding to the spin density wave and to the layered antiferromagnetic configurations. The nature of the different magnetic solutions is discussed in terms of the different interfacial environments in the proximity of Sn, V or Mn. The magnetic behavior at the interface is discussed in connection with the electronic structure through the density of electronic states projected at the interfacial X and Cr sites. We compare the results with those previously obtained for Fe 3 /X 1 /Cr 37 /X 1 (001) multilayers to analyze the role played by the ferromagnetic iron slab.

  19. The Formation of Massive Molecular Filaments and Massive Stars Triggered by a MHD Shock Wave

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hennebelle, Patrick; Fukui, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Iwasaki, Kazunari; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that intensive molecular cloud collision can trigger massive star/cluster formation. The most important physical process caused by the collision is a shock compression. In this paper, the influence of a shock wave on the evolution of a molecular cloud is studied numerically by using isothermal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with the effect of self-gravity. Adaptive-mesh-refinement and sink particle techniques are used to follow long-time evolution of the sh...

  20. Projector Augmented Wave Method Incorporated into Gauss-Type Atomic Orbital Based Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiao-Gen; Yanai, Takeshi

    2017-07-11

    The Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) method developed by Blöchl is well recognized as an efficient, accurate pseudopotential approach in solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the plane-wave basis. Here we present an approach to incorporate the PAW method into the Gauss-type function (GTF) based DFT implementation, which is widely used for molecular quantum chemistry calculations. The nodal and high-exponent GTF components of valence molecular orbitals (MOs) are removed or pseudized by the ultrasoft PAW treatment, while there is elaborate transparency to construct an accurate and well-controlled pseudopotential from all-electron atomic description and to reconstruct an all-electron form of valence MOs from the pseudo MOs. The smoothness of the pseudo MOs should benefit the efficiency of GTF-based DFT calculations in terms of elimination of high-exponent primitive GTFs and reduction of grid points in the numerical quadrature. The processes of the PAW method are divided into basis-independent and -dependent parts. The former is carried out using the previously developed PAW libraries libpaw and atompaw. The present scheme is implemented by incorporating libpaw into the conventional GTF-based DFT solver. The details of the formulations and implementations of GTF-related PAW procedures are presented. The test calculations are shown for illustrating the performance. With the near-complete GTF basis at the cc-pVQZ level, the total energies obtained using our PAW method with suited frozen core treatments converge to those with the conventional all-electron GTF-based method with a rather small absolute error.

  1. Seasonal and nightly variations of gravity-wave energy density in the middle atmosphere measured by the Purple Crow Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Sica

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The Purple Crow Lidar (PCL is a large power-aperture product monostatic Rayleigh-Raman-Sodium-resonance-fluorescence lidar, which has been in operation at the Delaware Observatory (42.9° N, 81.4° W, 237 m elevation near the campus of The University of Western Ontario since 1992. Kinetic-energy density has been calculated from the Rayleigh-scatter system measurements of density fluctuations at temporal-spatial scales relevant for gravity waves, e.g. soundings at 288 m height resolution and 9 min temporal resolution in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The seasonal averages from 10 years of measurements show in all seasons some loss of gravity-wave energy in the upper stratosphere. During the equinox periods and summer the measurements are consistent with gravity waves growing in height with little saturation, in agreement with the classic picture of the variations in the height at which gravity waves break given by Lindzen (1981. The mean values compare favourably to previous measurements when computed as nightly averages, but the high temporal-spatial resolution measurements show considerable day-to-day variability. The variability over a night is often extremely large, with typical RMS fluctuations of 50 to 100% at all heights and seasons common. These measurements imply that using a daily or nightly-averaged gravity-wave energy density in numerical models may be highly unrealistic.

  2. Calculation of local excitations in large systems by embedding wave-function theory in density-functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, A.S.P.; Jacob, C.R.; Visscher, L.

    2008-01-01

    We present a simple and efficient embedding scheme for the wave-function based calculation of the energies of local excitations in large systems. By introducing an embedding potential obtained from density-functional theory (DFT) it is possible to describe the effect of an environment on local

  3. Low-frequency permittivity of spin-density wave in (TMTSF)2PF6 at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nad, F.; Monceau, P.; Bechgaard, K.

    1995-01-01

    Conductivity and permittivity epsilon of(TMTSF)(2)PF6 have been measured at low frequencies of (10(2)-10(7) Hz) at low temperatures below the spin-density wave (SDW) transition temperature T-p. The temperature dependence of the conductivity shows a deviation from thermally activated behavior at T...

  4. Higgs-mode radiance and charge-density-wave order in 2 H -NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Romain; Cea, Tommaso; Gallais, Yann; Cazayous, Maximilien; Sacuto, Alain; Cario, Laurent; Benfatto, Lara; Méasson, Marie-Aude

    2018-03-01

    Despite being usually considered two competing phenomena, charge-density wave and superconductivity coexist in few systems, the most emblematic one being the transition-metal dichalcogenide 2 H -NbSe2 . This unusual condition is responsible for specific Raman signatures across the two phase transitions in this compound. While the appearance of a soft phonon mode is a well-established fingerprint of the charge-density-wave order, the nature of the sharp subgap mode emerging below the superconducting temperature is still under debate. In this work we use external pressure as a knob to unveil the delicate interplay between the two orders, and consequently the nature of the superconducting mode. Thanks to an advanced extreme-conditions Raman technique, we are able to follow the pressure evolution and the simultaneous collapse of the two intertwined charge-density-wave and superconducting modes. The comparison with microscopic calculations in a model system supports the Higgs-type nature of the superconducting mode and suggests that charge-density wave and superconductivity in 2 H -NbSe2 involve mutual electronic degrees of freedom. These findings fill the knowledge gap on the electronic mechanisms at play in transition-metal dichalcogenides, a crucial step to fully exploit their properties in few-layer systems optimized for device applications.

  5. Charge density wave and superconductivity in 2H-and 4H-NbSe2: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Good-quality hexagonal NbSe2 single crystals were prepared. In 2H-NbSe2, superconducting and charge density wave (CDW) transitions were found at = 7.4 K and = 35 K respectively as reported previously. We have noticed that these two transitions are changed to = 42 K and = 6.5 K, in 4H-NbSe2.

  6. Mapping the energy density of shaped waves in scattering media onto a complete set of diffusion modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojambati, O. S.; Mosk, A. P.; Vellekoop, I. M.; Lagendijk, A.; Vos, W.L.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the spatial distribution of the energy density of optimally shaped waves inside a scattering medium can be described by considering only a few of the lowest eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. Taking into account only the fundamental eigenfunction, the total internal energy inside

  7. Energy density distribution of shaped waves inside scattering media mapped onto a complete set of diffusion modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi Stephen; Mosk, Allard; Vellekoop, Ivo Micha; Lagendijk, Aart; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the spatial distribution of the energy density of optimally shaped waves inside a scattering medium can be described by considering only a few of the lowest eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. Taking into account only the fundamental eigenfunction, the total internal energy inside

  8. Effect of Chemical Pressure on the Charge Density Wave Transition in Rare-Earth Tritellurides RTe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; Condron, C.L.; Margulis, G.Y.; Shin, K.Y.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Toney, M.F.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Bristol U.

    2009-04-30

    The charge density wave transition is investigated in the bilayer family of rare-earth tritelluride RTe{sub 3} compounds (R=Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm) via high-resolution x-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity. The transition temperature increases monotonically with increasing lattice parameter from 244(3) K for TmTe{sub 3} to 416(3) K for SmTe{sub 3}. The heaviest members of the series, R=Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm, are observed to have a second transition at a lower temperature, which marks the onset of an additional charge density wave with wave vector almost equal in magnitude to the first, but oriented in the perpendicular direction.

  9. A multivariate analysis of risk factors associated with subcapsular hematoma formation following electromagnetic shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Nivedita Bhatta; Thornton, Julie; Karafa, Matthew T; Streem, Stevan B

    2004-12-01

    Subcapsular or perinephric hematoma is one of the most frequent and potentially serious complications of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). We determined the incidence of and risk factors for renal hematomas following electromagnetic shock wave lithotripsy. Between February 1999 and August 2003, 570 SWL treatments were performed using a Modulith SLX electromagnetic lithotriptor (Storz, St. Louis, Missouri). A total of 415 of these treatments in 317 patients were performed for stones in the renal pelvis or calices and these treatment episodes represent the study group reported. Treatment episodes were reviewed from a prospective institutional review board approved registry and analyzed for patient age, gender, body mass index, mean arterial pressure at induction, stone location, total number of shock waves and peak shock wave intensity. Following these 415 episodes subcapsular or perinephric hematomas developed in 17 patients for an overall incidence of 4.1%. The probability of hematoma after shock wave lithotripsy increased significantly as patient age at treatment increased, such that the probability of hematoma was estimated to be 1.67 times greater for each 10-year incremental increase in patient age. None of the other variables analyzed were significantly related to the incidence of hematoma formation at the 0.05 level. The incidence of renal hematoma formation following electromagnetic SWL for renal calculus was 4.1%. The probability of hematoma increased significantly with increasing patient age but it was not associated with increasing mean arterial pressure at treatment. These findings are in contrast to previous reports of hematoma associated with electrohydraulic SWL. These differences may be a consequence of the smaller focal zone and higher peak pressure associated with Storz Modulith electromagnetic SWL and, just as importantly, a consequence of the difference in the manner in which blood pressure was defined.

  10. Exposure of zebra mussels to extracorporeal shock waves demonstrates formation of new mineralized tissue inside and outside the focus zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternecker, Katharina; Geist, Juergen; Beggel, Sebastian; Dietz-Laursonn, Kristin; de la Fuente, Matias; Frank, Hans-Georg; Furia, John P; Milz, Stefan; Schmitz, Christoph

    2018-04-03

    The success rate of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for fracture nonunions in human medicine (i.e., radiographic union at six months after ESWT) is only approximately 75%. Detailed knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms that induce bio-calcification after ESWT is limited. We analyzed the biological response within mineralized tissue of a new invertebrate model organism, the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha , after exposure with extracorporeal shock waves (ESWs). Mussels were exposed to ESWs with positive energy density of 0.4 mJ/mm 2 (A) or were sham exposed (B). Detection of newly calcified tissue was performed by exposing the mussels to fluorescent markers. Two weeks later, the A-mussels showed a higher mean fluorescence signal intensity within the shell zone than the B-mussels (pmussels was independent of the size and position of the focal point of the ESWs. These data demonstrate that induction of bio-calcification after ESWT may not be restricted to the region of direct energy transfer of ESWs into calcified tissue. The results of the present study are of relevance for better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that induce formation of new mineralized tissue after ESWT. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Interfacial wave theory of pattern formation in solidification dendrites, fingers, cells and free boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive work explores interfacial instability and pattern formation in dynamic systems away from the equilibrium state in solidification and crystal growth. Further, this significantly expanded 2nd edition introduces and reviews the progress made during the last two decades. In particular, it describes the most prominent pattern formation phenomena commonly observed in material processing and crystal growth in the framework of the previously established interfacial wave theory, including free dendritic growth from undercooled melt, cellular growth and eutectic growth in directional solidification, as well as viscous fingering in Hele-Shaw flow. It elucidates the key problems, systematically derives their mathematical solutions by pursuing a unified, asymptotic approach, and finally carefully examines these results by comparing them with the available experimental results. The asymptotic approach described here will be useful for the investigation of pattern formation phenomena occurring in a much b...

  12. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures...... at B∼15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry...... remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ∼ 0.123, we find that a field (B∼10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction...

  13. Using projector augmented-wave (PAW) formalism inside the density-functional perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouze, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    In condensed matter physics, ab-initio simulation allows to get macroscopic quantities (for example equations of state) from microscopic ones, as phonon frequencies which characterize the vibration Eigenmodes of the system. Therefore, one can theoretically predict the behavior of the material at very high pressure conditions, which can be out of reach by experiences. Computations of phonon spectrum are obtained thanks to the linear response theory, where the equations of Density Functional Theory (as the Kohn-Sham model) are perturbed around their fundamental state. The linear response functionality is one of the options included in the ABINIT code, which is an open source package developed in particular by a team of the CEA-DAM (DPTA) and the Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Nevertheless, in spite of using pseudopotentials, computations of phonon spectrum are not tractable for heavy chemical elements, even on massively parallel computers. In order to overcome this difficulty, the linear response theory had to be extended to the PAW (Projector Augmented-Waves) formalism. In this CEA report, we first detail the PAW model, giving to it a more mathematical framework. Then we establish the linear response equations within the PAW formalism, up to the third order derivative of the total energy, for an isolated molecular system and for generic perturbations. Lastly, all these results are specified to the particular case of atom displacements and for perturbations associated to the change of an external potential in which the molecule is set. (author)

  14. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  15. Recent Advances in Two-Dimensional Materials with Charge Density Waves: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mongur Hossain

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two-dimensional (2D charge density wave (CDW materials have attracted extensive interest due to potential applications as high performance functional nanomaterials. As other 2D materials, 2D CDW materials are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into layers of single unit cell thickness. Although bulk CDW materials have been studied for decades, recent developments in nanoscale characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities allowing applications such as oscillators, electrodes in supercapacitors, energy storage and conversion, sensors and spinelectronic devices. In this review, we first outline the synthesis techniques of 2D CDW materials including mechanical exfoliation, liquid exfoliation, chemical vapor transport (CVT, chemical vapor deposition (CVD, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE and electrochemical exfoliation. Then, the characterization procedure of the 2D CDW materials such as temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy, temperature-dependent resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM are reviewed. Finally, applications of 2D CDW materials are reviewed.

  16. Analysis of Density Wave Oscillations in Helically Coiled Tube Once-Through Steam Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwei Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helically coiled tube Once-Through Steam Generator (H-OTSG is one of the key equipment types for small modular reactors. The flow instability of the secondary side of the H-OTSG is particularly serious, because the working condition is in the range of low and medium pressure. This paper presents research on density wave oscillations (DWO in a typical countercurrent H-OTSG. Based on the steady-state calculation, the mathematical model of single-channel system was established, and the transfer function was derived. Using Nyquist stability criterion of the single variable, the stability cases were studied with an in-house computer program. According to the analyses, the impact law of the geometrical parameters to the system stability was obtained. RELAP5/MOD3.2 code was also used to simulate DWO in H-OTSG. The theoretical analyses of the in-house program were compared to the simulation results of RELAP5. A correction factor was introduced to reduce the error of RELAP5 when modeling helical geometry. The comparison results agreed well which showed that the correction is effective.

  17. Itinerant Double-Q Spin-Density Wave in Iron Arsenide Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Raymond; Allred, Jared; Chmaissem, Omar; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Brown, Dennis; Taddei, Keith; Krogstad, Matthew; Bugaris, Daniel; Chung, Duck-Young; Claus, Helmut; Lapidus, Saul; Kanatzidis, Mercouri; Kang, Jian; Fernandes, Rafael; Eremin, Ilya

    The recent observation of a tetragonal magnetic (C4) phase in hole-doped iron arsenide superconductors has provided evidence of a magnetic origin for the electronic nematicity in the C2 phase of these compounds. Now, Mössbauer data shows that the new phase also establishes the itinerant character of the antiferromagnetism of these materials and the primary role played by magnetic over orbital degrees of freedom. Neutron diffraction had shown that the magnetic order in the C4 phase was compatible with a double-Q structure arising from a collinear spin-density wave along both the X and Y directions simultaneously. The coherent superposition of the two modulations produces a non-uniform magnetic structure, in which the spin amplitudes vanish on half of the sites and double on the others, a uniquely itinerant effect that is incompatible with local moment magnetism. Mössbauer spectra in the C4 phase confirm this double-Q structure, with 50% of the spectral weight in a zero-moment peak and 50% with double the magnetic splitting seen in the C2 phase. Supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Materials and Engineering Division.

  18. Commensurate and incommensurate spin-density waves in heavy electron systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schlottmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The nesting of the Fermi surfaces of an electron and a hole pocket separated by a nesting vector Q and the interaction between electrons gives rise to itinerant antiferromagnetism. The order can gradually be suppressed by mismatching the nesting and a quantum critical point (QCP is obtained as the Néel temperature tends to zero. The transfer of pairs of electrons between the pockets can lead to a superconducting dome above the QCP (if Q is commensurate with the lattice, i.e. equal to G/2. If the vector Q is not commensurate with the lattice there are eight possible phases: commensurate and incommensurate spin and charge density waves and four superconductivity phases, two of them with modulated order parameter of the FFLO type. The renormalization group equations are studied and numerically integrated. A re-entrant SDW phase (either commensurate or incommensurate is obtained as a function of the mismatch of the Fermi surfaces and the magnitude of |Q − G/2|.

  19. Determination of Fluid Density and Viscosity by Analyzing Flexural Wave Propagations on the Vibrating Micro-Cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deokman; Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung; Park, Junhong

    2017-10-27

    The determination of fluid density and viscosity using most cantilever-based sensors is based on changes in resonant frequency and peak width. Here, we present a wave propagation analysis using piezoelectrically excited micro-cantilevers under distributed fluid loading. The standing wave shapes of microscale-thickness cantilevers partially immersed in liquids (water, 25% glycerol, and acetone), and nanoscale-thickness microfabricated cantilevers fully immersed in gases (air at three different pressures, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen) were investigated to identify the effects of fluid-structure interactions to thus determine the fluid properties. This measurement method was validated by comparing with the known fluid properties, which agreed well with the measurements. The relative differences for the liquids were less than 4.8% for the densities and 3.1% for the viscosities, and those for the gases were less than 6.7% for the densities and 7.3% for the viscosities, showing better agreements in liquids than in gases.

  20. Wave-vector-dependent electron-phonon coupling and the charge-density-wave transition in TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschek, M.; Rosenkranz, S.; Heid, R.; Said, A. H.; Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Fisher, I. R.; Weber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the soft phonon mode in the charge-density-wave (CDW) system TbT e3 . We analyze our data based on lattice dynamical calculations using density-functional-perturbation theory and find clear evidence that strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling defines the periodicity of the CDW superstructure: Our experiment reveals strong phonon softening and increased phonon linewidths over a large part in reciprocal space adjacent to the CDW ordering vector qCDW=(0 ,0 ,0.3 ) . Further, qCDW is clearly offset from the wave vector of (weak) Fermi surface nesting qFS=(0 ,0 ,0.25 ) , and our detailed analysis indicates that electron-phonon coupling is responsible for this shift. Hence, we can add TbT e3 , which was previously considered as a canonical CDW compound following the Peierls scenario, to the list of distinct charge-density-wave materials characterized by momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  1. Study of virtual cathodes formation during beam-wave interaction in the reltron oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahto, Manpuran; Jain, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, a high power microwave oscillator—reltron has been analyzed to investigate the virtual cathode formation mechanism during the beam-wave interaction. In reltron, a side coupled modulation cavity is used as its RF interaction structure containing three metal grids along the longitudinal direction. The space charge current responsible for the virtual cathode and its steady state electric field distribution has been analyzed. Space charge and beam impedance conditions for efficient device operation have been demonstrated. It has been shown that during the beam-wave interaction in the device, first a virtual cathode forms in the post-acceleration gap, and then the second virtual cathode develops between the first and second grids of the modulation cavity. These two virtual cathodes co-exist and cause the formation of a third virtual cathode between the second and third grids. At this instant, only the third virtual cathode remains, and for sustained device oscillation, this process repeats periodically in the device. The present study would be useful in understanding the beam-wave interaction mechanism as well as the design and development of efficient reltron devices.

  2. Formation of whispering gallery modes by scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by two cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, Arnold, E-mail: qulaser@gmail.com [Kuang-Chi Institute of Advanced Technology, Shenzhen, 518057 (China); Kostikov, Alexander [Donbass State Engineering Academy, 84303, Kramatorsk, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2017-03-26

    We report the effect of scattering of electromagnetic plane waves by two cylinders on whispering gallery mode (WGM) formation in a cylinder. WGM can occur because of the presence of additional cylinder scatterers at specific location, while WGMs can only form in a single cylinder for specific cylinder radius and/or wavelength values, the matching accuracy required would be much greater than that required in our model for the additional cylinders locations. Analysis of the general solution to the problem showed that the effect can be explained by the interference of waves scattered by additional cylinders and incident on the main cylinder. - Highlights: • We consider scattering of electromagnetic plane waves by two cylinders. • WGMs occur because of the presence of additional cylinder at specific location. • The accuracy for the locations is much less than required for specific values of single cylinder. • The interference of waves scattered by additional cylinders and incident on the main is responsible for the effect.

  3. Substratum type and conspecific density as drivers of mussel patch formation

    KAUST Repository

    Bertolini, Camilla

    2017-01-19

    Biogenic reefs are an important component of aquatic ecosystems where they enhance biodiversity. These reefs are often established by dense aggregations of a single taxa and understanding the fundamental principles of biogenic reef formation is needed for their conservation and restoration. We tested whether substratum type and density affected the aggregation behaviour of two important biogenic-reef forming species, the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus (Linnaeus, 1758), and the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis (Linnaeus, 1758). First, we tested for effects of substratum type on mussel movement and aggregation behaviour by manipulating substrata available to mussels in mesocosms (three treatments: no sediment added, sediment added, sediment and shells added). Both mussel species moved less in treatments with sediment and with both sediment and shells present than when no sediment or shells were added and the percentage of these mussels that aggregated (clumps of two or more individuals) was lower when shells were present compared to treatments without shells, however, fewer M. modiolus attached to shells than M. edulis. There was no effect of different substratum type on patch complexity of either mussel species. In addition, motivated by our interest in the restoration of M. modiolus, we also tested experimentally whether the aggregation behaviour of M. modiolus was density-dependent. M. modiolus moved a similar distance in three density treatments (100, 200 and 300 mussels m), however, their aggregation rate appeared to be greater when mussel density was higher, suggesting that the encounter rate of individuals is an important factor for aggregation. M. modiolus also formed aggregations with a higher fractal dimension in the high and medium density treatments compared to lower density, suggesting that at higher density this increased patch complexity could further facilitate increased recruitment with the enhanced habitat available for settlement. These findings add

  4. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  5. Local Fitting of the Kohn-Sham Density in a Gaussian and Plane Waves Scheme for Large-Scale Density Functional Theory Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golze, Dorothea; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Hutter, Jürg

    2017-05-09

    A local resolution-of-the-identity (LRI) approach is introduced in combination with the Gaussian and plane waves (GPW) scheme to enable large-scale Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations. In GPW, the computational bottleneck is typically the description of the total charge density on real-space grids. Introducing the LRI approximation, the linear scaling of the GPW approach with respect to system size is retained, while the prefactor for the grid operations is reduced. The density fitting is an O(N) scaling process implemented by approximating the atomic pair densities by an expansion in one-center fit functions. The computational cost for the grid-based operations becomes negligible in LRIGPW. The self-consistent field iteration is up to 30 times faster for periodic systems dependent on the symmetry of the simulation cell and on the density of grid points. However, due to the overhead introduced by the local density fitting, single point calculations and complete molecular dynamics steps, including the calculation of the forces, are effectively accelerated by up to a factor of ∼10. The accuracy of LRIGPW is assessed for different systems and properties, showing that total energies, reaction energies, intramolecular and intermolecular structure parameters are well reproduced. LRIGPW yields also high quality results for extended condensed phase systems such as liquid water, ice XV, and molecular crystals.

  6. Soliton wave model for simulating the slug formation in vertical-to-horizontal partially blocked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nihan Onder; Alberto Teyssedou; Danila Roubtsov

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In CANDU reactors the fuel channels are connected to inlet and outlet headers by feeder-pipes that consist of vertical and horizontal legs. In some feeders, orifices are installed for flow adjustment. During a postulated Loss of Coolant Accidents, the emergency cooling water injected into the inlet and outlet headers enters the fuel channels through the feeder pipes. Steam produced in the feeders and in the fuel channels may flow in the direction opposite to that of the water, thereby creating vertical to horizontal Counter-Current Flow (CCF). The rate at which the cooling water enters the fuel channel may be substantially limited by the flooding phenomena that entrains the water in the same direction as the steam flow. Steam flowing in the direction opposite to the cooling water can bring about the formation of slug flow. Long slugs of liquid moving at relatively high speed are transported back towards the headers by the steam. This phenomenon substantially reduces the amount of cooling water that can reach the reactor core. We conducted CCF experiments using a vertical-to-horizontal test section connected by 90 deg. elbows, with an orifice installed in the horizontal leg. Four different orifices were used to carry out the experiments. We have observed that soliton-type waves generated close to the elbow propagate in the horizontal leg towards the orifice, where a partial reflection takes place. Without an orifice, the soliton waves are reflected from the second elbow. The reflected waves move in the opposite direction to that of the incident wave. Since soliton-type waves are periodically generated, the incident and reflected waves interfere at some place in the horizontal leg. If the amplitude of the interference wave is high enough, the bridging of the tubes occur, which generates the slugs. During the experiments the water and air flow rates, pressures and void fraction distributions were measured. The slug propagation

  7. KRONOSEISMOLOGY: USING DENSITY WAVES IN SATURN'S C RING TO PROBE THE PLANET'S INTERIOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D., E-mail: mmhedman@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Saturn's C ring contains multiple spiral patterns that appear to be density waves driven by periodic gravitational perturbations. In other parts of Saturn's rings, such waves are generated by Lindblad resonances with Saturn's various moons, but most of the wave-like C-ring features are not situated near any strong resonance with any known moon. Using stellar occultation data obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft, we investigate the origin of six unidentified C-ring waves located between 80,900 and 87,200 km from Saturn's center. By measuring differences in the waves' phases among the different occultations, we are able to determine both the number of arms in each spiral pattern and the speeds at which these patterns rotate around the planet. We find that all six of these waves have between two and four arms and pattern speeds between 1660 Degree-Sign day{sup -1} and 1861 Degree-Sign day{sup -1}. These speeds are too large to be attributed to any satellite resonance. Instead, they are comparable to the predicted pattern speeds of waves generated by low-order normal-mode oscillations within the planet. The precise pattern speeds associated with these waves should therefore provide strong constraints on Saturn's internal structure. Furthermore, we identify multiple waves with the same number of arms and very similar pattern speeds, indicating that multiple m = 3 and m = 2 sectoral (l = m) modes may exist within the planet.

  8. Wave energy focusing to subsurface poroelastic formations to promote oil mobilization

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, P. M.

    2015-04-22

    We discuss an inverse source formulation aimed at focusing wave energy produced by ground surface sources to target subsurface poroelastic formations. The intent of the focusing is to facilitate or enhance the mobility of oil entrapped within the target formation. The underlying forward wave propagation problem is cast in two spatial dimensions for a heterogeneous poroelastic target embedded within a heterogeneous elastic semi-infinite host. The semi-infiniteness of the elastic host is simulated by augmenting the (finite) computational domain with a buffer of perfectly matched layers. The inverse source algorithm is based on a systematic framework of partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization. It is demonstrated, via numerical experiments, that the algorithm is capable of converging to the spatial and temporal characteristics of surface loads that maximize energy delivery to the target formation. Consequently, the methodology is well-suited for designing field implementations that could meet a desired oil mobility threshold. Even though the methodology, and the results presented herein are in two dimensions, extensions to three dimensions are straightforward.

  9. The effects of surfactants on the formation and evolution of capillary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceniceros, Hector D.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of surface-active agents on the formation and evolution of small capillary ripples developing in the forward front of short water waves is investigated numerically. The capillary waves, believed to have a significant relevance in the process of wave breaking and the onset of turbulence, accompany the initial development of spilling breakers. A novel hybrid numerical methodology is introduced to couple the full two-fluid Navier-Stokes equations with the free boundary motion and with the surfactant dynamics. The hybrid method uses dynamically adaptive front-tracking to accurately represent interfacial quantities and forces and to aid in treating the numerical difficulties associated with surface tension. At the same time the method employs the level set approach to efficiently update the material properties of the flow. It is found that the capillaries are dramatically affected by the presence of surfactants. The capillary region is invariably marked by accumulation of surfactants that reduces locally the interfacial tension. The size of the wave roller (bulge) diminishes and both the amplitude and wavelength of the capillary ripples also decrease as interfacial tension gradients increase. When surface convection dominates over diffusion, the accumulation of surfactants in the capillary region intensifies and the roller gets smaller and flatter. Large concentration gradients can be produced and these lead to a spread of vorticity along the spilling breakers as a result of the tangential Marangoni stress. In addition to the full two-phase viscous flow simulations, boundary integral computations of the corresponding potential inviscid flow are also performed to compare and contrast the two models in the case of uniform interfacial tension. Differences between the potential and the viscous flows are observed as soon as the wave steepens and develops high-curvature regions.

  10. The formation and gravitational-wave detection of massive stellar black hole binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Buonanno, Alessandra; Cantiello, Matteo; Fryer, Chris L.; Holz, Daniel E.; Mandel, Ilya; Miller, M. Coleman

    2014-01-01

    If binaries consisting of two ∼100 M ☉ black holes exist, they would serve as extraordinarily powerful gravitational-wave sources, detectable to redshifts of z ∼ 2 with the advanced LIGO/Virgo ground-based detectors. Large uncertainties about the evolution of massive stars preclude definitive rate predictions for mergers of these massive black holes. We show that rates as high as hundreds of detections per year, or as low as no detections whatsoever, are both possible. It was thought that the only way to produce these massive binaries was via dynamical interactions in dense stellar systems. This view has been challenged by the recent discovery of several ≳ 150 M ☉ stars in the R136 region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Current models predict that when stars of this mass leave the main sequence, their expansion is insufficient to allow common envelope evolution to efficiently reduce the orbital separation. The resulting black hole-black hole binary remains too wide to be able to coalesce within a Hubble time. If this assessment is correct, isolated very massive binaries do not evolve to be gravitational-wave sources. However, other formation channels exist. For example, the high multiplicity of massive stars, and their common formation in relatively dense stellar associations, opens up dynamical channels for massive black hole mergers (e.g., via Kozai cycles or repeated binary-single interactions). We identify key physical factors that shape the population of very massive black hole-black hole binaries. Advanced gravitational-wave detectors will provide important constraints on the formation and evolution of very massive stars.

  11. Revisiting internal gravity waves analysis using GPS RO density profiles: comparison with temperature profiles and application for wave field stability study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoft, Petr; Sacha, Petr; Miksovsky, Jiri; Huszar, Peter; Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Foelsche, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    We revise selected findings regarding the utilization of Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPS RO) density profiles for the analysis of internal gravity waves (IGW), introduced by Sacha et al. (2014). Using various GPS RO datasets, we show that the differences in the IGW spectra between the dry-temperature and dry-density profiles that were described in the previous study as a general issue are in fact present in one specific data version only. The differences between perturbations in the temperature and density GPS RO profiles do not have any physical origin, and there is not the information loss of IGW activity that was suggested in Sacha et al. (2014). We investigate the previously discussed question of the temperature perturbations character when utilizing GPS RO dry-temperature profiles, derived by integration of the hydrostatic balance. Using radiosonde profiles as a proxy for GPS RO, we provide strong evidence that the differences in IGW perturbations between the real and retrieved temperature profiles (which are based on the assumption of hydrostatic balance) include a significant nonhydrostatic component that is present sporadically and might be either positive or negative. The detected differences in related spectra of IGW temperature perturbations are found to be mostly about ±10 %. The paper also presents a detailed study on the utilization of GPS RO density profiles for the characterization of the wave field stability. We have analyzed selected stability parameters derived from the density profiles together with a study of the vertical rotation of the wind direction. Regarding the Northern Hemisphere the results point to the western border of the Aleutian high, where potential IGW breaking is detected. These findings are also supported by an analysis of temperature and wind velocity profiles. Our results confirm advantages of the utilization of the density profiles for IGW analysis.

  12. Revisiting internal gravity waves analysis using GPS RO density profiles: comparison with temperature profiles and application for wave field stability study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pisoft

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We revise selected findings regarding the utilization of Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPS RO density profiles for the analysis of internal gravity waves (IGW, introduced by Sacha et al. (2014. Using various GPS RO datasets, we show that the differences in the IGW spectra between the dry-temperature and dry-density profiles that were described in the previous study as a general issue are in fact present in one specific data version only. The differences between perturbations in the temperature and density GPS RO profiles do not have any physical origin, and there is not the information loss of IGW activity that was suggested in Sacha et al. (2014. We investigate the previously discussed question of the temperature perturbations character when utilizing GPS RO dry-temperature profiles, derived by integration of the hydrostatic balance. Using radiosonde profiles as a proxy for GPS RO, we provide strong evidence that the differences in IGW perturbations between the real and retrieved temperature profiles (which are based on the assumption of hydrostatic balance include a significant nonhydrostatic component that is present sporadically and might be either positive or negative. The detected differences in related spectra of IGW temperature perturbations are found to be mostly about ±10 %. The paper also presents a detailed study on the utilization of GPS RO density profiles for the characterization of the wave field stability. We have analyzed selected stability parameters derived from the density profiles together with a study of the vertical rotation of the wind direction. Regarding the Northern Hemisphere the results point to the western border of the Aleutian high, where potential IGW breaking is detected. These findings are also supported by an analysis of temperature and wind velocity profiles. Our results confirm advantages of the utilization of the density profiles for IGW analysis.

  13. On the accuracy of density functional theory and wave function methods for calculating vertical ionization energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKechnie, Scott [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Booth, George H. [Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter, King’s College London, The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Cohen, Aron J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Cole, Jacqueline M., E-mail: jmc61@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The best practice in computational methods for determining vertical ionization energies (VIEs) is assessed, via reference to experimentally determined VIEs that are corroborated by highly accurate coupled-cluster calculations. These reference values are used to benchmark the performance of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function methods: Hartree-Fock theory, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and Electron Propagator Theory (EPT). The core test set consists of 147 small molecules. An extended set of six larger molecules, from benzene to hexacene, is also considered to investigate the dependence of the results on molecule size. The closest agreement with experiment is found for ionization energies obtained from total energy difference calculations. In particular, DFT calculations using exchange-correlation functionals with either a large amount of exact exchange or long-range correction perform best. The results from these functionals are also the least sensitive to an increase in molecule size. In general, ionization energies calculated directly from the orbital energies of the neutral species are less accurate and more sensitive to an increase in molecule size. For the single-calculation approach, the EPT calculations are in closest agreement for both sets of molecules. For the orbital energies from DFT functionals, only those with long-range correction give quantitative agreement with dramatic failing for all other functionals considered. The results offer a practical hierarchy of approximations for the calculation of vertical ionization energies. In addition, the experimental and computational reference values can be used as a standardized set of benchmarks, against which other approximate methods can be compared.

  14. On the accuracy of density functional theory and wave function methods for calculating vertical ionization energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKechnie, Scott; Booth, George H.; Cohen, Aron J.; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-01-01

    The best practice in computational methods for determining vertical ionization energies (VIEs) is assessed, via reference to experimentally determined VIEs that are corroborated by highly accurate coupled-cluster calculations. These reference values are used to benchmark the performance of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function methods: Hartree-Fock theory, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and Electron Propagator Theory (EPT). The core test set consists of 147 small molecules. An extended set of six larger molecules, from benzene to hexacene, is also considered to investigate the dependence of the results on molecule size. The closest agreement with experiment is found for ionization energies obtained from total energy difference calculations. In particular, DFT calculations using exchange-correlation functionals with either a large amount of exact exchange or long-range correction perform best. The results from these functionals are also the least sensitive to an increase in molecule size. In general, ionization energies calculated directly from the orbital energies of the neutral species are less accurate and more sensitive to an increase in molecule size. For the single-calculation approach, the EPT calculations are in closest agreement for both sets of molecules. For the orbital energies from DFT functionals, only those with long-range correction give quantitative agreement with dramatic failing for all other functionals considered. The results offer a practical hierarchy of approximations for the calculation of vertical ionization energies. In addition, the experimental and computational reference values can be used as a standardized set of benchmarks, against which other approximate methods can be compared

  15. Measurements of the plasma density in the FTU tokamak by a pulsed time-of-flight X-wave refractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V. G.; Petrov, A. A.; Malyshev, A. Yu.; De Benedetti, M.; Tudisco, O.

    2008-01-01

    On-line control over the plasma density in tokamaks (especially, in long-term discharges) requires reliable measurements of the averaged plasma density. For this purpose, a new method of density measurements-a pulsed time-of-flight plasma refractometry-was developed and tested in the T-11M tokamak. This method allows one to determine the averaged density from the measured time delay of nanosecond microwave pulses propagating through the plasma. For an O-wave, the measured time delay is proportional to the line-averaged density and is independent of the density profile (f>>f p ) τ o ∼ k o 1/f 2 ∫ l N(x)dx. Here, f is the frequency of the probing wave, f p is the plasma frequency, l= 4 a is the path length for two-pass probing in the equatorial plane, a is the plasma minor radius, k O and k X are numerical factors, f c is the electron-cyclotron frequency at the axis of the plasma column, and f p >>f c , f. Measurements of the time delay provide the same information as plasma interferometry, though they do no employ the effect of interference. When the conditions f p >>f c , f are not satisfied, the measured time delay depends on the shape of the density profile. In this case, in order to determine the average density regardless of the density profile, it is necessary to perform simultaneous measurements at several probing frequencies in order to determine the average density. In ITER (Bt ∼ 5T), a spectral window between the lower and upper cutoff frequencies in the range of 50-100 GHz can be used for pulsed time-of-flight X-wave refractometry. This appreciably simplifies the diagnostics and eliminates the problem of the first mirror. In this paper, the first results obtained in the FTU tokamak with a prototype of the ITER pulsed time-of-flight refractometer are presented. The geometry and layout of experiments similar to the planned ITER experiments are described. The density measured by pulsed time-of-flight refractometry is shown to agree well with the

  16. Vacancy formation in MoO3: hybrid density functional theory and photoemission experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Salawu, Omotayo Akande

    2016-09-29

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO3) is an important material that is being considered for numerous technological applications, including catalysis and electrochromism. In the present study, we apply hybrid density functional theory to investigate O and Mo vacancies in the orthorhombic phase. We determine the vacancy formation energies of different defect sites as functions of the electron chemical potential, addressing different charge states. In addition, we investigate the consequences of defects for the material properties. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy is employed to study the valence band of stoichiometric and O defective MoO3. We show that O vacancies result in occupied in-gap states.

  17. Formation time of hadrons and density of matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisut, J.; Zavada, P.

    1994-06-01

    Densities of interacting hadronic matter produced in Oxygen-Lead and Sulphur-Lead collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon are estimated as a function of the formation time of hadrons. Uncertainties in our knowledge of the critical temperature T c and of the formation time of hadrons τ 0 permit at present three scenarios: an optimistic one (QGP has already been produced in collisions of Oxygen and Sulphur with heavy ions and will be copiously in Lead collisions), a pessimistic one (QGP cannot be produced at 200 GeV/nucleon) and an intermediate one (QGP has not been produced in Oxygen and Sulphur Interactions with heavy ions and will be at best produced only marginally in Pb-collisions). The last option is found to be the most probable. (author)

  18. Time resolved interferometric study of the plasma plume induced shock wave in confined geometry: Two-dimensional mapping of the ambient and plasma density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Kaushik [IITB Monash Research Academy, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Narayan, Surya; Srivastava, Atul, E-mail: atulsr@iitb.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-04-15

    An experimental investigation of the laser produced plasma induced shock wave in the presence of confining walls placed along the axial as well as the lateral direction has been performed. A time resolved Mach Zehnder interferometer is set up to track the primary as well as the reflected shock waves and its effect on the evolving plasma plume has been studied. An attempt has been made to discriminate the electronic and medium density contributions towards the changes in the refractive index of the medium. Two dimensional spatial distributions for both ambient medium density and plasma density (electron density) have been obtained by employing customised inversion technique and algorithm on the recorded interferograms. The observed density pattern of the surrounding medium in the presence of confining walls is correlated with the reflected shock wave propagation in the medium. Further, the shock wave plasma interaction and the subsequent changes in the shape and density of the plasma plume in confined geometry are briefly described.

  19. Molecular dynamics and density functional simulations of tungsten nanostructure formation by helium plasma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.

    2014-10-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten diverter walls, it is necessary to suppress the surface deterioration due to the helium ash which induces the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures were explained by the four-step process which is composed of the penetration process, the diffusion and agglomeration process, the helium bubble growth process and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure formation process. The first to third step processes of the four-step process were investigated by using binary collision approximation, density functional theory and molecular dynamics, respectively. Furthermore, newly developed molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo hybrid simulation has successfully reproduced the early formation process of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure. From these simulations, we here suggest the following key mechanisms of the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures: (1) By comparison between helium, neon, argon and hydrogen, the noble gas atoms can agglomerate limitlessly not only at a vacancy but also at an interstitial site. In particular, at the low incident energy, only helium atoms bring about the nucleation for helium bubble. (2) In the helium bubble growth process, the strain of the tungsten material around a helium atom is released as a dislocation loop, which is regarded as the loop punching phenomenon. (3) In the tungsten nanostructure formation process, the bursting of a helium bubble forms cavity and convexity in the surface. The helium bubbles tend to be grown and to burst at the cavity region, and then the difference of height between the cavity and convexity on the surface are enhanced. Consequently, the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure is formed. (author)

  20. Platelet size and density affect shear-induced thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-10-01

    Thrombosis accounts for 80% of deaths in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients demonstrate tortuous microvessels and larger than normal platelets. Large platelets are associated with increased platelet activation and thrombosis, but the physical effects of large platelets in the microscale processes of thrombus formation are not clear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the physical effects of mean platelet volume (MPV), mean platelet density (MPD) and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A computational model of the transport, shear-induced activation, collision, adhesion and aggregation of individual platelets was used to simulate platelet interactions and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Our results showed that an increase in MPV resulted in a larger number of activated platelets, though MPD and level of tortuosity made little difference on platelet activation. Platelets with normal MPD yielded the lowest amount of mural thrombus. With platelets of normal MPD, the amount of mural thrombus decreased with increasing level of tortuosity but did not have a simple monotonic relationship with MPV. The physical mechanisms associated with MPV, MPD and arteriole tortuosity play important roles in platelet activation and thrombus formation.

  1. Spin polarization driven by a charge-density wave in monolayer 1T−TaS2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qingyun

    2014-08-06

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic and vibrational properties of monolayer T-phase TaS2. We demonstrate that a charge-density wave is energetically favorable at low temperature, similar to bulk 1T-TaS2. Electron-phonon coupling is found to be essential for the lattice reconstruction. The charge-density wave results in a strong localization of the electronic states near the Fermi level and consequently in spin polarization, transforming the material into a magnetic semiconductor with enhanced electronic correlations. The combination of inherent spin polarization with a semiconducting nature distinguishes the monolayer fundamentally from the bulk compound as well as from other two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. Monolayer T-phase TaS2 therefore has the potential to enable two-dimensional spintronics. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  2. Nonsimilar Solution for Shock Waves in a Rotational Axisymmetric Perfect Gas with a Magnetic Field and Exponentially Varying Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field with consideration for the axisymmetric rotational effects is investigated. The ambient medium is assumed to have the radial, axial, and azimuthal velocity components. The fluid velocities and density of the ambient medium are assumed to vary according to an exponential law. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained by taking into account the vorticity vector and its components. The dependences of the characteristics of the problem on the Alfven-Mach number and time are obtained. It is shown that the presence of a magnetic field has a decaying effect on the shock wave. The pressure and density are shown to vanish at the inner surface (piston), and hence a vacuum forms at the line of symmetry.

  3. Direct observation of competition between superconductivity and charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity often emerges in the proximity of, or in competition with, symmetry-breaking ground states such as antiferromagnetism or charge density waves (CDW). A number of materials in the cuprate family, which includes the high transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors, show spin...... and charge density wave order. Thus a fundamental question is to what extent do these ordered states exist for compositions close to optimal for superconductivity. Here we use high-energy X-ray diffraction to show that a CDW develops at zero field in the normal state of superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.67 (Tc= 67 K......). This sample has a hole doping of 0.12 per copper and a well-ordered oxygen chain superstructure. Below Tc, the application of a magnetic field suppresses superconductivity and enhances the CDW. Hence, the CDW and superconductivity in this typical high-Tc material are competing orders with similar energy...

  4. Progression of crack formation in artificial kidney stones subject to shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwelaert, Javier; Cleveland, Robin

    2002-11-01

    We used micro computed tomography (CT) imaging to follow the progressive development of cracks in artificial kidney stones. The artificial stones were made from U30 cement with a cylindrical shape (6.5 mm diameter and 7.5 mm long). The stones were held within a polypropylene vial in one of three different orientations: vertical, horizontal, and angled at 45 deg. The stones were treated with an electromagnetic lithotripter using between 50 and 150 shock waves. The initiation and growth of cracks was observed using microCT. We found that crack formation in the U30 stones was influenced by the orientation of the stone with respect to the shock wave (SW) propagation direction. Vertical stones developed a spall-like crack near the distal surface; horizontal stones had little internal damage for the number of shock waves applied; and angled stones were damaged primarily in the vicinity of the leading corner. The position of the cracks were in qualitative agreement with the numerical solutions of the pressure field inside the stones. The elastic properties of the U30 stones are being measured which will alow a quantitative analysis of crack growth to be performed and compared to the experimental data. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation.

  5. A comparison model between density functional and wave function theories by means of the Löwdin partitioning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Marc; Moreira, Ibério de P R; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2013-05-07

    A comparison model is proposed based on the Löwdin partitioning technique to analyze the differences in the treatment of electron correlation by the wave function and density functional models. This comparison model provides a tool to understand the inherent structure of both theories and its discrepancies in terms of the subjacent mathematical structure and the necessary conditions for variationality required for the energy functional. Some numerical results on simple molecules are also reported revealing the known phenomenon of "overcorrelation" of density functional theory methods.

  6. Charge density waves in nanocrystalline thin films of blue bronze K0.3MoO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starešinić, D.; Dominko, D.; Salamon, K.; Biljaković, K.; Tomeljak, A.; Schäfer, H.; Huber, T.; Demsar, J.; Socol, G.; Ristoscu, C.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Siketić, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Thin granular films of charge density wave (CDW) system K 0.3 MoO 3 were prepared by pulsed laser deposition and investigated by various standard characterization methods such as GI-XRD, electric transport, TOF-ERDA, AFM and UV–visible spectroscopy. While all these methods indicate that the thin films consist of nanometer grains of K 0.3 MoO 3 , it is only the non-destructive femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy (fsTRS) that demonstrates the charge density wave nature of the ground state and therefore proves directly the presence of K 0.3 MoO 3 . Furthermore, the comparison of the fsTRS data obtained in thin films and in single crystals shows the reduction of the charge density wave transition temperature and of the photoinduced signal strength in granular thin films with respect to single crystals, which is attributed to the granularity and crystal growth morphology. Our results establish fsTRS technique as the essential tool for the detection and characterization of complex ground states in nano-sized systems.

  7. Nanoscale measurement of Nernst effect in two-dimensional charge density wave material 1T-TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Luican-Mayer, Adina; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2017-11-01

    Advances in nanoscale material characterization on two-dimensional van der Waals layered materials primarily involve their optical and electronic properties. The thermal properties of these materials are harder to access due to the difficulty of thermal measurements at the nanoscale. In this work, we create a nanoscale magnetothermal device platform to access the basic out-of-plane magnetothermal transport properties of ultrathin van der Waals materials. Specifically, the Nernst effect in the charge density wave transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is examined on nano-thin flakes in a patterned device structure. It is revealed that near the commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) to nearly commensurate charge density wave (NCCDW) phase transition, the polarity of the Nernst effect changes. Since the Nernst effect is especially sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface, this suggests that large changes are occurring in the out-of-plane electronic structure of 1T-TaS2, which are otherwise unresolved in just in-plane electronic transport measurements. This may signal a coherent evolution of out-of-plane stacking in the CCDW → NCCDW transition.

  8. TRACING THE STAR-FORMATION-DENSITY RELATION TO z ∼ 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadri, Ryan F.; Williams, Rik J.; Franx, Marijn; Hildebrandt, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the star formation (SF) density relation—in which galaxies with low SF rates are preferentially found in dense environments—is still in place at z ∼ 1, but the situation becomes less clear at higher redshifts. We use mass-selected samples drawn from the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey to show that galaxies with quenched SF tend to reside in dense environments out to at least z ∼ 1.8. Over most of this redshift range we are able to demonstrate that this SF-density relation holds even at fixed stellar mass. The environmental quenching of SF appears to operate with similar efficiency on all galaxies regardless of stellar mass. Nevertheless, the environment plays a greater role in the buildup of the red sequence at lower masses, whereas other quenching processes dominate at higher masses. In addition to a statistical analysis of environmental densities, we investigate a cluster at z = 1.6, and show that the central region has an elevated fraction of quiescent objects relative to the field. Although the uncertainties are large, the environmental quenching efficiency in this cluster is consistent with that of galaxy groups and clusters at z ∼ 0. In this work we rely on photometric redshifts and describe some of the pitfalls that large redshift errors can present.

  9. Flow behind an exponential shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric perfect gas with magnetic field and variable density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G; Sahu, P K

    2016-01-01

    A self-similar model for one-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flows behind a strong exponential shock wave driven out by a cylindrical piston moving with time according to an exponential law in an ideal gas in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field and variable density is discussed in a rotating atmosphere. The ambient medium is assumed to possess radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The initial density, the fluid velocities and magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying with time according to an exponential law. The gas is taken to be non-viscous having infinite electrical conductivity. Solutions are obtained, in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector. The effects of the variation of the initial density index, adiabatic exponent of the gas and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field behind the shock wave are investigated. It is found that the presence of the magnetic field have decaying effects on the shock wave. Also, it is observed that the effect of an increase in the magnetic field strength is more impressive in the case of adiabatic flow than in the case of isothermal flow. The assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, non-dimensional azimuthal and axial components of vorticity vector distributions in comparison to those in the case of adiabatic flow. A comparison is made between isothermal and adiabatic flows. It is obtained that an increase in the initial density variation index, adiabatic exponent and strength of the magnetic field decrease the shock strength.

  10. Electron density and plasma waves in mid-latitude sporadic-E layer observed during the SEEK-2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mori

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The SEEK-2 campaign was carried out over Kyushu Island in Japan on 3 August 2002, by using the two sounding rockets of S310-31 and S310-32. This campaign was planned to elucidate generation mechanisms of Quasi-Periodic Echoes (QPEs associated with mid-latitude sporadic-E (Es layers. Electron number densities were successfully measured in the Es layers by using the impedance probe on board two rockets. The plasma waves in the VLF and ELF ranges were also observed on board the S310-32 rocket. Results of electron density measurement showed that there were one or two major peaks in the Es layers along the rockets' trajectories near the altitude of about 10km. There were some smaller peaks associated with the main Es layers in the altitude range from 90 to 120 km. These density peaks were distributed in a very large extent during the SEEK-2 campaign. The Es layer structure is also measured by using the Fixed Bias Probe (FBP, which has a high spatial resolution of several meters (the impedance probe has an altitude resolution of about 400 m. The comparison with the total electron content (TEC measured by the Dual Band Beacon revealed that the Es layer was also modulated in the horizontal direction with the scale size of 30–40 km. It was shown that the QP echoes observed by the ground-based coherent radar come from the major density peak of the Es layer. The plasma wave instrument detected the enhancement of VLF and ELF plasma waves associated with the operation of the TMA release, and also with the passage of the Es layers. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities; Midlatitude ionosphere; Plasma temeperature and density

  11. Insight into winter haze formation mechanisms based on aerosol hygroscopicity and effective density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuanyuan; Ye, Xingnan; Ma, Zhen; Tao, Ye; Wang, Ruyu; Zhang, Ci; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin; Chen, Hong

    2017-06-01

    We characterize a representative particulate matter (PM) episode that occurred in Shanghai during winter 2014. Particle size distribution, hygroscopicity, effective density, and single particle mass spectrometry were determined online, along with offline analysis of water-soluble inorganic ions. The mass ratio of SNA / PM1. 0 (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium) fluctuated slightly around 0.28, suggesting that both secondary inorganic compounds and carbonaceous aerosols contributed substantially to the haze formation, regardless of pollution level. Nitrate was the most abundant ionic species during hazy periods, indicating that NOx contributed more to haze formation in Shanghai than did SO2. During the representative PM episode, the calculated PM was always consistent with the measured PM1. 0, indicating that the enhanced pollution level was attributable to the elevated number of larger particles. The number fraction of the near-hydrophobic group increased as the PM episode developed, indicating the accumulation of local emissions. Three banana-shaped particle evolutions were consistent with the rapid increase of PM1. 0 mass loading, indicating that the rapid size growth by the condensation of condensable materials was responsible for the severe haze formation. Both hygroscopicity and effective density of the particles increased considerably with growing particle size during the banana-shaped evolutions, indicating that the secondary transformation of NOx and SO2 was one of the most important contributors to the particle growth. Our results suggest that the accumulation of gas-phase and particulate pollutants under stagnant meteorological conditions and subsequent rapid particle growth by secondary processes were primarily responsible for the haze pollution in Shanghai during wintertime.

  12. Plane-Wave Density Functional Theory Meets Molecular Crystals: Thermal Ellipsoids and Intermolecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deringer, Volker L; George, Janine; Dronskowski, Richard; Englert, Ulli

    2017-05-16

    Molecular compounds, organic and inorganic, crystallize in diverse and complex structures. They continue to inspire synthetic efforts and "crystal engineering", with implications ranging from fundamental questions to pharmaceutical research. The structural complexity of molecular solids is linked with diverse intermolecular interactions: hydrogen bonding with all its facets, halogen bonding, and other secondary bonding mechanisms of recent interest (and debate). Today, high-resolution diffraction experiments allow unprecedented insight into the structures of molecular crystals. Despite their usefulness, however, these experiments also face problems: hydrogen atoms are challenging to locate, and thermal effects may complicate matters. Moreover, even if the structure of a crystal is precisely known, this does not yet reveal the nature and strength of the intermolecular forces that hold it together. In this Account, we show that periodic plane-wave-based density functional theory (DFT) can be a useful, and sometimes unexpected, complement to molecular crystallography. Initially developed in the solid-state physics communities to treat inorganic solids, periodic DFT can be applied to molecular crystals just as well: theoretical structural optimizations "help out" by accurately localizing the elusive hydrogen atoms, reaching neutron-diffraction quality with much less expensive measurement equipment. In addition, phonon computations, again developed by physicists, can quantify the thermal motion of atoms and thus predict anisotropic displacement parameters and ORTEP ellipsoids "from scratch". But the synergy between experiment and theory goes much further than that. Once a structure has been accurately determined, computations give new and detailed insights into the aforementioned intermolecular interactions. For example, it has been debated whether short hydrogen bonds in solids have covalent character, and we have added a new twist to this discussion using an orbital

  13. Numerical simulation of the temperature, electron density, and electric field distributions near the ionospheric reflection height after turn-on of a powerful HF wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldrew, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    The time variation of the electron temperature profile in the ionosphere following turn-on of a powerful 1-s HF pulse is determined numerically from the energy balance equation. Using this and the equations of motion and continuity for a plasma, the effect of heating and the pondermotive force of a powerful HF wave on the electron density and electric field distributions are determined by numerical simulation. The temperature variation and ponderomotive force modify the density distribution, and this new density distribution, in turn, modifies the electric field distribution of the HF wave. The density deviations grow for a few hundred milliseconds after HF turn-on and then begin to fluctuate in time. At all heights the wave number of the density deviations is approximately twice the wave number of the HF wave. For electric fields near reflection of about 6.0 V/m, the electric field distribution becomes complicated, apparently depending on Bragg scattering of the HF wave from the density deviations. Density impulses propagate away (up and down) from electric field maxima, at the ion thermal velocity, at both turn-on and turn-off of the HF wave

  14. Gap formation processes in a high-density plasma opening switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, J.M.; Swanekamp, S.B.; Ottinger, P.F.; Commisso, R.J.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    A gap opening process in plasma opening switches (POS) is examined with the aid of numerical simulations. In these simulations, a high density (n e =10 14 --5x10 15 cm -3 ) uniform plasma initially bridges a small section of the coaxial transmission line of an inductive energy storage generator. A short section of vacuum transmission line connects the POS to a short circuit load. The results presented here extend previous simulations in the n e =10 12 --10 13 cm -3 density regime. The simulations show that a two-dimensional (2-D) sheath forms in the plasma near a cathode. This sheath is positively charged, and electrostatic sheath potentials that are large compared to the anode--cathode voltage develop. Initially, the 2-D sheath is located at the generator edge of the plasma. As ions are accelerated out of the sheath, it retains its original 2-D structure, but migrates axially toward the load creating a magnetically insulated gap in its wake. When the sheath reaches the load edge of the POS, the POS stops conducting current and the load current increases rapidly. At the end of the conduction phase a gap exists in the POS whose size is determined by the radial dimensions of the 2-D sheath. Simulations at various plasma densities and current levels show that the radial size of the gap scales roughly as B/n e , where B is the magnetic field. The results of this work are discussed in the context of long-conduction-time POS physics, but exhibit the same physical gap formation mechanisms as earlier lower density simulations more relevant to short-conduction-time POS. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  15. Density fluctuations measured by ISEE 1-2 in the Earth's magnetosheath and the resultant scattering of radio waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lacombe

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Radio waves undergo angular scattering when they propagate through a plasma with fluctuating density. We show how the angular scattering coefficient can be calculated as a function of the frequency spectrum of the local density fluctuations. In the Earth's magnetosheath, the ISEE 1-2 propagation experiment measured the spectral power of the density fluctuations for periods in the range 300 to 1 s, which produce most of the scattering. The resultant local angular scattering coefficient can then be calculated for the first time with realistic density fluctuation spectra, which are neither Gaussian nor power laws. We present results on the variation of the local angular scattering coefficient during two crossings of the dayside magnetosheath, from the quasi-perpendicular bow shock to the magnetopause. For a radio wave at twice the local electron plasma frequency, the scattering coefficient in the major part of the magnetosheath is b(2fp ≃ 0.5 – 4 × 10–9 rad2/m. The scattering coefficient is about ten times stronger in a thin sheet (0.1 to1RE just downstream of the shock ramp, and close to the magnetopause.

  16. Proximity effects on the spin density waves in X/Cr(001) multilayers (X = Sn, V, and Mn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amitouche, F. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou, B.P. No17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Bouarab, S., E-mail: bouarab_said@mail.ummto.d [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou, B.P. No17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Tazibt, S. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou, B.P. No17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Vega, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Demangeat, C. [Institut de Physique, 3 rue de l' Universite 67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2011-01-03

    We present ab initio density functional calculations of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of X{sub 2}/Cr{sub 36}(001) and X{sub 1}/Cr{sub 37}(001) multilayers, with X = Sn, V and Mn, to investigate the impact of the proximity effects of the X layers on the spin density waves of the Cr slab. We find different magnetic profiles corresponding to the spin density wave and to the layered antiferromagnetic configurations. The nature of the different magnetic solutions is discussed in terms of the different interfacial environments in the proximity of Sn, V or Mn. The magnetic behavior at the interface is discussed in connection with the electronic structure through the density of electronic states projected at the interfacial X and Cr sites. We compare the results with those previously obtained for Fe{sub 3}/X{sub 1}/Cr{sub 37}/X{sub 1}(001) multilayers to analyze the role played by the ferromagnetic iron slab.

  17. The nematicity induced d-symmetry charge density wave in electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chung-Pin; Chen, Hong-Yi; Ting, C. S.

    2018-03-01

    The interplay among the nematicity, the stripe spin-density-wave (SDW) order and superconductivity in iron-pnictides is studied in a self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Our calculations have shown that the nematic-order breaks the degeneracy of dxz and dyz orbitals and causes the elliptic Fermi surface near the Γ point in the normal state. In addition, the appearance of the orthorhombic magnetic fluctuations generates two uneven pairs of peaks at ( ± π, 0) and (0, ± π) in its Fourier transformation. All these are comparing favorably with experimental measurements. In the nematic phase, our results indicate that the charge density and its spatial image in the local density of states exhibit a dx2 -y2-like symmetry. Finally, the complete phase diagram is obtained and the nematic phase is found to be in a narrow region close to the SDW transition in the electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors.

  18. Vacuum formation behind the expansion wave in a piston motion problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Satoshi; Takata, Shigeru

    2012-07-01

    Long time behavior of one-dimensional gas motion caused by pulling a piston with a high speed is numerically studied on the basis of the kinetic theory of gases. It is clarified that (i) if the piston speed is lower than a critical speed, the state of the gas time-asymptotically approaches the local equilibrium that corresponds to the isentropic solution in the conventional gas dynamics, namely, an expansion wave followed by a uniform state, and (ii) otherwise, there appears a highly nonequilibrium region with a very low pressure behind the expansion tail. In the latter case, the components of temperature parallel and perpendicular to the flow direction become highly different, and the density tends to vanish as time goes on, forming a vacuum region behind the tail at the infinite time.

  19. Time Evolution of Meson Density During Formation of Expanding Quark-Antiquark System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffary, Tooraj

    2017-12-01

    Recently some researchers (Sepehri and Shoorvazi Astrophys. Spaces Sci. 344(2), 521-527, 2013) have considered the Universe as an acceleration cylindrical system. Motivated by their work and using their method in QCD, this paper has been cleared that because the acceleration of expansion in quark-antiquark system is relatively very large, one horizon is appeared outside the system. To obtain the total cross section of meson near this horizon, we need to multiply the production cross section for appeared horizon by the density of meson produced outside the system. As it can be seen by an observer who is outside the meson formation process, this cross section depends on time so the event horizon is now a time depended process.

  20. Formation of Fine Structures in Uniform Suspension under Standing Waves Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, V. F.; Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    Structurization of initially uniform suspension in fields of standing gravity waves was studied in a rectangular tank oscillating in vertical direction. The tank with aspect ratio of 50:4 was placed at shaker table with a low level of horizontal components of acceleration during the motion. Diluted aluminum powder suspension in water filled in tank with was undergone wave action in frequency range corresponding to first and second modes of intrinsic oscillations. For visualizations and tracers velocity measurements a digital high-speed video camera was used. The formation of large and small scale structures in initially uniform suspension was registered. Experiments were performed in tanks with flat smooth and rough bottom as well as with water above stationary ripples and deformable sand riffles. Large and small scales irregularities of initially smooth field of concentration were observed in the whole volume of the fluid. Large voids with shapes reminding the bottom topography features were formed first. Later the fine extended filaments were observed. Their horizontal scales were determined by bed forms extension, and the vertical scale grows in time. Depending on the wave mode the filament structures arose from the bottom or sank from the free surface. The evolution of the structure geometrical parameters were measured both in vertical and horizontal directions. The difference of dynamical behaviour of suspension concentration in vicinity and far from free surface, flat bottom or bed topography was determined and discussed. In theoretical description of the flow compete fundamental set of governing equations. Complete solution of the set contains family of thin singular perturbed components which are characterized by singular perturbed functions. These flow components can accumulate of admixtures and maintain non-uniform pattern of admixture concentration. The presented experiments were performed on set-up USU "HPC IPMec RAS" under support of Ministry of

  1. Formation of core transport barrier and CH-Mode by ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of core transport barrier formation (for particles, ion and electron energies, and toroidal momentum) by ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) in PBX-M plasma is reported. The formation of a transport barrier leads to a strong peaking and significant increase of the core pressure (70%) and toroidal momentum (20%), and has been termed the core-high confinement mode (CH-Mode). This formation of a transport barrier is consistent, in terms of the expected barrier location as well as the required threshold power, with a theoretical model based on the poloidal sheared flow generation by the ion Bernstein wave power. The use of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) induced sheared flow as a tool to control plasma pressure and bootstrap current profiles shows a favorable scaling for the use in future reactor grade tokamak plasmas

  2. The gravitational wave background from neutron star formation and bar-mode instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, E; Coward, D; Burman, R; Blair, D; Gilmore, J [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2004-03-07

    We present calculations of the stochastic gravitational wave background resulting from neutron star birth throughout the Universe, including order-of-magnitude estimates for post-collapse bar-mode instabilities based on simulations by Brown (2000 Phys. Rev. D 62 084024) and Shibata et al (2002 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 334 L27). We employ three waveforms from Dimmelmeier et al (2002 Astron. Astrophys. 393 523) based on models, incorporating general relativistic effects, for the axisymmetric core collapse of rotating massive stars. Source-rate evolution is accounted for by using a star formation rate simulation based on a 'flat-{lambda}' cosmology by Hernquist and Springel (2003 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 341 1253). We find that the core-collapse background signal is not detectable by cross correlating two advanced LIGO detectors, but a background generated by bar-mode instabilities is potentially detectable in one year of integration time.

  3. Dynamical barrier for the formation of solitary waves in discrete lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevrekidis, P.G.; Espinola-Rocha, J.A.; Drossinos, Y.; Stefanov, A.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of the existence of a dynamical barrier of 'mass' that needs to be excited on a lattice site to lead to the formation and subsequent persistence of localized modes for a nonlinear Schroedinger lattice. We contrast the existence of a dynamical barrier with its absence in the static theory of localized modes in one spatial dimension. We suggest an energetic criterion that provides a sufficient, but not necessary, condition on the amplitude of a single-site initial condition required to form a solitary wave. We show that this effect is not one-dimensional by considering its two-dimensional analog. The existence of a sufficient condition for the excitation of localized modes in the non-integrable, discrete, nonlinear Schroedinger equation is compared to the dynamics of excitations in the integrable, both discrete and continuum, version of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation

  4. Dynamical barrier for the formation of solitary waves in discrete lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: kevrekid@math.umass.edu; Espinola-Rocha, J.A. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Drossinos, Y. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Stefanov, A. [Department of Mathematics, University of Kansas, 1460 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045-7523 (United States)

    2008-03-24

    We consider the problem of the existence of a dynamical barrier of 'mass' that needs to be excited on a lattice site to lead to the formation and subsequent persistence of localized modes for a nonlinear Schroedinger lattice. We contrast the existence of a dynamical barrier with its absence in the static theory of localized modes in one spatial dimension. We suggest an energetic criterion that provides a sufficient, but not necessary, condition on the amplitude of a single-site initial condition required to form a solitary wave. We show that this effect is not one-dimensional by considering its two-dimensional analog. The existence of a sufficient condition for the excitation of localized modes in the non-integrable, discrete, nonlinear Schroedinger equation is compared to the dynamics of excitations in the integrable, both discrete and continuum, version of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation.

  5. Formation and damping of a shock wave induced by laser in a metallic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottet, F.

    1981-01-01

    In the first part of this work, a numerical simulation of the formation and of the damping of the shock wave induced in a solid target by a laser impulse is developed. It allows to interpret the experimental obtained in the second part of the study. Two series of experiments have been realized. An iron target metallographic study is intended to verify if laser shocks produce effects comparable with conventional shocks, particularly a deformation by albite twinning the existence of which is related to the shock amplitude and its evolution during the propagation in the target. Macles observation become a possible mean to estimate the value of the induced pressures. Another experiment series has been realized to determine more directly the shock parameters. Piezoelectric cermets have been used to detect a shock-wave passage and to measure the time taken to go through targets of variable thickness. The numerical solution allows, afterwards, to deduce the maximum pressure of the induced shock. The most part of the tests have been done on copper targets, the behaviour of which is well known in a large pressure domain. Some tests have been realized on aluminium and iron targets [fr

  6. Shock wave synthesis of amino acids from solutions of ammonium formate and ammonium bicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Chizuka; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Sekine, Toshimori; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks, such as amino acids and nucleobases, on the prebiotic Earth was a critical step for the beginning of life. Reduced species with low mass, such as ammonia, amines, or carboxylic acids, are potential precursors for these building blocks of life. These precursors may have been provided to the prebiotic ocean by carbonaceous chondrites and chemical reactions related to meteorite impacts on the early Earth. The impact of extraterrestrial objects on Earth occurred more frequently during this period than at present. Such impacts generated shock waves in the ocean, which have the potential to progress chemical reactions to form the building blocks of life from reduced species. To simulate shock-induced reactions in the prebiotic ocean, we conducted shock-recovery experiments on ammonium bicarbonate solution and ammonium formate solution at impact velocities ranging from 0.51 to 0.92 km/s. In the products from the ammonium formate solution, several amino acids (glycine, alanine, ß-alanine, and sarcosine) and aliphatic amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine) were detected, although yields were less than 0.1 mol % of the formic acid reactant. From the ammonium bicarbonate solution, smaller amounts of glycine, methylamine, ethylamine, and propylamine were formed. The impact velocities used in this study represent minimum cases because natural meteorite impacts typically have higher velocities and longer durations. Our results therefore suggest that shock waves could have been involved in forming life's building blocks in the ocean of prebiotic Earth, and potentially in aquifers of other planets, satellites, and asteroids.

  7. The dynamical masses, densities, and star formation scaling relations of Lyα galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Richardson, Mark L. A.; McLinden, Emily M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Tilvi, Vithal S.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyα galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, for nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. We use these measurements to study Lyα galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 10 9 to 10 10 M ☉ . We also fit stellar population models to our sample and use them to place the Lyα sample on a stellar mass versus line width relation. The Lyα galaxies generally follow the same scaling relation as star-forming galaxies at lower redshift, although, lower stellar mass fits are also acceptable in ∼1/3 of the Lyα galaxies. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyα galaxies have unusually active star formation for their gas mass surface density. This behavior is consistent with what is observed in starburst galaxies, despite the typically smaller masses and sizes of the Lyα galaxy population. Finally, we examine the mass densities of these galaxies and show that their future evolution likely requires dissipational ('wet') merging. In short, we find that Lyα galaxies are low-mass cousins of larger starbursts.

  8. Insight into carbon formation from acetic acid decomposition over Pd(100) via density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingzhe; Sun, Xuanyu; Zhang, Minhua

    2017-10-01

    The mechanism of carbon deposition in acetic acid/palladium system is of great research significance in the catalytic field. In order to illustrate the plausible carbon formation routes, a systematic survey on the stepwise decomposition from adsorbed acetic acid to atomic carbon on Pd(100) was conducted via density functional theory calculations. A complex reaction network including Osbnd H bond scission reaction and various Csbnd H and Csbnd C bond scission reactions was built and the relevant structural and energetic properties were calculated. The results show that Osbnd H bond breaking is very possible for CH3COOH, that Csbnd C bond breaking is always more favorable than Csbnd H bond breaking for CHxCOO (x = 1-3), and the dehydrogenation of CHx (x = 1-3) is more likely to proceed than most of other reactions. The most possible pathway for the formation of carbon monomer was proposed based on the analysis of the reaction network and it features the decarbonation of CH3COO to CH3 as the rate-limiting step.

  9. Determination of Fluid Density and Viscosity by Analyzing Flexural Wave Propagations on the Vibrating Micro-Cantilever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deokman Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The determination of fluid density and viscosity using most cantilever-based sensors is based on changes in resonant frequency and peak width. Here, we present a wave propagation analysis using piezoelectrically excited micro-cantilevers under distributed fluid loading. The standing wave shapes of microscale-thickness cantilevers partially immersed in liquids (water, 25% glycerol, and acetone, and nanoscale-thickness microfabricated cantilevers fully immersed in gases (air at three different pressures, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen were investigated to identify the effects of fluid-structure interactions to thus determine the fluid properties. This measurement method was validated by comparing with the known fluid properties, which agreed well with the measurements. The relative differences for the liquids were less than 4.8% for the densities and 3.1% for the viscosities, and those for the gases were less than 6.7% for the densities and 7.3% for the viscosities, showing better agreements in liquids than in gases.

  10. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young, E-mail: hayoung@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Doo [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Suk-Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Hyuk [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Hyun [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zabel, Brian A. [Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Bae, Yoe-Sik, E-mail: yoesik@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  11. Relationships between seismic wave-Speed, density, and electrical conductivity beneath Australia from seismology, mineralogy, and laboratory-based conductivity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, A.; Koch, S.; Shankland, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present maps of the three-dimensional density (ρ), electrical conductivity (σ), and shear-wave speed (VS) structure of the mantle beneath Australia and surrounding ocean in the depth range of 100–800 km. These maps derived from stochastic inversion of seismic surface-wave dispersion data, ther...

  12. Structured mass density slab as a waveguide of fast magnetoacoustic waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2015), s. 51-58 ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /13./. Hvar, 22.09.2014-26.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : magnetohydrodynamics * flares * waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  13. Novel charge density wave transition in crystals of R5Ir4Si10

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rate state below 55 K. The positions of these super lattice reflections can be described by modulation wave vectors q1 =(0, 0, 1/4δ), q2 =(0, 0, 1/4+δ) and q3 ..... [18] H T Stokes and D M Hatch, Isotropy subgroups of the 230 crystallographic space groups (World. Scientific, Singapore, 1988). [19] Very recently dissimilarities ...

  14. Non inductive formation of an extremely overdense spherical Tokamak by electron Bernstein wave heating and current drive on LATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchida Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An extremely overdense special Tokamak plasma has been non-inductively formed and maintained by electron Bernstein (EB wave heating and current drive in the Low Aspect ratio Torus Experiment (LATE device. The plasma current reaches 12 kA and the line-averaged electron density exceeds 7 times the plasma cut off density by injecting a 2.45 GHz microwave power of 60 kW. Such a highly overdense plasma is obtained when the upper hybrid resonance layer lies to the higher field side of the 2nd harmonic ECR layer, which may realize a good coupling to EB waves at their first propagation band. The effect of the injection polarization on the mode conversion rate to EB waves at the extremely overdense regime has been investigated and an improvement in the plasma current is observed.

  15. Separation of density and viscosity influence on liquid-loaded surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F.; Hahn, D.; Büttgenbach, S.

    1999-05-01

    Love-mode sensors are reported for separate measurement of liquid density and viscosity. They combine the general merits of Love-mode devices, e.g., ease of sensitivity adjustment and robustness, with a highly effective procedure of separate determination of liquid density and viscosity. A model is proposed to describe the frequency response of the devices to liquid loading. Moreover, design rules are given for further optimization and sensitivity enhancement.

  16. A Comprehensive Study of Fracture Patterns and Densities in The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Using Microearthquake Shear-Wave Splitting Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter E. Malin; Eylon Shalev; Min Lou; Silas M. Simiyu; Anastasia Stroujkova; Windy McCausland

    2004-02-24

    In this project we developed a method for using seismic S-wave data to map the patterns and densities of sub-surface fractures in the NW Geysers Geothermal Field/ (1) This project adds to both the general methods needed to characterize the geothermal production fractures that supply steam for power generation and to the specific knowledge of these in the Geysers area. (2)By locating zones of high fracture density it will be possible to reduce the cost of geothermal power development with the targeting of high production geothermal wells. (3) The results of the project having been transferred to both US based and international geothermal research and exploration agencies and concerns by several published papers and meeting presentations, and through the distribution of the data handling and other software codes we developed.

  17. A temperature dependent tunneling study of the spin density wave gap in EuFe2As2 single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Anupam; Hossain, Z; Gupta, Anjan K

    2013-09-18

    We report temperature dependent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements on single crystals of EuFe2As2 in the 15-292 K temperature range. The in situ cleaved crystals show atomic terraces with homogeneous tunnel spectra that correlate well with the spin density wave (SDW) transition at a temperature, TSDW ≈ 186 K. Above TSDW the local tunnel spectra show a small depression in the density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy (EF). The gap becomes more pronounced upon entering the SDW state with a gap value ∼90 meV at 15 K. However, the zero bias conductance remains finite down to 15 K indicating a finite DOS at the EF in the SDW phase. Furthermore, no noticeable change is observed in the DOS at the antiferromagnetic ordering transition of Eu(2+) moments at 19 K.

  18. Strong electron-lattice coupling as the mechanism behind charge density wave transformations in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a single band of conduction electrons interacting with displacements of the transitional ions. In the classical regime strong enough coupling transforms the harmonic elastic energy for an ion to the one of the well with two deep minima, so that the system is described in terms of Ising spins. Intersite interactions order spins at lower temperatures. Extension to the quantum regime is discussed. Below the charge density wave (CDW) transition the energy spectrum of electrons remains metallic because the structural vector Q and the Fermi surface sizes are not related. Large values of the CDW gap seen in the tunneling experiments correspond to the energy of the minima in the electron-ion two-well complex. The gap is defined through the density of states inside the electronic bands below the CDW transition. We focus mainly on electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  19. Self-action of Bessel wave packets in a system of coupled light guides and formation of light bullets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakin, A. A., E-mail: balakin.alexey@yandex.ru; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A., E-mail: sk.sa1981@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The self-action of two-dimensional and three-dimensional Bessel wave packets in a system of coupled light guides is considered using the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The features of the self-action of such wave fields are related to their initial strong spatial inhomogeneity. The numerical simulation shows that for the field amplitude exceeding a critical value, the development of an instability typical of a medium with the cubic nonlinearity is observed. Various regimes are studied: the self-channeling of a wave beam in one light guide at powers not strongly exceeding a critical value, the formation of the “kaleidoscopic” picture of a wave packet during the propagation of higher-power radiation along a stratified medium, the formation of light bullets during competition between self-focusing and modulation instabilities in the case of three-dimensional wave packets, etc. In the problem of laser pulse shortening, the situation is considered when the wave-field stratification in the transverse direction dominates. This process is accompanied by the self-compression of laser pulses in well enough separated light guides. The efficiency of conversion of the initial Bessel field distribution to two flying parallel light bullets is about 50%.

  20. Contribution to the electron density diagnostics of a plasma by means of three-wave interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Says, L.P.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma use can be considered as an acceleration technique but a high precision diagnostic is necessary. This can be provided by refractive index determination. A three wave interferometer gives an accuracy in the range of a few nanometers in optical path measurements. Such an apparatus has been designed, built and tested on a discharge plasma, previously diagnosed by conventional methods. Results are in good agreement and the expected accuracy is achieved [fr

  1. Polarization dependence of the spin-density-wave excitations in single-domain chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeni, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Roessli, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 75 - Paris (France); Sternlieb, B.J. [Brookhaven (United States); Lorenzo, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France); Werner, S.A. [Missouri (United States)

    1997-09-01

    A polarized neutron scattering experiment has been performed with a single-Q, single domain sample of chromium in a magnetic field of 4 T. It is confirmed that the longitudinal fluctuations are enhanced for small energy transfers and that the spin wave modes with {delta}S parallel to Q and {delta}S perpendicular to Q are similar. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  2. Current-drive and plasma formation experiments on the Versator-II tokamak using lower-hybrid and electron-cyclotron waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colborn, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    During lower-hybrid current-driven (LHCD) tokamak discharges with thermal electron temperature T e ∼ 150 eV, a two-parallel-temperature tail is observed in the electron distribution function. The cold tail extends to parallel energy E parallel ∼ 4.5 keV with temperature T cold tail ∼ 1.5 keV, and the hot tail extends to E parallel > 150 keV with T hot tail > 40 keV. Fokker-Planck computer simulations suggest the cold tail is created by low power, high-N parallel sidelobes in the lower-hybrid antenna spectrum, and that these sidelobes bridge the spectral gap, enabling current drive on small tokamaks such as Versator. During plasma-formation experiments using 28 GHz electroncyclotron (EC) waves, the plasma is born near the EC layer, then moves toward the upper-hybrid (UH) layer within 100-200μs. Wave power is detected in the plasma with frequency f = 300 MHz. Measured turbulent plasma fluctuations are correlated with decay-wave amplitude. Electron-cyclotron current-drive (ECCD) is observed with loop voltage V loop ≤ 0 and fully sustained plasma current I p approx-lt 15 kA at densities up to [n e ] = 2 x 10 12 cm -3 . The efficiency falls rapidly to zero as the density is raised, suggesting the ECCD depends on low collisonality. The EC waves enhance magnetic turbulence in the frequency range 50 kHz approx-lt f approx-lt 400 kHz by up to an order of magnitude. The time-of-arrival of the turbulence to probes at the plasma boundary is longer when the EC layer is farther from the probes

  3. Characterization of Spectral Magnification based on Four-Wave Mixing in Nonlinear Fibre for Advanced Modulation Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads; Corcoran, B.; Galili, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We characterize the performance of 4× spectral magnification based on four-wave mixing in optimized nonlinear fibres, for 4/8/16-QAM formats, and report >19-nm operational bandwidth. Predominantly OSNR penalties of ~1 dB per bit/QAM-symbol from aberrations non-intrinsic to time lenses are observed....

  4. Angle-resolved photoemission study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 (R= Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.

    2010-02-15

    We present a detailed ARPES investigation of the RTe{sub 3} family, which sets this system as an ideal 'textbook' example for the formation of a nesting driven Charge Density Wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDW instabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi Surface (FS) (up to 0.4eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k-space. An additional advantage of RTe{sub 3} is that the band structure can be very accurately described by a simple 2D tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure, by comparing our ARPES measurements with Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and, for the first time, of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k-space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDW interaction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n(Ef), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  5. ARPES study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 ( R=Y , La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, and Dy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zahid; Brouet, Veronique; Yang, Wanli; Zhou, Xingjiang; Hussain, Zahid; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D. H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Ru, N.; Fisher, R.

    2008-01-16

    We present a detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of the RTe3 family, which sets this system as an ideal"textbook" example for the formation of a nesting driven charge density wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDWinstabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi surface (up to 0.4 eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k space. An additional advantage of RTe3 is that theband structure can be very accurately described by a simple two dimensional tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure by comparing our ARPES measurements with the linear muffin-tinorbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R, and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDWinteraction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n (EF), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  6. Implementation of density functional embedding theory within the projector-augmented-wave method and applications to semiconductor defect states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Kuang; Libisch, Florian; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new implementation of the density functional embedding theory (DFET) in the VASP code, using the projector-augmented-wave (PAW) formalism. Newly developed algorithms allow us to efficiently perform optimized effective potential optimizations within PAW. The new algorithm generates robust and physically correct embedding potentials, as we verified using several test systems including a covalently bound molecule, a metal surface, and bulk semiconductors. We show that with the resulting embedding potential, embedded cluster models can reproduce the electronic structure of point defects in bulk semiconductors, thereby demonstrating the validity of DFET in semiconductors for the first time. Compared to our previous version, the new implementation of DFET within VASP affords use of all features of VASP (e.g., a systematic PAW library, a wide selection of functionals, a more flexible choice of U correction formalisms, and faster computational speed) with DFET. Furthermore, our results are fairly robust with respect to both plane-wave and Gaussian type orbital basis sets in the embedded cluster calculations. This suggests that the density functional embedding method is potentially an accurate and efficient way to study properties of isolated defects in semiconductors

  7. Two types of nonlinear wave equations for diffractive beams in bubbly liquids with nonuniform bubble number density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    2015-05-01

    This paper theoretically treats the weakly nonlinear propagation of diffracted sound beams in nonuniform bubbly liquids. The spatial distribution of the number density of the bubbles, initially in a quiescent state, is assumed to be a slowly varying function of the spatial coordinates; the amplitude of variation is assumed to be small compared to the mean number density. A previous derivation method of nonlinear wave equations for plane progressive waves in uniform bubbly liquids [Kanagawa, Yano, Watanabe, and Fujikawa (2010). J. Fluid Sci. Technol. 5(3), 351-369] is extended to handle quasi-plane beams in weakly nonuniform bubbly liquids. The diffraction effect is incorporated by adding a relation that scales the circular sound source diameter to the wavelength into the original set of scaling relations composed of nondimensional physical parameters. A set of basic equations for bubbly flows is composed of the averaged equations of mass and momentum, the Keller equation for bubble wall, and supplementary equations. As a result, two types of evolution equations, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including dissipation, diffraction, and nonuniform effects for high-frequency short-wavelength case, and a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation including dispersion and nonuniform effects for low-frequency long-wavelength case, are derived from the basic set.

  8. Enhanced charge density wave order in La2-xSrxCuO4 at high magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Wen, Jiajia; Jang, Hoyoung; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Matsuzawa, Satoshi; Song, Sanghoon; Chollet, Matthieu; Zhu, Diling; Fujita, Masaki; Rotundu, Costel R.; Sheckelton, John P.; Jiang, Mingde; Kao, Chi-Chang; Lee, Jun-Sik; Lee, Young S.

    There has been much recent interest in the charge density wave (CDW) order in the cuprate superconductors. An intriguing form of the density wave occurs in the La2CuO4-based family where both the charge and spin form ``stripes'' near 1/8 doping. Charge order has been reported in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) in zero magnetic field near 1/8 doping that was enhanced in moderate DC fields (up to 10 T). In this talk, I will discuss our recent experiment which combines a pulsed magnet with the x-rays from a free electron laser to characterize the CDW in LSCO with x =0.115 in fields up to 24 Tesla. In contrast to the YBCO family, which shows field-induced 3D CDW order, the field-enhanced CDW order in LSCO remains two-dimensional up to 24 T. Further results regarding the field-dependence and zero-field behavior of the CDW will be discussed. Our study provides important information on the interplay between CDW order and high-Tc superconductivity. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  9. Electronic structure of SnF{sub 3}: An example of valence skipper which forms charge density wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, I., E-mail: i.hase@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Yanagisawa, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Kawashima, K. [IMRA Material R& D Co., LTD., Kariya, Aichi 448-0032 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We calculated the electronic structure of SnF{sub 3} and BaBiO{sub 3} from first principles. • As for SnF{sub 3}, charge-density-wave (CDW) is found, which agrees with the experiment. • As for BaBiO{sub 3}, CDW is not found, contrary to the experiment. • We conclude that the CDW is hard in SnF{sub 3} and is soft in BaBiO{sub 3}. - Abstract: In the present study we calculated the electronic structure of the valence skipping compound SnF{sub 3} and BaBiO{sub 3} from first-principles. We confirmed that the charge-density-wave (CDW) is formed in SnF{sub 3}, and the Sn atoms in two crystallographic different sites take the valence Sn{sup 2+} and Sn{sup 4+}. Structure optimization study reveals that this CDW is stable, though the atomic position is slightly different from the experimental data. This behavior is in contrast with the case of BaBiO{sub 3}, where the structure optimization leads to the uniform state, which means that two Bi sites are equivalent. The CDW state is hard in SnF{sub 3}, which means that the CDW gap is large enough and it is difficult to melt this CDW order.

  10. Superconductor to spin-density-wave transition in quasi-one-dimensional metals with repulsive anisotropic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhkov, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism for superconductivity in a quasi-one-dimensional system with repulsive Ising-anisotropic interaction is studied. The Ising anisotropy opens the gap Δ s in the spin sector of the model. This gap allows the triplet superconductivity and the spin-density wave as the only broken symmetry phases. These phases are separated by the first order transition. The transport properties of the system are investigated in different parts of the phase diagram. The calculation of DC conductivity σ(T) in the high-temperature phase shows that the function σ(T) cannot be used as an indicator of a superconducting ground state: even if σ(T) is a decreasing function at high temperature, yet, the ground state may be insulating spin-density wave; the opposite is also true. The calculation of the spin dynamical structure factor S zz (q, ω) demonstrates that it is affected by the superconducting phase transition in a qualitative fashion: below T c the structure factor develops a gap with a coherent excitation inside this gap

  11. Ion beam induced surface pattern formation and stable travelling wave solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Satoshi; Smith, Roger

    2013-03-06

    The formation of ripple structures on ion bombarded semiconductor surfaces is examined theoretically. Previous models are discussed and a new nonlinear model is formulated, based on the infinitesimal local atomic relocation induced by elastic nuclear collisions in the early stages of collision cascades and an associated density change in the near surface region. Within this framework ripple structures are shown to form without the necessity to invoke surface diffusion or large sputtering as important mechanisms. The model can also be extended to the case where sputtering is important, and it is shown that in this case certain 'magic' angles can occur at which the ripple patterns are most clearly defined. The results are in very good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of the Effects of Slow Wave Sleep Deprivation During the First 3 h of Sleep on Subsequent EEG Power Density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Derk Jan; Beersma, Domien G.M.; Daan, Serge; Bloem, Gerda M.; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    1987-01-01

    The relation between EEG power density during slow wave sleep (SWS) deprivation and power density during subsequent sleep was investigated. Nine young male adults slept in the laboratory for 3 consecutive nights. Spectral analysis of the EEG on the 2nd (baseline) night revealed an exponential

  13. Formation of high density TiN nanocrystals and its application in non-volatile memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuelin; Chen Guoguang; Feng Shunshan

    2008-01-01

    Non-volatile memory based on TiN nanocrystal (TiN-NC) charge storage nodes embedded in SiO 2 has been fabricated and its electrical properties have been measured. It was found that the density and size distribution of TiN-NCs can be controlled by annealing temperature. The formation of well separated crystalline TiN nano-dots with an average size of 5nm is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the existence of a transition layer of TiN x O y /SiON oxide between TiN-NC and SiO 2 , which reduces the barrier height of tunnel oxide and thereby enhances programming/erasing speed. The memory device shows a memory window of 2.5V and an endurance cycle throughout 10 5 . Its charging mechanism, which is interpreted from the analysis of programming speed (dV th /dt) and the gate leakage versus voltage characteristics (I g vs V g ), has been explained by direct tunnelling for tunnel oxide and Fowler–Nordheim tunnelling for control oxide at programming voltages lower than 9V, and by Fowler–Nordheim tunnelling for both the oxides at programming voltages higher than 9 V

  14. Influence of Reprocessing in the formation of functional groups during low density polyethylene aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício M. Selonke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the interest in polymer recycling has increased. However, in every reprocessing step the material undergoes shear stress and is affected by temperature and oxygen. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of multiple extrusion in the generation of functional groups, namely hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and transvinylene. Low density polyethylene was reprocessed three times in a single screw extruder. In each recycling step hot pressed films were prepared. These films were submitted to a heat treatment in an oven with air circulation and renovation to proceed with aging tests at different times and temperatures. The results obtained showed that all functional groups had their concentration increased with the increase in number of reprocessing, the aging time and temperature of the heat treatment. The factorial design was applied to verify the influence of these parameters. All the parameters had significant effects, since their regression coefficients had the same order of magnitude, with the most influential parameter being the aging temperature, followed by the aging time and number of extrusions. Most of the interactions were influential, indicating that the formation of functional groups depends upon their interaction, and not only on their isolated effects.

  15. Formation of high density TiN nanocrystals and its application in non-volatile memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Lin; Feng, Shun-Shan; Chen, Guo-Guang

    2008-03-01

    Non-volatile memory based on TiN nanocrystal (TiN-NC) charge storage nodes embedded in SiO2 has been fabricated and its electrical properties have been measured. It was found that the density and size distribution of TiN-NCs can be controlled by annealing temperature. The formation of well separated crystalline TiN nano-dots with an average size of 5nm is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the existence of a transition layer of TiNxOy/SiON oxide between TiN-NC and SiO2, which reduces the barrier height of tunnel oxide and thereby enhances programming/erasing speed. The memory device shows a memory window of 2.5V and an endurance cycle throughout 105. Its charging mechanism, which is interpreted from the analysis of programming speed (dVth/dt) and the gate leakage versus voltage characteristics (Ig vs Vg), has been explained by direct tunnelling for tunnel oxide and Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling for control oxide at programming voltages lower than 9V, and by Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling for both the oxides at programming voltages higher than 9 V.

  16. Radar sounding of the Medusae Fossae Formation Mars: equatorial ice or dry, low-density deposits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Thomas R; Campbell, Bruce; Carter, Lynn; Leuschen, Carl J; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Picardi, Giovanni; Orosei, Roberto; Safaeinili, Ali; Clifford, Stephen M; Farrell, William M; Ivanov, Anton B; Phillips, Roger J; Stofan, Ellen R

    2007-11-16

    The equatorial Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is enigmatic and perhaps among the youngest geologic deposits on Mars. They are thought to be composed of volcanic ash, eolian sediments, or an ice-rich material analogous to polar layered deposits. The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) instrument aboard the Mars Express Spacecraft has detected nadir echoes offset in time-delay from the surface return in orbits over MFF material. These echoes are interpreted to be from the subsurface interface between the MFF material and the underlying terrain. The delay time between the MFF surface and subsurface echoes is consistent with massive deposits emplaced on generally planar lowlands materials with a real dielectric constant of approximately 2.9 +/- 0.4. The real dielectric constant and the estimated dielectric losses are consistent with a substantial component of water ice. However, an anomalously low-density, ice-poor material cannot be ruled out. If ice-rich, the MFF must have a higher percentage of dust and sand than polar layered deposits. The volume of water in an ice-rich MFF deposit would be comparable to that of the south polar layered deposits.

  17. NODC Standard Format NOS Coastal Wave Program (F182) Data (1979-1983) (NODC Accession 0014203)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data type was designed for analyzed wave data originating from the National Ocean Service (NOS) Coastal Wave Program. The data are organized into 3 record...

  18. The 7 × 1 Fermi Surface Reconstruction in a Two-dimensional f -electron Charge Density Wave System: PrTe3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsook; Kim, D. H.; Kim, Hyun Woo; Denlinger, J. D.; Kim, Heejung; Kim, Junwon; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.; Min, B. H.; Kwon, Y. S.; Kang, J.-S.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structure of a charge density wave (CDW) system PrTe3 and its modulated structure in the CDW phase have been investigated by employing ARPES, XAS, Pr 4 f RPES, and first-principles band structure calculation. Pr ions are found to be nearly trivalent, supporting the CDW instability in the metallic Te sheets through partial filling. Finite Pr 4 f spectral weight is observed near the Fermi level, suggesting the non-negligible Pr 4 f contribution to the CDW formation through the Pr 4 f -Te 5p hybridization. The two-fold symmetric features in the measured Fermi surface (FS) of PrTe3 are explained by the calculated FS for the assumed 7 × 1 CDW supercell formation in Te sheets. The shadow bands and the corresponding very weak FSs are observed, which originate from both the band folding due to the 3D interaction of Te sheets with neighboring Pr-Te layers and that due to the CDW-induced FS reconstruction. The straight vertical FSs are observed along kz, demonstrating the nearly 2D character for the near-EF states. The observed linear dichroism reveals the in-plane orbital character of the near-EF Te 5p states. PMID:27453329

  19. On the formation of nanostructures on a CdTe surface, stimulated by surface acoustic waves under nanosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasenko, A. I.; Baidullaeva, A.; Veleschuk, V. P., E-mail: vvvit@ukr.net; Mozol, P. E.; Boiko, N. I.; Litvin, O. S. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductors Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-02-15

    The formation of nanoscale structures in the unirradiated part of a p-CdTe crystal surface irradiated by a nanosecond ruby laser is revealed and investigated. It is shown that their formation is caused by the effect of the long-range action of a laser pulse with an intensity of I = 20 MW/cm{sup 2}. Nanoscale-structure formation is explained by the influence of the pressure gradient of the surface acoustic wave, in particular, within the “vacancy-pump” mechanism on the surface.

  20. Electroencephalogram Power Density and Slow Wave Sleep as a Function of Prior Waking and Circadian Phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Brunner, Daniel P.; Beersma, Domien G.M.; Borbély, Alexander A.

    1990-01-01

    Human sleep electroencephalograms, recorded in four experiments, were subjected to spectral analysis. Waking prior to sleep varied from 12 to 36 h and sleep was initiated at different circadian phases. Power density of delta and theta frequencies in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM)

  1. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weatherford, Brandon R.; Barnat, E. V.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100–120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3 × 10 9  cm s −1 , depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  2. Full wave model of image formation in optical coherence tomography applicable to general samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Peter R T; Curatolo, Andrea; Sampson, David D

    2015-02-09

    We demonstrate a highly realistic model of optical coherence tomography, based on an existing model of coherent optical microscopes, which employs a full wave description of light. A defining feature of the model is the decoupling of the key functions of an optical coherence tomography system: sample illumination, light-sample interaction and the collection of light scattered by the sample. We show how such a model can be implemented using the finite-difference time-domain method to model light propagation in general samples. The model employs vectorial focussing theory to represent the optical system and, thus, incorporates general illumination beam types and detection optics. To demonstrate its versatility, we model image formation of a stratified medium, a numerical point-spread function phantom and a numerical phantom, based upon a physical three-dimensional structured phantom employed in our laboratory. We show that simulated images compare well with experimental images of a three-dimensional structured phantom. Such a model provides a powerful means to advance all aspects of optical coherence tomography imaging.

  3. Density of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Adults and Larvae at Three Stages of the Invasion Wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Stephen J; McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M

    2018-02-08

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding buprestid, has killed hundreds of millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in the United States and two Canadian provinces. We evaluated EAB persistence in post-invasion sites and compared EAB adult captures and larval densities in 24 forested sites across an east-west gradient in southern Michigan representing the Core (post-invasion), Crest (high EAB populations), and Cusp (recently infested areas) of the EAB invasion wave. Condition of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) trees were recorded in fixed radius plots and linear transects in each site. Ash mortality was highest in Core sites in the southeast, moderate in Crest sites in central southern Michigan, and low in Cusp sites in the southwest. Traps and trap trees in Crest sites accounted for 75 and 60% of all EAB beetles captured in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Populations of EAB were present in all Core sites and traps in these sites captured 13% of all beetles each year. Beetle captures and larval densities at Cusp sites roughly doubled between 2010 and 2011, reflecting the increasing EAB populations. Sticky bands on girdled trees captured the highest density of EAB beetles per m2 of area, while baited double-decker traps had the highest detection rates and captured the most beetles. Larval densities were higher on girdled ash than on similar ungirdled trees and small planted trees. Woodpecker predation and a native larval parasitoid were present in all three invasion regions but had minor effects on ash survival and EAB densities. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Methane formation from the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide on Ni(110) surface--a density functional theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothra, Pallavi; Periyasamy, Ganga; Pati, Swapan K

    2013-04-21

    The complete hydrogenation mechanisms of CO2 are explored on Ni(110) surface catalyst using density functional theory. We have studied the possible hydrogenation mechanism to form product methane from the stable adsorption-co-adsorption intermediates of CO2 and H2 on Ni(110) surface. Our computations clearly elucidate that the mechanism for the formation of methyl, methoxy and methane moieties from carbon dioxide on the nickel catalyst. Moreover, our studies clearly show that the methane formation via hydroxyl carbonyl intermediate requires a lower energy barrier than via carbon monoxide and formate intermediates on the Ni(110) surface.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of perturbations in a thin fluid layer during wave formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokudina, L. A.

    2014-03-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the state of a free surface of a thin fluid layer (a fluid film) in heat-mass-exchange processes of condensation and evaporation. The wave motion of a fluid film is studied under inhomogeneous surface tension. Nonlinear development of perturbations belonging to a continuous band of wave numbers on the surface of a thin fluid layer is investigated within the framework of a non-linear parabolic equation. It is shown that wave packets with carrier wave lying near the harmonic of maximum increment become self-ordered; as a result, a monochromatic wave is generated on the surface of the fluid film. When a wave packet is generated in the neighborhood of the neutral stability curve, one can observe a phenomenon of directed energy transfer to the waves in the neighborhood of the harmonic of maximum increment.

  6. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...

  7. Subspace accelerated inexact Newton method for large scale wave functions calculations in Density Functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattebert, J

    2008-07-29

    We describe an iterative algorithm to solve electronic structure problems in Density Functional Theory. The approach is presented as a Subspace Accelerated Inexact Newton (SAIN) solver for the non-linear Kohn-Sham equations. It is related to a class of iterative algorithms known as RMM-DIIS in the electronic structure community. The method is illustrated with examples of real applications using a finite difference discretization and multigrid preconditioning.

  8. Polysaccharide charge density regulating protein adsorption to air/water interfaces by protein/polysaccharide complex formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Kosters, H.; Vliet, T. van; Stuart, M.A.C.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Because the formation of protein/polysaccharide complexes is dominated by electrostatic interaction, polysaccharide charge density is expected to play a major role in the adsorption behavior of the complexes. In this study, pullulan (a non-charged polysaccharide) carboxylated to four different

  9. Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause-Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-01-01

    At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity[Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D(approx) 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 and gt; 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in

  10. Characterization of methane-hydrate formation inferred from insitu Vp-density relationship for hydrate-bearing sediment cores obtained off the eastern coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, M.; Hamada, Y.; Hirose, T.; Yamada, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In 2015, the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Drilling Expedition 02 was carried out off the eastern margin of the Indian Peninsula in order to investigate distribution and occurrence of gas hydrates. From 25 drill sites, downhole logging data, cored samples, and drilling performance data were collected. One of the target areas (area B) is located on the axial and flank of an anticline, where the BSR is identified 100 m beneath the summit of anticline. 3 sites were drilled in the crest. The lower potential hydrate zone II was suggested by downhole logging (LWD) at 270-290 m below seafloor across the top of anticline. Core samples from this interval is characterized by a higher natural gamma radiation, gamma-ray-based higher bulk density and lower porosity, and higher electrical resistivity. All these features are in good agreement with LWD results. During this expedition, numerous special core sampling operations (PCAT) were carried out, keeping its insitu pressure in a pressure-tight vessel. They enabled acquiring insitu P-wave velocity and gamma-ray attenuation density measurements. In-situ X-CT images exhibit very clear hydrate distribution as lower density patches. Hydrate-bearing sediments exhibit a Vp-density trend that is clearly different from the ordinary formation. Vp values are significantly higher than 2 km/s whereas the density remains constant at 2-2.2 g/cm3 in hydrate zones. At some hydrate-bearing sediments, we noticed that Vp is negatively correlated to the density in the deeper portion (235-285 mbsf). On the other hand, in the shallower portion they are positively correlated. From lithostratigraphy the shallower portion consists of sand, whereas deeper portion are silty-clay dominant. We infer that the sand-dominant, shallower hydrate is a pore-filling type, and Vp is correlated positively to density. On the other hand, the clay-dominant, deeper hydrate is filled in vertical veins, and Vp is negatively correlated to density. Negative

  11. Irradiation of layered metallic dichalcogenides: disorder in the charge density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutka, Hannu.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is an experimental study on electron-irradiated metallic layer compounds (VSe 2 , NbSe 2 , TaS 2 , TaSe 2 ). The metal atoms displaced by irradiation remain in the form of stable defects up to 300 K; their concentration (10 - 5 ... 10 - 2 )is known from measurements of displacement threshold energy and magnetic susceptibility. The effect of these defects on the charge densite wave (CDW) phases and on the electronic and superconducting properties forms the major part of this study. In 1T-TaS 2 , a microstructure of CDW domains pinned to defects is observed by electron microscopy. The effects of this kind of disorder are also manifest in the thermodynamic properties of the CDW and in the electronic transport, as well as in the superconducting properties [fr

  12. Effect of injection angle, density ratio, and viscosity on droplet formation in a microfluidic T-junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Yaghoub Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The T-junction microchannel device makes available a sharp edge to form micro-droplets from bio-material solutions. This article investigates the effects of injection angle, flow rate ratio, density ratio, viscosity ratio, contact angle, and slip length in the process of formation of uniform droplets in microfluidic T-junctions. The governing equations were solved by the commercial software. The results show that contact angle, slip length, and injection angles near the perpendicular and parallel conditions have an increasing effect on the diameter of generated droplets, while flow rate, density and viscosity ratios, and other injection angles had a decreasing effect on the diameter. Keywords: Microfluidics, Droplet formation, Flow rate ratio, Density ratio

  13. Formation of large-scale structures with sharp density gradient through Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a two-dimensional slab under the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, R.; Hatori, T.; Miura, H.; Ito, A.; Sato, M.

    2015-01-01

    Two-fluid and the finite Larmor effects on linear and nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a two-dimensional slab are studied numerically with special attention to high-wave-number dynamics and nonlinear structure formation at a low β-value. The two effects stabilize the unstable high wave number modes for a certain range of the β-value. In nonlinear simulations, the absence of the high wave number modes in the linear stage leads to the formation of the density field structure much larger than that in the single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation, together with a sharp density gradient as well as a large velocity difference. The formation of the sharp velocity difference leads to a subsequent Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability only when both the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius terms are incorporated, whereas it is not observed otherwise. It is shown that the emergence of the secondary instability can modify the outline of the turbulent structures associated with the primary Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  14. Formation and loss of hierarchical structure in two-dimensional MHD simulations of wave-driven turbulence in interstellar clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    1999-01-01

    Two dimensional compressible magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulations run for 20 crossing times on a 800x640 grid with two stable thermal states show persistent hierarchical density structures and Kolmogorov turbulent motions in the interaction zone between incoming non-linear Alfven waves. These structures and motions are similar to what are commonly observed in weakly self-gravitating interstellar clouds, suggesting that these clouds get their fractal structures from non-linear magnetic wav...

  15. Formation of Large-Amplitude Wave Groups in an Experimental Model Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    field: varying blower motor speeds supplying air to the pneumatic domes and motion amplitude variation of the flapper valve that controls air being...pumped in and out of the domes. Hydraulic cylinders with a ± 10V control signal are employed to actuate the flapper valves. The wave-maker also has a...of the four regular waves was controlled by blower rpm, maximum voltage (the amplitude of flapper motion), frequency, and the number of wave cycles

  16. Ultrafast dynamics in CeTe{sub 3} near the pressure-induced charge-density-wave transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauch, Jonas; Obergfell, Manuel [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Schaefer, Hanjo [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Demsar, Jure [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (Germany); Giraldo, Paula; Fisher, Ian R. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University (United States); Pashkin, Alexej [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is an efficient tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in strongly correlated electronic systems, in particular, compounds with a charge-density-wave (CDW) order. Application of external pressure often leads to a suppression of a CDW state due to an impairment of the Fermi surface nesting. We combine time-resolved optical spectroscopy and diamond anvil cell technology to study electron and lattice dynamics in tri-telluride compound CeTe{sub 3}. Around pressures of 4 GPa we observe a gradual vanishing of the relaxation process related to the recombination of the photoexcited quasiparticles. The coherent oscillations of the phonon modes coupled to the CDW order parameter demonstrate even more dramatic suppression with increasing pressure. These observations clearly indicate a transition into the metallic state of CeTe{sub 3} induced by the external pressure.

  17. Coherent tunneling between elementary conducting layers in NbSe sub 3 conductor with wave charge density

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, Y I; Sinchenko, A A; Bulaevskii, L N; Monceau, P

    2002-01-01

    The peculiarities of the cross-sectional transport in the direction of the crystallographic axis alpha * in the conductor with the NbSe sub 3 wave charge density (WCD) are studied. The strong peak of dynamic conductivity is observed on the WCD of the layered structures and the NbSe sub 3 -NbSe sub 3 point contacts at low temperatures by the zero voltage shift. The identified behavior reminds in many respects the interlayer tunnel conductivity in the Bi-2212-type high-temperature layered conductors. The conductivity peak by the zero shift is explained in the model of the almost coherent interlayer tunneling of the carriers, noncondensed in the WCD

  18. Irreversible mean-field model of the critical behavior of charge-density waves below the threshold for sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier

    1993-05-01

    A mean-field (MF) model of the critical behavior of charge-density waves below the threshold for sliding is proposed, which replaces the combined effect of the pinning force and of the forces exerted by the neighbors on a given particle n by an effective force threshold Xn. It allows one to rationalize the numerical results of Middleton and Fisher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 (1991) 92] on the divergence of the polarization and of the largest correlation length and of Pla and Nori [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 (1991) 919] on the distribution D( d) of sliding bursts of size d, measured in narrow intervals of driving fields E at a finite distance below the threshold Ec.

  19. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP): Considerations for Beaming High Energy-Density Electromagnetic Waves Through the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of employing beamed electromagnetic energy for vehicle propulsion within and outside the Earth's atmosphere was co-funded by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency that began in June 2010 and culminated in a Summary Presentation in April 2011. A detailed report entitled "Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study" appeared in February 2012 as NASA/TM-2012-217014. Of the very many nuances of this subject that were addressed in this report, the effects of transferring the required high energy-density electromagnetic fields through the atmosphere were discussed. However, due to the limitations of the length of the report, only a summary of the results of the detailed analyses were able to be included. It is the intent of the present work to make available the complete analytical modeling work that was done for the BEP project with regard to electromagnetic wave propagation issues. In particular, the present technical memorandum contains two documents that were prepared in 2011. The first one, entitled "Effects of Beaming Energy Through the Atmosphere" contains an overview of the analysis of the nonlinear problem inherent with the transfer of large amounts of energy through the atmosphere that gives rise to thermally-induced changes in the refractive index; application is then made to specific beamed propulsion scenarios. A brief portion of this report appeared as Appendix G of the 2012 Technical Memorandum. The second report, entitled "An Analytical Assessment of the Thermal Blooming Effects on the Propagation of Optical and Millimeter- Wave Focused Beam Waves For Power Beaming Applications" was written in October 2010 (not previously published), provides a more detailed treatment of the propagation problem and its effect on the overall characteristics of the beam such as its deflection as well as its radius. Comparisons are then made for power beaming using the disparate electromagnetic wavelengths of 1.06 microns and 2

  20. Far infrared conductivity of charge density wave materials and the oxygen isotope effect in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creager, W.N.

    1991-09-01

    The far infrared reflectance and conductivity of (Ta 1-x Nb x Se 4 ) 2 I and TaS 3 have been measured to determine the origin of a huge infrared resonance that dominates the charge density wave (CDW) dynamics along with the pinned acoustic phason mode in the related materials (TaSe 4 ) 2 I and K 0. 3 MoO 3 . The measurements cover frequencies from 3 to 700cm -1 and the temperature range from 15K to 300K. In the niobium-doped alloys (Ta 1-x Nb x Se 4 ) 2 I, the size and frequency of the giant infrared mode remain nearly constant as the impurity concentration x is increased. For TaS 3 , the pinned acoustic phason near 0.5cm -1 dominates var-epsilon(ω) and an additional small mode lies near 9cm -1 . The latter mode is much smaller than the infrared mode in other CDW materials. These results rule out several models of a ''generic infrared mode'' in CDW excitations. They are compared in detail to the predictions of a recent theory attributing the infrared mode to a bound collective mode localized at impurity sites within the crystal. The transmittance of K 0.3 MoO 3 has been measured at 1.2K with a strong dc electric field applied across the crystal. Under these conditions, the charge density wave depins abruptly and carries large currents with near-zero differential resistance. For some samples, the low-frequency transmittance is enhanced slightly when the CDW depins. The magnitude of the oxygen isotope effect in the high-T c superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 has been determined by substitution of 18 O for 16 O. A series of cross-exchanges was performed on high-quality polycrystalline specimens to eliminate uncertainties due to sample heat treatments and sample inhomogeneities

  1. Calculation of local excitations in large systems by embedding wave-function theory in density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, André Severo Pereira; Jacob, Christoph R; Visscher, Lucas

    2008-09-21

    We present a simple and efficient embedding scheme for the wave-function based calculation of the energies of local excitations in large systems. By introducing an embedding potential obtained from density-functional theory (DFT) it is possible to describe the effect of an environment on local excitations of an embedded system in wave-function theory (WFT) calculations of the excitation energies. We outline the implementation of such a WFT-in-DFT embedding procedure employing the ADF, Dalton and DIRAC codes, where the embedded subsystem is treated with coupled cluster methods. We then evaluate this procedure in the calculation of the solvatochromic shift of acetone in water and of the f-f spectrum of NpO22+ embedded in a Cs2UO2Cl4 crystal and find that our scheme does effectively incorporate the environment effect in both cases. A particularly interesting finding is that with our embedding scheme we can model the equatorial Cl- ligands in NpO2Cl42- quite accurately, compared to a fully wavefunction-based calculation, and this opens up the possibility of modeling the interaction of different ligands to actinyl species with relatively high accuracy but at a much reduced computational cost.

  2. Plastic deformation and wave formation on the interface of metals welded by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuz’min, E. V.; Kuz’min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Lata, A. N.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the influence of the effect of ultrasound on the wave formation and plastic deformation in the metals welded by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding. It has been established that the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the metal leads to a reduction of the dynamic yield stress, which in turn leads to changes in the properties of the surface layers of metal and in the conditions of bonding between the collided plates upon explosive welding. It has been shown that the changes in the length and amplitude of waves that arise in the weld joint upon the explosive welding with the simultaneous action of ultrasonic vibrations is connected with a decrease in the magnitude of the deforming pulse and time of action of the compressive stresses that exceed the dynamic yield stress behind the point of contact.

  3. The interaction of laser driven shock waves with a spherical density perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, D.R; Budil, K.S.; Klein, R.I.; Perry, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    Strong shock waves produced by illumination of a CH target by laser produced x-rays were driven through a copper sphere. The motion and deformation of the sphere were measured using radiographs generated by backlighting the sphere with a large area backlighter. The sphere became non-spherical after the passage of the shock, having a complicated down-stream structure. This was an instability-induced structure that was predicted by calculations. The experiment is a convenient laboratory model of the complicated interactions occurring in much larger systems such as in astrophysics in the interaction of shocks formed in the interstellar medium with various types of clouds. In particular, the experiment is a useful tool for checking the computational ability of the new generation ASCI computers, as it requires three-dimensional modeling. This experiment has shown that three dimensional calculations seem to be necessary to describe major features observed in the experiment. Any attempt to explain hydrodynamic behavior with similar instabilities must take into account these three dimensional effects

  4. Increased extracellular matrix density decreases MCF10A breast cell acinus formation in 3D culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Amanda; Yang, Chih-Chao; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Dean, Delphine; Deitch, Sandy; Burg, Karen J L; Dréau, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the generation and dynamic of normal breast tissue, in particular to the generation of polarized acinar and ductal structures. In vitro 3D culture conditions, including variations in the composition of the ECM, have been shown to directly influence the formation and organization of acinus-like and duct-like structures. Furthermore, the density of the ECM appears to also play a role in the normal mammary tissue and tumour formation. Here we show that the density of the ECM directly influences the number, organization and function of breast acini. Briefly, non-malignant human breast MCF10A cells were incubated in increasing densities of a Matrigel®-collagen I matrix. Elastic moduli near and distant to the acinus structures were measured by atomic force microscopy, and the number of acinus structures was determined. Immunochemistry was used to investigate the expression levels of E-cadherin, laminin, matrix metalloproteinase-14 and ß-casein in MCF10A cells. The modulus of the ECM was significantly increased near the acinus structures and the number of acinus structures decreased with the increase in Matrigel-collagen I density. As evaluated by the expression of laminin, the organization of the acinus structures present was altered as the density of the ECM increased. Increases in both E-cadherin and MMP14 expression by MCF10A cells as ECM density increased were also observed. In contrast, MCF10A cells expressed lower ß-casein levels as the ECM density increased. Taken together, these observations highlight the key role of ECM density in modulating the number, organization and function of breast acini. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Influence of the pulse wave in the stratification of high density particles in a JIG device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Ospina-Alarcón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of particle motion subjected to four different pulsation profiles on a pulsated fluidized bed jig concentrator was carried out. The profiles used in the simulation were – sinusoidal, triangle, sawtooth-backward and sawtooth-forward. Two-dimensional local velocities of the water flow field were calculated from the continuity and momentum equations by CFD techniques implementing SIMPLE algorithm. The particle motion is modeled by a forces balance applying the Newton’s second law of motion. Liquid-solid interactions forces are calculated by the mathematical Euler-Lagrangian model extended to a particle suspension having a wide size and density distribution. To analyze the particle motion in jig, we derived a trajectory equation for the response time of particle that include virtual mass, gravity, pressure gradient, drag and Basset forces. The study demonstrates significant differences in the particle trajectories for various pulsation profiles applied to the boundary condition at the inlet to the jig chamber.

  6. Connections between variation principles at the interface of wave-function and density-functional theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Tom J P; Furness, James W; Ryley, Matthew S; Zemen, Jan; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2017-10-07

    A recently proposed variation principle [N. I. Gidopoulos, Phys. Rev. A 83, 040502(R) (2011)] for the determination of Kohn-Sham effective potentials is examined and extended to arbitrary electron-interaction strengths and to mixed states. Comparisons are drawn with Lieb's convex-conjugate functional, which allows for the determination of a potential associated with a given electron density by maximization, yielding the Kohn-Sham potential for a non-interacting system. The mathematical structure of the two functionals is shown to be intrinsically related; the variation principle put forward by Gidopoulos may be expressed in terms of the Lieb functional. The equivalence between the information obtained from the two approaches is illustrated numerically by their implementation in a common framework.

  7. Waveguide propagation of electromagnetic waves in high-density ducts aligned along the geomagnetic field in the near-equatorial magnetospheric region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    Waveguide propagation of electromagnetic waves in axial symmetric ducts with increased plasma density aligned along the constant external magnetic field is considered for frequencies, being higher than low-hybrid, in the WKB approximation. In this case tunnel effects leading to captured wave damping are taken into account. Conditions for waveguide propagation and the logarithmic decrement of damping are found. Field construction is performed using the systems of axially symmetric WKB solutions of the Maxwell equations

  8. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, C1510, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  9. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  10. Hydrostatic pressure and fluid-density distribution of the Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawley, M.E.

    1988-05-01

    The primary objectives of the Pressure - Density Survey were to obtain the middle-of-formation pressures, determine well-bore fluid densities, define well-bore fluid density stratification, and to provide, where possible, formation water density values for wells where little or no information on densities exists. The survey collected ground-water pressure and density data during three field testing periods during the years 1986 and 1987. Data were collected from 33 individual wells located in the vicinity of the WIPP Site. 18 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  12. Ultrafast broadband frequency modulation of a continuous wave reflectometry system to measure density profiles on ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.; Manso, M.E.; Cupido, L.; Albrecht, M.; Serra, F.; Varela, P.; Santos, J.; Vergamota, S.; Eusebio, F.; Fernandes, J.; Grossmann, T.; Kallenbach, A.; Kurzan, B.; Loureiro, C.; Meneses, L.; Nunes, I.; Silva, F.; Suttrop, W. [Associacao EURATOM/IST-Centro de Fusao Nuclear/Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1096 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    1996-12-01

    A reflectometry system has been developed for ASDEX Upgrade to measure the plasma profile from the scrape-off layer until the bulk plasma, simultaneously at the high and low field sides. Unique features of the system are the ultrafast broadband frequency modulation of a continuous wave using solid state stable hyper abrupt tuned oscillators (down to 10 {mu}s), high and low field side channels and fully remote control operation, via optical fiber links. Due to the special design of the transmission line, with decoupled in going and out going lines and one-antenna configuration, the system is optimized for reception and spurious reflections are eliminated. The ultrafast operation guarantees that the effect of plasma turbulence is greatly reduced. Both features determine the high performance of the diagnostic. A dedicated data acquisition system handles the large amounts of data generated by the broadband operation. Recent developments include the operation of new channels and an automatic and accurate frequency calibration circuit. Also, advanced digital signal processing techniques were applied to obtain density profiles with high spatial and temporal (20 {mu}s) resolutions under turbulent plasma regions, e.g., the scrape-off layer. Experimental results are presented showing the great sensitivity of the diagnostic to plasma radial movements and its tolerance to vertical movements of the plasma. Density profiles measured in ELMy regimes illustrate the capabilities of the diagnostic to detect fast profile changes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Efficiency of a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter with High-Density Beam for Applications to Aneutronic Fusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, Alfonso

    2012-03-01

    Due to the appeal of aneutronic fusion, a variety of reactor concepts have been proposed in past. In most cases, to achieve a positive net power balance these reactor concepts rely on a significant re-circulation of the energy produced to maintain a non-equilibrium configuration (unlike ignited plasmas). The availability of a direct conversion process with high efficiency is then critical for determining the feasibility of a reactor (particularly when the ``almost true aneutronic'' reaction like p-^11B is considered). A Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC, [1]) is considered for the energy conversion of a high-density beam formed by the fusion products (MeV-range α-particles). As in [2], a PIC code is utilized for a realistic beam model. The study is focused on the possibility of obtaining high-efficiency coupling between a modulated high-density ``bunched'' beam, accounting also for a neutralizing electron environment, and the TWDEC electrode collector structure.[4pt] [1] Momota et al. (1999) Fus. Tech., 35, 60[0pt] [2] Y.Yasaka et al. (2009), Nucl. Fus., 49, 075009

  14. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shehryar, E-mail: sherkhan@fysik.su.se; Odelius, Michael, E-mail: odelius@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kruk, Danuta [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Sloneczna 54, Olsztyn PL-10710 (Poland); Kowalewski, Jozef [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H{sub 2}O){sup −}, Gd(III)DTPA(H{sub 2}O){sup 2−}, and Gd(III)(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}{sup 3+} in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  15. Local extragalactic velocity field, the local mean mass density, and biased galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.E.; Peebles, P.J.E.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a relationship is derived between the local mass density and the perturbation of the local Hubble flow. The local mass density is estimated by the method used in the Virgocentric flow. The infrared Tully-Fisher relation of Aaronson et al. (1982) is used to find limits on the gravitational perturbation to the local Hubble flow and bright galaxy counts (N) are used to estimate the local galaxy concentration. It is concluded that if mass is proportional to N, with no fluctuations, and the local mass per galaxy is a fair sample, then the density parameter is roughly 0.1, consistent with other dynamical estimates and inconsistent with the naive interpretation of biasing which accounts for the low apparent mass density derived from clustering dynamics by the assumption that the mass per galaxy is unusually low in the regions of high density where clustering has been studied. 17 references

  16. Exchange correlation effects on plasmons and on charge-density wave instability in narrow-band quasi-one-dimensional metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Tosatti, E.

    1979-05-01

    The coexistence of tight-binding and exchange-correlation effects inside each chain of a model quasi-one-dimensional metal, on both plasmon and charge density wave properties have been studied. The results, while in qualitative agreement with other treatments of the problem at long wavelengths, indicate a strong tendency for plasmons to turn into excitons at larger momenta, and to exhibit an ''excitonic'' charge-density wave instability at k approximately 2ksub(F). The nature of the plasmon branches and of the excitonic charge distortion is examined. Relevance to existing quasi-one-dimensional materials is also discussed. (author)

  17. Application of the Mössbauer Spectroscopy to Study Harmonically Modulated Electronic Structures: Case Study of Charge- and Spin-Density Waves in Cr and Its Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Mieczyslaw Dubiel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of the Mössbauer spectroscopy in the study of harmonically modulated electronic structures i.e. spin-density waves (SDWs and charge-density waves (CDWs is presented and discussed. First, the effect of various parameters pertinent to the SDWs and CDWs is outlined on simulated 119Sn spectra and distributions of the hyperfine field and the isomer shift. Next, various examples of the 119Sn spectra measured on single-crystals and polycrystalline samples of Cr and Cr-V are reviewed.

  18. Valley current characterization of high current density resonant tunnelling diodes for terahertz-wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, K. J. P.; Stevens, B. J.; Baba, R.; Wada, O.; Mukai, T.; Hogg, R. A.

    2017-10-01

    We report valley current characterisation of high current density InGaAs/AlAs/InP resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs) grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) for THz emission, with a view to investigate the origin of the valley current and optimize device performance. By applying a dual-pass fabrication technique, we are able to measure the RTD I-V characteristic for different perimeter/area ratios, which uniquely allows us to investigate the contribution of leakage current to the valley current and its effect on the PVCR from a single device. Temperature dependent (20 - 300 K) characteristics for a device are critically analysed and the effect of temperature on the maximum extractable power (PMAX) and the negative differential conductance (NDC) of the device is investigated. By performing theoretical modelling, we are able to explore the effect of typical variations in structural composition during the growth process on the tunnelling properties of the device, and hence the device performance.

  19. Wave-Field Formation in a Hollow X-Ray Waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukreeva, I.; Popov, A.; Pelliccia, D.; Cedola, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Dabagov, S. B.

    2006-01-01

    Diffraction and refraction phenomena at the entrance of a hollow x-ray waveguide with weakly absorbing dielectric cladding layers are investigated using two independent approaches: (a) analytical and (b) numerical solutions of the wave equation in the paraxial (parabolic) approximation. It is shown that the wave penetrating through the cladding material substantially modifies the wave field near the waveguide entrance. It results in a significant increase of the total energy flux inside the guiding layer and in additional spatial modulation of the electromagnetic field

  20. Measurements of the parallel wavenumber of lower hybrid waves in the scrape-off layer of a high-density tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, S. G.; Wallace, G. M.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brunner, D.; Faust, I.; LaBombard, B. L.; Wukitch, S.; Shinya, T.; Takase, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments on tokamaks, the parallel wavenumber of lower hybrid waves is an important physics parameter that governs the wave propagation and absorption physics. However, this parameter has not been experimentally well-characterized in the present-day high density tokamaks, despite the advances in the wave physics modeling. In this paper, we present the first measurement of the dominant parallel wavenumber of lower hybrid waves in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak with an array of magnetic loop probes. The electric field strength measured with the probe in typical C-Mod plasmas is about one-fifth of that of the electric field at the mouth of the grill antenna. The amplitude and phase responses of the measured signals on the applied power spectrum are consistent with the expected wave energy propagation. At higher density, the observed k || increases for the fixed launched k || , and the wave amplitude decreases rapidly. This decrease is correlated with the loss of LHCD efficiency at high density, suggesting the presence of loss mechanisms. Evidence of the spectral broadening mechanisms is observed in the frequency spectra. However, no clear modifications in the dominant k || are observed in the spectrally broadened wave components, as compared to the measured k || at the applied frequency. It could be due to (1) the probe being in the SOL and (2) the limited k || resolution of the diagnostic. Future experiments are planned to investigate the roles of the observed spectral broadening mechanisms on the LH density limit problem in the strong single pass damping regime.

  1. Hall voltage drives pulsing counter-currents of the sliding charge density wave and of quantized normal carriers at self-filled Landau levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Andrey P.; Sinchenko, Aleksander A.; Monceau, Pierre; Brazovskii, Serguei; Latyshev, Yuri I.

    2017-11-01

    Remnant pockets of carriers left over after formation of a charge density wave (CDW) were brought, by virtue of transverse electric and magnetic fields, to a current-carrying state at quantized Landau Levels. The generated Hall voltage polarizes and puts to sliding the flexible CDW background. The screening from the CDW allows for a so strong redistribution of normal electrons density under the action of the Lorentz force alone, that an integer filling of the lowest Landau level might be reached at one edge at the expense of the full depletion at another edge of the Hall bar. With the Hall field exceeding the sliding threshold, the regime of exactly compensated collective and normal counter-currents develops in the open-circuit direction across the bar. The annihilation of the two currents proceeds via a regular sequence of phase slips which are the space-time vortices of the CDW phase around the enforced amplitude nodes. The resulting spontaneous generation of coherent high ( GHz) frequency signals was detected by observations of multiple Shapiro steps. This picture results from studies of micron-sized Hall bars in crystals of NbSe3 prepared by means of focused ion beams. The interpretation is confirmed and illustrated by a numerical solution of the derived equations. The depinning pulse propagates from edges to the bulk and the sliding sets in, accompanied by the generation of periodic phase slips near the Hall bar edge where the CDW phase is advanced in steps of 2π at expense of the CDW amplitude passing through zero.

  2. Tanshindiol C inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced macrophage foam cell formation via a peroxiredoxin 1 dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuyu; Li, Xueyan; Peng, Liying; An, Lin; Sun, Ningyuan; Hu, Xuewen; Zhou, Ping; Xu, Yong; Li, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2018-03-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been shown to be protective in atherosclerosis. The loss of Nrf2 in macrophages enhances foam cell formation and promotes early atherogenesis. Tanshindiol C (Tan C) is isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge., a traditional Chinese medicine that has been used for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases for many years. This study was aimed to test the potential role of Tan C against macrophage foam cell formation and to explore the underlying mechanism. Firstly, we observed that Tan C markedly suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) induced macrophage foam cell formation. Then, we found that Tan C was an activator of both Nrf2 and Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) in macrophages. Nrf2 and Sirt1 synergistically activated the transcription of anti-oxidant peroxiredoxin 1 (Prdx1) after Tan C treatment. More important, we demonstrated that silencing of Prdx1 promoted oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation. Prdx1 upregulated adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and decreased intracellular lipid accumulation. Furthermore, Tan C ameliorated oxLDL induced macrophage foam cell formation in a Prdx1-dependent manner. These observations suggest that Tan C protects macrophages from oxLDL induced foam cell formation via activation of Prdx1/ABCA1 signaling and that Prdx1 may be a novel target for therapeutic intervention of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Far infrared conductivity of charge density wave materials and the oxygen isotope effect in high-T sub c superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creager, W.N.

    1991-09-01

    The far infrared reflectance and conductivity of (Ta{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}Se{sub 4}){sub 2}I and TaS{sub 3} have been measured to determine the origin of a huge infrared resonance that dominates the charge density wave (CDW) dynamics along with the pinned acoustic phason mode in the related materials (TaSe{sub 4}){sub 2}I and K{sub 0. 3}MoO{sub 3}. The measurements cover frequencies from 3 to 700cm{sup {minus}1} and the temperature range from 15K to 300K. In the niobium-doped alloys (Ta{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}Se{sub 4}){sub 2}I, the size and frequency of the giant infrared mode remain nearly constant as the impurity concentration x is increased. For TaS{sub 3}, the pinned acoustic phason near 0.5cm{sup {minus}1} dominates {var epsilon}({omega}) and an additional small mode lies near 9cm{sup {minus}1}. The latter mode is much smaller than the infrared mode in other CDW materials. These results rule out several models of a generic infrared mode'' in CDW excitations. They are compared in detail to the predictions of a recent theory attributing the infrared mode to a bound collective mode localized at impurity sites within the crystal. The transmittance of K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured at 1.2K with a strong dc electric field applied across the crystal. Under these conditions, the charge density wave depins abruptly and carries large currents with near-zero differential resistance. For some samples, the low-frequency transmittance is enhanced slightly when the CDW depins. The magnitude of the oxygen isotope effect in the high-{Tc} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} has been determined by substitution of {sup 18}O for {sup 16}O. A series of cross-exchanges was performed on high-quality polycrystalline specimens to eliminate uncertainties due to sample heat treatments and sample inhomogeneities.

  4. Density functional computational studies on the glucose and glycine Maillard reaction: Formation of the Amadori rearrangement products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Roy, Amlan K.; Shipar, Abul Haider; Ahmed, M. Samsuddin

    Theoretical energy changes of various intermediates leading to the formation of the Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs) under different mechanistic assumptions have been calculated, by using open chain glucose (O-Glu)/closed chain glucose (A-Glu and B-Glu) and glycine (Gly) as a model for the Maillard reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) computations have been applied on the proposed mechanisms under different pH conditions. Thus, the possibility of the formation of different compounds and electronic energy changes for different steps in the proposed mechanisms has been evaluated. B-Glu has been found to be more efficient than A-Glu, and A-Glu has been found more efficient than O-Glu in the reaction. The reaction under basic condition is the most favorable for the formation of ARPs. Other reaction pathways have been computed and discussed in this work.0

  5. On the Probability Density Function of the Crest to Trough Heights of Waves and on the Physics of Extreme Waves Including Results from Hurricane Camille.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    bridge the gap between nonlinear periodic waves and their properties and the random nonlinear wave found in nature. Mansard and Funke (1982) needed to...14 illustrate attempts by Mansard and Funke C 1982 ) to generate various wave forms at a measurement point 22.8 m from the generator. The left hand...5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 TIME (S) *FIGURE 14 Desired and Measured Transients obtained in a Wave Tank. Redrawn from Mansard and Funke

  6. Surface-enhanced charge-density-wave instability in underdoped Bi2Sr2-xLaxCuO6+delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosen, J. A.; Comin, R.; Levy, G.; Fournier, D.; Zhu, Z. -H.; Ludbrook, B.; Veenstra, C. N.; Nicolaou, A.; Wong, D.; Dosanjh, P.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Blake, G. R.; White, F.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Sutarto, R.; He, F.; Pereira, A. Frano; Lu, Y.; Keimer, B.; Sawatzky, G.; Petaccia, L.; Damascelli, A.

    Neutron and X-ray scattering experiments have provided mounting evidence for spin and charge ordering phenomena in underdoped cuprates. These range from early work on stripe correlations in Nd-LSCO to the latest discovery of charge-density-waves in YBa2Cu3O6 + x. Both phenomena are characterized by

  7. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forgan, E.M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6...

  8. Scaling of spin-density-wave effects in the quantum critical (Cr{sub 86}Ru{sub 14}){sub 1-x}V{sub x} alloy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, L; Alberts, H L; Prinsloo, A R E; Strydom, A M, E-mail: hermana@uj.ac.z [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park, 2006 (South Africa)

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of experimental data on the electrical resistivity, Hall coefficient and electronic specific heat coefficient of a quantum critical (Cr{sub 86}Ru{sub 14}){sub 1-x}V{sub x} alloy system, is reported. The results give information on the role of spin-density-wave effects on the zero temperature relationships between these physical properties.

  9. The Main Principles of Formation of the Transverse Modes in the Multilayered Waveguides of Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveshnikov, B. V.; Bagdasaryan, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a self-consistent model allowing one to analyze the properties of the interdigital transducer of the surface acoustic waves as a symmetric five-layered waveguide on a piezoelectric substrate with three possible values of the phase velocity of the acoustic-wave propagation along the longitudinal axis of the system. The transcendental dispersion relation for describing the waves in such a system is derived and the method for its instructive graphic analysis is proposed. The condition under which only the fundamental transverse mode is excited in the waveguide is formulated. The method for calculating the normalized power and the transverse distribution of the field of the continuous-spectrum waves radiated from the considered waveguide is described. It is shown that the characteristic spatial scale of the longitudinal damping of the amplitude of this field at the waveguide center can be a qualitative estimate of the transverse-mode formation length. The efficiency of a new method for suppressing the higher-order transverse waveguide modes is demonstrated.

  10. Erratum to: On the Progression and Stability of Adolescent Identity Formation. A Five-Wave Longitudinal Study in Early-to-Middle and Middle-to-Late Adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeus, Wim; van de Schoot, Rens; Keijsers, Loes; Schwartz, S.J.; Branje, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article corrects: On the Progression and Stability of Adolescent Identity Formation: A Five-Wave Longitudinal Study in Early-to-Middle and Middle-to-Late Adolescence Vol. 81, Issue 5, 1565–1581,

  11. Plant root tortuosity: an indicator of root path formation in soil with different composition and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Liyana; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Fiorani, Fabio; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Root soil penetration and path optimization are fundamental for root development in soil. We describe the influence of soil strength on root elongation rate and diameter, response to gravity, and root-structure tortuosity, estimated by average curvature of primary maize roots. Methods Soils with different densities (1·5, 1·6, 1·7 g cm−3), particle sizes (sandy loam; coarse sand mixed with sandy loam) and layering (monolayer, bilayer) were used. In total, five treatments were performed: Mix_low with mixed sand low density (three pots, 12 plants), Mix_medium - mixed sand medium density (three pots, 12 plants), Mix_high - mixed sand high density (three pots, ten plants), Loam_low sandy loam soil low density (four pots, 16 plants), and Bilayer with top layer of sandy loam and bottom layer mixed sand both of low density (four pots, 16 plants). We used non-invasive three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging to quantify effects of these treatments. Key Results Roots grew more slowly [root growth rate (mm h–1); decreased 50 %] with increased diameters [root diameter (mm); increased 15 %] in denser soils (1·7 vs. 1·5 g cm–3). Root response to gravity decreased 23 % with increased soil compaction, and tortuosity increased 10 % in mixed sand. Response to gravity increased 39 % and tortuosity decreased 3 % in sandy loam. After crossing a bilayered–soil interface, roots grew more slowly, similar to roots grown in soil with a bulk density of 1·64 g cm–3, whereas the actual experimental density was 1·48±0·02 g cm–3. Elongation rate and tortuosity were higher in Mix_low than in Loam_low. Conclusions The present study increases our existing knowledge of the influence of physical soil properties on root growth and presents new assays for studying root growth dynamics in non-transparent media. We found that root tortuosity is indicative of root path selection, because it could result from both mechanical deflection and

  12. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-28

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q(-)) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, ()(1/2)=6.7 mH, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, |H(ab)|=3.8 mH. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q(-) in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  13. Predicting the distribution of spiral waves from cell properties in a developmental-path model of Dictyostelium pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Geberth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the model systems of biological pattern formation. One of the most successful answers to the challenge of establishing a spiral wave pattern in a colony of homogeneously distributed D. discoideum cells has been the suggestion of a developmental path the cells follow (Lauzeral and coworkers. This is a well-defined change in properties each cell undergoes on a longer time scale than the typical dynamics of the cell. Here we show that this concept leads to an inhomogeneous and systematic spatial distribution of spiral waves, which can be predicted from the distribution of cells on the developmental path. We propose specific experiments for checking whether such systematics are also found in data and thus, indirectly, provide evidence of a developmental path.

  14. Research on Formation Mechanism of Dynamic Response and Residual Stress of Sheet Metal Induced by Laser Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aixin; Cao, Yupeng; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    In order to reveal the quantitative control of the residual stress on the surface of metal materials, the relevant theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the dynamic response of metal thin plates and the formation mechanism of residual stress induced by laser shock wave. In this paper, the latest research trends on the surface residual stress of laser shock processing technology were elaborated. The main progress of laser shock wave propagation mechanism and dynamic response, laser shock, and surface residual stress were discussed. It is pointed out that the multi-scale characterization of laser and material, surface residual stress and microstructure change is a new hotspot in laser shock strengthening technology.

  15. Cluster formation and the virial equation of state of low-density nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, C.J.; Schwenk, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the virial equation of state of low-density nuclear matter composed of neutrons, protons and alpha particles. The virial equation of state is model-independent, and therefore sets a benchmark for all nuclear equations of state at low densities. We calculate the second virial coefficients for nucleon-nucleon, nucleon-alpha and alpha-alpha interactions directly from the relevant binding energies and scattering phase shifts. The virial approach systematically takes into account contributions from bound nuclei and the resonant continuum, and consequently provides a framework to include strong-interaction corrections to nuclear statistical equilibrium models. The virial coefficients are used to make model-independent predictions for a variety of properties of nuclear matter over a range of densities, temperatures and compositions. Our results provide constraints on the physics of the neutrinosphere in supernovae. The resulting alpha particle concentration differs from all equations of state currently used in supernova simulations. Finally, the virial equation of state greatly improves our conceptual understanding of low-density nuclear matter

  16. Compatibility of localized wave packets and unrestricted single particle dynamics for cluster formation in nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, A.

    2002-03-01

    Anti-symmetrized molecular dynamics with quantum branching is generalized so as to allow finite time duration of the unrestricted coherent mean field propagation which is followed by the decoherence into wave packets. In this new model, the wave packet shrinking by the mean field propagation is respected as well as the diffusion, so that it predicts a one-body dynamics similar to that in mean field models. The shrinking effect is expected to change the diffusion property of nucleons in nuclear matter and the global one-body dynamics. The central 129 Xe + Sn collisions at 50 MeV/nucleon are calculated by the models with and without shrinking, and it is shown that the inclusion of the wave packet shrinking has a large effect on the multifragmentation in a big expanding system with a moderate expansion velocity. (author)

  17. Formation and dynamics of electrostatic solitary waves associated with relativistic electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslem, W. M.; Bencheriet, F.; Sabry, R.; Djebli, M.

    2012-04-01

    Properties of nonlinear electrostatic solitary waves in a plasma are analyzed by using the hydrodynamic model for electrons, positrons, and relativistic electron beam. For this purpose, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation has been derived and its analytical solution is presented. It is found that the nonlinear solitary structures can propagate as slow and fast modes. The dependence of these modes on the plasma parameters is defined numerically. Furthermore, positive and negative electrostatic solitary structures can exist. In order to show that the characteristics of the solitary wave profile are influenced by the plasma parameters, the relevant numerical analysis of the KP equation is obtained. The electrostatic solitary waves, as predicted here, may be associated with the nonlinear structures caused by the interaction of relativistic jets with plasma medium, such as in the active galactic nuclei and in the magnetosphere of collapsing stars.

  18. Analytical results on the periodically driven damped pendulum. Application to sliding charge-density waves and Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azbel, M.Y.; Bak, P.

    1984-01-01

    The differential equation epsilonphi-dieresis+phi-dot-(1/2)α sin(2phi) = I+summation/sub n/ = -infinity/sup infinity/A/sub n/delta(t-t/sub n/) describing the periodically driven damped pendulum is analyzed in the strong damping limit epsilon<<1, using first-order perturbation theory. The equation may represent the motion of a sliding charge-density wave (CDW) in ac plus dc electric fields, and the resistively shunted Josephson junction driven by dc and microwave currents. When the torque I exceeds a critical value the pendulum rotates with a frequency ω. For infinite damping, or zero mass (epsilon = 0), the equation can be transformed to the Schroedinger equation of the Kronig-Penney model. When A/sub n/ is random the pendulum exhibits chaotic motion. In the regular case A/sub n/ = A the frequency ω is a smooth function of the parameters, so there are no phase-locked subharmonic plateaus in the ω(I) curve, or the I-V characteristics for the CDW or Josephson-junction systems. For small nonzero epsilon the return map expressing the phase phi(t/sub n/+1) as a function of the phase phi(t/sub n/) is a one-dimensional circle map. Applying known analytical results for the circle map one finds narrow subharmonic plateaus at all rational frequencies, in agreement with experiments on CDW systems

  19. Improved constraint on the primordial gravitational-wave density using recent cosmological data and its impact on cosmic string models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrot-Versillé, Sophie; Robinet, Florent; Leroy, Nicolas; Plaszczynski, Stéphane; Arnaud, Nicolas; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Cavalier, Fabien; Christensen, Nelson; Couchot, François; Franco, Samuel; Hello, Patrice; Huet, Dominique; Kasprzack, Marie; Perdereau, Olivier; Spinelli, Marta; Tristram, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    The production of a primordial stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background by processes occuring in the early Universe is expected in a broad range of models. Observing this background would open a unique window onto the Universe's evolutionary history. Probes like the cosmic microwave background (CMB) or the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used to set upper limits on the stochastic GW background energy density Ω GW for frequencies above 10 −15 Hz. We perform a profile likelihood analysis of the Planck CMB temperature anisotropies and gravitational lensing data combined with WMAP low-ℓ polarization, BAO, South Pole Telescope and Atacama Cosmology Telescope data. We find that Ω GW h 0 2 <3.8×10 −6 at a 95% confidence level for adiabatic initial conditions, which improves over the previous limit by a factor 2.3. Assuming that the primordial GW has been produced by a network of cosmic strings, we have derived exclusion limits in the cosmic string parameter space. If the size of the loops is determined by gravitational back-reaction, string tension values greater than ∼4 × 10 −9 are excluded for a reconnection probability of 10 −3 . (paper)

  20. Pressure dependence of the optical properties of the charge-density-wave compound LaTe2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavagnini, M.; Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Arcangeletti, E.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; /Rome U.; Perucchi, A.; /INFM, Trieste; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    We report the pressure dependence of the optical response of LaTe{sub 2}, which is deep in the charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state even at 300 K. The reflectivity spectrum is collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 7 GPa. We extract the energy scale due to the single particle excitation across the CDW gap and the Drude weight. We establish that the gap decreases upon compressing the lattice, while the Drude weight increases. This signals a reduction in the quality of nesting upon applying pressure, therefore inducing a lesser impact of the CDW condensate on the electronic properties of LaTe{sub 2}. The consequent suppression of the CDW gap leads to a release of additional charge carriers, manifested by the shift of weight from the gap feature into the metallic component of the optical response. On the contrary, the power-law behavior, seen in the optical conductivity at energies above the gap excitation and indicating a weakly interacting limit within the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid scenario, seems to be only moderately dependent on pressure.

  1. Non-iterative determination of the stress-density relation from ramp wave data through a window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Evan; Fratanduono, Dayne; Swift, Damian

    2017-06-01

    In the canonical ramp compression experiment, a smoothly-increasing load is applied the surface of the sample, and the particle velocity history is measured at interfaces two or more different distances into the sample. The velocity histories are used to deduce a stress-density relation by correcting for perturbations caused by reflected release waves, usually via the iterative Lagrangian analysis technique of Rothman and Maw. We previously described a non-iterative (recursive) method of analysis, which was more stable and orders of magnitude faster than iteration, but was subject to the limitation that the free surface velocity had to be sampled at uniform intervals. We have now developed more general recursive algorithms suitable for analyzing ramp data through a finite-impedance window. Free surfaces can be treated seamlessly, and the need for uniform velocity sampling has been removed. These calculations require interpolation of partially-released states using the partially-constructed isentrope, making them slower than the previous free-surface scheme, but they are still much faster than iterative analysis. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na2Ti2Sb2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S Y; Jiang, J; Ye, Z R; Niu, X H; Song, Y; Zhang, C L; Dai, P C; Xie, B P; Lai, X C; Feng, D L

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na2Ti2Sb2O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na2Ti2Sb2O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na2Ti2Sb2O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na2Ti2Sb2O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na2Ti2Sb2O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV at 7 K, indicating that Na2Ti2Sb2O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime.

  3. Streak-photographic investigation of shock wave emission after laser-induced plasma formation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Joachim; Vogel, Alfred

    1995-05-01

    The shock wave emission after dielectric breakdown in water was investigated to assess potential shock wave effects in plasma mediated tissue ablation and intraocular photodisruption. Of particular interest was the dependence of shock wave pressure as a function of distance from the plasma for different laser pulse energies. We have generated plasmas in water with a Nd:YAG laser system delivering pulses of 6 ns duration. The pulses, with energies between 0.4 and 36 mJ (approximately equals 180 times threshold), were focused into a cuvette containing distilled water. The shock wave was visualized with streak photography combined with a schlieren technique. An important advantage of this technique is that the shock position as a function of time can directly be obtained from a single streak and hence a single event. Other methods (e.g. flash photography or passage time measurements between fixed locations) in contrast rely on reproducible events. Using the shock wave speed obtained from the streak images, shock wave peak pressures were calculated providing detailed information on the propagation of the shock. The shock peak pressure as a function of distance r from the optical axis was found to decrease faster than 1/r2 in regions up to distances of 100-150 micrometers . For larger distances it was found to be roughly proportional to 1/r. The scaling law for maximum shock pressure p, at a given distance was found to be proportional to the square root of the laser pulse energy E for distances of 50-200 micrometers from the optical axis.

  4. Consolidation of Bimetallic Nanosized Particles and Formation of Nanocomposites Depending on Conditions of Shock Wave Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorozhtsov, S. A.; Kudryashova, O. B.; Lerner, M. I.; Vorozhtsov, A. B.; Khrustalyov, A. P.; Pervikov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    The authors consider and evaluate the physical parameters and regularities of the process of consolidation of Fe-Cu, Cu-Nb, Ag-Ni, Fe-Pb nanoparticles when creating composite materials by means of shock wave compaction. As a result of theoretical consideration of explosive compaction process, researchers established and discussed the physical process conditions, established a number of threshold pressure values corresponding to different target indicators of the state of the compact. The time of shock wave impact on powders for powder consolidation was estimated.

  5. Appendix D: Use of wave scenarios to assess potential submerged oil mat (SOM) formation along the coast of Florida and Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Thompson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    During the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, oil in the surf zone mixed with sediment in the surf zone to form heavier-than-water sediment oil agglomerates of various size, ranging from small (cm-scale) pieces (surface residual balls, SRBs) to large mats (100-m scale, surface residue mats, SR mats). Once SR mats formed in the nearshore or in the intertidal zone, they may have become buried by sand moving onshore or alongshore. To assist in locating possible sites of buried oil, wave scenarios previously developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) were used to determine the depths at which surface oil had the potential to mix with suspended sediment. For sediment to mix with floating oil and form an agglomerate of sufficient density to sink to the seafloor, either the water must be very shallow (e.g., within the swash zone) or sediment must be suspended to the water surface in sufficient concentrations to create a denser-than-sea water agglomerate. The focus of this study is to analyze suspended sediment mixing with surface oil in depths beyond the swash zone, in order to define the seaward limit of mat formation. A theoretical investigation of sediment dynamics in the nearshore zone revealed that non-breaking waves do not suspend enough sediment to the surface to form sinking sand/oil agglomerates. For this study, it was assumed that the cross-shore distribution of potential agglomerate formation is associated with the primary breaker line, and the presence of plunging breakers, over the time frame of oiling. The potential locations of submerged oil mats (SOMs) are sites where (1) possible agglomerate formation occurred, where (2) sediment accreted post-oiling and buried the SOM, and where (3) the bathymetry has not subsequently eroded to re-expose any mat that may have formed at that site. To facilitate identification of these locations, the range of water level variation over the time frame of oiling was also prescribed, which combined with the wave-breaking depth

  6. Joint Inversion of Geoid Anomaly and Teleseismic P-Wave Delay Times: Modeling Density and Velocity Perturbations Beneath the Parana Magmatic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, C. A. M.; Ussami, N.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Parana Magmatic Province (PMP) is one of the largest continental igneous provinces (LIP) on Earth. It is well dated at 133 Ma preceding the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, but the causative geodynamic processes are still poorly understood. Although a low-velocity anomaly has been imaged by seismic tomography in the northeast region of the PMP and interpreted as a fossil conduct of a mantle plume that is related to the flood basalt eruptions, geochemical data indicate that such magmatism is caused by the melting of a heterogeneous and enriched lithospheric mantle with no deep plume participation. Models of density perturbations in the upper mantle estimated from joint inversion of geoid anomalies and P-wave delay times will offer important constraints on mantle dynamics. A new generation of accurate global geopotential models derived from satellite-missions (e.g. GRACE, GOCE) allows us to estimate density distribution within the Earth from geoid inversion. In order to obtain the residual geoid anomaly related to the density structure of the mantle, we use the EGM2008 model removing estimated geoid perturbations owing to variations in crustal structure (i.e., topographical masses, Moho depth, thickness of sediments and basalts). Using a spherical-Earth approximation, the density model space is represented by a set of tesseroids and the velocity model is parameterized in nodes of a spherical grid where cubic B-splines are utilized as an interpolation function. To constrain the density inversion, we add more than 10,000 manually picked teleseismic P-wave delay times. During the inversion procedure, density and P-wave velocity are linked through the optimization of a constant linear factor correlating density and velocity perturbation. Such optimization will be performed using a probability density function (PDF) [Tarantola, 2005]. We will present the preliminary results of this joint inversion scheme and hypothesize on the geodynamic processes responsible for

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of early atherosclerotic plaque formation may determine the efficacy of high density lipoproteins (HDL in plaque regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Chalmers

    Full Text Available We use a computational model to explore the effect of foam cell accumulation on plaque regression following an increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL influx into the plaque. Atherosclerotic plaque formation is the outcome of cellular and cytokine responses to low density lipoproteins (LDL that penetrate the artery wall following an injury to the endothelium and become modified. We modelled the cells and cytokines that are most important in plaque formation using partial differential equations. The model includes monocytes and macrophages, foam cells, macrophage chemoattractants, endothelium-stimulating cytokines, modified low density lipoproteins (mod LDL and HDL. We included interactions both at the endothelium surface and inside the artery wall. The model predicts that when HDL influx into a well-established plaque with large numbers of foam cells is increased, the plaque may not regress but may continue to grow at a slower rate. If HDL influx is increased when a model plaque is recently established and has fewer foam cells, then the plaque does regress. If modLDL influx into the plaque is lowered at the same time that HDL influx increased or the capacity of the HDL to remove cholesterol from foam cells is increased, then the plaque is more likely to regress. The predictions of the model are in qualitative agreement with experimental studies in mice and rabbits. The results suggest that the intrinsic dynamics of reverse cholesterol transport by HDL are important in determining the success of HDL raising in promoting plaque regression.

  8. Filament formation in wind-cloud interactions- II. Clouds with turbulent density, velocity, and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda-Barragán, W. E.; Federrath, C.; Crocker, R. M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2018-01-01

    We present a set of numerical experiments designed to systematically investigate how turbulence and magnetic fields influence the morphology, energetics, and dynamics of filaments produced in wind-cloud interactions. We cover 3D, magnetohydrodynamic systems of supersonic winds impacting clouds with turbulent density, velocity, and magnetic fields. We find that lognormal density distributions aid shock propagation through clouds, increasing their velocity dispersion and producing filaments with expanded cross-sections and highly magnetized knots and subfilaments. In self-consistently turbulent scenarios, the ratio of filament to initial cloud magnetic energy densities is ∼1. The effect of Gaussian velocity fields is bound to the turbulence Mach number: Supersonic velocities trigger a rapid cloud expansion; subsonic velocities only have a minor impact. The role of turbulent magnetic fields depends on their tension and is similar to the effect of radiative losses: the stronger the magnetic field or the softer the gas equation of state, the greater the magnetic shielding at wind-filament interfaces and the suppression of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Overall, we show that including turbulence and magnetic fields is crucial to understanding cold gas entrainment in multiphase winds. While cloud porosity and supersonic turbulence enhance the acceleration of clouds, magnetic shielding protects them from ablation and causes Rayleigh-Taylor-driven subfilamentation. Wind-swept clouds in turbulent models reach distances ∼15-20 times their core radius and acquire bulk speeds ∼0.3-0.4 of the wind speed in one cloud-crushing time, which are three times larger than in non-turbulent models. In all simulations, the ratio of turbulent magnetic to kinetic energy densities asymptotes at ∼0.1-0.4, and convergence of all relevant dynamical properties requires at least 64 cells per cloud radius.

  9. Formation and mechanics of granular waves in gravity and shallow overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römkens, Mathias J. M.; Suryadevara, Madhu R.; Prasad, Shyam N.

    2010-05-01

    Sediment transport in overland flow is a highly complex process involving many properties relative to the flow regime characteristics, soil surface conditions, and type of sediment. From a practical standpoint, most sediment transport studies are concerned with developing relationships of rates of sediment movement under different hydraulic regimes in channel flow for use in soil erosion and sediment transport prediction models. Relatively few studies have focused on the more basic aspects of sediment movement in which particle-to-particle, particle-to-boundary, and particle-to-fluid interactions determine in an important way the nature of the movement. Our experimental work under highly controlled experimental conditions with both gravity flow of granular material (glass beads) in air and sediment transport (sand particles and glass beads) in shallow overland flow have shown that sediment movement is not a simple phenomenon solely determined by flow rates on a proportional basis, but that it is represented by a highly structured and organized regime determined by sedimentary fluid mechanical principles which yield very characteristic waves during transport. In the gravity flow case involving granular chute flow, two-dimensional grain waves developed into the rolling and saltating moving grain mass at certain grain concentrations. This phenomenon appeared to be related to an energy exchange process as a result of collisions between moving grain particles that led to reduced kinetic velocities. As a result, particle concentration differences in the direction of flow developed that were noted as denser zones. In these zones, particles dropped out at the upstream part of these denser zones to resume their accelerating motion once they reached the downstream part of the zone until, during the next collision event, the process is repeated. Thus a periodic granular wave structure evolved. Depending on the addition rate, the granular flow regime may be a fluidized

  10. The successive formation and disappearance of density structures in simple expanding systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimov, A R; Schamel, H

    2015-01-01

    The Lagrangian fluid description is employed to solve the initial value problem for one-dimensional, compressible fluid flows represented by the Euler–Poisson system. Exact nonlinear and time-dependent solutions are obtained, which exhibit a variety of transient phenomena such as a density collapse in finite space–time or the appearance and, for the first time, a successive dissolution of wavelet structures during the same event. The latter are superimposed on the gross density pattern in the course of the uni-directional expansion of an initially localized density hump. Whereas self-gravitating fluids will always experience collapse, neutral fluids and fluids with repulsive forces, such as a non-neutral, pure electron fluid, can exhibit an evolution of the second type, being determined by the initial conditions. For an electron fluid, being embedded in a neutralizing ion background, these nonlinearities are, however, strongly diminished due to the omnipresent plasma oscillations, which weaken and alternatively change the sign of the collective force. (paper)

  11. Velocity of detonation at any initial density without using heat of formation of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Mofrad, Reza Teimuri; Alamdari, Reza Fareghi; Moghadas, Mohammad Hassan; Mostofizadeh, Ali Reza; Sadeghi, Hossein

    2006-10-11

    The simplest method is introduced for reliable estimating the detonation velocity of large class of CHNO explosives based elemental composition and specific structural groups. There is no need to use heat of formation and the other experimental data for calculation of detonation velocity in the new procedure. Only elemental composition and the number of special structural groups without using heat of formation of explosive is sufficient for reliable desk calculation of detonation velocity. The results show good agreement with experimental values with respect to computed results obtained by complex computer code using BKWS and BKWR equations of state. Predicted velocities of detonation have root-mean-square (rms) percent deviation of 2.2, 5.9 and 5.3 from experimental data for new method, BKWS and BKWR equations of state, respectively.

  12. On the number density of interstellar comets as a constraint on the formation rate of planetary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of detecting interstellar comets as an indirect indicator of the rate of planetary formation in the galaxy is discussed. The tie between interstellar comet (ISC) detection and planetary-system detection rests on the assumptions (1) that interstellar comets result from dynamical losses from planetary systems, (2) that comets are a natural product of planetary-system formation, (3) that comets are neither created nor destroyed in the interstellar medium, and (4) that the distribution of comets in interstellar space is approximately homogeneous. It is found that the present constraint on the space density of interstellar comets, if valid, is not far from constraining the statistical frequency and average population of extrasolar Oort clouds. An efficient method for dedicated ISC searches is briefly described. 10 refs

  13. Effects of an elastic membrane on tube waves in permeable formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.; Johnson, D.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper, the modified properties were calculated for tube wave propagation in a fluid-filled borehole penetrating a permeable rock due to the presence of a mudcake which forms on the borehole wall. The mudcake was characterized by an impermeable elastic layer. The mudcake partial sealing mechanism was simulated using a finite membrane stiffness. Consequently, it was shown that the mudcake can reduce, but not eliminate, the permeability effects on the tube wave slowness and attenuation. Moreover, this paper discusses a variety of values for the relevant parameters especially the mudcake thickness and membrane stiffness. The important combinations of mudcake parameters were clarified by using an analytic expression for the low-frequency limit.

  14. An intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave potential energy densities from METOP GPS radio occultation measurements and ECMWF model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Markus; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Kaifler, Bernd

    2018-02-01

    Temperature profiles based on radio occultation (RO) measurements with the operational European METOP satellites are used to derive monthly mean global distributions of stratospheric (20-40 km) gravity wave (GW) potential energy densities (EP) for the period July 2014-December 2016. In order to test whether the sampling and data quality of this data set is sufficient for scientific analysis, we investigate to what degree the METOP observations agree quantitatively with ECMWF operational analysis (IFS data) and reanalysis (ERA-Interim) data. A systematic comparison between corresponding monthly mean temperature fields determined for a latitude-longitude-altitude grid of 5° by 10° by 1 km is carried out. This yields very low systematic differences between RO and model data below 30 km (i.e., median temperature differences is between -0.2 and +0.3 K), which increases with height to yield median differences of +1.0 K at 34 km and +2.2 K at 40 km. Comparing EP values for three selected locations at which also ground-based lidar measurements are available yields excellent agreement between RO and IFS data below 35 km. ERA-Interim underestimates EP under conditions of strong local mountain wave forcing over northern Scandinavia which is apparently not resolved by the model. Above 35 km, RO values are consistently much larger than model values, which is likely caused by the model sponge layer, which damps small-scale fluctuations above ˜ 32 km altitude. Another reason is the well-known significant increase of noise in RO measurements above 35 km. The comparison between RO and lidar data reveals very good qualitative agreement in terms of the seasonal variation of EP, but RO values are consistently smaller than lidar values by about a factor of 2. This discrepancy is likely caused by the very different sampling characteristics of RO and lidar observations. Direct comparison of the global data set of RO and model EP fields shows large correlation coefficients (0

  15. Formation and Dynamics of Waves in a Cortical Model of Cholinergic Modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Roach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is a regulator of neural excitability and one of the neurochemical substrates of sleep. Amongst the cellular effects induced by cholinergic modulation are a reduction in spike-frequency adaptation (SFA and a shift in the phase response curve (PRC. We demonstrate in a biophysical model how changes in neural excitability and network structure interact to create three distinct functional regimes: localized asynchronous, traveling asynchronous, and traveling synchronous. Our results qualitatively match those observed experimentally. Cortical activity during slow wave sleep (SWS differs from that during REM sleep or waking states. During SWS there are traveling patterns of activity in the cortex; in other states stationary patterns occur. Our model is a network composed of Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons with a M-current regulated by ACh. Regulation of ACh level can account for dynamical changes between functional regimes. Reduction of the magnitude of this current recreates the reduction in SFA the shift from a type 2 to a type 1 PRC observed in the presence of ACh. When SFA is minimal (in waking or REM sleep state, high ACh patterns of activity are localized and easily pinned by network inhomogeneities. When SFA is present (decreasing ACh, traveling waves of activity naturally arise. A further decrease in ACh leads to a high degree of synchrony within traveling waves. We also show that the level of ACh determines how sensitive network activity is to synaptic heterogeneity. These regimes may have a profound functional significance as stationary patterns may play a role in the proper encoding of external input as memory and traveling waves could lead to synaptic regularization, giving unique insights into the role and significance of ACh in determining patterns of cortical activity and functional differences arising from the patterns.

  16. Shock-wave profile formation in a gas with allowance for relaxation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnitskii, Yu. M.; Panasenko, A. V.

    2009-11-01

    An important distinctive feature of gaseous media that possess relaxation properties is a delay in the heat transfer, which must be taken into account in the description of processes in these media. Numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations shows that the classical distribution of parameters in a shock wave described by the well-known analytical solution of Becker [1] can be unacceptable if the medium possesses relaxation properties manifested on a nanosecond time scale.

  17. A travelling wave model of ripple formation on ion bombarded surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi, E-mail: s.numazawa@hzdr.de; Smith, Roger, E-mail: R.Smith@lboro.ac.uk

    2013-05-15

    We present a mathematical model describing surface modification resulting from atomic motion after ion bombardment. The model considers only the defect production and recovery process induced by the local atom rearrangement and is essentially independent of surface topography changes formed by both sputtering and surface diffusion. A stable analytic, travelling wave solution is presented for a specific incident angle, which agrees with experimental observation excellently.

  18. A statistical study of ionopause perturbation and associated boundary wave formation at Venus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, G. S.; Pope, S. A.; Walker, S. N.; Zhang, T.; Balikhin, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    In contrast to Earth, Venus does not possess an intrinsic magnetic field. Hence the interaction between solar wind and Venus is significantly different when compared to Earth, even though these two planets were once considered similar. Within the induced magnetosphere and ionosphere of Venus, previous studies have shown the existence of ionospheric boundary waves. These structures may play an important role in the atmospheric evolution of Venus. By using Venus Express data, the crossings of the ionopause boundary are determined based on the observations of photoelectrons during 2011. Pulses of dropouts in the electron energy spectrometer were observed in 92 events, which suggests potential perturbations of the boundary. Minimum variance analysis of the 1Hz magnetic field data for the perturbations is conducted and used to confirm the occurrence of the boundary waves. Statistical analysis shows that they were propagating mainly in the ±VSO-Y direction in the polar north terminator region. The generation mechanisms of boundary waves and their evolution into the potential nonlinear regime are discussed and analysed.

  19. Scanning tunneling microscopy of atoms and charge density waves in 1T-TaS2, 1T-TaSe2 and 1T-VSe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slough, G.; Giambattista, B.; Johnson, A.; McNairy, W.W.; Coleman, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    The layer structure dichalcogenide materials TaS 2 and TaSe 2 grow in several different phases depending on the coordination between the Ta and chalcogenide atoms and the number of three layer sandwiches per unit cell. The 1T phase has octahedral coordination between the Ta and chalcogenide atoms and has one three layer sandwich per unit cell. The high temperature Fermi surfaces (FSs) of the 1T phase Ta based materials exhibit a favorable nesting condition and undergo a charge-density-wave (CDW) transition at temperatures well above room temperature. At low temperatures the CDWs form a √13 /ovr string/a /times/ √13 a commensurate superlattice. STM scans on the 1T phases confirm the presence of an extremely strong CDW modulation inducing z-deflections in the constant current mode of anomalously large values. 1T-VSe 2 is also a member of the VB layer structure dichalcogenide group and band structure calculations show the high temperatures FS to be similar to that of 1T-TaSe 2 . However, sufficient differences exist such that the CDW formation is quite different. The CDW superlattice is observed to form only below room temperature and locks into a 4/ovr string/a /times/ 4/ovr string/a superlattice below /approximately/80K rather than the √13 /ovr string/a /times/ √13 /ovr string/a one observed in 1T-TaSe 2 . Based on electron and neutron diffraction results on stoichiometric 1T-VSe 2 two phase transitions are detected, a second order transition at 110K and a first order transition at /approximately/80K. 20 figs

  20. Metamorphic core complex formation by density inversion and lower-crust extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, F; Goodliffe, A M; Taylor, B

    2001-06-21

    Metamorphic core complexes are domal uplifts of metamorphic and plutonic rocks bounded by shear zones that separate them from unmetamorphosed cover rocks. Interpretations of how these features form are varied and controversial, and include models involving extension on low-angle normal faults, plutonic intrusions and flexural rotation of initially high-angle normal faults. The D'Entrecasteaux islands of Papua New Guinea are actively forming metamorphic core complexes located within a continental rift that laterally evolves to sea-floor spreading. The continental rifting is recent (since approximately 6 Myr ago), seismogenic and occurring at a rapid rate ( approximately 25 mm yr-1). Here we present evidence-based on isostatic modelling, geological data and heat-flow measurements-that the D'Entrecasteaux core complexes accommodate extension through the vertical extrusion of ductile lower-crust material, driven by a crustal density inversion. Although buoyant extrusion is accentuated in this region by the geological structure present-which consists of dense ophiolite overlaying less-dense continental crust-this mechanism may be generally applicable to regions where thermal expansion lowers crustal density with depth.

  1. Large-Format Submillimeter / Millimeter-Wave Cameras and Spectrometers for CCAT and Beyond

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Kinetic Inductance Detector (KID) technology is maturing rapidly, both in the US and abroad, with photon-noise-limited arrays now being fielded in formats up to...

  2. Sex-related differences in sleep slow wave activity in major depressive disorder: a high-density EEG investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plante David T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep disturbance plays an important role in major depressive disorder (MDD. Prior investigations have demonstrated that slow wave activity (SWA during sleep is altered in MDD; however, results have not been consistent across studies, which may be due in part to sex-related differences in SWA and/or limited spatial resolution of spectral analyses. This study sought to characterize SWA in MDD utilizing high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG to examine the topography of SWA across the cortex in MDD, as well as sex-related variation in SWA topography in the disorder. Methods All-night recordings with 256 channel hdEEG were collected in 30 unipolar MDD subjects (19 women and 30 age and sex-matched control subjects. Spectral analyses of SWA were performed to determine group differences. SWA was compared between MDD and controls, including analyses stratified by sex, using statistical non-parametric mapping to correct for multiple comparisons of topographic data. Results As a group, MDD subjects demonstrated significant increases in all-night SWA primarily in bilateral prefrontal channels. When stratified by sex, MDD women demonstrated global increases in SWA relative to age-matched controls that were most consistent in bilateral prefrontal regions; however, MDD men showed no significant differences relative to age-matched controls. Further analyses demonstrated increased SWA in MDD women was most prominent in the first portion of the night. Conclusions Women, but not men with MDD demonstrate significant increases in SWA in multiple cortical areas relative to control subjects. Further research is warranted to investigate the role of SWA in MDD, and to clarify how increased SWA in women with MDD is related to the pathophysiology of the disorder.

  3. Revealing the Formation of Stellar-mass Black Hole Binaries: The Need for Deci-Hertz Gravitational-wave Observatories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xian [Astronomy Department, School of Physics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Amaro-Seoane, Pau, E-mail: xian.chen@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: pau@ice.cat [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC-IEEC) at Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans s/n, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-06-10

    The formation of compact stellar-mass binaries is a difficult, but interesting problem in astrophysics. There are two main formation channels: in the field via binary star evolution, or in dense stellar systems via dynamical interactions. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has detected black hole binaries (BHBs) via their gravitational radiation. These detections provide us with information about the physical parameters of the system. It has been claimed that when the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is operating, the joint observation of these binaries with LIGO will allow us to derive the channels that lead to their formation. However, we show that for BHBs in dense stellar systems dynamical interactions could lead to high eccentricities such that a fraction of the relativistic mergers are not audible to LISA. A non-detection by LISA puts a lower limit of about 0.005 on the eccentricity of a BHB entering the LIGO band. On the other hand, a deci-Hertz observatory, like DECIGO or Tian Qin, would significantly enhance the chances of a joint detection and shed light on the formation channels of these binaries.

  4. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the water turbidity during the oxidation of phenol. Formation of (hydro)peroxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Natalia; Lomas, Jose M; Camarero, Luis M

    2017-11-01

    Analysis of the kinetics of aqueous phenol oxidation by a sono-Fenton process reveals that the via involving ortho-substituted intermediates prevails: catechol (25.0%), hydroquinone (7.7%) and resorcinol (0.6%). During the oxidation, water rapidly acquires color that reaches its maximum intensity at the maximum concentration of p-benzoquinone. Turbidity formation occurs at a slower rate. Oxidant dosage determines the nature of the intermediates, being trihydroxylated benzenes (pyrogallol, hydroxyhydroquinone) and muconic acid the main precursors causing turbidity. It is found that the concentration of iron species and ultrasonic waves affects the intensity of the turbidity. The pathway of (hydro)peroxo-iron(II) complexes formation is proposed. Operating with 20.0-27.8mgFe 2+ /kW rates leads to formation of (hydro)peroxo-iron(II) complexes, which induce high turbidity levels. These species would dissociate into ZZ-muconic acid and ferrous ions. Applying relationships around 13.9mgFe 2+ /kW, the formation of (hydro)peroxo-iron(III) complexes would occur, which could react with carboxylic acids (2,5-dioxo-3-hexenedioic acid). That reaction induces turbidity slower. This is due to the organic substrate reacting with two molecules of the (hydro)peroxo complex. Therefore, it is necessary to accelerate the iron regeneration, intensifying the ultrasonic irradiation. Afterwards, this complex would dissociate into maleic acid and ferric ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Revealing the Formation of Stellar-mass Black Hole Binaries: The Need for Deci-Hertz Gravitational-wave Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian; Amaro-Seoane, Pau

    2017-06-01

    The formation of compact stellar-mass binaries is a difficult, but interesting problem in astrophysics. There are two main formation channels: in the field via binary star evolution, or in dense stellar systems via dynamical interactions. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has detected black hole binaries (BHBs) via their gravitational radiation. These detections provide us with information about the physical parameters of the system. It has been claimed that when the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is operating, the joint observation of these binaries with LIGO will allow us to derive the channels that lead to their formation. However, we show that for BHBs in dense stellar systems dynamical interactions could lead to high eccentricities such that a fraction of the relativistic mergers are not audible to LISA. A non-detection by LISA puts a lower limit of about 0.005 on the eccentricity of a BHB entering the LIGO band. On the other hand, a deci-Hertz observatory, like DECIGO or Tian Qin, would significantly enhance the chances of a joint detection and shed light on the formation channels of these binaries.

  6. Star Formation in High Pressure, High Energy Density Environments: Laboratory Experiments of ISM Dust Analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breugel, W. van; Bajt, S.; Bradley, J.; Bringa, E.; Dai, Z.; Felter, T.; Graham, G.; Kucheyev, S.; Torres, D.; Tielens, A.; Baragiola, R.; Dukes, C.; Loeffler, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dust grains control the chemistry and cooling, and thus the gravitational collapse of interstellar clouds. Energetic particles, shocks and ionizing radiation can have a profound influence on the structure, lifetime and chemical reactivity of the dust, and therefore on the star formation efficiency. This would be especially important in forming galaxies, which exhibit powerful starburst (supernovae) and AGN (active galactic nucleus) activity. How dust properties are affected in such environments may be crucial for a proper understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The authors present the results of experiments at LLNL which show that irradiation of the interstellar medium (ISM) dust analog forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ) with swift heavy ions (10 MeV Xe) and a large electronic energy deposition amorphizes its crystalline structure, without changing its chemical composition. From the data they predict that silicate grains in the ISM, even in dense and cold giant molecular clouds, can be amorphized by heavy cosmic rays (CR's). This might provide an explanation for the observed absence of crystalline dust in the ISM clouds of the Milky Way galaxy. This processing of dust by CR's would be even more important in forming galaxies and galaxies with active black holes

  7. Density functional theory study on the formation of reactive benzoquinone imines by hydrogen abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Rasmus; Rydberg, Patrik; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2015-01-01

    Many drug compounds are oxidized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes to form reactive metabolites. This study presents density functional theory calculations of the CYP-mediated metabolism of acetaminophen and a series of related compounds that can form reactive metabolites by hydrogen abstraction....... The substitution pattern affects the activation barrier for hydrogen abstraction by up to 30 kJ/mol. A correlation (R(2) = 0.72) between the transition-state energies and the corresponding substrate radical energies has been established. Using this correlation is significantly less time-demanding than using...... the porphyrin model to determine the activation energies. We have used this correlation on monosubstituted phenols to rationalize the effect of the various substituents in the drug compounds. In addition to facilitating a chemical interpretation, the approach is sufficiently fast and reliable to be used...

  8. Enzymatically Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein Promotes Foam Cell Formation in Smooth Muscle Cells via Macropinocytosis and Enhances Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellan, Bijoy; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme-modified nonoxidized low-density lipoprotein (ELDL) is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective is to understand the mechanisms of ELDL uptake and its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Transformation of murine aortic SMCs into foam cells in response to ELDL was analyzed. ELDL, but not acetylated or oxidized LDL, was potent in inducing SMC foam cell formation. Inhibitors of macropinocytosis (LY294002, wortmannin, amiloride) attenuated ELDL uptake. In contrast, inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis (dynasore, sucrose) and inhibitor of caveolae-/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis (filipin) had no effect on ELDL uptake in SMC, suggesting that macropinocytosis is the main mechanism of ELDL uptake by SMC. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is not obligatory for ELDL-induced SMC foam cell formation, but primes SMC for the uptake of oxidized LDL in a RAGE-dependent manner. ELDL increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium, and expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in wild-type SMC but not in RAGE(-/-) SMC. The macropinocytotic uptake of ELDL is regulated predominantly by intracellular calcium because ELDL uptake was completely inhibited by pretreatment with the calcium channel inhibitor lacidipine in wild-type and RAGE(-/-) SMC. This is in contrast to pretreatment with PI3 kinase inhibitors which completely prevented ELDL uptake in RAGE(-/-) SMC, but only partially in wild-type SMC. ELDL is highly potent in inducing foam cells in murine SMC. ELDL endocytosis is mediated by calcium-dependent macropinocytosis. Priming SMC with ELDL enhances the uptake of oxidized LDL. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Excited state nuclear forces from the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to time-dependent density functional theory within the plane wave basis set framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Jürg

    2003-03-01

    An efficient formulation of time-dependent linear response density functional theory for the use within the plane wave basis set framework is presented. The method avoids the transformation of the Kohn-Sham matrix into the canonical basis and references virtual orbitals only through a projection operator. Using a Lagrangian formulation nuclear derivatives of excited state energies within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation are derived. The algorithms were implemented into a pseudo potential/plane wave code and applied to the calculation of adiabatic excitation energies, optimized geometries and vibrational frequencies of three low lying states of formaldehyde. An overall good agreement with other time-dependent density functional calculations, multireference configuration interaction calculations and experimental data was found.

  10. STM sub-gap structure in cuprates is a consequence of density waves, according to Mean-Field Theory and CDMFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verret, Simon; Roy, Jyotirmoy; Sénéchal, David; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    Much work has been done to find how the pseudogap is related to charge density waves in cuprates. In scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements, the superconducting gap and pseudogap of cuprates are sometimes accompanied by a small sub-gap structure at very low energy. This was documented early in vortex cores studies, and has now been reported at zero field for YBCO.(1) Here, we show that this can be caused by density waves, first through a standard mean-field approach, and then with Cellular Dynamical Mean-Field Theory for the Hubbard model using an exact diagonalization solver. We comment on the implication of these results for the relation between pseudogap and charge order. (1) Jens Bruér et al. arXiv:1507.06775 Supported by NSERC, CIFAR and the Tier I Canada Research Chair Program.

  11. SUPERNOVA SHOCK-WAVE-INDUCED CO-FORMATION OF GLASSY CARBON AND NANODIAMOND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroud, Rhonda [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Heck, Phillipp [The Field Museum, Chicago, IL; Alexander, Conel [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Nittler, Larry [Carnegie Institution of Washington

    2011-01-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) was the first extrasolar dust phase to be identified in meteorites. However, the 2 nm average size of the NDs precludes isotopic analysis of individual particles, and thus their origin(s) remains controversial. Using electron microscopy with subnanometer resolution, we show that ND separates from the Allende and Murchison meteorites are actually a two-phase mixture of ND and glassy carbon. This phase mixture is likely the product of supernova shock-wave transformation of pre-formed organics in the interstellar medium (ISM). The glassy carbon ND mixture is also a plausible contributor to the 2175 extinction feature in the diffuse ISM.

  12. SUPERNOVA SHOCK-WAVE-INDUCED CO-FORMATION OF GLASSY CARBON AND NANODIAMOND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroud, Rhonda M.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Heck, Philipp R.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Nittler, Larry R.

    2011-01-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) was the first extrasolar dust phase to be identified in meteorites. However, the 2 nm average size of the NDs precludes isotopic analysis of individual particles, and thus their origin(s) remains controversial. Using electron microscopy with subnanometer resolution, we show that ND separates from the Allende and Murchison meteorites are actually a two-phase mixture of ND and glassy carbon. This phase mixture is likely the product of supernova shock-wave transformation of pre-formed organics in the interstellar medium (ISM). The glassy carbon-ND mixture is also a plausible contributor to the 2175 A extinction feature in the diffuse ISM.

  13. Is Lipid Profile Associated with Bone Mineral Density and Bone Formation in Subjects with Spinal Cord Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadis Sabour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The association between serum lipids and bone mineral density (BMD has been investigated previously but, up to now, these relationships have not yet been described in spinal cord injury (SCI. We tried to assess the correlation between serum triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL and BMD in male subjects with SCI. Methods. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA was used to assess BMD in femoral neck, trochanter, intertrochanteric zone, and lumbar vertebras. Blood samples were taken to measure serums lipids and bone biomarkers including osteocalcin, cross-linked type I collagen (CTX, and bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP. Partial correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between mentioned measurements after adjustment for weight and age. Results. We found a positive correlation between HDL and femoral neck BMD (P: 0.004, r=0.33. HDL was negatively correlated with osteocalcin (P: 0.017, r=-0.31 which was not in consistency with its relationship with BMD. TC and LDL were not related to CTX, BALP and BMD. Conclusion. This study does not support a strong association between serum lipids and BMD in subjects with SCI. Moreover it seems that positive association between HDL and BMD is not mediated through increased bone formation.

  14. Magnetic properties of the charge density wave compounds RTe3, R=Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er & Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    The antiferromagnetic transition is investigated in the rare-earth (R) tritelluride RTe{sub 3} family of charge density wave (CDW) compounds via specific heat, magnetization and resistivity measurements. Observation of the opening of a superzone gap in the resistivity of DyTe{sub 3} indicates that additional nesting of the reconstructed Fermi surface in the CDW state plays an important role in determining the magnetic structure.

  15. The onset of massive star formation: The evolution of temperature and density structure in an infrared dark cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battersby, Cara [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Darling, Jeremy [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Longmore, Steve [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Dunham, Miranda [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We present new NH{sub 3} (1, 1), (2, 2), and (4, 4) observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array compiled with work in the literature to explore the range of conditions observed in young, massive star-forming regions. To sample the effects of evolution independent from those of distance/resolution, abundance, and large-scale environment, we compare clumps in different evolutionary stages within a single infrared dark cloud (IRDC), G32.02+0.06. We find that the early stages of clustered star formation are characterized by dense, parsec-scale filamentary structures interspersed with complexes of dense cores (<0.1 pc cores clustered in complexes separated by ∼1 pc) with masses from about 10 to 100 M {sub ☉}. The most quiescent core is the most extended while the star forming cores are denser and more compact, showing very similar column density structure before and shortly after the onset of massive star formation, with peak surface densities Σ ≳ 1 g cm{sup –2}. Quiescent cores and filaments show smoothly varying temperatures from 10 to 20 K, rising to over 40 K in star-forming cores. We calculate virial parameters for 16 cores and find that the level of support provided by turbulence is generally insufficient to support them against gravitational collapse ((α{sub vir}) ∼ 0.6). The star-forming filaments show smooth velocity fields, punctuated by discontinuities at the sites of active star formation. We discuss the massive molecular filament (M ∼ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}, length >60 pc) hosting the IRDC, hypothesizing that it may have been shaped by previous generations of massive stars.

  16. Wave-vector-dependent electron-phonon coupling and the charge-density-wave transition in TbTe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maschek, M.; Rosenkranz, S.; Heid, R.; Said, A. H.; Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Fisher, I. R.; Weber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the soft phonon mode in the charge-density-wave (CDW) system TbTe3. We analyze our data based on lattice dynamical calculations using density-functional-perturbation theory and find clear evidence that strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling defines the periodicity of the CDW superstructure: Our experiment reveals strong phonon softening and increased phonon linewidths over a large part in reciprocal space adjacent to the CDW ordering vector q(CDW) = (0,0,0.3). Further, q(CDW) is clearly offset from the wave vector of (weak) Fermi surface nesting q(FS) = (0,0,0.25), and our detailed analysis indicates that electron-phonon coupling is responsible for this shift. Hence, we can add TbTe3, which was previously considered as a canonical CDW compound following the Peierls scenario, to the list of distinct charge-density-wave materials characterized by momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  17. Nanoscale measurement of Nernst effect in two-dimensional charge density wave material 1T-TaS2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Stephen M. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA; Luican-Mayer, Adina [Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada; Bhattacharya, Anand [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2017-11-27

    Advances in nanoscale material characterization on two-dimensional van der Waals layered materials primarily involve their optical and electronic properties. The thermal properties of these materials are harder to access due to the difficulty of thermal measurements at the nanoscale. In this work, we create a nanoscale magnetothermal device platform to access the basic out-of-plane magnetothermal transport properties of ultrathin van der Waals materials. Specifically, the Nernst effect in the charge density wave transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is examined on nano-thin flakes in a patterned device structure. It is revealed that near the commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) to nearly commensurate charge density wave (NCCDW) phase transition, the polarity of the Nernst effect changes. Since the Nernst effect is especially sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface, this suggests that large changes are occurring in the out-of-plane electronic structure of 1T-TaS2, which are otherwise unresolved in just in-plane electronic transport measurements. This may signal a coherent evolution of out-of-plane stacking in the CCDW! NCCDW transition.

  18. Charge density waves in nanocrystalline thin films of blue bronze K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staresinic, D., E-mail: damirs@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Dominko, D., E-mail: ddominko@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K., E-mail: ksalamon@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Biljakovic, K., E-mail: katica@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Tomeljak, A., E-mail: atomeljak@gmail.com [J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Physics and Center for Applied Optics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Schaefer, H., E-mail: hanjo.schaefer@uni-konstanz.de [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Optics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Huber, T., E-mail: tim.huber@uni-konstanz.de [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Optics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Demsar, J., E-mail: jure.demsar@uni-konstanz.de [J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Physics and Center for Applied Optics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Socol, G., E-mail: gabriel.socol@inflpr.ro [Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions Laboratory, Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-54, Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Ristoscu, C., E-mail: carmen.ristoscu@inflpr.ro [Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions Laboratory, Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-54, Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N., E-mail: ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro [Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions Laboratory, Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-54, Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Siketic, Z., E-mail: zsiketic@irb.hr [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-06-01

    Thin granular films of charge density wave (CDW) system K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} were prepared by pulsed laser deposition and investigated by various standard characterization methods such as GI-XRD, electric transport, TOF-ERDA, AFM and UV-visible spectroscopy. While all these methods indicate that the thin films consist of nanometer grains of K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3}, it is only the non-destructive femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy (fsTRS) that demonstrates the charge density wave nature of the ground state and therefore proves directly the presence of K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3}. Furthermore, the comparison of the fsTRS data obtained in thin films and in single crystals shows the reduction of the charge density wave transition temperature and of the photoinduced signal strength in granular thin films with respect to single crystals, which is attributed to the granularity and crystal growth morphology. Our results establish fsTRS technique as the essential tool for the detection and characterization of complex ground states in nano-sized systems.

  19. Possible formation pathways for the low-density Neptune-mass planet HAT-P-26b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Lakhlani, Gunjan

    2018-01-01

    We investigate possible pathways for the formation of the low-density Neptune-mass planet HAT-P-26b. We use two different formation models based on pebble and planetesimal accretion, and includes gas accretion, disc migration and simple photoevaporation. The models track the atmospheric oxygen abundance, in addition to the orbital period, and mass of the forming planets, which we compare to HAT-P-26b. We find that pebble accretion can explain this planet more naturally than planetesimal accretion that fails completely unless we artificially enhance the disc metallicity significantly. Pebble accretion models can reproduce HAT-P-26b with either a high initial core mass and low amount of envelope enrichment through core erosion or pebbles dissolution, or the opposite, with both scenarios being possible. Assuming a low envelope enrichment factor as expected from convection theory and comparable to the values we can infer from the D/H measurements in Uranus and Neptune, our most probable formation pathway for HAT-P-26b is through pebble accretion starting around 10 au early in the disc's lifetime.

  20. The natural emergence of the correlation between H2 and star formation rate surface densities in galaxy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Bovino, Stefano; Capelo, Pedro R.; Volonteri, Marta; Silk, Joseph

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we present a suite of high-resolution numerical simulations of an isolated galaxy to test a sub-grid framework to consistently follow the formation and dissociation of H2 with non-equilibrium chemistry. The latter is solved via the package KROME, coupled to the mesh-less hydrodynamic code GIZMO. We include the effect of star formation (SF), modelled with a physically motivated prescription independent of H2, supernova feedback and mass-losses from low-mass stars, extragalactic and local stellar radiation, and dust and H2 shielding, to investigate the emergence of the observed correlation between H2 and SF rate surface densities. We present two different sub-grid models and compare them with on-the-fly radiative transfer (RT) calculations, to assess the main differences and limits of the different approaches. We also discuss a sub-grid clumping factor model to enhance the H2 formation, consistent with our SF prescription, which is crucial, at the achieved resolution, to reproduce the correlation with H2. We find that both sub-grid models perform very well relative to the RT simulation, giving comparable results, with moderate differences, but at much lower computational cost. We also find that, while the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation for the total gas is not strongly affected by the different ingredients included in the simulations, the H2-based counterpart is much more sensitive, because of the crucial role played by the dissociating radiative flux and the gas shielding.

  1. Impact of radial transport on the quasilinear plateau formation due to electron cyclotron wave absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, A.G.; Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical simulations using a three-dimensional Fokker-Planck code show that for small tokamaks the transport of electrons across the magnetic surfaces at a level consistent with anomalous transport has a large influence on the formation of the quasilinear plateau during electron cyclotron resonant

  2. Density-based global sensitivity analysis of sheet-flow travel time: Kinematic wave-based formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seiyed Mossa; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Simmons, Craig T.

    2018-04-01

    Despite advancements in developing physics-based formulations to estimate the sheet-flow travel time (tSHF), the quantification of the relative impacts of influential parameters on tSHF has not previously been considered. In this study, a brief review of the physics-based formulations to estimate tSHF including kinematic wave (K-W) theory in combination with Manning's roughness (K-M) and with Darcy-Weisbach friction formula (K-D) over single and multiple planes is provided. Then, the relative significance of input parameters to the developed approaches is quantified by a density-based global sensitivity analysis (GSA). The performance of K-M considering zero-upstream and uniform flow depth (so-called K-M1 and K-M2), and K-D formulae to estimate the tSHF over single plane surface were assessed using several sets of experimental data collected from the previous studies. The compatibility of the developed models to estimate tSHF over multiple planes considering temporal rainfall distributions of Natural Resources Conservation Service, NRCS (I, Ia, II, and III) are scrutinized by several real-world examples. The results obtained demonstrated that the main controlling parameters of tSHF through K-D and K-M formulae are the length of surface plane (mean sensitivity index T̂i = 0.72) and flow resistance (mean T̂i = 0.52), respectively. Conversely, the flow temperature and initial abstraction ratio of rainfall have the lowest influence on tSHF (mean T̂i is 0.11 and 0.12, respectively). The significant role of the flow regime on the estimation of tSHF over a single and a cascade of planes are also demonstrated. Results reveal that the K-D formulation provides more precise tSHF over the single plane surface with an average percentage of error, APE equal to 9.23% (the APE for K-M1 and K-M2 formulae were 13.8%, and 36.33%, respectively). The superiority of Manning-jointed formulae in estimation of tSHF is due to the incorporation of effects from different flow regimes as

  3. Formation of the first three gravitational-wave observations through isolated binary evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Simon; Vigna-Gómez, Alejandro; Mandel, Ilya; Barrett, Jim W; Neijssel, Coenraad J; Perkins, David; de Mink, Selma E

    2017-04-05

    During its first four months of taking data, Advanced LIGO has detected gravitational waves from two binary black hole mergers, GW150914 and GW151226, along with the statistically less significant binary black hole merger candidate LVT151012. Here we use the rapid binary population synthesis code COMPAS to show that all three events can be explained by a single evolutionary channel-classical isolated binary evolution via mass transfer including a common envelope phase. We show all three events could have formed in low-metallicity environments (Z=0.001) from progenitor binaries with typical total masses ≳160M ⊙ , ≳60M ⊙ and ≳90M ⊙ , for GW150914, GW151226 and LVT151012, respectively.

  4. The role of PR in the formation of psychological readiness for a rogue wave events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaykovskaya, N.; Rodin, A.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years the study of psychological foundations of human behavior when dealing with rogue waves has received increasing attention. However, this problem is only in the interest of a narrow circle of specialists, while the task is to explain the rules of behavior when dealing with the phenomenon to anyone who can get into this situation. This problem can only be solved by media and PR-specialists working in this field. PR- specialists are required to convey to people the need of correct action stereotype for assault element, because, as it is known, a fact only becomes a fact when it is written about in a newspaper or is made a story about in a summary of radio or TV news. This publication is devoted to the developing of forms and methods of PR-specialists activity in this area.

  5. The Star Formation Rate and Gas Surface Density Relation in the Milky Way: Implications for Extragalactic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; Evans, N. J., II; Allen, L. E.; Huard, T.; Heyer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the relation between star formation rate (SFR) and gas surface densities in Galactic star forming regions using a sample of YSOs and massive clumps. Our YSO sample consists of objects located in 20 molecular clouds from the Spitzer c2d and Gould's Belt surveys. We estimate the gas surface density (Sigma_gas) from Av maps and YSO SFR surface densities (Sigma_SFR) from the number of YSOs, assuming a mean mass and lifetime. We also divide the clouds into contour levels of Av, counting only the youngest Class I and Flat SED YSOs. For a sample of massive star forming clumps, we derive SFRs from the infrared luminosity and use HCN gas maps to estimate Sigma_gas. We find that Galactic clouds lie above the extragalactic relations (e.g., Kennicutt-Schmidt Law) by factors up to 17. Cloud regions with high Sigma_gas lie above extragalactic relations up to a factor of 54 and overlap with massive clumps. We use 12CO and 13CO gas maps of the Perseus and Ophiuchus clouds to estimate Sigma_gas and compare to Sigma_gas from Av maps. We find that 13CO, underestimates the Av-based mass by factors of 4-5. 12CO may underestimate the total gas mass at Sigma_gas > 200 Msun pc^-2 by > 30%; however, this does not explain the large discrepancy between Galactic and extragalactic relations. We find evidence for a threshold of star formation (Sigma_th) at 129+-14 Msun pc^-2. At Sigma_gas > Sigma_th, the Galactic relation is linear. A possible reason for the difference between Galactic and extragalactic relations is that all the CO-emitting gas, including Sigma_gas below Sigma_th, is measured in extragalactic studies. If the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation (Sigma_SFR Sigma_gas^1.4) and a linear relation between dense gas and star formation is assumed, the fraction of dense gas (f_dense) increases as Sigma_gas^0.4. When Sigma_gas reaches 300Sigma_th, f_dense is 1.

  6. The Formation Rate of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts and Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G. Q.; Wang, F. Y.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the luminosity function and formation rate of short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). First, we derive the {E}p{--}{L}p correlation using 16 sGRBs with redshift measurements and determine the pseudo redshifts of 284 Fermi sGRBs. Then, we use the Lynden-Bell c‑ method to study the luminosity function and formation rate of sGRBs without any assumptions. A strong evolution of luminosity L{(z)\\propto (1+z)}4.47 is found. After removing this evolution, the luminosity function is {{\\Psi }}(L)\\propto {L}0-0.29+/- 0.01 for dim sGRBs and \\psi (L)\\propto {L}0-1.07+/- 0.01 for bright sGRBs, with the break point 8.26× {10}50 erg s‑1. We also find that the formation rate decreases rapidly at zLIGO and Virgo is {0.85}-0.56+4.82 events yr‑1 for an NS–NS binary.

  7. Spin density wave in (Fe{sub x}V{sub 3-x})S{sub 4} and the coexistence of normal and condensate states: A Moessbauer study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Embaid, B.P., E-mail: pembaid@fisica.ciens.ucv.ve [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado 47586, Los Chaguaramos, Caracas 1041-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Gonzalez-Jimenez, F. [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado 47586, Los Chaguaramos, Caracas 1041-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Iron-vanadium sulfides of the monoclinic system Fe{sub x}V{sub 3-x}S{sub 4} (1.0{<=}x{<=}2.0) have been investigated by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy in the temperature range 30-300 K. Incommensurate spin density waves (SDW) have been found in this system. An alternative treatment of the spectra allows a direct measurement of the temperature evolution of condensate density of the SDW state which follows the Maki-Virosztek formula. For composition (x=1.0) the SDW condensate is unpinned while for compositions (x>1.0) the SDW condensate is pinned. Possible causes of the pinning-unpinning SDW will be discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sub x}V{sub 3-x}S{sub 4}(1.0{<=}x{<=}2.0) system was investigated by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incommensurate spin density wave (SDW) has been found in this system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the temperature evolution of the condensate density of SDW state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For composition (x=1.0) the SDW is unpinned while for (x>1.0) is pinned.

  8. The influence of air-filled structures on wave propagation and beam formation of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) in horizontal and vertical planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhongchang; Zhang, Yu; Thornton, Steven W; Li, Songhai; Dong, Jianchen

    2017-10-01

    The wave propagation, sound field, and transmission beam pattern of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) were investigated in both the horizontal and vertical planes. Results suggested that the signals obtained at both planes were similarly characterized with a high peak frequency and a relatively narrow bandwidth, close to the ones recorded from live animals. The sound beam measured outside the head in the vertical plane was narrower than that of the horizontal one. Cases with different combinations of air-filled structures in both planes were used to study the respective roles in controlling wave propagation and beam formation. The wave propagations and beam patterns in the horizontal and vertical planes elucidated the important reflection effect of the spermaceti and vocal chambers on sound waves, which was highly significant in forming intensive forward sound beams. The air-filled structures, the forehead soft tissues and skull structures formed wave guides in these two planes for emitted sounds to propagate forward.

  9. Molecule formation and infrared emission in fast interstellar shocks. II. Dissociation speeds for interstellar shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenbach, D.; McKee, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    The postshock destruction of molecules is examined, including the processes of (i) collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms and molecules, (ii) electronic collisions, and (iii) neutral chemical reactions with atoms, particularly atomic hydrogen. Using conservative estimates of collisional dissociation rates from individual vibrational states, we find that process (i) leads to the destruction of molecular hydrogen behind shocks with speeds v/sub s/> or approx. =25 km s -1 if the preshock molecular gas has hydrogen nucleus densities of n 0 > or approx. =10 4 cm -3 . At lower densities (n 0 approx. =10 2 cm -3 ), destruction occurs for v/sub s/> or approx. =50 km s -1 and process (ii) dominates. Dissociation of molecules such as CO, H 2 O, and O 2 follows the destruction of H 2 , as the resultant hydrogen atoms chemically dissociate the metal atoms from their bonds (process iii) in the hot postshock gas. These results demonstrate that many of the observed high-speed interstellar molecules, if shock accelerated, must have dissociated and reformed in the postshock gas

  10. Sliding charge density wave in the monophosphate tungsten bronze (PO2)4(WO3)2m with alternate stacking of m=4 and m=6 WO3 layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foury-Leylekian, P.; Sandre, E.; Ravy, S.; Pouget, J.-P.; Elkaim, E.; Roussel, P.; Groult, D.; Labbe, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    The monophosphate tungsten bronzes (PO 2 ) 4 (WO 3 ) 2m form family of two-dimensional metals which exhibit charge density wave (CDW) instabilities. These materials are generally built by the regular stacking of (a,b) layers in which chains made of segments of m WO 6 octahedra directed along the a and a±b directions are delimited. Their electronic structure thus originates from quasi-one-dimensional (1D) bands located on these chains. As a consequence their Fermi surface (FS) exhibits large flat portions whose nesting gives rise to successive CDW instabilities. Here we present a structural study of the CDW instability of the (PO 2 ) 4 (WO 3 ) 10 member formed by the alternate stacking of layers built with segments of m=4 and m=6 WO 6 octahedra. Its ab initio electronic structure calculation shows that the FS of this member exhibits large flat portions which can be extremely well nested. Its best nesting wave vector accounts for the modulation wave vector stabilized by the CDW transition which occurs at 156 K. Because of the regular stacking of layers of different m values the FS is slightly split. The unusual thermal dependence of the x-ray satellite intensity provides evidence that the two types of layers become modulated at different temperature. This also leads to a slight thermal sliding of the CDW-nesting modulation wave vector, which can be accounted for within the framework of a Landau-Ginzburg theory. In addition, the observation of a global hysteresis in the thermal cycling of the satellite intensity, as well as the degradation of the interlayer order upon cooling, suggest the formation of a disordered lattice of dilute solitons. Such solitons allow to accommodate the charge transferred between the two types of layer. Finally the relevance of local charge transfers, at intergrowth defects, for example, to create pinned discommensurations that break the CDW coherence is emphasized in this whole family of bronzes

  11. The Formation each Winter of the Circumpolar Wave in the Sea Ice around Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloersen, Per; White, Warren B.

    1999-01-01

    Seeking to improve upon the visualization of the Antarctic Circumpolar Wave (ACW) , we compare a 16-year sequence of 6-month winter averages of Antarctic sea ice extents and concentrations with those of adjacent sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Here we follow SSTs around the globe along the maximum sea ice edge rather than in a zonal band equatorward of it. The results are similar to the earlier ones, but the ACWs do not propagate with equal amplitude or speed. Additionally in a sequence of 4 polar stereographic plots of these SSTs and sea ice concentrations, we find a remarkable correlation between SST minima and sea ice concentration maxima, even to the extent of matching contours across the ice-sea boundary, in the sector between 900E and the Palmer Peninsula. Based on these observations, we suggest that the memory of the ACW in the sea ice is carried from one Austral winter to the next by the neighboring SSTS, since the sea ice is nearly absent in the Austral summer.

  12. Globular Cluster Formation at High Density: A Model for Elemental Enrichment with Fast Recycling of Massive-star Debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G., E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    The self-enrichment of massive star clusters by p -processed elements is shown to increase significantly with increasing gas density as a result of enhanced star formation rates and stellar scatterings compared to the lifetime of a massive star. Considering the type of cloud core where a globular cluster (GC) might have formed, we follow the evolution and enrichment of the gas and the time dependence of stellar mass. A key assumption is that interactions between massive stars are important at high density, including interactions between massive stars and massive-star binaries that can shred stellar envelopes. Massive-star interactions should also scatter low-mass stars out of the cluster. Reasonable agreement with the observations is obtained for a cloud-core mass of ∼4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ⊙} and a density of ∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −3}. The results depend primarily on a few dimensionless parameters, including, most importantly, the ratio of the gas consumption time to the lifetime of a massive star, which has to be low, ∼10%, and the efficiency of scattering low-mass stars per unit dynamical time, which has to be relatively large, such as a few percent. Also for these conditions, the velocity dispersions of embedded GCs should be comparable to the high gas dispersions of galaxies at that time, so that stellar ejection by multistar interactions could cause low-mass stars to leave a dwarf galaxy host altogether. This could solve the problem of missing first-generation stars in the halos of Fornax and WLM.

  13. ATP binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) mediates microparticle formation during high-density lipoprotein (HDL) biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiane, Anouar; Genest, Jacques

    2017-02-01

    Micro-particles (MP) are secreted by various cells. Their biological roles in health and in disease remain unknown. Here we describe formation of MP in the process of ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux in different cell types. The ATP-binding cassette transporter, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is the rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). We have found that ABCA1 and apoA-I contribute to the formation of MP. Using cell-based systems with overexpression and selective inactivation of ABCA1, pharmacological blockade and modulation of membrane cholesterol content, we characterized MP release from various cell lines. We studied MP release in BHK cells stably expressing ABCA1 under mifepristone control, human THP-1 macrophages and HepG2 cells without, or with incubation with human apoA-I. ABCA1 mediates the production of MPs containing cholesterol. This was also confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Adding apoA-I markedly increases MP release from cells. Inhibition of ABCA1 with probucol or decreasing plasma membrane cholesterol with methyl-β cyclodextrin (CDX) markedly reduced MP release and nascent HDL formation. MPs do not contain apoA-I, but contain flotilin-2, a marker of plasma membrane, and CD63, an exosome marker. MPs exhibit considerable size heterogeneity (50-250 nm). We show that MPs are lipoprotein-sized structures created by the ABCA1 transporter, and contribute approximately 30% of ABCA1-and apoA-I mediated cholesterol efflux. In addition, we found that MPs release from cells consists, in part, of exosomes and depends on the same pathway used for HDL biogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Formation of porous silicon oxide from substrate-bound silicon rich silicon oxide layers by continuous-wave laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Fricke-Begemann, Th.; Peretzki, P.; Ihlemann, J.; Seibt, M.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide that show room temperature photoluminescence (PL) have great potential in silicon light emission applications. Nanocrystalline silicon particle formation by laser irradiation has the unique advantage of spatially controlled heating, which is compatible with modern silicon micro-fabrication technology. In this paper, we employ continuous wave laser irradiation to decompose substrate-bound silicon-rich silicon oxide films into crystalline silicon particles and silicon dioxide. The resulting microstructure is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques with considerable emphasis on the formation and properties of laser damaged regions which typically quench room temperature PL from the nanoparticles. It is shown that such regions consist of an amorphous matrix with a composition similar to silicon dioxide which contains some nanometric silicon particles in addition to pores. A mechanism referred to as "selective silicon ablation" is proposed which consistently explains the experimental observations. Implications for the damage-free laser decomposition of silicon-rich silicon oxides and also for controlled production of porous silicon dioxide films are discussed.

  15. The Formation of Laurentia: Evidence from Shear Wave Splitting and Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Rawlinson, N.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.

    2017-12-01

    The northern Hudson Bay region of Canada comprises several Archean cratonic nuclei, assembled by Paleoproterozoic orogenies including the 1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) and Rinkian-Nagssugtoqidian Orogen (NO). Questions remain about how similar in scale and nature these orogens were compared to modern orogens like the Himalayas. Also in question is whether the thick Laurentian cratonic root below Hudson Bay is stratified, with a seismically-fast Archean core underlain by a lower, younger, thermal layer. We investigate these problems via shear-wave splitting and teleseismic tomography using up to 25 years of data from 65 broadband seismic stations across northern Hudson Bay. The results of the complementary studies comprise the most comprehensive study to date of mantle seismic velocity and anisotropy in northern Laurentia. Splitting parameter patterns are used to interpret multiple layers, lithospheric boundaries, dipping anisotropy, and deformation zone limits for the THO and NO. Source-side waveguide effects from Japan and the Aleutian trench are observed despite the tomographic data being exclusively relative arrival time. Mitigating steps to ensure data quality are explained and enforced. In the Hudson Strait, anisotropic fast directions (φ) generally parallel the THO, which appears in tomographic images as a strong low velocity feature relative to the neighbouring Archean cratons. Several islands in northern Hudson Bay show short length-scale changes in φ coincident with strong velocity contrasts. These are interpreted as distinct lithospheric blocks with unique deformational histories, and point to a complex, rather than simple 2-plate, collisional history for the THO. Strong evidence is presented for multiple anisotropic layers beneath Archean zones, consistent with the episodic development model of cratonic keels (e.g., Yuan & Romanowicz 2010). We show via both tomographic inversion models and SKS splitting patterns that southern Baffin Island was

  16. Stabilization and Structure Calculations for Noncovalent Interactions in Extended Molecular Systems Based on Wave Function and Density Functional Theories

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, K. E.; Pitoňák, Michal; Jurečka, P.; Hobza, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 9 (2010), s. 5023-5063 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non covalent interactions * wave function theories * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 33.033, year: 2010

  17. An implementation of core level spectroscopies in a real space Projector Augmented Wave density functional theory code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungberg, M.P.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the implementation of K-shell core level spectroscopies (X-ray absorption (XAS), X-ray emission (XES), and X-ray photoemission (XPS)) in the real-space-grid-based Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) GPAW code. The implementation for XAS is based on the Haydock recursion method avoiding...

  18. Effects of wave exposure and depth on biomass, density and fertility of the fucoid seaweed Sargassum polyceratium (Phaeophyta, Sargassaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, AH; Aberg, P; Olsen, JL; Stam, WT; Breeman, AM

    Sargassum polyceratium is widely distributed around the island of Curacao ( Netherlands Antilles) where it inhabits strongly contrasting habitats. Changes in population structure have been followed in three bays with increasing levels of wave exposure at two depths: shallow ( 0 m) and deep ( 18 m).

  19. Chiral Spin-Density Wave, Spin-Charge-Chern Liquid, and d+id Superconductivity in 1/4-Doped Correlated Electronic Systems on the Honeycomb Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghan Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two interesting candidate quantum phases—the chiral spin-density wave state featuring anomalous quantum Hall effect and the d+id superconductor—were proposed for the Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4 doping. Using a combination of exact diagonalization, density matrix renormalization group, the variational Monte Carlo method, and quantum field theories, we study the quantum phase diagrams of both the Hubbard model and the t-J model on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4 doping. The main advantage of our approach is the use of symmetry quantum numbers of ground-state wave functions on finite-size systems (up to 32 sites to sharply distinguish different quantum phases. Our results show that for 1≲U/t<40 in the Hubbard model and for 0.1density wave state or a spin-charge-Chern liquid, but not a d+id superconductor. However, in the t-J model, upon increasing J, the system goes through a first-order phase transition at J/t=0.80(2 into the d+id superconductor. Here, the spin-charge-Chern liquid state is a new type of topologically ordered quantum phase with Abelian anyons and fractionalized excitations. Experimental signatures of these quantum phases, such as tunneling conductance, are calculated. These results are discussed in the context of 1/4-doped graphene systems and other correlated electronic materials on the honeycomb lattice.

  20. Formation of Tidal Captures and Gravitational Wave Inspirals in Binary-single Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsing, Johan [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); MacLeod, Morgan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    We perform the first systematic study of how dynamical stellar tides and general relativistic (GR) effects affect the dynamics and outcomes of binary-single interactions. For this, we have constructed an N -body code that includes tides in the affine approximation, where stars are modeled as self-similar ellipsoidal polytropes, and GR corrections using the commonly used post-Newtonian formalism. Using this numerical formalism, we are able resolve the leading effect from tides and GR across several orders of magnitude in both stellar radius and initial target binary separation. We find that the main effect from tides is the formation of two-body tidal captures that form during the chaotic and resonant evolution of the triple system. The two stars undergoing the capture spiral in and merge. The inclusion of tides can thus lead to an increase in the stellar coalescence rate. We also develop an analytical framework for calculating the cross section of tidal inspirals between any pair of objects with similar mass. From our analytical and numerical estimates, we find that the rate of tidal inspirals relative to collisions increases as the initial semimajor axis of the target binary increases and the radius of the interacting tidal objects decreases. The largest effect is therefore found for triple systems hosting white dwarfs and neutron stars (NSs). In this case, we find the rate of highly eccentric white dwarf—NS mergers to likely be dominated by tidal inspirals. While tidal inspirals occur rarely, we note that they can give rise to a plethora of thermonuclear transients, such as Ca-rich transients.

  1. Formation of Tidal Captures and Gravitational Wave Inspirals in Binary-single Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    We perform the first systematic study of how dynamical stellar tides and general relativistic (GR) effects affect the dynamics and outcomes of binary-single interactions. For this, we have constructed an N -body code that includes tides in the affine approximation, where stars are modeled as self-similar ellipsoidal polytropes, and GR corrections using the commonly used post-Newtonian formalism. Using this numerical formalism, we are able resolve the leading effect from tides and GR across several orders of magnitude in both stellar radius and initial target binary separation. We find that the main effect from tides is the formation of two-body tidal captures that form during the chaotic and resonant evolution of the triple system. The two stars undergoing the capture spiral in and merge. The inclusion of tides can thus lead to an increase in the stellar coalescence rate. We also develop an analytical framework for calculating the cross section of tidal inspirals between any pair of objects with similar mass. From our analytical and numerical estimates, we find that the rate of tidal inspirals relative to collisions increases as the initial semimajor axis of the target binary increases and the radius of the interacting tidal objects decreases. The largest effect is therefore found for triple systems hosting white dwarfs and neutron stars (NSs). In this case, we find the rate of highly eccentric white dwarf—NS mergers to likely be dominated by tidal inspirals. While tidal inspirals occur rarely, we note that they can give rise to a plethora of thermonuclear transients, such as Ca-rich transients.

  2. iPEPS studies of emergent supersymmetry at the pair density wave transitions of Dirac fermions in 2+1D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yifan; Pei, Jiquan; Jian, Shaokai; Yao, Hong

    2015-03-01

    We study the quantum phase transition between the Dirac semimetal and pairing density wave (PDW) phase of the spinless honeycomb model with nearest neighbor attractions by doing fermionic projected entangled pairing state (PEPS) algorithm for infinite lattices. It was recently shown by renormalization group (RG) analysis that space-time supersymmetry (SUSY) emerges in Dirac fermions at their PDW transition. The connection of our present PEPS studies with the emergent space-time SUSY at the PDW transition shown by RG will be discussed.

  3. Influence of the electron density on the characteristics of terahertz waves generated under laser–cluster interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, A. A., E-mail: frolov@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    A theory of generation of terahertz radiation under laser–cluster interaction, developed earlier for an overdense cluster plasma [A. A. Frolov, Plasma Phys. Rep. 42. 637 (2016)], is generalized for the case of arbitrary electron density. The spectral composition of radiation is shown to substantially depend on the density of free electrons in the cluster. For an underdense cluster plasma, there is a sharp peak in the terahertz spectrum at the frequency of the quadrupole mode of a plasma sphere. As the electron density increases to supercritical values, this spectral line vanishes and a broad maximum at the frequency comparable with the reciprocal of the laser pulse duration appears in the spectrum. The dependence of the total energy of terahertz radiation on the density of free electrons is analyzed. The radiation yield is shown to increase significantly under resonance conditions, when the laser frequency is close to the eigenfrequency of the dipole or quadrupole mode of a plasma sphere.

  4. Sedimentology and stratigraphic development of the upper Nyalau Formation (Early Miocene), Sarawak, Malaysia: A mixed wave- and tide-influenced coastal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir Hassan, Meor H.; Johnson, Howard D.; Allison, Peter A.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah

    2013-10-01

    This work presents the first detailed facies analysis of the upper Nyalau Formation exposed around Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia. The Lower Miocene Nyalau Formation exposures in NW Sarawak represent one of the closest sedimentological outcrop analogues to the age equivalent, hydrocarbon-bearing, offshore deposits of the Balingian Province. Nine types of facies associations are recognised in the Nyalau Formation, which form elements of larger-scale facies successions. Wave-dominated shoreface facies successions display coarsening upward trends from Offshore, into Lower Shoreface and Upper Shoreface Facies Associations. Fluvio-tidal channel facies successions consist of multi-storey stacks of Fluvial-Dominated, Tide-Influenced and Tide-Dominated Channel Facies Associations interbedded with minor Bay and Mangrove Facies Associations. Estuarine bay facies successions are composed of Tidal Bar and Bay Facies Associations with minor Mangrove Facies Associations. Tide-dominated delta facies successions coarsen upward from an Offshore into the Tidal Bar Facies Association. The Nyalau Formation is interpreted as a mixed wave- and tide-influenced coastal depositional system, with an offshore wave-dominated barrier shoreface being incised by laterally migrating tidal channels and offshore migrating tidal bars. Stratigraphic successions in the Nyalau Formation form repetitive high frequency, regressive-transgressive cycles bounded by flooding surfaces, consisting of a basal coarsening upward, wave-dominated shoreface facies succession (representing a prograding barrier shoreface and/or beach-strandplain) which is sharply overlain by fluvio-tidal channel, estuarine bay or tide-dominated delta facies successions (representing more inshore, tide-influenced coastal depositional environments). An erosion surface separates the underlying wave-dominated facies succession from overlying tidal facies successions in each regressive-transgressive cycle. These erosion surfaces are

  5. Salt Bridge Formation between the I-BAR Domain and Lipids Increases Lipid Density and Membrane Curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Suetsugu, Shiro; Kitao, Akio

    2017-07-28

    The BAR domain superfamily proteins sense or induce curvature in membranes. The inverse-BAR domain (I-BAR) is a BAR domain that forms a straight "zeppelin-shaped" dimer. The mechanisms by which IRSp53 I-BAR binds to and deforms a lipid membrane are investigated here by all-atom molecular dynamics simulation (MD), binding energy analysis, and the effects of mutation experiments on filopodia on HeLa cells. I-BAR adopts a curved structure when crystallized, but adopts a flatter shape in MD. The binding of I-BAR to membrane was stabilized by ~30 salt bridges, consistent with experiments showing that point mutations of the interface residues have little effect on the binding affinity whereas multiple mutations have considerable effect. Salt bridge formation increases the local density of lipids and deforms the membrane into a concave shape. In addition, the point mutations that break key intra-molecular salt bridges within I-BAR reduce the binding affinity; this was confirmed by expressing these mutants in HeLa cells and observing their effects. The results indicate that the stiffness of I-BAR is important for membrane deformation, although I-BAR does not act as a completely rigid template.

  6. THE ALFALFA H α SURVEY. I. PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND THE LOCAL STAR FORMATION RATE DENSITY FROM THE FALL SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sistine, Angela Van; Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Sugden, Arthur; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Jaskot, Anne E.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    The ALFALFA H α survey utilizes a large sample of H i-selected galaxies from the ALFALFA survey to study star formation (SF) in the local universe. ALFALFA H α contains 1555 galaxies with distances between ∼20 and ∼100 Mpc. We have obtained continuum-subtracted narrowband H α images and broadband R images for each galaxy, creating one of the largest homogeneous sets of H α images ever assembled. Our procedures were designed to minimize the uncertainties related to the calculation of the local SF rate density (SFRD). The galaxy sample we constructed is as close to volume-limited as possible, is a robust statistical sample, and spans a wide range of galaxy environments. In this paper, we discuss the properties of our Fall sample of 565 galaxies, our procedure for deriving individual galaxy SF rates, and our method for calculating the local SFRD. We present a preliminary value of log(SFRD[ M _⊙ yr"−"1 Mpc"−"3]) = −1.747 ± 0.018 (random) ±0.05 (systematic) based on the 565 galaxies in our Fall sub-sample. Compared to the weighted average of SFRD values around z ≈ 2, our local value indicates a drop in the global SFRD of a factor of 10.2 over that lookback time.

  7. THE ALFALFA H α SURVEY. I. PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND THE LOCAL STAR FORMATION RATE DENSITY FROM THE FALL SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sistine, Angela Van [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Sugden, Arthur [Department of Endocrinology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P. [Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Jaskot, Anne E. [Department of Astronomy, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Wilcots, Eric M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    The ALFALFA H α survey utilizes a large sample of H i-selected galaxies from the ALFALFA survey to study star formation (SF) in the local universe. ALFALFA H α contains 1555 galaxies with distances between ∼20 and ∼100 Mpc. We have obtained continuum-subtracted narrowband H α images and broadband R images for each galaxy, creating one of the largest homogeneous sets of H α images ever assembled. Our procedures were designed to minimize the uncertainties related to the calculation of the local SF rate density (SFRD). The galaxy sample we constructed is as close to volume-limited as possible, is a robust statistical sample, and spans a wide range of galaxy environments. In this paper, we discuss the properties of our Fall sample of 565 galaxies, our procedure for deriving individual galaxy SF rates, and our method for calculating the local SFRD. We present a preliminary value of log(SFRD[ M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} Mpc{sup −3}]) = −1.747 ± 0.018 (random) ±0.05 (systematic) based on the 565 galaxies in our Fall sub-sample. Compared to the weighted average of SFRD values around z ≈ 2, our local value indicates a drop in the global SFRD of a factor of 10.2 over that lookback time.

  8. The ALFALFA Hα Survey. I. Project Description and The Local Star-formation Rate Density from the Fall Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sistine, Angela; Salzer, John J.; Sugden, Arthur; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Janowiecki, Steven; Jaskot, Anne E.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2016-06-01

    The ALFALFA Hα survey utilizes a large sample of H I-selected galaxies from the ALFALFA survey to study star formation (SF) in the local universe. ALFALFA Hα contains 1555 galaxies with distances between ˜20 and ˜100 Mpc. We have obtained continuum-subtracted narrowband Hα images and broadband R images for each galaxy, creating one of the largest homogeneous sets of Hα images ever assembled. Our procedures were designed to minimize the uncertainties related to the calculation of the local SF rate density (SFRD). The galaxy sample we constructed is as close to volume-limited as possible, is a robust statistical sample, and spans a wide range of galaxy environments. In this paper, we discuss the properties of our Fall sample of 565 galaxies, our procedure for deriving individual galaxy SF rates, and our method for calculating the local SFRD. We present a preliminary value of log(SFRD[M ⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3]) = -1.747 ± 0.018 (random) ±0.05 (systematic) based on the 565 galaxies in our Fall sub-sample. Compared to the weighted average of SFRD values around z ≈ 2, our local value indicates a drop in the global SFRD of a factor of 10.2 over that lookback time.

  9. Effect of molecular weight and density of ambient gas on shock wave in laser-induced surface nanostructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Liying; Wang Xinwei

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of molecular dynamics studies about the shock wave during laser-induced surface nanostructuring. A quasi-three dimensional model is constructed to study systems consisting of over 2 million atoms. Detailed studies are carried out about the shock wave front and Mach number, evolution of plume and ambient gas interaction zone, and energy exchange between the ambient gas and plume. Under an ambience of lower pressure or lighter molecular mass, the plume affects a larger area while the strength of the shock wave front is weaker. With the same ambient pressure, the ablated material features the same kinetic energy at the late stage regardless of the molecular weight of the ambient gas. The same conclusion holds for the energy increase of the ambient gas as well. When the ambient pressure is reduced, more kinetic energy is carried out by the ablated material while less energy is transferred to the ambient gas. It is observed that heavier ambient gas could bounce back the ablated material to the target surface.

  10. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study of the Evolution of Band Structure And Charge Density Wave Properties in Rte (3) (R=Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, And Dy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.

    2009-05-12

    We present a detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of the RTe{sub 3} family, which sets this system as an ideal 'textbook' example for the formation of a nesting driven charge density wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDW instabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi surface (up to 0.4 eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k space. An additional advantage of RTe{sub 3} is that the band structure can be very accurately described by a simple two dimensional tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure by comparing our ARPES measurements with the linear muffin-tin orbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R, and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDW interaction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n(E{sub F}), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  11. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  12. EISCAT observations of large scale electron temperture and electron density perturbations caused by high power HF radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, A. J.; Honary, F.; Robinson, T. R.; Jones, T. B.; Stubbe, P.; Kopka, H.

    In this paper EISCAT observations of the effect of artificial modification on the F-region electron temperature and electron density during several heating experiments at Tromsø are reported. During O-mode heating at full power ( ERP = 240 MW) the electron temperature is increased by up to 55% of its ambient value at altitudes close to the heater interaction height. Measurements of the electron density have revealed both enhancements and depletions in the vicinity of the heater reflection height. These differences are indicative of variations in the balance between the transport and chemical effects. These results are compared with a time dependent numerical model developed from the perturbation equations of VAS'KOV and GUREVICH [(1975) Geomagn. Aeron.15, 51]. The results of numerical modelling of the electron temperature are in good agreement with the EISCAT observations, whereas there is less good agreement with regard to electron density.

  13. Development of a heterodyne micro-wave reflectometer with ultra-fast sweeping. The study of the plasma turbulence influence on the measurements of electron density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, Philippe

    1997-01-01

    The density profile of the fusion plasmas can be investigated by the reflectometry diagnostics. The measurement principle is based on the radar techniques which calculate the phase shift of a millimeter wave propagating into the plasma and reflected at a cut-off layer. However, this propagation is perturbed by the plasma turbulence. These phenomena affect the phase delay measurement by not well understood a process. In this work we have tried to find the mechanisms and origin of the turbulence which is responsible for the phase disturbance. We point out the role of collisionality and plasma radiation in controlling the instability and also, demonstrate that the phase delay of the probing wave is very sensitive to the plasma MHD phenomena and is less affected by the micro-turbulence. The second part of this work is the development and the use of a new heterodyne reflectometer. The principal characteristics are given. Its heterodyne detection allows the separation of phase and amplitude information from the detected signal and then to study their contribution to the mechanism of signal perturbation. The use of this reflectometer allows us to point out the following points: - a high dynamic availability, required by the large amplitude drops, often greater than 30 db; - fast sweep operation requirement to 'freeze' the plasma turbulence; - multiple reflection effects which modulate the amplitude and phase of the probing wave if they are not suppressed by filtering the detected signal; - very good localisation of the measurement (of the order of millimeter). The heterodyne reflectometer developed during this work offers several advantages of different distinct reflectometry techniques (fast sweep, absolute and differential phase measurements, heterodyne detection). It could be developed to work over higher frequency range so as to measure density profile over larger radial extension with very high performances. (author)

  14. Theoretical study of the effect of the size of a high-energy proton beam of the Large Hadron Collider on the formation and propagation of shock waves in copper irradiated by 450-GeV proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazanov, A. I.; Stepakov, A. V.; Vasilyev, Ya. S.; Ferrari, A.

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of 450-GeV protons with copper, which is the material of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider, has been theoretically studied. A theoretical model for the formation and propagation of shock waves has been proposed on the basis of the analysis of the energy released by a proton beam in the electronic subsystem of the material owing to the deceleration of secondary particles appearing in nuclear reactions induced by this beam on the electronic subsystem of the material. The subsequent transfer of the energy from the excited electronic subsystem to the crystal lattice through the electron-phonon interaction has been described within the thermal spike model [I.M. Lifshitz, M.I. Kaganov, and L.V. Tanatarov, Sov. Phys. JETP 4, 173 (1957); I.M. Lifshitz, M.I. Kaganov, and L.V. Tanatarov, At. Energ. 6, 391 (1959); K. Yasui, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. B 90, 409 (1994)]. The model of the formation of shock waves involves energy exchange processes between excited electronic and ionic subsystems of the irradiated material and is based on the hydrodynamic approximation proposed by Zel'dovich [Ya.B. Zel'dovich and Yu.P. Raizer, Physics of Shock Waves and High-Temperature Hydrodynamic Phenomena (Nauka, Moscow, 1966; Dover, New York, 2002)]. This model makes it possible to obtain the space-time distributions of the main physical characteristics (temperatures of the ionic and electronic subsystems, density, pressure, etc.) in materials irradiated by high-energy proton beams and to analyze the formation and propagation of shock waves in them. The nonlinear differential equations describing the conservation laws of mass, energy, and momentum of electrons and ions in the Euler variables in the case of the propagation of shock waves has been solved with the Godunov scheme [S. K. Godunov, A.V. Zabrodin, M.Ya. Ivanov, A.N. Kraiko, and G.P. Prokopov, Numerical Solution of Multidimensional Problems in Gas Dynamics (Nauka, Moscow, 1976) [in Russian

  15. Electron densities in Jupiter’s outer magnetosphere determined from Voyager 1 and 2 plasma wave spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barnhart, B. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Groene, J. B.; Faden, J. B.; Santolík, Ondřej; Gurnett, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 114, - (2009), A05218/1-A05218/14 ISSN 0148-0227 Grant - others: NASA (US) NNG05GG98G Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Electron densities * Jupiter * magnetosphere * Voyager Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2009

  16. Density fitting for derivatives of Coulomb integrals in ab initio calculations using mixed Gaussian and plane-wave basis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čársky, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 620 (2009), s. 1237-1242 ISSN 0020-7608 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/0070; GA ČR GA202/08/0631; GA AV ČR 1ET400400413; GA AV ČR IAA100400501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Derivatives of Coulomb integrals * mixed Gaussian and plane-wave basis sets * electron scattering * computer time saving Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.315, year: 2009

  17. Detection of the wave-like structures in the F-region electron density: two station measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šauli, Petra; Abry, P.; Altadil, D.; Boška, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2006), s. 131-146 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/02/P077; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/01/1071; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3042102; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300420504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : HIRAC campaign * ionospheric variability * gravity waves * Solar Terminator * TID Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.603, year: 2006

  18. Influence of the overall charge and local charge density of pectin on the complex formation between pectin and beta-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperber, B.L.H.M.; Schols, H.A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Norde, W.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between ß-lactoglobulin (ß-lg) and pectin is studied using pectins with different physicochemical characteristics. Pectin allows for the control of both the overall charge by degree of methyl-esterification as well as local charge density by the degree of blockiness. Varying

  19. Influence of the overall charge and local charge density of pectin on the complex formation between pectin and beta-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperber, Bram L. H. M.; Schols, Henk A.; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem; Voragen, Alphons G. J.

    The complex formation between beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and pectin is studied using pectins with different physicochemical characteristics. Pectin allows for the control of both the overall charge by degree of methyl-esterification as well as local charge density by the degree of blockiness.

  20. The formation of eccentric compact binary inspirals and the role of gravitational wave emission in binary-single stellar encounters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The inspiral and merger of eccentric binaries leads to gravitational waveforms distinct from those generated by circularly merging binaries. Dynamical environments can assemble binaries with high eccentricity and peak frequencies within the LIGO band. In this paper, we study binary-single stellar scatterings occurring in dense stellar systems as a source of eccentrically inspiraling binaries. Many interactions between compact binaries and single objects are characterized by chaotic resonances in which the binary-single system undergoes many exchanges before reaching a final state. During these chaotic resonances, a pair of objects has a non-negligible probability of experiencing a very close passage. Significant orbital energy and angular momentum are carried away from the system by gravitational wave (GW) radiation in these close passages, and in some cases this implies an inspiral time shorter than the orbital period of the bound third body. We derive the cross section for such dynamical inspiral outcomes through analytical arguments and through numerical scattering experiments including GW losses. We show that the cross section for dynamical inspirals grows with increasing target binary semi-major axis a and that for equal-mass binaries it scales as a 2/7 . Thus, we expect wide target binaries to predominantly contribute to the production of these relativistic outcomes. We estimate that eccentric inspirals account for approximately 1% of dynamically assembled non-eccentric merging binaries. While these events are rare, we show that binary-single scatterings are a more effective formation channel than single-single captures for the production of eccentrically inspiraling binaries, even given modest binary fractions.

  1. Lipid Droplet Formation in HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells Depends on Cell Density and the Concentration of Exogenous Unsaturated Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guštin, Ema; Jarc, Eva; Kump, Ana; Petan, Toni

    2017-09-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) store excess fatty acids (FAs) in the form of neutral lipids and prevent starvation-induced cancer cell death. Here we studied the ability of mono- and polyunsaturated FAs to affect LD formation and survival in HeLa cervical cancer cells. We found that the LD content in HeLa cells increases with cell density, but it decreases in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Exogenously-added unsaturated FAs, including oleic (OA), linoleic (LA), arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) displayed a similar ability to alter LD formation in HeLa cells. There was a dual, concentration-dependent effect on neutral lipid accumulation: low micromolar concentrations of LA, AA and DHA reduced, while all FAs induced LD formation at higher concentrations. In serum starved He-La cells, OA stimulated LD formation, but, contrary to expectations, it promoted cell death. Our results reveal a link between cell population density and LD formation in HeLa cells and show that unsaturated FAs may both suppress or stimulate LD formation. This dynamic regulation of LD content must be accounted for when studying the effects of lipids and lipid metabolism-targeting drugs on LD metabolism in HeLa cells.

  2. The choice of the optimum terms for semi-empirical description of s-wave neutron resonance level densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarczyk, Maria; Lason, Lech [Division of Nuclear Physics, University of Lodz, ul Pomorska 149/153, 90-236 Lodz (Poland)

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a function describing the dependence of the neutron resonance level density {rho} on the neutron number N in the target nucleus. The function describes quite well, with an accuracy of one order, the experimental data for 284 nuclides. Moreover, it adequately describes the general tendency and shell model effects for magic nuclei and for nuclei close to magic ones. The achieved agreement between the values obtained from the proposed description and the experimental data {rho}{sub exp} can be improved if the {rho}{sub exp} values are normalized energetically and reduced to a narrow range of angular momentum J.

  3. Correlator bank detection of gravitational wave chirps--False-alarm probability, template density, and thresholds: Behind and beyond the minimal-match issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croce, R.P.; Demma, Th.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I.M.; Longo, M.; Marano, S.; Matta, V.

    2004-01-01

    The general problem of computing the false-alarm probability vs the detection-threshold relationship for a bank of correlators is addressed, in the context of maximum-likelihood detection of gravitational waves in additive stationary Gaussian noise. Specific reference is made to chirps from coalescing binary systems. Accurate (lower-bound) approximants for the cumulative distribution of the whole-bank supremum are deduced from a class of Bonferroni-type inequalities. The asymptotic properties of the cumulative distribution are obtained, in the limit where the number of correlators goes to infinity. The validity of numerical simulations made on small-size banks is extended to banks of any size, via a Gaussian-correlation inequality. The result is used to readdress the problem of relating the template density to the fraction of potentially observable sources which could be dismissed as an effect of template space discreteness

  4. Evolution of coherent collective modes through consecutive charge-density-wave transitions in the (PO2)4(WO3)12 monophosphate tungsten bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojchevska, L.; Borovšak, M.; Foury-Leylekian, P.; Pouget, J.-P.; Mertelj, T.; Mihailovic, D.

    2017-07-01

    All-optical femtosecond relaxation dynamics in a single crystal of monophosphate tungsten bronze (PO2)4(WO3)2m with alternate stacking m =6 of WO3 layers was studied through the three consequent charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions. Several transient coherent collective modes associated with the different CDW transitions were observed and analyzed in the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory. Remarkably, the interference of the modes leads to an apparent rectification effect in the transient reflectivity response. A saturation of the coherent-mode amplitudes with increasing pump fluence well below the CDWs destruction threshold fluence indicates a decoupling of the electronic and lattice parts of the order parameter on the femtosecond timescale.

  5. Terahertz spectra revealing the collective excitation mode in charge-density-wave single crystal LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiumei; Jin, Zuanming; Lin, Xian; Ma, Guohong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University (China); Cheng, Zhenxiang [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Balakrishnan, Geetha [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    A low-energy collective excitation mode in charge-ordered multiferroic LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is reported via terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Upon cooling from 300 to 40 K, the central resonance frequency showed a pronounced hardening from 0.85 to 1.15 THz. In analogy to the well-known low-energy optical properties of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, this emerging resonance was attributed to the charge-density-wave (CDW) collective excitations. By using the Drude-Lorentz model fitting, the CDW collective mode becomes increasingly damped with the increasing temperature. Furthermore, the kinks of the CDW collective mode at the magnetic transition temperature are analyzed, which indicate the coupling of spin order with electric polarization. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Fast-forward scaling theory for phase imprinting on a BEC: creation of a wave packet with uniform momentum density and loading to Bloch states without disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro; Nakahara, Mikio

    2018-02-01

    We study phase imprinting on Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with the fast-forward scaling theory revealing a nontrivial scaling property in quantum dynamics. We introduce a wave packet with uniform momentum density (WPUM) which has peculiar properties but is short-lived. The fast-forward scaling theory is applied to derive the driving potential for creation of the WPUMs in a predetermined time. Fast manipulation is essential for the creation of WPUMs because of the instability of the state. We also study loading of a BEC into a predetermined Bloch state in the lowest band from the ground state of a periodic potential. Controlled linear potential is not sufficient for creation of the Bloch state with large wavenumber because the change in the amplitude of the order parameter is not negligible. We derive the exact driving potential for creation of predetermined Bloch states using the obtained theory.

  7. Tidal and Ionospheric Contributions in GUVI O/N2 wave-4 Signals and Implications for F-region Plasma Density Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberheide, J.; Krier, C. S.; Gan, Q.; Nischal, N.; Zhang, Y.; Chang, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    The longitude/local time modulation of the column number density ratio of atomic oxygen to molecular nitrogen (O/N2 ratio) observed by GUVI/TIMED shows several features that are inconsistent with the known tidal structures in the thermosphere. The zonal wavenumber 4 (wave-4) pattern that is usually associated with the eastward propagating DE3 and SE2 nonmigrating tides is propagating westward and the diagnosed relative O/N2 amplitudes of 5-10% are larger than expected from a thermosphere-tidal coupling perspective. Two recent studies from the GUVI team already established the leading source of the bogus wave-4 tidal signals: ionospheric contamination of the O/N2 ratio derived from GUVI's optical observations caused by radiative O+ recombination in the F-region. However, the apparent westward propagation in the wave-4 GUVI O/N2 ratio remained unexplained since the ionospheric contamination pattern itself is controlled by the DE3 and SE2 tides in the F-region plasma and should thus propagate eastward. This paper revisits the problem by separating the "true" thermospheric tidal signal in the GUVI O/N2 ratio from the ionospheric contamination using the TIMED-based empirical climatological tidal model of the thermosphere (CTMT) and supporting COSMIC TEC tidal diagnostics. As such, it provides new observational information about the impact of tidally-induced composition changes on ionospheric variability. Furthermore, it is shown that the superposition of DE3, SE2, and SPW4 from ionospheric and thermospheric sources produces the apparent westward propagation in O/N2, which will be helpful to interpret the forthcoming GOLD and ICON observations.

  8. Fluid-phase pinocytosis of native low density lipoprotein promotes murine M-CSF differentiated macrophage foam cell formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Barthwal

    Full Text Available During atherosclerosis, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-derived cholesterol accumulates in macrophages to form foam cells. Macrophage uptake of LDL promotes foam cell formation but the mechanism mediating this process is not clear. The present study investigates the mechanism of LDL uptake for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF-differentiated murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. LDL receptor-null (LDLR-/- macrophages incubated with LDL showed non-saturable accumulation of cholesterol that did not down-regulate for the 24 h examined. Incubation of LDLR-/- macrophages with increasing concentrations of (125I-LDL showed non-saturable macrophage LDL uptake. A 20-fold excess of unlabeled LDL had no effect on (125I-LDL uptake by wild-type macrophages and genetic deletion of the macrophage scavenger receptors CD36 and SRA did not affect (125I-LDL uptake, showing that LDL uptake occurred by fluid-phase pinocytosis independently of receptors. Cholesterol accumulation was inhibited approximately 50% in wild-type and LDLR-/- mice treated with LY294002 or wortmannin, inhibitors of all classes of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K. Time-lapse, phase-contrast microscopy showed that macropinocytosis, an important fluid-phase uptake pathway in macrophages, was blocked almost completely by PI3K inhibition with wortmannin. Pharmacological inhibition of the class I PI3K isoforms alpha, beta, gamma or delta did not affect macrophage LDL-derived cholesterol accumulation or macropinocytosis. Furthermore, macrophages from mice expressing kinase-dead class I PI3K beta, gamma or delta isoforms showed no decrease in cholesterol accumulation or macropinocytosis when compared with wild-type macrophages. Thus, non-class I PI3K isoforms mediated macropinocytosis in these macrophages. Further characterization of the components necessary for LDL uptake, cholesterol accumulation, and macropinocytosis identified dynamin, microtubules, actin, and vacuolar type H(+-ATPase as

  9. Fluid-Phase Pinocytosis of Native Low Density Lipoprotein Promotes Murine M-CSF Differentiated Macrophage Foam Cell Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Bohnacker, Thomas; Wymann, Matthias P.; Kruth, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    During atherosclerosis, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol accumulates in macrophages to form foam cells. Macrophage uptake of LDL promotes foam cell formation but the mechanism mediating this process is not clear. The present study investigates the mechanism of LDL uptake for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-differentiated murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. LDL receptor-null (LDLR−/−) macrophages incubated with LDL showed non-saturable accumulation of cholesterol that did not down-regulate for the 24 h examined. Incubation of LDLR−/− macrophages with increasing concentrations of 125I-LDL showed non-saturable macrophage LDL uptake. A 20-fold excess of unlabeled LDL had no effect on 125I-LDL uptake by wild-type macrophages and genetic deletion of the macrophage scavenger receptors CD36 and SRA did not affect 125I-LDL uptake, showing that LDL uptake occurred by fluid-phase pinocytosis independently of receptors. Cholesterol accumulation was inhibited approximately 50% in wild-type and LDLR−/− mice treated with LY294002 or wortmannin, inhibitors of all classes of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K). Time-lapse, phase-contrast microscopy showed that macropinocytosis, an important fluid-phase uptake pathway in macrophages, was blocked almost completely by PI3K inhibition with wortmannin. Pharmacological inhibition of the class I PI3K isoforms alpha, beta, gamma or delta did not affect macrophage LDL-derived cholesterol accumulation or macropinocytosis. Furthermore, macrophages from mice expressing kinase-dead class I PI3K beta, gamma or delta isoforms showed no decrease in cholesterol accumulation or macropinocytosis when compared with wild-type macrophages. Thus, non-class I PI3K isoforms mediated macropinocytosis in these macrophages. Further characterization of the components necessary for LDL uptake, cholesterol accumulation, and macropinocytosis identified dynamin, microtubules, actin, and vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase as

  10. Effect of electromagnetic field induced by radio frequency waves at 900 to 1800 MHz on bone mineral density of iliac bone wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Tolga; Aksoy, Besir Andac; Aydogan, Nevres Hurriyet; Baydar, Metin Lutfi; Yildiz, Mustafa; Ozdemir, Ragip

    2009-09-01

    Telecommunication has gained a different meaning in daily life with the introduction of the mobile phone system. However, electromagnetic pollution has increased in parallel to this improvement. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of electromagnetic waves emitted from cellular phones operating at a frequency of 900 to 1800 MHz on the bone mineral density of the human iliac bone wings, which are the most common carriage sites for mobile phones. A total of 150 male volunteer participants were included in this study. The mean age was 31.85 years, and the age range was between 21 and 57 years. The participants were separated into 2 groups based on as follows: iliac side exposed to electromagnetic wave (group 1) and unexposed side (group 2). Of the total number of participants, 122 were carrying their phones on their right iliac wings, whereas 28 were carrying their phones on their left iliac wings. The mean daily carriage duration was 14.7 hours (between 12 and 20 h), and the mean duration for cellular phone use was 6.2 years (between 4 and 9 yr). Mineral bone density was measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in the right and the left iliac wings of all the participants. The SPSS 15 software (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL) was used for statistical analysis. In the comparison of the 2 sides, Student t test was performed and P 0.05). In addition, the mean values of group 1 were not as low as those measured in osteopeny or osteoporosis cases. Current data may suggest that taking into consideration cellular phone use when iliac bone graft is necessary in clinical practice would constitute an important factor for more favorable outcomes.

  11. Three-dimensional electron realm in VSe2 by soft-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: origin of charge-density waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strocov, Vladimir N; Shi, Ming; Kobayashi, Masaki; Monney, Claude; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Krempasky, Juraj; Schmitt, Thorsten; Patthey, Luc; Berger, Helmuth; Blaha, Peter

    2012-08-24

    The resolution of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) in three-dimensional (3D) momentum k is fundamentally limited by ill defined surface-perpendicular wave vector k(perpendicular) associated with the finite photoelectron mean free path. Pushing ARPES into the soft-x-ray energy region sharpens the k(perpendicular) definition, allowing accurate electronic structure investigations in 3D materials. We apply soft-x-ray ARPES to explore the 3D electron realm in a paradigm transition metal dichalcogenide VSe2. Essential to break through the dramatic loss of the valence band photoexcitation cross section at soft-x-ray energies is the advanced photon flux performance of our synchrotron instrumentation. By virtue of the sharp 3D momentum definition, the soft-x-ray ARPES experimental band structure and Fermi surface of VSe2 show a textbook clarity. We identify pronounced 3D warping of the Fermi surface and show that its concomitant nesting acts as the precursor for the exotic 3D charge-density waves in VSe2. Our results demonstrate the immense potential of soft-x-ray ARPES to explore details of 3D electronic structure.

  12. A hierarchical classification approach for recognition of low-density (LDPE) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in mixed plastic waste based on short-wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2018-03-03

    The aim of this work was to recognize different polymer flakes from mixed plastic waste through an innovative hierarchical classification strategy based on hyperspectral imaging, with particular reference to low density polyethylene (LDPE) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). A plastic waste composition assessment, including also LDPE and HDPE identification, may help to define optimal recycling strategies for product quality control. Correct handling of plastic waste is essential for its further "sustainable" recovery, maximizing the sorting performance in particular for plastics with similar characteristics as LDPE and HDPE. Five different plastic waste samples were chosen for the investigation: polypropylene (PP), LDPE, HDPE, polystyrene (PS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). A calibration dataset was realized utilizing the corresponding virgin polymers. Hyperspectral imaging in the short-wave infrared range (1000-2500nm) was thus applied to evaluate the different plastic spectral attributes finalized to perform their recognition/classification. After exploring polymer spectral differences by principal component analysis (PCA), a hierarchical partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model was built allowing the five different polymers to be recognized. The proposed methodology, based on hierarchical classification, is very powerful and fast, allowing to recognize the five different polymers in a single step. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Strain Engineering a 4a×√3aCharge Density Wave Phase in Transition Metal Dichalcogenide 1T-VSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duming; Ha, Jeonghoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Chan, Yang-Hao; Natterer, Fabian D; Myers, Alline F; Schumacher, Joshua D; Cullen, William G; Davydov, Albert V; Kuk, Young; Chou, M Y; Zhitenev, Nikolai B; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2017-07-01

    We report a rectangular charge density wave (CDW) phase in strained 1T-VSe 2 thin films synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy on c -sapphire substrates. The observed CDW structure exhibits an unconventional rectangular 4 a ×√3 a periodicity, as opposed to the previously reported hexagonal 4 a ×4 a structure in bulk crystals and exfoliated thin layered samples. Tunneling spectroscopy shows a strong modulation of the local density of states of the same 4 a ×√3 a CDW periodicity and an energy gap of 2 Δ CDW = (9.1 ± 0.1) meV. The CDW energy gap evolves into a full gap at temperatures below 500 mK, indicating a transition to an insulating phase at ultra-low temperatures. First-principles calculations confirm the stability of both 4 a ×4 a and 4 a ×√3 a structures arising from soft modes in the phonon dispersion. The unconventional structure becomes preferred in the presence of strain, in agreement with experimental findings.

  14. Strain engineering a 4 a ×√ 3 a charge-density-wave phase in transition-metal dichalcogenide 1 T -VS e2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duming; Ha, Jeonghoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Chan, Yang-Hao; Natterer, Fabian D.; Myers, Alline F.; Schumacher, Joshua D.; Cullen, William G.; Davydov, Albert V.; Kuk, Young; Chou, M. Y.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.; Stroscio, Joseph A.

    2017-07-01

    We report a rectangular charge density wave (CDW) phase in strained 1 T -VS e2 thin films synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy on c -sapphire substrates. The observed CDW structure exhibits an unconventional rectangular 4 a ×√ 3 a periodicity, as opposed to the previously reported hexagonal 4 a ×4 a structure in bulk crystals and exfoliated thin-layered samples. Tunneling spectroscopy shows a strong modulation of the local density of states of the same 4 a ×√ 3 a CDW periodicity and an energy gap of 2 ΔCDW=(9.1 ±0.1 ) meV . The CDW energy gap evolves into a full gap at temperatures below 500 mK, indicating a transition to an insulating phase at ultra-low temperatures. First-principles calculations confirm the stability of both 4 a ×4 a and 4 a ×√ 3 a structures arising from soft modes in the phonon dispersion. The unconventional structure becomes preferred in the presence of strain, in agreement with experimental findings.

  15. Universal scaling of Néel temperature, staggered magnetization density, and spin-wave velocity of three-dimensional disordered and clean quantum antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, D.-R.; Jiang, F.-J.

    2017-02-01

    The Néel temperature, staggered magnetization density, as well as the spin-wave velocity of a three-dimensional (3D) quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic disorder (randomness) are calculated using first-principles nonperturbative quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, we examine the validity of universal scaling relations that are related to these three studied physical quantities. These relations are relevant to experimental data and are firmly established for clean (regular) 3D dimerized spin-1/2 Heisenberg models. Remarkably, our numerical results show that the considered scaling relations remain true for the investigated model with the introduced disorder. In addition, while the presence of disorder may change the physical properties of regular dimerized models, hence leading to different critical theories, both the obtained data of Néel temperature and staggered magnetization density in our study are fully compatible with the expected critical behavior for clean dimerized systems. As a result, it is persuasive to conclude that the related quantum phase transitions of the considered disordered model and its clean analogues are governed by the same critical theory, which is not always the case in general. Finally, we also find smooth scaling curves even emerging when both the data of the investigated disordered model as well as its associated clean system are taken into account concurrently. This in turn implies that, while in a restricted sense, the considered scaling relations for 3D spin-1/2 antiferromagnets are indeed universal.

  16. The adsorption of CO on charged and neutral Au and Au2: A comparison between wave-function based and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Lein, Matthias; Krawczyk, Robert P.; Jacob, Christoph R.

    2008-03-01

    Quantum theoretical calculations are presented for CO attached to charged and neutral Au and Au2 with the aim to test the performance of currently applied density functional theory (DFT) by comparison with accurate wave-function based results. For this, we developed a compact sized correlation-consistent valence basis set which accompanies a small-core energy-consistent scalar relativistic pseudopotential for gold. The properties analyzed are geometries, dissociation energies, vibrational frequencies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities. The important role of the basis-set superposition error is addressed which can be substantial for the negatively charged systems. The dissociation energies decrease along the series Au+-CO, Au-CO, and Au--CO and as well as along the series Au2+-CO, Au2-CO, and Au2--CO. As one expects, a negative charge on gold weakens the carbon oxygen bond considerably, with a consequent redshift in the CO stretching frequency when moving from the positively charged to the neutral and the negatively charged gold atom or dimer. We find that the different density functional approximations applied are not able to correctly describe the rather weak interaction between CO and gold, thus questioning the application of DFT to CO adsorption on larger gold clusters or surfaces.

  17. Cross-cutting ties, organizational density, and new firm formation in the US biotech industry, 1994-1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bae, J.; Wezel, F.C.; Koo, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the role of cooperative relations among incumbents in the formation of new firms. We argue that cooperative interfirm relations that bridge geographically remote and diverse sources of knowledge—cross-cutting ties—contribute to new firm formation. Employing data on state-level

  18. Accelerated rogue waves generated by soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum formation in photonic-crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driben, Rodislav; Babushkin, Ihar

    2012-12-15

    Soliton fusion is a fascinating and delicate phenomenon that manifests itself in optical fibers in case of interaction between copropagating solitons with small temporal and wavelength separation. We show that the mechanism of acceleration of a trailing soliton by dispersive waves radiated from the preceding one provides necessary conditions for soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation in photonic-crystal fibers. As a result of fusion, large-intensity robust light structures arise and propagate over significant distances. In the presence of small random noise the delicate condition for the effective fusion between solitons can easily be broken, making the fusion-induced giant waves a rare statistical event. Thus oblong-shaped giant accelerated waves become excellent candidates for optical rogue waves.

  19. Origin of structure: statistical characterization of the primordial density fluctuations and the collapse of the wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León, Gabriel [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria - Pab. I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Sudarsky, Daniel, E-mail: gleon@df.uba.ar, E-mail: sudarsky@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510, México (Mexico)

    2015-06-01

    The statistical properties of the primordial density perturbations has been considered in the past decade as a powerful probe of the physical processes taking place in the early universe. Within the inflationary paradigm, the properties of the bispectrum are one of the keys that serves to discriminate among competing scenarios concerning the details of the origin of cosmological perturbations. However, all of the scenarios, based on the conventional approach to the so-called ''quantum-to-classical transition'' during inflation, lack the ability to point out the precise physical mechanism responsible for generating the inhomogeneity and anisotropy of our universe starting from and exactly homogeneous and isotropic vacuum state associated with the early inflationary regime. In past works, we have shown that the proposals involving a spontaneous dynamical reduction of the quantum state provide plausible explanations for the birth of said primordial inhomogeneities and anisotropies. In the present manuscript we show that, when considering within the context of such proposals, the characterization of the spectrum and bispectrum turn out to be quite different from those found in the traditional approach, and in particular, some of the statistical features, must be treated in a different way leading to some rather different conclusions.

  20. Origin of structure: statistical characterization of the primordial density fluctuations and the collapse of the wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, Gabriel; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The statistical properties of the primordial density perturbations has been considered in the past decade as a powerful probe of the physical processes taking place in the early universe. Within the inflationary paradigm, the properties of the bispectrum are one of the keys that serves to discriminate among competing scenarios concerning the details of the origin of cosmological perturbations. However, all of the scenarios, based on the conventional approach to the so-called ''quantum-to-classical transition'' during inflation, lack the ability to point out the precise physical mechanism responsible for generating the inhomogeneity and anisotropy of our universe starting from and exactly homogeneous and isotropic vacuum state associated with the early inflationary regime. In past works, we have shown that the proposals involving a spontaneous dynamical reduction of the quantum state provide plausible explanations for the birth of said primordial inhomogeneities and anisotropies. In the present manuscript we show that, when considering within the context of such proposals, the characterization of the spectrum and bispectrum turn out to be quite different from those found in the traditional approach, and in particular, some of the statistical features, must be treated in a different way leading to some rather different conclusions