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  1. Varying kernel density estimation on ℝ+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnatsakanov, Robert; Sarkisian, Khachatur

    2015-01-01

    In this article a new nonparametric density estimator based on the sequence of asymmetric kernels is proposed. This method is natural when estimating an unknown density function of a positive random variable. The rates of Mean Squared Error, Mean Integrated Squared Error, and the L1-consistency are investigated. Simulation studies are conducted to compare a new estimator and its modified version with traditional kernel density construction. PMID:26740729

  2. Time-varying Combinations of Predictive Densities using Nonlinear Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Billio (Monica); R. Casarin (Roberto); F. Ravazzolo (Francesco); H.K. van Dijk (Herman)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a Bayesian combination approach for multivariate predictive densities which relies upon a distributional state space representation of the combination weights. Several specifications of multivariate time-varying weights are introduced with a particular focus on weight dynamics

  3. Modified Shallow Water Equations for significantly varying bottoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we propose an modified version of the nonlinear shallow water (Saint-Venant) equations for the case when the bottom undergoes some significant variations in space and time. The model is derived from a variational principle by choosing the appropriate shallow water ansatz and imposing some constraints. Our derivation procedure does not explicitly involve any small parameter and is straightforward. The novel system is a non-dispersive, and non-hydrostatic extension of the classical Saint-Venant equations. We also propose a finite volume discretization of the obtained hyperbolic system. Several test-cases are presented to highlight the added value of the new model. Some implications to tsunami wave modelling are also discussed.

  4. Do plasma proteins distinguish between liposomes of varying charge density?

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2012-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are one of the most employed nonviral nanovector systems in gene therapy. However, their transfection efficiency is strongly affected by interactions with plasma components, that lead to the formation of a "protein corona" onto CL surface. The interactions between nanoparticles entering the body and biomolecules have an essential role for their biodistribution. Because the knowledge of proteins adsorbed onto vector surface could be useful in the screening of new, more efficient and more biocompatible liposomal formulations, the behavior of three CLs with different membrane charge densities was investigated. The proteins of the three coronas were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified with label-free spectral counting strategy. Fibrinogen displayed higher association with CLs with high membrane charge density, while apolipoproteins and C4b-binding protein with CLs with low membrane charge density. These results are discussed in terms of the different lipid compositions of CLs and may have a deep biological impact for in vivo applications. Surface charge of nanoparticles is emerging as a relevant factor determining the corona composition after interaction with plasma proteins. Remarkably, it is also shown that the charge of the protein corona formed around CLs is strongly related to their membrane charge density. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Shear band in sand with spatially varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Ronaldo I.; Song, Xiaoyu; Rechenmacher, Amy L.; Abedi, Sara; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Bifurcation theory is often used to investigate the inception of a shear band in a homogeneously deforming body. The theory predicts conjugate shear bands that have the same likelihood of triggering. For structures loaded symmetrically the choice of which of the two conjugate shear bands will persist is arbitrary. In this paper we show that spatial density variation could be a determining factor for the selection of the persistent shear band in a symmetrically loaded localizing sand body. We combine experimental imaging on rectangular sand specimens loaded in plane strain compression with mesoscale finite element modeling on symmetrically loaded sand specimens to show that spatial heterogeneity in density does have a profound impact on the persistent shear band.

  6. Significance of microvessel density in prostate cancer core biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salapura-Dugonjić Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In prostate tumors, angiogenesis, measured as microvessel density, is associated with tumor stage and Gleason score. The aim of this study was determine neovascularization of prostatic adenocarcinomas in core biopsies and corresponding prostatectomies. Methods. The study population included 61 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP for localized prostate carcinoma patients and did not receive chemohormonal, or radiation therapy before surgery. Tumor blocks were immunostained using the endothelial-specific antibody CD31 and subsequently evaluated at x 400 magnification in both biopsies and corresponding prostatectomies. Results. When comparing microvessel density in core biopsies and corresponding prostatectomies, no statistically significant difference was found (p > 0.1. A statistically significant positive correlation was found when determining correlation between microvessel density (as linear and categorical variable, i.e. with the cut-off value of 48 that was associated with the Gleason score (p 0.1. Conclusion. Microvessel density can be reliably applied to needle prostate biopsy specimens. Quantification of the microvascular density in biopsies is an accurate pre-operative predictor of tumor stage, discriminating between organconfined and organ-extending neoplasms.

  7. Binder-Jet Printing of Fine Stainless Steel Powder with Varied Final Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaee, Mohsen; Tridas, Eric M.; Crane, Nathan B.

    2017-03-01

    Binder jetting is an additive manufacturing process that produces weak porous parts that are strengthened through sintering and/or infiltration. This article reports on two different methods of preparing fine 316 stainless steel powder and their impact on the final sintered density and dimensions relative to direct printing into space holder to increase porosity. Sintered density and sintering shrinkage of agglomerate material are shown to vary with the density of the spread powder bed. Nevertheless, with added nylon, the shrinkage correlates with the shrinkage of the base steel powder, whereas the density depends on the quantity of the nylon. Thus, it is possible to create varied sintered density with compatible shrinkage levels—a key step toward creating binder-jetting systems with spatially controlled porosity.

  8. Microvessel Density in Thyroid Carcinoma and Its Clinical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Gang(薛刚); YAO Zhenxiang(姚榛祥)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationships between angiogenesis and development, metastasis as well as prognosis of thyroid carcinoma. Methods:48 cases of thyroid carcinoma and 5 cases of thyroid adenoma were studied.Density of microvessels of the tumors were identified by immunohistochemical staining in formalin -fixed and paraffin-embedded sections with anti-CD34 monoclonal antibody, and counted microscopically (×200).Results :The mean value of MVD in tumors>2cm in diameter was (174.92±72.63)/field, while that in tumors≤2cm was ( 117.40± 39.95)/field ( t = 3.3298, P = 0.0026).The number of microvessels was also significantly different in respect to the histotype of the thyroid carcinomas, such as papillary thyroid carcinoma(PTC), follicular thyroid carcinoma(FTC)and medullary thyroid carcinoma(MTC) ( F = 14. 95, P = 0. 0001), but not significantly different in respect to patients'age nor sex ( P>0.05). Conclusions:By studying microvessel density (MVD) of thyroid arcinomas and correlated with their clinical features and biological behaviors, it is concluded that ngiogenesis is important in tumor growth and metastasis as well as prognosis of thyroid carcinomas. Measures to combat angiogenesis may be beneficial in the treatment for thyroid carcinomas.

  9. Wood anatomy and wood density in shrubs: Responses to varying aridity along transcontinental transects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cabrera, Hugo I; Jones, Cynthia S; Espino, Susana; Schenk, H Jochen

    2009-08-01

    Wood density plays a key role in ecological strategies and life history variation in woody plants, but little is known about its anatomical basis in shrubs. We quantified the relationships between wood density, anatomy, and climate in 61 shrub species from eight field sites along latitudinal belts between 31° and 35° in North and South America. Measurements included cell dimensions, transverse areas of each xylem cell type and percentage contact between different cell types and vessels. Wood density was more significantly correlated with precipitation and aridity than with temperature. High wood density was achieved through reductions in cell size and increases in the proportion of wall relative to lumen. Wood density was independent of vessel traits, suggesting that this trait does not impose conduction limitations in shrubs. The proportion of fibers in direct contact with vessels decreased with and was independent of wood density, indicating that the number of fiber-vessel contacts does not explain the previously observed correlation between wood density and implosion resistance. Axial and radial parenchyma each had a significant but opposite association with wood density. Fiber size and wall thickness link wood density, life history, and ecological strategies by controlling the proportion of carbon invested per unit stem volume.

  10. Assessing accuracy in varying Lidar data point densities in Digital Elevation Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis discusses the production of Digital Elevation Maps (DEM) using varying density of data points from a Lidar (Laser or Light Detection And Ranging) collection. Additionally, this thesis contains information on the multiple space missions that use laser altimetry or Lidar to gather data about planet earth, the moon, asteroids, Mars and Mercury. The thesis covers the accuracy of different amounts of data used when generating a DEM in Quick Terrain Modeler software package and the ...

  11. Finding Significant Stress Episodes in a Discontinuous Time Series of Rapidly Varying Mobile Sensor Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Hillol; Tyburski, Matthew; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Hovsepian, Karen; Sharmin, Moushumi; Epstein, David H; Preston, Kenzie L; Furr-Holden, C Debra; Milam, Adam; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; al'Absi, Mustafa; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-05-01

    Management of daily stress can be greatly improved by delivering sensor-triggered just-in-time interventions (JITIs) on mobile devices. The success of such JITIs critically depends on being able to mine the time series of noisy sensor data to find the most opportune moments. In this paper, we propose a time series pattern mining method to detect significant stress episodes in a time series of discontinuous and rapidly varying stress data. We apply our model to 4 weeks of physiological, GPS, and activity data collected from 38 users in their natural environment to discover patterns of stress in real-life. We find that the duration of a prior stress episode predicts the duration of the next stress episode and stress in mornings and evenings is lower than during the day. We then analyze the relationship between stress and objectively rated disorder in the surrounding neighborhood and develop a model to predict stressful episodes.

  12. Performance of broiler chicken fed varied nutrient density diets supplemented with direct fed microbial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative dietary response of different isolated strains (Direct fed microbial- DFM of lactobacilli, streptococci and yeast isolated from leopard feces (Panthera leo was studied as probiotic in poultry broiler birds reared as per varied mineral densities viz. calcium and phosphorus. Various treatments consisted of T0 (Control, culture medium, T1 (Lactobacillus casei + Streptococcus fecalis + Saccharomyces cerevisiae offered standard formulated diet D1, T2 - Control (Culture medium offered ten percent lower calcium and phosphorus diet D2, T3 (Lactobacillus casei + Streptococcus fecalis + Saccharomyces cerevisiae offered ten percent lower calcium and phosphorus diet D2. Growth results obtained during the starter phase (1st to 3rd week exhibited higher gain in live body weight and lower feed conversion ratio, both by DFM supplemented treatment T1 offered standard formulated diet D1 and treatment T3 offered experimentally formulated mineral (Ca and P deficient (10% diet D2 compared to respective control T0 and T2. The obtained results revealed a significantly higher growth performance in treatment T1 compared to its control T0 where a higher growth in treatment T3 offered experimentally formulated mineral (Ca and P deficient (10% diet D2 supplemented with isolated DFM compared to its control T2 was exhibited. Treatment groups T1 and T3 supplemented with isolated DFM exhibited a better intestinal micro flora balance, effective colonization and higher count in the intestinal tract with higher calcium and phosphorus retention in the digestibility studies. Thus, it was found that supplementation of isolated DFM has the potential to improve biological growth performance of poultry broiler birds offered both standard formulated diet D1, as well as mineral deficient diet D2. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46002

  13. A Keystone Ant Species Provides Robust Biological Control of the Coffee Berry Borer Under Varying Pest Densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Morris

    Full Text Available Species' functional traits are an important part of the ecological complexity that determines the provisioning of ecosystem services. In biological pest control, predator response to pest density variation is a dynamic trait that impacts the provision of this service in agroecosystems. When pest populations fluctuate, farmers relying on biocontrol services need to know how natural enemies respond to these changes. Here we test the effect of variation in coffee berry borer (CBB density on the biocontrol efficiency of a keystone ant species (Azteca sericeasur in a coffee agroecosystem. We performed exclosure experiments to measure the infestation rate of CBB released on coffee branches in the presence and absence of ants at four different CBB density levels. We measured infestation rate as the number of CBB bored into fruits after 24 hours, quantified biocontrol efficiency (BCE as the proportion of infesting CBB removed by ants, and estimated functional response from ant attack rates, measured as the difference in CBB infestation between branches. Infestation rates of CBB on branches with ants were significantly lower (71%-82% than on those without ants across all density levels. Additionally, biocontrol efficiency was generally high and did not significantly vary across pest density treatments. Furthermore, ant attack rates increased linearly with increasing CBB density, suggesting a Type I functional response. These results demonstrate that ants can provide robust biological control of CBB, despite variation in pest density, and that the response of predators to pest density variation is an important factor in the provision of biocontrol services. Considering how natural enemies respond to changes in pest densities will allow for more accurate biocontrol predictions and better-informed management of this ecosystem service in agroecosystems.

  14. A Keystone Ant Species Provides Robust Biological Control of the Coffee Berry Borer Under Varying Pest Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jonathan R; Vandermeer, John; Perfecto, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    Species' functional traits are an important part of the ecological complexity that determines the provisioning of ecosystem services. In biological pest control, predator response to pest density variation is a dynamic trait that impacts the provision of this service in agroecosystems. When pest populations fluctuate, farmers relying on biocontrol services need to know how natural enemies respond to these changes. Here we test the effect of variation in coffee berry borer (CBB) density on the biocontrol efficiency of a keystone ant species (Azteca sericeasur) in a coffee agroecosystem. We performed exclosure experiments to measure the infestation rate of CBB released on coffee branches in the presence and absence of ants at four different CBB density levels. We measured infestation rate as the number of CBB bored into fruits after 24 hours, quantified biocontrol efficiency (BCE) as the proportion of infesting CBB removed by ants, and estimated functional response from ant attack rates, measured as the difference in CBB infestation between branches. Infestation rates of CBB on branches with ants were significantly lower (71%-82%) than on those without ants across all density levels. Additionally, biocontrol efficiency was generally high and did not significantly vary across pest density treatments. Furthermore, ant attack rates increased linearly with increasing CBB density, suggesting a Type I functional response. These results demonstrate that ants can provide robust biological control of CBB, despite variation in pest density, and that the response of predators to pest density variation is an important factor in the provision of biocontrol services. Considering how natural enemies respond to changes in pest densities will allow for more accurate biocontrol predictions and better-informed management of this ecosystem service in agroecosystems.

  15. Fast Semantic Segmentation of 3d Point Clouds with Strongly Varying Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Timo; Wegner, Jan D.; Schindler, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    We describe an effective and efficient method for point-wise semantic classification of 3D point clouds. The method can handle unstructured and inhomogeneous point clouds such as those derived from static terrestrial LiDAR or photogammetric reconstruction; and it is computationally efficient, making it possible to process point clouds with many millions of points in a matter of minutes. The key issue, both to cope with strong variations in point density and to bring down computation time, turns out to be careful handling of neighborhood relations. By choosing appropriate definitions of a point's (multi-scale) neighborhood, we obtain a feature set that is both expressive and fast to compute. We evaluate our classification method both on benchmark data from a mobile mapping platform and on a variety of large, terrestrial laser scans with greatly varying point density. The proposed feature set outperforms the state of the art with respect to per-point classification accuracy, while at the same time being much faster to compute.

  16. DMPD: Low density lipoprotein oxidation and its pathobiological significance. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9261091 Low density lipoprotein oxidation and its pathobiological significance. Ste...in oxidation and its pathobiological significance. PubmedID 9261091 Title Low density lipoprotein oxidation ...and its pathobiological significance. Authors Steinberg D. Publication J Biol Che

  17. Assessment of bone marrow changes in postmenopausal women with varying bone densities: magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; TANG Guang-yu; TANG Rong-biao; PENG Yi-feng; LI Wei

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that bone marrow adipose tissue might play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. There are inconsistent findings on the relationship among marrow fat content, bone mineral density and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). This study aimed to prospectively explore the efficacy of MR spectroscopy (MRS)and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in detecting vertebral marrow changes in postmenopausal women with varying bone densities.Methods Both MRS and DWI of the lumber spine were performed in 102 postmenopausal women (mean age,(67.3±6.5) years; range, 55-83 years), who underwent dual X-ray absorptiometry. Marrow fat content and ADC were compared and correlated among three groups: 24 with normal bone density, 31 with osteopenia and 47 with osteoporosis.Results Vertebral marrow fat content was significantly increased in the osteoporotic group ((65.60±7.68)%, P <0.001)and the osteopenic group ((57.68±6.45)%, P <0.001), when compared with the normal bone density group ((51.67±3.27)%). ADC values were significantly decreased in the osteoporotic group ((0.39±0.03)×10-3mm2/s, P <0.001)and in the osteopenic group ((0.42±0.02)×10-3mm2/s, P <0.001), when compared with the normal bone density group ((0.47±0.03)×10-3 mm2/s). The marrow fat content negatively correlated with both bone density (r=-0.731, P <0.001)and marrow ADC (r=-0.572, P <0.001). The bone density positively correlated with the ADC values (r=0.802, P<0.001).Conclusions Postmenopausal women experience a corresponding increase in vertebral marrow fat content as the bone density decreases. Marrow fat content and ADC correlate to the bone density. MRS and DWI may indirectly assess the early bone marrow changes in postmenopausal women.

  18. Dynamics of supercritical methanol of varying density from first principles simulations: hydrogen bond fluctuations, vibrational spectral diffusion, and orientational relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu

    2013-06-14

    A first principles study of the dynamics of supercritical methanol is carried out by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the fluctuation dynamics of hydroxyl stretch frequencies, hydrogen bonds, dangling hydroxyl groups, and orientation of methanol molecules are investigated for three different densities at 523 K. Apart from the dynamical properties, various equilibrium properties of supercritical methanol such as the local density distributions and structural correlations, hydrogen bonding aspects, frequency-structure correlations, and dipole distributions of methanol molecules are also investigated. In addition to the density dependence of various equilibrium and dynamical properties, their dependencies on dispersion interactions are also studied by carrying out additional simulations using a dispersion corrected density functional for all the systems. It is found that the hydrogen bonding between methanol molecules decreases significantly as we move to the supercritical state from the ambient one. The inclusion of dispersion interactions is found to increase the number of hydrogen bonds to some extent. Calculations of the frequency-structure correlation coefficient reveal that a statistical correlation between the hydroxyl stretch frequency and the nearest hydrogen-oxygen distance continues to exist even at supercritical states of methanol, although it is weakened with increase of temperature and decrease of density. In the supercritical state, the frequency time correlation function is found to decay with two time scales: One around or less than 100 fs and the other in the region of 250-700 fs. It is found that, for supercritical methanol, the times scales of vibrational spectral diffusion are determined by an interplay between the dynamics of hydrogen bonds, dangling OD groups, and inertial rotation of methanol molecules and the roles of these various components are found to vary with density of the supercritical solvent. Effects

  19. Temperature and Magnetic Field Dependence of Critical Current Density of YBCO with Varying Flux Pinning Additions (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2083 TEMPERATURE AND MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS...MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b...20 ‒ 77 K. Films were prepared with pulsed laser deposition by (M/ YBCO )N multilayer or ( YBCO )1-x Mx single-target methods, for different M phases

  20. Process-Based Modeling of Floods Through Shrub Carrs of Varying Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.

    2001-12-01

    Floodplain surfaces typically are protected from erosion during deep overbank flows by vegetation of varying types and densities. Drag on stems, branches, leaves, and exposed roots of the floodplain plants reduces both the near-bed flow and the fluid forces on the sediment grains. The drag on vegetation and on topographic elements of the floodplain surface can be calculated by carefully applying fundamental fluid-mechanical principals. Doing so requires identification and appropriate approximation of the reference velocity in the drag equation, and accurate estimates of the floodplain plant geometries and spacings. For shrubs, calculations indicate that skin friction on leaves is negligible compared to form drag on stems and branches, whereas, for uncut grasses, skin friction on the fronds is of primary importance. Scaling relationships are developed for each shrub species for specific applications, so that the fluid mechanically important properties can be estimated from mean stem diameters, mean stem group diameters, and mean stem group spacings. Stem group spacings and diameters can be related to shrub-canopy spacings and diameters respectively, which are determined from aerial photographs in the applications. A process-based model incorporating the necessary principles was developed and applied to a headwater tributary of East Plum Creek, Colorado. Calculations using the estimated decrease in density of the sandbar willows along this tributary accurately postdict the site of initiation of floodplain unraveling (transformation from a narrow, sinuous stream to a wide, straight one) that occurred during an extreme flood in 1965. Details of this application are presented in an accompanying poster. The model then is applied to Clark Fork of the Columbia River in the Deer Lodge Valley, Montana. This meandering fluvial system is an EPA Superfund site, because the flood-of-record in 1908 deposited several decimeters of contaminated tailings in the meander belt. The

  1. Effects of varying food and density on reproduction in Diaptomus clavipes Schacht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooney, J.D.; Gehrs, C.W.; Bunting, D.L. II

    1978-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of varying food and density on the egg production of the calanoid copepod, Diaptomus clavipes Schacht. These experiments were performed at both the population and organismic level. An attempt was also made to evaluate the feasibility of using a flow-through system to study the effects of various environmental factors on egg production in copepods. It was found that food supply was an important factor determining rate of clutch production, number of eggs per clutch, and size of individual eggs. As food supply decreased, both the rate of clutch production and the number of eggs per clutch decreased, but the size of individual eggs increased. During periods of extreme food shortage, not only did egg production cease, but also the production of spermatophores by males. When starved females were placed under optimum feeding conditions, they produced eggs within a few days and were producing maximally within two weeks. Egg production in the flow-through system was reduced, due primarily to food shortage. The trout chow solution which was used as food was inadequate because it was not directly utilized by the copepods.

  2. Analytical performance of molecular beacons on surface immobilized gold nanoparticles of varying size and density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-11-25

    The high quenching efficiency of metal nanoparticles has facilitated its use as quenchers in molecular beacons. To optimize this system, a good understanding of the many factors that influence molecular beacon performance is required. In this study, molecular beacon performance was evaluated as a function of gold nanoparticle size and its immobilization characteristics. Gold nanoparticles of 4 nm, 15 nm and 87 nm diameter, were immobilized onto glass slides. Each size regime offered distinctive optical properties for fluorescence quenching of molecular dyes that were conjugated to oligonucleotides that were immobilized to the gold nanoparticles. Rigid double stranded DNA was used as a model to place fluorophores at different distances from the gold nanoparticles. The effect of particle size and also the immobilization density of nanoparticles was evaluated. The 4 nm and 87 nm gold nanoparticles offered the highest sensitivity in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity as a function of distance (3-fold improvement for Cy5). The optical properties of the molecular fluorophore was of significance, with Cy5 offering higher contrast ratios than Cy3 due to the red-shifted emission spectrum relative to the plasmon peak. A high density of gold nanoparticles reduced contrast ratios, indicating preference for a monolayer of immobilized nanoparticles when considering analytical performance. Molecular beacon probes were then used in place of the double stranded oligonucleotides. There was a strong dependence of molecular beacon performance on the length of a linker used for attachment to the nanoparticle surface. The optimal optical performance was obtained with 4 nm gold nanoparticles that were immobilized as monolayers of low density (5.7×10(11)particles cm(-2)) on glass surfaces. These nanoparticle surfaces offered a 2-fold improvement in analytical performance of the molecular beacons when compared to other nanoparticle sizes investigated. The principles developed

  3. The density of knobs on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes depends on developmental age and varies among isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina A Quadt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is related to the parasite's ability to evade host immunity through clonal antigenic variation and tissue-specific adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs. The P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 family expressed on dome-shaped protrusions called knobs on the IE surface is central to both. Differences in receptor specificity and affinity of expressed PfEMP1 are important for IE adhesiveness, but it is not known whether differences in the number and size of the knobs on which the PfEMP1 proteins are expressed also play a role. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide detailed information on isolate- and time-dependent differences in knob size and density. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used atomic force microscopy to characterize knobs on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Fourteen ex vivo isolates from Ghanaian children with malaria and 10 P. falciparum isolates selected in vitro for expression of a particular PfEMP1 protein (VAR2CSA were examined. Knob density increased from ∼20 h to ∼35 h post-invasion, with significant variation among isolates. The knob density ex vivo, which was about five-fold higher than following long-term in vitro culture, started to decline within a few months of culture. Although knob diameter and height varied among isolates, we did not observe significant time-dependent variation in these dimensions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The density of knobs on the P. falciparum-IE surface depends on time since invasion, but is also determined by the infecting isolate in a time-independent manner. This is the first study to quantitatively evaluate knob densities and dimensions on different P. falciparum isolates, to examine ex vivo isolates from humans, and to compare ex vivo and long-term in vitro-cultured isolates. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the interaction between P. falciparum parasites and the

  4. Transient evolution of C-type shocks in dusty regions of varying density

    CERN Document Server

    Ashmore, I; Caselli, P; Falle, S A E G; Hartquist, T W

    2009-01-01

    Outflows of young stars drive shocks into dusty, molecular regions. Most models of such shocks assume that they are steady and propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field. Real shocks often violate both of these assumptions and the media through which they propagate are inhomogeneous. We use the code employed previously to produce the first time-dependent simulations of fast-mode, oblique C-type shocks interacting with density perturbations. We include a self-consistent calculation of the thermal and ionisation balances and a fluid treatment of grains. We identify features that develop when a multifluid shock encounters a density inhomogeneity to investigate whether any part of the precursor region ever behaves in a quasi-steady fashion. If it does the shock may be modelled approximately without solving the time-dependent hydromagnetic equations. Simulations were made for initially steady oblique C-type shocks encountering density inhomogeneities. For a semi-finite inhomogeneity with a density larger than...

  5. Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions in simple spin-models with strongly varying vortex densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Himbergen, J.E.J.M. van

    1985-01-01

    A generalized XY-model, consisting of a family of nearest neighbour potentials of varying shape, for classical planar spins on a two-dimensional square lattice is analysed by a combination of Migdal-Kadanoff real-space renormalization and Monte Carlo simulations on a sequence of finite lattices of

  6. Effect of varying protein and energy densities in complete rations fed to cows in first lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, G K; Grieve, D G; McMillan, I; Smith, G C

    1984-07-01

    Sixty-three Holstein cows in first lactation were allotted randomly at 28 days postpartum to receive one of nine rations in a 3 X 3 factorial design. Rations had crude protein 12, 15, or 18% in each of three energy densities from ratios of forage:concentrate of 75:25, 55:45, and 35:65. Corn silage and hay crop silage were combined in a ratio of 2:1 (dry basis) in each case, and diets were offered for ad libitum intake as complete feeds for an 11-wk experimental period plus 2 wk for a digestion trial. In regression analysis as energy density increased, feed intake, milk yield, milk protein, and lactose yields increased linearly, urea nitrogen in blood plasma decreased linearly, and milk fat percent and yield decreased curvilinearly. As dietary protein increased, feed intake, fat-corrected milk, milk fat yield, and plasma urea nitrogen increased linearly, and yields of milk, solids-corrected milk, milk protein, and lactose increased curvilinearly. Actual milk yield adjusted for dry matter intake increased with greater energy density but not with higher protein concentration. Increases of energy and protein each resulted in linear increases of digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, and energy of diets. There were no interactions of energy X protein for these measurements. Cows in first lactation will increase milk production in response to increasing protein over a range of energy densities when feed intake is increased.

  7. Snag density varies with intensity of timber harvest and human access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Wisdom; Lisa J. Bate

    2008-01-01

    Many species of vertebrates depend on snags (standing dead trees) for persistence, and limited research suggests that snag density is lower in areas of intensive timber harvest and increased human access. While intensive timber harvest is one source of potential snag loss, ease of human access to forest stands may also facilitate loss via firewood cutting of snags....

  8. Varying plant density and harvest time to optimize cowpea leaf yield and nutrient content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, T. A.; Nielsen, S. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Plant density and harvest time were manipulated to optimize vegetative (foliar) productivity of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] canopies for future dietary use in controlled ecological life-support systems as vegetables or salad greens. Productivity was measured as total shoot and edible dry weights (DW), edible yield rate [(EYR) grams DW per square meter per day], shoot harvest index [(SHI) grams DW per edible gram DW total shoot], and yield-efficiency rate [(YER) grams DW edible per square meter per day per grams DW nonedible]. Cowpeas were grown in a greenhouse for leaf-only harvest at 14, 28, 42, 56, 84, or 99 plants/m2 and were harvested 20, 30, 40, or 50 days after planting (DAP). Shoot and edible dry weights increased as plant density and time to harvest increased. A maximum of 1189 g shoot DW/m2 and 594 g edible DW/m2 were achieved at an estimated plant density of 85 plants/m2 and harvest 50 DAP. EYR also increased as plant density and time to harvest increased. An EYR of 11 g m-2 day-1 was predicted to occur at 86 plants/m2 and harvest 50 DAP. SHI and YER were not affected by plant density. However, the highest values of SHI (64%) and YER (1.3 g m-2 day-1 g-1) were attained when cowpeas were harvested 20 DAP. The average fat and ash contents [dry-weight basis (dwb)] of harvested leaves remained constant regardless of harvest time. Average protein content increased from 25% DW at 30 DAP to 45% DW at 50 DAP. Carbohydrate content declined from 50% DW at 30 DAP to 45% DW at 50 DAP. Total dietary fiber content (dwb) of the leaves increased from 19% to 26% as time to harvest increased from 20 to 50 days.

  9. Performance Evaluation of Aodv&DSR with Varying Pause Time & Node Density Over TCP&CBR Connections in Vanet

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Bijan; Bikas, Md Abu Naser

    2012-01-01

    Vehicular ad hoc network is formed by cars which are called nodes; allow them to communicate with one another without using any fixed road side unit. It has some unique characteristics which make it different from other ad hoc network as well as difficult to define any exact mobility model and routing protocols because of their high mobility and changing mobility pattern. Hence performance of routing protocols can vary with the various parameters such as speed, pause time, node density and traffic scenarios. In this research paper, the performance of two on-demand routing protocols AODV & DSR has been analyzed by means of packet delivery ratio, loss packet ratio & average end-to-end delay with varying pause time and node density under TCP & CBR connection.

  10. Spatial heterogeneity and functional response: an experiment in microcosms with varying obstacle densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauzy, Céline; Tully, Thomas; Spataro, Thierry; Paul, Grégory; Arditi, Roger

    2010-07-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of the environment has long been recognized as a major factor in ecological dynamics. Its role in predator-prey systems has been of particular interest, where it can affect interactions in two qualitatively different ways: by providing (1) refuges for the prey or (2) obstacles that interfere with the movements of both prey and predators. There have been relatively fewer studies of obstacles than refuges, especially studies on their effect on functional responses. By analogy with reaction-diffusion models for chemical systems in heterogeneous environments, we predict that obstacles are likely to reduce the encounter rate between individuals, leading to a lower attack rate (predator-prey encounters) and a lower interference rate (predator-predator encounters). Here, we test these predictions under controlled conditions using collembolans (springtails) as prey and mites as predators in microcosms. The effect of obstacle density on the functional response was investigated at the scales of individual behavior and of the population. As expected, we found that increasing obstacle density reduces the attack rate and predator interference. Our results show that obstacles, like refuges, can reduce the predation rate because obstacles decrease the attack rate. However, while refuges can increase predator dependence, we suggest that obstacles can decrease it by reducing the rate of encounters between predators. Because of their opposite effect on predator dependence, obstacles and refuges could modify in different ways the stability of predator-prey communities.

  11. Statistical Evidence for the Preference of Frailty Distributions with Regularly-Varying-at-Zero Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missov, Trifon I.; Schöley, Jonas

    to this criterion admissible distributions are, for example, the gamma, the beta, the truncated normal, the log-logistic and the Weibull, while distributions like the log-normal and the inverse Gaussian do not satisfy this condition. In this article we show that models with admissible frailty distributions......Missov and Finkelstein (2011) prove an Abelian and its corresponding Tauberian theorem regarding distributions for modeling unobserved heterogeneity in fixed-frailty mixture models. The main property of such distributions is the regular variation at zero of their densities. According...... and a Gompertz baseline provide a better fit to adult human mortality data than the corresponding models with non-admissible frailty distributions. We implement estimation procedures for mixture models with a Gompertz baseline and frailty that follows a gamma, truncated normal, log-normal, or inverse Gaussian...

  12. Boreal coniferous forest density leads to significant variations in soil physical and geochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianelli, Carole; Ali, Adam A.; Beguin, Julien; Bergeron, Yves; Grondin, Pierre; Hély, Christelle; Paré, David

    2017-07-01

    At the northernmost extent of the managed forest in Quebec, Canada, the boreal forest is currently undergoing an ecological transition between two forest ecosystems. Open lichen woodlands (LW) are spreading southward at the expense of more productive closed-canopy black spruce-moss forests (MF). The objective of this study was to investigate whether soil properties could distinguish MF from LW in the transition zone where both ecosystem types coexist. This study brings out clear evidence that differences in vegetation cover can lead to significant variations in soil physical and geochemical properties.Here, we showed that soil carbon, exchangeable cations, and iron and aluminium crystallinity vary between boreal closed-canopy forests and open lichen woodlands, likely attributed to variations in soil microclimatic conditions. All the soils studied were typical podzolic soil profiles evolved from glacial till deposits that shared a similar texture of the C layer. However, soil humus and the B layer varied in thickness and chemistry between the two forest ecosystems at the pedon scale. Multivariate analyses of variance were used to evaluate how soil properties could help distinguish the two types at the site scale. MF humus (FH horizons horizons composing the O layer) showed significantly higher concentrations of organic carbon and nitrogen and of the main exchangeable base cations (Ca, Mg) than LW soils. The B horizon of LW sites held higher concentrations of total Al and Fe oxides and particularly greater concentrations of inorganic amorphous Fe oxides than MF mineral soils, while showing a thinner B layer. Overall, our results show that MF store three times more organic carbon in their soils (B+FH horizons, roots apart) than LW. We suggest that variations in soil properties between MF and LW are linked to a cascade of events involving the impacts of natural disturbances such as wildfires on forest regeneration that determines the vegetation structure (stand density

  13. Optimized LTE Cell Planning with Varying Spatial and Temporal User Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-03-09

    Base station deployment in cellular networks is one of the fundamental problems in network design. This paper proposes a novel method for the cell planning problem for the fourth generation (4G) cellular networks using meta-heuristic algorithms. In this approach, we aim to satisfy both cell coverage and capacity constraints simultaneously by formulating an optimization problem that captures practical planning aspects. The starting point of the planning process is defined through a dimensioning exercise that captures both coverage and capacity constraints. Afterwards, we implement a meta-heuristic algorithm based on swarm intelligence (e.g., particle swarm optimization or the recently-proposed grey wolf optimizer) to find suboptimal base station locations that satisfy both problem constraints in the area of interest which can be divided into several subareas with different spatial user densities. Subsequently, an iterative approach is executed to eliminate eventual redundant base stations. We also perform Monte Carlo simulations to study the performance of the proposed scheme and compute the average number of users in outage. Next, the problems of green planning with regards to temporal traffic variation and planning with location constraints due to tight limits on electromagnetic radiations are addressed, using the proposed method. Finally, in our simulation results, we apply our proposed approach for different scenarios with different subareas and user distributions and show that the desired network quality of service targets are always reached even for large-scale problems.

  14. Positive streamers in air and nitrogen of varying density: experiments on similarity laws

    CERN Document Server

    Briels, T M P; Ebert, Ute

    2008-01-01

    Positive streamers in ambient air at pressures from 0.013 to 1 bar are investigated experimentally. The voltage applied to the anode needle ranges from 5 to 45 kV, the discharge gap from 1 to 16 cm. Using a "slow" voltage rise time of 100 to 180 ns, the streamers are intentionally kept thin. For each pressure p, we find a minimal diameter d_{min}. To test whether streamers at different pressures are similar, the minimal streamer diameter d_{min} is multiplied by its pressure p; we find this product to be well approximated by p*d_{min}=0.20 \\pm 0.02 mm*bar over two decades of air pressure at room temperature. The value also fits diameters of sprite discharges above thunderclouds at an altitude of 80 km when extrapolated to room temperature (as air density rather than pressure determines the physical behavior). The minimal velocity of streamers in our measurements is approximately 0.1 mm/ns = 10^5 m/s. The same minimal velocity has been reported for tendrils in sprites. We also investigate the size of the initi...

  15. Growth performance, carcass quality, and noncarcass components of indigenous Caribbean goats under varying nutritional densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liméa, L; Boval, M; Mandonnet, N; Garcia, G; Archimède, H; Alexandre, G

    2009-11-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of feeding regimens on growth and carcass quality of the Creole goat, a genotype indigenous to the Caribbean. Forty kids weighing 9.0 +/- 1.2 kg of BW were reared indoors after weaning. Four supplement amounts were compared (10 kids per treatment): the G0 group received the basal diet (tropical forage, 8.8 MJ of ME and 108 g of CP/kg of DM) without concentrate, whereas the G100, G200, and G300 groups were offered 130, 230, and 310 g/d of concentrate (13.6 MJ of ME and 209 g of CP/kg of DM), respectively, in addition to the basal diet. The kids were slaughtered according to the standard procedure at 22 to 24 kg of BW for assessment of carcass traits and meat quality. Total DMI increased significantly, from 51 to 78 g/kg of BW(0.75), for G0 to G300 kids, whereas their ADG doubled from 42 to 84 g/d (P diets and were satisfactory compared with literature values. The carcass weight and dressing percentage (P diet. The conformation score increased significantly (P diet, it was possible to obtain well-conformed and heavy carcasses, with no excessive fattening. Indigenous Creole goats have potential as meat animals when fed to gain more than 80 g/d. The optimal supplement supply with good-quality grass would be approximately 3.69 MJ of ME/d in our conditions. Further studies are required on meat sensory parameters and fatty acid profiles.

  16. Nonsimilar Solution for Shock Waves in a Rotational Axisymmetric Perfect Gas with a Magnetic Field and Exponentially Varying Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field with consideration for the axisymmetric rotational effects is investigated. The ambient medium is assumed to have the radial, axial, and azimuthal velocity components. The fluid velocities and density of the ambient medium are assumed to vary according to an exponential law. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained by taking into account the vorticity vector and its components. The dependences of the characteristics of the problem on the Alfven-Mach number and time are obtained. It is shown that the presence of a magnetic field has a decaying effect on the shock wave. The pressure and density are shown to vanish at the inner surface (piston), and hence a vacuum forms at the line of symmetry.

  17. The composition of phyllosphere fungal assemblages of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) varies significantly along an elevation gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Tristan; Robin, Cécile; Capdevielle, Xavier; Fabreguettes, Olivier; Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure; Vacher, Corinne

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about the potential effect of climate warming on phyllosphere fungi, despite their important impact on the dynamics and diversity of plant communities. The structure of phyllosphere fungal assemblages along elevation gradients may provide information about this potential effect, because elevation gradients correspond to temperature gradients over short geographic distances. We thus investigated variations in the composition of fungal assemblages inhabiting the phyllosphere of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) at four sites over a gradient of 1000 m of elevation in the French Pyrénées Mountains, by using tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing. Our results show that the composition of fungal assemblages varied significantly between elevation sites, in terms of both the relative abundance and the presence-absence of species, and that the variations in assemblage composition were well correlated with variations in the average temperatures. Our results therefore suggest that climate warming might alter both the incidence and the abundance of phyllosphere fungal species, including potential pathogens. For example, Mycosphaerella punctiformis, a causal agent of leaf spots, showed decreasing abundance with elevation and might therefore shift to higher elevations in response to warming.

  18. Density perturbations in f (R ,ϕ ) gravity with an application to the varying-power-law model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Fayçal

    2017-09-01

    Density perturbations in the cosmic microwave background within general f (R ,ϕ ) models of gravity are investigated. The general dynamical equations for the tensor and scalar modes in any f (R ,ϕ )-gravity model are derived. An application of the equations to the varying-power-law modified gravity toy model is then made. Formulas and numerical values for the tensor-to-scalar ratio, the scalar tilt, and the tensor tilt are all obtained within this specific model. While the model cannot provide a theoretical reason for the value of the energy scale at which inflation should occur, it is found, based on the latest observations of the density perturbations in the sky, that the model requires inflation to occur at an energy scale less than the grand unified theory scale, namely, ˜1014 GeV . The different energy intervals examined here show that the density perturbations recently obtained from observations are recovered naturally, with very high precision, and without fine tuning the model's parameters.

  19. Propagation of a strong cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with exponentially varying density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gorakh Nath

    2010-01-01

    Non-similarity solutions are obtained for one-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic flow behind strong cylindrical shock wave propagation in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas,which has a variable azimuthal and axial fluid velocity.The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas.The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained,and the density of the mixture is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law.The fluid velocities in the ambient medium are assumed to obey exponential laws.The shock wave moves with variable velocity.The effects of variation of the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture,and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables in the region behind the shock are investigated at given times.Also,a comparison between the solutions in the cases of isothermal and adiabatic flows is made.

  20. Propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a gravitating or non-gravitating dusty gas with exponentially varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a dusty gas with or without self-gravitational effects is investigated in the case of isothermal and adiabatic flows. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas. The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained, and the density of the mixture is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law. Non-similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of variations of the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, and the presence of self-gravitational field on the flow variables are investigated at given times. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effects surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable differences are found in the distribution of flow variables. An increase in time also, increases the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that the consideration of isothermal flow increases the shock strength, and removes the singularity in the density distribution. Also, the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the inner contact surface and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in self-gravitating dusty gas can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, star formation and shocks in stellar explosion, nuclear explosion, in industry, rupture of a pressurized vessel and explosion in the ionosphere. Other potential applications of this study include analysis of data from exploding wire experiments and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or re-entry of vehicles etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating media. The obtained solutions are applicable for

  1. Experimental Analysis of AODV & DSR over TCP & CBR Connections with Varying Speed and Node Density in VANET

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Bijan; Bikas, Md Abu Naser

    2012-01-01

    Vehicular adhoc network or VANET is special types of adhoc network consists of moving cars referred to as nodes; provide a way to exchange any information between cars without depending on fixed infrastructure. For efficient communication between nodes various routing protocols and mobility models have been proposed based on different scenarios. Due to rapid topology changing and frequent disconnection makes it difficult to select suitable mobility model and routing protocols. Hence performance evaluation and comparison between routing protocols is required to understand any routing protocol as well as to develop a new routing protocol. In this research paper, the performance of two on-demand routing protocols AODV & DSR has been analyzed by means of packet delivery ratio, loss packet ratio & average end-to-end delay with varying speed limit and node density under TCP & CBR connection.

  2. Does natural larval parasitism of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) vary between years, generation, density of the host and vine cultivar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuéreb, A; Thiéry, D

    2006-04-01

    Populations of European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana Denis & Schiffermüller and its larval parasitoids were studied for two consecutive years on an experimental insecticide-free vineyard in France planted with adjacent plots of five grape cultivars (Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Sauvignon, Cabernet Sauvignon and Sémillon) using a natural L. botrana population during the first year, and a natural population supplemented with artificially inoculated individuals during the second year. Levels of natural populations of larval parasitoids were measured by their parasitism rate. The ichneumonid Campoplex capitator Aubert was the most common species collected from L. botrana larvae. Its incidence was higher during the spring compared to summer. The overall parasitism rate found on the experimental vineyard varied from 23% in 2000 to 53% in 2001, and was mainly due to C. capitator. Parasitism was not affected by the grape cultivar on which the host developed but was positively correlated with the host density, per bunch or per stock, suggesting that among the five grape cultivars tested, C. capitator females probably do not discriminate between hosts feeding on different grape cultivars, but rather the densities of L. botrana larvae.

  3. Wolbachia gonadal density in female and male Drosophila vary with laboratory adaptation and respond differently to physiological and environmental challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Claudia C; Ballard, J William O

    2012-11-01

    In symbiotic associations such as those between Wolbachia and insects, the within-host symbiont density plays an important role in the maintenance of the infection in natural populations, as it relates to transmission fidelity and pathogenicity of the symbiont. Within-host density is speculated to be the result of complex interactions between the bacterial genotype, the host genotype and the environment, which may account for the substantial variation in Wolbachia titres among wild collected individuals compared to laboratory lines. Using quantitative PCR, we screened the Wolbachia gonadal density of individuals from 50 isofemale Drosophila simulans lines raised in standard conditions for at least two generations after collection from the wild. Although these newly collected lines displayed significant variation of ovarian Wolbachia titres, such variation was lost by F(19). Assaying these flies at different ages and under different environmental conditions indicated that symbiont titres in female gonads were not affected by the conditions tested. However, Wolbachia density in male gonads was consistently affected by these treatments in a line-specific way. We propose that the differences in Wolbachia densities among ovaries of F(4) flies are the consequence of large differences in the field-collected females caused by the variable environment, and carried over for at least four generations. In addition, we provide evidence of sex-specific dynamics of Wolbachia in gonads of females and males. In combination, our results support the view of sex-specific Wolbachia evolutionary interactions for males and females, which has been predicted by theory and observed experimentally.

  4. Significance of periductal lymphatic and blood vascular densities in intraductal carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gohary, Yasser M; Metwally, Ghada; Saad, Reda S; Robinson, Morton J; Mesko, Thomas; Poppiti, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the significance of periductal lymphatic and blood vascular densities in intraductal carcinomas (IDC) of the breast. Thirty five cases of pure IDC treated by partial or total mastectomy were reviewed. Seven cases with normal breast tissue and 48 cases of invasive breast carcinoma were included as controls. All cases were immunostained with D2-40 and CD31. Positively stained microvessels were counted in densely vascular/lymphatic foci (hot spots) at 400x (=0.17 mm(2)) in the periductal areas. IDC without comedonecrosis showed a mean periductal D2-40 lymphatic microvessel density (LMD) of 5.8 +/- 5 (range 0-18), and a CD31 microvessel density (MD) of 14 +/- 8.9 (range 1-40). IDC with comedonecrosis showed periductal D2-40 LMD of 8.4 +/- 3.8 (range 4-18), and a CD31 MD of 24.3 +/- 7.6 (range 14-40). There was a significant difference between periductal D2-40 LMD and CD31 MD counts in IDC with and without comedonecrosis. There was a positive correlation of periductal D2-40 LMD and CD31 MD counts with high nuclear grade (r = 0.39 and 0.56) of IDC as well as with the presence of comedonecrosis (r = 0.49 and 0.59). Both D2-40 LMD and CD31 MD did not correlate significantly with tumor size, estrogen status, or progesterone status. As IDC with comedonecrosis and/or high nuclear grade has a worse prognosis than IDC without comedonecrosis and/or with low nuclear grade, it appears that lymphatic and blood vascular density evaluated by D2-40 and CD31, respectively, are independent prognostic indicators for patients with IDC of the breast and may be an indicator of early or unrecognized invasion or "regression."

  5. Unsteady isothermal flow behind a magnetogasdynamic shock wave in a self-gravitating gas with exponentially varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2014-06-01

    The propagation of spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in an ideal gas with or without gravitational effects in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field is investigated. Non-similarity solutions are obtained for isothermal flow between the shock and the piston. The numerical solutions are obtained using the Runge-Kutta method of the fourth order. The density of the gas is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law. The shock wave moves with variable velocity, and the total energy of the wave is non-constant and varies with time. The effects of variation of the Alfven-Mach number, gravitational parameter and time are obtained. It is investigated that the presence of gravitational field reduces the effect of the magnetic field. Also, the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and, therefore, the distance between the inner contact surface and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in conducting perfect gas can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, rupture of a pressurized vessel and explosion in the ionosphere. Other potential applications of this study include analysis of data from exploding wire experiments and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or re-entry vehicles etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating medium with or without magnetic field. The obtained solutions are applicable for arbitrary values of time.

  6. Variation of interface trap level charge density within the bandgap of 4H-SiC with varying oxide thickness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjeev K Gupta; A Azam; J Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial characteristics of metal oxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) structure with different thickness of SiO2, thermally grown in steam ambient on Si-face of 4H-SiC (0 0 0 1) substrate were investigated. Variations in interface trapped level density (Dit) was systematically studied employing high-low (H-L) frequency – method. It was found that the distribution of Dit within the bandgap of 4H-SiC varied with oxide thickness. The calculated Dit value near the midgap of 4H-SiC remained almost stable for all oxide thicknesses in the range of 109 –1010 cm-2 eV-1. The Dit near the conduction band edge had been found to be of the order of 1011 cm-2 eV-1 for thicker oxides and for thinner oxides Dit was found to be the range of 1010 cm-2 eV-1. The process had direct relevance in the fabrication of MOS-based device structures.

  7. Relative Significance of the Stimulated Raman Scattering and Two-Plasmon-Decay Instabilities at Quarter-Critical Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R. W.; Wen, H.; Maximov, A. V.; Myatt, J. F.; Seka, W.

    2016-10-01

    In direct-drive experiments on OMEGA, correlated signals of half-harmonic light and hot-electron production have usually been ascribed to two-plasmon decay (TPD). However, as scale lengths and temperatures increase, absolute stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is expected to play a larger role in generating hot electrons and half-harmonic light. This may already be occurring in more-recent OMEGA experiments. Both instabilities occur at quarter-critical density, and for obliquely incident light, they can merge into a ``hybrid'' instability with a threshold differing from SRS and TPD thresholds considered separately. This talk analyzes how the thresholds of the quarter-critical instabilities vary with the incidence angle and polarization of the incident light, as well as the plasma parameters, and the expected significance for direct-drive experiments. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Varying relationship between 25-hydroxy-vitamin D, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and serum 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase with sunlight exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Vivek G; Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Mughal, Zulf M; Khadilkar, Vaman V

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol and cholecalciferol are synthesized from a common substrate 7-dehydrocholesterol. 7-dehydrocholesterol is converted to cholesterol by 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase enzyme (DHCR7) and to cholecalciferol by ultraviolet B radiation from sunlight. To examine the effect of sunlight exposure and serum DHCR7 levels on cholecalciferol and cholesterol levels and studying any interrelationship. In a cross-sectional observational study, 307 apparently healthy men (aged 40-60 years) were assessed for sunlight exposure, lipid levels, serum DHCR7, 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), body composition, and dietary milk calcium intake. Vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D sunlight exposure (P sunlight exposure (sunlight exposure (1-2 h/d), there was no significant association. However, with higher sunlight exposure (>2 h/d), serum 25(OH)D concentrations were significantly negatively associated with HDL-C (P sunlight exposure, an inverse significant relationship was observed between 25(OH)D and serum DHCR7 (P sunlight exposure, no significant relationship was seen. 25(OH)D seems to show a varying relationship with HDL-C and serum DHCR7 at different durations of sunlight exposure. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Larval Survivorship and Settlement of Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris at Varying Algal Cell Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan S. Pratchett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dispersal potential of crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS larvae is important in understanding both the initiation and spread of population outbreaks, and is fundamentally dependent upon how long larvae can persist while still retaining the capacity to settle. This study quantified variation in larval survivorship and settlement rates for CoTS maintained at three different densities of a single-celled flagellate phytoplankton, Proteomonas sulcata (1 × 103, 1 × 104, and 1 × 105 cells/mL. Based on the larval starvation hypothesis, we expected that low to moderate levels of phytoplankton prey would significantly constrain both survival and settlement. CoTS larvae were successfully maintained for up to 50 days post-fertilization, but larval survival differed significantly between treatments. Survival was greatest at intermediate food levels (1 × 104 cells/mL, and lowest at high (1 × 105 cells/mL food levels. Rates of settlement were also highest at intermediate food levels and peaked at 22 days post-fertilization. Peak settlement was delayed at low food levels, probably reflective of delayed development, but there was no evidence of accelerated development at high chlorophyll concentrations. CoTS larvae were recorded to settle 17–43 days post-fertilization, but under optimum conditions with intermediate algal cell densities, peak settlement occurred at 22 days post-fertilization. Natural fluctuations in nutrient concentrations and food availability may affect the number of CoTS that effectively settle, but seem unlikely to influence dispersal dynamics.

  10. Effects of Varying Shrub Density on Erosion and Deposition During a Large Flood, Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, E. R.; Friedman, J. M.; Vincent, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A large flood in August 2006 following saltcedar control efforts along a 12-km segment of the Rio Puerco provided an opportunity to measure the effects of varying shrub density on down-valley flood flow and sediment transport. Post-flood field observations in two 3-km long arroyo segments, one in the sprayed reach and one downstream from the sprayed reach, indicate the density and distribution of woody vegetation had a substantial effect on locations and magnitudes of sediment erosion and deposition. In the reach sprayed with herbicide three years before the flood, in which dense woody stems covered only about 30% of the pre-flood (2005) floodplain, average channel width increased by 63% during the flood. Downstream from the sprayed reach, where both pre-and post-flood shrubs covered 50% of the floodplain, erosion was limited to sites where flood flow through sharp bends undercut the arroyo wall. Flow and suspended sediment transport were computed for two 500-m-long floodplain segments, one in the sprayed reach and one downstream from the sprayed reach. Large volumes of fine-grain sediment (fine to very fine sand and silt) were available for transport during the flood in both reaches. In the reach sprayed with herbicide, dense canopy (dominantly saltcedar; Tamarix spp.) remained only within 10-m-wide linear bands oriented along the present or former channel and in isolated, small shrubs scattered about the floodplain. Downstream from the sprayed reach, adjacent shrub bands were closely spaced, with canopies touching in many areas. Mature saltcedar along the Rio Puerco have rigid, dense stems more than 2 m high, whereas floodplain flow depths during the August 2006 event were on the order of 1 m. Drag on the stems was computed using the average stem density (average stem diameter divided by average stem spacing squared) determined from a large number of measurements along the Rio Puerco, 0.35 m-1 (Friedman and others, unpublished data, 2004). Computations of flow

  11. Thermodynamic study of three pharmacologically significant drugs: Density, viscosity, and refractive index measurements at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mjiqauchem@yahoo.com; Chaudhry, Mansoora Ahmed [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of density, viscosity, and refractive index of three pharmacologically significant drugs, i.e. diclofenac sodium, cetrizine, and doxycycline have been carried in aqueous medium at T = (293.15 to 313.15) K. An automated vibrating-tube densimeter, viscometer, and refractometer are used in a concentration range from (7.5) . 10{sup -3} to 25 . 10{sup -3}) mol . kg{sup -1}. The precise density results are used to evaluate the apparent molar volume, partial molar volume, thermal expansion coefficient, partial molar expansivity, and the Hepler's constant. Viscosity results are used to calculate the Jones-Dole viscosity B-coefficient, free energy of activation of the solute and solvent, activation enthalpy, and activation entropy. The molar refractive indices of the drug solutions can be employed to calculate molar refraction. It is inferred from these results that the above mentioned drugs act as structure-making compounds due to hydrophobic hydration of the molecules in the drugs.

  12. Kernel density surface modelling as a means to identify significant concentrations of vulnerable marine ecosystem indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Kenchington

    Full Text Available The United Nations General Assembly Resolution 61/105, concerning sustainable fisheries in the marine ecosystem, calls for the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME from destructive fishing practices. Subsequently, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO produced guidelines for identification of VME indicator species/taxa to assist in the implementation of the resolution, but recommended the development of case-specific operational definitions for their application. We applied kernel density estimation (KDE to research vessel trawl survey data from inside the fishing footprint of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO Regulatory Area in the high seas of the northwest Atlantic to create biomass density surfaces for four VME indicator taxa: large-sized sponges, sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals. These VME indicator taxa were identified previously by NAFO using the fragility, life history characteristics and structural complexity criteria presented by FAO, along with an evaluation of their recovery trajectories. KDE, a non-parametric neighbour-based smoothing function, has been used previously in ecology to identify hotspots, that is, areas of relatively high biomass/abundance. We present a novel approach of examining relative changes in area under polygons created from encircling successive biomass categories on the KDE surface to identify "significant concentrations" of biomass, which we equate to VMEs. This allows identification of the VMEs from the broader distribution of the species in the study area. We provide independent assessments of the VMEs so identified using underwater images, benthic sampling with other gear types (dredges, cores, and/or published species distribution models of probability of occurrence, as available. For each VME indicator taxon we provide a brief review of their ecological function which will be important in future assessments of significant adverse impact on these habitats here

  13. The influence of part-word phonotactic probability/neighborhood density on word learning by preschool children varying in expressive vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkel, Holly L; Hoover, Jill R

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the influence of part-word phonotactic probability/neighborhood density on word learning by preschool children with normal vocabularies that varied in size. Ninety-eight children (age 2 ; 11-6 ; 0) were taught consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) nonwords orthogonally varying in the probability/density of the CV (i.e. body) and VC (i.e. rhyme). Learning was measured via picture naming. Children with the lowest expressive vocabulary scores showed no effect of either CV or VC probability/density, although floor effects could not be ruled out. In contrast, children with low or high expressive vocabulary scores demonstrated sensitivity to part-word probability/density with the nature of the effect varying by group. Children with the highest expressive vocabulary scores displayed yet a third pattern of part-word probability/density effects. Taken together, word learning by preschool children was influenced by part-word probability/density but the nature of this influence appeared to depend on the size of the lexicon.

  14. Varying protein source and quantity does not significantly improve weight loss, fat loss, or satiety in reduced energy diets among midlife adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    This pilot study tested whether varying protein source and quantity in a reduced energy diet would result in significant differences in weight, body composition, and renin angiotensin aldosterone system activity in midlife adults. Eighteen subjects enrolled in a 5 month weight reduction study, invol...

  15. Carbon storage potential in size–density fractions from semi-natural grassland ecosystems with different productivities over varying soil depths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breulmann, Marc [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Environmental and Biotechnology Centre (UBZ), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Boettger, Tatjana [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Isotope Hydrology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Buscot, François [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gruendling, Ralf [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department, Department of Soil Physics, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Schulz, Elke [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have increasingly recognised a profound need for more information on SOC stocks in the soil and the factors governing their stability and dynamics. Many questions still remain unanswered about the interplay between changes in plant communities and the extent to which changes in aboveground productivity affect the carbon dynamics in soils through changes in its quantity and quality. Therefore, the main aim of this research was to examine the SOC accumulation potential of semi-natural grasslands of different productivities and determine the distribution of SOM fractions over varying soil depth intervals (0–10, 10–20, 20–30 30–50 50–80 and 80 + cm). SOM fractionation was considered as a relative measure of stability to separate SOM associated with clay minerals from SOM of specific light densities less than 2 g cm{sup −3} (size-density fractionation). Two clay-associated fractions (CF1, < 1 μm; and CF2, 1–2 μm) and two light fractions (LF1, < 1.8 g cm{sup −3}; and LF2, 1.8–2.0 g cm{sup −3}) were separated. The stability of these fractions was characterised by their carbon hot water extractability (C{sub HWE}) and stable carbon isotope composition. In the semi-natural grasslands studied, most OC was stored in the top 30 cm, where turnover is rapid. Effects of low productivity grasslands became only significantly apparent when fractional OC contributions of total SOM was considered (CF1 and LF1). In deeper soil depths OC was largely attributed to the CF1 fraction of low productivity grasslands. We suggest that the majority of OM in deeper soil depth intervals is microbially-derived, as evidenced by decreasing C/N ratios and decreasing δ{sup 13}C values. The hot water extraction and natural δ{sup 13}C abundance, employed here allowed the characterisation of SOM stabilisation properties, however how climatic changes affect the fate of OM within different soil depth intervals is still unknown. - Highlights: • OC stocks over varying

  16. Intravenous contrast injection significantly affects bone mineral density measured on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompe, Esther; Willemink, Martin J.; Dijkhuis, Gawein R.; Verhaar, Harald J.J.; Hoesein, Firdaus A.A.M.; Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Internal Medicine-Geriatrics, Postbus 85500, Postbox: E.03.511, GA, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-05

    The objective is to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast media on bone mineral density (BMD) assessment by comparing unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examinations performed for other indications. One hundred and fifty-two patients (99 without and 53 with malignant neoplasm) who underwent both unenhanced and two contrast-enhanced (arterial and portal venous phase) abdominal CT examinations in a single session between June 2011 and July 2013 were included. BMD was evaluated on the three examinations as CT-attenuation values in Hounsfield Units (HU) in the first lumbar vertebra (L1). CT-attenuation values were significantly higher in both contrast-enhanced phases, compared to the unenhanced phase (p < 0.01). In patients without malignancies, mean ± standard deviation (SD) HU-values increased from 128.8 ± 48.6 HU for the unenhanced phase to 142.3 ± 47.2 HU for the arterial phase and 147.0 ± 47.4 HU for the portal phase (p < 0.01). In patients with malignancies, HU-values increased from 112.1 ± 38.1 HU to 126.2 ± 38.4 HU and 130.1 ± 37.3 HU (p < 0.02), respectively. With different thresholds to define osteoporosis, measurements in the arterial and portal phase resulted in 7-25 % false negatives. Our study showed that intravenous contrast injection substantially affects BMD-assessment on CT and taking this into account may improve routine assessment of low BMD in nonquantitative CT. (orig.)

  17. Intravenous contrast injection significantly affects bone mineral density measured on CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pompe, Esther; Willemink, Martin J.; Dijkhuis, Gawein R.; Verhaar, Harald J. J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111379628; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341235512; de Jong, Pim A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/287955672

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective is to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast media on bone mineral density (BMD) assessment by comparing unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examinations performed for other indications. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two patients (99 without and 5

  18. Intravenous contrast injection significantly affects bone mineral density measured on CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pompe, Esther; Willemink, Martin J.; Dijkhuis, Gawein R.; Verhaar, Harald J. J.; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A A; de Jong, Pim A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective is to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast media on bone mineral density (BMD) assessment by comparing unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examinations performed for other indications. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two patients (99 without and 5

  19. The density of knobs on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes depends on developmental age and varies among isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quadt, Katharina A; Barfod, Lea; Andersen, Daniel;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is related to the parasite's ability to evade host immunity through clonal antigenic variation and tissue-specific adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs). The P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family expressed on dome....... Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide detailed information on isolate- and time-dependent differences in knob size and density. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used atomic force microscopy to characterize knobs on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Fourteen ex vivo isolates...

  20. Significance of non-perturbative input to TMD gluon density for hard processes at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Grinyuk, A A; Lykasov, G I; Zotov, N P

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of the non-perturbative input to the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) gluon density in hard processes at the LHC. We derive the input TMD gluon distribution at low scale mu0^2 ~ 1 GeV^2 from the fit of the inclusive hadron spectra measured at low transverse momenta in pp collisions at the LHC and demonstrate that the best description of these spectra for larger hadron transverse momenta can be achieved by matching the derived TMD gluon distribution with the exact solution of the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) equation obtained at low x and small gluon transverse momenta outside the saturation region. Then, we extend the input TMD gluon density to higher mu^2 numerically using the Catani-Ciafoloni-Fiorani-Marchesini (CCFM) gluon evolution equation. A special attention is put to the phenomenological applications of obtained TMD gluon density to some LHC processes, which are sensitive to the gluon content of a proton.

  1. Improving detection tools for the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): comparison of prism and multifunnel traps at varying population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Crook, Damon J; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

    2013-12-01

    The current emerald ash borer survey trap used in the United States is a prism trap constructed from a stock purple corrugated plastic. In recent years, several colors (particularly shades of green and purple) have been shown to be more attractive to the emerald ash borer than this stock color. Our goal was to determine if plastics produced with these colors and incorporated into prism traps can improve and serve as a new alternative to plastics already in use for the emerald ash borer survey. The plastics were tested in moderate to heavily infested areas in Michigan in two initial studies to test their effectiveness at catching the emerald ash borer. Because results from studies performed in heavily infested sites may not always correspond with what is found along the edges of the infestation, we compared trap catch and detection rates (recording at least one catch on a trap over the course of the entire trapping season) of several trap types and colors at sites outside the core of the currently known emerald ash borer infestation in a nine-state detection tool comparison study. Two of the new plastics, a (Sabic) purple and a medium-dark (Sabic) green were incorporated into prism traps and tested alongside a standard purple prism trap and a green multifunnel trap. In areas with lower emerald ash borer density, the new purple (Sabic) corrugated plastic caught more beetles than the current purple prism trap, as well as more than the medium-dark green (Sabic) prism and green multifunnel traps. Sabic purple traps in the detection tools comparison study recorded a detection rate of 86% compared with 73, 66, and 58% for the standard purple, Sabic green, and green multifunnel traps, respectively. These detection rates were reduced to 80, 63, 55, and 46%, respectively, at low emerald ash borer density sites.

  2. Molecular simulation insights on the in vacuo adsorption of amino acids on graphene oxide surfaces with varying surface oxygen densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Farzin; Nouranian, Sasan; Mahdavi, Mina; Al-Ostaz, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    In this fundamental study, a series of molecular dynamics simulations were performed in vacuo to investigate the energetics and select geometries of 20 standard amino acids (AAs) on pristine graphene (PG) and graphene oxide (GO) surfaces as a function of graphene surface oxygen density. These interactions are of key interest to graphene/biomolecular systems. Our results indicate that aromatic AAs exhibit the strongest total interactions with the PG surfaces due to π-π stacking. Tryptophan (Trp) has the highest aromaticity due to its indole side chain and, hence, has the strongest interaction among all AAs (-16.66 kcal/mol). Aliphatic, polar, and charged AAs show various levels of affinity to the PG sheets depending on the strength of their side chain hydrophobic interactions. For example, arginine (Arg) with its guanidinium side chain exhibits the strongest interaction with the PG sheets (-13.81 kcal/mol) following aromatic AAs. Also, glycine (Gly; a polar AA) has the weakest interaction with the PG sheets (-7.29 kcal/mol). When oxygen-containing functional groups are added to the graphene sheets, the π-π stacking in aromatic AAs becomes disrupted and perfect parallelism of the aromatic rings is lost. Moreover, hydrogen bonding and/or electrostatic interactions become more pronounced. Charged AAs exhibit the strongest interactions with the GO surfaces. In general, the AA-GO interactions increase with increasing surface oxygen density, and the effect is more pronounced at higher O/C ratios. This study provides a quantitative measure of AA-graphene interactions for the design and tuning of biomolecular systems suitable for biosensing, drug delivery, and gene delivery applications.

  3. Brain response to images of food varying in energy density is associated with body composition in 7- to 10-year-old children: Results of an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnbach, S Nicole; English, Laural K; Lasschuijt, Marlou; Wilson, Stephen J; Savage, Jennifer S; Fisher, Jennifer O; Rolls, Barbara J; Keller, Kathleen L

    2016-08-01

    Energy balance is regulated by a multifaceted system of physiological signals that influence energy intake and expenditure. Therefore, variability in the brain's response to food may be partially explained by differences in levels of metabolically active tissues throughout the body, including fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that children's body composition would be related to their brain response to food images varying in energy density (ED), a measure of energy content per weight of food. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure brain response to High (>1.5kcal/g) and Low (food images, and Control images, in 36 children ages 7-10years. Body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Multi-subject random effects general linear model (GLM) and two-factor repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to test for main effects of ED (High ED vs. Low ED) in a priori defined brain regions of interest previously implicated in energy homeostasis and reward processing. Pearson's correlations were then calculated between activation in these regions for various contrasts (High ED-Low ED, High ED-Control, Low ED-Control) and child body composition (FFM index, FM index, % body fat). Relative to Low ED foods, High ED foods elicited greater BOLD activation in the left thalamus. In the right substantia nigra, BOLD activation for the contrast of High ED-Low ED foods was positively associated with child FFM. There were no significant results for the High ED-Control or Low ED-Control contrasts. Our findings support literature on FFM as an appetitive driver, such that greater amounts of lean mass were associated with greater activation for High ED foods in an area of the brain associated with dopamine signaling and reward (substantia nigra). These results confirm our hypothesis that brain response to foods varying in energy content is related to measures of child body

  4. Non-invasive prediction of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses by contrast density difference in coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Michaela M., E-mail: michaela.hell@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen (Germany); Dey, Damini [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Taper Building, Room A238, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan; Schmid, Jasmin; Schuhbaeck, Annika [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Overestimation of coronary lesions by coronary computed tomography angiography and subsequent unnecessary invasive coronary angiography and revascularization is a concern. • Differences in plaque characteristics and contrast density difference between hemodynamically significant and non-significant stenoses, as defined by invasive fractional flow reserve, were assessed. • At a threshold of ≥24%, contrast density difference predicted hemodynamically significant lesions with a specificity of 75%, sensitivity of 33%, PPV of 35% and NPV of 73%. • The determination of contrast density difference required less time than transluminal attenuation gradient measurement. - Abstract: Objectives: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) allows the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease. However, its ability to predict the hemodynamic significance of stenoses is limited. We assessed differences in plaque characteristics and contrast density difference between hemodynamically significant and non-significant stenoses, as defined by invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). Methods: Lesion characteristics of 59 consecutive patients (72 lesions) in whom invasive FFR was performed in at least one coronary artery with moderate to high-grade stenoses in coronary CTA were evaluated by two experienced readers. Coronary CTA data sets were acquired on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner using retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition or prospectively ECG-triggered axial acquisition mode. Plaque volume and composition (non-calcified, calcified), remodeling index as well as contrast density difference (defined as the percentage decline in luminal CT attenuation/cross-sectional area over the lesion) were assessed using a semi-automatic software tool (Autoplaq). Additionally, the transluminal attenuation gradient (defined as the linear regression coefficient between intraluminal CT attenuation and length from the ostium) was determined

  5. On the significance of density-induced speed of sound variations on US-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Department, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To show the effect of speed of sound (SOS) aberration on ultrasound guided radiotherapy (US-gRT) as a function of implemented workflow. US systems assume that SOS is constant in human soft tissues (at a value of 1540 m/s), while its actual nonuniform distribution produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. When a coregistered computerized tomography (CT) scan is available, the US image can be corrected for SOS aberration. Typically, image guided radiotherapy workflows implementing US systems only provide a CT scan at the simulation (SIM) stage. If changes occur in geometry or density distribution between SIM and treatment (TX) stage, SOS aberration can change accordingly, with a final impact on the measured position of structures which is dependent on the workflow adopted. Methods: Four basic scenarios were considered of possible changes between SIM and TX: (1) No changes, (2) only patient position changes (rigid rotation-translation), (3) only US transducer position changes (constrained on patient's surface), and (4) patient tissues thickness changes. Different SOS aberrations may arise from the different scenarios, according to the specific US-gRT workflow used: intermodality (INTER) where TX US scans are compared to SIM CT scans; intramodality (INTRA) where TX US scans are compared to SIM US scans; and INTERc and INTRAc where all US images are corrected for SOS aberration (using density information provided by SIM CT). For an experimental proof of principle, the effect of tissues thickness change was simulated in the different workflows: a dual layered phantom was filled with layers of sunflower oil (SOS 1478 m/s), water (SOS 1482 m/s), and 20% saline solution (SOS 1700 m/s). The phantom was US scanned, the layer thicknesses were increased and the US scans were repeated. The errors resulting from the different workflows were compared. Results: Theoretical considerations show that workflows

  6. Correlations Between the Gradient of Contrast Density, Evaluated by Cardio CT, and Functional Significance of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzan Marius

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis is a challenging task, being extremely important for the establishment of indication for revascularization in atherosclerotic coronary artery stenosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of a new marker reflecting the functional significance of a coronary artery stenosis, represented by the attenuation degree of contrast density along the stenosis by Coronary CT.

  7. Scaling of surface-plasma reactors with a significantly increased energy density for NO conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad Arif; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2012-03-30

    Comparative studies revealed that surface plasmas developing along a solid-gas interface are significantly more effective and energy efficient for remediation of toxic pollutants in air than conventional plasmas propagating in air. Scaling of the surface plasma reactors to large volumes by operating them in parallel suffers from a serious problem of adverse effects of the space charges generated at the dielectric surfaces of the neighboring discharge chambers. This study revealed that a conductive foil on the cathode potential placed between the dielectric plates as a shield not only decoupled the discharges, but also increased the electrical power deposited in the reactor by a factor of about forty over the electrical power level obtained without shielding and without loss of efficiency for NO removal. The shield had no negative effect on efficiency, which is verified by the fact that the energy costs for 50% NO removal were about 60 eV/molecule and the energy constant, k(E), was about 0.02 L/J in both the shielded and unshielded cases.

  8. Using geographically weighted regression (GWR) to explore spatial varying relationships of immature mosquitoes and human densities with the incidence of dengue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Wen, Tzai-Hung

    2011-01-01

    of entomology and dengue cases in the cities of Kaohsiung and Fengshan in 2002. Our findings indicate that dengue-mosquito and dengue-human relationships were significantly spatially non-stationary. This means that in some areas higher dengue incidences were associated with higher vector/host densities...

  9. Combining Density and Overlap (CoDO): A New Method for Assessing the Significance of Overlap Among Subgraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Magner, Abram; Grama, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Algorithms for detecting clusters (including overlapping clusters) in graphs have received significant attention in the research community. A closely related important aspect of the problem -- quantification of statistical significance of overlap of clusters, remains relatively unexplored. This paper presents the first theoretical and practical results on quantifying statistically significant interactions between clusters in networks. Such problems commonly arise in diverse applications, ranging from social network analysis to systems biology. The paper addresses the problem of quantifying the statistical significance of the observed overlap of the two clusters in an Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi graph model. The analytical framework presented in the paper assigns a $p$-value to overlapping subgraphs by combining information about both the sizes of the subgraphs and their edge densities in comparison to the corresponding values for their overlapping component. This $p$-value is demonstrated to have excellent discriminati...

  10. Carbon storage potential in size-density fractions from semi-natural grassland ecosystems with different productivities over varying soil depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breulmann, Marc; Boettger, Tatjana; Buscot, François; Gruendling, Ralf; Schulz, Elke

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have increasingly recognised a profound need for more information on SOC stocks in the soil and the factors governing their stability and dynamics. Many questions still remain unanswered about the interplay between changes in plant communities and the extent to which changes in aboveground productivity affect the carbon dynamics in soils through changes in its quantity and quality. Therefore, the main aim of this research was to examine the SOC accumulation potential of semi-natural grasslands of different productivities and determine the distribution of SOM fractions over varying soil depth intervals (0-10, 10-20, 20-30 30-50 50-80 and 80+cm). SOM fractionation was considered as a relative measure of stability to separate SOM associated with clay minerals from SOM of specific light densities less than 2 g cm(-3) (size-density fractionation). Two clay-associated fractions (CF1, soil depths OC was largely attributed to the CF1 fraction of low productivity grasslands. We suggest that the majority of OM in deeper soil depth intervals is microbially-derived, as evidenced by decreasing C/N ratios and decreasing δ(13)C values. The hot water extraction and natural δ(13)C abundance, employed here allowed the characterisation of SOM stabilisation properties, however how climatic changes affect the fate of OM within different soil depth intervals is still unknown.

  11. Soil biogeochemistry properties vary between two boreal forest ecosystems in Quebec: significant differences in soil carbon, available nutrients and iron and aluminium crystallinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianelli, Carole; Ali, Adam A.; Beguin, Julien; Bergeron, Yves; Grondin, Pierre; Hély, Christelle; Paré, David

    2017-04-01

    At the northernmost extent of the managed forest in Quebec, the boreal forest is currently undergoing an ecological transition from closed-canopy black spruce-moss forests towards open-canopy lichen woodlands, which spread southward. Our study aim was to determine whether this shift could impact soil properties on top of its repercussions on forest productivity or carbon storage. We studied the soil biogeochemical composition of three pedological layers in moss forests (MF) and lichen woodlands (LW) north of the Manicouagan crater in Quebec. The humus layer (FH horizons) was significantly thicker and held more carbon, nitrogen and exchangeable Ca and Mg in MF plots than in LW plots. When considering mineral horizons, we found that the deep C horizon had a very close composition in both ecosystem plots, suggesting that the parent material was of similar geochemical nature. This was expected as all selected sites developed from glacial deposit. Multivariate analysis of surficial mineral B horizon showed however that LW B horizon displayed higher concentrations of Al and Fe oxides than MF B horizon, particularly for inorganic amorphous forms. Conversely, main exchangeable base cations (Ca, Mg) were higher in B horizon of MF than that of LW. Ecosystem types explained much of the variations in the B horizon geochemical composition. We thus suggest that the differences observed in the geochemical composition of the B horizon have a biological origin rather than a mineralogical origin. We also showed that total net stocks of carbon stored in MF soils were three times higher than in LW soils (FH + B horizons, roots apart). Altogether, we suggest that variations in soil properties between MF and LW are linked to a cascade of events involving the impacts of natural disturbances such as wildfires on forest regeneration that determines the of vegetation structure (stand density) and composition (ground cover type) and their subsequent consequences on soil environmental

  12. Effects of feeding diets varying in energy and nutrient density to Hy-Line W-36 laying hens on production performance and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dePersio, S; Utterback, P L; Utterback, C W; Rochell, S J; O'Sullivan, N; Bregendahl, K; Arango, J; Parsons, C M; Koelkebeck, K W

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of feeding 5 different energy and nutrient dense diets to Hy-Line W-36 hens on long-term performance and economics. A total of 480 19 wk old Hy-Line W-36 Single Comb White Leghorn hens were weighed and randomly allocated to 6 replicate groups of 16 hens each (2 adjacent cages containing 8 hens per cage, 60.9×58.4 cm) per dietary treatment in a randomized complete block design. The hens were fed 5 treatment diets formulated to contain 85, 90, 95, 100, and 105% of the energy and nutrient recommendations stated in the 2009 Hy-Line Variety W-36 Commercial Management Guide. Production performance was measured for 52 wk from 19 to 70 wk age. Over the course of the trial, a significant increasing linear response to increasing energy and nutrient density was seen for hen-day egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed efficiency, energy intake, and body weight (BW). Feed intake showed no significant linear level response to increasing energy and nutrient density except during the early production cycle. No consistent responses were noted for egg quality, percent yolk, and percent egg solids throughout the study. Significant linear responses due to energy and nutrient density were seen for egg income, feed cost, and income minus feed cost. In general, as energy and nutrient density increased, egg income and feed cost per hen increased, but income minus feed cost decreased. Overall, these results indicate that feeding Hy-Line W-36 hens increasing energy and nutrient-dense diets will increase egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed efficiency, energy intake, BW, egg income, and feed cost, but decrease egg income minus feed cost. However, these benefits do not take effect in early production and seem to be most effective in later stages of the production cycle, perhaps "priming" the birds for better egg-production persistency with age.

  13. STUDY ON THE CLINICAL-PATHOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF MICROVESSEL DENSITY AND VASCULAR ENDOTHILIAL GROWTH FACTOR EXPRESSION IN PRIMARY LIVER CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jing-lin; YANG Bing-hui; YE Sheng-long; LIN Zhi-ying; MA Zeng-chen; ZHOU Xin-da; WU Zhi-quan; TANG Zhao-you

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical-pathological significance of intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) expression in primary liver cancer (PLC). Methods: A retrospective study from 63 postoperative patients all with small PLC (diameter ≤ 5 cm) was done. One group of 29 patients developed recurrence or metastasis within 2 years. The other group of 34 patients had no evidence of recurrence or metastasis within 2 years. Three sections were taken from each patient. One for H.E. staining, the other two for VEGF and Bio-UEA-Ⅰ immunohistochemical staining respectively.MVD was counted by endothelial cells, which were highlighted by Bio-UEA-Ⅰ. Results: The MVD of the recurrence (or metastasis) group (49.6±29.7) were significantly greater than the other group (22.7±28.2) (P<0.01); The VEGF positive rate of the recurrence group was 86.2% (25/29), the rate of the other group was 47.1% (16/34). The difference between the 2 groups was stafistically significant (P<0.01). The stage of the tumor, the positive rate of satellite nodules and the positive rate of the portal vein embolus were all significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Besides tumor stage, satellite nodule and portal vein embolus, the MVD and VEGF are also of prognostic significance.

  14. Depth-varying density and organization of chondrocytes in immature and mature bovine articular cartilage assessed by 3d imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadin, Kyle D.; Wong, Benjamin L.; Bae, Won C.; Li, Kelvin W.; Williamson, Amanda K.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Sah, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a heterogeneous tissue, with cell density and organization varying with depth from the surface. The objectives of the present study were to establish a method for localizing individual cells in three-dimensional (3D) images of cartilage and quantifying depth-associated variation in cellularity and cell organization at different stages of growth. Accuracy of nucleus localization was high, with 99% sensitivity relative to manual localization. Cellularity (million cells per cm3) decreased from 290, 310, and 150 near the articular surface in fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, to 120, 110, and 50 at a depth of 1.0 mm. The distance/angle to the nearest neighboring cell was 7.9 microm/31 degrees , 7.1 microm/31 degrees , and 9.1 microm/31 degrees for cells at the articular surface of fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, and increased/decreased to 11.6 microm/31 degrees , 12.0 microm/30 degrees , and 19.2 microm/25 degrees at a depth of 0.7 mm. The methodologies described here may be useful for analyzing the 3D cellular organization of cartilage during growth, maturation, aging, degeneration, and regeneration.

  15. Depth-varying density and organization of chondrocytes in immature and mature bovine articular cartilage assessed by 3d imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadin, Kyle D.; Wong, Benjamin L.; Bae, Won C.; Li, Kelvin W.; Williamson, Amanda K.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Sah, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a heterogeneous tissue, with cell density and organization varying with depth from the surface. The objectives of the present study were to establish a method for localizing individual cells in three-dimensional (3D) images of cartilage and quantifying depth-associated variation in cellularity and cell organization at different stages of growth. Accuracy of nucleus localization was high, with 99% sensitivity relative to manual localization. Cellularity (million cells per cm3) decreased from 290, 310, and 150 near the articular surface in fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, to 120, 110, and 50 at a depth of 1.0 mm. The distance/angle to the nearest neighboring cell was 7.9 microm/31 degrees , 7.1 microm/31 degrees , and 9.1 microm/31 degrees for cells at the articular surface of fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, and increased/decreased to 11.6 microm/31 degrees , 12.0 microm/30 degrees , and 19.2 microm/25 degrees at a depth of 0.7 mm. The methodologies described here may be useful for analyzing the 3D cellular organization of cartilage during growth, maturation, aging, degeneration, and regeneration.

  16. Largely Reduced Grid Densities in a Vibrational Self-Consistent Field Treatment Do Not Significantly Impact the ResultingWavenumbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver M. D. Lutz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Especially for larger molecules relevant to life sciences, vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF calculations can become unmanageably demanding even when only first and second order potential coupling terms are considered. This paper investigates to what extent the grid density of the VSCF’s underlying potential energy surface can be reduced without sacrificing accuracy of the resulting wavenumbers. Including single-mode and pair contributions, a reduction to eight points per mode did not introduce a significant deviation but improved the computational efficiency by a factor of four. A mean unsigned deviation of 1.3% from the experiment could be maintained for the fifteen molecules under investigation and the approach was found to be applicable to rigid, semi-rigid and soft vibrational problems likewise. Deprotonated phosphoserine, stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds, was investigated as an exemplary application.

  17. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1: protein,ligands, expression and pathophysiological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiu-ping; DU Guan-hua

    2007-01-01

    Objective To review the recent research progress in lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1)including its protein, ligands, expression and pathophysiological significance.Data sources Information included in this article was identified by searching of PUBMED (1997-2006) online resources using the key term LOX-1.Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators of the field were selected.Results The key issues related to the LOX-1 protein as well as ligands for LOX-1. Factors regulating the expression of LOX-1 were summarized. The pathophysiological functions of LOX-1 in several diseases were discussed.Conclusions Identification of LOX-1 and a definition of its biological role in pathophysiologic states provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of some cardiovascular diseases especially in atherosclerosis and provide a potential selective therapeutic approach. LOX-1 is unlocking and drugs targeting LOX-1 might be a promising direction to explore.

  18. Relationship between the Expression of E-cadherin and Microvessel Density in Lung Cancer and Its Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXinyun; YANGJuhong; MAYing; CHENGBo; ZHENGHongwei; ZHENGHaiyan; ZHUCongzhong; LIUTing; LIYan; WANGAixiang; SUNCuiyun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the expression of E-cadherin and microvessel density (MVD) in lung cancer. Methods: The expression of E-cadherin and factor Ⅷ was detected in 104 lung cancer tissues by an immunohistochemical method, and MVD was calculated by an imageanalysis system. Results: The expression of E-cadherin was significantly related to the differentiation of lung cancers (P<0.05). A negative correlation was found between E-cadherin expression and MVD in lung cancer tissues (P=0.047). Conclusion: Down-expression of E-cadherin and an increase of MVD may play an important role in the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer, and may also be used as a useful marker for tumor prognosis.

  19. Fourier transform infrared matrix-isolation analysis of acetaldehyde fragmentation products after charge exchange with Ar•+ under varied ionization density conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew G K; White, Matthew R; Linford, Bryan D; King, Kaitlynn A; Robinson, Mark M; Parnis, J Mark

    2011-10-01

    The products of the Ar(•+) charge exchange ionization of acetaldehyde have been isolated and compared with related photoionization results and computational work. Acetaldehyde has been used to assess the effect of varied ion density in the ionization region of the electron bombardment matrix isolation apparatus. The amount of acetaldehyde destruction has been measured for constant gas-sample composition and constant ionization current for two anode geometries: a pin anode and a plate anode. For the same ionization current, a pin-shaped anode demonstrates higher precursor molecule destruction efficiency (85%) than the plate-shaped anode (30%), resulting in substantial effect on the yield and quantity of isolated products. When the plate anode is used, the observed infrared products correspond to matrix-isolated carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH(4)), ketene (CH(2)CO), ethynyloxy radical (HCCO), formyl radical (HCO(•)), acetyl radical (CH(3)CO(•)), vinyl alcohol (H(2)C = CH-OH), and cationic proton-bound dimer, Ar(2)H(+). When the pin anode is used, the same products are observed with different relative proportions and new absorption features corresponding to dicarbon monoxide (CCO) and methyl radical (CH(3)(•)) are observed. The surprising observation of infrared absorptions corresponding to vinyl alcohol along with low yield of products anticipated through the analysis of photoelectron-photoionization coincidence measurements suggests that the initially formed fragmentation products are able to further react within the matrix-isolation environment to influence observed product yields. Related experiments, using the isotopomer CD(3)CHO, suggest that the observed products are formed via radical-radical reactions that occur under the high pressure conditions of the matrix isolation environment. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Assessing the reliability of microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests in malaria diagnosis in areas with varying parasite density among older children and adult patients in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E E Ayogu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current malaria control strategies are based on early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of malaria cases. The study aimed at comparing the performance of blood film microscopy and rapid diagnostic test (RDT in Plasmodium falciparum detection in patients ≥6 years of age. Materials and Methods: A total of 154 consecutive pyretic patients aged 6-62 years were enrolled, sampled, and tested for malaria using RDT (first response and microscopy by Giemsa staining. Genomic DNA was extracted after saponin hemolysis and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to detect Plasmodium falciparum. The endpoints were sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV. Results: Of the 154 patients, 80 (51.9% had fever of ≥37.5°C. 106 (68.8% were positive by First response® , 132 (85.7% by microscopy, and 121 (78.6% by PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of first response compared to microscopic method were 82.2%, 100.0%, 100.0%, and 34.3%, respectively, while it was 75.4%, 75.0%, 95.3%, and 31.2%, respectively, when compared to PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the microscopic method compared to PCR were 92.3%, 50.0%, 90.91%, and 54.5%, respectively. There was a significant difference in the performance of RDT and film microscopy methods (P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: Microscopy performed better and is more reliable than first response (RDT in areas with low parasite density among patients ≥6 years of age. Rapid diagnostic tests could be useful in aareas with high parasite density as an alternative to smear microscopy

  1. The effects of varied densities on the growth and emigration of adult cutthroat trout and brook trout in fenced stream enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, D.J.; Hilderbrand, R.H.; Kershner, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of various density treatments on adult fish growth and emigration rates between Bonneville cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki utah and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in stream enclosures in Beaver Creek, Idaho, We used 3 density treatments (low, ambient, and high fish densities) to evaluate density-related effects and to ensure a response. Intraspecific ambient-density tests using cutthroat trout only were also performed. Results indicated an absence of cage effects in the stream enclosures and no differences in fish growth between ambient-density stream-enclosure fish and free-range fish. Brook trout outgrew and moved less than cutthroat trout in the stream enclosures, especially as density increased, In all 3 density treatments, brook trout gained more weight than cutthroat trout, with brook trout gaining weight in each density treatment and cutthroat trout losing weight at the highest density. At high densities, cutthroat trout attempted to emigrate more frequently than brook trout in sympatry and allopatry. We observed a negative correlation between growth and emigration for interspecific cutthroat trout, indicating a possible competitive response due to the presence of brook trout. We observed similar responses for weight and emigration in trials of allopatric cutthroat trout, indicating strong intraspecific effects as density increased. While cutthroat trout showed a response to experimental manipulation with brook trout at different densities, there has been long-term coexistence between these species in Beaver Creek, This system presents a unique opportunity to study the mechanisms that lead cutthroat trout to coexist with rather than be replaced by nonnative brook trout.

  2. Acute pathological changes of facial nucleus and expressions of postsynaptic density protein-95 following facial nerve injury of varying severity A semi-quantitative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Li; Wenlong Luo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is widely distributed in the central nervous system and is related to the development of the CNS and sensory signal transmission as well as acute or chronic nerve cell death following ischemic brain injury.OBJECTIVE: To semi-quantitatively determine the pathological changes of apoptotic facial neurons and the expression of PSD-95 in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury of varying extents using immunohistochemical staining methods.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled animal experiments were performed in the Ultrasonic Institute of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences from September to December 2007.MATERIALS: Sixty-five healthy, adult, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, both male and female, were used for this study. Rabbit anti-rat PSD-95 polyclonal antibody was purchased from Beijing Biosynthesis Biotechnology Co., Ltd.METHODS: SD rats were randomly assigned into a control group with five rats and three injured groups with 20 rats per group. Exposure, clamp and cut for bilateral facial nerve trunks were performed in the rats of the injury groups, and no injury was inflicted on the rats of the control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The brainstems of all the rats were excised on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 post injury, and then the facial nuclei were stained with hematoxylin-eosin to observe any pathological changes due to apoptosis in facial neurons. PSD-95 expression in facial nuclei was detected by immunohistochemistry, and the number of PSD-95 positive cells was counted under a light microscope.RESULTS: The expression of PSD-95 in the facial nucleus and morphology of the facial neuron within the exposure group had no obvious changes at various points in time tested (P>0.05). However, the expressions of PSD-95 in the facial nucleus of the clamp group and cut group increased on day 1 post injury (Pclamp group>exposure group

  3. Varying protein source and quantity do not significantly improve weight loss, fat loss, or satiety in reduced energy diets among midlife adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Noel D; Reicks, Marla M; Sibley, Shalamar D; Redmon, J Bruce; Thomas, William; Raatz, Susan K

    2011-02-01

    We hypothesized that a whey protein diet would result in greater weight loss and improved body composition compared with standard weight loss diets. Weight change, body composition, and renin-angiotensin aldosterone system activity in midlife adults were compared between diet groups. Eighteen subjects enrolled in a 5-month study of 8-week controlled food intake followed by 12-weeks ad libitum intake. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups: control diet (CD) (55% carbohydrate/15% protein/30% fat), mixed protein (40% carbohydrate/30% protein/30% fat), or whey protein (WP) (40% carbohydrate/15% mixed protein/15% whey protein/30% fat). Measurements included weight, metabolic measures, body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and resting energy expenditure. No statistically significant differences in total weight loss or total fat loss were observed between treatments; however, a trend toward greater total weight loss (P = .08) and total fat loss (P = .09) was observed in the WP group compared with the CD group. Fat loss in the leg and gynoid regions was greater (P loss or in total fat loss, but significant differences in regional fat loss and in decreased blood pressure were observed in the WP group. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between the expression of estrogen receptor beta 1 and microvessel density in human thyroid tumor and its clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-ling JIN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the difference in expression of estrogen receptor beta 1(ERβ1 in different histological types of thyroid carcinoma,and to investigate the correlation between the ERβ1 expression and microvessel density(MVD in human thyroid carcinoma tissue.Methods Among 163 paraffin-embedded samples,collected from Jan.2004 to Dec.2009,107 were follicular differentiated thyroid carcinoma [59 cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma(PTC and 48 cases of follicular thyroid carcinoma(FTC],and 56 were thyroid adenoma.Another 10 cases of normal thyroid tissue,pathologically testified,were enrolled as control.Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expressions of ERβ1 and CD31,and the positive results of CD31 were used to calculate MVD of tissues.The expression status and localization of ERβ1 and CD31 in the thyroid tissue were observed,the expression levels of ERβ1 in different histological types of thyroid carcinoma were compared.The correlation between cervical lymph node metastasis of cancer cells and ERβ1 expression and MVD was analyzed,and the correlation between ERβ1 and MVD was also observed.Results CD31 was mainly expressed in vascular endothelial cells in each type of thyroid tissues,while ERβ1 in both follicular epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells.In different types such as normal thyroid tissue,thyroid adenoma tissue and thyroid carcinoma tissue,the positive expression rate of ERβ1 was 80%,48.2% and 29.8%,respectively(P < 0.05,with mean value of gray level of 116.22±14.23,130.08±17.51,146.26±18.13,respectively(P < 0.05.The expression level of ERβ1 was significantly lower in the cancer cells with higher metastasis and strong infiltration than in those with lower metastasis and weaker infiltration(P < 0.05,and MVD was significant higher in thyroid carcinoma with lymph node metastasis than in those without lymph node metastasis.MVD was notablely lower in thyroid carcinoma tissue with ERβ1 expression than in those

  5. Significance of nonperturbative input to the transverse momentum dependent gluon density for hard processes at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyuk, A. A.; Lipatov, A. V.; Lykasov, G. I.; Zotov, N. P.

    2016-01-01

    We study the role of the nonperturbative input to the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) gluon density in hard processes at the LHC. We derive the input TMD gluon distribution at a low scale μ02˜1 GeV2 from a fit of inclusive hadron spectra measured at low transverse momenta in p p collisions at the LHC and demonstrate that the best description of these spectra for larger hadron transverse momenta can be achieved by matching the derived TMD gluon distribution with the exact solution of the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov equation obtained at low x and small gluon transverse momenta outside the saturation region. Then, we extend the input TMD gluon density to higher μ2 numerically using the Catani-Ciafoloni-Fiorani-Marchesini gluon evolution equation. Special attention is paid to phenomenological applications of the obtained TMD gluon density to some LHC processes, which are sensitive to the gluon content of a proton.

  6. Effect of house type on growth performance, litter quality and incidence of foot lesions in broiler chickens reared in varying stocking density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danial Farhadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of different stocking density on broiler performance two repeated experiments were conducted in a conventional and an environmentally controlled house using a total of 10,232 broiler chickens. In each experiment, a total of 5,116 one-day old Ross 308 broiler chickens were randomly distributed to 16 floor pens arranged within each house at density of 16, 18, 20 or 22 birds/m2. Results showed that the broiler chickens grown in environmentally controlled house had greater (p<0.05 weight gain, kg body weight (BW/m2, production efficiency index (PEI and spleen relative weight at day 42 and also had lower (p<0.05 feed conversion ratio and mortality rate during 21 to 42 and 1 to 42 days of age than those reared in conventional house. Weight gain, feed intake and PEI decreased (p<0.05 and kg BW/m2 and carcass yield increased (p<0.05, when broiler density increased more than 20 birds/m2. House type and stocking density had no effect on relative weights of liver, abdominal fat, bursa of Fabricius, and litter pH and ammonia emission. However, higher litter moisture in conventional house led to a greater (p<0.05 incidence of foot pad lesions and hock burns, which intensified with increased density. In conclusion, broiler chickens reared in environmentally controlled house had superior performance, higher liability, and lower litter moisture content and foot lesions. Moreover, broiler rearing at the density of 22 birds/m2 adversely affected growth performance and foot quality, despite the greater kg BW/m2 compared to broilers grown at lower densities.

  7. The functional significance of density and distribution of outgrowths on co-opted contact pairs in biological arresting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Popov, Valentin L.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Microstructures responsible for temporary arresting of contacting surfaces are widely distributed on surfaces in different organisms. Recent morphological studies show that these structures have different density of outgrowths and not ideal distribution pattern on both complementary parts of the contact. One can suggest that this difference is optimized by natural selection to get stronger mechanical arrest within the system. In this paper, we simulate such a system numerically, both in the frames of continuous contact and discrete dynamical models to prove this hypothesis and elucidate other aspects of optimization of such mechanical adhesive systems. PMID:25533090

  8. Revision of single atom local density and capture number varying with coverage in uniform depletion approximation and its effect on coalescence and number of stable clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Qing-Yi; Zhang Juan

    2011-01-01

    In vapour deposition,single atoms(adatoms)on the substrate surface are the main source of growth.The change in its density plays a decisive role in the growth of thin films and quantum size islands.In the nucleation and cluster coalescence stages of vapour deposition,the growth of stable clusters occurs on the substrate surface covered by stable clusters.Nucleation occurs in the non-covered part,while the total area covered by stable clusters on the substrate surface will gradually increase.Carefully taking into account the coverage effect,a revised single atom density rate equation is given for the famous and widely used thin-film rate equation theory,but the work of solving the revised equation has not been done.In this paper,we solve the equation and obtain the single-atom density and capture number by using a uniform depletion approximation.We determine that the single atom density is much lower than that evaluated from the single atom density rate equation in the traditional rate equation theory when the stable cluster coverage fraction is large,and it goes down very fast with an increase in the coverage fraction.The revised equation gives a higher value for the 'average' capture number than the present equation. It also increases with increasing coverage.That makes the preparation of single crystalline thin film materials difficult and the size control of quantum size islands complicated.We also discuss the effect of the revision on coalescence and the number of stable clusters in vapour deposition.

  9. Benthic Foraminiferal Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca Presented Under Varying Population Densities on the Southeastern United States Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, J. K.; Hintz, C. J.; Chandler, G. T.; McCorkle, D. C.; Bernhard, J. M.; Shaw, T. J.; Etson, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    Unraveling the inherent variabilities in benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca and other trace elements will help produce a more refined temperature proxy for benthic foraminiferal calcification temperature. To date, proxy signature variability in field samples has been attributed to microhabitat and poorly understood vital effects. Vital effects such as food supply, calcification rate, metabolic rate, may influence microhabitat chemistry or foraminiferal shell chemistry, but are difficult to measure. However, easily measurable benthic population densities and abundances are likely to be driven by food supply, and may also be controlled by foraminiferal calcification or metabolic rates. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca from live core-top benthic foraminfera were investigated to test whether vital effect factors, as reflected by faunal abundance and diversity, influence foraminiferal element/calcium ratios. Foraminiferal element/calcium ratios are presented along with corresponding abundances and species diversities of cores collected in 2001, 2005, and 2006 from the shallow-slope environ of the Charleston Bump (31° 55'N, 79° 11'W; ~220m water depth; temp range: 9.4-11.2° C; calcite saturation state: 2.29- 2.73). Overall total foraminiferal population densities increased by 6 fold in the more recent years (2001, n=350, 6.1 individuals/cm3; 2005, n>2300, 40 individuals/cm3; 2006, n>1900, 33.6 individuals/cm3). If a correlation exists between benthic foraminiferal population densities and element/calcium ratios, then this may suggest that biological processes can affect foraminiferal element/calcium shell chemistry. Funded by NSF OCE9911654, OCE0351029, and OCE 0437366.

  10. Improving detection tools for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): comparison of multifunnel traps, prism traps, and lure types at varying population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Lance, David R; Hull-Sanders, Helen M; Mastro, Victor C; Silk, Peter J; Ryall, Krista L

    2014-08-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) that has caused devastating mortality since it was first identified in North America in 2002. In 2012, we conducted field trapping assays that tested the efficacy of purple prism and fluon-coated green multifunnel (Lindgren funnel) traps. Traps were baited with combinations of several lures that were previously shown to be attractive to A. planipennis: manuka oil--a sesquiterpene-rich oil, (3Z)-hexenol--a green leaf volatile, or (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide [= (3Z)-lactone], a sex pheromone. Eighty-nine blocks (trap lines) were tested throughout nine states along the outer edges of the currently known A. planipennis infestation in North America. Trap catch was highest on fluon-coated green multifunnel traps, and trap detections at sites with low A. planipennis population density ranged from 72 to 76% for all trap and lure types tested. (3Z)-hexenol and (3Z)-lactone baited traps functioned as well as (3Z)-hexenol and manuka oil-baited traps. Independent of the lure used, detection rates on green fluon-coated multifunnel traps were comparable with glued purple prism traps in areas with low A. planipennis population densities.

  11. Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume

    2003-01-01

    We review some string-inspired theoretical models which incorporate a correlated spacetime variation of coupling constants while remaining naturally compatible both with phenomenological constraints coming from geochemical data (Oklo; Rhenium decay) and with present equivalence principle tests. Barring unnatural fine-tunings of parameters, a variation of the fine-structure constant as large as that recently ``observed'' by Webb et al. in quasar absorption spectra appears to be incompatible with these phenomenological constraints. Independently of any model, it is emphasized that the best experimental probe of varying constants are high-precision tests of the universality of free fall, such as MICROSCOPE and STEP. Recent claims by Bekenstein that fine-structure-constant variability does not imply detectable violations of the equivalence principle are shown to be untenable.

  12. Hepatitis B virus infection does not significantly influence Plasmodium parasite density in asymptomatic infections in Ghanaian transfusion recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Lee Freimanis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Areas endemic for malaria and Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection largely overlap geographically. A recent study has suggested the existence of an interaction between the two pathogens in symptomatic co-infected individuals on the South-American continent. We examined this issue in a hyperendemic area for both pathogens in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Pre-transfusion samples from a retrospective cohort of 154 blood transfusion recipients were screened for both serological and molecular markers of HBV and Plasmodium genomes using species-specific nested PCR and quantitative real-time PCR. Thirty-seven individuals met exclusion criteria and were subsequently eliminated from further analysis. Of 117 participants, 90% of recipients exhibited evidence of exposure to HBV, 42% with HBsAg and/or HBV DNA and 48% anti-HBc reactive without detectable HBV DNA. Plasmodium genome prevalence by NAT was 50%. Parasitemic individuals were significantly younger than non-parasitemic individuals (P = 0.04. Parasitemia level was not significantly lower in individuals with HBV DNA positive infections compared to those with HBV DNA negative exposures. HBV DNA load was not significantly different in parasitemic and non-parasitemic individuals. CONCLUSION: The data presented suggests that, in sub-Saharan Africa, asymptomatic co-infections with these two ubiquitous pathogens do not appear to significantly affect each other and evolve independently.

  13. Effects of Abaloparatide-SC on Fractures and Bone Mineral Density in Subgroups of Postmenopausal Women With Osteoporosis and Varying Baseline Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosman, Felicia; Hattersley, Gary; Hu, Ming-Yi; Williams, Gregory C; Fitzpatrick, Lorraine A; Black, Dennis M

    2017-01-01

    Abaloparatide-SC is a novel 34-amino acid peptide created to be a potent and selective activator of the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR1) signaling pathway. In the Abaloparatide Comparator Trial in Vertebral Endpoints (ACTIVE) Phase 3 trial (NCT01343004), abaloparatide reduced new morphometric vertebral fractures by 86% compared with placebo (p osteoporosis. Abaloparatide-SC increased bone mineral density (BMD) 3.4% at the total hip, 2.9% at the femoral neck, and 9.2% at the lumbar spine at 18 months (all p -2.5 and ≤-3.0 versus >-3.0), history of nonvertebral fracture (yes versus no), prevalent vertebral fracture (yes versus no), and age (osteoporosis. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  14. Morphology and gas sensing characteristics of density-controlled CuO nanostructures obtained by varying the oxygen partial pressure during growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Jin, Changhyun; Noh, Youngwook; Park, Seokhyun; Choi, Sun-Woo

    2016-07-01

    By exerting different O2 partial pressures (0, 20, 40, and 60 sccm) onto copper substrates, we discovered that the growth parameter, namely, the O2 flow rate, affects the degree of nucleation, diameter, length, and crystalline quality of CuO nanowires (NWs). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the evolution of the morphological and the microstructural changes in the CuO nanostructures. The formation of a Cu2O interlayer between the Cu and the CuO layers could be adjusted by controlling more precisely the O2 flow rate. In addition, the reducing (H2S) and the oxidizing (O2, NO2, and SO2) gas sensing performances of these O2-assisted CuO NWs were compared with those of CuO NWs grown in static air. The response to the reducing H2S of the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using O2 at 40 sccm showed a higher electrical change and faster response and recovery times than the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using lower O2 flow rates, including the ones grown in static air and/or used for sensing oxidizing gases (O2, NO2, and SO2) did. On the basis of their growth and their gas-sensing applications, the possible mechanisms characteristic of the density-controlled CuO NWs grown using various O2 partial pressures are discussed.

  15. Significant enhancement in energy density of polymer composites induced by dopamine-modified Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Shen, Yang; Hu, Penghao; Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Ming; Nan, C. W.

    2012-10-01

    Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 (BST) nanofibers prepared via electrospinning and modified by dopamine are used as dielectric fillers in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based composites. With 4.4 vol. % of BST nanofibers, the extractable energy density of the BST/PVDF composites is more than doubled as compared with pure PVDF matrix. Such significant enhancement is attributed to the combined effect of both surface modification by dopamine and large aspect ratio of the BST nanofibers. Paraelectric or anti-ferroelectric fillers of large aspect ratio may serve as a general strategy for enhanced electric energy density in polymer composites.

  16. Effects of varying bulk densities of steam-flaked corn and dietary roughage concentration on in vitro fermentation, performance, carcass quality, and acid-base balance measurements in finishing steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, K E; McMeniman, J P; Leibovich, J; Vasconcelos, J T; Quinn, M J; May, M L; DiLorenzo, N; Smith, D R; Galyean, M L

    2010-03-01

    Effects of varying bulk densities of steam-flaked corn (SFC) and level of inclusion of roughage in feedlot diets were evaluated in 3 experiments. In Exp. 1, a total of 128 beef steers were used in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement to evaluate the effects of bulk density of SFC (335 or 386 g/L) and roughage concentration (6 or 10% ground alfalfa hay, DM basis) on performance and carcass characteristics. No interactions were observed between bulk density and roughage concentration for performance data. From d 0 to the end, cattle fed the 335 g/L SFC had greater overall G:F (P = 0.04) than those fed the 386 g/L SFC, with tendencies (P 0.20). In Exp. 2, the effects of bulk density of SFC (283, 335, or 386 g/L) and 6 or 10% ground alfalfa hay on IVDMD and in vitro pH were evaluated at 6, 12, 18, and 24 h of incubation. With a reduced-strength buffer in vitro fermentation system, pH increased (P system, there were no treatment differences (P > 0.23) for IVDMD. In Exp. 3, two diets that varied in bulk density of SFC and roughage concentration (335 g/L SFC with 6% alfalfa hay vs. 386 g/L SFC with 10% alfalfa hay) were compared for their effects on the pattern of feed intake and the acid-base balance in Holstein steers (12/treatment). No differences (P > 0.10) between treatments were noted for blood gases or urine pH; however, day effects (P acid-base balance.

  17. Response function of an HPGe detector simulated through MCNP 4A varying the density and chemical composition of the matrix; Funcion respuesta de un detector HPGe simulada mediante MCNP 4A variando la densidad y composicion quimica de la matriz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal A, B.; Mireles G, F.; Quirino T, L.; Pinedo, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas (Mexico)]. e-mail: bleal79@yahoo.com.mx

    2005-07-01

    In the area of the Radiological Safety it is required of a calibrated detection system in energy and efficiency for the determination of the concentration in activity in samples that vary in chemical composition and by this in density. The area of Nuclear Engineering requires to find the grade of isotopic enrichment of the uranium of the Sub-critic Nuclear Chicago 9000 Mark. Given the experimental importance that has the determination from the curves of efficiency to the effects of establishing the quantitative results, is appealed to the simulation of the response function of the detector used in the Regional Center of Nuclear Studies inside the range of energy of 80 keV to 1400 keV varying the density of the matrix and the chemical composition by means of the application of the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. The obtained results in the simulation of the response function of the detector show a grade of acceptance in the range from 500 to 1400 keV energy, with a smaller percentage discrepancy to 10%, in the range of low energy that its go from 59 to 400 keV, the percentage discrepancy varies from 17% until 30%, which is manifested in the opposing isotopic relationship for 5 fuel rods of the Sub critic nuclear assemble. (Author)

  18. Further significant effects of eldecalcitol on bone resorption markers and bone mineral density in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients having undergone long-term bisphosphonate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iba, Kousuke; Sonoda, Tomoko; Takada, Junichi; Dohke, Takayuki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2017-03-01

    We investigated whether eldecalcitol has further significant effects on bone metabolic markers and bone mineral density (BMD) in osteoporosis patients having undergone long-term bisphosphonate treatment. Eldecalcitol treatment was initiated in 48 postmenopausal osteoporosis patients who had undergone bisphosphonate treatment with or without alfacalcidol treatment for more than 2 years (average period 6.3 years). Age, height, weight, total muscle volume, total fat volume, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, and distal third of the radius were measured as background data for each patient. Serum alkaline phosphatase, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, calcium, and phosphate levels were measured at the baseline and 3 and 12 months after the initiation of eldecalcitol treatment, and BMD was measured at the baseline and 12 months after the initiation of eldecalcitol treatment. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b level was significantly decreased at 3 and 12 months after the initiation of eldecalcitol treatment in comparison with the baseline level. There were no significant changes in alkaline phosphatase, calcium, or phosphate levels in comparison with the baseline levels. In addition, the lumbar spine BMD at 12 months after the initiation of treatment was significantly increased in comparison with the baseline level, although no significant changes in BMD at the total hip and distal third of the radius were observed. Eldecalcitol demonstrated significant effects in additionally decreasing the level of the bone resorption marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b and increasing BMD at the lumbar spine, even in osteoporosis patients having undergone long-term bisphosphonate treatment.

  19. The synthesis of lamellar nano MgB2 grains with nanoimpurities, flux pinning centers and their significantly improved critical current density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zongqing; Liu, Yongchang; Cai, Qi

    2012-03-21

    MgB(2) superconductors with unique microstructures were rapidly fabricated at low temperatures, and exhibited significantly improved critical current density (J(c)). According to the microstructure observations, the prepared samples consisted of lamellar nano MgB(2) grains with many embedded nanoimpurities (about 10 nm). The formation of these lamellar nano MgB(2) grains is associated with the presence of a local Mg-Cu liquid at sintering temperatures as low as 575 °C. The ball milling treatment of the original powders also plays a positive role in the growth of lamellar grains. Based on an analysis of the relationship between resistivity and temperature, the lamellar nano MgB(2) grains in the prepared sample possess better grain connectivity than the typical morphology of MgB(2) samples prepared by traditional high-temperature sintering. Furthermore, the presence of many nano MgB(2) grain boundaries and nano impurities in the prepared sample can obviously increase the flux pinning centers in accordance with the analysis of flux pinning behavior. Both factors mentioned above contribute to the significant improvement in J(c) from low field to relative high field. The method developed in the present work is an effective and low-cost way to further enhance J(c) in MgB(2) superconductors across a wide range of applied magnetic fields without using expensive nanometer-sized dopants.

  20. Índice de área foliar em canola cultivada sob variações de espaçamento e de densidade de semeadura Leaf area index of canola under varying row spacing and plant density of sowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Chavarria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi estimar através de método não-destrutivo o índice de área foliar do híbrido de canola Hyola 61 em variações de espaçamento e densidade de semeadura. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos casualizados com parcelas subdivididas, sendo que nas parcelas foram distribuídos os espaçamentos entre linhas (17, 34, 51 e 68cm e nas subparcelas as densidades (15, 30, 45 e 60 plantas m-2. Para determinação do comprimento, largura do limbo foliar e da área foliar, bem como estabelecimento de uma correlação entre essas variáveis foram coletadas aleatoriamente 250 folhas. Posteriormente, foram selecionadas aleatoriamente quatro plantas por unidade experimental, que tiveram todas as folhas medidas quanto ao comprimento e largura para estimativa da área foliar e do índice de área foliar. O comprimento do limbo foliar é a variável biométrica com maior correlação com a área foliar. Um comportamento linear entre o adensamento de plantas e o índice de área foliar nos espaçamentos de 34, 51 e 68cm no híbrido Hyola 61 foi observado. O índice de área foliar das plantas foi menor no espaçamento de 17cm, com a densidade de 60 plantas m-2. Para a manutenção do índice de área foliar do híbrido Hyola 61, é recomendável usar o espaçamento de 17cm com a densidade 45 plantas m-2.The aim of this work was to estimate leaf area index of the canola cultivar 'Hyola 61' under variations of row spacing and density of sowing by a non-destructive method. The experimental design consisted of a split plot with four blocks with row widths of 17, 34, 51 and 68cm and plant populations of 15, 30, 45 and 60m². Two hundred and fifth leaves were collected at random and mesure width (C, length (L and leaf area (LA and the parameters were correlated. Also the leaves of four plants of each plot, selected at random, were measured L and C and estimated the leaf area index (LAI. Width leaf was the biometric parameter

  1. Prognostic significance of Ki67 proliferation index, HIF1 alpha index and microvascular density in patients with non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berghoff, A.S. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Ilhan-Mutlu, A.; Preusser, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Woehrer, A.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Hackl, M. [Austrian National Cancer Registry, Statistics Austria, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, K. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Melchardt, T. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital Salzburg, Third Medical Department, Salzburg (Austria); Dome, B. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Heinzl, H. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Vienna (Austria); Birner, P. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Survival upon diagnosis of brain metastases (BM) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is highly variable and established prognostic scores do not include tissue-based parameters. Patients who underwent neurosurgical resection as first-line therapy for newly diagnosed NSCLC BM were included. Microvascular density (MVD), Ki67 tumor cell proliferation index and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) index were determined by immunohistochemistry. NSCLC BM specimens from 230 patients (151 male, 79 female; median age 56 years; 199 nonsquamous histology) and 53/230 (23.0 %) matched primary tumor samples were available. Adjuvant whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) was given to 153/230 (66.5 %) patients after neurosurgical resection. MVD and HIF-1 alpha indices were significantly higher in BM than in matched primary tumors. In patients treated with adjuvant WBRT, low BM HIF-1 alpha expression was associated with favorable overall survival (OS), while among patients not treated with adjuvant WBRT, BM HIF-1 alpha expression did not correlate with OS. Low diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment score (DS-GPA), low Ki67 index, high MVD, low HIF-1 alpha index and administration of adjuvant WBRT were independently associated with favorable OS. Incorporation of tissue-based parameters into the commonly used DS-GPA allowed refined discrimination of prognostic subgroups. Ki67 index, MVD and HIF-1 alpha index have promising prognostic value in BM and should be validated in further studies. (orig.) [German] Die Ueberlebensprognose von Patienten mit zerebralen Metastasen eines nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) ist sehr variabel. Bisher werden gewebsbasierte Parameter nicht in die prognostische Beurteilung inkludiert. Neurochirurgische Resektate zerebraler NSCLC-Metastasen wurden in dieser Studie untersucht. Die Gefaessdichte (''microvascular density'', MVD), der Ki67-Proliferationsindex sowie der HIF-1α-Index wurden mittels

  2. Pilot Sequencing of Onion Genomic DNA Reveals Fragments of Transposable Elements, Low Gene Densities, and Significant Gene Enrichment After Methyl Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onion (Allium cepa) is a diploid (2n=2x=16) monocot with one of the largest nuclear genomes among cultivated plants, over 6 and 16 times that of maize and rice, respectively. In this study, we sequenced onion BACs to estimate gene densities and investigate the nature and distribution of repetitive ...

  3. Do the risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus vary by location? A spatial analysis of health insurance claims in Northeastern Germany using kernel density estimation and geographically weighted regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhl, Boris; Schweikart, Jürgen; Krafft, Thomas; Keste, Andrea; Moskwyn, Marita

    2016-11-03

    The provision of general practitioners (GPs) in Germany still relies mainly on the ratio of inhabitants to GPs at relatively large scales and barely accounts for an increased prevalence of chronic diseases among the elderly and socially underprivileged populations. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is one of the major cost-intensive diseases with high rates of potentially preventable complications. Provision of healthcare and access to preventive measures is necessary to reduce the burden of T2DM. However, current studies on the spatial variation of T2DM in Germany are mostly based on survey data, which do not only underestimate the true prevalence of T2DM, but are also only available on large spatial scales. The aim of this study is therefore to analyse the spatial distribution of T2DM at fine geographic scales and to assess location-specific risk factors based on data of the AOK health insurance. To display the spatial heterogeneity of T2DM, a bivariate, adaptive kernel density estimation (KDE) was applied. The spatial scan statistic (SaTScan) was used to detect areas of high risk. Global and local spatial regression models were then constructed to analyze socio-demographic risk factors of T2DM. T2DM is especially concentrated in rural areas surrounding Berlin. The risk factors for T2DM consist of proportions of 65-79 year olds, 80 + year olds, unemployment rate among the 55-65 year olds, proportion of employees covered by mandatory social security insurance, mean income tax, and proportion of non-married couples. However, the strength of the association between T2DM and the examined socio-demographic variables displayed strong regional variations. The prevalence of T2DM varies at the very local level. Analyzing point data on T2DM of northeastern Germany's largest health insurance provider thus allows very detailed, location-specific knowledge about increased medical needs. Risk factors associated with T2DM depend largely on the place of residence of the

  4. Bouncing universes with varying constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrow, John D [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Kimberly, Dagny [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Magueijo, Joao [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-21

    We investigate the behaviour of exact closed bouncing Friedmann universes in theories with varying constants. We show that the simplest BSBM varying alpha theory leads to a bouncing universe. The value of alpha increases monotonically, remaining approximately constant during most of each cycle, but increasing significantly around each bounce. When dissipation is introduced we show that in each new cycle the universe expands for longer and to a larger size. We find a similar effect for closed bouncing universes in Brans-Dicke theory, where G also varies monotonically in time from cycle to cycle. Similar behaviour occurs also in varying speed of light theories.

  5. Bouncing Universes with Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Magueijo, J; Barrow, John D.; Kimberly, Dagny; Magueijo, Joao

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of exact closed bouncing Friedmann universes in theories with varying constants. We show that the simplest BSBM varying-alpha theory leads to a bouncing universe. The value of alpha increases monotonically, remaining approximately constant during most of each cycle, but increasing significantly around each bounce. When dissipation is introduced we show that in each new cycle the universe expands for longer and to a larger size. We find a similar effect for closed bouncing universes in Brans-Dicke theory, where $G$ also varies monotonically in time from cycle to cycle. Similar behaviour occurs also in varying speed of light theories.

  6. Effective suppression of efficiency droop in GaN-based light-emitting diodes: role of significant reduction of carrier density and built-in field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yang-Seok; Na, Jong-Ho; Son, Sung Jin; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A critical issue in GaN-based high power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is how to suppress the efficiency droop problem occurred at high current injection while improving overall quantum efficiency, especially in conventional c-plane InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW), without using complicated bandgap engineering or unconventional materials and structures. Although increasing thickness of each QW may decrease carrier density in QWs, formation of additional strain and defects as well as increased built-in field effect due to enlarged QW thickness are unavoidable. Here, we propose a facile and effective method for not only reducing efficiency droop but also improving quantum efficiency by utilizing c-plane InGaN/GaN QWs having thinner barriers and increased QW number while keeping the same single well thickness and total active layer thickness. As the barrier thickness decreases and the QW number increases, both internal electric field and carrier density within QWs are simultaneously reduced without degradation of material quality. Furthermore, we found overall improved efficiency and reduced efficiency droop, which was attributed to the decrease of the built-in field and to less influence by non-radiative recombination processes at high carrier density. This simple and effective approach can be extended further for high power ultraviolet, green, and red LEDs. PMID:27756916

  7. Theoretical basis and significance of the variance of discharge as a bidimensional variable for the design of lateral lines of micro-irrigation Bases teóricas e importância da variância da vazão como variável bidimensional no dimensionamento de linhas laterais em microirrigação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euro Roberto Detomini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to support the theoretical basis and contribute to the improvement of educational capability issues relating to irrigation systems design, this point of view presents an alternative deduction of the variance of the discharge as a bidimensional and independent random variable. Then a subsequent brief application of an existing model is applied for statistical design of laterals in micro-irrigation. The better manufacturing precision of emitters allows lengthening a lateral for a given soil slope, although this does not necessarily mean that the statistical uniformity throughout the lateral will be more homogenous.Visando a reforçar as bases teóricas e contribuir com a melhoria da capacitação educacional em assuntos relacionados a dimensionamento de sistemas de irrigação, o presente ponto de vista revela uma dedução alternativa para a variância da vazão dos emissores, variável aleatória independente bidimensional. Posteriormente apresenta breve aplicação do modelo aceito para dimensionamento de linhas laterais em sistemas de microirrigação, de acordo com a abordagem estatística. A melhor precisão na fabricação de emssores permite, para uma dada inclinação de terreno, dimensionar laterais mais longas, o que não significa necessariamente que uniformidade de emissão dessas laterais será projetada como mais homogênea.

  8. Evaluating the significance of density, localization, and PD-1/PD-L1 immunopositivity of mononuclear cells in the clinical course of lung adenocarcinoma patients with brain metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Téglási, Vanda; Reiniger, Lilla; Fabian, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    therapeutic strategies with these agents. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of ICs and determine the expression of the checkpoint molecules programmed death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligand, PD-L1, in brain metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) patients and to analyze......Background. Management of lung cancer patients who suffer from brain metastases represents a major challenge. Considering the promising results with immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment, evaluating the status of immune cell (IC) infiltrates in the prognosis of brain metastasis may lead to better...... their clinicopathological correlations. Methods. We determined the presence of peritumoral mononuclear cells (mononuclear ring) and the density of intratumoral stromal mononuclear cells on brain metastasis tissue sections of 208 LUAD patients. PD-L1/PD-1 expressions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results...

  9. Dispersion-correcting potentials can significantly improve the bond dissociation enthalpies and noncovalent binding energies predicted by density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiLabio, Gino A., E-mail: Gino.DiLabio@nrc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Koleini, Mohammad [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    Dispersion-correcting potentials (DCPs) are atom-centered Gaussian functions that are applied in a manner that is similar to effective core potentials. Previous work on DCPs has focussed on their use as a simple means of improving the ability of conventional density-functional theory methods to predict the binding energies of noncovalently bonded molecular dimers. We show in this work that DCPs developed for use with the LC-ωPBE functional along with 6-31+G(2d,2p) basis sets are capable of simultaneously improving predicted noncovalent binding energies of van der Waals dimer complexes and covalent bond dissociation enthalpies in molecules. Specifically, the DCPs developed herein for the C, H, N, and O atoms provide binding energies for a set of 66 noncovalently bonded molecular dimers (the “S66” set) with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.21 kcal/mol, which represents an improvement of more than a factor of 10 over unadorned LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) and almost a factor of two improvement over LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) used in conjunction with the “D3” pairwise dispersion energy corrections. In addition, the DCPs reduce the MAE of calculated X-H and X-Y (X,Y = C, H, N, O) bond dissociation enthalpies for a set of 40 species from 3.2 kcal/mol obtained with unadorned LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) to 1.6 kcal/mol. Our findings demonstrate that broad improvements to the performance of DFT methods may be achievable through the use of DCPs.

  10. Efeitos do treinamento resistido sobre variáveis relacionadas com a baixa densidade óssea de mulheres menopausadas tratadas com alendronato Effects of resistance training on low bone density-related variables in menopausal women taking alendronate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Joaquim Borba-Pinheiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A osteoporose é uma doença crônica que atinge o esqueleto humano. OBJETIVO: Verificar os efeitos do treinamento resistido sobre a densidade mineral óssea (DMO, força muscular, equilíbrio e qualidade de vida em mulheres menopausadas em tratamento com alendronato. MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo 16 voluntárias. Elas foram separadas em dois grupos: que praticaram o treino resistido (n = 9, 49,7 ± 4,2 idade e que constituíram o grupo controle (n = 7, 53,8 ± 4,4 idade. Os instrumentos de avaliação seguintes foram usados: a absorciometria de dupla energia por raios X -DXA (que mediu a coluna lombar L2-L4, colo do fêmur, triângulo de Wards e trocanter maior, o Osteoporosis Assessment Questionnaire (OPAQ e um teste de equilíbrio. O treinamento foi periodizado em 12 meses, divididos em seis ciclos com intensidade de 70-90% da carga máxima (10RM. Testes paramétricos (t ou Wilcoxon, para análise intragrupo e (Anova para intergrupos, foram usados. RESULTADOS: Foram encontradas diferenças significativas favoráveis ao grupo que treinou nos sítios da lombar L2-L4 (6,8%, p = 0,001, colo do fêmur (4,8%, p = 0,005 e trocanter (0,76%, p = 0,005. Além de diferenças significativas também para o equilíbrio corporal (21,4%, p = 0,001, qualidade de vida (9,1%, p = 0,001 e todas as medidas de força como na pressão de pernas 45° (49,3%, p Osteoporosis is a chronic disease of the human skeleton. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effects of resistance training on bone mineral density (BMD, muscular strength, balance and quality of life in menopausal women taking Alendronate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen female volunteers participated in the study. The volunteers were separated into two groups: resistance training participants (n=9; 49.7±4.2 years and control group (n=7; 53.8±4.4 years. The following evaluation instruments were used: absorptiometry-DXA (which measured the lumbar spine L2-L4, neck femur, Wards triangle and major trochanter, the

  11. Low bone mineral density is a significant risk factor for low-energy distal radius fractures in middle-aged and elderly men: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnsen Villy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general there is a lack of data on osteoporosis and fracture in men; this also includes low-energy distal radius fractures. The objectives of this study were to examine BMD and identify factors associated with distal radius fractures in male patients compared with controls recruited from the background population. Methods In a 2-year period, 44 men 50 years or older were diagnosed with low-energy distal radius fractures, all recruited from one hospital. The 31 men who attended for osteoporosis assessment were age-matched with 35 controls. Demographic and clinical data were collected and BMD at femoral neck, total hip and spine L2-4 was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Apart from weight and living alone, no significant differences were found between patient and controls for demographic variables (e.g. height, smoking and clinical variables (e.g. co-morbidity, use of glucocorticoids, osteoporosis treatment, falls and previous history of fracture. However, BMD expressed as T-score was significant lower in patients than in controls at all measurement sites (femoral neck: -2.24 vs. -1.15, p Conclusion The results from our study indicate that reduced BMD is an important risk factor for low-energy distal radius fracture in men. This suggests that improvement of BMD by both pharmacological and non-pharmacological initiatives may be a strategy to reduce fracture risk in men.

  12. Fluorosis varied treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwood I

    2010-01-01

    Fluorosis has been reported way back in 1901. The treatment options for fluorosis are varied depending upon individual cases. This article comes from Madurai in India where its surrounding towns are fluorosis-prone zones. The purpose of this article is to report various treatment options available for dental fluorosis; this is the first time that complete full mouth rehabilitation for dental fluorosis is being reported. This article also dwells on the need for the dentists to be aware of thei...

  13. Fluorosis varied treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwood I

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorosis has been reported way back in 1901. The treatment options for fluorosis are varied depending upon individual cases. This article comes from Madurai in India where its surrounding towns are fluorosis-prone zones. The purpose of this article is to report various treatment options available for dental fluorosis; this is the first time that complete full mouth rehabilitation for dental fluorosis is being reported. This article also dwells on the need for the dentists to be aware of their local indigenous pathologies to treat it in a better manner.

  14. 妊娠期骨密度检测对孕期的指导作用%Guiding Significance of Bone Mineral Density Testing During Pregnancy for Pregnant Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡丽萍

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the significance of Bone Mineral Density testing during pregnancy for pregnant women through the study of bone mineral density changes.Methods Broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA),Bone Mineral Density(BMD),speed of sound(SOS)were recorded for 498 pregnant women of different gestational age and compared the data.ResultsThe bone density detection results of BUA,BMD,SOS and Z-Score Value for Pregnant Women showed a downward trend with the increase of the gestational age and the incidence of osteoporosis had a tendency to increase with the gestational age.Conclusion Bone Mineral Density Testing during Pregnancy which is convenient and effective,can predict the body lack of nutrition timely,and then ensure the pregnant women and fetus healthy through the appropriate nutritional intervention.%目的:通过对孕期骨密度变化的研究,探讨骨密度检测对孕期的指导作用。方法检测不同孕期498例孕妇的超声振幅衰减(BUA)、骨密度(BMD)、超声传导速度(SOS),并进行比较分析。结果孕妇跟骨BUA、BMD、SOS及Z-Score值随着月份的增加而表现出下降的趋势;与孕早期组相比,孕中期组和孕晚期组的骨量减少和骨质疏松的发生率均提高,骨质疏松的发生率随着孕周的增加而增加。结论妊娠期骨密度检测方便有效,可及时预测出机体的营养缺失情况,进而通过合适的营养干预,保证孕妇和胎儿的健康。

  15. Time Varying Feature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex

  16. Cosmo MSW effect for mass varying neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, P Q; Hung, Pham Quang; P\\"as, Heinrich

    2003-01-01

    We consider neutrinos with varying masses which arise in scenarios relating neutrino masses to the dark energy density in the universe. We point out that the neutrino mass variation can lead to level crossing and thus a cosmo MSW effect, having dramatic consequences for the flavor ratio of astrophysical neutrinos and the composition of the relic neutrino background.

  17. varying elastic parameters distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The experimental identication of mechanical properties is crucial in mechanics for understanding material behavior and for the development of numerical models. Classical identi cation procedures employ standard shaped specimens, assume that the mechanical elds in the object are homogeneous, and recover global properties. Thus, multiple tests are required for full characterization of a heterogeneous object, leading to a time consuming and costly process. The development of non-contact, full- eld measurement techniques from which complex kinematic elds can be recorded has opened the door to a new way of thinking. From the identi cation point of view, suitable methods can be used to process these complex kinematic elds in order to recover multiple spatially varying parameters through one test or a few tests. The requirement is the development of identi cation techniques that can process these complex experimental data. This thesis introduces a novel identi cation technique called the constitutive compatibility method. The key idea is to de ne stresses as compatible with the observed kinematic eld through the chosen class of constitutive equation, making possible the uncoupling of the identi cation of stress from the identi cation of the material parameters. This uncoupling leads to parametrized solutions in cases where 5 the solution is non-unique (due to unknown traction boundary conditions) as demonstrated on 2D numerical examples. First the theory is outlined and the method is demonstrated in 2D applications. Second, the method is implemented within a domain decomposition framework in order to reduce the cost for processing very large problems. Finally, it is extended to 3D numerical examples. Promising results are shown for 2D and 3D problems.

  18. Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, V; Huber, Patrick; Marfatia, Danny

    2005-11-18

    We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric neutrino and K2K data and with reactor antineutrino data at short and long baselines (from CHOOZ and KamLAND). We find that the survival probability of solar MaVaNs is independent of how the suppression of neutrino mass caused by the acceleron-matter couplings varies with density. Measurements of MeV and lower energy solar neutrinos will provide a rigorous test of the idea.

  19. Dermatophyte susceptibility varies towards antimicrobial textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Timo R; Mucha, Helmut; Hoefer, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Dermatophytoses are a widespread problem worldwide. Textiles in contact with infected skin can serve as a carrier for fungus propagation. Hitherto, it is unknown, whether antifungal textiles could contribute in controlling dermatophytes e.g. by disrupting the chain of infection. Testing of antimicrobial fabrics for their antifungal activities therefore is a fundamental prerequisite to assess the putative clinical relevance of textiles for dermatophyte prevention. Fabrics finished with either didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), poly-hexamethylenbiguanide, copper and two silver chloride concentrations were tested for their antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Candida albicans. To prove dermatophyte susceptibility towards the textiles, swatches were subjected to DIN EN 14199 (Trichophyton sp.) or DIN EN ISO 20743 (C. albicans) respectively. In addition, samples were embedded, and semi-thin sections were analysed microscopically. While all samples showed a clear inhibition of C. albicans, activity against Trichophyton sp. varied significantly: For example, DDAC completely inhibited T. rubrum growth, whereas T. mentagrophytes growth remained unaffected even in direct contact to the fibres. The results favour to add T. mentagrophytes as a test organism in textile dermatophyte efficacy tests. Microscopic analysis of swatches allowed detailed evaluation of additional parameters like mycelium thickness, density and hyphae penetration depth into the fabric.

  20. Time-Varying Fundamental Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Keith

    2003-04-01

    Recent data from quasar absorption systems can be interpreted as arising from a time variation in the fine-structure constant. However, there are numerous cosmological, astro-physical, and terrestrial bounds on any such variation. These includes bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (from the ^4He abundance), the Oklo reactor (from the resonant neutron capture cross-section of Sm), and from meteoretic lifetimes of heavy radioactive isotopes. The bounds on the variation of the fine-structure constant are significantly strengthened in models where all gauge and Yukawa couplings vary in a dependent manner, as would be expected in unified theories. Models which are consistent with all data are severly challenged when Equivalence Principle constraints are imposed.

  1. On a time varying fine structure constant

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, M S; Berman, Marcelo S.; Trevisan, Luis A.

    2001-01-01

    By employing Dirac LNH, and a further generalization by Berman (GLNH), we estimate how should vary the total number of nucleons, the energy density, Newton Gravitational constant, the cosmological constant, the magnetic permeability and electric permitivity, of the Universe,in order to account for the experimentally observed time variation of the fine structure constant. As a bonus,we find an acceptable value for the deceleration parameter of the present Universe, compatible with the Supernovae observations.

  2. Serum GH and IGF-I are significant determinants of bone turnover but not bone mineral density in active acromegaly: a prospective study of more than 70 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueland, T; Fougner, S L; Godang, K; Schreiner, T; Bollerslev, J

    2006-11-01

    Acromegaly is characterized by a persistent hypersecretion of GH and provides information on long-term effects of GH on bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of gonadal status and disease activity on bone metabolism in active acromegaly. Seventy-three consecutive patients with active acromegaly: 40 women and 33 men (50 +/- 13 (mean +/- s.d.) and 49 +/- 10 years respectively) were evaluated and compared with age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls by X-ray absorptiometry and biochemical analysis (markers of disease activity and bone turnover). We found that bone turnover, as evaluated by biochemical bone markers, is coupled and markedly increased in relation to disease activity in active acromegaly. Acromegalic women, but not men, were characterized by an increased bone area and slightly decreased bone mineral content resulting in significantly decreased bone mineral density (BMD) in the ultradistal radius, proximal radius, and total body. No differences in bone turnover or BMD were found between eu-and hypogonadal subjects. Multivariate analysis identified age, BMI, and gender as independent predictors of total BMD in acromegaly. Our study demonstrates a decreased total body BMD in women, not men, with active acromegaly, regardless of gonadal status or disease activity. Bone turnover is markedly increased in relation to disease activity, possibly counteracting the anabolic effects of excess GH/IGF-I in these subjects. We suggest more focus on biomechanical analyses when investigating endocrine disorders affecting bone size and distribution between compartments.

  3. Significance of vascular endothelial growth factor and CD31 and morphometric analysis of microvessel density by CD31 receptor expression as an adjuvant tool in diagnosis of psoriatic lesions of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Nitika; Kataria, Sant Prakash; Aggarwal, Kamal; Chauhan, Pardeep; Kumar, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenesis of psoriasis is a debated issue. Several mechanisms have been proposed to identify the etiology and pathogenesis so that specific treatments can be given to patients with psoriasis. (1) To compare pattern and distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD31 in patients with psoriasis and other psoriasiform lesions of skin. (2) To study the correlation between VEGF and CD31 expression, clinical severity, and histopathology of psoriasiform lesions of skin. (3) Evaluation of microvessel density (MVD) by using computer-assisted quantitative image analysis in psoriatic skin lesions. This study was conducted on eighty cases, out of which forty were diagnosed cases of psoriasis and forty cases of clinically suspected psoriasiform lesions, submitted in the Department of Pathology, Pt. B.D. Sharma, University of Health Sciences, Rohtak, for histopathological examination. Histopathological sections were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin staining, and these biopsies were further subjected to immunohistochemical staining with VEGF and CD31 as per standard technique. Assessment of various histopathological features revealed strong correlation between epidermal hyperplasia, suprapapillary thinning, and elongation of rete ridges. Suprabasilar keratinocytes in psoriatic lesions stained intensely for VEGF. The difference for number of microvessels and MVD in psoriasis and psoriasiform lesions was statistically significant. Correlation between intensity of VEGF staining by suprabasilar keratinocytes and MVD was found to be highly significant in psoriatic lesions. The present study concluded that psoriatic lesions exhibit potent angiogenic activity. Early lesions show increased MVD along with other histomorphological parameters such as hypogranulosis, parakeratosis and Munro's microabscesses. Overexpression of VEGF by suprabasilar keratinocytes correlated with increased MVD in papillary dermis.

  4. Genomewide Linkage Analysis of Bipolar Disorder by Use of a High-Density Single-Nucleotide–Polymorphism (SNP) Genotyping Assay: A Comparison with Microsatellite Marker Assays and Finding of Significant Linkage to Chromosome 6q22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, F. A.; Pato, M. T.; Gentile, K. L.; Morley, C. P.; Zhao, X.; Eisener, A. F.; Brown, A.; Petryshen, T. L.; Kirby, A. N.; Medeiros, H.; Carvalho, C.; Macedo, A.; Dourado, A.; Coelho, I.; Valente, J.; Soares, M. J.; Ferreira, C. P.; Lei, M.; Azevedo, M. H.; Kennedy, J. L.; Daly, M. J.; Sklar, P.; Pato, C. N.

    2004-01-01

    We performed a linkage analysis on 25 extended multiplex Portuguese families segregating for bipolar disorder, by use of a high-density single-nucleotide–polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay, the GeneChip Human Mapping 10K Array (HMA10K). Of these families, 12 were used for a direct comparison of the HMA10K with the traditional 10-cM microsatellite marker set and the more dense 4-cM marker set. This comparative analysis indicated the presence of significant linkage peaks in the SNP assay in chromosomal regions characterized by poor coverage and low information content on the microsatellite assays. The HMA10K provided consistently high information and enhanced coverage throughout these regions. Across the entire genome, the HMA10K had an average information content of 0.842 with 0.21-Mb intermarker spacing. In the 12-family set, the HMA10K-based analysis detected two chromosomal regions with genomewide significant linkage on chromosomes 6q22 and 11p11; both regions had failed to meet this strict threshold with the microsatellite assays. The full 25-family collection further strengthened the findings on chromosome 6q22, achieving genomewide significance with a maximum nonparametric linkage (NPL) score of 4.20 and a maximum LOD score of 3.56 at position 125.8 Mb. In addition to this highly significant finding, several other regions of suggestive linkage have also been identified in the 25-family data set, including two regions on chromosome 2 (57 Mb, NPL = 2.98; 145 Mb, NPL = 3.09), as well as regions on chromosomes 4 (91 Mb, NPL = 2.97), 16 (20 Mb, NPL = 2.89), and 20 (60 Mb, NPL = 2.99). We conclude that at least some of the linkage peaks we have identified may have been largely undetected in previous whole-genome scans for bipolar disorder because of insufficient coverage or information content, particularly on chromosomes 6q22 and 11p11. PMID:15060841

  5. Is the Accuracy of Density Functional Theory for Atomization Energies and Densities in Bonding Regions Correlated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Pak, Michael V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-05-04

    The development of approximate exchange-correlation functionals is critical for modern density functional theory. A recent analysis of atomic systems suggested that some modern functionals are straying from the path toward the exact functional because electron densities are becoming less accurate while energies are becoming more accurate since the year 2000. To investigate this trend for more chemically relevant systems, the electron densities in the bonding regions and the atomization energies are analyzed for a series of diatomic molecules with 90 different functionals. For hybrid generalized gradient approximation functionals developed since the year 2000, the errors in densities and atomization energies are decoupled; the accuracy of the energies remains relatively consistent while the accuracy of the densities varies significantly. Such decoupling is not observed for generalized gradient and meta-generalized gradient approximation functionals. Analysis of electron densities in bonding regions is found to be important for the evaluation of functionals for chemical systems.

  6. Regulatory effect and significance of hydrogen sulfide on low-density lipoprotein receptor%硫化氢对低密度脂蛋白受体的调节作用及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王圆; 金红芳; 杜军保

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the regulatory effect and significance of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S)on low -density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR).Methods Mouse primary hepatocytes were divided into control group,low -den-sity lipoprotein (LDL)group and LDL +sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS,the donor of H2 S)group.The cells in LDL group were treated with LDL (50 mg/L)and the cells in LDL +NaHS group were pretreated with NaHS (100 μmol/L)for 0.5 hours and then treated with LDL (50 mg/L).Real -time PCR and Western blot were used to detect the expres-sions of LDLR mRNA and protein,respectively.Mouse primary hepatocytes were divided into control group,1,1′-dioctadecyl -3,3,3′,3′-tetramethyl -indocarbocyanine perchlorate low -density lipoprotein (DiI -LDL)group and DiI -LDL +NaHS group.The cells in DiI -LDL group were incubated with DiI -LDL (10 mg/L)for 3 hours.The cells in DiI -LDL +NaHS group were pretreated with NaHS (100 μmol/L)for 1 hour before DiI -LDL (10 mg/L) was added.Confocal method was used to measure the uptake of DiI -LDL by mouse primary hepatocytes,and fluores-cent quantitative method was performed to detect the content of DiI -LDL in the supernatant of mouse primary hepato-cytes.Results The levels of LDLR mRNA and protein in the mouse primary hepatocytes were significantly downregu-lated compared with those in the control group (t =5.733,P <0.01;t =2.527,P <0.05);after NaHS was adminis-tered,LDLR mRNA and protein level in the mouse primary hepatocytes were significantly upregulated (t =-7.639, P <0.01;t =2.388,P <0.05).In the mouse primary hepatocytes,compared with that in the control group,the uptake of DiI -LDL by cells in DiI -LDL group was increased;the uptake of DiI -LDL by mouse primary hepatocytes in DiI -LDL +NaHS group was significantly increased in comparison with that in the DiI -LDL group.Compared with that in the control group,the DiI -LDL content of culture supernatant in the DiI -LDL group was significantly increased (t =-39.156,P <0.01);after treatment

  7. Alcohol outlet density and violence: A geographically weighted regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Michael P; Cochrane, William; Gordon, Craig; Livingston, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the relationship between outlet density (of different types) and violence (as measured by police activity) across the North Island of New Zealand, specifically looking at whether the relationships vary spatially. We use New Zealand data at the census area unit (approximately suburb) level, on police-attended violent incidents and outlet density (by type of outlet), controlling for population density and local social deprivation. We employed geographically weighted regression to obtain both global average and locally specific estimates of the relationships between alcohol outlet density and violence. We find that bar and night club density, and licensed club density (e.g. sports clubs) have statistically significant and positive relationships with violence, with an additional bar or night club is associated with nearly 5.3 additional violent events per year, and an additional licensed club associated with 0.8 additional violent events per year. These relationships do not show significant spatial variation. In contrast, the effects of off-licence density and restaurant/café density do exhibit significant spatial variation. However, the non-varying effects of bar and night club density are larger than the locally specific effects of other outlet types. The relationships between outlet density and violence vary significantly across space for off-licences and restaurants/cafés. These results suggest that in order to minimise alcohol-related harms, such as violence, locally specific policy interventions are likely to be necessary. [Cameron MP, Cochrane W, Gordon C, Livingston M. Alcohol outlet density and violence: A geographically weighted regression approach. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:280-288]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  8. Decaying Lambda cosmology, varying G and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, S

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a class of uniform and isotropic, spatially flat, decaying Lambda cosmologies, in the realm of a model where the gravitation constant G is a function of the cosmological time. Besides the usual de Sitter solution, the models at late times are characterized by a constant ratio between the matter and total energy densities. One of them presents a coasting expansion where the matter density parameter is equal to 1/3, and the age of the universe satisfies Ht = 1. From considerations in line with the holographic conjecture, it is argued that, among the non-decelerating solutions, the coasting expansion is the only acceptable from a thermodynamic viewpoint, and that the time varying cosmological term must be proportional to the square of the Hubble parameter, a result earlier obtained using different arguments.

  9. Varying c and Particle Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Chimento, L P; Pavón, D; Chimento, Luis P; Jakubi, Alejandro S; Pavon, Diego

    2001-01-01

    We explore what restrictions may impose the second law of thermodynamics on varying speed of light theories. We find that the attractor scenario solving the flatness problem is consistent with the generalized second law at late time.

  10. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  11. 焦石坝页岩气田中高密度甲烷包裹体的发现及其意义%Discovery of high density methane inclusions in Jiaoshiba shale gas field and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高键; 何生; 易积正

    2015-01-01

    根据流体包裹体激光拉曼光谱和显微测温分析,在焦石坝页岩气田五峰组-龙马溪组页岩石英和方解石脉体样品中发现高密度甲烷包裹体。利用甲烷包裹体的甲烷拉曼散射峰v1以及均一温度分别计算了甲烷包裹体的密度,其甲烷拉曼散射峰v1分布在2910.57~2911.27 cm-1,甲烷包裹体均一温度(Th)分布在-95.8~-88.2℃,相对应的甲烷包裹体密度为0.254~0.290 g/cm3,具有高密度特征。结合页岩脉体样品中与高密度甲烷包裹体共生的气-液两相盐水包裹体的均一温度最小值,利用CH4体系的状态方程计算了高密度纯甲烷包裹体的捕获压力为102.6~137.3 MPa,相应的压力系数达到1.63~2.18,具有中等-强超压特征。该区高密度甲烷包裹体形成时的异常高压和较高的温度可能指示了燕山运动抬升初期含气页岩的地温条件和超压状态。焦石坝页岩气田中高密度甲烷包裹体的发现可为焦石坝页岩超压形成和演化以及页岩气富集与页岩超压的关系研究提供重要的地质依据。%High density methane inclusions are discovered in the samples of quartz and calcite veins from Wufeng-Long-maxi Formation of Jiaoshiba shale gas field through micro-thermometric and Raman spectral analysis of fluid inclusions. The Raman scatter peak v1 and the homogenization temperatures of methane inclusions are applied to calculate the density of pure methane inclusions.The Raman scatter peak v1 is in the range from 2 910.57 to 2 911.27 cm-1 ,and the homoge-nization temperatures( Th ) ranges from -95.8 to -88.2 ℃,and the corresponding density values range from 0.254 to 0.290 g/cm3 ,which signifies methane inclusions of high density.Taking the minimum homogenization temperatures of two-phase fluid inclusions paragenetic with high density pure methane inclusions as the trapping temperature of the latter, the state equation of CH4 system is

  12. Forecasting Thermosphere Density: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, S.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge of the thermosphere has improved considerably since 2000 thanks to the availability of high-resolution accelerometer inferred densities. Consequently, precision and shortcomings of thermosphere models are better known. Thermosphere density forecast accuracy is limited by: 1) the accuracy of the thermosphere model 2) the solar and geomagnetic activity forecast 3) the quality of the data assimilation system. The precision of semi-empirical thermosphere models is 10-25%. Solar activity forecasts can be accurate up to 5 days. They become less accurate with time, but some proxies are more forecastable than others. Geomagnetic activity forecasting is more problematic, since in most cases storm events cannot be predicted on any time scale. The forecast accuracy is ultimately bounded by the thermosphere model precision and the (varying) degree to which mainly the solar proxy represents EUV heating of the atmosphere. Both errors can be corrected for by means of near real time (nrt) assimilation of satellite drag data, provided that the data is of high quality. At present, only the classified High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model of the Air Force has that capability operationally, even if other prototype nrt models have been developed. Data assimilation significantly improves density forecasts up to 72-hours out; there is no gain for longer periods due to the short memory of the thermosphere system. Only physical models, e.g. TIMEGCM and CTIPe, can in principle reproduce the dynamic changes in density for example during geomagnetic storms. However, accurate information on atmospheric heating is often missing, or not used. When it is, observed and modeled Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances are very similar. Nonmigrating tides and waves propagating from the lower atmosphere cause longitudinal density variations; sources of geophysical noise for semi-empirical models, they can be predicted qualitatively and sometimes quantitatively with physical models. This

  13. Time-varying Crash Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Feunoua, Bruno; Jeon, Yoontae

    We estimate a continuous-time model with stochastic volatility and dynamic crash probability for the S&P 500 index and find that market illiquidity dominates other factors in explaining the stock market crash risk. While the crash probability is time-varying, its dynamic depends only weakly on re...

  14. Mass Varying Neutrinos in Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi-Torres, F; de Holanda, P C; Peres, O L G

    2010-01-01

    We study limits for the mass varying neutrino model, using constrains from supernova neutrinos placed by the r-process condition, $Y_e<0.5$. Also, we use this model in a supernova environment to study the regions of survival probability in the oscillation space parameter ($\\tan^2\\theta$ and $\\Delta m^2_0$), considering the channel $\

  15. Time-varying Crash Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Feunoua, Bruno; Jeon, Yoontae

    We estimate a continuous-time model with stochastic volatility and dynamic crash probability for the S&P 500 index and find that market illiquidity dominates other factors in explaining the stock market crash risk. While the crash probability is time-varying, its dynamic depends only weakly...... on return variance once we include market illiquidity as an economic variable in the model....

  16. Esmaklassiline Karlovy Vary / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2007-01-01

    Ilmar Raagi mängufilm "Klass" võitis 42. Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelise filmifestivalil kaks auhinda - ametliku kõrvalvõistlusprogrammi "East of the West" eripreemia "Special mention" ja Euroopa väärtfilmikinode keti Europa Cinemas preemia. Ka Asko Kase lühifilmi "Zen läbi prügi linastumisest ning teistest auhinnasaajatest ning osalejatest

  17. Optimistlik Karlovy Vary / Jaan Ruus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruus, Jaan, 1938-2017

    2007-01-01

    42. Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelise filmifestivali auhinnatud filmidest (žürii esimees Peter Bart). Kristallgloobuse sai Islandi-Saksamaa "Katseklaasilinn" (režii Baltasar Kormakur), parimaks režissööriks tunnistati norralane Bard Breien ("Negatiivse mõtlemise kunst"). Austraallase Michael James Rowlandi "Hea õnne teekond" sai žürii eripreemia

  18. Eestlased Karlovy Varys / J. R.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Ilmar Raagi mängufilm "Klass" osaleb 42. Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelise filmifestivali võistlusprogrammis "East of the West" ja Asko Kase lühimängufilm "Zen läbi prügi" on valitud festivali kõrvalprogrammi "Forum of Independents"

  19. Esmaklassiline Karlovy Vary / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2007-01-01

    Ilmar Raagi mängufilm "Klass" võitis 42. Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelise filmifestivalil kaks auhinda - ametliku kõrvalvõistlusprogrammi "East of the West" eripreemia "Special mention" ja Euroopa väärtfilmikinode keti Europa Cinemas preemia. Ka Asko Kase lühifilmi "Zen läbi prügi linastumisest ning teistest auhinnasaajatest ning osalejatest

  20. Relationships between human population density and burned area at continental and global scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistinas, Ioannis; Oom, Duarte; Sá, Ana C L; Harrison, Sandy P; Prentice, I Colin; Pereira, José M C

    2013-01-01

    We explore the large spatial variation in the relationship between population density and burned area, using continental-scale Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) based on 13 years of satellite-derived burned area maps from the global fire emissions database (GFED) and the human population density from the gridded population of the world (GPW 2005). Significant relationships are observed over 51.5% of the global land area, and the area affected varies from continent to continent: population density has a significant impact on fire over most of Asia and Africa but is important in explaining fire over area in croplands. Overall, the relationship between population density and burned area is non-monotonic: burned area initially increases with population density and then decreases when population density exceeds a threshold. These thresholds vary regionally. Our study contributes to improved understanding of how human activities relate to burned area, and should contribute to a better estimate of atmospheric emissions from biomass burning.

  1. Density dependent neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halnes, Geir; Liljenström, Hans; Arhem, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a neural network depends on density parameters at (at least) two different levels: the subcellular density of ion channels in single neurons, and the density of cells and synapses at a network level. For the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) neural model, the density of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) channels determines the behaviour of a single neuron when exposed to an external stimulus. The features of the onset of single neuron oscillations vary qualitatively among different regions in the channel density plane. At a network level, the density of neurons is reflected in the global connectivity. We study the relation between the two density levels in a network of oscillatory FH neurons, by qualitatively distinguishing between three regions, where the mean network activity is (1) spiking, (2) oscillating with enveloped frequencies, and (3) bursting, respectively. We demonstrate that the global activity can be shifted between regions by changing either the density of ion channels at the subcellular level, or the connectivity at the network level, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms can explain similar global phenomena. Finally, we model a possible effect of anaesthesia by blocking specific inhibitory ion channels.

  2. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  3. Nonstationary Feller process with time-varying coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonstationary Feller process with time varying coefficients. We obtain the exact probability distribution exemplified by its characteristic function and cumulants. In some particular cases we exactly invert the distribution and achieve the probability density function. We show that for sufficiently long times this density approaches a Γ distribution with time-varying shape and scale parameters. Not far from the origin the process obeys a power law with an exponent dependent of time, thereby concluding that accessibility to the origin is not static but dynamic. We finally discuss some possible applications of the process.

  4. Harmonic functions with varying coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dziok

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex-valued harmonic functions that are univalent and sense preserving in the open unit disk can be written in the form f = h + g ‾ $f=h+\\overline{g}$ , where h and g are analytic. In this paper we investigate some classes of univalent harmonic functions with varying coefficients related to Janowski functions. By using the extreme points theory we obtain necessary and sufficient convolution conditions, coefficients estimates, distortion theorems, and integral mean inequalities for these classes of functions. The radii of starlikeness and convexity for these classes are also determined.

  5. Linearized Bekenstein Varying Alpha Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pina-Avelino, P; Oliveira, J C

    2004-01-01

    We study the simplest class of Bekenstein-type, varying $\\alpha$ models, in which the two available free functions (potential and gauge kinetic function) are Taylor-expanded up to linear order. Any realistic model of this type reduces to a model in this class for a certain time interval around the present day. Nevertheless, we show that no such model is consistent with all existing observational results. We discuss possible implications of these findings, and in particular clarify the ambiguous statement (often found in the literature) that ``the Webb results are inconsistent with Oklo''.

  6. Linearized Bekenstein varying α models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, P. P.; Martins, C. J.; Oliveira, J. C.

    2004-10-01

    We study the simplest class of Bekenstein-type, varying α models, in which the two available free functions (potential and gauge kinetic function) are Taylor-expanded up to linear order. Any realistic model of this type reduces to a model in this class for a certain time interval around the present day. Nevertheless, we show that no such model is consistent with all existing observational results. We discuss possible implications of these findings, and, in particular, clarify the ambiguous statement (often found in the literature) that “the Webb results are inconsistent with Oklo.”

  7. Time-varying cosmological term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, J.; D'oleire, M.; Pimentel, Luis O.

    2015-11-01

    We present the case of time-varying cosmological term using the Lagrangian formalism characterized by a scalar field ϕ with standard kinetic energy and arbitrary potential V(ϕ). This model is applied to Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW)cosmology. Exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by a special ansats to solve the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equation and a particular potential for the scalar field and barotropic perfect fluid. We present the evolution on this cosmological term with different scenarios.

  8. Sorting cells by their density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Nazila; Bhakta, Heran C.

    2017-01-01

    Sorting cells by their type is an important capability in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, most cell sorting techniques rely on labels or tags, which may have limited availability and specificity. Sorting different cell types by their different physical properties is an attractive alternative to labels because all cells intrinsically have these physical properties. But some physical properties, like cell size, vary significantly from cell to cell within a cell type; this makes it difficult to identify and sort cells based on their sizes alone. In this work we continuously sort different cells types by their density, a physical property with much lower cell-to-cell variation within a cell type (and therefore greater potential to discriminate different cell types) than other physical properties. We accomplish this using a 3D-printed microfluidic chip containing a horizontal flowing micron-scale density gradient. As cells flow through the chip, Earth’s gravity makes each cell move vertically to the point where the cell’s density matches the surrounding fluid’s density. When the horizontal channel then splits, cells with different densities are routed to different outlets. As a proof of concept, we use our density sorter chip to sort polymer microbeads by their material (polyethylene and polystyrene) and blood cells by their type (white blood cells and red blood cells). The chip enriches the fraction of white blood cells in a blood sample from 0.1% (in whole blood) to nearly 98% (in the output of the chip), a 1000x enrichment. Any researcher with access to a 3D printer can easily replicate our density sorter chip and use it in their own research using the design files provided as online Supporting Information. Additionally, researchers can simulate the performance of a density sorter chip in their own applications using the Python-based simulation software that accompanies this work. The simplicity, resolution, and throughput of this

  9. Varying prior information in Bayesian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Matthew; Curtis, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Bayes' rule is used to combine likelihood and prior probability distributions. The former represents knowledge derived from new data, the latter represents pre-existing knowledge; the Bayesian combination is the so-called posterior distribution, representing the resultant new state of knowledge. While varying the likelihood due to differing data observations is common, there are also situations where the prior distribution must be changed or replaced repeatedly. For example, in mixture density neural network (MDN) inversion, using current methods the neural network employed for inversion needs to be retrained every time prior information changes. We develop a method of prior replacement to vary the prior without re-training the network. Thus the efficiency of MDN inversions can be increased, typically by orders of magnitude when applied to geophysical problems. We demonstrate this for the inversion of seismic attributes in a synthetic subsurface geological reservoir model. We also present results which suggest that prior replacement can be used to control the statistical properties (such as variance) of the final estimate of the posterior in more general (e.g., Monte Carlo based) inverse problem solutions.

  10. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  11. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  12. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  13. Early Growth of Improved Acacia mangium at Different Planting Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Nirsatmanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrating tree improvement into silvicultural practices is essential in forest plantation. Concerning this fact, Acacia mangium spacing trial planted using genetically improved seed was established in West Java. This study was aimed to evaluate the impact of ages and planting density on early growth of improved seed A. mangium in the spacing trial. Improved seed from 2 seed orchards (SSO-5 and SSO-20 and a control of unimproved seed from seed stand (SS-7 were tested together in spacing 3 × 3 m and 2 × 2 m. Height, diameter, stem volume, and stand volume were observed at 3 ages. The results showed that improved seed consistently outperformed to unimproved seed. Ages were highly significant for all traits, but the significant difference varied among traits and seed sources for planting density and the interactions. High density performed better growth than low density at first year, and they were varied in subsequent ages depending on traits and seed sources. Improved seed from less intensity selection orchard was less tolerance to high density than that from high intensity selection orchard, but the tolerance was reversed in low density. Improved seed A. mangium from different level of genetic selection has responded differently in behavior to the changes of planting density.

  14. 椎体骨密度与抗压强度的关系及临床意义%The relationship and clincal significance between bone mineral density and vertebral compressive intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊仕才; 朱青安; 王柏川; 樊继宏; 王闵; 周艳莉; 刘大庸

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between bone mineral density and vertebral compressive intensity.Methods:BMD of 18 cadaveric lumbar spines were evaluated with DEXA and be separated into individual vertebral bodies.According to their BMD,all vertebral bodies were divided into 3 groups:normal group(n=20);osteoporotic group(n=15) and serious osteoporotic group(n=15).The strengths and stiffness of those vertebral bodies were measured.Results:The average BMD is 0.916±0.191 g/cm2 in normal group;0.594±0.116 g/cm2 in osteoporotic group and 0.402±0.096 g/cm2 in serious osteoporotic group.The strength and stiffness were 7 037.2±1 525.9 N、2 161.6±473.3 N/mm in normal group;3 158.8±749.5 N, 1 085.5±265.2 N/mm in osteoporotic group and 1 567.0±711.5 N, 608.6±315.2 N/mm in serious osteoporotic group.Conclusion:It was suggested that the axial compression strength and stiffiness were influenced by BMD.It was necessary that the BMD should be measured for old people,especially for postmenopausal woman.%目的:探讨椎体骨密度(BMD)与抗压强度的关系。方法:18具完整腰段脊柱标本(L1~L5),用DEXA测试每个椎体的BMD,游离成单个椎体,按骨质疏松试行诊断标准分成正常对照组、轻中度骨质疏松组和重度骨质疏松组;测试椎体静态压缩下的最大抗压力和刚度。结果:正常对照组、轻中度骨质疏松组和重度骨质疏松组平均骨密度分别为(0.916±0.191)、 (0.594±0.116)和(0.402±0.096)g/cm2;三组间的最大抗压力分别为(7 037.2±1 525.9)、 (3 158.8±749.5)和(1 567.0±711.5)N;抗压刚度分别为(2 161.6±473.3)、 (1 085.5±265.2)和(608.6±315.2)N/mm。BMD与椎体最大抗压力和刚度呈正相关关系;三组间的BMD、最大抗压力和刚度均存在显著性差异(P<0.01)。结论:椎体BMD与椎体的生物力学性质有明显的相关关系,是预测椎体压缩性骨折危险性的重要指标;老年人,尤其是绝经期妇女应检测BMD。

  15. Local Varying-Alpha Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper we demonstrated how the simplest model for varying alpha may be interpreted as the effect of a dielectric material, generalized to be consistent with Lorentz invariance. Unlike normal dielectrics, such a medium cannot change the speed of light, and its dynamics obey a Klein-Gordon equation. This work immediately suggests an extension of the standard theory, even if we require compliance with Lorentz invariance. Instead of a wave equation, the dynamics may satisfy a local algebraic relation involving the permittivity and the properties of the electromagnetic field, in analogy with more conventional dielectric (but still preserving Lorentz invariance). We develop the formalism for such theories and investigate some phenomenological implications. The problem of the divergence of the classical self-energy can be solved, or at least softened, in this framework. Some interesting new cosmological solutions for the very early universe are found, including the possibility of a bounce, inflation and e...

  16. Varying constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. It is thus of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We thus detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, Solar system observations, meteorites dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describ...

  17. Exploration of Periodically Varying Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Flocchini, Paola; Santoro, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    We study the computability and complexity of the exploration problem in a class of highly dynamic graphs: periodically varying (PV) graphs, where the edges exist only at some (unknown) times defined by the periodic movements of carriers. These graphs naturally model highly dynamic infrastructure-less networks such as public transports with fixed timetables, low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite systems, security guards' tours, etc. We establish necessary conditions for the problem to be solved. We also derive lower bounds on the amount of time required in general, as well as for the PV graphs defined by restricted classes of carriers movements: simple routes, and circular routes. We then prove that the limitations on computability and complexity we have established are indeed tight. In fact we prove that all necessary conditions are also sufficient and all lower bounds on costs are tight. We do so constructively presenting two worst case optimal solution algorithms, one for anonymous systems, and one for those w...

  18. Weighted approximation with varying weight

    CERN Document Server

    Totik, Vilmos

    1994-01-01

    A new construction is given for approximating a logarithmic potential by a discrete one. This yields a new approach to approximation with weighted polynomials of the form w"n"(" "= uppercase)P"n"(" "= uppercase). The new technique settles several open problems, and it leads to a simple proof for the strong asymptotics on some L p(uppercase) extremal problems on the real line with exponential weights, which, for the case p=2, are equivalent to power- type asymptotics for the leading coefficients of the corresponding orthogonal polynomials. The method is also modified toyield (in a sense) uniformly good approximation on the whole support. This allows one to deduce strong asymptotics in some L p(uppercase) extremal problems with varying weights. Applications are given, relating to fast decreasing polynomials, asymptotic behavior of orthogonal polynomials and multipoint Pade approximation. The approach is potential-theoretic, but the text is self-contained.

  19. A comparison of myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity among selected teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, H I; Yee, N; Shiels, H A; Brauner, C; Farrell, A P

    2000-11-01

    This study quantified the cell surface beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity in the ventricular tissue of seven teleost species; skipjack tuna (Katsowonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), mahimahi (dolphin fish; Coryphaena hippurus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an Antarctic nototheniid (Trematomus bernacchii). Beta-Adrenoreceptor density varied by almost fourfold among these species, being highest for the athletic fish: sockeye salmon among the salmonids and skipjack tuna among the scombrids. Beta-Adrenoreceptor density was lowest for the Antarctic icefish. Beta-Adrenoreceptor binding affinity varied by almost threefold. We conclude that there is a significant species-specific variability in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and binding affinity and these interspecific differences cannot be attributed to temperature even though intraspecifically cold temperature can stimulate an increase in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density. Instead, we suggest that interspecifically myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density is highest in fish that inhabit tropical water.

  20. Herbaceous forage and selection patterns by ungulates across varying herbivore assemblages in a South African Savanna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Christina Treydte

    Full Text Available Herbivores generally have strong structural and compositional effects on vegetation, which in turn determines the plant forage species available. We investigated how selected large mammalian herbivore assemblages use and alter herbaceous vegetation structure and composition in a southern African savanna in and adjacent to the Kruger National Park, South Africa. We compared mixed and mono-specific herbivore assemblages of varying density and investigated similarities in vegetation patterns under wildlife and livestock herbivory. Grass species composition differed significantly, standing biomass and grass height were almost twice as high at sites of low density compared to high density mixed wildlife species. Selection of various grass species by herbivores was positively correlated with greenness, nutrient content and palatability. Nutrient-rich Urochloa mosambicensis Hack. and Panicum maximum Jacq. grasses were preferred forage species, which significantly differed in abundance across sites of varying grazing pressure. Green grasses growing beneath trees were grazed more frequently than dry grasses growing in the open. Our results indicate that grazing herbivores appear to base their grass species preferences on nutrient content cues and that a characteristic grass species abundance and herb layer structure can be matched with mammalian herbivory types.

  1. The Physical Density of the City—Deconstruction of the Delusive Density Measure with Evidence from Two European Megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Taubenböck

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Density is among the most important descriptive as well as normative measures in urban research. While its basic concept is generally understandable, approaches towards the density measure are manifold, diverse and of multidimensional complexity. This evolves from differing thematic, spatial and calculative specifications. Consequently, applied density measures are often used in a subjective, non-transparent, unspecific and thus non-comparable manner. In this paper, we aim at a systematic deconstruction of the measure density. Varying thematic, spatial and calculative dimensions show significant influence on the measure. With both quantitative and qualitative techniques of evaluation, we assess the particular influences on the measure density. To do so, we reduce our experiment setting to a mere physical perspective; that is, the quantitative measures building density, degree of soil sealing, floor space density and, more specifically, the density of generic structural classes such as open spaces and highest built-up density areas. Using up-to-date geodata derived from remote sensing and volunteered geographic information, we build upon high-quality spatial information products such as 3-D city models. Exemplified for the comparison of two European megacities, namely Paris and London, we reveal and systemize necessary variables to be clearly defined for meaningful conclusions using the density measure.

  2. Spatial Distribution of City Tweets and Their Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bin; Yin, Junjun; Sandberg, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Social media outlets such as Twitter constitute valuable data sources for understanding human activities in the virtual world from a geographic perspective. This paper examines spatial distribution of tweets and densities within cities. The cities refer to natural cities that are automatically aggregated from a country's small street blocks, so called city blocks. We adopted street blocks (rather than census tracts) as the basic geographic units and topological center (rather than geometric center) in order to assess how tweets and densities vary from the center to the peripheral border. We found that, within a city from the center to the periphery, the tweets first increase and then decrease, while the densities decrease in general. These increases and decreases fluctuate dramatically, and differ significantly from those if census tracts are used as the basic geographic units. We also found that the decrease of densities from the center to the periphery is less significant, and even disappears, if an arbitra...

  3. Gait phase varies over velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yancheng; Lu, Kun; Yan, Songhua; Sun, Ming; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2014-02-01

    We sought to characterize the percent (PT) of the phases of a gait cycle (GC) as velocity changes to establish norms for pathological gait characteristics with higher resolution technology. Ninety five healthy subjects (49 males and 46 females with age 34.9 ± 11.8 yrs, body weight 64.0 ± 11.7 kg and BMI 23.5 ± 3.6) were enrolled and walked comfortably on a 10-m walkway at self-selected slower, normal, and faster velocities. Walking was recorded with a high speed camera (250 frames per second) and the eight phases of a GC were determined by examination of individual frames for each subject. The correlation coefficients between the mean PT of the phases of the three velocities gaits and PT defined by previous publications were all greater than 0.99. The correlation coefficient between velocity and PT of gait phases is -0.83 for loading response (LR), -0.75 for mid stance (MSt), and -0.84 for pre-swing (PSw). While the PT of the phases of three velocities from this study are highly correlated with PT described by Dr. Jacquenlin Perry decades ago, actual PT of each phase varied amongst these individuals with the largest coefficient variation of 24.31% for IC with slower velocity. From slower to faster walk, the mean PT of MSt diminished from 35.30% to 25.33%. High resolution recording revealed ambiguity of some gait phase definitions, and these data may benefit GC characterization of normal and pathological gait in clinical practice. The study results indicate that one should consider individual variations and walking velocity when evaluating gaits of subjects using standard gait phase classification.

  4. 血清总胆固醇与高密度脂蛋白胆固醇比值作为冠心病危险标志的意义%Significance of serum total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio as a risk marker for coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李璐; 纪玲

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析冠心病(CHD)患者的血脂水平,探讨血清总胆固醇(TC)与高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(HDL‐C)比值作为CHD危险标志的临床意义。方法测定295例CHD患者的血清 TC、三酰甘油(TG)、HDL‐C及低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL‐C)水平,并计算TC/HDL‐C比值。结果依据《中国成人血脂异常防治指南》颁布的血脂水平合适范围,CHD患者血清 TC、TG及LDL‐C高于合适范围百分率分别为32.20%、34.24%及37.63%,血清 HDL‐C低于合适范围百分率为39.32%。血清TC/HDL‐C比值高于合适范围百分率为57.29%。血清TC/HDL‐C比值异常率显著高于血清TC、TG、HDL‐C及LDL‐C(χ2=37.540、31.576、19.066、22.866,P<0.01)。结论与任一单项血脂检测相比,血清 TC/HDL‐C比值作为CHD危险标志可能更有临床意义,临床血脂检测报告单应增加TC/HDL‐C比值。%Objective To analyze blood lipid levels in patients with coronary heart disease ,and to explore clinical significance of serum total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio as a risk marker for coronary heart disease .Methods Serum lev‐els of total cholesterol ,triglycerides ,high density lipoprotein cholesterol ,and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were measured for 295 patients with coronary heart disease .Ratio of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein cholesterol was calculated based on the lipid tests .Results The percentages of abnormal total cholesterol ,triglycerides ,high density lipoprotein cholesterol ,and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were 32 .20% 、34 .24% ,39 .32% ,and 37 .63% ,respectively ,for patients with coronary heart disease according to normal ranges issued by Guidelines on Prevention and Treatment of Dyslipidemia in Adults in Chinese Population .The abnormal percentage of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was 57 .29% .The

  5. Significance of density and demarcation of calcifications in calcifying tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhthoff, H.K.; Sarkar, K.; Hammond, I.

    1982-04-01

    Calcification of tendons can be either degenerative and progressive in nature or reactive and selfhealing. Radiologic examinations permit to distinguish between both kinds. The reactive calcification, known also as calcifying tendinitis, passes through two main phases, the formative and the resorptive phase. Since treatment is different for each phase, their roentgenologic distinction is important. Dense, well demarcated and homogenous calcifications indicate the presence of a formative phase whereas less dense, ill defined and fluffy deposits point toward an ongoing resorption.

  6. Plant Density Effect on Grain Number and Weight of Two Winter Wheat Cultivars at Different Spikelet and Grain Positions

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Li; Zhengyong Cui; Yingli Ni; Mengjing Zheng; Dongqing Yang; Min Jin; Jin Chen; Zhenlin Wang; Yanping Yin

    2016-01-01

    In winter wheat, grain development is asynchronous. The grain number and grain weight vary significantly at different spikelet and grain positions among wheat cultivars grown at different plant densities. In this study, two winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars, 'Wennong6' and 'Jimai20', were grown under four different plant densities for two seasons, in order to study the effect of plant density on the grain number and grain weight at different spikelet and grain positions. The resul...

  7. Contingent kernel density estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Fortmann-Roe

    Full Text Available Kernel density estimation is a widely used method for estimating a distribution based on a sample of points drawn from that distribution. Generally, in practice some form of error contaminates the sample of observed points. Such error can be the result of imprecise measurements or observation bias. Often this error is negligible and may be disregarded in analysis. In cases where the error is non-negligible, estimation methods should be adjusted to reduce resulting bias. Several modifications of kernel density estimation have been developed to address specific forms of errors. One form of error that has not yet been addressed is the case where observations are nominally placed at the centers of areas from which the points are assumed to have been drawn, where these areas are of varying sizes. In this scenario, the bias arises because the size of the error can vary among points and some subset of points can be known to have smaller error than another subset or the form of the error may change among points. This paper proposes a "contingent kernel density estimation" technique to address this form of error. This new technique adjusts the standard kernel on a point-by-point basis in an adaptive response to changing structure and magnitude of error. In this paper, equations for our contingent kernel technique are derived, the technique is validated using numerical simulations, and an example using the geographic locations of social networking users is worked to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  8. Decreasing seagrass density negatively influences associated fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Rosemary M; Unsworth, Richard K F

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass meadows globally are disappearing at a rapid rate with physical disturbances being one of the major drivers of this habitat loss. Disturbance of seagrass can lead to fragmentation, a reduction in shoot density, canopy height and coverage, and potentially permanent loss of habitat. Despite being such a widespread issue, knowledge of how such small scale change affects the spatial distribution and abundances of motile fauna remains limited. The present study investigated fish and macro faunal community response patterns to a range of habitat variables (shoot length, cover and density), including individual species habitat preferences within a disturbed and patchy intertidal seagrass meadow. Multivariate analysis showed a measurable effect of variable seagrass cover on the abundance and distribution of the fauna, with species specific preferences to both high and low seagrass cover seagrass. The faunal community composition varied significantly with increasing/decreasing cover. The faunal species composition of low cover seagrass was more similar to sandy control plots than to higher cover seagrass. Shannon Wiener Diversity (H') and species richness was significantly higher in high cover seagrass than in low cover seagrass, indicating increasing habitat value as density increases. The results of this study underline how the impacts of small scale disturbances from factors such as anchor damage, boat moorings and intertidal vehicle use on seagrass meadows that reduce shoot density and cover can impact upon associated fauna. These impacts have negative consequences for the delivery of ecosystem services such as the provision of nursery habitat.

  9. Effect of time-varying humidity on the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noorani, Shamsuddin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn (United States); Shamim, Tariq [Mechanical Engineering, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (United Arab Emirates)], E-mail: tshamim@masdar.ac.ae

    2011-07-01

    In the energy sector, fuel cells constitute a promising solution for the future due to their energy-efficient and environment-friendly characteristics. However, the performance of fuel cells is very much affected by the humidification level of the reactants, particularly in hot regions. The aim of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the effect of driving conditions on the performance of fuel cells. A macroscopic single-fuel-cell-based, one dimensional, isothermal model was used on a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell to carry out a computational study of the impact of humidity conditions which vary over time. It was found that the variation of humidity has a significant effect on water distribution but a much lower impact on power and current densities. This paper provided useful information on fuel cells' performance under varying conditions which could be used to improve their design for mobile applications.

  10. Study on Simulating Spatial Distribution and Varying Patterns of Urumqi's Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xuegang; Yang Zhaoping; Zhang Xiaolei

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,an approach to simulate the spatial distribution of urban population is proposed using urban land use and population statistical data through the geographical information systems(GIS).Then,the spatial population distribution of Urumqi as a case is simulated by the approach mentioned above and its varying patterns are analyzed by the raster population surface.As a result,producing raster population surface is more accurate and natural than the traditional choropleth map of population density.Concerning the spatial population distribution of Urumqi,the population density declines from south to north and the population distribution mainly presents"T-type",the population distribution presents multi-centre agglomeration and the population distribution of the districts shows different features.The population density varies significantly with the incmase in the distance from central business district(CBD).Finally,it is found in this paper that the development history of districts,terrain and traffic road are main factors that have an influence Urumqi's population distribution.This paper tries to provide more accurate population data for the plan and management of urban land,traffic and public facilities in order to enrich the researches on urban population distribution.

  11. Varying and inverting the mass hierarchy in collisional energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    Kolevatov, Rodion

    2008-01-01

    Heavy ion collisions at RHIC and at the LHC give access to the medium-induced suppression patterns of heavy-flavored single inclusive hadron spectra at high transverse momentum. This opens novel opportunities for a detailed characterization of the medium produced in the collision. In this note, we point out that the capacity of a QCD medium to absorb the recoil of a partonic projectile is an independent signature, which may differ for different media at the same density. In particular, while the mass hierarchy (i.e., the projectile mass dependence) of radiative energy loss depends solely on a property of the projectile, the mass hierarchy of collisional energy loss depends significantly on properties of the medium. By varying these properties in a class of models, we find that the mass hierarchy of collisional parton energy loss can be modified considerably and can even be inverted, compared to that of radiative parton energy loss. This may help to disentangle the relative strengths of radiative and collision...

  12. Variation in density of cattle-visiting muscid flies between Danish inland pastures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn; Jespersen, Jørgen B.; Nielsen, B. Overgaard

    1993-01-01

    recorded, whilst the relative abundance and density of the species and the total fly-load varied considerably between pastures. In most cases the mean loads of Haematobia irritans (L.) and Hydrotaea irritans (Fall.) on heifers varied significantly in relation to site topography and shelter. These crude......The density of cattle-visiting flies (Muscidae) and the load of black-flies (Simulium spp.) were estimated in twelve and eighteen inland pastures in Denmark in 1984 and 1985 respectively. No differences in the geographical distribution pattern of the predominant cattle-visiting Muscidae were...... site variables explained 65-98% of the variation in densities of horn flies and sheep head flies observed between pastures. Highest densities of Hydrotaea irritans were primarily associated with permanent, low-lying, fairly sheltered grassland sites, whereas the density was low in temporary, dry, wind...

  13. Branch xylem density variations across Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Patiño

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of branch xylem density, Dx, were made for 1466 trees representing 503 species, sampled from 80 sites across the Amazon basin. Measured values ranged from 240 kg m−3 for a Brosimum parinarioides from Tapajos in West Pará, Brazil to 1130 kg m−3 for an Aiouea sp. from Caxiuana, Central Pará, Brazil. Analysis of variance showed significant differences in average Dx across the sample plots as well as significant differences between families, genera and species. A partitioning of the total variance in the dataset showed that geographic location and plot accounted for 33% of the variation with species identity accounting for an additional 27%; the remaining "residual" 40% of the variance accounted for by tree to tree (within species variation. Variations in plot means, were, however, hardly accountable at all by differences in species composition. Rather, it would seem that variations of xylem density at plot level must be explained by the effects of soils and/or climate. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the xylem density of the more widely distributed species varied systematically from plot to plot. Thus, as well as having a genetic component branch xylem density is a plastic trait that, for any given species, varies according to where the tree is growing and in a predictable manner. Exceptions to this general rule may be some pioneers belonging to Pourouma and Miconia and some species within the genera Brosimum, Rinorea and Trichillia which seem to be more constrained in terms of this plasticity than most species sampled as part of this study.

  14. Energy density and energy flow of magnetoplasmonic waves on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2017-03-01

    By means the linearized magnetohydrodynamic theory, expressions for energy density and energy flow are derived for the p-polarized surface magnetoplasmon polaritons on graphene in the Voigt configuration, where a static magnetic field is normal to the graphene surface. Numerical results show that the external magnetic field has significant impact on the energy density and energy transport velocity of magnetoplasmon waves in the long-wavelength region, while total power flow vary only weakly with magnetostatic field. The velocity of energy propagation is proved to be identical with group velocity of the surface waves.

  15. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  16. Possible Cosmological Implications of Time Varying Fine Structure Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, M S; Berman, Marcelo S.; Trevisan, Luis A.

    2001-01-01

    We make use of Dirac LNH and results for a time varying fine structure constant in order to derive possible laws of variation for speed of light, the number of nucleons in the Universe, energy density and gravitational constant. By comparing with experimental bounds on G variation, we find that the deceleration paramenter of the present Universe is negative. This is coherent with recent Supernovae observations.

  17. Representations and Metrics for Time-Varying Terrain Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    multiple terrain scans. The individual scans are point clouds augmented with a varying probability density functions at each sample point. A scalar...system. The boxes are individual executable programs and the cylinders are data files. The Point-Set Generator generates simple test point clouds , such... point clouds to a height-field raster, displayable as a gray-scale image. We first investigated using a 3D, volumetric variant of SIFT which stacks

  18. Performance of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus fed varying dietary L-carnitine levels at different stocking densities Desempenho de juvenis de pregado (Scophthalmus maximus em função da densidade de estocagem e de níveis dietéticos de L-carnitina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Magalhães Gonçalves

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Commercial farming of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus at high stocking densities may lead to growth depression and increasing production costs. Moreover, the high levels of accumulated waste in an intensive system may cause rapid deterioration of water quality, which may undermine the production. L-carnitine is known as a growth-enhancer which shows promise as mitigator of crowding effects. The effects of stocking densities (4, 8, 11 and 14 kg m² on growth performance, feed utilization and body composition were evaluated during 75 days on turbot (75.6 ± 2.8 g fed two dietary L-carnitine levels (40 or 240 mg kg¹. At the end of the feeding trial, total ammonia excretion (TAN was measured postprandially for 24h. Specific growth rate and weight gain decreased with increasing stocking density. Fish held at 4 kg m² had higher final body weight (94-96 g than fish held at higher densities (80-87 g. Protein efficiency ratio was higher in fish held at 4 kg m² (1.33-1.36, in comparison to fish stocked at 8 kg m² (0.98 or 14 kg m² (0.45. Voluntary feed intake decreased from 0.70 to 0.56% BW with increasing stocking density. Dietary L-carnitine supplementation did not affect growth performance and body composition, except for body L-carnitine content which increased from 75 to 128 mg kg¹ BW with supplementation. Fish fed 240 mg L-carnitine supplements had lower TAN that the ones fed 40 mg L-carnitine (p A aquicultura de pregado (Scophthalmus maximus utilizando elevadas densidades pode reduzir o crescimento e aumentar os custos de produção. Elevados níveis de metabolitos gerados nestes sistemas intensivos provocam rápida deterioração da qualidade da água, podendo também comprometer a performance da produção. A L-carnitina atua como potenciadora do crescimento parecendo ser promissora por atenuar alguns desses efeitos. Os efeitos de densidades (4, 8, 11 e 14 kg m² no desempenho do crescimento, composição corporal foram avaliados em pregados

  19. Mixing properties of ARCH and time-varying ARCH processes

    CERN Document Server

    Fryzlewicz, Piotr; 10.3150/10-BEJ270

    2011-01-01

    There exist very few results on mixing for non-stationary processes. However, mixing is often required in statistical inference for non-stationary processes such as time-varying ARCH (tvARCH) models. In this paper, bounds for the mixing rates of a stochastic process are derived in terms of the conditional densities of the process. These bounds are used to obtain the $\\alpha$, 2-mixing and $\\beta$-mixing rates of the non-stationary time-varying $\\operatorname {ARCH}(p)$ process and $\\operatorname {ARCH}(\\infty)$ process. It is shown that the mixing rate of the time-varying $\\operatorname {ARCH}(p)$ process is geometric, whereas the bound on the mixing rate of the $\\operatorname {ARCH}(\\infty)$ process depends on the rate of decay of the $\\operatorname {ARCH}(\\infty)$ parameters. We note that the methodology given in this paper is applicable to other processes.

  20. Branch xylem density variations across the Amazon Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Patiño

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Xylem density is a physical property of wood that varies between individuals, species and environments. It reflects the physiological strategies of trees that lead to growth, survival and reproduction. Measurements of branch xylem density, ρx, were made for 1653 trees representing 598 species, sampled from 87 sites across the Amazon basin. Measured values ranged from 218 kg m−3 for a Cordia sagotii (Boraginaceae from Mountagne de Tortue, French Guiana to 1130 kg m−3 for an Aiouea sp. (Lauraceae from Caxiuana, Central Pará, Brazil. Analysis of variance showed significant differences in average ρx across regions and sampled plots as well as significant differences between families, genera and species. A partitioning of the total variance in the dataset showed that species identity (family, genera and species accounted for 33% with environment (geographic location and plot accounting for an additional 26%; the remaining "residual" variance accounted for 41% of the total variance. Variations in plot means, were, however, not only accountable by differences in species composition because xylem density of the most widely distributed species in our dataset varied systematically from plot to plot. Thus, as well as having a genetic component, branch xylem density is a plastic trait that, for any given species, varies according to where the tree is growing in a predictable manner. Within the analysed taxa, exceptions to this general rule seem to be pioneer species belonging for example to the Urticaceae whose branch xylem density is more constrained than most species sampled in this study. These patterns of variation of branch xylem density across Amazonia suggest a large functional diversity amongst Amazonian trees which is not well understood.

  1. Variation in density of cattle-visiting muscid flies between Danish inland pastures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn; Jespersen, Jørgen B.; Nielsen, B. Overgaard

    1993-01-01

    The density of cattle-visiting flies (Muscidae) and the load of black-flies (Simulium spp.) were estimated in twelve and eighteen inland pastures in Denmark in 1984 and 1985 respectively. No differences in the geographical distribution pattern of the predominant cattle-visiting Muscidae were...... recorded, whilst the relative abundance and density of the species and the total fly-load varied considerably between pastures. In most cases the mean loads of Haematobia irritans (L.) and Hydrotaea irritans (Fall.) on heifers varied significantly in relation to site topography and shelter. These crude...

  2. Comparison of arabidopsis stomatal density mutants indicates variation in water stress responses and potential epistatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneka S. Lawson; Paula M. Pijut; Charles H. Michler

    2014-01-01

    Recent physiological analysis of Arabidopsis stomatal density (SD) mutants indicated that SD was not the major factor controlling aboveground biomass accumulation. Despite the general theory that plants with fewer stomata have limited biomass acquisition capabilities, epf1 and several other Arabidopsis mutants varied significantly in leaf fresh...

  3. Do Time-Varying Covariances, Volatility Comovement and Spillover Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Balasubramanyan

    2005-01-01

    Financial markets and their respective assets are so intertwined; analyzing any single market in isolation ignores important information. We investigate whether time varying volatility comovement and spillover impact the true variance-covariance matrix under a time-varying correlation set up. Statistically significant volatility spillover and comovement between US, UK and Japan is found. To demonstrate the importance of modelling volatility comovement and spillover, we look at a simple portfo...

  4. Petri nets extension to model state-varying failure rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common assumptions in reliability modeling is the constant failure rate. This has been increasingly changing lately, yielding significant research towards abandoning simulation results based on this assumption; thus, deeming constant failure rates as inadequate to model failures......-varying failure rates and extend the formalism of Petri nets to model them. To illustrate our approach we provide an example model that features state-varying failure rates....

  5. GPU Generation of Large Varied Animated Crowds

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac Rudomin; Benjamín Hernández; Oriam de Gyves; Leonel Toledo; Ivan Rivalcoba; Sergio Ruiz

    2013-01-01

    ..We discuss several steps in the process of simulating and visualizing large and varied crowds in real time for consumer-level computers and graphic cards (GPUs). Animating varied crowds using a diversity of models and animations (assets) is complex and costly. One has to use models that are expensive if bought, take a long time to model, and consume too much memory and computing resources. We discuss methods for simulating, generating, animating and rendering crowds of varied aspect and a d...

  6. A new varied-time photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Ma, Ji; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Li, Hong; Chen, Wan-Jin; Yuan, Hong-chun; Li, Heng-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed a new one-dimensional varied-time photonic crystals, i.e., the refractive indices of media $A$ and $B$ are the time functions. We consider the varied-time photonic crystals of refractive indices period variation and calculate the transmissivity and electronic field distribution with and without defect layer, which are different from the conventional photonic crystals, which transmissivity and electronic field distribution are static, but the varied-time...

  7. Inflationary Phase with Time Varying Fundamental Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, M S; Berman, Marcelo S.; Trevisan, Luis A.

    2002-01-01

    Following Barrow, and Barrow and collaborators, we find a cosmological JBD model, with varying speed of light and varying fine structure constant, where the deceleration parameter is -1,causing acceleration of the Universe.Indeed, we have an exponential inflationary phase. Plancks time, energy, length,etc.,might have had different numerical values in the past, than those available in the litterature, due to the varying values for speed of light, and gravitational constant.

  8. A new varied-time photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed a new one-dimensional varied-time photonic crystals, i.e., the refractive indices of media $A$ and $B$ are the time functions. We consider the varied-time photonic crystals of refractive indices period variation and calculate the transmissivity and electronic field distribution with and without defect layer, which are different from the conventional photonic crystals, which transmissivity and electronic field distribution are static, but the varied-time...

  9. Relação entre variáveis da composição corporal e densidade mineral óssea em mulheres idosas Relación entre las variables de la composición corporal y la densidade mineral ósea en mujeres añosas Relationship between variables of body composition and mineral bone density in elder women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Moreira Chaves

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Na literatura, há controvérsias sobre a importância da massa corporal total (MCT, da massa magra (MM e da massa gorda (MG como determinantes da densidade mineral óssea (DMO em mulheres idosas. OBJETIVOS: Determinar a relação da DMO com a MCT, MM e MG em mulheres idosas. MÉTODOS: Foram estudadas 97 mulheres com idade entre 60-70 anos e média de 66,41 ± 4,82 anos. Nenhuma participante fazia uso de hormônios ou qualquer outro medicamento que pudesse afetar o metabolismo ósseo, assim como não tinham o hábito de fumar ou de ingerir bebidas alcoólicas. A composição corporal e a DMO do colo femoral (CF e da coluna lombar (CL foram medidas através da DXA, um DPX-IQ lunar. As relações entre MCT, MM e MG e a DMO do CF e da CL foram realizadas separadamente, através da análise de regressão linear. A análise de regressão múltipla foi utilizada para determinar a contribuição da MCT, MM e MG sobre a DMO do CF e da CL. RESULTADOS: A MCT mostrou-se fortemente correlacionada com a DMO do CF e da CL (r = 0,54, p = 0,01 e r = 0,37, p = 0,01, respectivamente, do que a MG (r = 0,30, p = 0,01 e r = 0,19, p = 0,06, respectivamente e MM (r = 0,44, p = 0,01 e r = 0,26, p = 0,05, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: A MCT e a MM foram os componentes corporais que mantiveram relação significativa com a DMO do CF e da CL. A MG mostrou correlação fraca com a DMO do CF e da CL, não sendo estatisticamente significativa neste último sítio. Assim, a MCT e a MM são, entre as variáveis da composição corporal, as que mais significativamente determinam a DMO em mulheres idosas.En la literatura, hay controversias sobre la importancia de la masa corporal total (MCT, la masa magra (MM, y la masa grasa (MG como decisivas sobre la estimación de la densidad mineral osea (DMO en las mujeres mayores. OBJETIVO: Determinar la relación de DMO con MCT, MM y MG en las mujeres mayores. MÉTODOS: Se estudiaron 97 mujeres con la edad entre 60 -70 años de promedio

  10. Time varying effects in survival analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H.

    2002-01-01

    additive risk model; counting process; proportional hazards model; semi-parametric models; survival data; time-varying effects; nonparametric testing......additive risk model; counting process; proportional hazards model; semi-parametric models; survival data; time-varying effects; nonparametric testing...

  11. Fractal analysis of time varying data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Sadana, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of time varying data, such as an electrical signal, are analyzed by converting the data from a temporal domain into a spatial domain pattern. Fractal analysis is performed on the spatial domain pattern, thereby producing a fractal dimension D.sub.F. The fractal dimension indicates the regularity of the time varying data.

  12. Modelling tourists arrival using time varying parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciptawati, P.; Sukarsa, K. G.; Kencana, Eka N.

    2017-06-01

    The importance of tourism and its related sectors to support economic development and poverty reduction in many countries increase researchers’ attentions to study and model tourists’ arrival. This work is aimed to demonstrate time varying parameter (TVP) technique to model the arrival of Korean’s tourists to Bali. The number of Korean tourists whom visiting Bali for period January 2010 to December 2015 were used to model the number of Korean’s tourists to Bali (KOR) as dependent variable. The predictors are the exchange rate of Won to IDR (WON), the inflation rate in Korea (INFKR), and the inflation rate in Indonesia (INFID). Observing tourists visit to Bali tend to fluctuate by their nationality, then the model was built by applying TVP and its parameters were approximated using Kalman Filter algorithm. The results showed all of predictor variables (WON, INFKR, INFID) significantly affect KOR. For in-sample and out-of-sample forecast with ARIMA’s forecasted values for the predictors, TVP model gave mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) as much as 11.24 percent and 12.86 percent, respectively.

  13. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information › Bone Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your ... compared to people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine ...

  14. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-11

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces.

  15. The density curve of F distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaopeng; LIU Kunhui

    2004-01-01

    Employing the properties of special function,we discuss the positional relation between two density curves with different parameters for F distribution in this paper.Some varying regularities about the position of density curve of F distribution have been obtained.

  16. Spatially varying relationships between land-cover change and driving factors at multiple sampling scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shihong; Wang, Qiao; Guo, Luo

    2014-05-01

    Modeling the relationships between environment, human activity, and natural conditions is very important for understanding human-environment interactions. This study aims at examining how these relationships vary over spatial sampling scales and investigating the spatially varying relationships between land-cover changes and driving factors, as well as the variations in the relationships at different sampling scales in the Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of Qinghai Province, P.R. China. Regular sampling methods are used first to generate eight sets of data points at different scales, and then the values for land-cover changes and the factors are extracted for these data points. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) model is applied to analyze the relationships between land-cover changes and the factors at different sampling scales. The results indicate that the influences of the factors (e.g. the signs, significances, and values of coefficients) change greatly over different sampling scales; similarly, for different types of land-cover changes, the contributions of the factors also vary. Generally, roads, rivers, and lakes contribute greatly to land-cover changes, while villages, temples, and elevations contribute less. A possible reason is that the densities of roads, rivers, and lakes is much greater than those of villages and temples, and the populations in temples and villages are too small to have much effect on land-cover changes. The results demonstrate that the sampling scales have an important influence on the relationships between land-cover change and the factors.

  17. Role and significance of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in measurement of bone mineral density in children with upper extremity fractures%双能X线吸收法检测儿童上肢骨折的骨密度及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦溦; 杨星华; 刘洋; 韦继刚; 陈辉; 郭元

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the bone mineral density in children with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and examine the relevance of bone mineral density with the risk of pediatric upper limb fracture.Methods A total of 864 children (8-14 years of age) admitted into our hospital in 2009 were involved in the study.The bone mass density (Z score) at the left radius was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.Children were grouped according to their Z score and age to observe correlations of Z value and age with the incidence of fractures.Results Thirty-three children were lost to follow-up.For the other 831 children,the mean duration of follow-up was 2 years.Z sore was ≤-2 in 66 children and >-2 in 765 children.There was significant difference in fracture incidence between children with Z score of ≤-2 and >-2 (27.27% vs 5.49%,P <0.01).Furthermore,fracture incidence in children at age group of 8-10 years and 11-14 years revealed significant difference (10.83% vs 5.03%,P < 0.01).Conclusions Bone mineral density is closely related to upper limb fracture in children and increases with aging.Early application of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to detect the bone density is an effective primary measure for prevention of fractures in children.%目的 探讨双能X线吸收法检测儿童上肢骨折的骨密度及其意义. 方法 选取2009年1-12月体检的8~14岁儿童864例,采用双能X线骨密度测试仪检测左桡骨骨密度Z值,根据Z值大小进行分组观察Z值与骨折的关系;根据年龄分组观察年龄与骨折的关系. 结果 864例患者中获得2年随访831例,失随访33例.Z值结果显示,Z值≤-2者66例,Z值>-2者765例.Z值≤-2组儿童骨折发生率为27.27%,Z值>-2组骨折发生率为5.49%,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);8~10岁组儿童骨折发生率为10.83%,11 ~ 14岁组骨折发生率为5.03%,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01). 结论 骨密度与儿童上肢骨

  18. Poverty Index With Time Varying Consumption and Income Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K; Mallick, Sushanta K

    2016-01-01

    In a recent work (Chattopadhyay, A. K. et al, Europhys. Lett. {\\bf 91}, 58003, 2010) based on food consumption statistics, we showed how a stochastic agent based model could represent the time variation of the income distribution statistics in a developing economy, thereby defining an alternative \\enquote{poverty index} (PI) that largely agreed with poverty gap index data. This PI used two variables, the probability density function of the income statistics and a consumption deprivation (CD) function, representing the shortfall in the minimum consumption needed for survival. Since the time dependence of the CD function was introduced there through data extrapolation only and not through an endogenous time dependent series, this model left unexplained how the minimum consumption needed for survival varies with time. The present article overcomes these limitations and arrives at a new unified theoretical structure through time varying consumption and income distributions where trade is only allowed when the inc...

  19. Varying Alpha and the Electroweak Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kimberly, D; Kimberly, Dagny; Magueijo, Joao

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by recent claims for a varying fine structure constant, alpha, we investigate the effect of ``promoting coupling constants to variables'' upon various parameters of the standard model. We first consider a toy model: Proca's theory of the massive photon. We then explore the electroweak theory with one and two dilaton fields. We find that a varying alpha unavoidably implies varying W and Z masses. This follows from gauge invariance, and is to be contrasted with Proca' theory. For the two dilaton theory the Weinberg angle is also variable, but Fermi's constant and the tree level fermion masses remain constant unless the Higgs' potential becomes dynamical. We outline some cosmological implications.

  20. Tavatult jahe Karlovy Vary / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2011-01-01

    1.-10. juulini toimunud Karlovy Vary 46. filmifestivalist (muusikafilmide alajaotuses näidati Marianne Kõrveri dokumentaalfilmi "Erkki-Sven Tüür: 7 etüüdi piltides" (2010) programmis "A Musical Odyssey")

  1. Inhomogeneous Universe Models with Varying Cosmological Term

    CERN Document Server

    Chimento, L P; Chimento, Luis P.; Pavon, Diego

    1998-01-01

    The evolution of a class of inhomogeneous spherically symmetric universe models possessing a varying cosmological term and a material fluid, with an adiabatic index either constant or not, is studied.

  2. 血清对氧磷酯酶-1及氧化低密度脂蛋白在缺血性脑卒中的临床意义%The clinical significance of serum paraoxonase-1 activity, oxidized low-density lipoprotein level in ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱卫香; 刘彦敏; 张砚卿; 杜国辉; 张琳琳

    2015-01-01

    目的::探讨急性缺血性脑卒中患者血清对氧磷酯酶-1(PON-1)活性和氧化低密度脂蛋白(ox-LDL)水平的变化及其临床意义。方法:选择急性缺血性脑卒中患者96例及正常对照组72名,采用对硝基苯酚为底物的速率法和酶联免疫吸附法分别测定血清PON-1、ox-LDL,同时检测2组的总胆固醇、三酰甘油、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇、高密度脂蛋白胆固醇等生化指标并进行对比;探讨PON-1、ox-LDL与急性缺血性脑卒中的关系。结果:缺血性脑卒中组血清PON-1和高密度脂蛋白胆固醇均明显低于对照组,ox-LDL和低密度脂蛋白胆固醇明显高于对照组(P<0.01);大梗死组血清PON-1活性均低于中梗死组和小梗死组(P<0.05和P<0.01);而大梗死组ox-LDL水平均明显高于中梗死组和小梗死组(P<0.01);神经功能重度损伤组患者血清PON-1活性均明显低于轻、中度损伤组(P<0.01),而血清ox-LDL水平均显著高于轻、中度损伤组(P<0.01)。相关分析显示:PON-1与ox-LDL呈负相关关系(P<0.01)。结论:急性缺血性脑卒中患者PON-1活性降低,导致抗氧化能力减弱,使血清ox-LDL水平增加,这种改变可能是缺血性脑卒中重要的危险因素,对预测脑卒中风险有重要意义。%Objective:To investigate the changes of serum paraoxonase-1(PON-1) activity,oxidized low-density lipoprotein(ox-LDL) level in acute ischemic stroke patients and analyze the clinical significance. Methods:Ninety-six acute ischemic stroke cases and 72 health subjects were selected. Serum PON-1 activity was measured using paroxon as substrate and ox-LDL level was detected by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay method. Total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were all measured in the two groups. The relationships of serum PON-1 activity,ox-LDL level and acute ischemic stroke were explored. Results:In ischemic stroke group

  3. Functional Piezocrystal Characterisation under Varying Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Liao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Piezocrystals, especially the relaxor-based ferroelectric crystals, have been subject to intense investigation and development within the past three decades, motivated by the performance advantages offered by their ultrahigh piezoelectric coefficients and higher electromechanical coupling coefficients than piezoceramics. Structural anisotropy of piezocrystals also provides opportunities for devices to operate in novel vibration modes, such as the d36 face shear mode, with domain engineering and special crystal cuts. These piezocrystal characteristics contribute to their potential usage in a wide range of low- and high-power ultrasound applications. In such applications, conventional piezoelectric materials are presently subject to varying mechanical stress/pressure, temperature and electric field conditions. However, as observed previously, piezocrystal properties are significantly affected by a single such condition or a combination of conditions. Laboratory characterisation of the piezocrystal properties under these conditions is therefore essential to fully understand these materials and to allow electroacoustic transducer design in realistic scenarios. This will help to establish the extent to which these high performance piezocrystals can replace conventional piezoceramics in demanding applications. However, such characterisation requires specific experimental arrangements, examples of which are reported here, along with relevant results. The measurements include high frequency-resolution impedance spectroscopy with the piezocrystal material under mechanical stress 0–60 MPa, temperature 20–200 °C, high electric AC drive and DC bias. A laser Doppler vibrometer and infrared thermal camera are also integrated into the measurement system for vibration mode shape scanning and thermal conditioning with high AC drive. Three generations of piezocrystal have been tested: (I binary, PMN-PT; (II ternary, PIN-PMN-PT; and (III doped ternary, Mn

  4. Echo strength and density structure of Hawaiian mesopelagic boundary community patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2003-10-01

    A broadband sonar system and digital camera with strobe lights were mounted on a vertically profiling frame with a depth sensor. The echo strengths and densities of animals within individual mesopelagic boundary community patches were investigated as a function of depth. Time and distance from shore were also investigated. Simultaneous surface echosounder surveys permitted comparison of density estimates from two techniques. Echo strength values suggest nearshore boundary community animals are primarily myctophid fishes, which was confirmed by preliminary photographic evidence. Echo strength varied significantly as a function of distance from the shoreline and time. These measures of echo strength are important for estimating density from a surface echosounder. Density estimates from these revised echo strengths compare well with those made with echo highlight counting, which is independent of echo strength. These density measures suggest that previous density estimates were too low but do not change the conclusions of these studies. Vertical microstructure in density was apparent but animal size and compositional structure was not evident within a patch. Patch edges were abrupt, with no differences in the density or echo strength from patch interiors. These edges were generally straight, with a sharp drop in density to the background density of zero. Estimates of animal size as a function of time provide information about the diel migration patterns of these mesopelagic animals.

  5. Climatic response to a time varying solar constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, G. R.; Short, D. A.; Mengel, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Recent measurements of the solar constant, theoretical arguments, and climatic measurements combined with signal processing suggest the possibility that the solar constant varies significantly on time scales ranging from billions of years to 11-yr (sunspot) cycles, and even to scales of a few weeks. Simple climate models with a time varying solar constant are examined here, with emphasis on the heat balance models (North et al., 1981). Linear heat balance model results are presented for high (10 cycles/yr) and low (0.1 cycle/yr) frequencies, providing a useful guide in estimating the direct heat response to solar variability.

  6. Mosquito host selection varies seasonally with host availability and mosquito density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara C Thiemann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Host selection by vector mosquitoes is a critical component of virus proliferation, particularly for viruses such as West Nile (WNV that are transmitted enzootically to a variety of avian hosts, and tangentially to dead-end hosts such as humans. Culex tarsalis is a principal vector of WNV in rural areas of western North America. Based on previous work, Cx. tarsalis utilizes a variety of avian and mammalian hosts and tends to feed more frequently on mammals in the late summer than during the rest of the year. To further explore this and other temporal changes in host selection, bloodfed females were collected at a rural farmstead and heron nesting site in Northern California from May 2008 through May 2009, and bloodmeal hosts identified using either a microsphere-based array or by sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene. Host composition during summer was dominated by four species of nesting Ardeidae. In addition, the site was populated with various passerine species as well as domestic farm animals and humans. When present, Cx. tarsalis fed predominantly (>80% upon the ardeids, with Black-crowned Night-Herons, a highly competent WNV host, the most prevalent summer host. As the ardeids fledged and left the area and mosquito abundance increased in late summer, Cx. tarsalis feeding shifted to include more mammals, primarily cattle, and a high diversity of avian species. In the winter, Yellow-billed Magpies and House Sparrows were the predominant hosts, and Yellow-billed Magpies and American Robins were fed upon more frequently than expected given their relative abundance. These data demonstrated that host selection was likely based both on host availability and differences in utilization, that the shift of bloodfeeding to include more mammalian hosts was likely the result of both host availability and increased mosquito abundance, and that WNV-competent hosts were fed upon by Cx. tarsalis throughout the year.

  7. Performance Evaluation of DSDV and MDSDV Routing Protocol with Varying Node Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Mahajan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANET is an important and challenging research area. The routing protocol should detect and maintain a good route between source and destination nodes in these dynamic networks. Many routing protocols have been proposed for mobile ad hoc networks, and none can be considered as the best under all conditions. This thesis work consist a systematic comparative evaluation of a new multipath routing protocol for MANETS. The new protocol, called Multipath Destination Sequenced Distance Vector (MDSDV is based on the well known single path Destination Sequenced Distance Vector (DSDV is compared with known protocol DSDV. This work containing evaluates the protocols on a range of MANETS with between 50, 75 and 100 nodes, which are static nodes. The protocol comparison metrics are Throughput and Residual Energy

  8. Performance of green LTE networks powered by the smart grid with time varying user density

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we implement a green heuristic algorithm involving the base station sleeping strategy that aims to ensure energy saving for the radio access network of the 4GLTE (Fourth Generation Long Term Evolution) mobile networks. We propose an energy procurement model that takes into consideration the existence of multiple energy providers in the smart grid power system (e.g. fossil fuel and renewable energy sources, etc.) in addition to deployed photovoltaic panels in base station sites. Moreover, the analysis is based on the dynamic time variation of daily traffic and aims to maintain the network quality of service. Our simulation results show an important contribution in the reduction of CO2 emissions that can be reached by optimal power allocation over the active base stations. Copyright © 2013 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc.

  9. Digital repetitive control under varying frequency conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Germán A; Olm, Josep M

    2013-01-01

    The tracking/rejection of periodic signals constitutes a wide field of research in the control theory and applications area. Repetitive Control has proven to be an efficient way to face this topic. However, in some applications the frequency of the reference/disturbance signal is time-varying or uncertain. This causes an important performance degradation in the standard Repetitive Control scheme. This book presents some solutions to apply Repetitive Control in varying frequency conditions without loosing steady-state performance. It also includes a complete theoretical development and experimental results in two representative systems. The presented solutions are organized in two complementary branches: varying sampling period Repetitive Control and High Order Repetitive Control. The first approach allows dealing with large range frequency variations while the second allows dealing with small range frequency variations. The book also presents applications of the described techniques to a Roto-magnet plant and...

  10. Varying alpha and the electroweak model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly, Dagny; Magueijo, Joao

    2004-03-25

    Inspired by recent claims for a varying fine structure constant, alpha, we investigate the effect of 'promoting coupling constants to variables' upon various parameters of the standard model. We first consider a toy model: Proca theory of the massive photon. We then explore the electroweak theory with one and two dilaton fields. We find that a varying alpha unavoidably implies varying W and Z masses. This follows from gauge invariance, and is to be contrasted with Proca theory. For the two dilaton theory the Weinberg angle is also variable, but Fermi's constant and the tree level fermion masses remain constant unless the Higgs potential becomes dynamical. We outline some cosmological implications.

  11. Detection and clinical significance of high-density lipoprotein subfractions in women with coronary heart disease%女性冠心病患者高密度脂蛋白亚组分的检测及临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖华; 陈英; 姚振国

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of high-density lipoprotein subfractions in women with coronary heart disease. Method 78 female patients with coronary artery disease (observation group) and 82 normal subjects (control group) were analyzed for the serum HDL using two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. Results In the observation group, the levels of TC ,TG,LDL-C ,and the ratio of LDL-C/HDL-C were significantly higher than the control group.The level of HDL-C in the observation group was significantly lower than the control group (P<0.01). The levels of serum Prepl-HDL, HDL-3b, and HDL-3c were also significantly higher than the control group (P<0.05).In contrast,the level of HDL-2b was significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05), suggesting that the HDL tended to be smaller in women with coronary heart disease. Conclusions Women with coronary heart disease tended to have smaller HDL particles.HDL-2b can be used to predict the likelihood of coronary heart disease.%目的 研究女性冠心病患者高密度脂蛋白(HDL)亚组分及相对含量的变化并分析其临床意义.方法 采用双相电泳-免疫印迹法分析78例女性冠心病患者(观察组)及82例女性非冠心病组(对照组)血清HDL各亚组分的含量.结果 观察组血清总胆固醇(TC)、甘油三酯(TG)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)、LDL-C/HDL-C的值明显高于对照组,而HDL-C明显低于对照组,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01);女性冠心病患者血清中Preβ 1-HDL、HDL-3b、HDL-3c水平显著高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P均<0.05),而HDL-2b水平显著低于对照组(P<0.05).结论 女性冠心病患者血清中,HDL颗粒有变小的趋势,HDL-2b预测冠心病的可能性更高.

  12. Significant NRC Enforcement Actions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — This dataset provides a list of Nuclear Regulartory Commission (NRC) issued significant enforcement actions. These actions, referred to as "escalated", are issued by...

  13. Hydrodynamic solutions of spatially-varying 1D exclusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Greg; Chou, Tom

    2007-03-01

    We analyze the open boundary partially asymmetric exclusion process with smoothly varying internal hopping rates in the infinite-size, mean field limit. The mean field equations for particle densities are written in terms of Ricatti equations with the steady-state current J as a parameter. These equations are solved both analytically and numerically. Upon imposing the boundary conditions set by the injection and extraction rates, the currents J are found self-consistently. We find a number of cases where analytic solutions can be found exactly or approximated. Results for J from asymptotic analyses for slowly varying hopping rates agree extremely well with those from extensive Monte Carlo simulations, suggesting that mean field currents are exact as long as the hopping rates vary slowly over the lattice. If the forward hopping rate is greater than or less than the backward hopping rate throughout the entire chain, the three standard steady-state phases are preserved. Our analysis reveals the sensitivity of the current to the relative phase between the forward and backward hopping rate functions.

  14. Filmihullu eluvesi voolab Karlovy Varys / Margit Tõnson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tõnson, Margit, 1978-

    2010-01-01

    Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelisest filmifestivalist. Filmidest "Mr. Nobody" (rež. Jaco Van Dormaeli), "Kasside ema Teresa" (rež. Pawel Sala) ja "The Arbor" (rež. Clio Barnardi). Nimekiri võitnud töödest ja viimastel aastatel festivalil näidatud Eesti mängufilmidest

  15. Efficient Estimation in Heteroscedastic Varying Coefficient Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhua Wei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers statistical inference for the heteroscedastic varying coefficient model. We propose an efficient estimator for coefficient functions that is more efficient than the conventional local-linear estimator. We establish asymptotic normality for the proposed estimator and conduct some simulation to illustrate the performance of the proposed method.

  16. Õunpuu Karlovy Varys edukas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    45. Karlovy Vary filmifestivali võistlusprogrammis "East of the West" märgiti ära Veiko Õunpuu film "Püha Tõnu kiusamine". Peaauhind läks rumeenlase Cristi Puiu filmile "Aurora". Grand prix´sai Augustĺ Vila film "La mosquitera". Teisi preemiasaajaid

  17. Filmihullu eluvesi voolab Karlovy Varys / Margit Tõnson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tõnson, Margit, 1978-

    2010-01-01

    Karlovy Vary rahvusvahelisest filmifestivalist. Filmidest "Mr. Nobody" (rež. Jaco Van Dormaeli), "Kasside ema Teresa" (rež. Pawel Sala) ja "The Arbor" (rež. Clio Barnardi). Nimekiri võitnud töödest ja viimastel aastatel festivalil näidatud Eesti mängufilmidest

  18. Ellipsometry with randomly varying polarization states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, F.; Lee, C. J.; Chen, J. Q.; E. Louis,; van der Slot, P. J. M.; Boller, K. J.; F. Bijkerk,

    2012-01-01

    We show that, under the right conditions, one can make highly accurate polarization-based measurements without knowing the absolute polarization state of the probing light field. It is shown that light, passed through a randomly varying birefringent material has a well-defined orbit on the Poincar s

  19. Choosing Outcomes of Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spady, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Outcomes are high-quality, culminating demonstrations of significant learning in context. The High Success Network uses the "Demonstration Mountain" to differentiate among three major "learning zones" and six different forms of learning demonstrations that increase in complexity, generalizability, and significance, along with…

  20. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  1. Toward accurate and precise estimates of lion density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Nicholas B; Gopalaswamy, Arjun M

    2017-08-01

    Reliable estimates of animal density are fundamental to understanding ecological processes and population dynamics. Furthermore, their accuracy is vital to conservation because wildlife authorities rely on estimates to make decisions. However, it is notoriously difficult to accurately estimate density for wide-ranging carnivores that occur at low densities. In recent years, significant progress has been made in density estimation of Asian carnivores, but the methods have not been widely adapted to African carnivores, such as lions (Panthera leo). Although abundance indices for lions may produce poor inferences, they continue to be used to estimate density and inform management and policy. We used sighting data from a 3-month survey and adapted a Bayesian spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) model to estimate spatial lion density in the Maasai Mara National Reserve and surrounding conservancies in Kenya. Our unstructured spatial capture-recapture sampling design incorporated search effort to explicitly estimate detection probability and density on a fine spatial scale, making our approach robust in the context of varying detection probabilities. Overall posterior mean lion density was estimated to be 17.08 (posterior SD 1.310) lions >1 year old/100 km(2) , and the sex ratio was estimated at 2.2 females to 1 male. Our modeling framework and narrow posterior SD demonstrate that SECR methods can produce statistically rigorous and precise estimates of population parameters, and we argue that they should be favored over less reliable abundance indices. Furthermore, our approach is flexible enough to incorporate different data types, which enables robust population estimates over relatively short survey periods in a variety of systems. Trend analyses are essential to guide conservation decisions but are frequently based on surveys of differing reliability. We therefore call for a unified framework to assess lion numbers in key populations to improve management and

  2. Significance Testing Without Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ICES REPORT 12-34 August 2012 Significance testing without truth by William Perkins, Mark Tygert, and Rachel Ward The Institute for Computational...testing without truth , ICES REPORT 12-34, The Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, August 2012...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Significance testing without truth 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  3. Temperature and temporal dependence of neutral density transmittance standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, A.; Hamlin, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    The Schott series of NG glasses are frequently used to manufacture neutral density transmittance standards for validation of spectrophotometer systems as well as for comparisons of regular spectral transmittance scales. A study has been made of the temperature and temporal dependence of transmittance in these types of filters. The temperature dependence of transmittance is found to scale as -ln(T). The filter transmittance was found to vary significantly with time shortly after manufacture but appears to be stabilizing nine months after beginning measurements.

  4. Varying-coefficient functional linear regression

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yichao; Müller, Hans-Georg; 10.3150/09-BEJ231

    2011-01-01

    Functional linear regression analysis aims to model regression relations which include a functional predictor. The analog of the regression parameter vector or matrix in conventional multivariate or multiple-response linear regression models is a regression parameter function in one or two arguments. If, in addition, one has scalar predictors, as is often the case in applications to longitudinal studies, the question arises how to incorporate these into a functional regression model. We study a varying-coefficient approach where the scalar covariates are modeled as additional arguments of the regression parameter function. This extension of the functional linear regression model is analogous to the extension of conventional linear regression models to varying-coefficient models and shares its advantages, such as increased flexibility; however, the details of this extension are more challenging in the functional case. Our methodology combines smoothing methods with regularization by truncation at a finite numb...

  5. Varying flexibilities in systems of organised decentralisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Andersen, Søren Kaj

    information, collective agreements and interviews with representatives from tradeunions and employers' associations in Germany and Denmark. Based on our preliminary findings three explanatory theses for further research are developed in the article: 1) The level of specification, i.e. the level where...... response to this pressure from the company level can be described as a form of organised decentralisation in both countries, the response within the Danish collective bargaining system can be characterised as a proactive organised decentralisation while the response of the German system should rather...... be while the response of the German system should rather be interpreted as a reactive organised decentralisation. 3) The varying regulation of working time flexibility in Germany and Denmark implies varying risks in the regulation. In Germany lacking competencies in small or medium-sized companies lead...

  6. Varying flexibilities in systems of organised decentralisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Andersen, Søren Kaj

    information, collective agreements and interviews with representatives from tradeunions and employers' associations in Germany and Denmark. Based on our preliminary findings three explanatory theses for further research are developed in the article: 1) The level of specification, i.e. the level where...... response to this pressure from the company level can be described as a form of organised decentralisation in both countries, the response within the Danish collective bargaining system can be characterised as a proactive organised decentralisation while the response of the German system should rather...... be while the response of the German system should rather be interpreted as a reactive organised decentralisation. 3) The varying regulation of working time flexibility in Germany and Denmark implies varying risks in the regulation. In Germany lacking competencies in small or medium-sized companies lead...

  7. The population dynamical consequences of density-dependent prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jennifer J H; White, Andrew; Sherratt, Jonathan A; Boots, Mike

    2011-11-07

    When infectious disease transmission is density-dependent, the risk of infection will tend to increase with host population density. Since host defence mechanisms can be costly, individual hosts may benefit from increasing their investment in immunity in response to increasing population density. Such "density-dependent prophylaxis" (DDP) has now indeed been demonstrated experimentally in several species. However, it remains unclear how DDP will affect the population dynamics of the host-pathogen interaction, with previous theoretical work making conflicting predictions. We develop a general host-pathogen model and assess the role of DDP on the population dynamics. The ability of DDP to drive population cycles is critically dependent on the time delay between the change in density and the subsequent phenotypic change in the level of resistance. When the delay is absent or short, DDP destabilises the system. As the delay increases, its destabilising effect first diminishes and then DDP becomes increasingly stabilising. Our work highlights the significance of the time delay and suggests that it must be estimated experimentally or varied in theoretical investigations in order to understand the implications of DDP for the population dynamics of particular systems.

  8. Stabilization of Slowly Varying Switched Linear Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bing; LIANG Tong

    2012-01-01

    The stabilization problem of systems that switch among a finite set of slowly varying linear systems with arbitrary switching frequency is discussed.It is shown that if the entries of the pointwise stabilizing feedback gain matrix are continuously differentiable functions of the entries of the system coefficient matrices,then the closed-loop system is uniformly asymptotically stable if the rate of time variation of the system coefficient matrices is sufficiently small.

  9. New varying speed of light theories

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J

    2003-01-01

    We review recent work on the possibility of a varying speed of light (VSL). We start by discussing the physical meaning of a varying $c$, dispelling the myth that the constancy of $c$ is a matter of logical consistency. We then summarize the main VSL mechanisms proposed so far: hard breaking of Lorentz invariance; bimetric theories (where the speeds of gravity and light are not the same); locally Lorentz invariant VSL theories; theories exhibiting a color dependent speed of light; varying $c$ induced by extra dimensions (e.g. in the brane-world scenario); and field theories where VSL results from vacuum polarization or CPT violation. We show how VSL scenarios may solve the cosmological problems usually tackled by inflation, and also how they may produce a scale-invariant spectrum of Gaussian fluctuations, capable of explaining the WMAP data. We then review the connection between VSL and theories of quantum gravity, showing how ``doubly special'' relativity has emerged as a VSL effective model of quantum space...

  10. Primordial density and BAO reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Chen, Xuelei

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method to reconstruct the primordial (linear) density field using the estimated nonlinear displacement field. The divergence of the displacement field gives the reconstructed density field. We solve the nonlinear displacement field in the 1D cosmology and show the reconstruction results. The new reconstruction algorithm recovers a lot of linear modes and reduces the nonlinear damping scale significantly. The successful 1D reconstruction results imply the new algorithm should also be a promising technique in the 3D case.

  11. Mammographic density estimation with automated volumetric breast density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p = 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  12. Mammography density estimation with automated volumetic breast density measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  13. Density-functional theory of thermoelectric phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, F G; Di Ventra, M; Vignale, G

    2014-05-16

    We introduce a nonequilibrium density-functional theory of local temperature and associated local energy density that is suited for the study of thermoelectric phenomena. The theory rests on a local temperature field coupled to the energy-density operator. We identify the excess-energy density, in addition to the particle density, as the basic variable, which is reproduced by an effective noninteracting Kohn-Sham system. A novel Kohn-Sham equation emerges featuring a time-dependent and spatially varying mass which represents local temperature variations. The adiabatic contribution to the Kohn-Sham potentials is related to the entropy viewed as a functional of the particle and energy density. Dissipation can be taken into account by employing linear response theory and the thermoelectric transport coefficients of the electron gas.

  14. Holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant in Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setare, M.R. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Ave., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamil, Mubasher, E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: mjamil@camp.nust.edu.pk [Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi, 46000 (Pakistan)

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the holographic dark energy scenario with a varying gravitational constant in a flat background in the context of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. We extract the exact differential equation determining the evolution of the dark energy density parameter, which includes G variation term. Also we discuss a cosmological implication of our work by evaluating the dark energy equation of state for low redshifts containing varying G corrections.

  15. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng F [Newton, MA; Tu, Yi [Belmont, MA

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  16. A Significant Play

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁海光; 陈明

    2002-01-01

    Yesterday evening, I went to see a play. It was really significant. It was about Zheng Xiaoyue, a very clever and diligent middle school student. Unfortunately, her mother died when she and her brother were very young. Her father was out of work and,

  17. Varying the exchange interaction between NiO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Mørup, Steen

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate that exchange interactions between antiferromagnetic nanoparticles of 57Fe-doped NiO can be varied by simple macroscopic treatments. Mössbauer spectroscopy studies of the superparamagnetic relaxation behaviour show that grinding or suspension in water of nanoparticles of NiO can...... significantly reduce interparticle interactions. Slow drying of aqueous suspensions of NiO nanoparticles did not lead to enhanced interparticle interactions. This is opposite to the behaviour of α-Fe2O3 (hematite) nanoparticles....

  18. Varying the exchange interaction between NiO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Mørup, Steen

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate that exchange interactions between antiferromagnetic nanoparticles of 57Fe-doped NiO can be varied by simple macroscopic treatments. Mössbauer spectroscopy studies of the superparamagnetic relaxation behaviour show that grinding or suspension in water of nanoparticles of NiO can...... significantly reduce interparticle interactions. Slow drying of aqueous suspensions of NiO nanoparticles did not lead to enhanced interparticle interactions. This is opposite to the behaviour of α-Fe2O3 (hematite) nanoparticles....

  19. Density of the continental roots: Compositional and thermal contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, M.K.; Schwintzer, P.; Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    The origin and evolution of cratonic roots has been debated for many years. Precambrian cratons are underlain by cold lithospheric roots that are chemically depleted. Thermal and petrologic data indicate that Archean roots are colder and more chemically depleted than Proterozoic roots. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the degree of depletion in a lithospheric root depends mostly on its age. Here we test this hypothesis using gravity, thermal, petrologic, and seismic data to quantify differences in the density of cratonic roots globally. In the first step in our analysis we use a global crustal model to remove the crustal contribution to the observed gravity. The result is the mantle gravity anomaly field, which varies over cratonic areas from -100 to +100 mGal. Positive mantle gravity anomalies are observed for cratons in the northern hemisphere: the Baltic shield, East European Platform, and the Siberian Platform. Negative anomalies are observed over cratons in the southern hemisphere: Western Australia, South America, the Indian shield, and Southern Africa. This indicates that there are significant differences in the density of cratonic roots, even for those of similar age. Root density depends on temperature and chemical depletion. In order to separate these effects we apply a lithospheric temperature correction using thermal estimates from a combination of geothermal modeling and global seismic tomography models. Gravity anomalies induced by temperature variations in the uppermost mantle range from -200 to +300 mGal, with the strongest negative anomalies associated with mid-ocean ridges and the strongest positive anomalies associated with cratons. After correcting for thermal effects, we obtain a map of density variations due to lithospheric compositional variations. These maps indicate that the average density decrease due to the chemical depletion within cratonic roots varies from 1.1% to 1.5%, assuming the chemical boundary layer has the same

  20. Application of 3D variation-density interface inversion of gravity anomalies in South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuling; Meng, Xiaohong

    2017-04-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is a marginal basin with extremely complicated crustal structure and whose evolutional history is associated with continental rifting and seafloor spreading. The gravity data are among the most important data sets for studying deep crustal structures and the tectonic evolution. Density interface inversion by gravity anomalies can effectively estimate the depth of Moho interface. However, the Moho interface inversion in SCS are facing challenges due to the density contract of crust-mantle vary in three dimensions, which are associated with the complicated crustal structure (co-existing oceanic crust, continental crust and transitional crust). The regular inversion methods always assume the density contract on both sides of the interface would be constant, which is quite unrealistic since actual strata densities vary both vertically and laterally. To meet the challenges of 3D variation of density in SCS, we present an improved 3D variation-density interface inversion of gravity anomalies based on Parker-Oldenburg method. We first construct two variation density models with exponential density-depth relationships, which expressed the variation of stratum density depending on the depth in oceanic and continental crust respectively. Meanwhile, to minimize multiple solutions for potential field inversion, we collect deep seismic sounding data and employ the gravity inversion by joint using seismic data to be constraint for depth of Moho. Finally, we have estimated the depth of Moho interface which infers the tectonic significance in SCS. The inversion results agree well with seismic data in SCS show this approach is more effective and precise to quantitative estimate the depth of interface. Keywords: South China Sea; Gravity anomalies; Density interface inversion;

  1. Unified dark energy thermodynamics: varying w and the -1-crossing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saridakis, Emmanuel N [Department of Physics, University of Athens, GR-15771 Athens (Greece); Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sigueenza, Carmen L [Estacion Ecologica de BiocosmologIa, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellin (Spain)

    2009-08-21

    We investigate, in a unified and general way, the thermodynamic properties of dark energy with an arbitrary, varying equation-of-state parameter w(a). We find that all quantities are well defined and regular for every w(a), including the -1-crossing, with the temperature being negative in the phantom regime (w(a) < -1) and positive in the quintessence one (w(a) > -1). The density and entropy are always positive while the chemical potential can be arbitrary. At the -1-crossing, both temperature and chemical potential are zero. The temperature negativity can only be interpreted in the quantum framework. The regular behavior of all quantities at the -1-crossing leads to the conclusion that such a crossing does not correspond to a phase transition, but rather to a smooth crossover.

  2. Laboratory Density Functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, B. G.

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  3. Laboratory Density Functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, B G

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  4. Significant Tsunami Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Furtney, M.; McLean, S. J.; Sweeney, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis have inflicted death and destruction on the coastlines of the world throughout history. The occurrence of tsunamis and the resulting effects have been collected and studied as far back as the second millennium B.C. The knowledge gained from cataloging and examining these events has led to significant changes in our understanding of tsunamis, tsunami sources, and methods to mitigate the effects of tsunamis. The most significant, not surprisingly, are often the most devastating, such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami. The goal of this poster is to give a brief overview of the occurrence of tsunamis and then focus specifically on several significant tsunamis. There are various criteria to determine the most significant tsunamis: the number of deaths, amount of damage, maximum runup height, had a major impact on tsunami science or policy, etc. As a result, descriptions will include some of the most costly (2011 Tohoku, Japan), the most deadly (2004 Sumatra, 1883 Krakatau), and the highest runup ever observed (1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska). The discovery of the Cascadia subduction zone as the source of the 1700 Japanese "Orphan" tsunami and a future tsunami threat to the U.S. northwest coast, contributed to the decision to form the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 marked the beginning of the modern era of seismology. Knowledge gained from the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics. The 1946 Alaska, 1952 Kuril Islands, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, and the 2004 Banda Aceh, tsunamis all resulted in warning centers or systems being established.The data descriptions on this poster were extracted from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global historical tsunami database. Additional information about these tsunamis, as well as water level data can be found by accessing the NGDC website www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/

  5. Time varying market efficiency of the GCC stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charfeddine, Lanouar; Khediri, Karim Ben

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the time-varying levels of weak-form market efficiency for the GCC stock markets over the period spanning from May 2005 to September 2013. We use two empirical approaches: (1) the generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity in mean (GARCH-M) model with state space time varying parameter (Kalman filter), and (2) a rolling technique sample test of the fractional long memory parameter d. As long memory estimation methods, we use the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) technique, the modified R/S statistic, the exact local whittle (ELW) and the feasible Exact Local Whittle (FELW) methods. Moreover, we use the Bai and Perron (1998, 2003) multiple structural breaks technique to test and date the time varying behavior of stock market efficiency. Empirical results show that GCC markets have different degrees of time-varying efficiency, and also have experiencing periods of efficiency improvement. Results also show evidence of structural breaks in all GCC markets. Moreover, we observe that the recent financial shocks such as Arab spring and subprime crises have a significant impact on the time path evolution of market efficiency.

  6. Thermospheric density model biases at the 23rd sunspot maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, C.; Moe, K.; Anselmo, L.

    2012-07-01

    statistically significant. The minimum average biases were obtained with JB2008, NRLMSISE-00 and GOST-2004. Above 500 km, where only one satellite was analyzed (at 630 km), and errors tend to increase with altitude, it cannot be asserted that the calculated biases are significant. Nevertheless, they are presented to show how the various models diverge at higher altitudes. Around 630 km, NRLMSISE-00 had a negligible average bias, while the other models underestimated (GOST-2004) or overestimated the average density, by amounts varying between 6% and 16%. However, in terms of semi-major axis root mean square residuals, JB2006 and JB2008 were the best in any case. Below 500 km, the short-term behavior of the models was also investigated by fitting the semi-major axis decay over 30-day arcs. The resulting fitted drag coefficients displayed a significant variability, probably associated with mismodeled density variations, but JB2008, followed by JB2006, provided the smallest semi-major axis residuals and a reduced short-term variability of the density bias at just a few frequencies, having been probably successful in removing a significant fraction of the mismodeling sources.

  7. New varying speed of light theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magueijo, Joao [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, South Kensington, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2003-11-01

    We review recent work on the possibility of a varying speed of light (VSL). We start by discussing the physical meaning of a varying-c, dispelling the myth that the constancy of c is a matter of logical consistency. We then summarize the main VSL mechanisms proposed so far: hard breaking of Lorentz invariance; bimetric theories (where the speeds of gravity and light are not the same); locally Lorentz invariant VSL theories; theories exhibiting a colour-dependent speed of light; varying-c induced by extra dimensions (e.g. in the brane-world scenario); and field theories where VSL results from vacuum polarization or CPT violation. We show how VSL scenarios may solve the cosmological problems usually tackled by inflation, and also how they may produce a scale-invariant spectrum of Gaussian fluctuations, capable of explaining the WMAP data. We then review the connection between VSL and theories of quantum gravity, showing how 'doubly special' relativity has emerged as a VSL effective model of quantum space-time, with observational implications for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and gamma ray bursts. Some recent work on the physics of 'black' holes and other compact objects in VSL theories is also described, highlighting phenomena associated with spatial (as opposed to temporal) variations in c. Finally, we describe the observational status of the theory. The evidence is currently slim-redshift dependence in the atomic fine structure, anomalies with UHECRs, and (to a much lesser extent) the acceleration of the universe and the WMAP data. The constraints (e.g. those arising from nucleosynthesis or geological bounds) are tight but not insurmountable. We conclude with the observational predictions of the theory and the prospects for its refutation or vindication.

  8. New varying speed of light theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magueijo, João

    2003-11-01

    We review recent work on the possibility of a varying speed of light (VSL). We start by discussing the physical meaning of a varying-c, dispelling the myth that the constancy of c is a matter of logical consistency. We then summarize the main VSL mechanisms proposed so far: hard breaking of Lorentz invariance; bimetric theories (where the speeds of gravity and light are not the same); locally Lorentz invariant VSL theories; theories exhibiting a colour-dependent speed of light; varying-c induced by extra dimensions (e.g. in the brane-world scenario); and field theories where VSL results from vacuum polarization or CPT violation. We show how VSL scenarios may solve the cosmological problems usually tackled by inflation, and also how they may produce a scale-invariant spectrum of Gaussian fluctuations, capable of explaining the WMAP data. We then review the connection between VSL and theories of quantum gravity, showing how 'doubly special' relativity has emerged as a VSL effective model of quantum space-time, with observational implications for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and gamma ray bursts. Some recent work on the physics of 'black' holes and other compact objects in VSL theories is also described, highlighting phenomena associated with spatial (as opposed to temporal) variations in c. Finally, we describe the observational status of the theory. The evidence is currently slim—redshift dependence in the atomic fine structure, anomalies with UHECRs, and (to a much lesser extent) the acceleration of the universe and the WMAP data. The constraints (e.g. those arising from nucleosynthesis or geological bounds) are tight but not insurmountable. We conclude with the observational predictions of the theory and the prospects for its refutation or vindication.

  9. 基质金属蛋白酶9及微血管密度在前列腺癌组织中的表达及意义%Significance and expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and microvessel density in prostatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宁刚; 陈鸿杰; 陈顺平; 王军; 张俊; 王绍平

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究前列腺癌(PCa)组织中基质金属蛋白酶9(MMP-9)的表达和微血管密度(MVD),探讨二者与PCa侵袭转移的关系.方法 对42例PCa标本和28例良性前列腺增生症(BPH)标本行MMP-9、CD34(标记MVD)免疫组化染色,检测它们在前列腺组织中的表达情况,对照临床分期及病理结果,采用统计学方法 进行分析.结果 MMP-9在BPH和PCa组织中的阳性表达率分别为10.7%(3/28)、54.8%(23/42),MMP-9在PCa组织中的阳性表达率明显高于BPH(P<0.05).MMP-9在PCa转移者(C+D期)和局限者(A+B期)中阳性表达率分别为76.9%(20/26)、18.8%(3/16),两者比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).PCa转移者MVD值为(69.47±11.86)个/视野,局限者MVD值为(51.09±11.98)个/视野,两者比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),而且PCa标本的MVD值均明显高于BPH标本的(27.92±8.41)个/视野(P<0.01).在PCa中MVD值与MMP-9阳性表达呈显著正相关(r=0.325,P<0.05).结论 MVD值、MMP-9阳性表达可作为判断PCa浸润转移的指标.%Objective To study the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and microvessel density (MVD) in prostatic cancer (PCa) and correlation with their metastasis. Methods The expression of MMP-9 and CD34(marked MVD) was detected by immunohistochemistry in 70 cases of prostatic diseases,including PCa (42 cases) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)(28 cases), compared clinical-stage and pathology and studied their results by statistical methods. Results The positive rate of MMP-9 in BPH and PCa was 10.7% (3/28) and 54.8% (23/42), the positive rate of MMP-9 was significantly higher in PCa than that in BPH (P< 0.05). The positive rate of MMP-9 in PCa metastasis group (C+D phase) and situ group (A+B phase) was 76.9% (20/26) and 18.8% (3/16),there was statistically significant difference between PCa metastasis group and situ group (P < 0.01). The concentration of MVD in PCa metastasis group and situ group was (69.47 ± 11.86), (51.09 ± 11.98) points each

  10. Tracking time-varying coefficient-functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Joensen, Alfred K.;

    2000-01-01

    is a combination of recursive least squares with exponential forgetting and local polynomial regression. It is argued, that it is appropriate to let the forgetting factor vary with the value of the external signal which is the argument of the coefficient functions. Some of the key properties of the modified method......, but otherwise unknown, functions of a low-dimensional input process. These coefficient functions are estimated adaptively and recursively without specifying a global parametric, form, i.e. the method allows for online tracking of the coefficient functions. Essentially, in its most simple form, the method...

  11. Tracking Time-Varying Coefficient-Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Joensen, Alfred K.;

    1999-01-01

    of recursive least squares with exponential forgetting and local polynomial regression. However, it is argued, that it is appropriate to let the forgetting factor vary with the value of the external signal shich is argument of the coeffieient-functions.The properties of the modified method are sutdied......A conditional parametric ARX-model is an ARX-model in which the parameters re replaced by smooth functions of an, possibly multivariate, externalinput signal. These functions are called coefficient functions is suggested. Essentially, in its most simple form, this method is a combination...

  12. A time-varying magnetic flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibret, B.; Premaratne, M.; Lewis, P. M.; Thomson, R.; Fitzgerald, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    It is known that diverse technological applications require the use of focused magnetic fields. This has driven the quest for controlling the magnetic field. Recently, the principles in transformation optics and metamaterials have allowed the realization of practical static magnetic flux concentrators. Extending such progress, here, we propose a time-varying magnetic flux concentrator cylindrical shell that uses electric conductors and ferromagnetic materials to guide magnetic flux to its center. Its performance is discussed based on finite-element simulation results. Our proposed design has potential applications in magnetic sensors, medical devices, wireless power transfer, and near-field wireless communications.

  13. Image Based Rendering under Varying Illumination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chengfeng (王城峰); Hu Zhanyi

    2003-01-01

    A new approach for photorealistic rendering of a class of objects at arbitrary illumination is presented. The approach of the authors relies entirely on image based rendering techniques. A scheme is utilized for re-illumination of objects based on linear combination of low dimensional image representations. The minimum rendering condition of technique of the authors is three sample images under varying illumination of a reference object and a single input image of an interested object. Important properties of this approach are its simplicity, robustness and speediness. Experimental results validate the proposed rendering approach.

  14. A Significant Step Forward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Australia officially ratified the Kyoto Protocol on December 3,the first act of its new government under Prime Minister Kevin Rudd.Rudd signed the instrument of ratification the very day he was sworn in by Australia’s Governor General Michael Jeffery. This is a significant step in Australia’s efforts to fight climate change domestically and with the international community,Rudd said in a statement.The Australian Government will do everything in its power to help Australia meet its Kyoto obligations,he added.

  15. Wave Equations about Displacement, Velocity, Stress and Strain in FGM with Constituents Varied Continuously and Smoothly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Hongxin; ZHANG Qingjie

    2008-01-01

    The wave equations about displacement, velocity, stress and strain in functionally gradient material (FGM) with constituents varied continuously and smoothly were established. Four kinds of waves are of linear second-order partial differential equation of hyperbolic type and have the same characteristic curve at the plane of X,t. In general, the varying mode of stress is different from that of displacement and velocity at the front of wave. But in a special case that the product of density p and elastic modulus E of the material remains unchanged, the three wave equations have a similar expression and they have a similar varying mode in the front of wave.

  16. Long Memory of Financial Time Series and Hidden Markov Models with Time-Varying Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Peter; Madsen, Henrik; Lindström, Erik

    2016-01-01

    estimation approach that allows for the parameters of the estimated models to be time varying. It is shown that a two-state Gaussian hidden Markov model with time-varying parameters is able to reproduce the long memory of squared daily returns that was previously believed to be the most difficult fact...... to reproduce with a hidden Markov model. Capturing the time-varying behavior of the parameters also leads to improved one-step density forecasts. Finally, it is shown that the forecasting performance of the estimated models can be further improved using local smoothing to forecast the parameter variations....

  17. Disagreement, Uncertainty and the True Predictive Density

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian Krüger; Ingmar Nolte

    2011-01-01

    This paper generalizes the discussion about disagreement versus uncertainty in macroeconomic survey data by emphasizing the importance of the (unknown) true predictive density. Using a forecast combination approach, we ask whether cross sections of survey point forecasts help to approximate the true predictive density. We find that although these cross-sections perform poorly individually, their inclusion into combined predictive densities can significantly improve upon densities relying sole...

  18. Performance Evaluation of MANET Routing Protocols under Varying Node Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Balaji Gupta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile ad hoc network (MANET is an autonomous system containing a cluster of mobile nodes which can dynamically change their network topology. It requires no pre-existing fixed network infrastructureor centralized administration. It operates in a standalone fashion. All the mobile nodes in the network are connected by wireless links. These nodes are free to move anywhere and organize themselves into a network. Each node behaves as a router and should therefore forward packets to other nodes in the network. For this purpose, a routing protocol is needed. Mobile ad-hoc network has certain characteristics such as dynamic topology that inserts new demands on the routing protocol which often limits resources such as storage capacityof CPU, battery power and bandwidth. Mobility models emulate the realistic conditions and dictate the movement of nodes. This paper aims to evaluate the performance and compare the three MANET routingprotocols AODV, DSR and DSDV in different mobility conditions while varying pause time and node density. Three mobility models included are Random Waypoint, Random Walk and Random Direction. Lastly, wepresent simulation results that illustrate how the performance of a MANET protocols drastically change, as a result of changing the mobility taking Throughput, Average End-End Delay, Packet Delivery Ratio and Normalized Routing Load as differentials. The conclusion, which routing protocol is best in each of the varying mobility is also stated. Simulations are carried out using Ns2.

  19. MULTIVARIATE VARYING COEFFICIENT MODEL FOR FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongtu; Li, Runze; Kong, Linglong

    2012-10-01

    Motivated by recent work studying massive imaging data in the neuroimaging literature, we propose multivariate varying coefficient models (MVCM) for modeling the relation between multiple functional responses and a set of covariates. We develop several statistical inference procedures for MVCM and systematically study their theoretical properties. We first establish the weak convergence of the local linear estimate of coefficient functions, as well as its asymptotic bias and variance, and then we derive asymptotic bias and mean integrated squared error of smoothed individual functions and their uniform convergence rate. We establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated covariance function of the individual functions and its associated eigenvalue and eigenfunctions. We propose a global test for linear hypotheses of varying coefficient functions, and derive its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis. We also propose a simultaneous confidence band for each individual effect curve. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation to examine the finite-sample performance of the proposed procedures. We apply MVCM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the genu tract of the corpus callosum in a clinical study of neurodevelopment.

  20. Local Rank Inference for Varying Coefficient Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Kai, Bo; Li, Runze

    2009-12-01

    By allowing the regression coefficients to change with certain covariates, the class of varying coefficient models offers a flexible approach to modeling nonlinearity and interactions between covariates. This paper proposes a novel estimation procedure for the varying coefficient models based on local ranks. The new procedure provides a highly efficient and robust alternative to the local linear least squares method, and can be conveniently implemented using existing R software package. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations both reveal that the gain of the local rank estimator over the local linear least squares estimator, measured by the asymptotic mean squared error or the asymptotic mean integrated squared error, can be substantial. In the normal error case, the asymptotic relative efficiency for estimating both the coefficient functions and the derivative of the coefficient functions is above 96%; even in the worst case scenarios, the asymptotic relative efficiency has a lower bound 88.96% for estimating the coefficient functions, and a lower bound 89.91% for estimating their derivatives. The new estimator may achieve the nonparametric convergence rate even when the local linear least squares method fails due to infinite random error variance. We establish the large sample theory of the proposed procedure by utilizing results from generalized U-statistics, whose kernel function may depend on the sample size. We also extend a resampling approach, which perturbs the objective function repeatedly, to the generalized U-statistics setting; and demonstrate that it can accurately estimate the asymptotic covariance matrix.

  1. Seasonally Varying Reference Atmospheres for East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Vertical profiles of seasonally varying pressure, temperature, water vapor, and trace gases (O3, N2O, CO,CH4), representing atmospheric conditions up to a height of 100 km over the East Asia region (30°-50°N,110°-150°E) were constructed by using various observation data, model outputs of atmospheric thermodynamic parameters, and gaseous concentrations. Optical characteristics of the obtained East Asia reference atmospheres were compared with those from typical midlatitude summer and winter atmospheres. It was noted that, in the water vapor field, there are major differences between the two model atmospheres during the summer. The resultant impact during the summer of water vapor difference on incoming solar fluxes at the surface and emitted terrestrial fluxes at the top of the atmosphere are 14.3 W m-2 and 6.5 W m-2,respectively. On the other hand, the winter difference between East Asian and midlatitude atmospheres appears to be insignificant. Reference atmospheres for the spring and fall are also available. Utilizing the constructed atmospheric profiles as inputs to the radiative transfer model, it is expected that the constructed seasonally varying reference atmospheres can facilitate better descriptions of optical properties in East Asia.

  2. Insect attachment on crystalline bioinspired wax surfaces formed by alkanes of varying chain lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gorb

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The impeding effect of plant surfaces covered with three-dimensional wax on attachment and locomotion of insects has been shown previously in numerous experimental studies. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of different parameters of crystalline wax coverage on insect attachment. We performed traction experiments with the beetle Coccinella septempunctata and pull-off force measurements with artificial adhesive systems (tacky polydimethylsiloxane semi-spheres on bioinspired wax surfaces formed by four alkanes of varying chain lengths (C36H74, C40H82, C44H90, and C50H102. All these highly hydrophobic coatings were composed of crystals having similar morphologies but differing in size and distribution/density, and exhibited different surface roughness. The crystal size (length and thickness decreased with an increase of the chain length of the alkanes that formed these surfaces, whereas the density of the wax coverage, as well as the surface roughness, showed an opposite relationship. Traction tests demonstrated a significant, up to 30 fold, reduction of insect attachment forces on the wax surfaces when compared with the reference glass sample. Attachment of the beetles to the wax substrates probably relied solely on the performance of adhesive pads. We found no influence of the wax coatings on the subsequent attachment ability of beetles. The obtained data are explained by the reduction of the real contact between the setal tips of the insect adhesive pads and the wax surfaces due to the micro- and nanoscopic roughness introduced by wax crystals. Experiments with polydimethylsiloxane semi-spheres showed much higher forces on wax samples when compared to insect attachment forces measured on these surfaces. We explain these results by the differences in material properties between polydimethylsiloxane probes and tenent setae of C. septempunctata beetles. Among wax surfaces, force experiments showed stronger insect attachment and higher

  3. Lichen Persistence and Recovery in Response to Varied Volcanic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Wheeler, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce many ecological disturbances that structure vegetation. While lichens are sensitive to disturbances, little is known about their responses to volcanic disturbances, except for colonization of lava. We examined lichen community responses through time to different disturbances produced by the May 1, 2008 eruption of Volcan Chaiten in south-central Chile. Pre-eruption vegetation near the volcano was old-growth Valdivian temperate rainforest dominated by closed-canopy Nothofagus sp... In 2012, we installed thirteen 1-acre plots across volcanic disturbance zones on which a time-constrained search was done for all macrolichen species, each of which was assigned an approximate log10 categorical abundance. We also installed a 0.2 m2 quadrat on two representative trees per plot for repeat photography of lichen cover. We remeasured at least one plot per disturbance zone in 2014 and re-photographed tree quadrats in 2013 and 2014. We then analyzed species composition and abundance differences among disturbance zones. In 2012, the blast (pyroclastic density flow), scorch (standing scorched forest at the edge of the blast) and deep tephra (>10 cm) zones had the lowest lichen species richness (5-13 species), followed by reference (unimpacted) and shallow (lichen species since 2012 while the light tephra and reference were essentially unchanged. Gravel rain, gravel rain + pumice and flooded forest plots all had about the same number of species in 2014 as 2012. Lichen colonization and growth in tree quadrats varied widely, from very little colonization in the blast to prolific colonization in the gravel rain + pumice zone. Lichen's varied responses to different volcanic disturbances were attributable to varying degrees of mortality and subsequent availability of substrate, quantity of light and removal of competitors. While sensitive to disturbance, lichens are apparently resilient to and can quickly recolonize after a variety of large, violent volcanic

  4. Visual exploration of complex time-varying graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gautam; Garland, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Many graph drawing and visualization algorithms, such as force-directed layout and line-dot rendering, work very well on relatively small and sparse graphs. However, they often produce extremely tangled results and exhibit impractical running times for highly non-planar graphs with large edge density. And very few graph layout algorithms support dynamic time-varying graphs; applying them independently to each frame produces distracting temporally incoherent visualizations. We have developed a new visualization technique based on a novel approach to hierarchically structuring dense graphs via stratification. Using this structure, we formulate a hierarchical force-directed layout algorithm that is both efficient and produces quality graph layouts. The stratification of the graph also allows us to present views of the data that abstract away many small details of its structure. Rather than displaying all edges and nodes at once, resulting in a convoluted rendering, we present an interactive tool that filters edges and nodes using the graph hierarchy and allows users to drill down into the graph for details. Our layout algorithm also accommodates time-varying graphs in a natural way, producing a temporally coherent animation that can be used to analyze and extract trends from dynamic graph data. For example, we demonstrate the use of our method to explore financial correlation data for the U.S. stock market in the period from 1990 to 2005. The user can easily analyze the time-varying correlation graph of the market, uncovering information such as market sector trends, representative stocks for portfolio construction, and the interrelationship of stocks over time.

  5. The Expression and Significance of Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver-3 and Microvessel Density in Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma%喉癌中肝细胞再生磷酸酶-3的表达及与微血管密度的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡海丽; 董雪蕾; 田秀芬

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨在喉鳞状细胞癌中肝细胞再生磷酸酶-3(PRL-3)和微血管密度(MVD)的相关性.方法:采用免疫组化SABC法检测69例喉鳞状细胞癌组织和25例相应癌旁组织中PRL-3的表达情况,并用CD105标记MVD,研究PRL-3的表达及MVD计数与喉鳞癌临床病理特征的关系,采用Spearman等级相关分析PRL-3表达与MVD的相关性.结果:PRL-3在癌组织中的阳性表达率(65.22%)高于癌旁组织(8%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).癌组织中有淋巴结转移患者的PRL-3阳性率和MVD计数明显高于尤淋巴结转移患者,病理分期为Ⅲ~Ⅳ期的PRL-3和MVD高于Ⅰ~Ⅱ期,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).PRL-3的表达与MVD计数呈正相关(r=0.811,P<0.01).结论:PRL-3可能作为一种新的肿瘤标志物来监控喉鳞状细胞癌的发生、浸润和转移.%Objective: To evaluate the role of phosphatase of regenerating liver-3(PRL-3) and Microvessel density (MVD) in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and their relationship thereof. Methods: The expression level of PRL-3 was detected by immmuno-histochemical SABC method in tissue samples of 69 laryngeal carcinoma and 25 corresponding adjacent tissues. MVD was marked by CD105. The relationship between expression of PRL-3, the count of MVD and the clinicopathologic parameters of laiyngeal squamous cell carcinoma was investigated. Results: The positive rate of PRL-3 was significantly higher in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (65.22%) than that of corresponding adj acent tissues (8%, P < 0.01). The positive expression of PRL-3 and count of MVD were significantly higher in lymph-node metastasis group than those in no-metastasis group (P < 0.05). The expression of PRL-3 and MVD were significantly higher in Ⅲ-Ⅳ pathological staging than those of stage Ⅰ - Ⅱ (P < 0.05). The expression of PRL-3 was positively correlated with MVD (r = 0.811, P < 0.01).Conclusion : PRL-3 may be used as a new tumor marker in ocCurrence, invasion

  6. Inventory Replenishment Policy with Time-Varying Demand and Shortages Considering Time-Varying Costs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized EOQ model is developed with time-varying demand and shortages considering time-varying costs. The solution procedure is shown for determining the op timal replenishment policy over a finite time horizon during which the replenishment periods are assumed to be constant. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal replenishment policy are pre sented. The procedure is illustrated with two special cases of linear and non-linear demands and costs. Two numerical examples are also given.

  7. Predicting significant torso trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirula, Ram; Talmor, Daniel; Brasel, Karen

    2005-07-01

    Identification of motor vehicle crash (MVC) characteristics associated with thoracoabdominal injury would advance the development of automatic crash notification systems (ACNS) by improving triage and response times. Our objective was to determine the relationships between MVC characteristics and thoracoabdominal trauma to develop a torso injury probability model. Drivers involved in crashes from 1993 to 2001 within the National Automotive Sampling System were reviewed. Relationships between torso injury and MVC characteristics were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the model to current ACNS models. There were a total of 56,466 drivers. Age, ejection, braking, avoidance, velocity, restraints, passenger-side impact, rollover, and vehicle weight and type were associated with injury (p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (83.9) was significantly greater than current ACNS models. We have developed a thoracoabdominal injury probability model that may improve patient triage when used with ACNS.

  8. Anthropological significance of phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, L F

    1975-01-01

    The highest incidence rates of phenylketonuria (PKU) have been observed in Ireland and Scotlant. Parents heterozygous for PKU in Norway differ significantly from the general population in the Rhesus, Kell and PGM systems. The parents investigated showed an excess of Rh negative, Kell plus and PGM type 1 individuals, which makes them similar to the present populations in Ireland and Scotlant. It is postulated that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated sub-population of Celtic origin, who came or were brought here, 1ooo years ago. Bronze objects of Western European (Scottish, Irish) origin, found in Viking graves widely distributed in Norway, have been taken as evidence of Vikings returning with loot (including a number of Celts) from Western Viking settlements. The continuity of residence since the Viking age in most habitable parts of Norway, and what seems to be a nearly complete regional relationship between the sites where Viking graves contain western imported objects and the birthplaces of grandparents of PKUs identified in Norway, lend further support to the hypothesis that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated subpopulation. The remarkable resemblance between Iceland and Ireland, in respect of several genetic markers (including the Rhesus, PGM and Kell systems), is considered to be an expression of a similar proportion of people of Celtic origin in each of the two countries. Their identical, high incidence rates of PKU are regarded as further evidence of this. The significant decline in the incidence of PKU when one passes from Ireland, Scotland and Iceland, to Denmark and on to Norway and Sweden, is therefore explained as being related to a reduction in the proportion of inhabitants of Celtic extraction in the respective populations.

  9. Exploring high-density baryonic matter: Maximum freeze-out density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randrup, Joergen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Cleymans, Jean [University of Cape Town, UCT-CERN Research Centre and Department of Physics, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    2016-08-15

    The hadronic freeze-out line is calculated in terms of the net baryon density and the energy density instead of the usual T and μ{sub B}. This analysis makes it apparent that the freeze-out density exhibits a maximum as the collision energy is varied. This maximum freeze-out density has μ{sub B} = 400 - 500 MeV, which is above the critical value, and it is reached for a fixed-target bombarding energy of 20-30 GeV/N well within the parameters of the proposed NICA collider facility. (orig.)

  10. Particle Densities of the Atmospheric-Pressure Argon Plasmas Generated by the Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Li, Li; Wang, Yunuan; Xiu, Xianwu; Wang, Chao; Song, Yuzhi

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure argon plasmas have received increasing attention due to their high potential in many industrial and biomedical applications. In this paper, a 1-D fluid model is used for studying the particle density characteristics of the argon plasmas generated by the pulsed dielectric barrier discharges. The temporal evolutions of the axial particle density distributions are illustrated, and the influences of changing the main discharge conditions on the averaged particle densities are researched by independently varying the various discharge conditions. The calculation results show that the electron density and the ion density reach two peaks near the momentary cathodes during the rising and the falling edges of the pulsed voltage. Compared with the charged particle densities, the densities of the resonance state atom Arr and the metastable state atom Arm have more uniform axial distributions, reach higher maximums and decay more slowly. During the platform of the pulsed voltage and the time interval between the pulses, the densities of the excited state atom Ar* are far lower than those of the Arr or the Arm. The averaged particle densities of the different considered particles increase with the increases of the amplitude and the frequency of the pulsed voltage. Narrowing the discharge gap and increasing the relative dielectric constant of the dielectric also contribute to the increase of the averaged particle densities. The effects of reducing the discharge gap distance on the neutral particle densities are more significant than the influences on the charged particle densities. supported by Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (No. ZR2015AQ008), and Project of Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program of China (No. J15LJ04)

  11. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  12. Hemolymph drop impact outcomes on surfaces with varying wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milionis, Athanasios; Ghokulla Krishnan, K.; Loth, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Insect fouling from coagulated hemolymph and exoskeleton parts is a major challenge in the aerospace industry for the next generation of aerodynamic surfaces, which will employ laminar flow that requires extremely smooth surfaces. However, the wetting physics and dynamics of hemolymph (insect blood) on surfaces are not well understood. The present study seeks to gain a fundamental insight on the effect of surface wetting characteristics and dynamics resulting from a hemolymph drop impact, the first such study. In particular, hemolymph drops extracted from Acheta domesticus were dispensed from a range of heights to vary the kinetic impact on surfaces, which had widely varying water wetting behavior (from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic). The impact dynamics were investigated with high-speed imaging while the dried residues were studied with optical microscopy. It was found that a superhydrophobic surface (based on thermoplastic with silica nano-particles) was able to significantly reduce hemolymph drop spreading, and even provide complete rebound when impacting on inclined surfaces.

  13. Local Feature Learning for Face Recognition under Varying Poses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Xiaodong; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a local feature learning method for face recognition to deal with varying poses. As opposed to the commonly used approaches of recovering frontal face images from profile views, the proposed method extracts the subject related part from a local feature by removing the pose...... related part in it on the basis of a pose feature. The method has a closed-form solution, hence being time efficient. For performance evaluation, cross pose face recognition experiments are conducted on two public face recognition databases FERET and FEI. The proposed method shows a significant...... recognition improvement under varying poses over general local feature approaches and outperforms or is comparable with related state-of-the-art pose invariant face recognition approaches. Copyright ©2015 by IEEE....

  14. An ETAS model with varying productivity rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, D. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present an epidemic type aftershock sequenc (ETAS) model where the offspring rates vary both spatially and temporally. This is achieved by distinguishing between those space-time volumes where the interpoint space and time distances are small, and those where they are considerably larger. We also question the nature of the background component in the ETAS model. Is it simply a temporal boundary correction (t = 0) or does it represent an additional tectonic process not described by the aftershock component? The form of these stochastic models should not be considered to be fixed. As we accumulate larger and better earthquake catalogues, GPS data, strain rates, etc., we have the ability to ask more complex questions about the nature of the process. By fitting modified models consistent with such questions, we should gain a better insight into the earthquake process. Hence, we consider a sequence of incrementally modified ETAS type models rather than `the' ETAS model.

  15. Photon Propagation in Slowly Varying Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbstein, F.

    2017-03-01

    Effective theory of soft photons in slowly varying electromagnetic background fields is studied at one-loop order in QED. This is of relevance for the study of all-optical signatures of quantum vacuum nonlinearity in realistic electromagnetic background fields as provided by high-intensity lasers. The central result derived in this article is a new analytical expression for the photon polarization tensor in two linearly polarized counterpropagating pulsed Gaussian laser beams. Treating the peak field strengths of both laser beams as free parameters, this field configuration can be considered as interpolating between the limiting cases of a purely right- or left-moving laser beam (if one of the peak field strengths is set equal to zero) and the standing-wave type scenario with two counter-propagating beams of equal strength.

  16. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kapoor, Amit; Senthilkumaran, P; Joseph, Joby

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  17. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  18. Varied Clinical Manifestations of Amebic Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Chad J; Fleming, Rhonda; Boman, Darius A; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2015-11-01

    Invasive amebiasis is common worldwide, but infrequently observed in the United States. It is associated with considerable morbidity in patients residing in or traveling to endemic areas. We review the clinical and endoscopic manifestations of amebic colitis to alert physicians to the varied clinical manifestations of this potentially life-threatening disease. Copyright ©Most patients present with watery or bloody diarrhea. Less common presentations of amebic colitis include abdominal pain, overt gastrointestinal bleeding, exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, or the incidental association with colon cancer. Amebic liver abscesses are the most frequent complication. Rectosigmoid involvement may be found on colonoscopy; however, most case series have reported that the cecum is the most commonly involved site, followed by the ascending colon. Endoscopic evaluation should be used to assist in the diagnosis, with attention to the observation of colonic inflammation, ulceration, and amebic trophozoites on histopathological examination.

  19. Photon propagation in slowly varying electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Karbstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    We study the effective theory of soft photons in slowly varying electromagnetic background fields at one-loop order in QED. This is of relevance for the study of all-optical signatures of quantum vacuum nonlinearity in realistic electromagnetic background fields as provided by high-intensity lasers. The central result derived in this article is a new analytical expression for the photon polarization tensor in two linearly polarized counter-propagating pulsed Gaussian laser beams. As we treat the peak field strengths of both laser beams as free parameters this field configuration can be considered as interpolating between the limiting cases of a purely right- or left-moving laser beam (if one of the peak field strengths is set to zero) and the standing-wave type scenario with two counter-propagating beams of equal strength.

  20. String theory, cosmology and varying constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damour, Thibault

    In string theory the coupling `constants' appearing in the low-energy effective Lagrangian are determined by the vacuum expectation values of some (a priori) massless scalar fields (dilaton, moduli). This naturally leads one to expect a correlated variation of all the coupling constants, and an associated violation of the equivalence principle. We review some string-inspired theoretical models which incorporate such a spacetime variation of coupling constants while remaining naturally compatible both with phenomenological constraints coming from geochemical data (Oklo; Rhenium decay) and with present equivalence principle tests. Barring a very unnatural fine-tuning of parameters, a variation of the fine-structure constant as large as that recently `observed' by Webb et al. in quasar absorption spectra appears to be incompatible with these phenomenological constraints. Independently of any model, it is emphasized that the best experimental probe of varying constants are high-precision tests of the universality of free fall, such as MICROSCOPE and STEP.

  1. String theory, cosmology and varying constants

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume

    2002-01-01

    In string theory the coupling ``constants'' appearing in the low-energy effective Lagrangian are determined by the vacuum expectation values of some (a priori) massless scalar fields (dilaton, moduli). This naturally leads one to expect a correlated variation of all the coupling constants, and an associated violation of the equivalence principle. We review some string-inspired theoretical models which incorporate such a spacetime variation of coupling constants while remaining naturally compatible both with phenomenological constraints coming from geochemical data (Oklo; Rhenium decay) and with present equivalence principle tests. Barring a very unnatural fine-tuning of parameters, a variation of the fine-structure constant as large as that recently ``observed'' by Webb et al. in quasar absorption spectra appears to be incompatible with these phenomenological constraints. Independently of any model, it is emphasized that the best experimental probe of varying constants are high-precision tests of the universa...

  2. Time-Varying Graphs and Dynamic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Casteigts, Arnaud; Quattrociocchi, Walter; Santoro, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The past few years have seen intensive research efforts carried out in some apparently unrelated areas of dynamic systems -- delay-tolerant networks, opportunistic-mobility networks, social networks -- obtaining closely related insights. Indeed, the concepts discovered in these investigations can be viewed as parts of the same conceptual universe; and the formal models proposed so far to express some specific concepts can be viewed as fragments of a larger formal description of this universe. The main contribution of this paper is to integrate the existing partial models proposed in the literature into a unified framework, which we call TVG (for time-varying graphs). Using this framework, it is possible to express directly in the same formalism not only the concepts common to all those different areas, but also those specific to each. As part of the framework definition, we identify a hierarchy of classes of TVGs, defined with respects to basic properties to which correspond necessary conditions and impossibi...

  3. Meaning and significance of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph D Student Roman Mihaela

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of "public accountability" is a challenge for political science as a new concept in this area in full debate and developement ,both in theory and practice. This paper is a theoretical approach of displaying some definitions, relevant meanings and significance odf the concept in political science. The importance of this concept is that although originally it was used as a tool to improve effectiveness and eficiency of public governance, it has gradually become a purpose it itself. "Accountability" has become an image of good governance first in the United States of America then in the European Union.Nevertheless,the concept is vaguely defined and provides ambiguous images of good governance.This paper begins with the presentation of some general meanings of the concept as they emerge from specialized dictionaries and ancyclopaedies and continues with the meanings developed in political science. The concept of "public accontability" is rooted in economics and management literature,becoming increasingly relevant in today's political science both in theory and discourse as well as in practice in formulating and evaluating public policies. A first conclusin that emerges from, the analysis of the evolution of this term is that it requires a conceptual clarification in political science. A clear definition will then enable an appropriate model of proving the system of public accountability in formulating and assessing public policies, in order to implement a system of assessment and monitoring thereof.

  4. Viscous New Varying Modified Cosmic Chaplygin Gas with Cosmological Constant in Non-flat Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Jalil; Saadat, Hassan

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we study new varying modified cosmic Chaplygin gas which has viscosity in presence of cosmological constant and space curvature. By using well-known forms of scale factor in Friedmann equation we obtain behavior of dark energy density numerically. We use observational data to fix solution and discuss about stability of our system.

  5. Recurrence Metrics and Time Varying Light Cones

    CERN Document Server

    Singh-Modgil, M

    2005-01-01

    It is shown by explicit construction of new metrics, that General Relativity can solve the exact Poinc$\\acute{a}$re recurrence problem. In these solutions, the light cone, flips periodically between past and future, due to a periodically alternating arrow of the proper time. The geodesics in these universes show periodic Loschmidt's velocity reversion $v \\to -v$, at critical points, which leads to recurrence. However, the matter tensors of some of these solutions exhibit unusual properties - such as, periodic variations in density and pressure. While this is to be expected in periodic models, the physical basis for such a variation is not clear. Present paper therefore can be regarded as an extension of Tipler's "no go theorem for recurrence in an expanding universe", to other space-time geometries.

  6. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  7. Future Road Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  8. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  9. Impacts of mangrove density on surface sediment accretion, belowground biomass and biogeochemistry in Puttalam Lagoon, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D.H.; Kumara, M.P.; Jayatissa, L.P.; Krauss, Ken W.; Huxham, M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the effects of seedling density on sediment accretion, biogeochemistry and belowground biomass in mangrove systems can help explain ecological functioning and inform appropriate planting densities during restoration or climate change mitigation programs. The objectives of this study were to examine: 1) impacts of mangrove seedling density on surface sediment accretion, texture, belowground biomass and biogeochemistry, and 2) origins of the carbon (C) supplied to the mangroves in Palakuda, Puttalam Lagoon, Sri Lanka. Rhizophora mucronata propagules were planted at densities of 6.96, 3.26, 1.93 and 0.95 seedlings m−2along with an unplanted control (0 seedlings m−2). The highest seedling density generally had higher sediment accretion rates, finer sediments, higher belowground biomass, greatest number of fine roots and highest concentrations of C and nitrogen (N) (and the lowest C/N ratio). Sediment accretion rates, belowground biomass (over 1370 days), and C and N concentrations differed significantly between seedling densities. Fine roots were significantly greater compared to medium and coarse roots across all plantation densities. Sulphur and carbon stable isotopes did not vary significantly between different density treatments. Isotope signatures suggest surface sediment C (to a depth of 1 cm) is not derived predominantly from the trees, but from seagrass adjacent to the site.

  10. Crowding and Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Design and Environment, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Three-part report pinpointing problems and uncovering solutions for the dual concepts of density (ratio of people to space) and crowding (psychological response to density). Section one, A Primer on Crowding,'' reviews new psychological and social findings; section two, Density in the Suburbs,'' shows conflict between status quo and increased…

  11. Does the HI Mass Function Vary with Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchin, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Based on analysis of a large dataset from the ALFALFA survey, Jones et al. (2016) recently claimed that the slope of the HI mass function is constant across different galactic environments, defined by their density. They point out that this finding is “perplexing” given that many previous studies have found that the HI mass functions of groups of galaxies have flat slopes, while the general field has a relatively steep slope. I argue that the analysis of Jones et al., and similar analyses in the past, is flawed as they examine the HI mass function of the galaxies found in environments with a given density, summed across the survey, not the HI mass function actually present in the individual structures at that density. If the position of the knee in the HI mass function were to vary between these structures, then the slope of the HI mass function found by summing across all of the structures with a given density would be steeper than the slope actually found in the individual structures. For example, if a survey were to contain three groups of galaxies, all with flat HI mass functions, but with the ‘knee’, at the mass of the largest galaxy in the group, at 108, 109 and 1010 solar masses, then the summed HI mass function would appear to have a knee at 1010 solar masses and a steep slope below this, rather than the flat slope that is actually present in the individual environments. It is not possible, therefore, to say from the analysis of Jones et al. that there is no dependence of the HI mass function on environment. This scenario explains the “seemingly contradictory findings” of Jones et al. and the earlier studies of individual groups as being due to differences in what is being studies, without having to invoke methodological errors in the derivation of the HI mass function.The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968), and in alliance with Ana G. M

  12. Time-varying modeling of cerebral hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Shin, Dae C; Orme, Melissa; Rong Zhang

    2014-03-01

    The scientific and clinical importance of cerebral hemodynamics has generated considerable interest in their quantitative understanding via computational modeling. In particular, two aspects of cerebral hemodynamics, cerebral flow autoregulation (CFA) and CO2 vasomotor reactivity (CVR), have attracted much attention because they are implicated in many important clinical conditions and pathologies (orthostatic intolerance, syncope, hypertension, stroke, vascular dementia, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases with cerebrovascular components). Both CFA and CVR are dynamic physiological processes by which cerebral blood flow is regulated in response to fluctuations in cerebral perfusion pressure and blood CO2 tension. Several modeling studies to date have analyzed beat-to-beat hemodynamic data in order to advance our quantitative understanding of CFA-CVR dynamics. A confounding factor in these studies is the fact that the dynamics of the CFA-CVR processes appear to vary with time (i.e., changes in cerebrovascular characteristics) due to neural, endocrine, and metabolic effects. This paper seeks to address this issue by tracking the changes in linear time-invariant models obtained from short successive segments of data from ten healthy human subjects. The results suggest that systemic variations exist but have stationary statistics and, therefore, the use of time-invariant modeling yields "time-averaged models" of physiological and clinical utility.

  13. Microsatellites in varied arenas of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Remya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites known as simple-sequence repeats (SSRs or short-tandem repeats (STRs, represent specific sequences of DNA consisting of tandemly repeated units of one to six nucleotides. The repetitive nature of microsatellites makes them particularly prone to grow or shrink in length and these changes can have both good and bad consequences for the organisms that possess them. They are responsible for various neurological diseases and hence the same cause is now utilized for the early detection of various diseases, such as, Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder, Congenital generalized Hypertrichosis, Asthma, and Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness. These agents are widely used for forensic identification and relatedness testing, and are predominant genetic markers in this area of application. The application of microsatellites is an extending web and covers the varied scenarios of science, such as, conservation biology, plant genetics, and population studies. At present, researches are progressing round the globe to extend the use of these genetic repeaters to unmask the hidden genetic secrets behind the creation of the world.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Frames with Varying Inertia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerana Nampalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an elastic seismic response of reinforced concrete frames with 3 variations of heights, i.e. (G+2, (G+4, (G+6 storey models are compared for bare frame and frame with brick infill structures which have been analyzed for gravity as well as seismic forces and their response is studied as the geometric parameters varying from view point of predicting behavior of similar structures subjected to similar loads or load combinations. In this study, two different cases are selected i.e. frames with prismatic members and frames with non-prismatic members. The structural response of various members when geometry changes physically, as in case of linear and parabolic haunches provided beyond the face of columns at beam column joints or step variations as in case of stepped haunches was also studied. Frames have been analyzed statically as well as dynamically using ETABS-9.7.4 software referring IS: 456-2000, IS: 1893 (Part-12002 and the results so obtained are grouped into various categories

  15. The Strength of Varying Tie Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Bruggeman, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    "The Strength of Weak Ties" argument (Granovetter 1973) says that the most valuable information is best collected through bridging ties with other social circles than one's own, and that those ties tend to be weak. Aral and Van Alstyne (2011) added that to access complex information, actors need strong ties ("high bandwidth") instead. These insights I generalize by pointing at actors' interest to avoid spending large resources on low value information. Weak ties are well-suited for relatively simple information at low transmission and tie maintenance costs, whereas for complex information, the best outcomes are expected for those actors who vary their bandwidths along with the value of information accessed. To support my claim I use all patents in the USA (two million) over the period 1975-1999. I also show that in rationalized fields, such as technology, bandwidth correlates highly with the value of information, which provides support for using this proxy if value can't be measured directly. Finally, I show ...

  16. Varied acceptance of clinical trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1989-12-01

    The subject of varied acceptance of clinical trial results is discussed in the context of review of trials with which I have been involved and my subjective evaluation of their impact on the practice of clinical medicine. My experience goes back to 1949 and a World Health Organization trial of hyperimmune gamma globulin against rabies. This was followed by a large trial of secondary prevention of poliomyelitis. I participated in the planning and initiation of the first chronic disease trial, the University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP). The latter lasted for 15 years and its ramifications continue to this day. My next trial was the Coronary Drug Project (CDP), a complex trial with more than 8,000 patients. The trials of aspirin and aspirin combined with persantine (the CDPA, AMIS, PARIS I, and PARIS II) followed. My last three trials were a trial of photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy (DRS), a six-country trial of the antiarrhythmic drug mexiletine (IMPACT), and a study involving two diagnostic procedures for pulmonary embolism (PIOPED). When one considers, in retrospect, the plethora of trials one is struck by the uniform absence of a priori considerations of the impact on medical practice, or likely lack thereof, of possible outcomes.

  17. A Generalized Theory of Varying Alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate a generalization of the simple Bekenstein-Sandvik-Barrow-Magueijo (BSBM) theory of varying alpha by allowing the coupling constant, \\omega, for the corresponding scalar field \\psi\\ to depend on \\psi. We focus on the situation where \\omega\\ is exponential in \\psi\\ and find the late-time behaviours that occur in matter-dominated and dark-energy dominated cosmologies. We also consider the situation when the background expansion scale factor of the universe evolves in proportion to an arbitrary power of the cosmic time. We find the conditions under which the fine structure `constant' increases with time, as in the BSBM theory, and establish a cosmic no-hair behaviour for accelerating universes. We also find the conditions under which the fine structure `constant' can decrease with time and compare the whole family of models with astronomical data from quasar absorption spectra. Finally, we show that spatial variations on sub-horizon scales can dominate over the cosmological time evolut...

  18. A finite crack with arbitrarily varied surface piezoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We study the contribution of arbitrarily varied surface piezoelectricity to the anti-plane deformation and in-plane electric fields of a hexagonal piezoelectric material containing a finite crack. The varied surface piezoelectricity is incorporated by using an extended version of the continuum-based surface/interface model of Gurtin and Murdoch. In our discussion, the surface properties, including the surface elastic stiffness, the surface piezoelectric modulus and the surface dielectric permittivity, are assumed to be varied arbitrarily along the crack surfaces. By using the Green’s function method, the original boundary value problem is reduced to a system of two coupled first-order Cauchy singular integro-differential equations. Through a diagonalization strategy, the coupled system is transformed into two independent singular integro-differential equations, each of which can be numerically solved by using the collocation method. Our results indicate that the variation of the surface electroelastic moduli exerts a significant influence on the crack opening displacement, the electric potential jump across the crack faces and on the strengths of the logarithmic singularity in stresses and electric displacements at the crack tips.

  19. Observational constraint on the varying speed of light theory

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Jing-Zhao; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2014-01-01

    The varying speed of light (VSL) theory is controversial. It succeeds in explaining some cosmological problems, but on the other hand it is excluded by mainstream physics because it will shake the foundation of physics. In the present paper, we devote ourselves to test whether the speed of light is varying from the observational data of the type Ia Supernova, Baryon Acoustic Oscillation, Observational $H(z)$ data and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We select the common form $c(t)=c_0a^n(t)$ with the contribution of dark energy and matter, where $c_0$ is the current value of speed of light, $n$ is a constant, and consequently construct a varying speed of light dark energy model (VSLDE). The combined observational data show a much trivial constraint $n=-0.0033 \\pm 0.0045$ at 68.3\\% confidence level, which indicates that the speed of light may be a constant with high significance. By reconstructing the time-variable $c(t)$, we find that the speed of light almost has no variation for redshift $z < 10^{-1}$....

  20. Quintessence and Varying \\alpha from Shape Moduli

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Mark; Byrne, Mark; Kolda, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    In extra-dimensional models which are compactified on an n-torus (n>1) there exist moduli associated with the torus volume (which sets the fundamental Planck scale), the ratios of the torus radii, and the angle(s) of periodicity. We consider a model with gravity in the bulk of n=2 large extra dimensions with a fixed volume, taking all Standard Model fields to be confined to a "thick" and supersymmetric 3-brane. The Casimir energy of fields in the bulk of the 2-torus accounts for the present dark energy density while the shape moduli begin rolling at late times (z ~ 1) and induce a shift in the Kaluza-Klein masses of the Standard Model fields. The low energy value of the fine-structure constant is sensitive at loop level to this shift. For reasonable cosmological initial conditions on the shape moduli we obtain a redshift dependence of the fine-structure constant similar to that reported by Webb et al., which is roughly compatible with Oklo and meteorite bounds. Constraints from coincident variation in the QCD...

  1. A von Bertalanffy growth model with a seasonally varying coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.; Nichols, Frederic H.

    1978-01-01

    The von Bertalanffy model of body growth is inappropriate for organisms whose growth is restricted to a seasonal period because it assumes that growth rate is invariant with time. Incorporation of a time-varying coefficient significantly improves the capability of the von Bertalanffy equation to describe changing body size of both the bivalve mollusc Macoma balthicain San Francisco Bay and the flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon, in Washington state. This simple modification of the von Bertalanffy model should offer improved predictions of body growth for a variety of other aquatic animals.

  2. Reduced dielectric response in spatially varying electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamical equation for polarization is derived. From this the dielectric response to a spatially varying electric field is analyzed showing a reduced response due to flux of polarization in the material. This flux is modeled as a diffusive process through linear constitutive...... relations between the flux and the gradient of the polarization. Comparison between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations confirms this effect. The effect is significant for small length scale electric field variations and the inclusion of the flux is thus important in nanoscale modeling...

  3. Morphable Word Clouds for Time-Varying Text Data Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Ming-Te; Lin, Shih-Syun; Chen, Shiang-Yi; Lin, Chao-Hung; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2015-12-01

    A word cloud is a visual representation of a collection of text documents that uses various font sizes, colors, and spaces to arrange and depict significant words. The majority of previous studies on time-varying word clouds focuses on layout optimization and temporal trend visualization. However, they do not fully consider the spatial shapes and temporal motions of word clouds, which are important factors for attracting people's attention and are also important cues for human visual systems in capturing information from time-varying text data. This paper presents a novel method that uses rigid body dynamics to arrange multi-temporal word-tags in a specific shape sequence under various constraints. Each word-tag is regarded as a rigid body in dynamics. With the aid of geometric, aesthetic, and temporal coherence constraints, the proposed method can generate a temporally morphable word cloud that not only arranges word-tags in their corresponding shapes but also smoothly transforms the shapes of word clouds over time, thus yielding a pleasing time-varying visualization. Using the proposed frame-by-frame and morphable word clouds, people can observe the overall story of a time-varying text data from the shape transition, and people can also observe the details from the word clouds in frames. Experimental results on various data demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of the proposed method in morphable word cloud generation. In addition, an application that uses the proposed word clouds in a simulated exhibition demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed method.

  4. Fabrication and evaluation of uniform and gradient density epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domeier, L.A.; Skala, D.M.; Goods, S.H. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Filled epoxy materials which vary in density in a designed manner have been fabricated and their mechanical properties evaluated. Density variations were produced by incorporating different volume fractions of either glass microballoons (GMB) or alumina. Several different sample types were evaluated including uniform density (0.8 g/cm{sup 3} < {rho} < 2.0 g/cm{sup 3}) samples and gradient density samples (GMB only, 0.8 g/cm{sup 3} < {rho} < 1.2 g/cm{sup 3}). The uniform density specimens were evaluated for the effects of filler type and concentration on modulus and toughness. Results indicated that addition of alumina filler significantly increased the resulting modulus while addition of GMB had little measurable effect. These differences could be understood in terms of the differing moduli of the additives relative to that of the epoxy matrix. In the former case the alumina particulates had a modulus much greater than that of the epoxy while in the latter case, the modulus of the GMB additive was only slightly greater than that of the matrix. Addition of either filler significantly degraded the toughness of the composite specimens and precluded the use of gradients to enhance toughness performance. Discontinuous {open_quotes}block{close_quotes} gradients used for testing were fabricated by simple sequential pours of formulations with different GMB loadings and were evaluated for modulus, strength and ductility. Continuous gradients were fabricated in process studies by programmed shifts in the peristaltic pumping/mixing ratio of epoxies filled with either alumina or GMB. None of the continuous gradient materials were mechanically tested. These results suggest that applications utilizing gradient materials containing alumina and similar high modulus fillers to provide designed stiffness rather than improved toughness are the most appropriate targets for future investigation.

  5. Assessment of Different Sampling Methods for Measuring and Representing Macular Cone Density Using Flood-Illuminated Adaptive Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shu; Gale, Michael J; Fay, Jonathan D; Faridi, Ambar; Titus, Hope E; Garg, Anupam K; Michaels, Keith V; Erker, Laura R; Peters, Dawn; Smith, Travis B; Pennesi, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    To describe a standardized flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) imaging protocol suitable for the clinical setting and to assess sampling methods for measuring cone density. Cone density was calculated following three measurement protocols: 50 × 50-μm sampling window values every 0.5° along the horizontal and vertical meridians (fixed-interval method), the mean density of expanding 0.5°-wide arcuate areas in the nasal, temporal, superior, and inferior quadrants (arcuate mean method), and the peak cone density of a 50 × 50-μm sampling window within expanding arcuate areas near the meridian (peak density method). Repeated imaging was performed in nine subjects to determine intersession repeatability of cone density. Cone density montages could be created for 67 of the 74 subjects. Image quality was determined to be adequate for automated cone counting for 35 (52%) of the 67 subjects. We found that cone density varied with different sampling methods and regions tested. In the nasal and temporal quadrants, peak density most closely resembled histological data, whereas the arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods tended to underestimate the density compared with histological data. However, in the inferior and superior quadrants, arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods most closely matched histological data, whereas the peak density method overestimated cone density compared with histological data. Intersession repeatability testing showed that repeatability was greatest when sampling by arcuate mean and lowest when sampling by fixed interval. We show that different methods of sampling can significantly affect cone density measurements. Therefore, care must be taken when interpreting cone density results, even in a normal population.

  6. The Impact of Density and Ratio on Object-Ensemble Representation in Human Anterior-Medial Ventral Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cant, Jonathan S; Xu, Yaoda

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral research has demonstrated that observers can extract summary statistics from ensembles of multiple objects. We recently showed that a region of anterior-medial ventral visual cortex, overlapping largely with the scene-sensitive parahippocampal place area (PPA), participates in object-ensemble representation. Here we investigated the encoding of ensemble density in this brain region using fMRI-adaptation. In Experiment 1, we varied density by changing the spacing between objects and found no sensitivity in PPA to such density changes. Thus, density may not be encoded in PPA, possibly because object spacing is not perceived as an intrinsic ensemble property. In Experiment 2, we varied relative density by changing the ratio of 2 types of objects comprising an ensemble, and observed significant sensitivity in PPA to such ratio change. Although colorful ensembles were shown in Experiment 2, Experiment 3 demonstrated that sensitivity to object ratio change was not driven mainly by a change in the ratio of colors. Thus, while anterior-medial ventral visual cortex is insensitive to density (object spacing) changes, it does code relative density (object ratio) within an ensemble. Object-ensemble processing in this region may thus depend on high-level visual information, such as object ratio, rather than low-level information, such as spacing/spatial frequency.

  7. Enhancement of keV X-rays from low-density cellulose triacetate (TAC) foam targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Kaur, Channprit; Borisenko, N. G.; Pasley, J.; Orekhov, A.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-07-01

    The interaction of a high-power laser with a low-density foam target can in some instances result in a significant enhancement in x-ray generation relative to that when the same laser is incident upon a homogenous solid. In this paper, we present x-ray emission studies from foam targets where the density is varied from under-dense to over-dense. The targets are irradiated with the first harmonic of Nd:Glass laser. The laser intensity on the target was approximately 2 × 1014 W/cm2 with the pulse duration of 500 ps. Mass-matched cellulose triacetate foam targets with densities of 2 mg/cc, 4 mg/cc, 7 mg/cc, and 20 mg/cc were used. The areal density presented by the targets on the laser beam axis was held constant at 0.2 mg/cm2 by varying the target thickness in inverse proportion to the density. The x-ray yield in the spectral range (5-8 keV) and (4.5-16 keV) was found to be enhanced by approximately 2.3 times in foam targets with the density of 2 mg/cc (under-dense) compared with foam targets with the density of 20 mg/cc (over-dense).

  8. Probability densities and Lévy densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler

    For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated.......For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated....

  9. Probability densities and Lévy densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler

    For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated.......For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated....

  10. A mechanistic analysis of density dependence in algal population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eBorlestean

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Population density regulation is a fundamental principle in ecology, but the specific process underlying functional expression of density dependence remains to be fully elucidated. One view contends that patterns of density dependence are largely fixed across a species irrespective of environmental conditions, whereas another is that the strength and expression of density dependence are fundamentally variable depending on the nature of exogenous or endogenous constraints acting on the population. We conducted a study investigating the expression of density dependence in Chlamydomonas spp. grown under a gradient from low to high nutrient density. We predicted that the relationship between per capita growth rate (pgr and population density would vary from concave up to concave down as nutrient density became less limiting and populations experienced weaker density regulation. Contrary to prediction, we found that the relationship between pgr and density became increasingly concave-up as nutrient levels increased. We also found that variation in pgr increased, and pgr levels reached higher maxima in nutrient-limited environments. Most likely, these results are attributable to population growth suppression in environments with high intraspecific competition due to limited nutrient resources. Our results suggest that density regulation is strongly variable depending on exogenous and endogenous processes acting on the population, implying that expression of density dependence depends extensively on local conditions. Additional experimental work should reveal the mechanisms influencing how the expression of density dependence varies across populations through space and time.

  11. MCBS Sites of Biodiversity Significance

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data layer represents areas with varying levels of native biodiversity that may contain high quality native plant communities, rare plants, rare animals, and/or...

  12. Using Fish Population Metrics to Compare the Effects of Artificial Reef Density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catheline Y M Froehlich

    Full Text Available Artificial reefs continue to be added as habitat throughout the world, yet questions remain about how reef design affects fish diversity and abundance. In the present study, the effects of reef density were assessed for fish communities and sizes of economically valuable Lutjanus campechanus 13 km off Port Mansfield, Texas, at a reef composed of more than 4000 concrete culverts. The study spanned from May to June in 2013 and 2014, and sites sampled included natural reefs, bare areas, and varying culvert patch density categories, ranging from 1-190 culverts. Abundances of adults and species evenness of juvenile populations differed between the years. Fish communities did not significantly differ among density categories; however, highest species richness and total abundances were observed at intermediate culvert densities and at natural reefs. Whereas the abundance of L. campechanus did not differ among density categories, mean total lengths of L. campechanus were greatest at the lower density. Our findings suggest that reefs should be deployed with intermediate patch density of 71-120 culverts in a 30-m radius to yield the highest fish abundances.

  13. The role of G-density in switch region repeats for immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The boundaries of R-loops are well-documented at immunoglobulin heavy chain loci in mammalian B cells. Within primary B cells or B cell lines, the upstream boundaries of R-loops typically begin early in the repetitive portion of the switch regions. Most R-loops terminate within the switch repetitive zone, but the remainder can extend a few hundred base pairs further, where G-density on the non-template DNA strand gradually drops to the genome average. Whether the G-density determines how far the R-loops extend is an important question. We previously studied the role of G-clusters in initiating R-loop formation, but we did not examine the role of G-density in permitting the elongation of the R-loop, after it had initiated. Here, we vary the G-density of different portions of the switch region in a murine B cell line. We find that both class switch recombination (CSR) and R-loop formation decrease significantly when the overall G-density is reduced from 46% to 29%. Short 50 bp insertions with low G-density within switch regions do not appear to affect either CSR or R-loop elongation, whereas a longer (150 bp) insertion impairs both. These results demonstrate that G-density is an important determinant of the length over which mammalian genomic R-loops extend.

  14. Bayesian Inference on the Effect of Density Dependence and Weather on a Guanaco Population from Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubillaga, María; Skewes, Oscar; Soto, Nicolás; Rabinovich, Jorge E.; Colchero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive population dynamics is fundamental for management of wild populations. The guanaco (Lama guanicoe) is one of two wild camelid species in South America. We evaluated the effects of density dependence and weather variables on population regulation based on a time series of 36 years of population sampling of guanacos in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. The population density varied between 2.7 and 30.7 guanaco/km2, with an apparent monotonic growth during the first 25 years; however, in the last 10 years the population has shown large fluctuations, suggesting that it might have reached its carrying capacity. We used a Bayesian state-space framework and model selection to determine the effect of density and environmental variables on guanaco population dynamics. Our results show that the population is under density dependent regulation and that it is currently fluctuating around an average carrying capacity of 45,000 guanacos. We also found a significant positive effect of previous winter temperature while sheep density has a strong negative effect on the guanaco population growth. We conclude that there are significant density dependent processes and that climate as well as competition with domestic species have important effects determining the population size of guanacos, with important implications for management and conservation. PMID:25514510

  15. Evidence for coordinate genetic control of Na,K pump density in erythrocytes and lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuise, M.; Flier, J.S.

    1985-08-01

    The erythrocyte is widely used as a model cell for studies of the Na,K pump in health and disease. However, little is known about the factors that control the number of Na,K pumps expressed on the erythrocytes of a given individual, nor about the extent to which erythrocytes can be used to validly assess the pump density on other cell types. In this report, the authors have compared the interindividual variance of Na,K pump density in erythrocytes of unrelated individuals to that seen with identical twins. Unlike unrelated individuals, in whom pump parameters, i.e., ouabain binding sites, /sup 86/Rb uptake, and cell Na concentration vary widely, identical twin pairs showed no significant intrapair variation for these values. Thus, a role for genetic factors is suggested. In addition, the authors established and validated a method for determining Na,K pump density and pump-mediated /sup 86/Rb uptake in human peripheral lymphocytes. Using this method, they show that whereas Na,K pump density differs markedly between erythrocytes (mean of 285 sites per cell) and lymphocytes (mean 40,600 sites per cell), there is a strong and highly significant correlation (r = 0.79, P less than 0.001) between the pump density in these cell types in any given individual. Taken together, these studies suggest that genetic factors are important determinants of Na,K pump expression, and that pump density appears to be coordinately regulated in two cell types in healthy individuals.

  16. Sensitivity of ring growth and carbon allocation to climatic variation vary within ponderosa pine trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhoulas, Lucy P; Kane, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Most dendrochronological studies focus on cores sampled from standard positions (main stem, breast height), yet vertical gradients in hydraulic constraints and priorities for carbon allocation may contribute to different growth sensitivities with position. Using cores taken from five positions (coarse roots, breast height, base of live crown, mid-crown branch and treetop), we investigated how radial growth sensitivity to climate over the period of 1895-2008 varies by position within 36 large ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa Dougl.) in northern Arizona. The climate parameters investigated were Palmer Drought Severity Index, water year and monsoon precipitation, maximum annual temperature, minimum annual temperature and average annual temperature. For each study tree, we generated Pearson correlation coefficients between ring width indices from each position and six climate parameters. We also investigated whether the number of missing rings differed among positions and bole heights. We found that tree density did not significantly influence climatic sensitivity to any of the climate parameters investigated at any of the sample positions. Results from three types of analyses suggest that climatic sensitivity of tree growth varied with position height: (i) correlations of radial growth and climate variables consistently increased with height; (ii) model strength based on Akaike's information criterion increased with height, where treetop growth consistently had the highest sensitivity and coarse roots the lowest sensitivity to each climatic parameter; and (iii) the correlation between bole ring width indices decreased with distance between positions. We speculate that increased sensitivity to climate at higher positions is related to hydraulic limitation because higher positions experience greater xylem tensions due to gravitational effects that render these positions more sensitive to climatic stresses. The low sensitivity of root growth to all climatic variables

  17. 血清 LDL-C 水平与老年射血分数降低性心衰患者预后的关系%Prognostic significance of serum low - density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in elderly patients hospitalized for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田甜; 徐予; 夏长伟; 张新雨

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the long - term relationship between levels of low - density lipoprotein cholesterol and post - discharge mortality among elderly patients hospitalized for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction(HFrEF). Methods This study was a single - center retrospective study. A total of 340 elderly HFrEF patients were included from August of 2007 to February of 2012. The cohort was divided into tertiles according to LDL - C levels:the low LDL - C level group(LDL - C≤2. 2667 mmol/ L),the moderate LDL - C level group( LDL - C 2. 873 3 mmol/ L ≤ )and the high LDL - C level group(LDL - C ﹥2. 873 3 mmol/ L). All - cause mortalities were compared. The impact of the different levels of LDL - C on all - cause mortality was analyzed by using multiariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results There were 116 all - cause deaths. All - cause mortality in the high LDL - C level group(23. 89%) was significantly lower than the moderate LDL - C level group( 36. 09%)and the low LDL - C level group( 43. 36%). Kaplan - Meier curves showed the all - cause mortality was lower in the high LDL - C level group than in the other two groups. According to the Cox proportional hazards regression model,the patients in the low LDL - C level group had a hazard ratio of all - cause death of 2. 135(95%CI:1. 311 ~3. 477,P = 0. 002)compared to those with high LDL - C level. Conclusion The high LDL - C levels were associated with a reduced post - discharge mortality among elderly patients hospitalized for HFrEF.%目的:研究血清低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL - C)水平对老年住院射血分数降低性心力衰竭(HFrEF)患者长期预后的影响。方法本研究为单中心回顾性研究。选取2007年8月至2012年2月于郑州大学人民医院住院治疗的不同病因的340例老年 HFrEF 患者,依据血清 LDL - C 水平分为3组:低水平 LDL - C 组(LDL - C≤2.2667 mmol/ L),中等水平 LDL - C 组(LDL - C≤2.8733 mmol/ L

  18. Analysis of nonstationarity in renal autoregulation mechanisms using time-varying transfer and coherence functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chon, Ki H; Zhong, Yuru; Moore, Leon C;

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which renal blood flow dynamics vary in time and whether such variation contributes substantively to dynamic complexity have emerged as important questions. Data from Sprague-Dawley rats (SDR) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were analyzed by time-varying transfer functions...... (TVTF) and time-varying coherence functions (TVCF). Both TVTF and TVCF allow quantification of nonstationarity in the frequency ranges associated with the autoregulatory mechanisms. TVTF analysis shows that autoregulatory gain in SDR and SHR varies in time and that SHR exhibit significantly more...

  19. Population Density Modeling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-05

    194 POPULATION DENSITY MODELING TOOL by Davy Andrew Michael Knott David Burke 26 June 2012 Distribution...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2012/194 26 June 2012 POPULATION DENSITY MODELING TOOL by Davy Andrew Michael Knott David Burke...Density Modeling Tool 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Davy Andrew Michael Knott David Burke 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  20. Bimetric varying speed of light theories and primordial fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, Joao

    2008-01-01

    We exhibit a varying speed of light (VSL) theory that implements the recently proposed decaying speed of sound mechanism for generating density fluctuations. We avail ourselves of bimetric VSL theories, where the speed of gravity differs from that of light. We first show that a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) type of $K$-essence has the necessary speed of sound profile to produce (near) scale-invariant fluctuations. We then examine the map between bimetric and $K$-essence models: typically the bi-scalar connecting the two metrics is a $K$-essence field in one of them. Remarkably, the DBI model is found to perturbatively represent the minimal bimetric model, where the bi-scalar is Klein-Gordon in the matter frame. But the full non-perturbative bimetric structure is even simpler: the bi-scalar dynamics should be simply driven by a cosmological constant in the matter frame, balanced by an opposite cosmological constant in the gravity frame. Thus the problem of structure formation receives an elegant and universal soluti...

  1. Response of a transmission tower-line system at a canyon site to spatially varying ground motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-nan LI; Feng-long BAI; Li TIAN; Hong HAO

    2011-01-01

    Collapses of transmission towers were often observed in previous large earthquakes such as the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan and Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan, China. These collapses were partially caused by the pulling forces from the transmission lines generated from out-of-phase responses of the adjacent towers owing to spatially varying earthquake ground motions. In this paper, a 3D finite element model of the transmission tower-line system is established considering the geometric nonlinearity of transmission lines. The nonlinear responses of the structural system at a canyon site are analyzed subjected to spatially varying ground motions. The spatial variations of ground motion associated with the wave passage, coherency loss, and local site effects are given. The spatially varying ground motions are simulated stochastically based on an empirical coherency loss function and a filtered Tajimi-Kanai power spectral density function. The site effect is considered by a transfer function derived from ID wave propagation theory. Compared with structural responses calculated using the uniform ground motion and delayed excitations, numerical results indicate that seismic responses of transmission towers and power lines are amplified when considering spatially varying ground motions including site effects. Each factor of ground motion spatial variations has a significant effect on the seismic response of the structure, especially for the local site effect. Therefore, neglecting the earthquake ground motion spatial variations may lead to a substantial underestimation of the response of transmission tower-line system during strong earthquakes. Each effect of ground motion spatial variations should be incorporated in seismic analysis of the structural system.

  2. Density Functional Calculations for the Neutron Star Matter at Subnormal Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwaba, Yu; Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    The pasta phases of nuclear matter, whose existence is suggested at low density, may influence observable properties of neutron stars. In order to investigate properties of the neutron star matter, we calculate self-consistent solutions for the ground states of slab-like phase using the microscopic density functional theory with Bloch wave functions. The calculations are performed at each point of fixed average density and proton fraction (\\bar{ρ },Yp), varying the lattice constant of the unit cell. For small Yp values, the dripped neutrons emerge in the ground state, while the protons constitute the slab (crystallized) structure. The shell effect of protons affects the thickness of the slab nuclei.

  3. Sleep spindle density in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Hvidtfelt, Mathias; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Jennum, Poul

    2017-06-01

    Patients with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) show alterations in sleep stage transitions, rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep due to the loss of hypocretinergic signaling. However, the sleep microstructure has not yet been evaluated in these patients. We aimed to evaluate whether the sleep spindle (SS) density is altered in patients with NT1 compared to controls and patients with narcolepsy type 2 (NT2). All-night polysomnographic recordings from 28 NT1 patients, 19 NT2 patients, 20 controls (C) with narcolepsy-like symptoms, but with normal cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels and multiple sleep latency tests, and 18 healthy controls (HC) were included. Unspecified, slow, and fast SS were automatically detected, and SS densities were defined as number per minute and were computed across sleep stages and sleep cycles. The between-cycle trends of SS densities in N2 and NREM sleep were evaluated within and between groups. Between-group comparisons in sleep stages revealed no significant differences in any type of SS. Within-group analyses of the SS trends revealed significant decreasing trends for NT1, HC, and C between first and last sleep cycle. Between-group analyses of SS trends between first and last sleep cycle revealed that NT2 differ from NT1 patients in the unspecified SS density in NREM sleep, and from HC in the slow SS density in N2 sleep. SS activity is preserved in NT1, suggesting that the ascending neurons to thalamic activation of SS are not significantly affected by the hypocretinergic system. NT2 patients show an abnormal pattern of SS distribution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring finite density QCD phase transition with canonical approach -Power of multiple precision computation-

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Shotaro

    2015-01-01

    The canonical approach for finite density lattice QCD has a numerical instability. This instability makes it difficult to use the method reliably at the finite real chemical potential region. We studied this instability in detail and found that it is caused by the cancellation of significant digits. In order to reduce the effect of this cancellation, we adopt the multiple precision calculation for our discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) program, and we get the canonical partition function Zc(n,T) with required accuracy. From the obtained Zc(n,T), we calculate Lee--Yang zero distribution varying the number of significant digits. As a result, some curves surround the origin in the fugacity plane, but they are moved by varying the number of significant digits. Hence, we conclude that these curves are pseudo phase transition lines, and not real ones.

  5. Density-dependent role of an invasive marsh grass, Phragmites australis, on ecosystem service provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Brandon J.; Theuerkauf, Kathrynlynn W.; Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Eggleston, David B.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can positively, neutrally, or negatively affect the provision of ecosystem services. The direction and magnitude of this effect can be a function of the invaders’ density and the service(s) of interest. We assessed the density-dependent effect of an invasive marsh grass, Phragmites australis, on three ecosystem services (plant diversity and community structure, shoreline stabilization, and carbon storage) in two oligohaline marshes within the North Carolina Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NCNERR), USA. Plant species richness was equivalent among low, medium and high Phragmites density plots, and overall plant community composition did not vary significantly by Phragmites density. Shoreline change was most negative (landward retreat) where Phragmites density was highest (-0.40 ± 0.19 m yr-1 vs. -0.31 ± 0.10 for low density Phragmites) in the high energy marsh of Kitty Hawk Woods Reserve and most positive (soundward advance) where Phragmites density was highest (0.19 ± 0.05 m yr-1 vs. 0.12 ± 0.07 for low density Phragmites) in the lower energy marsh of Currituck Banks Reserve, although there was no significant effect of Phragmites density on shoreline change. In Currituck Banks, mean soil carbon content was approximately equivalent in cores extracted from low and high Phragmites density plots (23.23 ± 2.0 kg C m-3 vs. 22.81 ± 3.8). In Kitty Hawk Woods, mean soil carbon content was greater in low Phragmites density plots (36.63 ± 10.22 kg C m-3) than those with medium (13.99 ± 1.23 kg C m-3) or high density (21.61 ± 4.53 kg C m-3), but differences were not significant. These findings suggest an overall neutral density-dependent effect of Phragmites on three ecosystem services within two oligohaline marshes in different environmental settings within a protected reserve system. Moreover, the conceptual framework of this study can broadly inform an ecosystem services-based approach to invasive species management

  6. Density-dependent role of an invasive marsh grass, Phragmites australis, on ecosystem service provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuerkauf, Seth J; Puckett, Brandon J; Theuerkauf, Kathrynlynn W; Theuerkauf, Ethan J; Eggleston, David B

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can positively, neutrally, or negatively affect the provision of ecosystem services. The direction and magnitude of this effect can be a function of the invaders' density and the service(s) of interest. We assessed the density-dependent effect of an invasive marsh grass, Phragmites australis, on three ecosystem services (plant diversity and community structure, shoreline stabilization, and carbon storage) in two oligohaline marshes within the North Carolina Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NCNERR), USA. Plant species richness was equivalent among low, medium and high Phragmites density plots, and overall plant community composition did not vary significantly by Phragmites density. Shoreline change was most negative (landward retreat) where Phragmites density was highest (-0.40 ± 0.19 m yr-1 vs. -0.31 ± 0.10 for low density Phragmites) in the high energy marsh of Kitty Hawk Woods Reserve and most positive (soundward advance) where Phragmites density was highest (0.19 ± 0.05 m yr-1 vs. 0.12 ± 0.07 for low density Phragmites) in the lower energy marsh of Currituck Banks Reserve, although there was no significant effect of Phragmites density on shoreline change. In Currituck Banks, mean soil carbon content was approximately equivalent in cores extracted from low and high Phragmites density plots (23.23 ± 2.0 kg C m-3 vs. 22.81 ± 3.8). In Kitty Hawk Woods, mean soil carbon content was greater in low Phragmites density plots (36.63 ± 10.22 kg C m-3) than those with medium (13.99 ± 1.23 kg C m-3) or high density (21.61 ± 4.53 kg C m-3), but differences were not significant. These findings suggest an overall neutral density-dependent effect of Phragmites on three ecosystem services within two oligohaline marshes in different environmental settings within a protected reserve system. Moreover, the conceptual framework of this study can broadly inform an ecosystem services-based approach to invasive species management.

  7. Reflection tomography in laterally varying media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrion, Phillip M.; Boehm, Gualtiero; Vesnaver, Aldo

    1993-12-31

    In this paper, we will discuss a separate reconstruction of lateral velocity gradients and reflection interfaces using the method of reflection tomography. We will be limited by inversion of traveltimes. As it is known such inversion may suffer from a significant drawback: ambiguity. This ambiguity is referred to as depth/velocity ambiguity which is especially notable in the case of non-vertical angles of propagation. In tomographic experiments this ambiguity is suppressed by finite angular aperture. The next problem is non-uniqueness. It will be shown that the lateral gradients of velocity and the depths to the reflection points can be uniquely recovered from surface seismic data in the reflection tomography experiments. Reflection data inversion is done via an optimization process which can be formulated either in the physical space of seismic velocities or in the dual space of Lagrangian multipliers. We compare both methods and show the advantages of the dual transform. (author). 4 refs., 8 figs

  8. The interactive roles of Aedes aegypti super-production and human density in dengue transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Padmanabha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A. aegypti production and human density may vary considerably in dengue endemic areas. Understanding how interactions between these factors influence the risk of transmission could improve the effectiveness of the allocation of vector control resources. To evaluate the combined impacts of variation in A. aegypti production and human density we integrated field data with simulation modeling. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data from seven censuses of A. aegypti pupae (2007-2009 and from demographic surveys, we developed an agent-based transmission model of the dengue transmission cycle across houses in 16 dengue-endemic urban 'patches' (1-3 city blocks each of Armenia, Colombia. Our field data showed that 92% of pupae concentrated in only 5% of houses, defined as super-producers. Average secondary infections (R(0 depended on infrequent, but highly explosive transmission events. These super-spreading events occurred almost exclusively when the introduced infectious person infected mosquitoes that were produced in super-productive containers. Increased human density favored R(0, and when the likelihood of human introduction of virus was incorporated into risk, a strong interaction arose between vector production and human density. Simulated intervention of super-productive containers was substantially more effective in reducing dengue risk at higher human densities. SIGNIFICANCE/CONCLUSIONS: These results show significant interactions between human population density and the natural regulatory pattern of A. aegypti in the dynamics of dengue transmission. The large epidemiological significance of super-productive containers suggests that they have the potential to influence dengue viral adaptation to mosquitoes. Human population density plays a major role in dengue transmission, due to its potential impact on human-A. aegypti contact, both within a person's home and when visiting others. The large variation in population density

  9. Herbivore effects on productivity vary by guild: cattle increase mean productivity while wildlife reduce variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Grace K; Porensky, Lauren M; Riginos, Corinna; Veblen, Kari E; Young, Truman P

    2017-01-01

    Wild herbivores and livestock share the majority of rangelands worldwide, yet few controlled experiments have addressed their individual, additive, and interactive impacts on ecosystem function. While ungulate herbivores generally reduce standing biomass, their effects on aboveground net primary production (ANPP) can vary by spatial and temporal context, intensity of herbivory, and herbivore identity and species richness. Some evidence indicates that moderate levels of herbivory can stimulate aboveground productivity, but few studies have explicitly tested the relationships among herbivore identity, grazing intensity, and ANPP. We used a long-term exclosure experiment to examine the effects of three groups of wild and domestic ungulate herbivores (megaherbivores, mesoherbivore wildlife, and cattle) on herbaceous productivity in an African savanna. Using both field measurements (productivity cages) and satellite imagery, we measured the effects of different herbivore guilds, separately and in different combinations, on herbaceous productivity across both space and time. Results from both productivity cage measurements and satellite normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) demonstrated a positive relationship between mean productivity and total ungulate herbivore pressure, driven in particular by the presence of cattle. In contrast, we found that variation in herbaceous productivity across space and time was driven by the presence of wild herbivores (primarily mesoherbivore wildlife), which significantly reduced heterogeneity in ANPP and NDVI across both space and time. Our results indicate that replacing wildlife with cattle (at moderate densities) could lead to similarly productive but more heterogeneous herbaceous plant communities in rangelands.

  10. Aggregation pattern transitions by slightly varying the attractive/repulsive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Cheng

    Full Text Available Among collective behaviors of biological swarms and flocks, the attractive/repulsive (A/R functional links between particles play an important role. By slightly changing the cutoff distance of the A/R function, a drastic transition between two distinct aggregation patterns is observed. More precisely, a large cutoff distance yields a liquid-like aggregation pattern where the particle density decreases monotonously from the inside to the outwards within each aggregated cluster. Conversely, a small cutoff distance produces a crystal-like aggregation pattern where the distance between each pair of neighboring particles remains constant. Significantly, there is an obvious spinodal in the variance curve of the inter-particle distances along the increasing cutoff distances, implying a legible transition pattern between the liquid-like and crystal-like aggregations. This work bridges the aggregation phenomena of physical particles and swarming of organisms in nature upon revealing some common mechanism behind them by slightly varying their inter-individual attractive/repulsive functions, and may find its potential engineering applications, for example, in the formation design of multi-robot systems and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs.

  11. Psycho-Physical Effects of Varied Rest Intervals Following Warm-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronchick, Joel; Burke, Edmund J.

    1977-01-01

    An assessment of the effects of rest intervals of varying lengths following a five minute warm-up revealed no significant differeence among them for perceived exertion, heart rate, and state anxiety. (MB)

  12. Carbon density and distribution of six Chinese temperate forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying forest carbon(C) storage and distribution is important for forest C cycling studies and terrestrial ecosystem modeling.Forest inventory and allometric approaches were used to measure C density and allocation in six representative temperate forests of similar stand age(42-59 years old) and growing under the same climate in northeastern China.The forests were an aspen-birch forest,a hardwood forest,a Korean pine plantation,a Dahurian larch plantation,a mixed deciduous forest,and a Mongolian oak forest.There were no significant differences in the C densities of ecosystem components(except for detritus) although the six forests had varying vegetation compositions and site conditions.However,the differences were significant when the C pools were normalized against stand basal area.The total ecosystem C density varied from 186.9 tC hm-2 to 349.2 tC hm-2 across the forests.The C densities of vegetation,detritus,and soil ranged from 86.3-122.7 tC hm-2,6.5-10.5 tC hm-2,and 93.7-220.1 tC hm-2,respectively,which accounted for 39.7% ± 7.1%(mean ± SD),3.3% ± 1.1%,and 57.0% ± 7.9% of the total C densities,respectively.The overstory C pool accounted for > 99% of the total vegetation C pool.The foliage biomass,small root(diameter < 5mm) biomass,root-shoot ratio,and small root to foliage biomass ratio varied from 2.08-4.72 tC hm-2,0.95-3.24 tC hm-2,22.0%-28.3%,and 34.5%-122.2%,respectively.The Korean pine plantation had the lowest foliage production efficiency(total biomass/foliage biomass:22.6 g g-1) among the six forests,while the Dahurian larch plantation had the highest small root production efficiency(total biomass/small root biomass:124.7 g g-1).The small root C density decreased with soil depth for all forests except for the Mongolian oak forest,in which the small roots tended to be vertically distributed downwards.The C density of coarse woody debris was significantly less in the two plantations than in the four naturally regenerated forests.The variability

  13. On density forecast evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diks, C.

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, probability integral transforms (PITs) have been popular means for evaluating density forecasts. For an ideal density forecast, the PITs should be uniformly distributed on the unit interval and independent. However, this is only a necessary condition, and not a sufficient one, as

  14. MEASUREMENT OF WHEAT DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯跟胜; 党金春; 等

    1995-01-01

    A method used for on line determining the change of wheat density with a automatic watering machine in a lqarge flour mill has been studied.The results show that the higher distinguishing ability is obtained when using 241Am as a γ-ray source for measuring the wheat density than using 137Cs.

  15. Determination of Doping Density in GaAs Semiconductor by Wavelength-Dependent Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jongtae; Choi, Oklim; Boo, Doo Wan; Choi, Joonggill [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The wavelength dependence of the photoacoustic signal for n-type GaAs semiconductors in the region of the band-gap energies was investigated. The significant changes in the phase and amplitude of the photoacoustic signal near the band-gap absorption wavelengths were observed to occur when the Si-doping densities in GaAs were varied. Particularly, the first derivatives of the photoacoustic phase vs. wavelength graphs were evaluated and fitted with single Gaussian functions. The peak centers and the widths of the Gaussian curves clearly showed linear relationships with the log values of the Si-doping densities in n-type GaAs semiconductors. It is proposed that the wavelength-dependent PA spectroscopy can be used as a simple and nondestructive method for measuring the doping densities in bulk semiconductors.

  16. Product Binding Varies Dramatically between Processive and Nonprocessive Cellulase Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Stahlberg, J.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-07-13

    Cellulases hydrolyze {beta}-1,4 glycosidic linkages in cellulose, which are among the most prevalent and stable bonds in Nature. Cellulases comprise many glycoside hydrolase families and exist as processive or nonprocessive enzymes. Product inhibition negatively impacts cellulase action, but experimental measurements of product-binding constants vary significantly, and there is little consensus on the importance of this phenomenon. To provide molecular level insights into cellulase product inhibition, we examine the impact of product binding on processive and nonprocessive cellulases by calculating the binding free energy of cellobiose to the product sites of catalytic domains of processive and nonprocessive enzymes from glycoside hydrolase families 6 and 7. The results suggest that cellobiose binds to processive cellulases much more strongly than nonprocessive cellulases. We also predict that the presence of a cellodextrin bound in the reactant site of the catalytic domain, which is present during enzymatic catalysis, has no effect on product binding in nonprocessive cellulases, whereas it significantly increases product binding to processive cellulases. This difference in product binding correlates with hydrogen bonding between the substrate-side ligand and the cellobiose product in processive cellulase tunnels and the additional stabilization from the longer tunnel-forming loops. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate- and product-side ligands are disrupted by water in nonprocessive cellulase clefts, and the lack of long tunnel-forming loops results in lower affinity of the product ligand. These findings provide new insights into the large discrepancies reported for binding constants for cellulases and suggest that product inhibition will vary significantly based on the amount of productive binding for processive cellulases on cellulose.

  17. Learning Grasp Affordance Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, Renaud; Kraft, Dirk; Kroemer, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    We address the issue of learning and representing object grasp affordance models. We model grasp affordances with continuous probability density functions (grasp densities) which link object-relative grasp poses to their success probability. The underlying function representation is nonparametric...... and relies on kernel density estimation to provide a continuous model. Grasp densities are learned and refined from exploration, by letting a robot “play” with an object in a sequence of graspand-drop actions: The robot uses visual cues to generate a set of grasp hypotheses; it then executes...... these and records their outcomes. When a satisfactory number of grasp data is available, an importance-sampling algorithm turns these into a grasp density. We evaluate our method in a largely autonomous learning experiment run on three objects of distinct shapes. The experiment shows how learning increases success...

  18. Symmetry energy and density

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, Wolfgang; Russotto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear equation-of-state is a topic of highest current interest in nuclear structure and reactions as well as in astrophysics. In particular, the equation-of-state of asymmetric matter and the symmetry energy representing the difference between the energy densities of neutron matter and of symmetric nuclear matter are not sufficiently well constrained at present. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is conventionally expressed in the form of the slope parameter L describing the derivative with respect to density of the symmetry energy at saturation. Results deduced from nuclear structure and heavy-ion reaction data are distributed around a mean value L=60 MeV. Recent studies have more thoroughly investigated the density range that a particular observable is predominantly sensitive to. Two thirds of the saturation density is a value typical for the information contained in nuclear-structure data. Higher values exceeding saturation have been shown to be probed with meson production and collective ...

  19. EFFECT OF MOISTURE CONTENT AND PARTICLE SIZE ON BULK DENSITY, POROSITY, PARTICLE DENSITY AND COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION OF COIR PITH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.I.Neethi Manickam,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coir pith can be used as fuel in loose form or in briquettes. Bulk density, coefficient of friction, porosity and particle density affects densification and combustion of coir pith. The moisture content and particle size ranges were 10.1 to 60.2%w.b. and 0.098 to 0.925mm respectively. Porosity was varied from 0.623 to 0.862 and the particle density was varied from 0.939 to 0.605 gm/cc for the above ranges of moisture content and particle size. Bulk density was in the range of 0.097 to 0.341gm/cc. The coefficient of friction against mild steel was in the range of 0.5043 to 0.6332. Models were developed to find out bulk density, porosity, particle density and coefficient of friction for different moisture content and particle size.

  20. NGP A stars - density variation, kinematics and the total mass density of the disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knude, J.

    1997-11-01

    From an uvbyβ photometric survey of the north galactic pole where most A stars (A3-A9) above b=70°and brighter than B=11.5 were included we report the observed number density and age variation with z(pc). Stars between ~30 and 1300 pc are included. Our sample consists of 396 sharply defined main sequence/subgiant A stars following the Stroemgren - Crawford definition, no B, imA or F type stars are included, approximate color limits are 0.055-0.220 in (b-y)_0_. Proper motions from the PPM and CAMC catalogs are available for all stars implying U and V velocities. Radial velocities for a subsample (179 stars with b>75° and zentity but something like it is required for fitting the observations better than 10%. A consequence of the hump is that derivatives of the distribution display large variations. There seems to be significant differences between this distribution and the sum of four sech^2^s from the previous paragraph. W and U dispersions seem to have a constant ratio within the z range where we have both kinds of data. σ_U_ shows a homogeneous increase from ~20 to 45km/s within the completeness limit, with a 75pc independent binning, and to ~70km/s at 800pc. The complete U histogram may not be fitted with a single gaussian, three with different dispersions and mean values provide a reasonable fit. A more detailed binning shows dσ_U_/dz to change in a discontinous way at ~200pc. An application of the data might be a combination of the density and velocity data for a determination of the local, total disk density. But since velocity dispersions do obey some sort of age depence, the age - z variation turns out to be of importance and there is a very clear systematic trend of mean ages with z. The average age increases almost linearly to ~0.75Gyr, reached at 200pc, and then it stays constant within the completeness limit. On the average the younger A stars show a relative absence beyond 200pc implying that very different velocity dispersions might be seen on

  1. Fish stocking density impacts tank hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Lunger, Angela; Laursen, Jesper;

    2006-01-01

    hydrodynamics was established using in-tank-based Rhodamine WT fluorometry at a flow rate of 0.23 l s-1 (tank exchange rate of 1.9 h-1). With increasing numbers of animals, curvilinear relationships were observed for dispersion coefficients and tank mixing times. Stocking densities of 3, 6, 9 and 12 kg m-3......The effect of stocking density upon the hydrodynamics of a circular tank, configured in a recirculation system, was investigated. Red drums Sciaenops ocellatus of approximately 140 g wet weight, were stocked at five rates varying from 0 to 12 kg m-3. The impact of the presence of fish upon tank...

  2. Isogeometric shape optimization of magnetic density separators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang Manh, N.; Evgrafov, A.; Gravesen, J.; Lahaye, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The waste recycling industry increasingly relies on magnetic density separators. These devices generate an upward magnetic force in ferro-fluids allowing to separate the immersed particles according to their mass density. Recently a new separator design that significantly reduces the requir

  3. Crops Models for Varying Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry; Cavazzoni, James; Keas, Paul

    2001-01-01

    New variable environment Modified Energy Cascade (MEC) crop models were developed for all the Advanced Life Support (ALS) candidate crops and implemented in SIMULINK. The MEC models are based on the Volk, Bugbee, and Wheeler Energy Cascade (EC) model and are derived from more recent Top-Level Energy Cascade (TLEC) models. The MEC models simulate crop plant responses to day-to-day changes in photosynthetic photon flux, photoperiod, carbon dioxide level, temperature, and relative humidity. The original EC model allows changes in light energy but uses a less accurate linear approximation. The simulation outputs of the new MEC models for constant nominal environmental conditions are very similar to those of earlier EC models that use parameters produced by the TLEC models. There are a few differences. The new MEC models allow setting the time for seed emergence, have realistic exponential canopy growth, and have corrected harvest dates for potato and tomato. The new MEC models indicate that the maximum edible biomass per meter squared per day is produced at the maximum allowed carbon dioxide level, the nominal temperatures, and the maximum light input. Reducing the carbon dioxide level from the maximum to the minimum allowed in the model reduces crop production significantly. Increasing temperature decreases production more than it decreases the time to harvest, so productivity in edible biomass per meter squared per day is greater at nominal than maximum temperatures, The productivity in edible biomass per meter squared per day is greatest at the maximum light energy input allowed in the model, but the edible biomass produced per light energy input unit is lower than at nominal light levels. Reducing light levels increases light and power use efficiency. The MEC models suggest we can adjust the light energy day-to- day to accommodate power shortages or Lise excess power while monitoring and controlling edible biomass production.

  4. Effect of Heating on Turbulent Density Fluctuations and Noise Generation From High Speed Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Mielke, Amy F.; Eck, Dennis G.

    2004-01-01

    Heated jets in a wide range of temperature ratios (TR), and acoustic Mach numbers (Ma) were investigated experimentally using far field microphones and a molecular Rayleigh scattering technique. The latter provided density fluctuations measurements. Two sets of operating conditions were considered: (1) TR was varied between 0.84 and 2.7 while Ma was fixed at 0.9; (2) Ma was varied between 0.6 and 1.48, while TR was fixed at 2.27. The implementation of the molecular Rayleigh scattering technique required dust removal and usage of a hydrogen combustor to avoid soot particles. Time averaged density measurements in the first set of data showed differences in the peripheral density shear layers between the unheated and heated jets. The nozzle exit shear layer showed increased turbulence level with increased plume temperature. Nevertheless, further downstream the density fluctuations spectra are found to be nearly identical for all Mach number and temperature ratio conditions. To determine noise sources a correlation study between plume density fluctuations and far field sound pressure fluctuations was conducted. For all jets the core region beyond the end of the potential flow was found to be the strongest noise source. Except for an isothermal jet, the correlations did not differ significantly with increasing temperature ratio. The isothermal jet created little density fluctuations. Although the far field noise from this jet did not show any exceptional trend, the flow-sound correlations were very low. This indicated that the density fluctuations only acted as a "tracer parameter" for the noise sources.

  5. Ions in solution: density corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Sim, Eunji; Burke, Kieron

    2014-05-14

    Standard density functional approximations often give questionable results for odd-electron radical complexes, with the error typically attributed to self-interaction. In density corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT), certain classes of density functional theory calculations are significantly improved by using densities more accurate than the self-consistent densities. We discuss how to identify such cases, and how DC-DFT applies more generally. To illustrate, we calculate potential energy surfaces of HO·Cl(-) and HO·H2O complexes using various common approximate functionals, with and without this density correction. Commonly used approximations yield wrongly shaped surfaces and/or incorrect minima when calculated self consistently, while yielding almost identical shapes and minima when density corrected. This improvement is retained even in the presence of implicit solvent.

  6. Ions in solution: Density Corrected Density Functional Theory (DC-DFT)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Burke, Kieron

    2014-01-01

    Standard density functional approximations often give questionable results for odd-electron radical complexes, with the error typically attributed to self-interaction. In density corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT), certain classes of density functional theory calculations are significantly improved by using densities more accurate than the self-consistent densities. We discuss how to identify such cases, and how DC-DFT applies more generally. To illustrate, we calculate potential energy surfaces of HO$\\cdot$Cl$^-$ and HO$\\cdot$H$_2$O complexes using various common approximate functionals, with and without this density correction. Commonly used approximations yield wrongly shaped surfaces and/or incorrect minima when calculated self consistently, while yielding almost identical shapes and minima when density corrected. This improvement is retained even in the presence of implicit solvent.

  7. Development of a Passively Varying Pitch Propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, Stearns Beamon

    compared to the fixed pitch propellers currently used on most light aircraft and small unmanned systems, making significant improvements in aircraft performance possible. These improvements may yield aircraft with reduced takeoff distances, improved climb rates, increased range and endurance, and higher top speeds, without sacrificing on-design performance.

  8. Ensemble mean density and its connection to other microphysical properties of falling snow as observed in Southern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiira, Jussi; Moisseev, Dmitri N.; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Ori, Davide; Tokay, Ali; Bliven, Larry F.; Petersen, Walter

    2016-09-01

    In this study measurements collected during winters 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 at the University of Helsinki measurement station in Hyytiälä are used to investigate connections between ensemble mean snow density, particle fall velocity and parameters of the particle size distribution (PSD). The density of snow is derived from measurements of particle fall velocity and PSD, provided by a particle video imager, and weighing gauge measurements of precipitation rate. Validity of the retrieved density values is checked against snow depth measurements. A relation retrieved for the ensemble mean snow density and median volume diameter is in general agreement with previous studies, but it is observed to vary significantly from one winter to the other. From these observations, characteristic mass-dimensional relations of snow are retrieved. For snow rates more than 0.2 mm h-1, a correlation between the intercept parameter of normalized gamma PSD and median volume diameter was observed.

  9. Facilitation in Caribbean coral reefs: high densities of staghorn coral foster greater coral condition and reef fish composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Brittany E; Miller, Margaret W; Pausch, Rachel; Richter, Lee

    2017-05-01

    Recovery of the threatened staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis) is posited to play a key role in Caribbean reef resilience. At four Caribbean locations (including one restored and three extant populations), we quantified characteristics of contemporary staghorn coral across increasing conspecific densities, and investigated a hypothesis of facilitation between staghorn coral and reef fishes. High staghorn densities in the Dry Tortugas exhibited significantly less partial mortality, higher branch growth, and supported greater fish abundances compared to lower densities within the same population. In contrast, partial mortality, branch growth, and fish community composition did not vary with staghorn density at the three other study locations where staghorn densities were lower overall. This suggests that density-dependent effects between the coral and fish community may only manifest at high staghorn densities. We then evaluated one facilitative mechanism for such density-dependence, whereby abundant fishes sheltering in dense staghorn aggregations deliver nutrients back to the coral, fueling faster coral growth, thereby creating more fish habitat. Indeed, dense staghorn aggregations within the Dry Tortugas exhibited significantly higher growth rates, tissue nitrogen, and zooxanthellae densities than sparse aggregations. Similarly, higher tissue nitrogen was induced in a macroalgae bioassay outplanted into the same dense and sparse aggregations, confirming greater bioavailability of nutrients at high staghorn densities. Our findings inform staghorn restoration efforts, suggesting that the most effective targets may be higher coral densities than previously thought. These coral-dense aggregations may reap the benefits of positive facilitation between the staghorn and fish community, favoring the growth and survivorship of this threatened species.

  10. Public Health Significance of Neuroticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2009-01-01

    The personality trait of neuroticism refers to relatively stable tendencies to respond with negative emotions to threat, frustration, or loss. Individuals in the population vary markedly on this trait, ranging from frequent and intense emotional reactions to minor challenges to little emotional reaction even in the face of significant…

  11. TESTS FOR VARIANCE COMPONENTS IN VARYING COEFFICIENT MIXED MODELS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaixing Li; Yuedong Wang; Ping Wu; Wangli Xu; Lixing Zhu

    2012-01-01

    .... To address the question of whether a varying coefficient mixed model can be reduced to a simpler varying coefficient model, we develop one-sided tests for the null hypothesis that all the variance components are zero...

  12. Premorbid IQ varies across different definitions of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urfer Parnas, Annick; Jansson, Lennart; Handest, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the association between IQ and schizophrenia is still unclear. So far no study addressed this issue in relation to the breadth or scope of the very concept of schizophrenia. We examined the premorbid IQ in a polydiagnostic study with four classifications of schizophrenia: ICD-8/9, ICD......-10, St. Louis and Flexible System-Wide. Only the ICD-10 schizophrenia patients exhibited a significantly lower premorbid IQ. There were suggestive differences between the four examined systems as well as between the ICD-10 paranoid and non-paranoid subtypes. Exploration of crucial diagnostic features...... of schizophrenia in relation to IQ revealed associations between low premorbid IQ and hallucinations as well as negative symptoms. It is concluded that premorbid IQ varies across different definitions of schizophrenia....

  13. Conditional CAPM: Time-varying Betas in the Brazilian Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Fischberg Blank

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The conditional CAPM is characterized by time-varying market beta. Based on state-space models approach, beta behavior can be modeled as a stochastic process dependent on conditioning variables related to business cycle and estimated using Kalman filter. This paper studies alternative models for portfolios sorted by size and book-to-market ratio in the Brazilian stock market and compares their adjustment to data. Asset pricing tests based on time-series and cross-sectional approaches are also implemented. A random walk process combined with conditioning variables is the preferred model, reducing pricing errors compared to unconditional CAPM, but the errors are still significant. Cross-sectional test show that book-to-market ratio becomes less relevant, but past returns still capture cross-section variation

  14. Time-varying risk aversion. An application to energy hedging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotter, John [Centre for Financial Markets, School of Business, University College Dublin, Blackrock, Co. Dublin (Ireland); Hanly, Jim [School of Accounting and Finance, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-03-15

    Risk aversion is a key element of utility maximizing hedge strategies; however, it has typically been assigned an arbitrary value in the literature. This paper instead applies a GARCH-in-Mean (GARCH-M) model to estimate a time-varying measure of risk aversion that is based on the observed risk preferences of energy hedging market participants. The resulting estimates are applied to derive explicit risk aversion based optimal hedge strategies for both short and long hedgers. Out-of-sample results are also presented based on a unique approach that allows us to forecast risk aversion, thereby estimating hedge strategies that address the potential future needs of energy hedgers. We find that the risk aversion based hedges differ significantly from simpler OLS hedges. When implemented in-sample, risk aversion hedges for short hedgers outperform the OLS hedge ratio in a utility based comparison. (author)

  15. Acute phase response to surgery of varying intensity in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Nielsen, Jon Vedding; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postoperative inflammatory response of horses to elective surgery of varying intensity. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study. ANIMALS: Horses referred to 2 hospitals for either arthroscopic removal of a unilateral osteochondritic lesion in the tibiotarsal joint...... (minimal surgical trauma, n=11), correction of recurrent laryngeal neuropathy by laryngoplasty and ventriculectomy (intermediate surgical trauma, n=10) or removal of an ovarian tumor by laparotomy (major surgical trauma, n=5). METHODS: Horses had a thorough clinical examination every day. White blood cell....... RESULTS: Postoperative concentrations of SAA and fibrinogen were significantly higher in horses that had laparotomy and ovariectomy than in horses that had laryngoplasty and ventriculectomy, or arthroscopy. Iron concentrations decreased to lower levels after intermediate and major surgical trauma than...

  16. Caloric density of Loricariichthys platymetopon (Osteichthyes, Loricariidae in the Upper Paraná River floodplain, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida Garcia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the muscle energy content (caloric density of L. platymetopon captured at different sites of the Upper Paraná River floodplain, and potential relationships between the content and various environmental variables (water temperature, oxygen dissolved in water, food availability, relative numeric abundance and biological variables (body size and reproductive cycle. Quarterly samplings from September 2006 to June 2007 in the lakes and rivers resulted in a sample of 739 specimens, whose muscle caloric density was determined using a calorimeter. Differences between the caloric averages of the males and females and among the different stages of gonadal development were not significant. Caloric density varied over time and space, with two seasonal variation trends. The intensity of the correlation between the caloric density and each environmental variable, as well as the type of correlation, varied according to the sampled site. Body size and reproductive cycle were not correlated with caloric density.Este estudo analisou o conteúdo de energia (densidade calórica de L. platymetopon capturados em diferentes locais da planície alagável do Alto Rio Paraná, e potenciais relações entre este conteúdo e várias variáveis ambientais (temperatura da água, oxigênio dissolvido na água, disponibilidade de alimento, abundância relativa numérica e variáveis biológicas (tamanho corpóreo e ciclo reprodutivo. Coletas trimestrais, de setembro/2006 a junho/2007, em lagos e rios, resultaram em uma amostra de 739 espécimes, cuja densidade calórica muscular foi determinada através de calorímetro. Diferenças entre as médias calóricas de machos e fêmeas e entre os estádios de desenvolvimento gonadal não foram significativas Densidade calórica variou sazonal e espacialmente, com duas tendências de variação sazonal. A intensidade da correlação entre densidade calórica e cada variável e cada variável ambiental, assim como

  17. Comparison of Linear Microinstability Calculations of Varying Input Realism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Rewoldt

    2003-09-08

    The effect of varying ''input realism'' or varying completeness of the input data for linear microinstability calculations, in particular on the critical value of the ion temperature gradient for the ion temperature gradient mode, is investigated using gyrokinetic and gyrofluid approaches. The calculations show that varying input realism can have a substantial quantitative effect on the results.

  18. Reduced vertebral bone density in hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietschmann, F.; Breslau, N. A.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and single-photon absorptiometry were used to determine bone density at the lumbar spine and radial shaft in 62 patients with absorptive hypercalciuria, 27 patients with fasting hypercalciuria, and 31 nonhypercalciuric stone formers. Lumbar bone density was significantly lower in patients with absorptive (-10%) as well as in those with fasting hypercalciuria (-12%), with 74 and 92% of patients displaying values below the normal mean, whereas only 48% of the nonhypercalciuric stone formers had bone density values below the normal mean. In contrast, radial bone density was similar in all three groups of renal stone formers investigated. The comparison of urinary chemistry in patients with absorptive hypercalciuria and low normal bone density compared to those with high normal bone density showed a significantly increased 24 h urinary calcium excretion on random diet and a trend toward a higher 24 h urinary uric acid excretion and a higher body mass index in patients with low normal bone density. Moreover, among the patients with absorptive hypercalciuria we found a statistically significant correlation between the spinal bone density and the 24 h sodium and sulfate excretion and the urinary pH. These results gave evidence for an additional role of environmental factors (sodium and animal proteins) in the pathogenesis of bone loss in absorptive hypercalciuria. In conclusion, our data suggest an osteopenia of trabecular-rich bone tissues in patients with fasting and absorptive hypercalciurias.

  19. Intrinsic-Density Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, J

    2006-01-01

    The Hohenberg-Kohn theorem and Kohn-Sham procedure are extended to functionals of the localized intrinsic density of a self-bound system such as a nucleus. After defining the intrinsic-density functional, we modify the usual Kohn-Sham procedure slightly to evaluate the mean-field approximation to the functional, and carefully describe the construction of the leading corrections for a system of fermions in one dimension with a spin-degeneracy equal to the number of particles N. Despite the fact that the corrections are complicated and nonlocal, we are able to construct a local Skyrme-like intrinsic-density functional that, while different from the exact functional, shares with it a minimum value equal to the exact ground-state energy at the exact ground-state intrinsic density, to next-to-leading order in 1/N. We briefly discuss implications for real Skyrme functionals.

  20. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures. Peripheral DEXA ( ...

  1. 西藏拉萨地体冈底斯岩基紫苏花岗岩中的高密度CO2包裹体成因及其地质意义%Origin and geological significance of high-density CO2 fluid inclusions in Charnockites from the Gangdese batholith, Lhasa terrane, southern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈昆; 张泽明; Santosh M; 董昕

    2012-01-01

    Charnockits, occurring as intrusive rocks in the Gangdese batholith in the southeastern Lhasa terrane, are characterized by the presence of dry mineral assemblage. The anhydrous conditions required for the formation of charnockites are thought to be controlled by the lowering of water activity through the influx of CO2 -- bearing fluids. Through petrographic, microthermometric studies and Raman analysis of CO2- rich fluid inclusions in the eharnockite samples from the Gangdese batholith, we have characterized the composition and density of the fluids during the crystallization of the charnockites. Our results indicate that the carbonic fluid inclusions were trapped during the crystallization of the charnockites and its isochores pass through the P T conditions around 850 ℃ -950 ℃ and 0.75- 1.0 GPa as estimated by mineral thermobarometry data. High-density carbonic fluid inclusions (up to 1.14 g/cm^3 ) in quartz provide potential evidence for the involvement of CO2 -- rich fluid during granulite facies metamorphism in the Lhasa terrane. Occurrence of CO2 --rich inclusions and elevated P--T conditions open up the possibility favoring the mechanism of vapour-deficient dehydration melting accompanied by CO2 infiltration to account for charnockite formation in the ocean ridge subduction process.%产于西藏拉萨地体东南部冈底斯岩基中的紫苏花岗岩侵入体具有低水活度的矿物组合,富含CO2流体包裹体.形成紫苏花岗岩所需要的低水活度条件主要是受到含CO2流体带入的控制.通过对产于冈底斯岩基紫苏花岗岩中CO2流体包裹体的岩相学观察、显微测温和激光拉曼光谱分析,确定了其组成和密度.结果表明碳质(CO2)流体包裹体是在紫苏花岗岩结晶过程中捕获的,其等容线通过了由矿物温压计估算的P-T条件(850℃~950℃,0.75~1.0GPa),随后经历了短期近等压降温作用和地体快速隆起的影响.石英中的高密度碳质流体

  2. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 1. Statistical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    Full Text Available Forty-five months of continuous spacecraft potential measurements from the Polar satellite are used to study the average electron density in the magnetosphere and its dependence on geomagnetic activity and season. These measurements offer a straightforward, passive method for monitoring the total electron density in the magnetosphere, with high time resolution and a density range that covers many orders of magnitude. Within its polar orbit with geocentric perigee and apogee of 1.8 and 9.0 RE, respectively, Polar encounters a number of key plasma regions of the magnetosphere, such as the polar cap, cusp, plasmapause, and auroral zone that are clearly identified in the statistical averages presented here. The polar cap density behaves quite systematically with season. At low distance (~2 RE, the density is an order of magnitude higher in summer than in winter; at high distance (>4 RE, the variation is somewhat smaller. Along a magnetic field line the density declines between these two altitudes by a factor of 10–20 in winter and by a factor of 200–1000 in summer. A likely explanation for the large gradient in the summer is a high density of heavy ions that are gravitationally bound in the low-altitude polar cap. The geomagnetic effects are also significant in the polar cap, with the average density being an order of magnitude larger for high Kp; for an individual case, the polar cap density may increase even more dramatically. The plasma density in the cusp is controlled primarily by the solar wind variables, but nevertheless, they can be characterized to some extent in terms of the Kp index. We also investigate the local time variation of the average density at the geosynchronous distance that appears to be in accordance with previous geostationary observations. The average density decreases with increasing Kp at all MLT sectors

  3. The local mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeder, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    An improved mass-luminosity relation for faint main-sequence stars derived from recently revised masses for some faint double stars is presented. The total local mass density is increased to nearly 0.2 solar masses per cu pc. This estimate is as large as the mass density required by Oort's (1965) dynamical analysis of stellar motions perpendicular to the galactic plane if the mass is concentrated in a narrow layer.

  4. Mode resolved density of atmospheric aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Aalto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the mode resolved density of ultrafine atmospheric particles measured in boreal forest environment. The method used here enables us to find the distinct density information for each mode in atmospheric fine particle population: the density values for nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation mode particles are presented. The experimental data was gained during 2 May 2005–19 May 2005 at the boreal forest measurement station "SMEAR II" in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The density values for accumulation mode varied from 1.1 to 2 g/cm3 (average 1.5 g/cm3 and for Aitken mode from 0.4 to 2 g/cm3 (average 0.97 g/cm3. As an overall trend during the two weeks campaign, the density value of Aitken mode was seen to gradually increase. With the present method, the time dependent behaviour of the particle density can be investigated in the time scale of 10 min. This allows us to follow the density evolution of the nucleation mode particles during the particle growth process following the nucleation burst. The density of nucleation mode particles decreased during the growth process. The density values for 15 nm particles were 1.2–1.5 g/cm3 and for grown 30 nm particles 0.5–1 g/cm3. These values are consistent with the present knowledge that the condensing species are semi-volatile organics, emitted from the boreal forest.

  5. Using time-varying global sensitivity analysis to understand the importance of different uncertainty sources in hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianosi, Francesca; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Simulations from environmental models are affected by potentially large uncertainties stemming from various sources, including model parameters and observational uncertainty in the input/output data. Understanding the relative importance of such sources of uncertainty is essential to support model calibration, validation and diagnostic evaluation, and to prioritize efforts for uncertainty reduction. Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) provides the theoretical framework and the numerical tools to gain this understanding. However, in traditional applications of GSA, model outputs are an aggregation of the full set of simulated variables. This aggregation of propagated uncertainties prior to GSA may lead to a significant loss of information and may cover up local behaviour that could be of great interest. In this work, we propose a time-varying version of a recently developed density-based GSA method, called PAWN, as a viable option to reduce this loss of information. We apply our approach to a medium-complexity hydrological model in order to address two questions: [1] Can we distinguish between the relative importance of parameter uncertainty versus data uncertainty in time? [2] Do these influences change in catchments with different characteristics? The results present the first quantitative investigation on the relative importance of parameter and data uncertainty across time. They also provide a demonstration of the value of time-varying GSA to investigate the propagation of uncertainty through numerical models and therefore guide additional data collection needs and model calibration/assessment.

  6. Water structure near single and multi-layer nanoscopic hydrophobic plates of varying separation and interaction potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malay Rana; Amalendu Chandra

    2008-06-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of water containing two nanoscopic hydrophobic plates to investigate the modifications of the density and hydrogen bond distributions of water in the vicinity of the surfaces. Our primary goal is to look at the effects of plate thickness, solute–solvent interaction and also interplate separation on the solvent structure in the confined region between two graphite-like plates and also near the outer surfaces of the plates. The thickness of the plates is varied by considering single and triple-layer graphite plates and the interaction potential is varied by tuning the attractive strength of the 12–6 pair interaction potential between a carbon atom of the graphite plates and a water molecule. The calculations are done for four different values of the tuning parameter ranging from fully Lennard–Jones to pure repulsive pair interactions. It is found that both the solvation characteristics and hydrogen bond distributions can depend rather strongly on the strength of the attractive part of the solute–water interaction potential. The thickness of the plates, however, is found to have only minor effects on the density profiles and hydrogen bond network. This indicates that the long range electrostatic interactions between water molecules on the two opposite sides of the same plate do not make any significant contribution to the overall solvation structure of these hydrophobic plates. The solvation characteristics are primarily determined by the balance between the loss of energy due to hydrogen bond network disruption, cavity repulsion potential and offset of the same by attractive component of the solute–water interactions. Our studies with different system sizes show that the essential features of solvation properties, e.g. wetting and dewetting characteristics for different interplate separations and interaction potentials, are also present in relatively smaller systems consisting of a few hundred

  7. Time Frequency Features of Rotor Systems with Slowly Varying Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the analytic method and numerical method respectively, the asymptotic solutions and finite element model of rotor system with single slowly varying mass is obtained to investigate the time frequency features of such rotor system; furthermore, with given model of slowly varying mass, the rotor system with dual slowly varying mass is studied. For the first order approximate solution is used, there exists difference between the results with analytic method and numerical method. On the base of common characteristics of rotor system with dual slowly varying mass, the general rules and formula describing the frequency distribution of rotor system with multiple slowly varying mass are proposed.

  8. Core-crust transition properties of neutron stars within systematically varied extended relativistic mean-field model

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaksono, A; Agrawal, B K

    2014-01-01

    The model dependence and the symmetry energy dependence of the core-crust transition properties for the neutron stars are studied using three different families of systematically varied extended relativistic mean field model. Several forces within each of the families are so considered that they yield wide variations in the values of the nuclear symmetry energy $a_{\\rm sym}$ and its slope parameter $L$ at the saturation density. The core-crust transition density is calculated using a method based on random-phase-approximation. The core-crust transition density is strongly correlated, in a model independent manner, with the symmetry energy slope parameter evaluated at the saturation density. The pressure at the transition point dose not show any meaningful correlations with the symmetry energy parameters at the saturation density. At best, pressure at the transition point is correlated with the symmetry energy parameters and their linear combination evaluated at the some sub-saturation density. Yet, such corre...

  9. Varying Levels of Automation on UAS Operator Responses to Traffic Resolution Advisories in Civil Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Caitlin; Fern, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Continuing demand for the use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) has put increasing pressure on operations in civil airspace. The need to fly UAS in the National Airspace System (NAS) in order to perform missions vital to national security and defense, emergency management, and science is increasing at a rapid pace. In order to ensure safe operations in the NAS, operators of unmanned aircraft, like those of manned aircraft, may be required to maintain separation assurance and avoid loss of separation with other aircraft while performing their mission tasks. This experiment investigated the effects of varying levels of automation on UAS operator performance and workload while responding to conflict resolution instructions provided by the Tactical Collision Avoidance System II (TCAS II) during a UAS mission in high-density airspace. The purpose of this study was not to investigate the safety of using TCAS II on UAS, but rather to examine the effect of automation on the ability of operators to respond to traffic collision alerts. Six licensed pilots were recruited to act as UAS operators for this study. Operators were instructed to follow a specified mission flight path, while maintaining radio contact with Air Traffic Control and responding to TCAS II resolution advisories. Operators flew four, 45 minute, experimental missions with four different levels of automation: Manual, Knobs, Management by Exception, and Fully Automated. All missions included TCAS II Resolution Advisories (RAs) that required operator attention and rerouting. Operator compliance and reaction time to RAs was measured, and post-run NASA-TLX ratings were collected to measure workload. Results showed significantly higher compliance rates, faster responses to TCAS II alerts, as well as less preemptive operator actions when higher levels of automation are implemented. Physical and Temporal ratings of workload were significantly higher in the Manual condition than in the Management by Exception and

  10. Tulip-poplar leaf diffusion resistance calculated from stomatal dimensions and varying environmental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConathy, R.K.

    1983-03-01

    The study describes the gradients of stomatal size and density in the crown of a mature forest-grown tulip-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) in eastern Tennessee. These data are used to predict leaf resistance to vapor diffusion in relation to stomatal width and boundary layer resistance. Stomatal density on individual leaves did not vary, but density increased with increasing crown height. Stomatal size decreased with increasing height of leaves within the crown. Stomatal size and density variations interacted to result in a constant number of stomata per leaf at all crown heights. Stomatal diffusive resistance values calculated from stomatal measurements and varying environmental parameters indicated that stomatal resistance controlled transpiration water losses only at small apertures (<0.6 ..mu..m). Boundary layer resistance was controlling at large stomatal apertures (>0.6 ..mu..m) and at low wind speeds (approx.100 cm/s). Under normal forest conditions tulip-poplar stomatal resistance exercised more control over transpiration than did boundary layer resistance.

  11. Modeling density segregation in granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Lueptow, Richard; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A recently developed continuum-based model accurately predicts segregation in flows of granular mixtures varying in particle size by considering the interplay of advection, diffusion and segregation. In this research, we extend the domain of the model to include density driven segregation. Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-2D bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density driven segregation velocity on local shear rate, particle concentration, and a segregation length which scales with the particle size and the logarithm of the density ratio. With these inputs, the model yields theoretical predictions of density segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios (1.11-3.33) and flow rates (19.2-113.6 cm3/s). Matching experiments with various combinations of glass, steel and ceramic particles were also performed which reproduced the segregation patterns obtained in both the simulations and the theory.

  12. Gastric siderosis: patterns and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marginean, Esmeralda C; Bennick, Michael; Cyczk, Jan; Robert, Marie E; Jain, Dhanpat

    2006-04-01

    Recently, we encountered 2 cases of diffuse iron deposition in gastric antral and fundic glandular epithelium, which in 1 patient eventually led to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Gastric mucosal siderosis (GS) has previously been described in hemochromatosis patients, alcoholics, and in association with iron medications. However, the prevalence of various patterns of iron deposition in the gastric mucosa and their clinical significance have not been studied in detail. The 2 index cases mentioned above and 500 additional consecutive gastric biopsies examined over a period of 8 months at our institution were stained for iron by the Prussian blue method. In addition, all patients with genetic hemochromatosis diagnosed by liver biopsy in our department between 1998 and 2003 who also had gastric biopsies were identified from the surgical pathology files and included in the study (n = 3). The location of iron deposition [stromal cells (endothelium, fibroblasts, macrophages), glandular epithelium, or extracellular] was recorded and subjectively graded as 1+ to 3+ according to the severity of deposition within the mucosa. Relevant histologic changes (inflammation, presence of H. pylori, ulceration) and clinical features were reviewed. Three patterns of GS were identified: A) "nonspecific GS" with predominant iron deposition in the stromal cells including macrophages, and focally in epithelium; B) "iron-pill gastritis" with often mild gastritis and reactive gastropathy type changes, and mostly extracellular deposition with focal stromal cells and epithelial deposition; and C) predominant deposition in antral and fundic glandular epithelium. Of the 500 cases studied, a total of 18 (3.6%) cases were found to have GS. Of these 18 cases, 11 (2.2%) showed pattern A, 4 (0.8%) showed pattern B, and 3 (0.6%) showed pattern C. The GS in patterns A and B was always focal or patchy (1+ to 2+), whereas in pattern C it was generally diffuse and strong (2+ to 3+). A history of oral

  13. Holographic cinematography of time-varying reflecting and time-varying phase objects using a Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a Nd:YAG laser to record holographic motion pictures of time-varying reflecting objects and time-varying phase objects is discussed. Sample frames from both types of holographic motion pictures are presented. The holographic system discussed is intended for three-dimensional flow visualization of the time-varying flows that occur in jet-engine components.

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kyle, Robert A; Vincent Rajkumar, S

    2006-01-01

    Summary Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the natural history, pathogenesis, mechanisms of progression and prognosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS...

  15. Mass density at geostationary orbit and apparent mass refilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, R. E.; Takahashi, Kazue; Amoh, Justice; Singer, H. J.

    2016-04-01

    We used the inferred equatorial mass density ρm,eq based on measurements of Alfvén wave frequencies measured by the GOES satellites during 1980-1991 in order to construct a number of different models of varying complexity for the equatorial mass density at geostationary orbit. The most complicated models are able to account for 66% of the variance with a typical variation from actual values of a factor of 1.56. The factors that influenced ρm,eq in the models were, in order of decreasing importance, the F10.7 EUV index, magnetic local time, the solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn, the phase of the year, and the solar wind BZ (GSM Z direction). During some intervals, some of which were especially geomagnetically quiet, ρm,eq rose to values that were significantly higher than those predicted by our models. For 10 especially quiet intervals, we examined long-term (>1 day) apparent refilling, the increase in ρm,eq at a fixed location. We found that the behavior of ρm,eq varies for different events. In some cases, there is significant apparent refilling, whereas in other cases ρm,eq stays the same or even decreases slightly. Nevertheless, we showed that on average, ρm,eq increases exponentially during quiet intervals. There is variation of apparent refilling with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. On the third day of apparent refilling, ρm,eq has on average a similar value at solar maximum or solar minimum, but at solar maximum, ρm,eq begins with a larger value and rises relatively less than at solar minimum.

  16. Ice sheet growth with laterally varying bedrock relaxation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Vizcaino Rubio, Pablo; De Boer, Bas; van de Wal, Roderik

    2017-04-01

    Isostatic response of the bedrock, or glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) in included in most ice sheet models. This is important because the surface elevation determines the mass balance and thereby implicitly also the strength of the mass balance feedback where higher surface elevation yields lower temperatures implying less melt and vice versa. Usually a single relaxation time or a set of relaxation times is used to model the response everywhere on Earth or at least for an entire ice sheet. In reality the viscosity in the Earth's mantle, and hence the relaxation time experienced by the ice, varies with location. Seismic studies indicate that several regions that were covered by ice during the last glacial cycle are underlain by mantle in which viscosity varies with orders of magnitude, such as Antarctica and North America. The question is whether such a variation of viscosity influences ice evolution. Several GIA models exist that can deal with 3D viscosity, but their large computation times make it nearly impossible to couple them to ice sheet models. Here we use the ANICE ice-sheet model (de Boer et al. 2013) with a simple bedrock-relaxation model in which a different relaxation time is used for separate regions. A temperature anomaly is applied to grow a schematic ice sheet on a flat earth, with other forcing mechanisms neglected. It is shown that in locations with a fast relaxation time of 300 years the equilibrium ice sheet is significantly thinner and narrower but also ice thickness in neighbouring regions (with the more standard relaxation time of 3000 years) is affected.

  17. The density limit in JET diverted plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.J.; Clement, S.; Gottardi, N.; Gowers, C.; Harbour, P.; Loarte, A.; Horton, L.; Lingertat, J.; Lowry, C.G.; Saibene, G.; Stamp, M.; Stork, D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Monk, R. [Royal Holloway Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1994-07-01

    In JET limiter plasmas the density limit is associated with radiated power fractions of 100% and, in plasmas with carbon limiters, it is invariably disruptive. However, in discharges with solid beryllium limiters the limit is identified with the formation of a MARFE and disruptions are less frequent. In addition, the improved conditioning of the vessel arising from the use of beryllium has significantly improved the density limit scaling, so that the maximum density rises with the square root of the input power. In diverted plasmas several confinement regimes exist, making the characterization of the density limit more complex. While the density limit in L-mode plasmas is generally disruptive, the limit in ELMy and ELM-free H-modes generally prompts a return to the L-mode and a disruption is not inevitable. The density limit does rise with the increasing power, but the L-to-H transition complicates the analysis. Nevertheless, at low plasma currents (<2 MA), densities significantly above the Greenwald limit can be achieved, while at higher currents power handling limitations have constrained the range of density which can be achieved. (authors). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  18. High Density Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone J.R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been the subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has led to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. There remains great uncertainty in these models which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfil basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics. In this contribution latest developments in construction of the Equation of State (EoS of high-density matter at zero and finite temperature assuming different composition of matter will be discussed. Critical comparison of model EoS with available experimental data from heavy ion collisions and observations on neutron stars, including gravitational mass, radii and cooling patterns and data on X-ray burst sources and low mass X-ray binaries are made. Fundamental differences between the EoS of low-density, high temperature matter, such as is created in heavy ion collisions and of high-density, low temperature compact objects is discussed.

  19. Spatial mapping of humeral head bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidousti, Hamidreza; Giles, Joshua W; Emery, Roger J H; Jeffers, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Short-stem humeral replacements achieve fixation by anchoring to the metaphyseal trabecular bone. Fixing the implant in high-density bone can provide strong fixation and reduce the risk of loosening. However, there is a lack of data mapping the bone density distribution in the proximal humerus. The aim of the study was to investigate the bone density in proximal humerus. Eight computed tomography scans of healthy cadaveric humeri were used to map bone density distribution in the humeral head. The proximal humeral head was divided into 12 slices parallel to the humeral anatomic neck. Each slice was then divided into 4 concentric circles. The slices below the anatomic neck, where short-stem implants have their fixation features, were further divided into radial sectors. The average bone density for each of these regions was calculated, and regions of interest were compared using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance set at P density was found to decrease from proximal to distal regions, with the majority of higher bone density proximal to the anatomic neck of the humerus (P density increases from central to peripheral regions, where cortical bone eventually occupies the space (P density distribution in the medial calcar region was also observed. This study indicates that it is advantageous with respect to implant fixation to preserve some bone above the anatomic neck and epiphyseal plate and to use the denser bone at the periphery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Smart density: a more accurate method of measuring rural residential density for health-related research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Lucinda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies involving the built environment have typically relied on US Census data to measure residential density. However, census geographic units are often unsuited to health-related research, especially in rural areas where development is clustered and discontinuous. Objective We evaluated the accuracy of both standard census methods and alternative GIS-based methods to measure rural density. Methods We compared residential density (units/acre in 335 Vermont school neighborhoods using conventional census geographic units (tract, block group and block with two GIS buffer measures: a 1-kilometer (km circle around the school and a 1-km circle intersected with a 100-meter (m road-network buffer. The accuracy of each method was validated against the actual residential density for each neighborhood based on the Vermont e911 database, which provides an exact geo-location for all residential structures in the state. Results Standard census measures underestimate residential density in rural areas. In addition, the degree of error is inconsistent so even the relative rank of neighborhood densities varies across census measures. Census measures explain only 61% to 66% of the variation in actual residential density. In contrast, GIS buffer measures explain approximately 90% of the variation. Combining a 1-km circle with a road-network buffer provides the closest approximation of actual residential density. Conclusion Residential density based on census units can mask clusters of development in rural areas and distort associations between residential density and health-related behaviors and outcomes. GIS-defined buffers, including a 1-km circle and a road-network buffer, can be used in conjunction with census data to obtain a more accurate measure of residential density.

  1. Glycaemic response to barley porridge varying in dietary fibre content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thondre, Pariyarath S; Wang, Ke; Rosenthal, Andrew J; Henry, Christiani J K

    2012-03-01

    The interest in barley as a food is increasing worldwide because of its high dietary fibre (DF) content and low glycaemic index (GI). DF in cereals may prove beneficial in improving blood glucose response in the long term. However, a dose-dependent effect of insoluble fibre on reducing postprandial blood glucose levels is yet to be proven. The objective of the present study was to determine the glycaemic response to two barley porridges prepared from whole barley grains varying in fibre content. In two separate non-blind randomised crossover trials, ten human subjects consumed barley porridge with 16 g/100 g and 10 g/100 g fibre content provided in different serving sizes (equivalent to 25 and 50 g available carbohydrate). The glycaemic response to both barley porridges was significantly lower than the reference glucose (P porridges. We concluded that irrespective of the difference in total fibre content or serving size of barley porridges, their GI values did not differ significantly.

  2. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabra I Djomehri

    Full Text Available Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca to phosphorus (P and Ca to zinc (Zn elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc. A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49, hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46, cementum (1.51, and bone (1.68 were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765 and in cementum (595-990, highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  3. Field line distribution of density at L=4.8 inferred from observations by CLUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schäfer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available For two events observed by the CLUSTER spacecraft, the field line distribution of mass density ρ was inferred from Alfvén wave harmonic frequencies and compared to the electron density ne from plasma wave data and the oxygen density nO+ from the ion composition experiment. In one case, the average ion mass M≈ρ/ne was about 5 amu (28 October 2002, while in the other it was about 3 amu (10 September 2002. Both events occurred when the CLUSTER 1 (C1 spacecraft was in the plasmatrough. Nevertheless, the electron density ne was significantly lower for the first event (ne=8 cm−3 than for the second event (ne=22 cm−3, and this seems to be the main difference leading to a different value of M. For the first event (28 October 2002, we were able to measure the Alfvén wave frequencies for eight harmonics with unprecedented precision, so that the error in the inferred mass density is probably dominated by factors other than the uncertainty in frequency (e.g., magnetic field model and theoretical wave equation. This field line distribution (at L=4.8 was very flat for magnetic latitude |MLAT|≲20° but very steeply increasing with respect to |MLAT| for |MLAT|≳40°. The total variation in ρ was about four orders of magnitude, with values at large |MLAT| roughly consistent with ionospheric values. For the second event (10 September 2002, there was a small local maximum in mass density near the magnetic equator. The inferred mass density decreases to a minimum 23% lower than the equatorial value at |MLAT|=15.5°, and then steeply increases as one moves along the field line toward the ionosphere. For this event we were also able to examine the spatial dependence of the electron density using measurements of ne from all four CLUSTER spacecraft. Our analysis indicates that the density varies with L at L~5 roughly like L−4, and that ne is also locally peaked at the magnetic equator, but with a smaller peak. The value of ne reaches a density minimum

  4. He 2++ molecular ion in a strong time-dependent magnetic field: a current-density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas

    2011-08-01

    The He 2++ molecular ion exposed to a strong ultrashort time-dependent (TD) magnetic field of the order of 10(9) G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and current-density functional theory (CDFT) based approach using vector exchange-correlation (XC) potential and energy density functional that depend not only on the electronic charge-density but also on the current density. The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed in a parallel internuclear-axis and magnetic field-axis configuration at the field-free equilibrium internuclear separation R = 1.3 au with the field-strength varying between 0 and 10(11) G. The TD behavior of the exchange- and correlation energy of the He 2++ is analyzed and compared with that obtained using a [B-TD-QFD-density functional theory (DFT)] approach based on the conventional TD-DFT under similar computational constraints but using only scalar XC potential and energy density functional dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The CDFT based approach yields TD exchange- and correlation energy and TD electronic charge-density significantly different from that obtained using the conventional TD-DFT based approach, particularly, at typical magnetic field strengths and during a typical time period of the TD field. This peculiar behavior of the CDFT-based approach is traced to the TD current-density dependent vector XC potential, which can induce nonadiabatic effects causing retardation of the oscillating electronic charge density. Such dissipative electron dynamics of the He 2++ molecular ion is elucidated by treating electronic charge density as an electron-"fluid" in the terminology of QFD.

  5. Nuclear level density predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucurescu Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple formulas depending only on nuclear masses were previously proposed for the parameters of the Back-Shifted Fermi Gas (BSFG model and of the Constant Temperature (CT model of the nuclear level density, respectively. They are now applied for the prediction of the level density parameters of all nuclei with available masses. Both masses from the new 2012 mass table and from different models are considered and the predictions are discussed in connection with nuclear regions most affected by shell corrections and nuclear structure effects and relevant for the nucleosynthesis.

  6. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, William D; W. Dale Plummer Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventio...

  7. Holographic Magnetisation Density Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2016-01-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically $AdS$ black brane solutions of $D=4$ Einstein theory coupled to a scalar and two $U(1)$ gauge fields. The solutions are holographically dual to $d=3$ CFTs in a constant external magnetic field along one of the $U(1)$'s. Below a critical temperature the system's magnetisation density becomes inhomogeneous, leading to spontaneous formation of current density waves. We find that the transition can be of second order and that the solutions which minimise the free energy locally in the parameter space of solutions have averaged stressed tensor of a perfect fluid.

  8. Polarizable Density Embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Steinmann, Casper; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We present a new QM/QM/MM-based model for calculating molecular properties and excited states of solute-solvent systems. We denote this new approach the polarizable density embedding (PDE) model and it represents an extension of our previously developed polarizable embedding (PE) strategy. The PDE...... model is a focused computational approach in which a core region of the system studied is represented by a quantum-chemical method, whereas the environment is divided into two other regions: an inner and an outer region. Molecules belonging to the inner region are described by their exact densities...

  9. Holographic charge density waves

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2013-01-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with non-zero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  10. Holographic charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  11. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  12. Gap and density theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Levinson, N

    1940-01-01

    A typical gap theorem of the type discussed in the book deals with a set of exponential functions { \\{e^{{{i\\lambda}_n} x}\\} } on an interval of the real line and explores the conditions under which this set generates the entire L_2 space on this interval. A typical gap theorem deals with functions f on the real line such that many Fourier coefficients of f vanish. The main goal of this book is to investigate relations between density and gap theorems and to study various cases where these theorems hold. The author also shows that density- and gap-type theorems are related to various propertie

  13. Stochastic Modeling and Power Control of Time-Varying Wireless Communication Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Charalambous, Prof. Charalambos [University of Cyprus

    2014-01-01

    Wireless networks are characterized by nodes mobility, which makes the propagation environment time-varying and subject to fading. As a consequence, the statistical characteristics of the received signal vary continuously, giving rise to a Doppler power spectral density (DPSD) that varies from one observation instant to the next. This paper is concerned with dynamical modeling of time-varying wireless fading channels, their estimation and parameter identification, and optimal power control from received signal measurement data. The wireless channel is characterized using a stochastic state-space form and derived by approximating the time-varying DPSD of the channel. The expected maximization and Kalman filter are employed to recursively identify and estimate the channel parameters and states, respectively, from online received signal strength measured data. Moreover, we investigate a centralized optimal power control algorithm based on predictable strategies and employing the estimated channel parameters and states. The proposed models together with the estimation and power control algorithms are tested using experimental measurement data and the results are presented.

  14. Varying electric charge in multi-scale spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Fernández, David Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    We derive the covariant equations of motion for Maxwell field theory and electrodynamics in multi-scale spacetimes with weighted Laplacian. An effective spacetime-dependent electric charge of geometric origin naturally emerges from the theory, thus giving rise to a varying fine-structure constant. The theory is compared with other varying-coupling models, such as those with a varying electric charge or varying speed of light. The theory is also confronted with cosmological observations, which can place constraints on the characteristic scales in the multi-fractional measure. We note that the model considered here is fundamentally different from those previously proposed in the literature, either of the varying-e or varying-c persuasion.

  15. Investigation on the coloured noise in GPS-derived position with time-varying seasonal signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszczynska, Marta; Klos, Anna; Bos, Machiel Simon; Bogusz, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal signals in the GPS-derived time series arise from real geophysical signals related to tidal (residual) or non-tidal (loadings from atmosphere, ocean and continental hydrosphere, thermo elastic strain, etc.) effects and numerical artefacts including aliasing from mismodelling in short periods or repeatability of the GPS satellite constellation with respect to the Sun (draconitics). Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is a method for investigation of nonlinear dynamics, suitable to either stationary or non-stationary data series without prior knowledge about their character. The aim of SSA is to mathematically decompose the original time series into a sum of slowly varying trend, seasonal oscillations and noise. In this presentation we will explore the ability of SSA to subtract the time-varying seasonal signals in GPS-derived North-East-Up topocentric components and show properties of coloured noise from residua. For this purpose we used data from globally distributed IGS (International GNSS Service) permanent stations processed by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) in a PPP (Precise Point Positioning) mode. After introducing a threshold of 13 years, 264 stations left with a maximum length reaching 23 years. The data was initially pre-processed for outliers, offsets and gaps. The SSA was applied to pre-processed series to estimate the time-varying seasonal signals. We adopted a 3-years window as the optimal dimension of its size determined with the Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC) values. A Fisher-Snedecor test corrected for the presence of temporal correlation was used to determine the statistical significance of reconstructed components. This procedure showed that first four components describing annual and semi-annual signals, are significant at a 99.7% confidence level, which corresponds to 3-sigma criterion. We compared the non-parametric SSA approach with a commonly chosen parametric Least-Squares Estimation that assumes constant amplitudes and

  16. Transient,spatially-varied recharge for groundwater modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Kibreab; Woodbury, Allan

    2013-04-01

    This study is aimed at producing spatially and temporally varying groundwater recharge for transient groundwater modeling in a pilot watershed in the North Okanagan, Canada. The recharge modeling is undertaken by using a Richard's equation based finite element code (HYDRUS-1D) [Simunek et al., 2002], ArcGISTM [ESRI, 2011], ROSETTA [Schaap et al., 2001], in situ observations of soil temperature and soil moisture and a long term gridded climate data [Nielsen et al., 2010]. The public version of HYDUS-1D [Simunek et al., 2002] and another beta version with a detailed freezing and thawing module [Hansson et al., 2004] are first used to simulate soil temperature, snow pack and soil moisture over a one year experimental period. Statistical analysis of the results show both versions of HYDRUS-1D reproduce observed variables to the same degree. Correlation coefficients for soil temperature simulation were estimated at 0.9 and 0.8, at depths of 10 cm and 50 cm respectively; and for soil moisture, 0.8 and 0.6 at 10 cm and 50 cm respectively. This and other standard measures of model performance (root mean square error and average error) showed a promising performance of the HYDRUS-1D code in our pilot watershed. After evaluating model performance using field data and ROSETTA derived soil hydraulic parameters, the HYDRUS-1D code is coupled with ArcGISTM to produce spatially and temporally varying recharge maps throughout the Deep Creek watershed. Temporal and spatial analysis of 25 years daily recharge results at various representative points across the study watershed reveal significant temporal and spatial variations; average recharge estimated at 77.8 ± 50.8mm /year. This significant variation over the years, caused by antecedent soil moisture condition and climatic condition, illustrates the common flaw of assigning a constant percentage of precipitation throughout the simulation period. Groundwater recharge modeling has previously been attempted in the Okanagan Basin

  17. Delay-independent stabilization for teleoperation with time varying delay

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Namerikawa, Toru

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the stability for nonlinear teleoperation with time varying communication delays. The proposed method is passivity-based controllers with time varying gains which depend on the rate of change of time varying delay. In our proposed method, stability condition is independent of the magnitude of the communication delay and the damping of the system. The delay-independent stability is shown via Lyapunov stability methods. Several experimental results show the effectiveness o...

  18. Rates of gyrase supercoiling and transcription elongation control supercoil density in a bacterial chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Rovinskiy

    Full Text Available Gyrase catalyzes negative supercoiling of DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction that helps condense bacterial chromosomes into a compact interwound "nucleoid." The supercoil density (σ of prokaryotic DNA occurs in two forms. Diffusible supercoil density (σ(D moves freely around the chromosome in 10 kb domains, and constrained supercoil density (σ(C results from binding abundant proteins that bend, loop, or unwind DNA at many sites. Diffusible and constrained supercoils contribute roughly equally to the total in vivo negative supercoil density of WT cells, so σ = σ(C+σ(D. Unexpectedly, Escherichia coli chromosomes have a 15% higher level of σ compared to Salmonella enterica. To decipher critical mechanisms that can change diffusible supercoil density of chromosomes, we analyzed strains of Salmonella using a 9 kb "supercoil sensor" inserted at ten positions around the genome. The sensor contains a complete Lac operon flanked by directly repeated resolvase binding sites, and the sensor can monitor both supercoil density and transcription elongation rates in WT and mutant strains. RNA transcription caused (- supercoiling to increase upstream and decrease downstream of highly expressed genes. Excess upstream supercoiling was relaxed by Topo I, and gyrase replenished downstream supercoil losses to maintain an equilibrium state. Strains with TS gyrase mutations growing at permissive temperature exhibited significant supercoil losses varying from 30% of WT levels to a total loss of σ(D at most chromosome locations. Supercoil losses were influenced by transcription because addition of rifampicin (Rif caused supercoil density to rebound throughout the chromosome. Gyrase mutants that caused dramatic supercoil losses also reduced the transcription elongation rates throughout the genome. The observed link between RNA polymerase elongation speed and gyrase turnover suggests that bacteria with fast growth rates may generate higher supercoil densities

  19. Laplacian-level density functionals for the kinetic energy density and exchange-correlation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdew, John P.; Constantin, Lucian A.

    2007-04-01

    We construct a Laplacian-level meta-generalized-gradient-approximation (meta-GGA) for the noninteracting (Kohn-Sham orbital) positive kinetic energy density τ of an electronic ground state of density n . This meta-GGA is designed to recover the fourth-order gradient expansion τGE4 in the appropriate slowly varying limit and the von Weizsäcker expression τW=∣∇n∣2/(8n) in the rapidly varying limit. It is constrained to satisfy the rigorous lower bound τW(r)⩽τ(r) . Our meta-GGA is typically a strong improvement over the gradient expansion of τ for atoms, spherical jellium clusters, jellium surfaces, the Airy gas, Hooke’s atom, one-electron Gaussian density, quasi-two-dimensional electron gas, and nonuniformly scaled hydrogen atom. We also construct a Laplacian-level meta-GGA for exchange and correlation by employing our approximate τ in the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) meta-GGA density functional. The Laplacian-level TPSS gives almost the same exchange-correlation enhancement factors and energies as the full TPSS, suggesting that τ and ∇2n carry about the same information beyond that carried by n and ∇n . Our kinetic energy density integrates to an orbital-free kinetic energy functional that is about as accurate as the fourth-order gradient expansion for many real densities (with noticeable improvement in molecular atomization energies), but considerably more accurate for rapidly varying ones.

  20. Audio Effects Based on Biorthogonal Time-Varying Frequency Warping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavaliere Sergio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrate the mathematical background and musical use of a class of audio effects based on frequency warping. These effects alter the frequency content of a signal via spectral mapping. They can be implemented in dispersive tapped delay lines based on a chain of all-pass filters. In a homogeneous line with first-order all-pass sections, the signal formed by the output samples at a given time is related to the input via the Laguerre transform. However, most musical signals require a time-varying frequency modification in order to be properly processed. Vibrato in musical instruments or voice intonation in the case of vocal sounds may be modeled as small and slow pitch variations. Simulation of these effects requires techniques for time-varying pitch and/or brightness modification that are very useful for sound processing. The basis for time-varying frequency warping is a time-varying version of the Laguerre transformation. The corresponding implementation structure is obtained as a dispersive tapped delay line, where each of the frequency dependent delay element has its own phase response. Thus, time-varying warping results in a space-varying, inhomogeneous, propagation structure. We show that time-varying frequency warping is associated to an expansion over biorthogonal sets generalizing the discrete Laguerre basis. Slow time-varying characteristics lead to slowly varying parameter sequences. The corresponding sound transformation does not suffer from discontinuities typical of delay lines based on unit delays.

  1. Energy in density gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindric configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and in particular in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit ...

  2. Density of Gabor Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Heil, Christopher; Deng, Baiqiao

    1999-01-01

    Beurling densities of Lambda = boolean ORk=1r Lambda(k) satisfy D- (Lambda) greater than or equal to 1 and D+(Lambda) Ramanathan and Steger. Additionally, we prove the conjecture that no collection boolean ORk=1r {g(k)(x - a)}(a is an element of Gamma k) of pure...

  3. Energy in density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J., E-mail: jvranjes@yahoo.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Kono, M., E-mail: kono@fps.chuo-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  4. Radon diffusion coefficients in soils of varying moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristodoulou, C.; Ioannides, K.; Pavlides, S.

    2009-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is generated in the Earth's crust and is free to migrate through soil and be released to the atmosphere. Due to its unique properties, soil gas radon has been established as a powerful tracer used for a variety of purposes, such as exploring uranium ores, locating geothermal resources and hydrocarbon deposits, mapping geological faults, predicting seismic activity or volcanic eruptions and testing atmospheric transport models. Much attention has also been given to the radiological health hazard posed by increased radon concentrations in the living and working environment. In order to exploit radon profiles for geophysical purposes and also to predict its entry indoors, it is necessary to study its transport through soils. Among other factors, the importance of soil moisture in such studies has been largely highlighted and it is widely accepted that any measurement of radon transport parameters should be accompanied by a measurement of the soil moisture content. In principle, validation of transport models in the field is encountered by a large number of uncontrollable and varying parameters; laboratory methods are therefore preferred, allowing for experiments to be conducted under well-specified and uniform conditions. In this work, a laboratory technique has been applied for studying the effect of soil moisture content on radon diffusion. A vertical diffusion chamber was employed, in which radon was produced from a 226Ra source, was allowed to diffuse through a soil column and was finally monitored using a silicon surface barrier detector. By solving the steady-state radon diffusion equation, diffusion coefficients (D) were determined for soil samples of varying moisture content (m), from null (m=0) to saturation (m=1). For dry soil, a D value of 4.1×10-7 m2s-1 was determined, which increased moderately by a factor of ~3 for soil with low moisture content, i.e. up to m ~0.2. At higher water fractions, a decrease

  5. Culture systems: embryo density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Embryo density is defined as the embryo-to-volume ratio achieved during in vitro culture; in other words, it is the number of embryos in a defined volume of culture medium. The same density can be achieved by manipulating either the number of embryos in a given volume of medium, or manipulating the volume of the medium for a given number of embryos: for example, a microdrop with five embryos in a 50 μl volume under oil has the same embryo-to-volume ratio (1:10 μl) as a microdrop with one embryo in a 10 μl volume under oil (1:10 μl). Increased embryo density can improve mammalian embryo development in vitro; however, the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect may be different with respect to which method is used to increase embryo density.Standard, flat sterile plastic petri dishes are the most common, traditional platform for embryo culture. Microdrops under a mineral oil overlay can be prepared to control embryo density, but it is critical that dish preparation is consistent, where appropriate techniques are applied to prevent microdrop dehydration during preparation, and results of any data collection are reliable, and repeatable. There are newer dishes available from several manufacturers that are specifically designed for embryo culture; most are readily available for use with human embryos. The concept behind these newer dishes relies on fabrication of conical and smaller volume wells into the dish design, so that embryos rest at the lowest point in the wells, and where putative embryotrophic factors may concentrate.Embryo density is not usually considered by the embryologist as a technique in and of itself; rather, the decision to culture embryos in groups or individually is protocol-driven, and is based more on convenience or the need to collect data on individual embryos. Embryo density can be controlled, and as such, it can be utilized as a simple, yet effective tool to improve in vitro development of human embryos.

  6. Partition density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafziger, Jonathan

    Partition density functional theory (PDFT) is a method for dividing a molecular electronic structure calculation into fragment calculations. The molecular density and energy corresponding to Kohn Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) may be exactly recovered from these fragments. Each fragment acts as an isolated system except for the influence of a global one-body 'partition' potential which deforms the fragment densities. In this work, the developments of PDFT are put into the context of other fragment-based density functional methods. We developed three numerical implementations of PDFT: One within the NWChem computational chemistry package using basis sets, and the other two developed from scratch using real-space grids. It is shown that all three of these programs can exactly reproduce a KS-DFT calculation via fragment calculations. The first of our in-house codes handles non-interacting electrons in arbitrary one-dimensional potentials with any number of fragments. This code is used to explore how the exact partition potential changes for different partitionings of the same system and also to study features which determine which systems yield non-integer PDFT occupations and which systems are locked into integer PDFT occupations. The second in-house code, CADMium, performs real-space calculations of diatomic molecules. Features of the exact partition potential are studied for a variety of cases and an analytical formula determining singularities in the partition potential is derived. We introduce an approximation for the non-additive kinetic energy and show how this quantity can be computed exactly. Finally a PDFT functional is developed to address the issues of static correlation and delocalization errors in approximations within DFT. The functional is applied to the dissociation of H2 + and H2.

  7. Colour-Based Binary Discrimination of Scarified Quercus robur Acorns under Varying Illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Jabłoński

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to predict the germination ability of acorns using their shape, length, diameter and density are reported in the literature. These methods, however, are not efficient enough. As such, a visual assessment of the viability of seeds based on the appearance of cross-sections of seeds following their scarification is used. This procedure is more robust but demands significant effort from experienced employees over a short period of time. In this article an automated method of acorn scarification and assessment has been announced. This type of automation requires the specific setup of a machine vision system and application of image processing algorithms for evaluation of sections of seeds in order to predict their viability. In the stage of the analysis of pathological changes, it is important to point out image features that enable efficient classification of seeds in respect of viability. The article shows the results of the binary separation of seeds into two fractions (healthy or spoiled using average components of regular red-green-blue and perception-based hue-saturation-value colour space. Analysis of accuracy of discrimination was performed on sections of 400 scarified acorns acquired using two various setups: machine vision camera under uncontrolled varying illumination and commodity high-resolution camera under controlled illumination. The accuracy of automatic classification has been compared with predictions completed by experienced professionals. It has been shown that both automatic and manual methods reach an accuracy level of 84%, assuming that the images of the sections are properly normalised. The achieved recognition ratio was higher when referenced to predictions provided by professionals. Results of discrimination by means of Bayes classifier have been also presented as a reference.

  8. Patterns of inflammatory responses and parasite tolerance vary with malaria transmission intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademolue, Temitope W; Aniweh, Yaw; Kusi, Kwadwo A; Awandare, Gordon A

    2017-04-11

    In individuals living in malaria-endemic regions, parasitaemia thresholds for the onset of clinical symptoms vary with transmission intensity. The mechanisms that mediate this relationship are however, unclear. Since inflammatory responses to parasite infection contribute to the clinical manifestation of malaria, this study investigated inflammatory cytokine responses in children with malaria from areas of different transmission intensities (ranging from low to high). Blood samples were obtained from children confirmed with malaria at community hospitals in three areas with differing transmission intensities. Cytokine levels were assessed using the Luminex(®)-based magnetic bead array system, and levels were compared across sites using appropriate statistical tests. The relative contributions of age, gender, parasitaemia and transmission intensity on cytokine levels were investigated using multivariate regression analysis. Parasite density increased with increasing transmission intensity in children presenting to hospital with symptomatic malaria, indicating that the parasitaemia threshold for clinical malaria increases with increasing transmission intensity. Furthermore, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-12, decreased with increasing transmission intensity, and correlated significantly with parasitaemia levels in the low transmission area but not in high transmission areas. Similarly, levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-4, IL-7, IL-10 and IL-13, decreased with increasing transmission intensity, with IL-10 showing strong correlation with parasitaemia levels in the low transmission area. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that transmission intensity was a stronger predictor of cytokine levels than age, gender and parasitaemia. Taken together, the data demonstrate a strong relationship between the prevailing

  9. Link between Food Energy Density and Body Weight Changes in Obese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Rodacki, Tomasz; Dobrowolska-Iwanek, Justyna; Brzozowska, Anna; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Wojtanowska-Krosniak, Agnieszka; Zagrodzki, Paweł; Bechthold, Angela; Mardas, Marcin; Boeing, Heiner

    2016-04-20

    Regulating the energy density of food could be used as a novel approach for successful body weight reduction in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to conduct a systemic review of the literature on the relationship between food energy density and body weight changes in obese adults to obtain solid evidence supporting this approach. The search process was based on the selection of publications in the English language listed in public databases. A meta-analysis was performed to combine individual study results. Thirteen experimental and observational studies were identified and included in the final analysis. The analyzed populations consist of 3628 individuals aged 18 to 66 years. The studies varied greatly in terms of study populations, study design and applied dietary approaches. The meta-analysis revealed a significant association between low energy density foods and body weight reduction, i.e., -0.53 kg when low energy density foods were eaten (95% CI: -0.88, -0.19). In conclusions, this study adds evidence which supports the energy density of food as a simple but effective measure to manage weight in the obese with the aim of weight reduction.

  10. Link between Food Energy Density and Body Weight Changes in Obese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Stelmach-Mardas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulating the energy density of food could be used as a novel approach for successful body weight reduction in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to conduct a systemic review of the literature on the relationship between food energy density and body weight changes in obese adults to obtain solid evidence supporting this approach. The search process was based on the selection of publications in the English language listed in public databases. A meta-analysis was performed to combine individual study results. Thirteen experimental and observational studies were identified and included in the final analysis. The analyzed populations consist of 3628 individuals aged 18 to 66 years. The studies varied greatly in terms of study populations, study design and applied dietary approaches. The meta-analysis revealed a significant association between low energy density foods and body weight reduction, i.e., −0.53 kg when low energy density foods were eaten (95% CI: −0.88, −0.19. In conclusions, this study adds evidence which supports the energy density of food as a simple but effective measure to manage weight in the obese with the aim of weight reduction.

  11. Density-dependent reduction and induction of milkweed cardenolides by a sucking insect herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, John W; Malcolm, Stephen B

    2004-03-01

    The effect of aphid population size on host-plant chemical defense expression and the effect of plant defense on aphid population dynamics were investigated in a milkweed-specialist herbivore system. Density effects of the aposematic oleander aphid, Aphis nerii, on cardenolide expression were measured in two milkweed species, Asclepias curassavica and A. incarnata. These plants vary in constitutive chemical investment with high mean cardenolide concentration in A. curassavica and low to zero in A. incarnata. The second objective was to determine whether cardenolide expression in these two host plants impacts mean A. nerii colony biomass (mg) and density. Cardenolide concentration (microgram/g) of A. curassavica in both aphid-treated leaves and opposite, herbivore-free leaves decreased initially in comparison with aphid-free controls, and then increased significantly with A. nerii density. Thus, A. curassavica responds to aphid herbivory initially with density-dependent phytochemical reduction, followed by induction of cardenolides to concentrations above aphid-free controls. In addition, mean cardenolide concentration of aphid-treated leaves was significantly higher than that of opposite, herbivore-free leaves. Therefore, A. curassavica induction is strongest in herbivore-damage tissue. Conversely, A. incarnata exhibited no such chemical response to aphid herbivory. Furthermore, neither host plant responded chemically to herbivore feeding duration time (days) or to the interaction between herbivore initial density and feeding duration time. There were also no significant differences in mean colony biomass or population density of A. nerii reared on high cardenolide (A. curassavica) and low cardenolide (A. incarnata) hosts.

  12. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.

    Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  13. The role of dislocations in varied olivine deformation mechanisms investigated using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars; Britton, Ben; Wilkinson, Angus

    2016-04-01

    distributions of dislocation substructures, such as slip bands and subgrain boundaries, formed by different deformation mechanisms under varied deformation conditions. Single crystals deformed by dislocation creep exhibit a transition in dominant GND structures from homogenously-distributed slip bands at low temperature to regular subgrain boundaries at high temperature. Polycrystals deformed by dislocation-accommodated grain-boundary sliding reveal more complex substructure, with high GND densities spatially associated with grain boundaries and triple junctions. Samples deformed by diffusion creep contain significant dislocation content distributed relatively homogenously within grains. Our results demonstrate the varied GND substructures formed by different deformation mechanisms at the grain- to aggregate-scales, and thereby provide valuable constraints for the microphysical models of olivine deformation that underpin rheological flow laws. Furthermore, these results provide a basis for quantitatively interpreting deformation mechanisms that operated in natural olivine-rich tectonites based on their dislocation substructure.

  14. Optimization of space-time material layout for 1D wave propagation with varying mass and stiffness parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2010-01-01

    Results are presented for optimal layout of materials in the spatial and temporal domains for a 1D structure subjected to transient wave propagation. A general optimization procedure is outlined including derivation of design sensitivities for the case when the mass density and stiffness vary in ...

  15. Expected optimal feedback with Time-Varying Parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucci, M.P.; Kendrick, D.A.; Amman, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we derive the closed loop form of the Expected Optimal Feedback rule, sometimes called passive learning stochastic control, with time varying parameters. As such this paper extends the work of Kendrick (1981,2002, Chapter 6) where parameters are assumed to vary randomly around a known

  16. Prices of Generic Heart Failure Drugs Vary Widely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162035.html Prices of Generic Heart Failure Drugs Vary Widely Patients can spend from $12 to $ ... Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cash prices of generic medicines to treat heart failure vary so widely that ...

  17. Analysis of time-varying psoriasis lesion image patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maletti, Gabriela Mariel; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2004-01-01

    The multivariate alteration detection transform is applied to pairs of within and between time varying registered psoriasis image patterns. Color band contribution to the variates explaining maximal change is analyzed.......The multivariate alteration detection transform is applied to pairs of within and between time varying registered psoriasis image patterns. Color band contribution to the variates explaining maximal change is analyzed....

  18. Linear Parameter Varying Control of Doubly Fed Induction Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tien, H. Nguyen; Scherer, Carsten W.; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Müller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the design of a self-scheduled current controller for doubly fed induction machines. The design is based on the framework of linear parameter-varying systems where the mechanical angular speed is considered to be a measurable time-varying parameter. The objective is to o

  19. Specimen loading list for the varying temperature experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A.L.; Sitterson, R.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The varying temperature experiment HFIR-RB-13J has been assembled and inserted in the reactor. Approximately 5300 specimens were cleaned, inspected, matched, and loaded into four specimen holders. A listing of each specimen loaded into the steady temperature holder, its position in the capsule, and the identification of the corresponding specimen loaded into the varying temperature holder is presented in this report.

  20. High-altitude atomic nitrogen densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, E. S.; Strobel, D. F.; Mauersberger, K.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the seasonal and diurnal variations of atomic nitrogen are compared with measurements made by the open source neutral mass spectrometer on the AE-C satellite. With the simultaneous measurements of molecular nitrogen and atomic oxygen densities as input, model calculations of odd nitrogen densities predict the same trends in atomic nitrogen as those observed. From these comparisons it is inferred that horizontal transport significantly reduces the diurnal variation of atomic nitrogen. Estimates are given of the sensitivity of atomic nitrogen densities to variations in the photoelectron flux, the neutral temperatures, and the neutral winds.

  1. High density of tree-cavities and snags in tropical dry forest of western Mexico raises questions for a latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Vázquez

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that a latitudinal gradient exists of a low density of snags and high density of naturally-formed tree-cavities in tropical vs. temperate forests, though few cavities may have characteristics suitable for nesting by birds. We determined snag and cavity density, characteristics, and suitability for birds in a tropical dry forest biome of western Mexico, and evaluated whether our data fits the trend of snag and cavity density typically found in tropical moist and wet forests. We established five 0.25-ha transects to survey and measure tree-cavities and snags in each of three vegetation types of deciduous, semi-deciduous, and mono-dominant Piranhea mexicana forest, comprising a total of 3.75 ha. We found a high density of 77 cavities/ha, with 37 cavities suitable for birds/ha, where density, and characteristics of cavities varied significantly among vegetation types. Lowest abundance of cavities occurred in deciduous forest, and these were in smaller trees, at a lower height, and with a narrower entrance diameter. Only 8.6% of cavities were excavated by woodpeckers, and only 11% of cavities were occupied, mainly by arthropods, though 52% of all cavities were unsuitable for birds. We also found a high density of 56 snags/ha, with greatest density in deciduous forest (70 snags/ha, though these were of significantly smaller diameter, and snags of larger diameter were more likely to contain cavities. The Chamela-Cuixmala tropical dry forest had the highest density of snags recorded for any tropical or temperate forest, and while snag density was significantly correlated with mean snag dbh, neither latitude nor mean dbh predicted snag density in ten forest sites. The high spatial aggregation of snag and cavity resources in tropical dry forest may limit their availability, particularly for large-bodied cavity adopters, and highlights the importance of habitat heterogeneity in providing resources for primary and secondary cavity-nesters.

  2. High density of tree-cavities and snags in tropical dry forest of western Mexico raises questions for a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Leopoldo; Renton, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that a latitudinal gradient exists of a low density of snags and high density of naturally-formed tree-cavities in tropical vs. temperate forests, though few cavities may have characteristics suitable for nesting by birds. We determined snag and cavity density, characteristics, and suitability for birds in a tropical dry forest biome of western Mexico, and evaluated whether our data fits the trend of snag and cavity density typically found in tropical moist and wet forests. We established five 0.25-ha transects to survey and measure tree-cavities and snags in each of three vegetation types of deciduous, semi-deciduous, and mono-dominant Piranhea mexicana forest, comprising a total of 3.75 ha. We found a high density of 77 cavities/ha, with 37 cavities suitable for birds/ha, where density, and characteristics of cavities varied significantly among vegetation types. Lowest abundance of cavities occurred in deciduous forest, and these were in smaller trees, at a lower height, and with a narrower entrance diameter. Only 8.6% of cavities were excavated by woodpeckers, and only 11% of cavities were occupied, mainly by arthropods, though 52% of all cavities were unsuitable for birds. We also found a high density of 56 snags/ha, with greatest density in deciduous forest (70 snags/ha), though these were of significantly smaller diameter, and snags of larger diameter were more likely to contain cavities. The Chamela-Cuixmala tropical dry forest had the highest density of snags recorded for any tropical or temperate forest, and while snag density was significantly correlated with mean snag dbh, neither latitude nor mean dbh predicted snag density in ten forest sites. The high spatial aggregation of snag and cavity resources in tropical dry forest may limit their availability, particularly for large-bodied cavity adopters, and highlights the importance of habitat heterogeneity in providing resources for primary and secondary cavity-nesters.

  3. Study on Varied Types of Ultrafine Powder Used in Refractory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIXiaoming; WUQingshun

    1997-01-01

    The properties and low and medium tem-perature bonding mechanisms of varied types of SiO2 ultrafine powder used in ceramic and refractory and the temperature at which SiO2 ultrafine powder began to react with Al2O3 were studied,And initial researches on effects of ultrafine powders of Al2O3,SiC,3Al2o3·2SiO2,MgO·Al2O3 and ZrSiO4 on promoting sintering were made. The results indicated that among various types of SiO2 ultrafine powder ,non-crystal sil-ica ultrafine powder wa characterized by its structure and properties,It could yield consid-erable silica gel on its surface at low tempera-ture,which then dehydrated and formed Si-O-Si bond,thereby developing a netty structure that caused higher bond strength at low and medium temperature since the netty structure basically remperature since the netty structure basically reained as termperture rising.SiO2 ultrafine powder began to react with Al2O3 at 700℃, All of other types of ultrafine powder had effects on stimulating sintering ,but the effects were significant only when the particle size of ultrafine powder was less than 5μm。

  4. The varying shape of the coronoid process of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Ranganathan; Manjunath, K Y; Balasubramanyam

    2004-01-01

    The coronoid process (meaning crow) is a flattened triangular bony process of the ramus of the mandible. It is usually directed upwards and slightly forwards in the living subject. The coronoid process is of clinical significance to the maxillofacial surgeon for reconstructive purposes. Several authors have described the varying shapes of the process. In the present study, the variable shape and surface area of the coronoid process were observed in a collection of 154 south Indian mandibles. Using the criterion proposed by Isaac and Holla (2001), the coronoid process of each side was inspected for the shape and direction, and surface area of the ramus and the coronoid process was also calculated. The shape of the coronoid process was bilaterally triangular in 16.2%, hook-shaped in 45.5%, rounded in 18.2% rounded and hook-shaped in 4.5%, and unilaterally triangular in 12.3%, hook-shaped in 11.7%, and rounded in 7.1% of the mandibles. The coronoid processes faced directly upward in 55.4%, forward in 40.7% and backward in 3.8% of the mandible.

  5. Management of neonatal jaundice varies by practitioner type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Patrocinio C.; Lee, Kyong-Soon; Barozzino, Matthew; Sgro, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To survey current practices among different types of medical practitioners in Ontario to assess if national guidelines for screening and management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were being followed. Design An anonymized, cross-sectional survey distributed by mail and e-mail. Setting Ontario. Participants From each group (general practitioners, family medicine practitioners, and pediatricians), 500 participants were randomly selected, and all 390 registered midwives were selected. Main outcome measures Compliance with national guidelines for screening, postdischarge follow-up, and management of newborns with hyperbilirubinemia. Results Of the 1890 potential respondents, 321 (17%) completed the survey. Only 41% of family physicians reported using national guidelines, compared with 75% and 69% of pediatricians and midwives, respectively (P Bilirubin was routinely measured for all newborns before discharge by 42% of family physicians, 63% of pediatricians, and 22% of midwives (P < .001). Newborn follow-up was completed within 72 hours after discharge by 60% of family physicians, 89% of pediatricians, and 100% of midwives. Management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia differed significantly (P < .001), with 91% of family physicians, 99% of pediatricians, and 79% of midwives correctly managing a case scenario according to the guidelines. Conclusion The management of jaundice varied considerably among the different practitioner types, with pediatricians both most aware of the guidelines and most likely to follow them. Increased knowledge translation efforts are required to promote adherence to the jaundice management guidelines across all practitioner types, but particularly among family physicians. PMID:23946045

  6. Spatially Varying Determinants of Farmland Conversion Across Qiantang Watershed, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shiliang; Xiao, Rui

    2013-10-01

    This paper employed geographically weighted regression (GWR) to characterize the determinants of farmland conversion at administrative scale between 1994 and 2003 across Qiantang watershed, China. Six determinants were identified: total area of forest, distance to highway, distance to second road, distance to river, population, and gross domestic product. Relationships between these identified determinants and farmland conversion showed great spatial non-stationarity, since their character, nature, and strength varied significantly across space. Typically, for cities whose development was heavily relied on road infrastructure development, the impacts of "distance to second road" and "distance to river" was negative. However, in mountainous areas, the restriction of terrain factors led to positive impacts from these two variables. For areas undergoing rapid socio-economic development, farmland conversion was accelerated by population growth and economic development. However, for more urbanized regions, a slow-down rate of farmland conversion would be expected. Our study highlighted that the problem of spatial non-stationarity should be addressed when qualifying the determinants of farmland conversion. Linking our results within the context of farmland protection, we argue that implementing local-specific land management practices, instead of the current one-size-fits-all framework, is the key for the success of farmland protection in China.

  7. Cold surge: a sudden and spatially varying threat to health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tse-Chuan; Wu, Pei-Chih; Chen, Vivian Yi-Ju; Su, Huey-Jen

    2009-05-01

    While cold surge is one of the most conspicuous features of the winter monsoon in East Asia, its impact on human health remains underexplored. Based on the definition by the Central Weather Bureau in Taiwan, we identified four cold surges between 2000 and 2003 and collected the cardiovascular disease mortality data 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after these events. We attempted to answer the following research questions: 1) whether the cold surges impose an adverse and immediate effect on cardiovascular mortality; 2) whether the people living in temperate zones have a higher tolerance of extreme temperature drop than those in the subtropics. With geographic weighting techniques, we not only found that the cardiovascular disease mortality rates increased significantly after the cold surges, but also discovered a spatially varying pattern of tolerance to cold surges. Even within a small study area such as Taiwan, human reaction to severe weather drop differs across space. Needless to say, in the U.S., these findings should be considered in redirecting policy to address populations living in warm places when extreme temperature drops occur.

  8. Axial variations in anatomical properties and basic density of Eucalypt urograndis hybrid (Eucalyptus grandis 3 E. urophylla) clones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S K Sharma; S R Shukla; S Shashikala; V Sri Poornima

    2015-01-01

    We studied two clones of Eucalypt urograndis hybrid (Eucalyptus grandis 9 E. urophylla), GR283 and GR330, grown in Tumkur district of Karnataka (India), and felled 5–6 years old three trees of each clone. We recorded axial variations in heartwood content, bark properties, wood density and anatomical characteristics of wood including fibre length, fibre diameter, fibre wall thickness, lumen diameter, vessel frequency, vessel diameter and vessel element length. Clone GR283 had about 10 % heartwood, significantly lower than for clone GR330 (37 %). Basic wood density along the tree height varied significantly within and between the clones. We observed significant variations in fibre length, fibre diameter and wall thickness within and between the two clones. Vessel frequency and vessel element length did not vary but vessel diameter differed significantly between the clones. With a greater proportion of sapwood, clone GR283 can be utilized for paper and pulp applications. Clone GR330 had a higher proportion of heartwood and lower wood density and, hence, is more suitable for light-weight material applications.

  9. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  10. Competition-density effect in plant populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The competition-density effect of plant populations is of significance in theory and practice of forest management and has been studied for long time. The differences between the two reciprocal equations of the competition-density effect in nonself-thinning populations and self-thinning populations were analyzed theoretically. This supplies a theoretical basis for analyzing the dynamics of forest populations and evaluating the effect of forest management.

  11. Isogeometric shape optimization of magnetic density separators

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The waste recycling industry increasingly relies on magnetic density separators. These devices generate an upward magnetic force in ferro-fluids allowing to separate the immersed particles according to their mass density. Recently a new separator design that significantly reduces the required amount of permanent magnet material has been proposed. The purpose of this paper is to alleviate the undesired end-effects in this design by altering the shape of the ferromagnetic covers of the...

  12. Extending satisficing control strategy to slowly varying nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binazadeh, T.; Shafiei, M. H.

    2013-04-01

    Based on the satisficing control strategy, a novel approach to design a stabilizing control law for nonlinear time varying systems with slowly varying parameters (slowly varying systems) is presented. The satisficing control strategy has been originally introduced for time-invariant systems; however, this technique does not have any stability proof for time varying systems. In this paper, first, a parametric version of the satisficing control strategy is developed. Then, by considering the time as a frozen parameter, the parametric satisficing control strategy is utilized. Finally, a theorem is presented which suggested a stabilizing satisficing control law for the slowly varying control systems. Moreover, in this theorem, the maximum admissible rate of change of the system dynamics is evaluated. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a computer simulation.

  13. Time varying voltage combustion control and diagnostics sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Thornton, Jimmy D.; Huckaby, E. David; Fincham, William

    2011-04-19

    A time-varying voltage is applied to an electrode, or a pair of electrodes, of a sensor installed in a fuel nozzle disposed adjacent the combustion zone of a continuous combustion system, such as of the gas turbine engine type. The time-varying voltage induces a time-varying current in the flame which is measured and used to determine flame capacitance using AC electrical circuit analysis. Flame capacitance is used to accurately determine the position of the flame from the sensor and the fuel/air ratio. The fuel and/or air flow rate (s) is/are then adjusted to provide reduced flame instability problems such as flashback, combustion dynamics and lean blowout, as well as reduced emissions. The time-varying voltage may be an alternating voltage and the time-varying current may be an alternating current.

  14. Significance Tests for Periodogram Peaks

    CERN Document Server

    Frescura, F A M; Frank, B S

    2007-01-01

    We discuss methods currently in use for determining the significance of peaks in the periodograms of time series. We discuss some general methods for constructing significance tests, false alarm probability functions, and the role played in these by independent random variables and by empirical and theoretical cumulative distribution functions. We also discuss the concept of "independent frequencies" in periodogram analysis. We propose a practical method for estimating the significance of periodogram peaks, applicable to all time series irrespective of the spacing of the data. This method, based on Monte Carlo simulations, produces significance tests that are tailor-made for any given astronomical time series.

  15. Fine root productivity varies along nitrogen and phosphorus gradients in high-rainfall mangrove forests of Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Nicole; Twilley, Robert R.; Ewel, Katherine C.; Krauss, Ken W.

    2015-01-01

    Belowground biomass is thought to account for much of the total biomass in mangrove forests and may be related to soil fertility. The Yela River and the Sapwalap River, Federated States of Micronesia, contain a natural soil resource gradient defined by total phosphorus (P) density ranging from 0.05 to 0.42 mg cm−3 in different hydrogeomorphic settings. We used this fertility gradient to test the hypothesis that edaphic conditions constrain mangrove productivity through differential allocation of biomass to belowground roots. We removed sequential cores and implanted root ingrowth bags to measure in situ biomass and productivity, respectively. Belowground root biomass values ranged among sites from 0.448 ± 0.096 to 2.641 ± 0.534 kg m−2. Root productivity (roots ≤20 mm) did not vary significantly along the gradient (P = 0.3355) or with P fertilization after 6 months (P = 0.2968). Fine root productivity (roots ≤2 mm), however, did vary significantly among sites (P = 0.0363) and ranged from 45.88 ± 21.37 to 118.66 ± 38.05 g m−2 year−1. The distribution of total standing root biomass and fine root productivity followed patterns of N:P ratios as hypothesized, with larger root mass generally associated with lower relative P concentrations. Many of the processes of nutrient acquisition reported from nutrient-limited mangrove forests may also occur in forests of greater biomass and productivity when growing along soil nutrient gradients.

  16. Song trait similarity in great tits varies with social structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysanne Snijders

    Full Text Available For many animals, long-range signalling is essential to maintain contact with conspecifics. In territorial species, individuals often have to balance signalling towards unfamiliar potential competitors (to solely broadcast territory ownership with signalling towards familiar immediate neighbours (to also maintain so-called "dear enemy" relations. Hence, to understand how signals evolve due to these multilevel relationships, it is important to understand how general signal traits vary in relation to the overall social environment. For many territorial songbirds dawn is a key signalling period, with several neighbouring individuals singing simultaneously without immediate conflict. In this study we tested whether sharing a territory boundary, rather than spatial proximity, is related to similarity in dawn song traits between territorial great tits (Parus major in a wild personality-typed population. We collected a large dataset of automatized dawn song recordings from 72 unique male great tits, during the fertile period of their mate, and compared specific song traits between neighbours and non-neighbours. We show here that both song rate and start time of dawn song were repeatable song traits. Moreover, neighbours were significantly more dissimilar in song rate compared to non-neighbours, while there was no effect of proximity on song rate similarity. Additionally, similarity in start time of dawn song was unrelated to sharing a territory boundary, but birds were significantly more similar in start time of dawn song when they were breeding in close proximity of each other. We suggest that the dissimilarity in dawn song rate between neighbours is either the result of neighbouring great tits actively avoiding similar song rates to possibly prevent interference, or a passive consequence of territory settlement preferences relative to the types of neighbours. Neighbourhood structuring is therefore likely to be a relevant selection pressure shaping

  17. Song trait similarity in great tits varies with social structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Lysanne; van der Eijk, Jerine; van Rooij, Erica P; de Goede, Piet; van Oers, Kees; Naguib, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For many animals, long-range signalling is essential to maintain contact with conspecifics. In territorial species, individuals often have to balance signalling towards unfamiliar potential competitors (to solely broadcast territory ownership) with signalling towards familiar immediate neighbours (to also maintain so-called "dear enemy" relations). Hence, to understand how signals evolve due to these multilevel relationships, it is important to understand how general signal traits vary in relation to the overall social environment. For many territorial songbirds dawn is a key signalling period, with several neighbouring individuals singing simultaneously without immediate conflict. In this study we tested whether sharing a territory boundary, rather than spatial proximity, is related to similarity in dawn song traits between territorial great tits (Parus major) in a wild personality-typed population. We collected a large dataset of automatized dawn song recordings from 72 unique male great tits, during the fertile period of their mate, and compared specific song traits between neighbours and non-neighbours. We show here that both song rate and start time of dawn song were repeatable song traits. Moreover, neighbours were significantly more dissimilar in song rate compared to non-neighbours, while there was no effect of proximity on song rate similarity. Additionally, similarity in start time of dawn song was unrelated to sharing a territory boundary, but birds were significantly more similar in start time of dawn song when they were breeding in close proximity of each other. We suggest that the dissimilarity in dawn song rate between neighbours is either the result of neighbouring great tits actively avoiding similar song rates to possibly prevent interference, or a passive consequence of territory settlement preferences relative to the types of neighbours. Neighbourhood structuring is therefore likely to be a relevant selection pressure shaping variation in

  18. Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bewley, Gregory P; Sinhuber, Michael; Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    The Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel (VDTT) at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in G\\"ottingen, Germany produces very high turbulence levels at moderate flow velocities, low power consumption and adjustable kinematic viscosity. To reach the highest Reynolds number, the tunnel can be filled and pressurized up to 15 bar with the dense gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF$_6$). The Reynolds number can be varied by changing the pressure or flow rate of the gas or by using different non-flammable gases including air. Turbulence is generated at the upstream ends of two measurement sections with grids, and the evolution of this turbulence is observed as it moves down the length of the sections. We describe the instrumentation presently in operation, which consists of the tunnel itself, classical grid turbulence generators, and state-of-the-art nano-fabricated hot-wire anemometers provided by Princeton University [Vallikivi et al. (2011) Exp. Fluids 51, 1521]. We report measurements of the charact...

  19. Nuclear shape transitions, level density, and underlying interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Karampagia, S

    2016-01-01

    The configuration interaction approach to nuclear structure uses the effective Hamiltonian in a finite orbital space. The various parts of this Hamiltonian and their interplay are responsible for specific features of physics including the shape of the mean field and level density. This interrelation is not sufficiently understood. We intend to study phase transitions between spherical and deformed shapes driven by different parts of the nuclear Hamiltonian and to establish the presence of the collective enhancement of the nuclear level density by varying the shell-model matrix elements. Varying the interaction matrix elements we define, for nuclei in the sd and pf shells, the sectors with spherical and deformed shapes. Using the moments method that does not require the full diagonalization we relate the shape transitions with the corresponding level density. Enhancement of the level density in the low-energy part of the spectrum is observed in clear correlation with a deformation phase transition induced main...

  20. The computation of relative numerosity, size and density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Sabine; Morgan, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the mechanisms for the perception of relative numerosity, we used two-interval forced-choice (temporal 2AFC) to measure thresholds for area, density and numerosity differences between dot textures, and a 2×2 FC task to measure the ability of observers to distinguish changes in area from changes in density. To prevent the use of a one-dimensional size signal we used textures in which dots were scattered within irregular polygonal areas. Numerosity thresholds were similar in the area and density-varying conditions, consistent with a single numerosity mechanism. Thresholds for area and density discriminations were raised when number was held constant, consistent with numerosity thresholds being lower than those for size and density. Also, area thresholds for polygonal outlines were increased when no dots were present in the outline. However, a single numerosity mechanism cannot account for all the data, because we find that observers in randomly-interleaved size-varying and density-varying conditions are also able to discriminate between changes in size and density with a precision predicted from independently-noisy size and density channels that have similar noise to that in the putative numerosity channel. A complication, previously noted with circular shapes, is that denser textures tend to be confused with larger textures, and vice versa. This could explain why thresholds rise when density and size changes are in opposition, in the constant-number case. These findings taken together do not rule out an independent numerosity mechanism, but they are equally compatible with a flexible computation of numerosity from size and density cues.

  1. Degenerate Density Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Palenik, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of $N_d$ degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the initial and perturbed states. Using the X$\\alpha$ exchange-correlation (XC) functional, we find an analytic solution for the first-order density and first through third-order energies as a function of $\\alpha$, with and without a self-interaction correction. The fact that the XC Hessian is not positive definite plays an important role in the behavior of the occupation numbers.

  2. Gluon density in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, A P; Levin, E M

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we present our detail study ( theory and numbers) [1] on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather contraversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula [2] and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Than we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus - nucleus cascade.

  3. Quantal density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Viraht

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with quantal density functional theory (QDFT) which is a time-dependent local effective potential theory of the electronic structure of matter. The treated time-independent QDFT constitutes a special case. In the 2nd edition, the theory is extended to include the presence of external magnetostatic fields. The theory is a description of matter based on the ‘quantal Newtonian’ first and second laws which is in terms of “classical” fields that pervade all space, and their quantal sources. The fields, which are explicitly defined, are separately representative of electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion, correlation-kinetic, correlation-current-density, and correlation-magnetic effects. The book further describes Schrödinger theory from the new physical perspective of fields and quantal sources. It also describes traditional Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham DFT, and explains via QDFT the physics underlying the various energy functionals and functional derivatives o...

  4. Density-of-states

    CERN Document Server

    Langfeld, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Although Monte Carlo calculations using Importance Sampling have matured into the most widely employed method for determining first principle results in QCD, they spectacularly fail for theories with a sign problem or for which certain rare configurations play an important role. Non-Markovian Random walks, based upon iterative refinements of the density-of-states, overcome such overlap problems. I will review the Linear Logarithmic Relaxation (LLR) method and, in particular, focus onto ergodicity and exponential error suppression. Applications include the high-state Potts model, SU(2) and SU(3) Yang-Mills theories as well as a quantum field theory with a strong sign problem: QCD at finite densities of heavy quarks.

  5. Degenerate density perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2016-09-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of Nd degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the initial and perturbed states. Using the X α exchange-correlation (XC) functional, we find an analytic solution for the first-order density and first- through third-order energies as a function of α , with and without a self-interaction correction. The fact that the XC Hessian is not positive definite plays an important role in the behavior of the occupation numbers.

  6. Significant Scales in Community Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Traag, V A; Van Dooren, P

    2013-01-01

    Many complex networks show signs of modular structure, uncovered by community detection. Although many methods succeed in revealing various partitions, it remains difficult to detect at what scale some partition is significant. This problem shows foremost in multi-resolution methods. We here introduce an efficient method for scanning for resolutions in one such method. Additionally, we introduce the notion of "significance" of a partition, based on subgraph probabilities. Significance is independent of the exact method used, so could also be applied in other methods, and can be interpreted as the gain in encoding a graph by making use of a partition. Using significance, we can determine "good" resolution parameters, which we demonstrate on benchmark networks. Moreover, optimizing significance itself also shows excellent performance. We demonstrate our method on voting data from the European Parliament. Our analysis suggests the European Parliament has become increasingly ideologically divided and that nationa...

  7. Amniotic fluid iodine concentrations do not vary in pregnant women with varying iodine intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fuentes, Eduardo; Gallo, Manuel; García, Laureano; Prieto, Stephanie; Alcaide-Torres, Javier; Santiago, Piedad; Velasco, Inés; Soriguer, Federico

    2008-06-01

    Iodine deficiency is an important clinical and public health problem. Its prevention begins with an adequate intake of iodine during pregnancy. International agencies recommend at least 200 microg iodine per d for pregnant women. We assessed whether iodine concentrations in the amniotic fluid of healthy pregnant women are independent of iodine intake. This cross-sectional, non-interventional study included 365 consecutive women who underwent amniocentesis to determine the fetal karyotype. The amniocentesis was performed with abdominal antisepsis using chlorhexidine. The iodine concentration was measured in urine and amniotic fluid. The study variables were the intake of iodized salt and multivitamin supplements or the prescription of a KI supplement. The mean level of urinary iodine was 139.0 (SD 94.5) microg/l and of amniotic fluid 15.81 (SD 7.09) microg/l. The women who consumed iodized salt and those who took a KI supplement had significantly higher levels of urinary iodine than those who did not (P = 0.01 and P = 0.004, respectively). The urinary iodine levels were not significantly different in the women who took a multivitamin supplement compared with those who did not take this supplement, independently of iodine concentration or multivitamin supplement. The concentrations of iodine in the amniotic fluid were similar, independent of the dietary iodine intake. Urine and amniotic fluid iodine concentrations were weakly correlated, although the amniotic fluid values were no higher in those women taking a KI supplement. KI prescription at recommended doses increases the iodine levels in the mother without influencing the iodine levels in the amniotic fluid.

  8. Fat mass measured by DXA varies with scan velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Eva; Petersen, Liselotte; Kreutzer, Martin

    2002-01-01

    To study the influence of scan velocities of DXA on the measured size of fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral content and density, and total body weight.......To study the influence of scan velocities of DXA on the measured size of fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral content and density, and total body weight....

  9. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  10. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  11. Collapse and Fragmentation of Magnetic Molecular Cloud Cores with the Enzo AMR MHD Code. I. Uniform Density Sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important contributers to the dynamics of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and can have a major effect on whether collapse results in a single protostar or fragmentation into a binary or multiple protostar system. New models are presented of the collapse of magnetic cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo2.0. The code was used to calculate the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of initially spherical, uniform density and rotation clouds with density perturbations, i.e., the Boss and Bodenheimer (1979) standard isothermal test case for three dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics (HD) codes. After first verifying that Enzo reproduces the binary fragmentation expected for the non-magnetic test case, a large set of models was computed with varied initial magnetic field strengths and directions with respect to the cloud core axis of rotation (parallel or perpendicular), density perturbation amplitudes, and equations of state. Three significantly different outcomes resulted: (1) c...

  12. Country roads, take me home… to my friends: How intelligence, population density, and friendship affect modern happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Norman P; Kanazawa, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    We propose the savanna theory of happiness, which suggests that it is not only the current consequences of a given situation but also its ancestral consequences that affect individuals' life satisfaction and explains why such influences of ancestral consequences might interact with intelligence. We choose two varied factors that characterize basic differences between ancestral and modern life - population density and frequency of socialization with friends - as empirical test cases. As predicted by the theory, population density is negatively, and frequency of socialization with friends is positively, associated with life satisfaction. More importantly, the main associations of life satisfaction with population density and socialization with friends significantly interact with intelligence, and, in the latter case, the main association is reversed among the extremely intelligent. More intelligent individuals experience lower life satisfaction with more frequent socialization with friends. This study highlights the utility of incorporating evolutionary perspectives in the study of subjective well-being.

  13. Generalized density-functional theory: Conquering the -representability problem with exact functionals for the electron pair density and the second-order reduced density matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paul W Ayers; Mel Levy

    2005-09-01

    Using the constrained search and Legendre-transform formalisms, one can derive ``generalized” density-functional theories, in which the fundamental variable is either the electron pair density or the second-order reduced density matrix. In both approaches, the -representability problem is solved by the functional, and the variational principle is with respect to all pair densities (density matrices) that are nonnegative and appropriately normalized. The Legendre-transform formulation provides a lower bound on the constrained-search functional. Noting that experience in density-functional and density-matrix theories suggests that it is easier to approximate functionals than it is to approximate the set of -representable densities sheds some light on the significance of this work.

  14. Λ(t) cosmology induced by a slowly varying Elko field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S. H.; A. Pinho S., S.; Hoff da Silva, J. M.; Jesus, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work the exact Friedmann-Robertson-Walker equations for an Elko spinor field coupled to gravity in an Einstein-Cartan framework are presented. The torsion functions coupling the Elko field spin-connection to gravity can be exactly solved and the FRW equations for the system assume a relatively simple form. In the limit of a slowly varying Elko spinor field there is a relevant contribution to the field equations acting exactly as a time varying cosmological model Λ(t)=Λ*+3β H2, where Λ* and β are constants. Observational data using distance luminosity from magnitudes of supernovae constraint the parameters Ωm and β, which leads to a lower limit to the Elko mass. Such model mimics, then, the effects of a dark energy fluid, here sourced by the Elko spinor field. The density perturbations in the linear regime were also studied in the pseudo-Newtonian formalism.

  15. A Diffusive System Driven by a Battery or by a Smoothly Varying Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, J. L.

    2010-08-01

    We consider the steady state of a one dimensional diffusive system, such as the symmetric simple exclusion process (SSEP) on a ring, driven by a battery at the origin or by a smoothly varying field along the ring. The battery appears as the limiting case of a smoothly varying field, when the field becomes a delta function at the origin. We find that in the scaling limit the long range pair correlation functions of the system driven by a battery are very different from the ones known in the steady state of the SSEP maintained out of equilibrium by contact with two reservoirs, even when the steady state density profiles are identical in both models.

  16. Tracking a Time-Varying Number of Targets with Radio-Frequency Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao He肖贺; Liu Hang刘航; Xu Jun徐俊; Men Aidong门爱东

    2015-01-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) tomography is an emerging technology which derives targets location informa-tion by analyzing the changes of received signal strength (RSS) in wireless links. This paper presents and evaluates a novel RF tomography system which is capable of detecting and tracking a time-varying number of targets in a cluttered indoor environment. The system incorporates an observation model based on RSS attenuation histogram and a multi-target tracking-by-detection filtering approach based on probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter. In addition, the sequential Monte Carlo method is applied to implement the multi-target filtering. To evaluate the tracking system, the experiments involving up to 3 targets were performed within an obstructed indoor area of 70 m2. The experimental results indicate that the proposed tracking system is capable of tracking a time-varying num-ber of targets.

  17. Phonon structures in the electronic density of states of graphene in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Adam; Carbotte, J. P.; Nicol, E. J.

    2011-06-01

    Unlike in ordinary metals, in graphene, phonon structure can be seen in the quasiparticle electronic density of states, because the latter varies on the scale of the phonon energy. In a magnetic field, quantization into Landau levels creates even more significant variations. We calculate the density of states incorporating electron-phonon coupling in this case and find that the coupling has pronounced new effects: shifting and broadening of Landau levels, creation of new peaks, and splitting of any Landau levels falling near one of the new peaks. Comparing our calculations with a recent experiment, we find evidence for a phonon with energy similar to but somewhat greater than the optical E2g mode and a coupling corresponding to a mass enhancement parameter λsime0.07.

  18. The Nonsubsampled Contourlet Transform Based Statistical Medical Image Fusion Using Generalized Gaussian Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guocheng; Li, Meiling; Chen, Leiting; Yu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel medical image fusion scheme based on the statistical dependencies between coefficients in the nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) domain, in which the probability density function of the NSCT coefficients is concisely fitted using generalized Gaussian density (GGD), as well as the similarity measurement of two subbands is accurately computed by Jensen-Shannon divergence of two GGDs. To preserve more useful information from source images, the new fusion rules are developed to combine the subbands with the varied frequencies. That is, the low frequency subbands are fused by utilizing two activity measures based on the regional standard deviation and Shannon entropy and the high frequency subbands are merged together via weight maps which are determined by the saliency values of pixels. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method significantly outperforms the conventional NSCT based medical image fusion approaches in both visual perception and evaluation indices.

  19. The Nonsubsampled Contourlet Transform Based Statistical Medical Image Fusion Using Generalized Gaussian Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guocheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel medical image fusion scheme based on the statistical dependencies between coefficients in the nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT domain, in which the probability density function of the NSCT coefficients is concisely fitted using generalized Gaussian density (GGD, as well as the similarity measurement of two subbands is accurately computed by Jensen-Shannon divergence of two GGDs. To preserve more useful information from source images, the new fusion rules are developed to combine the subbands with the varied frequencies. That is, the low frequency subbands are fused by utilizing two activity measures based on the regional standard deviation and Shannon entropy and the high frequency subbands are merged together via weight maps which are determined by the saliency values of pixels. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method significantly outperforms the conventional NSCT based medical image fusion approaches in both visual perception and evaluation indices.

  20. Effect of current density on distribution coefficient of solute at solid-liquid interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常国威; 王自东; 吴春京; 胡汉起

    2003-01-01

    When current passes through the solid-liquid interface, the growth rate of crystal, solid-liquid interfaceenergy and radius of curvature at dendritic tip will change. Based on this fact, the theoretical relation between thedistribution of solute at solid-liquid interface and current density was established, and the effect of current on thedistribution coefficient of solute through effecting the rate of crystal growth, the solid-liquid interface energy and theradius of curvature at the dendritic tip was discussed. The results show that as the current density increases, thedistribution coefficient of solute tends to rise in a whole, and when the former is larger than about 400 A/cm2 , thelatter varies significantly.

  1. Robust Stabilization of Nonlinear Systems with Uncertain Varying Control Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiyue Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stabilization problem for a class of nonlinear systems, whose control coefficient is uncertain and varies continuously in value and sign. The study emphasizes the development of a robust control that consists of a modified Nussbaum function to tackle the uncertain varying control coefficient. By such a method, the finite-time escape phenomenon has been prevented when the control coefficient is crossing zero and varying its sign. The proposed control guarantees the asymptotic stabilization of the system and boundedness of all closed-loop signals. The control performance is illustrated by a numerical simulation.

  2. Impulsive control of nonlinear systems with time-varying delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yong-Bin; Bao Jing-Fu; Zhang Hong-Bin; Zhong Qi-Shui; Liao Xiao-Feng; Yu Jue-Sang

    2008-01-01

    A whole impulsive control scheme of nonlinear systems with time-varying delays, which is an extension for impulsive control of nonlinear systems without time delay, is presented in this paper. Utilizing the Lyapunov functions and the impulsive-type comparison principles, we establish a series of different conditions under which impulsively controlled nonlinear systems with time-varying delays are asymptotically stable. Then we estimate upper bounds of impulse interval and time-varying delays for asymptotically stable control. Finally a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  3. Implications of a Time-Varying Fine Structure Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Alfonso-Faus, A

    2002-01-01

    Much work has been done after the possibility of a fine structure constant being time-varying. It has been taken as an indication of a time-varying speed of light. Here we prove that this is not the case. We prove that the speed of light may or may not vary with time, independently of the fine structure constant being constant or not. Time variations of the speed of light, if present, have to be derived by some other means and not from the fine structure constant. No implications based on the possible variations of the fine structure constant can be imposed on the speed of light.

  4. TESTING FOR VARYING DISPERSION IN DISCRETE EXPONENTIAL FAMILY NONLINEAR MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinJinguan; WeiBocheng; ZhangNansong

    2003-01-01

    It is necessary to test for varying dispersion in generalized nonlinear models. Wei ,et al(1998) developed a likelihood ratio test,a score test and their adjustments to test for varying dispersion in continuous exponential family nonlinear models. This type of problem in the framework of general discrete exponential family nonlinear models is discussed. Two types of varying dispersion, which are random coefficients model and random effects model, are proposed,and corresponding score test statistics are constructed and expressed in simple ,easy to use ,matrix formulas.

  5. Precipitating and non-precipitating monoclonal antibodies against chicken avidin. Significance of epitope density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, K; Ashorn, R; Ashorn, P; Kulomaa, M

    1987-01-01

    1. Monoclonal antibodies, generated against chicken avidin, were characterized in Ouchterlony's immunodiffusion. 2. Of the nine antibodies three were non-precipitable but six could form clear visible precipitation lines with egg-white avidin in agarose gel. 3. The latter six antibodies could be divided into two groups according to their reactive pattern in immunodiffusion. 4. Antibodies belonging to the first group precipitated both dimeric as well as tetrameric avidin molecules, while those of the second group precipitated only the tetrameric avidin molecules. 5. The relevance of these results to the structure of avidin as well as possibilities to use monoclonal antibodies and the immunodiffusion technique to compare the structure of avidin induced by different factors are discussed.

  6. Astronomical Significance of Ancient Monuments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonia, I.

    2011-06-01

    Astronomical significance of Gokhnari megalithic monument (eastern Georgia) is considered. Possible connection of Amirani ancient legend with Gokhnari monument is discussed. Concepts of starry practicality and solar stations are proposed.

  7. Historical Significant Volcanic Eruption Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A significant eruption is classified as one that meets at least one of the following criteriacaused fatalities, caused moderate damage (approximately $1 million or...

  8. Semiclassics in Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghyung; Cangi, Attila; Elliott, Peter; Burke, Kieron

    2009-03-01

    Recently, we published an article [1] about the semiclassical origin of density functional theory. We showed that the density and the kinetic energy density of one dimensional finite systems with hard walls can be expressed in terms of the external potential using the semiclassical Green's function method. Here, we show a uniformization scheme for the semiclassical density and the kinetic energy density for turning-point problems.[1] P. Elliott, D. Lee, A. Cangi, and K. Burke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 256406 (2008).

  9. Breast percent density estimation from 3D reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakic, Predrag R.; Kontos, Despina; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2008-03-01

    Breast density is an independent factor of breast cancer risk. In mammograms breast density is quantitatively measured as percent density (PD), the percentage of dense (non-fatty) tissue. To date, clinical estimates of PD have varied significantly, in part due to the projective nature of mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging modality in which cross-sectional images are reconstructed from a small number of projections acquired at different x-ray tube angles. Preliminary studies suggest that DBT is superior to mammography in tissue visualization, since superimposed anatomical structures present in mammograms are filtered out. We hypothesize that DBT could also provide a more accurate breast density estimation. In this paper, we propose to estimate PD from reconstructed DBT images using a semi-automated thresholding technique. Preprocessing is performed to exclude the image background and the area of the pectoral muscle. Threshold values are selected manually from a small number of reconstructed slices; a combination of these thresholds is applied to each slice throughout the entire reconstructed DBT volume. The proposed method was validated using images of women with recently detected abnormalities or with biopsy-proven cancers; only contralateral breasts were analyzed. The Pearson correlation and kappa coefficients between the breast density estimates from DBT and the corresponding digital mammogram indicate moderate agreement between the two modalities, comparable with our previous results from 2D DBT projections. Percent density appears to be a robust measure for breast density assessment in both 2D and 3D x-ray breast imaging modalities using thresholding.

  10. Onychomycosis: A significant medical problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesudanam T

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of onychomycosis is often underestimated. Far more than being a simple cosmetic problem, infected nails serve as a chronic reservoir of infection which can give rise to repeated mycotic infections of the skin. 448 patients with nail abnormalities attending Skin O. P. D of King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam during a 1(one year period between November′98 - October′99, were subjected to detailed clinical, epidemiological study. Diagnosis was confirmed in 204 cases by direct microscopy or culture or by both. Females (51. 96% were slightly more than the males (48. 04%. Majority of the cases were between 21-40 years age group. Housewives (33. 33% were most frequently affected. Trauma was a predisposing factor in 11. 27% of the cases. The duration of lesions varied from 3 months to 15 years. In the majority (38. 23% it was less than one year. Candidal onychomycosis was the most prevalent clinical type (58. 82% followed by distal subungual onychomycosis (38. 72%. Disease was limited only to finger nails in 57. 35% and toe nails in 32. 35%. Ptedominant isolates obtained were condida spp. (56. 7%, followed by dermatophytes (38. 2% and non-dermatophyte molds (3. 37%. 26. 96% of the patients had experienced physical, psychosocial and occupational problems.

  11. Engineering Significant of Swelling Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Kalantari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study describes some of the most important swelling characters of expansive soils when used as foundation materials to support various types of civil engineering structures. Expansive soils are considered among difficult foundation materials and expand upon wetting and shrink upon losing moisture. They are considered problematic soils for architectural and civil engineers. These types of soils may cause minor to major structural damages to pavements as well as buildings. It is therefore essential to detect swelling soils from non-problematic foundation soils before any civil engineering projects are constructed over or adjacent to them. The study begins with definition of expansive soils and shows its distributions in the world as well as the basic causes for swelling potential that these type of soils poses. It is also shown that, the most probable depth of expansion to check for possible swelling potential for swelling soils is soil’s active zone. This zone is the most upper depth of expansive soil and it may extend up to 20 ft. (6 m below ground level. The moisture content of soil through active zone varies during different seasons while in lower part of expansive soil the moisture content stays constant during hot and cold season. Among various methods to check for swelling potential, plastic index and liquid limits are two most crucial factors, as these factors tend to increase, the swelling potential increase as well.

  12. Perfect fluid Bianchi Type-I cosmological models with time varying and

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J P Singh; R K Tiwari

    2008-04-01

    Bianchi Type-I cosmological models containing perfect fluid with time varying and have been presented. The solutions obtained represent an expansion scalar bearing a constant ratio to the anisotropy in the direction of space-like unit vector . Of the two models obtained, one has negative vacuum energy density, which decays numerically. In this model, we obtain ∼ 2, ∼ 44/ and ∼ -2 ( is the cosmic time) which is in accordance with the main dynamical laws for the decay of . The second model reduces to a static solution with repulsive gravity.

  13. Theory of electromagnetic cyclotron wave growth in a time-varying magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail, William B.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of a time-dependent perturbation in the magnetoplasma on the wave and particle populations is investigated using the Kennel-Petchek (1966) approach. Perturbations in the cold plasma density, energetic particle distribution, and resonance condition are calculated on the basis of the ideal MHD assumption given an arbitrary compressional magnetic field perturbation. An equation is derived describing the time-dependent growth rate for parallel propagating electromagnetic cyclotron waves in a time-varying magnetoplasma with perturbations superimposed on an equilibrium configuration.

  14. A study of sex differences in fingerprint ridge density in a North Indian young adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Ngangom, Chitrabala

    2013-05-01

    Fingerprints have considerable value in morphological, biological, anthropological and forensic studies. Fingerprints collected from the crime scene and from the items of evidence of crime have been successfully used to identify suspects, victims or any other person who had touched the surface in question. The thickness of epidermal ridges varies between individuals; females are supposed to have finer ridges than males and therefore a greater ridge density. The present research is an attempt to distinguish sex from fingerprint ridge density in the radial, ulnar and lower areas of a fingerprint in a North Indian population. A total of 194 individuals (97 males and 97 females) aged between 18 and 25 years were included in the study and fingerprints were collected from each finger of the participants. Thus, a total of 1940 fingerprints were obtained and epidermal ridges were counted in the radial, ulnar, and lower areas of each fingerprint. The radial and ulnar areas are the 5 mm × 5 mm areas on the radial and ulnar side of the central core respectively while the lower area is designated as 5 mm × 5 mm area adjoining the flexion crease of the terminal phalanx on a fingerprint. The fingerprint ridge density in radial, ulnar and lower areas and between sexes was compared statistically using t-test. The results indicate that the females tend to have a significantly higher ridge density than males in the three areas analyzed in the study. The fingerprint ridge density in the ulnar and radial areas of the fingerprints is significantly higher than the lower area. The present study suggests that the fingerprint ridge density can be a relevant and useful morphological parameter in distinguishing sex of a latent fingerprint of unknown origin from the scene of crime. The findings can also be useful in identification of mutilated remains when a dismembered hand is brought for medico-legal examination.

  15. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Dupont

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventional scatter plot. Each bin with from l to d observations contains a light sunflower. Other bins contain a dark sunflower. In a light sunflower each petal represents one observation. In a dark sunflower, each petal represents k observations. (A dark sunflower with p petals represents between /2-pk k and /2+pk k observations. The user can control the sizes and colors of the sunflowers. By selecting appropriate colors and sizes for the light and dark sunflowers, plots can be obtained that give both the overall sense of the data density distribution as well as the number of data points in any given region. The use of this graphic is illustrated with data from the Framingham Heart Study. A documented Stata program, called sunflower, is available to draw these graphs. It can be downloaded from the Statistical Software Components archive at http://ideas.repec.org/c/boc/bocode/s430201.html . (Journal of Statistical Software 2003; 8 (3: 1-5. Posted at http://www.jstatsoft.org/index.php?vol=8 .

  16. Food Allergies Among Kids Vary by Race: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162165.html Food Allergies Among Kids Vary by Race: Study Researchers find ... study of 817 children who were diagnosed with food allergies from birth to age 18, show that race ...

  17. Estimation of Time Varying Autoregressive Symmetric Alpha Stable

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this work, we present a novel method for modeling time-varying autoregressive impulsive signals driven by symmetric alpha stable distributions. The proposed...

  18. The Arbitrarily Varying Multiple-Access Channel with Conferencing Encoders

    CERN Document Server

    Wiese, Moritz

    2011-01-01

    We derive the capacity region of arbitrarily varying multiple-access channels with conferencing encoders for both deterministic and random coding. We obtain a dichotomy: either the channel's deterministic capacity region is zero or it equals the two-dimensional random coding region. We determine exactly when either case holds. We also discuss the benefits of conferencing. For both the compound and the arbitrarily varying cases, we give the example of a channel which does not achieve any non-zero rate pair without encoder cooperation, but the two-dimensional random coding capacity region if conferencing is possible. Unlike compound multiple-access channels, arbitrarily varying multiple-access channels may exhibit a discontinuous increase of the capacity region when conferencing is enabled. We use the arbitrarily varying multiple-access channel with conferencing encoders for an information-theoretic analysis of the performance of wireless networks with cooperating base stations disturbed by exterior interferenc...

  19. Comments on "Note on varying speed of light theories"

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, Joao

    2007-01-01

    In a recent note Ellis criticizes varying speed of light theories on the grounds of a number of foundational issues. His reflections provide us with an opportunity to clarify some fundamental matters pertaining to these theories.

  20. PERMANENCE AND PERSISTENCE OF TIME VARYING LOTKA-VOLTERRA SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the permanence and persistence for three classes time varying Lotka-Volterra ecological system are investigated by using Lyapunov stability analysis and constructing the compact set of attraction. Some examples are given to illustrate the theorems.

  1. Modeling non-Gaussian time-varying vector autoregressive process

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a novel and general methodology for modeling time-varying vector autoregressive processes which are widely used in many areas such as modeling of chemical...

  2. Significance analysis of prognostic signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Beck

    Full Text Available A major goal in translational cancer research is to identify biological signatures driving cancer progression and metastasis. A common technique applied in genomics research is to cluster patients using gene expression data from a candidate prognostic gene set, and if the resulting clusters show statistically significant outcome stratification, to associate the gene set with prognosis, suggesting its biological and clinical importance. Recent work has questioned the validity of this approach by showing in several breast cancer data sets that "random" gene sets tend to cluster patients into prognostically variable subgroups. This work suggests that new rigorous statistical methods are needed to identify biologically informative prognostic gene sets. To address this problem, we developed Significance Analysis of Prognostic Signatures (SAPS which integrates standard prognostic tests with a new prognostic significance test based on stratifying patients into prognostic subtypes with random gene sets. SAPS ensures that a significant gene set is not only able to stratify patients into prognostically variable groups, but is also enriched for genes showing strong univariate associations with patient prognosis, and performs significantly better than random gene sets. We use SAPS to perform a large meta-analysis (the largest completed to date of prognostic pathways in breast and ovarian cancer and their molecular subtypes. Our analyses show that only a small subset of the gene sets found statistically significant using standard measures achieve significance by SAPS. We identify new prognostic signatures in breast and ovarian cancer and their corresponding molecular subtypes, and we show that prognostic signatures in ER negative breast cancer are more similar to prognostic signatures in ovarian cancer than to prognostic signatures in ER positive breast cancer. SAPS is a powerful new method for deriving robust prognostic biological signatures from clinically

  3. Density-Dependent Effects of an Invasive Ant on a Ground-Dwelling Arthropod Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, M; Sim, D A; Lester, P J

    2015-02-01

    It is frequently assumed that an invasive species that is ecologically or economically damaging in one region, will typically be so in other environments. The Argentine ant Linepithema humile (Mayr) is listed among the world's worst invaders. It commonly displaces resident ant species where it occurs at high population densities, and may also reduce densities of other ground-dwelling arthropods. We investigated the effect of varying Argentine ant abundance on resident ant and nonant arthropod species richness and abundance in seven cities across its range in New Zealand. Pitfall traps were used to compare an invaded and uninvaded site in each city. Invaded sites were selected based on natural varying abundance of Argentine ant populations. Argentine ant density had a significant negative effect on epigaeic ant abundance and species richness, but hypogaeic ant abundance and species richness was unaffected. We observed a significant decrease in Diplopoda abundance with increasing Argentine ant abundance, while Coleoptera abundance increased. The effect on Amphipoda and Isopoda depended strongly on climate. The severity of the impact on negatively affected taxa was reduced in areas where Argentine ant densities were low. Surprisingly, Argentine ants had no effect on the abundance of the other arthropod taxa examined. Morphospecies richness for all nonant arthropod taxa was unaffected by Argentine ant abundance. Species that are established as invasive in one location therefore cannot be assumed to be invasive in other locations based on presence alone. Appropriate management decisions should reflect this knowledge. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The glycemic index: physiological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Amin; Wong, Julia M W; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2009-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a physiological assessment of a food's carbohydrate content through its effect on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Evidence from trials and observational studies suggests that this physiological classification may have relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with overconsumption and inactivity leading to central obesity and insulin resistance. The glycemic index classification of foods has been used as a tool to assess potential prevention and treatment strategies for diseases where glycemic control is of importance, such as diabetes. Low GI diets have also been reported to improve the serum lipid profile, reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and aid in weight control. In cross-sectional studies, low GI or glycemic load diets (mean GI multiplied by total carbohydrate) have been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), with reduced CRP concentrations, and, in cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, some case-control and cohort studies have found positive associations between dietary GI and risk of various cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and prostate. Although inconsistencies in the current findings still need to be resolved, sufficient positive evidence, especially with respect to renewed interest in postprandial events, suggests that the glycemic index may have a role to play in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  5. Discrete density of states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Alhun; Sisman, Altug

    2016-03-01

    By considering the quantum-mechanically minimum allowable energy interval, we exactly count number of states (NOS) and introduce discrete density of states (DOS) concept for a particle in a box for various dimensions. Expressions for bounded and unbounded continua are analytically recovered from discrete ones. Even though substantial fluctuations prevail in discrete DOS, they're almost completely flattened out after summation or integration operation. It's seen that relative errors of analytical expressions of bounded/unbounded continua rapidly decrease for high NOS values (weak confinement or high energy conditions), while the proposed analytical expressions based on Weyl's conjecture always preserve their lower error characteristic.

  6. Finite Density Fat QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, R; Di Carlo, G; Galante, A; Grillo, A F

    2000-01-01

    Lattice formulation of Finite Baryon Density QCD is problematic from computer simulation point of view; it is well known that for light quark masses the reconstructed partition function fails to be positive in a wide region of parameter space. For large bare quark masses, instead, it is possible to obtain more sensible results; problems are still present but restricted to a small region. We present evidence for a saturation transition independent from the gauge coupling $\\beta$ and for a transition line that, starting from the temperature critical point at $\\mu=0$, moves towards smaller $\\beta$ with increasing $\\mu$ as expected from simplified phenomenological arguments.

  7. Design of 2D Time-Varying Vector Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Guoning

    2012-10-01

    Design of time-varying vector fields, i.e., vector fields that can change over time, has a wide variety of important applications in computer graphics. Existing vector field design techniques do not address time-varying vector fields. In this paper, we present a framework for the design of time-varying vector fields, both for planar domains as well as manifold surfaces. Our system supports the creation and modification of various time-varying vector fields with desired spatial and temporal characteristics through several design metaphors, including streamlines, pathlines, singularity paths, and bifurcations. These design metaphors are integrated into an element-based design to generate the time-varying vector fields via a sequence of basis field summations or spatial constrained optimizations at the sampled times. The key-frame design and field deformation are also introduced to support other user design scenarios. Accordingly, a spatial-temporal constrained optimization and the time-varying transformation are employed to generate the desired fields for these two design scenarios, respectively. We apply the time-varying vector fields generated using our design system to a number of important computer graphics applications that require controllable dynamic effects, such as evolving surface appearance, dynamic scene design, steerable crowd movement, and painterly animation. Many of these are difficult or impossible to achieve via prior simulation-based methods. In these applications, the time-varying vector fields have been applied as either orientation fields or advection fields to control the instantaneous appearance or evolving trajectories of the dynamic effects. © 1995-2012 IEEE.

  8. Model Identification of Linear Parameter Varying Aircraft Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimore, Atsushi; Ljung, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a parameter estimation of continuous-time polytopic models for a linear parameter varying (LPV) system. The prediction error method of linear time invariant (LTI) models is modified for polytopic models. The modified prediction error method is applied to an LPV aircraft system whose varying parameter is the flight velocity and model parameters are the stability and control derivatives (SCDs). In an identification simulation, the polytopic model is more suitable for expre...

  9. GPU Acceleration of Image Convolution using Spatially-varying Kernel

    OpenAIRE

    Hartung, Steven; Shukla, Hemant; Miller, J. Patrick; Pennypacker, Carlton

    2012-01-01

    Image subtraction in astronomy is a tool for transient object discovery such as asteroids, extra-solar planets and supernovae. To match point spread functions (PSFs) between images of the same field taken at different times a convolution technique is used. Particularly suitable for large-scale images is a computationally intensive spatially-varying kernel. The underlying algorithm is inherently massively parallel due to unique kernel generation at every pixel location. The spatially-varying k...

  10. Varying nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length during capillary electrophoresis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Varuni; Griffith, Lindsay; Haes, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis based separations of the hypothesized Parkinson’s disease biomarkers dopamine, epinephrine, pyrocatechol, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), glutathione, and uric acid are performed in the presence of a 1 nM 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid functionalized gold (Au@MUA) nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug. Au@MUA nanoparticles are monitored in the capillary and remain stable in the presence of electrically-driven flow. Migration times, peak areas, and relative velocity changes (vs. no pseudostationary) are monitored upon varying (1) the Au@MUA nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length at a fixed separation voltage and (2) the separation voltage for a fixed Au@MUA nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length. For instance, the migration times of positively charged dopamine and epinephrine increase slightly as the nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length increases with concomitant decreases in peak areas and relative velocities as a result of attractive forces between the positively charged analytes and the negatively charged nanoparticles. Migration times for neutral pyrocatechol and slightly negative L-DOPA did not exhibit significant changes with increasing nanoparticle pseudostationary plug length; however, reduction in peak areas for these two molecules were evident and attributed to non-specific interactions (i.e. hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions) between the biomarkers and nanoparticles. Moreover, negatively charged uric acid and glutathione displayed progressively decreasing migration times and peak areas and as a result, increased relative velocities with increasing nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length. These trends are attributed to partitioning and exchanging with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid on nanoparticle surfaces for uric acid and glutathione, respectively. Similar trends are observed when the separation voltage decreased thereby suggesting that nanoparticle-biomarker interaction

  11. Dual effects of pedestrian density on emergency evacuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yi, E-mail: yima23-c@my.cityu.edu.hk [School of Transportation and Logistics, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yuen, Richard Kwok Kit [Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2017-02-05

    This paper investigates the effect of the pedestrian density in building on the evacuation dynamic with simulation method. In the simulations, both the visibility in building and the exit limit of building are taken into account. The simulation results show that the effect of the pedestrian density in building on the evacuation dynamics is dual. On the one hand, when the visibility in building is very large, the increased pedestrian density plays a negative effect. On the other hand, when the visibility in building is very small, the increased pedestrian density can play a positive effect. The simulation results also show that when both the exit width and visibility are very small, the varying of evacuation time with regard to the pedestrian density is non-monotonous and presents a U-shaped tendency. That is, in this case, too large or too small pedestrian density in building is disadvantageous to the evacuation process. Our findings provide a new insight about the effect of the pedestrian density in building on the evacuation dynamic. - Highlights: • Pedestrian density inside buildings has dual effects on evacuation. • Increased pedestrian density has a negative effect in cases of increased visibility. • Increased pedestrian density has a positive effect in cases of decreased visibility.

  12. Interaction between host genotype and environmental conditions affects bacterial density in Wolbachia symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mouton, Laurence; Henri, Hélène; Charif, Delphine; Boulétreau, Michel; Vavre, Fabrice

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of microbial population density is a necessity in stable symbiotic interactions. In Wolbachia symbiosis, both bacterial and host genotypes are involved in density regulation, but environmental factors may also affect bacterial population density. Here, we studied the interaction between three strains of Wolbachia in two divergent homozygous lines of the wasp Leptopilina heterotoma at two different temperatures. Wolbachia density varied between the two host genotypes at only one tem...

  13. Oblique dust density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  14. Gluon density in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, A.L. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica][Pelotas Univ., RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Matematica; Ducati, M.B.G. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Levin, E.M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)][Nuclear Physics Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    In this talk we present our detailed study (theory and numbers) on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather controversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Then we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus-nucleus cascade. The initial conditions should be fixed both theoretically and phenomenologically before to attack such complicated problems as the mixture of hard and soft processes in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy or the theoretically reliable approach to hadron or/and parton cascades for high energy nucleus-nucleus interaction. 35 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Relationship between molecular cloud structure and density PDFs

    CERN Document Server

    Stanchev, Orlin; Veltchev, Todor V; Shetty, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Volume and column density PDFs in molecular clouds are important diagnostics for understanding their general structure. We developed a novel approach to trace the cloud structure by varying the lower PDF cut-off and exploring a suggested mass-density relationship with a power-law index $x^\\prime$. The correspondence of x' as a function of spatial scale to the slope of the high-density PDF tail is studied. To validate the proposed model, we use results from hydrodynamical simulations of a turbulent self-gravitating cloud and recent data on dust continuum emission from the Planck mission.

  16. Using Volumetric Breast Density to Quantify the Potential Masking Risk of Mammographic Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destounis, Stamatia; Johnston, Lisa; Highnam, Ralph; Arieno, Andrea; Morgan, Renee; Chan, Ariane

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare BI-RADS density categories with quantitative volumetric breast density (VBD) for the reporting of mammographic sensitivity and to identify which patient factors are most predictive of a diagnosis of interval cancer of the breast versus screen-detected cancer. This retrospective study included screen-detected cancers (n = 652) and interval cancers (n = 119) identified between January 2009 and December 2012. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine which patient factors are predictive of a diagnosis of interval cancer. Sensitivity (screen-detected cancer / [screen-detected cancer + interval cancer]) was determined with the BI-RADS 4th edition density categories and an automated equivalent density grade obtained with a proprietary tool. Sensitivity changes within automated density grade categories were investigated by use of quantitative thresholds at the midpoints of each category. In univariate analysis, age, menopausal status, and breast density were associated with a diagnosis of interval cancer. Of these risk factors, breast density was the only independent factor whether it was assessed by visual BI-RADS category (odds ratio, 3.54; 95% CI, 1.55-8.10), automated density grade (odds ratio, 4.68; 95% CI, 2.26-9.67), or VBD (odds ratio, 4.51; 95% CI, 1.92-10.61). Sensitivity decreased consistently across increasing automated density grade categories from fatty to extremely dense (95%, 89%, 83%, 65%) and less so for visual BI-RADS (82%, 90%, 84%, 66%). Further dichotomization with VBD cutoffs showed a striking linear relation between VBD and sensitivity (R(2) = 0.959). In this study, breast density was the only risk factor significantly associated with a diagnosis of interval cancer versus screen-detected cancer. Quantitative VBD captures the potential masking risk of breast density more precisely than does the widely used visual BI-RADS density classification system.

  17. Knowledge of Density and Screening Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moothathu, Nitya S; Philpotts, Liane E; Busch, Susan H; Gross, Cary P; Staib, Lawrence H; Hooley, Regina J

    2017-05-01

    To determine breast density awareness and attitudes regarding supplemental breast ultrasound screening since implementation of the nation's first breast density notification law, Connecticut Public Act 09-41. A self-administered survey was distributed at a Connecticut academic breast imaging center between February 2013 and February 2014. Women with prior mammography reports describing heterogeneous or extremely dense breast tissue were invited to participate when presenting for screening mammography, screening ultrasound, or both. Data were collected on breast density awareness, history of prior ultrasounds, attitudes toward ultrasound and breast-cancer risk, and demographics. Data were collected from 950 completed surveys. The majority of surveyed women (92%) were aware of their breast density, and 77% had undergone a prior screening ultrasound. Forty-three percent of participants who were aware of their breast density also expressed increased anxiety about developing breast cancer due to having dense breast tissue. Caucasian race and higher education were significantly associated (p density (93% and 95%, respectively) and having a prior screening breast ultrasound (79% and 80%, respectively). Patients with less than a college degree (82%) were significantly more likely to rely exclusively on their provider's recommendation regarding obtaining screening ultrasound (p density awareness is strongly associated with higher education, higher income, and Caucasian race. Non-Caucasian patients and those with less than a college education rely more heavily on their physicians' recommendations regarding screening ultrasound. Among women aware of their increased breast density, nearly half reported associated increased anxiety regarding the possibility of developing breast cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Significant advancement in algebraic geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Supported by a grant for Distinguished Young Scholars of the National Natural Science Foundation of China,Prof.SUN Xiaotao with the CAS Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science has recently achieved a research breakthrough in revealing the deep relationship between stability of vector bundles and Frobenius morphism.It is considered as significant work with important theoretical value.

  19. Generating survival times to simulate Cox proportional hazards models with time-varying covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Peter C

    2012-12-20

    Simulations and Monte Carlo methods serve an important role in modern statistical research. They allow for an examination of the performance of statistical procedures in settings in which analytic and mathematical derivations may not be feasible. A key element in any statistical simulation is the existence of an appropriate data-generating process: one must be able to simulate data from a specified statistical model. We describe data-generating processes for the Cox proportional hazards model with time-varying covariates when event times follow an exponential, Weibull, or Gompertz distribution. We consider three types of time-varying covariates: first, a dichotomous time-varying covariate that can change at most once from untreated to treated (e.g., organ transplant); second, a continuous time-varying covariate such as cumulative exposure at a constant dose to radiation or to a pharmaceutical agent used for a chronic condition; third, a dichotomous time-varying covariate with a subject being able to move repeatedly between treatment states (e.g., current compliance or use of a medication). In each setting, we derive closed-form expressions that allow one to simulate survival times so that survival times are related to a vector of fixed or time-invariant covariates and to a single time-varying covariate. We illustrate the utility of our closed-form expressions for simulating event times by using Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the statistical power to detect as statistically significant the effect of different types of binary time-varying covariates. This is compared with the statistical power to detect as statistically significant a binary time-invariant covariate.

  20. Gedanken Densities and Exact Constraints in Density Functional Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Perdew, John P; Sun, Jianwei; Burke, Kieron

    2014-01-01

    Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is no...