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Sample records for density temperature pressure

  1. Equation of state density models for hydrocarbons in ultradeep reservoirs at extreme temperature and pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Baled, Hseen O.; Enick, Robert M.; McHugh, Mark A.

    2013-10-01

    The necessity of exploring ultradeep reservoirs requires the accurate prediction of hydrocarbon density data at extreme temperatures and pressures. In this study, three equations of state (EoS) models, Peng-Robinson (PR), high-temperature high-pressure volume-translated PR (HTHP VT-PR), and perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) EoS are used to predict the density data for hydrocarbons in ultradeep reservoirs at temperatures to 523 K and pressures to 275 MPa. The calculated values are compared with experimental data. The results show that the HTHP VT-PR EoS and PC-SAFT EoS always perform better than the regular PR EoS for all the investigated hydrocarbons.

  2. Density and Viscosity Measurement of Diesel Fuels at Combined High Pressure and Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Schaschke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the measurement of the viscosity and density of various diesel fuels, obtained from British refineries, at elevated pressures up to 500 MPa and temperatures in the range 298 K to 373 K. The measurement and prediction procedures of fluid properties under high pressure conditions is of increasing interest in many processes and systems including enhanced oil recovery, automotive engine fuel injection, braking, and hydraulic systems. Accurate data and understanding of the fluid characteristic in terms of pressure, volume and temperature is required particularly where the fluid is composed of a complex mixture or blend of aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons. In this study, high pressure viscosity data was obtained using a thermostatically-controlled falling sinker-type high pressure viscometer to provide reproducible and reliable viscosity data based on terminal velocity sinker fall times. This was supported with density measurements using a micro-pVT device. Both high-pressure devices were additionally capable of illustrating the freezing points of the hydrocarbon mixtures. This work has, thus, provided data that can extend the application of mixtures of commercially available fuels and to test the validity of available predictive density and viscosity models. This included a Tait-style equation for fluid compressibility prediction. For complex diesel fuel compositions, which have many unidentified components, the approach illustrates the need to apply appropriate correlations, which require accurate knowledge or prediction of thermodynamic properties.

  3. The viscosity and density of sour gas fluids at high temperatures and high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, B.R.; Marriott, R.A.; Blais, P.; Clark, P.D. [Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-01-15

    This poster session discussed an experiment designed to measure the viscosity and density of sour gas fluids at high temperatures and pressures. An option for disposing acid gases while enhancing the production of oil and gas fields is the re-injection of gases rich in hydrogen sulphide/carbon dioxide (H{sub 2}S/CO{sub 2}) into reservoirs up to very high pressures, but issues with respect to corrosion, compression, pumping, and transport need addressing, and the reliable high-density/high-pressure data needed to arrive at an optimum process concept and the design of pumps, compressors, and transport lines had up to this point been lacking. The experimental set up involved the use of a Vibrating Tube Densimeter and a Cambridge Viscometer. Working with toxic gases at very high pressures and obtaining highly accurate data in a wide range of conditions were two of the challenges faced during the experiment. The experiment resulted in physical property measurement systems being recalibrated and a new daily calibration routine being adopted for accuracy. The densities and viscosities of pure CO{sub 2} and sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in a wide pressure and temperature range were determined. 1 tab., 9 figs.

  4. High Temperature, high pressure equation of state density correlations and viscosity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapriyal, D.; Enick, R.; McHugh, M.; Gamwo, I.; Morreale, B.

    2012-07-31

    Global increase in oil demand and depleting reserves has derived a need to find new oil resources. To find these untapped reservoirs, oil companies are exploring various remote and harsh locations such as deep waters in Gulf of Mexico, remote arctic regions, unexplored deep deserts, etc. Further, the depth of new oil/gas wells being drilled has increased considerably to tap these new resources. With the increase in the well depth, the bottomhole temperature and pressure are also increasing to extreme values (i.e. up to 500 F and 35,000 psi). The density and viscosity of natural gas and crude oil at reservoir conditions are critical fundamental properties required for accurate assessment of the amount of recoverable petroleum within a reservoir and the modeling of the flow of these fluids within the porous media. These properties are also used to design appropriate drilling and production equipment such as blow out preventers, risers, etc. With the present state of art, there is no accurate database for these fluid properties at extreme conditions. As we have begun to expand this experimental database it has become apparent that there are neither equations of state for density or transport models for viscosity that can be used to predict these fundamental properties of multi-component hydrocarbon mixtures over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Presently, oil companies are using correlations based on lower temperature and pressure databases that exhibit an unsatisfactory predictive capability at extreme conditions (e.g. as great as {+-} 50%). From the perspective of these oil companies that are committed to safely producing these resources, accurately predicting flow rates, and assuring the integrity of the flow, the absence of an extensive experimental database at extreme conditions and models capable of predicting these properties over an extremely wide range of temperature and pressure (including extreme conditions) makes their task even more daunting.

  5. Pressure, density, temperature and entropy fluctuations in compressible turbulent plane channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gerolymos, G A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of thermodynamic state-variables in compressible aerodynamic wall-turbulence, using results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent plane channel flow. The basic transport equations governing the behaviour of thermodynamic variables (density, pressure, temperature and entropy) are reviewed and used to derive the exact transport equations for the variances and fluxes (transport by the fluctuating velocity field) of the thermodynamic fluctuations. The scaling with Reynolds and Mach number of compressible turbulent plane channel flow is discussed. Correlation coefficients and higher-order statistics of the thermodynamic fluctuations are examined. Finally, detailed budgets of the transport equations for the variances and fluxes of the thermodynamic variables from a well-resolved DNS are analysed. Implications of these results both to the understanding of the thermodynamic interactions in compressible wall-turbulence and to possible improvements in statistical...

  6. Calculation of the density of solutions (sunflower oil + n-hexane) over a wide range of temperatures and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarov, M. M.; Abdukhamidova, Z.

    1995-09-01

    We present the results from an experimental investigation of the density of the sunflower oil system as a function of the mass concentration of n-hexane in the ranges of temperatures T=290 520 K and pressures P=0.101 98.1 MPa. A method of hydrostatic weighing was used to measure the density of the solutions under study.

  7. Atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and wind variations between 50 and 200 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1972-01-01

    Data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 50 and 200 km were collected from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others. These data were analyzed by a daily difference method and results on the distribution statistics, magnitude, and spatial structure of the irregular atmospheric variations are presented. Time structures of the irregular variations were determined by the analysis of residuals from harmonic analysis of time series data. The observed height variations of irregular winds and densities are found to be in accord with a theoretical relation between these two quantities. The latitude variations (at 50 - 60 km height) show an increasing trend with latitude. A possible explanation of the unusually large irregular wind magnitudes of the White Sands MRN data is given in terms of mountain wave generation by the Sierra Nevada range about 1000 km west of White Sands. An analytical method is developed which, based on an analogy of the irregular motion field with axisymmetric turbulence, allows measured or model correlation or structure functions to be used to evaluate the effective frequency spectra of scalar and vector quantities of a spacecraft moving at any speed and at any trajectory elevation angle.

  8. An analysis of the errors associated with the determination of atmospheric temperature from atmospheric pressure and density data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minzner, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A graph was developed for relating delta T/T, the relative uncertainty in atmospheric temperature T, to delta p/p, the relative uncertainty in the atmospheric pressure p, for situations, when T is derived from the slope of the pressure-height profile. A similar graph relates delta T/T to delta roh/rho, the relative uncertainty in the atmospheric density rho, for those cases when T is derived from the downward integration of the density-height profile. A comparison of these two graphs shows that for equal uncertainties in the respective basic parameters, p or rho, smaller uncertainties in the derived temperatures are associated with density-height rather than with pressure-height data. The value of delta T/T is seen to depend not only upon delta p or delta rho, and to a small extent upon the value of T or the related scale height H, but also upon the inverse of delta h, the height increment between successive observations of p or rho. In the case of pressure-height data, delta T/T is dominated by 1/delta h for all values of delta h; for density-height data, delta T/T is dominated by delta rho/rho for delta h smaller than about 5 km. In the case of T derived from density-height data, this inverse relationship between delta T/T and delta h applies only for large values of delta h, that is, for delta h 35 km. No limit exists in the fineness of usable height resolution of T which may be derived from densities, while a fine height resolution in pressure-height data leads to temperature with unacceptably large uncertainties.

  9. Effect of isomeric structures of branched cyclic hydrocarbons on densities and equation of state predictions at elevated temperatures and pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A; Burgess, Ward A; Tapriyal, Deepak; Baled, Hseen O; Enick, Robert M; McHugh, Mark A

    2013-07-25

    The cis and trans conformation of a branched cyclic hydrocarbon affects the packing and, hence, the density, exhibited by that compound. Reported here are density data for branched cyclohexane (C6) compounds including methylcyclohexane, ethylcyclohexane (ethylcC6), cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane (cis-1,2), cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (cis-1,4), and trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (trans-1,4) determined at temperatures up to 525 K and pressures up to 275 MPa. Of the four branched C6 isomers, cis-1,2 exhibits the largest densities and the smallest densities are exhibited by trans-1,4. The densities are modeled with the Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EoS), the high-temperature, high-pressure, volume-translated (HTHP VT) PREoS, and the perturbed chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) EoS. Model calculations highlight the capability of these equations to account for the different densities observed for the four isomers investigated in this study. The HTHP VT-PREoS provides modest improvements over the PREoS, but neither cubic EoS is capable of accounting for the effect of isomer structural differences on the observed densities. The PC-SAFT EoS, with pure component parameters from the literature or from a group contribution method, provides improved density predictions relative to those obtained with the PREoS or HTHP VT-PREoS. However, the PC-SAFT EoS, with either set of parameters, also cannot fully account for the effect of the C6 isomer structure on the resultant density.

  10. Effect of Isomeric Structures of Branched Cyclic Hydrocarbons on Densities and Equation of State Predictions at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A; Burgess, Ward A; Tapriyal, Deepak; Baled, Hseen O; Enick, Robert M; McHugh, Mark

    2013-07-25

    The cis and trans conformation of a branched cyclic hydrocarbon affects the packing and, hence, the density, exhibited by that compound. Reported here are density data for branched cyclohexane (C6) compounds including methylcyclohexane, ethylcyclohexane (ethylcC6), cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane (cis-1,2), cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (cis-1,4), and trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (trans-1,4) determined at temperatures up to 525 K and pressures up to 275 MPa. Of the four branched C6 isomers, cis-1,2 exhibits the largest densities and the smallest densities are exhibited by trans-1,4. The densities are modeled with the Peng–Robinson (PR) equation of state (EoS), the high-temperature, high-pressure, volume-translated (HTHP VT) PREoS, and the perturbed chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) EoS. Model calculations highlight the capability of these equations to account for the different densities observed for the four isomers investigated in this study. The HTHP VT-PREoS provides modest improvements over the PREoS, but neither cubic EoS is capable of accounting for the effect of isomer structural differences on the observed densities. The PC-SAFT EoS, with pure component parameters from the literature or from a group contribution method, provides improved density predictions relative to those obtained with the PREoS or HTHP VT-PREoS. However, the PC-SAFT EoS, with either set of parameters, also cannot fully account for the effect of the C6 isomer structure on the resultant density.

  11. NO density and gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges by Mid-IR QCLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, Marien; Stancu, Gabi-Daniel; Laux, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a key species for many processes: in combustion, in human skin physiology... Recently, NO-ground state absolute density measurements produced by atmospheric pressure NRP discharges were carried out in air as a function of the discharge parameters, using Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. These measurements were space averaged and performed in the post-discharge region in a large gas volume. Here we present radial profiles of NO density and temperature measured directly in the discharge for different configurations. Small plasma volume and species densities, high temperature and EM noise environment make the absorption diagnostic challenging. For this purpose the QCLAS sensitivity was improved using a two-detector system. We conducted lateral absorbance measurements with a spatial resolution of 300 μm for two absorption features at 1900.076 and 1900.517 cm-1. The radial temperature and NO density distributions were obtained from the Abel inverted lateral measurements. Time averaged NO densities of about 1.E16 cm-3 and gas temperature of about 1000K were obtained in the center of the discharge. PLASMAFLAME Project (Grant No ANR-11-BS09-0025).

  12. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  13. Simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and pressure in a supersonic turbulent flow using laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Gross, K. P.; Logan, P.

    1985-01-01

    A pulsed laser-induced fluorescence technique is described that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and pressure in low-temperature, turbulent flows. The measurements are made with spatial and temporal resolution comparable to that obtained with modern laser anemometer techniques used for turbulent boundary layer research. The capabilities of the method are briefly described and its demonstration in a simple two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at Mach 2 is reported. The results are compared with conventional hot-wire anemometer data obtained in the same flow.

  14. Handbook of Geophysics and Space Environments. Chapter 15, 1983 Revision. Atmospheric Temperature, Density and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-13

    D.C. 20402. 15 . , iF -w" Stevenson Screen. The shelter has a base about 1 m (1.7 to 2.0 m in Central Europe) above the ground and is mounted in an...10 through 12 August 1893, Fin- land, after Homen (Geigerl 2 ) Temperature (C) Annual Means Daily Means Swamp Sandy Granite Loam Sand Humus Land Heath

  15. Experimental measurements and equation of state modeling of liquid densities for long-chain n-alkanes at pressures to 265 MPa and temperatures to 523 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde; Liu, Kun; McHugh, Mark A.; Baled, Hseen; Enick, Robert M.; Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental densities are reported for n-hexadecane, n-octadecane, and n-eicosane at pressures to ~265 MPa and temperatures of 323.15, 423.15, and 523.15 K. The reported densities are in good agreement with the available literature data that cover limited pressure and temperature ranges. The Peng–Robinson equation of state (PR EOS), a new high-temperature high-pressure volume-translated Soave–Redlich–Kwong equation of state (HTHP-VT SRK EOS), and the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) are used to predict the reported densities. Finally, both the HTHP-VT SRK and PC-SAFT equations exhibit mean absolute percent deviation (MAPD) values of 2.4–1.3% for the densities of all three hydrocarbons while the MAPD values for the PR EOS are all near 16%.

  16. Density measurements of subcooled water in the temperature range of (243 and 283) K and for pressures up to 400 MPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Raffaella; Giuliano Albo, P Alberto; Lorefice, Salvatore; Lago, Simona

    2016-02-21

    In this work, accurate density measurements of subcooled water (freshly double-distilled water) were performed along eight constant-mass curves in the temperature range of (243 to 283) K and in the pressure range of (140 to 400) MPa, by a pseudo-isochoric method. The experimental apparatus mainly consisted of a high pressure vessel, especially designed for this experiment, of known volume as a function of temperature and pressure, used to perform measurements in the T-p range under study. The density of subcooled water was obtained by measuring the equilibrium pressure at different temperatures, keeping the mass constant. All terms contributing to the uncertainty of subcooled water density measurements were considered; the estimated relative uncertainty, in the investigated temperature and pressure range, is about 0.07%. The experimental results were compared with the literature densities. In particular, the trend of density versus temperature for a constant mass of sample observed experimentally differs from the trend calculated by the equation provided by the International Association for Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS-95) outside the range of validity, i.e., in the metastable region.

  17. An experimental measurement of the coexistence curve and critical temperature, density and pressure of bulk nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, J B; Moretto, L G; Phair, L

    2012-01-01

    Infinite, neutron-proton symmetric, neutral nuclear matter has a critical temperature of 17.9+-0.4 MeV, a critical density of 0.06+-0.01 nucleons per cubic fermi and a critical pressure of 0.31+-0.07 MeV per cubic fermi. These values have been obtained from our analysis of data from six different reactions studied in three different experiments: two "compound nuclear" reactions: 58Ni+12C-->70Se and 64Ni+12C-->76Se (both performed at the LBNL 88" Cyclotron) and four "multifragmentation" reactions: 1 GeV/c pi+197Au (performed by the ISiS collaboration), 1 AGeV 197Au+C, 1 AGeV 139La+12C and 1 AGeV 84Kr+12C (all performed by the EOS collaboration). The charge yields of all reactions as a function of excitation energy were fit with a version of Fisher's droplet model modified to account for the dual components of the fluid (i.e. protons and neutrons), Coulomb effects, finite size effects and angular momentum arising from the nuclear collisions.

  18. Multiple reentrant glass transitions of soft spheres at high densities: monotonicity of the curves of constant relaxation time in jamming phase diagrams depending on temperature over pressure and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedeberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    By using molecular-dynamics simulations, we determine the jamming phase diagrams at high densities for a bidisperse mixture of soft spheres that interact according to repulsive power-law pair potentials. We observe that the relaxation time varies nonmonotonically as a function of density at constant temperature. Therefore, the jamming phase diagrams contain multiple reentrant glass transitions if temperature and density are used as control parameters. However, if we consider a new formulation of the jamming phase diagrams where temperature over pressure and pressure are employed as control parameters, no nonmonotonic behavior is observed.

  19. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  20. Experimental study of the density and viscosity of polyethylene glycols and their mixtures at temperatures from 293 K to 473 K and at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagdeev, D.I.; Fomina, M.G.; Mukhamedzyanov, G.Kh. [Kazan State Technological University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Abdulagatov, I.M., E-mail: ilmutdin@boulder.nist.gov [Geothermal Research Institute of the Dagestan Scientific Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Makhachkala, Dagestan (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Viscosity and density of polyethylene glycols. > Combined experimental apparatus for density and viscosity measurements. > Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher model for viscosity. - Abstract: A new apparatus to measure simultaneously the density and viscosity of liquids has been designed and constructed based on the hydrostatic weighing and falling-body principles. The density and viscosity of monoethylene glycol (MEG), diethylene glycol (DEG), and triethylene glycol (TEG) and their binary, (50%MEG + 50%DEG), (50%MEG + 50%TEG), (50%DEG + 50%TEG), and ternary (33.33%MEG + 33.33%DEG + 33.34%TEG) mixtures have been measured over the temperature range from 293 K to 473 K and at atmospheric pressure. The expanded uncertainty of the density, pressure, temperature, and viscosity measurements at the 95% confidence level with a coverage factor of k = 2 is estimated to be 0.15% to 0.30%, 0.05%, 0.06 K, and 1.5% to 2.0% (depending on temperature and pressure ranges), respectively. The theoretically based Arrhenius-Andrade and Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher type equations were used to describe the temperature dependence of measured viscosities for pure polyethylene glycols and their mixtures.

  1. Electron Density and Temperature Measurement by Stark Broadening in a Cold Argon Arc-Plasma Jet at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiuping; CHENG Cheng; MENG Yuedong

    2009-01-01

    Determination of both the electron density and temperature simultaneously in a cold argon arc-plasma jet by analyzing the Stark broadening of two different emission lines is presented.This method is based on the fact that the Stark broadening of different lines has a different dependence on the electron density and temperature.Therefore,a comparison of two or more line broadenings allows us to diagnose the electron density and temperature simultaneously.In this study we used the first two Balmer series hydrogen lines H_α and H_β for their large broadening width.For this purpose,a small amount of hydrogen was introduced into the discharge gas.The results of the Gigosos-Cardenoso computational model,considering more relevant processes for the hydrogen Balmer lines,is used to process the experimental data.With this method,we obtained reliable electron density and temperature,1.88 ×10 ~(15) cm~(-3 )and 13000 K,respectively.Possible sources of error were also analyzed.

  2. Changes in recruitment, growth, and stock size of northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) at West Greenland: temperature and density-dependent effects at released predation pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai

    2005-01-01

    was carried out oil a spatially disaggregated basis in order to account for the latitudinal differences in bottom temperature and shrimp density. Changes in recruitment and, with a lag of 2 years, in stock biomass were most pronounced in the northern part of its distributional range, while bottom temperature...... threshold of the optimal range in the northern regions has extended the distributional area that is most favourable for northern shrimp. This, together with a decreasing rate of exploitation and a continuous low predation pressure, resulted in an increase of the stock to a level at which density...

  3. Measurement of the (pressure, density, temperature) relation of two (methane + nitrogen) gas mixtures at temperatures between 240 and 400 K and pressures up to 20 MPa using an accurate single-sinker densimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamorro, C.R. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: cescha@eis.uva.es; Segovia, J.J. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Martin, M.C. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Villamanan, M.A. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Estela-Uribe, J.F. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Javeriana-Cali, Calle 18, 118-250 Cali (Colombia); Trusler, J.P.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Comprehensive (p, {rho}, T) measurements on two gas mixtures of (0.9CH{sub 4} + 0.1N{sub 2}) and (0.8CH{sub 4} + 0.2N{sub 2}) have been carried out at six temperatures between 240 and 400 K and at pressures up to 20 MPa. A total of 108 (p, {rho}, T) data for the first mixture and 134 for the second one are given. These measurements were performed using a compact single-sinker densimeter based on Archimedes' buoyancy principle. The overall uncertainty in density {rho} is estimated to be (1.5 . 10{sup -4} . {rho} + 2 . 10{sup -3} kg . m{sup -3}) (coverage factor k = 2), the uncertainty in temperature T is estimated to be 0.006 K (coverage factor k = 2), and the uncertainty in pressure p is estimated to be 1 . 10{sup -4}.p (coverage factor k = 2). The equipment has been previously checked with pure nitrogen over the whole temperature and pressure working ranges and experimental results (35 values) are given and a comparison with the reference equation of state for nitrogen is presented.

  4. Densities and derived thermodynamic properties of 1-heptanol and 2-heptanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 22 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738 Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738 Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Betancourt-Cardenas, Felix F. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738 Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    Experimental densities were determined in liquid phase for 1-heptanol and 2-heptanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 22 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. Water and nitrogen were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainties of the experimental measurements in the whole range of reported data are estimated to be {+-}0.03 K for temperature, {+-}0.008 MPa for pressure, and {+-}0.20 kg . m{sup -3} for density. The experimental data are correlated using a short empirical equation of six parameters and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations are reported. Published density data of 1-heptanol are compared with values calculated with the 6-parameter equation using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with an available correlation for 1-heptanol. Densities of 2-heptanol at high pressure were not found in the literature and the data reported here represent the first set of data reported in the literature. Isothermal compressibilities and isobaric thermal expansivity are calculated using the 6-parameter equation for both alcohols within uncertainties estimated to be {+-}0.025 Gpa{sup -1} and {+-}4 x 10{sup -7} K{sup -1}, respectively.

  5. Optimization of High Temperature and Pressurized Steam Modified Wood Fibers for High-Density Polyethylene Matrix Composites Using the Orthogonal Design Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The orthogonal design method was used to determine the optimum conditions for modifying poplar fibers through a high temperature and pressurized steam treatment for the subsequent preparation of wood fiber/high-density polyethylene (HDPE composites. The extreme difference, variance, and significance analyses were performed to reveal the effect of the modification parameters on the mechanical properties of the prepared composites, and they yielded consistent results. The main findings indicated that the modification temperature most strongly affected the mechanical properties of the prepared composites, followed by the steam pressure. A temperature of 170 °C, a steam pressure of 0.8 MPa, and a processing time of 20 min were determined as the optimum parameters for fiber modification. Compared to the composites prepared from untreated fibers, the tensile, flexural, and impact strength of the composites prepared from modified fibers increased by 20.17%, 18.5%, and 19.3%, respectively. The effect on the properties of the composites was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. When the temperature, steam pressure, and processing time reached the highest values, the composites exhibited the best mechanical properties, which were also well in agreement with the results of the extreme difference, variance, and significance analyses. Moreover, the crystallinity and thermal stability of the fibers and the storage modulus of the prepared composites improved; however, the hollocellulose content and the pH of the wood fibers decreased.

  6. Temperature- and pressure-dependent densities, self-diffusion coefficients, and phase behavior of monoacid saturated triacylglycerides: toward molecular-level insights into processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Maximilian; Reilly, Anthony M; Briesen, Heiko

    2012-05-23

    Using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations the densities and self-diffusion coefficients of a range of liquid monoacid triacylglycerides (TAGs) have been studied as a function of temperature and, for the first time, pressure. While offset by their ambient properties, the response of the TAGs to temperature and pressure is qualitatively similar. Application of pressure was found to significantly increase densities and reduce diffusion of the TAG molecules, suggesting that it may have as much a role in processing and crystallizing TAGs as supercooling does. A solution of glycerol tripalmitate and glycerol trihexanoate was also studied, showing that application of pressure should lead to a significant decrease in the saturation point of the solution, which is an important consideration for processing TAGs. Different solid/liquid interfaces of glycerol tripalmitate have also been investigated. Although crystal growth could not be observed, dissolution of one interface was seen in the MD simulations. The results suggest that over moderate distances the melting of TAGs may be cooperative in nature, rather than involving dissolution of individual TAG molecules.

  7. Compressed liquid densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Camacho-Camacho, Luis E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-02-15

    (p, {rho}, T) properties were determined in liquid phase for 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainty is estimated to be lower than {+-}0.2 kg . m{sup -3} for the experimental densities. Nitrogen and water were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. Experimental densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol were correlated with a short empirical equation and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations were reported. Published densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol are compared with values calculated with the BWRS EoS using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with available correlations for 1-butanol and 2-butanol.

  8. 温度和压力对井内流体密度的影响%The Impact of Temperature & Pressure on Borehole Fluids Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗宇维; 朱江林; 李东; 方国伟; 凌伟汉

    2012-01-01

    The safety pressure window is narrow in deep well with HPHT conditions,the differential pressure and differential temperature at different depth of wellbore are very huge; at the same time, the density of the fluid in the well would change when expanding due to formation heat and pressure of fluid column; therefore the improper selection of initial density of in-well fluid would lead to pressure instability. With independently developed HTHP fluid density measuring apparatus, the experiment was conducted to test the influence of temperature and pressure on fresh water,spacer fluid, water mud and mineral oil density and relevant curves were obtained; the proper density model for temperature and pressure change in well cementation was selected—Dodson-Standing Model; With Drillbench software, the water-based and oil-based drilling fluid with initial in-well density of 1. 2 kg/L and 2. 0 kg/L was calculated,four corresponding curves, including static equivalent density variation curve were acquired under different geo-thermal gradient. These curves could serve as reference to the density design of drilling fluid and cement slurry for deep wells under HTHP conditions. The experiment results indicated that,in the wells deeper than 5000 m with BHST higher than 270 ℃, the density of water-based fluid could be decreased by 5. 58% and that of oil-based fluid decreased by 6. 41%,compared with the in-well density of 1. 2 g/L.%高温高压深井的安全压力窗口窄,井筒内不同深度之间的流体温差和压差大,且井内流体受到地层加热膨胀和液柱压力压缩造成密度变化,因而容易因入井流体初始密度选择不当造成压力失稳.利用自主研制的高温高压流体密度变化测量仪,进行了温度和压力对淡水、隔离液、水泥浆和矿物白油密度的影响试验,得到了相应的关系曲线;筛选出了适合固井水泥浆温度、压力变化的密度模型—Dodson-Standing模型;通过Drillbench软件,

  9. Shear thinning and shear dilatancy of liquid n-hexadecane via equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations: Temperature, pressure, and density effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Huan-Chang; Wu, Jiann-Shing; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2008-07-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed in both isochoric-isothermal (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensemble systems. Under steady state shearing conditions, thermodynamic states and rheological properties of liquid n-hexadecane molecules have been studied. Between equilibrium and nonequilibrium states, it is important to understand how shear rates (γ˙) affect the thermodynamic state variables of temperature, pressure, and density. At lower shear rates of γ˙1×1011s-1, specific behavior of shear dilatancy is observed in the variations of nonequilibrium thermodynamic states. Significantly, by analyzing the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and density on shear flow system, we report a variety of rheological properties including the shear thinning relationship between viscosity and shear rate, zero-shear-rate viscosity, rotational relaxation time, and critical shear rate. In addition, the flow activation energy and the pressure-viscosity coefficient determined through Arrhenius and Barus equations acceptably agree with the related experimental and MD simulation results.

  10. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  11. Subduction Factory 3: An Excel worksheet and macro for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and H2O contents of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Abers, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    An Excel macro to calculate mineral and rock physical properties at elevated pressure and temperature is presented. The workbook includes an expandable database of physical parameters for 52 rock-forming minerals stable at high pressures and temperatures. For these minerals the elastic moduli, densities, seismic velocities, and H2O contents are calculated at any specified P and T conditions, using basic thermodynamic relationships and third-order finite strain theory. The mineral modes of suites of rocks are also specifiable, so that their predicted aggregate properties can be calculated using standard solid mixing theories. A suite of sample rock modes taken from the literature provides a useful starting point. The results of these calculations can be applied to a wide variety of geophysical questions including estimating the alteration of the oceanic crust and mantle; predicting the seismic velocities of lower-crustal xenoliths; estimating the effects of changes in mineralogy, pressure and temperature on buoyancy; and assessing the H2O content and mineralogy of subducted lithosphere from seismic observations.

  12. Toward a self-consistent pressure scale: elastic moduli and equation of state of MgO by simultaneous x-ray density and Brillouin sound velocity measurements at high-pressure high-temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lakshtanov, D. L.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Wang, J.; Chen, B.; Shen, G.; Bass, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate phase diagrams and PVT equations of state (EOS) of materials strongly depend on the PVT calibrations of standard materials (e.g. MgO, NaCl, Au, Pt), which currently do not predict identical pressures at the same experimental conditions. MgO is commonly used as a pressure standard in a variety of high pressure and high- temperature experiments. Despite being one of the simplest and most studied materials, its accurate EOS is still uncertain, especially at high PT. The direct way of obtaining a self consistent pressure scale is by measuring acoustic velocities (Vp and Vs) and density simultaneously. Such P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements allow one to determine the pressure directly, without resort to a separate calibration standard. Recently, as part of a major COMPRES initiative, we have constructed a Brillouin spectrometer at GSECARS, APS (13-BM-D) which allows accurate simultaneous sound velocity and lattice parameter measurements at high pressures and high temperatures. Such measurements were performed on single crystal MgO at simultaneously high pressures (up to 30 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 873K) in diamond cells with Ne or Ar as pressure medium. At each PT point we measured the unit cell parameters and the acoustic velocities of MgO in several crystallographic directions, and directly obtained all three single crystal elastic moduli, as well as isotropic adiabatic bulk (KS) and shear (μ) moduli. Unit cell parameters of pressure medium (Ne, Ar) and additional pressure calibrants (Au, Pt, NaCl) were measured at each PT for cross calibration. The results of these experiments and implications for a self consistent P-V-T(-Vp-Vs) pressure scale will be presented and discussed.

  13. Toward a self-consistent pressure scale: elastic moduli and equation of state of MgO and Ringwoodite by simultaneous x-ray density and Brillouin sound velocity measurements at high-pressure high-temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S.; Lakshtanov, D.; Prakapenka, V.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Wang, J.; Shen, G.; Bass, J.

    2009-05-01

    Accurate phase diagrams and PVT equations of state (EOS) of materials strongly depend on the PVT calibrations of standard materials (e.g. MgO, NaCl, Au, Pt), which currently do not predict identical pressures at the same experimental conditions. MgO is commonly used as a pressure standard in a variety of high pressure and high-temperature experiments. Despite being one of the simplest and most studied materials, its accurate EOS is still uncertain, especially at high PT. The direct way of obtaining a self consistent pressure scale is by measuring acoustic velocities (Vp and Vs) and density simultaneously. Such P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements allow one to determine the pressure directly, without resort to a separate calibration standard. Recently, as part of a major COMPRES initiative, we have constructed a Brillouin spectrometer at GSECARS, APS (13-BM-D) which allows accurate simultaneous sound velocity and lattice parameter measurements at high pressures and high temperatures. Such measurements were performed on single crystal MgO at simultaneously high pressures (up to 30 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 873K) in diamond cells. At each PT point we measured the unit cell parameters and the acoustic velocities of MgO in several crystallographic directions, and directly obtained all three single crystal elastic moduli, as well as isotropic adiabatic bulk (Ks) and shear (μ) moduli. Unit cell parameters of pressure medium (Ne, Ar) and additional pressure calibrants (Au, Pt, NaCl) were measured at each PT for cross calibration. In addition we demonstrate that successful P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements can be performed on certain polycrystalline materials, e.g. Ringwoodite (γ-Mg2SiO4). The results of these experiments and implications for a self consistent P-V-T(-Vp-Vs) pressure scale will be presented and discussed.

  14. Liquid density of biofuel mixtures: (Dibutyl ether + 1-butanol) system at pressures up to 140 MPa and temperatures from (293.15 to 393.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaoui, Fatima E.M. [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, UMR CNRS 5150, Universite de Pau, BP 1155, 64013 Pau Cedex (France); Departamento de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Burgos, E-09006 Burgos (Spain); Montero, Eduardo A., E-mail: emontero@ubu.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Burgos, E-09006 Burgos (Spain); Bazile, Jean-Patrick [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, UMR CNRS 5150, Universite de Pau, BP 1155, 64013 Pau Cedex (France); Aguilar, Fernando [Departamento de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Burgos, E-09006 Burgos (Spain); Boned, Christian [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, UMR CNRS 5150, Universite de Pau, BP 1155, 64013 Pau Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > New density data for binary mixtures of (dibutyl ether + 1-butanol) are reported. > The pressure and temperature intervals are 0.1 to 140 MPa and 293.15 to 393.15 K. > 445 Data points measured at five compositions were fitted to a Tait-like equation. > Excess volumes have been calculated from the experimental data. > The isobaric expansivity and the isothermal compressibility have been derived. - Abstract: This work reports new experimental density data (445 points) for binary mixtures of (dibutyl ether + 1-butanol) over the composition range (five compositions; 0.15 {<=} dibutyl ether mole fraction x {<=} 0.85), from (293.15 to 393.15) K (every 20 K), and for 15 pressures from (0.1 to 140) MPa (every 10 MPa). An Anton Paar vibrating tube densimeter, calibrated with an uncertainty of {+-}0.5 kg . m{sup -3} was used to perform these measurements. The experimental density data were fitted with a Tait-like equation with low standard deviations. Excess volumes have been calculated from the experimental data and fitted by the Redlich-Kister equation. In addition, the isobaric thermal expansivity and the isothermal compressibility have been derived from the Tait-like equation.

  15. Pressure Correction in Density Functional Theory Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S H

    2008-01-01

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory have been widely used in studies of the structural, thermoelastic, rheological, and electronic properties of earth-forming materials. The exchange-correlation term, however, is implemented based on various approximations, and this is believed to be the main reason for discrepancies between experiments and theoretical predictions. In this work, by using periclase MgO as a prototype system we examine the discrepancies in pressure and Kohn-Sham energy that are due to the choice of the exchange-correlation functional. For instance, we choose local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation. We perform extensive first-principles calculations at various temperatures and volumes and find that the exchange-correlation-based discrepancies in Kohn-Sham energy and pressure should be independent of temperature. This implies that the physical quantities, such as the equation of states, heat capacity, and the Gr\\"{u}neisen parameter, estimat...

  16. Numerical studies of independent control of electron density and gas temperature via nonlinear coupling in dual-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Nie, Q. Y.; Wang, Z. B.; Gao, X. T.; Kong, F. R.; Sun, Y. F.; Jiang, B. H.

    2016-07-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) provide a promising technology of generating non-equilibrium cold plasmas in atmospheric pressure gases. For both application-focused and fundamental studies, it is important to explore the strategy and the mechanism for enabling effective independent tuning of key plasma parameters in a DBD system. In this paper, we report numerical studies of effects of dual-frequency excitation on atmospheric DBDs, and modulation as well as separate tuning mechanism, with emphasis on dual-frequency coupling to the key plasma parameters and discharge evolution. With an appropriately applied low frequency to the original high frequency, the numerical calculation demonstrates that a strong nonlinear coupling between two frequencies governs the process of ionization and energy deposition into plasma, and thus raises the electron density significantly (e.g., three times in this case) in comparisons with a single frequency driven DBD system. Nevertheless, the gas temperature, which is mainly determined by the high frequency discharge, barely changes. This method then enables a possible approach of controlling both averaged electron density and gas temperature independently.

  17. A MATLAB toolbox and Excel workbook for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and major element composition of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abers, Geoffrey A.; Hacker, Bradley R.

    2016-02-01

    To interpret seismic images, rock seismic velocities need to be calculated at elevated pressure and temperature for arbitrary compositions. This technical report describes an algorithm, software, and data to make such calculations from the physical properties of minerals. It updates a previous compilation and Excel® spreadsheet and includes new MATLAB® tools for the calculations. The database of 60 mineral end-members includes all parameters needed to estimate density and elastic moduli for many crustal and mantle rocks at conditions relevant to the upper few hundreds of kilometers of Earth. The behavior of α and β quartz is treated as a special case, owing to its unusual Poisson's ratio and thermal expansion that vary rapidly near the α-β transition. The MATLAB tools allow integration of these calculations into a variety of modeling and data analysis projects.

  18. Density and phase equilibrium of the binary system methane + n-decane under high temperatures and pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira Muñiz, Teresa; Pantelide, Georgia; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    of thisbinary system by using a variable volume cell with full visibility from (293.15-472.47) K for three mixtures with methane mole fractions of 0.4031, 0.6021 and 0.8496. Liquid fraction upon expansion below the saturation pressure has also been determined. Finally different equations of state were used......Densities of the binary system methane + n-decane have been determined through a vibrating tube densitometer from (278.15-463.15) K at pressures up to 140 MPa, and for methane mole fractions up to0.8496. Negative excess volumes were found under the experimental conditions studied. Moreover...... isothermal compressibility values were obtained by differentiation from the Tammann-Tait correlation ofthe determined density values. Isobaric thermal expansion coefficients were also calculated based on differentiation from the isobaric fit of density data. We also measured the phase equilibrium...

  19. Changes in recruitment, growth, and stock size of northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) at West Greenland: temperature and density-dependent effects at released predation pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai

    2005-01-01

    increased in all survey regions since the mid-1990s. Length-at-age was positively correlated with temperature in general, but a trend towards slower growth was observed in areas with the highest stock densities in the most recent years. It is concluded that the moderate increase in temperature above a lower......Stock size of northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) in West Greenland waters has been fairly stable from the late 1980s to the mid-1990s. Thereafter, survey estimates of biomass increased substantially, and the exploitation rate declined slightly in the most recent years. The present analysis...... was carried out oil a spatially disaggregated basis in order to account for the latitudinal differences in bottom temperature and shrimp density. Changes in recruitment and, with a lag of 2 years, in stock biomass were most pronounced in the northern part of its distributional range, while bottom temperature...

  20. Volume-translated cubic EoS and PC-SAFT density models and a free volume-based viscosity model for hydrocarbons at extreme temperature and pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Morreale, Bryan D.; Soong, Yee; Baled, Hseen O.; Enick, Robert M.; Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; McHugh, Mark A.

    2013-12-01

    This research focuses on providing the petroleum reservoir engineering community with robust models of hydrocarbon density and viscosity at the extreme temperature and pressure conditions (up to 533 K and 276 MPa, respectively) characteristic of ultra-deep reservoirs, such as those associated with the deepwater wells in the Gulf of Mexico. Our strategy is to base the volume-translated (VT) Peng–Robinson (PR) and Soave–Redlich–Kwong (SRK) cubic equations of state (EoSs) and perturbed-chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) on an extensive data base of high temperature (278–533 K), high pressure (6.9–276 MPa) density rather than fitting the models to low pressure saturated liquid density data. This high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) data base consists of literature data for hydrocarbons ranging from methane to C{sub 40}. The three new models developed in this work, HTHP VT-PR EoS, HTHP VT-SRK EoS, and hybrid PC-SAFT, yield mean absolute percent deviation values (MAPD) for HTHP hydrocarbon density of ~2.0%, ~1.5%, and <1.0%, respectively. An effort was also made to provide accurate hydrocarbon viscosity models based on literature data. Viscosity values are estimated with the frictional theory (f-theory) and free volume (FV) theory of viscosity. The best results were obtained when the PC-SAFT equation was used to obtain both the attractive and repulsive pressure inputs to f-theory, and the density input to FV theory. Both viscosity models provide accurate results at pressures to 100 MPa but experimental and model results can deviate by more than 25% at pressures above 200 MPa.

  1. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the superconducting transition temperature and superfluid density of SmFeAsO0.85 and PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X. L.; Lu, W.; Yang, J.; Yi, W.; Li, Z. C.; Zhang, C.; Ren, Z. A.; Che, G. C.; Sun, L. L.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, X. J.; Zhao, Z. X.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured magnetic susceptibility of iron pnictide superconductors SmFeAsO0.85 and PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO under hydrostatic pressure up to 1.15 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) deceases linearly and the Meissner signal size also decreases with increasing pressure for SmFeAsO0.85 . In contrast, the TC of PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO initially increases with pressure then saturates above ˜0.8GPa . Meanwhile its Meissner signal exhibits the similar pressure dependence. Our results indicate that the pressure dependences of TC and superfluid density in both systems are positively correlated which suggests that these quaternary iron-based superconductors are not conventional BCS ones.

  2. Compressed liquid densities and excess molar volumes for (CO{sub 2} + 1-pentanol) binary system at temperatures from 313 to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Laboratorio de Termodinamica, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738, Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Laboratorio de Termodinamica, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738, Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Sandler, Stanley I. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-3119 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Measurements of compressed liquid densities for 1-pentanol and for {l_brace}CO{sub 2} (1) + 1-pentanol (2){r_brace} system were carried out at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa. Densities were measured for binary mixtures at 10 different compositions, x{sub 1} = 0.0816, 0.1347, 0.3624, 0.4651, 0.6054, 0.7274, 0.8067, 0.8573, 0.9216, and 0.9757. A vibrating tube densimeter was used to perform density measurements using two reference calibration fluids. The uncertainty is estimated to be better than {+-}0.2 kg . m{sup -3} for the experimental density measurements. For each mixture and for 1-pentanol, the experimental densities were correlated using an explicit volume equation of six parameters and an 11-parameter equation of state (EoS). Excess molar volumes were determined for the (CO{sub 2} + 1-pentanol) system using 1-pentanol densities calculated from the 11-parameter EoS and CO{sub 2} densities calculated from a multiparameter reference EoS.

  3. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  4. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  5. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  6. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  7. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  8. Densities and volume properties of (water + tert-butanol) over the temperature range of (274.15 to 348.15) K at pressure of 0.1 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, Gennadiy I., E-mail: gie@isc-ras.r [Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics of Molecular and Ion-Molecular Solutions, Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Akademicheskaya Street, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Makarov, Dmitriy M. [Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics of Molecular and Ion-Molecular Solutions, Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Akademicheskaya Street, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    The densities of {l_brace}water (1) + tert-butanol (2){r_brace} binary mixture were measured over the temperature range (274.15 to 348.15) K at atmospheric pressure using 'Anton Paar' digital vibrating-tube densimeter. Density measurements were carried out over the whole concentration range at (308.15 to 348.15) K. The following volume parameters were calculated: excess molar volumes and thermal isobaric expansivities of the mixture, partial molar volumes and partial molar thermal isobaric expansivities of the components. Concentration dependences of excess molar volumes were fitted with Redlich-Kister equation. The results of partial molar volume calculations using four equations were compared. It was established that for low alcohol concentrations at T {<=} 208 K the inflection points at x{sub 2} {approx} 0.02 were observed at concentration dependences of specific volume. The concentration dependences of partial molar volumes of both water and tert-butanol had extremes at low alcohol content. The temperature dependence of partial molar volumes of water had some inversion at x{sub 2} {approx} 0.65. The temperature dependence of partial molar volumes of tert-butanol at infinite dilution had minimum at {approx}288 K. It was discovered that concentration dependences of thermal isobaric expansivities of the mixture at small alcohol content and low temperatures passed through minimum.

  9. Free energies of (Co, Fe, Ni, Zn)Fe₂O₄ spinels and oxides in water at high temperatures and pressure from density functional theory: results for stoichiometric NiO and NiFe₂O₄ surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, C J; Rák, Z; Brenner, D W

    2013-11-06

    A set of effective chemical potentials (ECPs) are derived that connect energies of (Co, Fe, Ni, Zn)Fe2O4 spinels and oxides calculated at 0 K from density functional theory (DFT) to free energies in high temperature and pressure water. The ECPs are derived and validated by solving a system of linear equations that combine DFT and experimental free energies for NiO, ZnO, Fe2O3, Fe3O4, FeO(OH), CoFe2O4, ZnFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and H2O. To connect to solution phase chemistry, a set of ECPs are also derived for solvated Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions using an analogous set of linear equations and the solid ECPs. The ECPs are used to calculate free energies of low index stoichiometric surfaces of nickel oxide (NiO) and nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) in water as a function of temperature from 300 to 600 K at a pressure of 155 bar. Surface denuding at high temperatures is predicted, the implications of which for the formation of oxide corrosion products on heat transfer surfaces in light-water nuclear reactors are discussed.

  10. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data.

  11. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank

    and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures and pressures. To perform measurements under high pressure and at elevated temperatures it was necessary to build a measurement system around an autoclave which could stand high temperatures up to 250 °C and pressures up to 200 bar...... as well as extremely caustic environments. Based on a literature study to identify resistant materials for these conditions, Inconel 600 was selected among the metals which are available for autoclave construction. An initial single atmosphere high temperature and pressure measurement setup was build...... comprising this autoclave. A second high temperature and pressure measurement setup was build based on experiences from the first setup in order to perform automatized measurements. The conductivity of aqueous KOH at elevated temperatures and high concentrations was investigated using the van der Pauw method...

  12. Temperature stable low density slurry for low pressure loss deep wells%低压易漏深井大温差低密度水泥浆体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎泽寒; 李早元; 刘俊峰; 岳家平; 李怀仲; 郭小阳

    2012-01-01

    针对塔中低压深井长封固段大温差固井面临的低密度水泥浆高温稳定性差、易漏失、返出井口后长时间无强度等固井技术难题,开展了密度1.20~1.60 g/cm3大温差低密度水泥浆体系研究.从抗压、抗剪切性能、颗粒形态等方面对漂珠进行优选;基于颗粒级配原理,从提高水泥浆稳定性和抗压强度出发对减轻剂、填充剂、超细材料进行优选及合理组配,结合缓凝剂和降失水剂之间的协同作用,设计出一套长封固段大温差低密度水泥浆体系.实验结果表明:该低密度水泥浆体系流变性好,失水低,模拟工况条件下,水泥浆上下密度差小于0.02 g/cm3,稠化时间和强度发展满足施工要求,能满足温差70~120 ℃、一次性封固6 000m左右的固井需要.%To solve the cementing difficulty that the low density slurry has poor temperature stability and loss issues, and has no strength during a long period after the flowback, faced by the situation of low pressure deep well in Tazhong area cementing long vertical section with big temperature difference, it is studied that the temperature stable of low density slurry with density of 1.20~ 1.60 g/cm3. The floating potential is optimized from the aspects of pressure and shearing resistance and grain morphology. Based on grain composition principle, the light weight additive, filling agent, and superfine material are screened and matched, in view of improving slurry stability and pressure strength. Combining with the synergetic effect between retarder and filtrate reducer, a type of temperature stable low density slurry for long cementing sections is obtained. The results show that the slurry system has good rheology and low loss, and the density difference in the wellbore is lower than 0.02 g/cm3. The thickening time and strength increase satisfy with operation demand, especially the cementing need of temperature difference of 70~120℃ and cementing length of 6 000 m

  13. On the intergalactic temperature-density relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Matthew; Upton Sanderbeck, Phoebe R.

    2016-02-01

    Cosmological simulations of the low-density intergalactic medium exhibit a strikingly tight power-law relation between temperature and density that holds over two decades in density. It is found that this relation should roughly apply Δz ˜ 1-2 after a reionization event, and this limiting behaviour has motivated the power-law parameterizations used in most analyses of the Ly α forest. This relation has been explained by using equations linearized in the baryonic overdensity (which does not address why a tight power-law relation holds over two decades in density) or by equating the photoheating rate with the cooling rate from cosmological expansion (which we show is incorrect). Previous explanations also did not address why recombination cooling and Compton cooling off of the cosmic microwave background, which are never negligible, do not alter the character of this relation. We provide an understanding for why a tight power-law relation arises for unshocked gas at all densities for which collisional cooling is unimportant. We also use our results to comment on (1) how quickly fluctuations in temperature redshift away after reionization processes, (2) how much shock heating occurs in the low-density intergalactic medium, and (3) how the temperatures of collapsing gas parcels evolve.

  14. On the intergalactic temperature-density relation

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological simulations of the low-density intergalactic medium exhibit a strikingly tight power-law relation between temperature and density that holds over two decades in density. It is found that this relation should roughly apply Delta z ~ 1-2 after a reionization event, and this limiting behavior has motivated the power-law parameterizations used in most analyses of the Ly-alpha forest. This relation has been explained by using equations linearized in the baryonic overdensity (which does not address why a tight power-law relation holds over two decades in density) or by equating the photoheating rate with the cooling rate from cosmological expansion (which we show is incorrect). Previous explanations also did not address why recombination cooling and Compton cooling off of the cosmic microwave background, which are never negligible, do not alter the character of this relation. We provide an understanding for why a tight power-law relation arises for unshocked gas at all densities for which collisional c...

  15. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    the operational temperature and pressure to produce pressurized hydrogen at high rate (m3 H2·h-1·m-2 cell area) and high electrical efficiency. This work describes an exploratory technical study of the possibility to produce hydrogen and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures...... for immobilization of aqueous KOH solutions. Electrolysis cells with this electrolyte and metal foam based gas diffusion electrodes were successfully demonstrated at temperatures up to 250 °C at 40 bar. Different electro-catalysts were tested in order to reduce the oxygen and hydrogen overpotentials. Current...

  16. Pressure and Temperature Sensors Using Two Spin Crossover Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin-Maricel Jureschi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of a new design concept for dual spin crossover based sensors for concomitant detection of both temperature and pressure is presented. It is conjectured from numerical results obtained by mean field approximation applied to a Ising-like model that using two different spin crossover compounds containing switching molecules with weak elastic interactions it is possible to simultaneously measure P and T. When the interaction parameters are optimized, the spin transition is gradual and for each spin crossover compounds, both temperature and pressure values being identified from their optical densities. This concept offers great perspectives for smart sensing devices.

  17. Pressure - Density Isotherms of HELIUM-3 Gas Below 1.3 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, James Allen

    The second virial coefficient of He('3) gas and the absolute temperature of the gas were determined at five different temperatures below 1.3 K. The technique used involved measuring pressure and density simultaneously at different points along on isotherm and using the virial equation to determine the temperature and the second virial coefficient. The results are in good agreement with empirical calculations of the second virial coefficient which are based on measurements made at higher temperatures. The measurements of temperature, while only known to within (+OR-)1.5 mK, confirm the widespread belief that the T(,62) temperature scale is in error by several mK. Pressure and density were measured in-situ, using superconducting microwave cavities. These eliminate many sources of error which have in the past made measurements inaccurate below 1.5 K. The density and pressure could be related to changes in the resonant frequencies of the cavities. The frequency of one cavity, which contained the He('3) gas was proportional to the dielectric constant of the gas. The Clausius-Mossotti relationship was used to determine the density as a function of the dielectric constant. The pressure was measured using a reentrant cavity with a flexible diaphragm forming one end wall. The pressure of the gas flexed this diaphragm, changing the frequency of the cavity. A room temperature mercury manometer was used to provide a frequency vs. pressure calibration of this cavity.

  18. (AJST) ON THE PRESSURE VELOCITY AND TEMPERATURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the pressure and fluid velocity are average over the ... describing the flow are sets of nonlinear first-order ... resemble those of the one-dimensional gas dynamics. [5]. .... blood constituents (solid corpuscles and plasma) flow ... where ρ is the varying fluid density, u axial fluid ..... (1989): Biofluid mechanics, Annual review fluid.

  19. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...

  20. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    and pressures. Two measurement systems were built to perform measurements under high pressures and at elevated temperatures of up to 95 bar and 250 °C, respectively. The conductivity of aqueous KOH and aqueous KOH immobilized in a porous SrTiO3 structure were investigated at elevated temperatures and high...... the operational temperature and pressure to produce pressurized hydrogen at high rate (m3 H2·h-1·m-2 cell area) and high electrical efficiency. This work describes an exploratory technical study of the possibility to produce hydrogen and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures...... concentrations of the electrolyte using the van der Pauw method in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Conductivity values as high as 2.9 S cm-1 for 45 wt% KOH aqueous KOH and 0.84 S cm-1 for the immobilized KOH of the same concentration were measured at 200 °C. Porous SrTiO3 was used...

  1. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive...... media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells......, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established...

  2. Nonperturbative Yukawa theory at finite density and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2009-01-01

    In-medium Yukawa theory is part of the thermodynamics of the Standard Model of particle physics and is one of the main building blocks of most effective field theories of fermionic systems. By computing its pressure we investigate the nonperturbative thermodynamics at finite temperature and density using the optimized perturbation theory (OPT) framework. Our calculations are valid for arbitrary fermion and scalar masses, temperature, chemical potential, and not restricted to weak coupling. The model is considered in the presence as well as in the absence of condensates. Comparison with nonperturbative results shows that second order perturbation theory (PT) fails in the first case but performs rather well when condensates are absent, even at high-temperature regimes.

  3. Crystal structures at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Wendel Alexander

    2000-10-01

    The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is a unique instrument that can generate pressures equivalent to those inside planetary interiors (pressures on the order of 1 million atmospheres) under sustained conditions. When combined with a bright source of collimated x-rays, the DAC can be used to probe the structure of materials in-situ at ultra-high pressures. An understanding of the high-pressure structure of materials is important in determining what types of processes may take place in the Earth at great depths. Motivated by previous studies showing that xenon becomes metallic at pressures above ˜1 megabar (100 GPa), we examined the stable structures and reactivity of xenon at pressures approaching that of the core-mantle boundary in the Earth. Our findings indicate the transformation of xenon from face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structures is kinetically hindered at room temperature, with the equilibrium fcc--hcp phase boundary at 21 (+/-3) gigapascals, a pressure lower than was previously thought. Additionally, we find no tendency on the part of xenon to form a metal alloy with iron or platinum to at least 100 to 150 gigapascals, making it unlikely that the Earth's core serves as a reservoir for primordial xenon. Measurements of the compressibility of natural (Mg.75,Fe .25)2SiO4 gamma-spinel at pressures of the Earth's transition zone yield a pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K0 ' = 6.3 (+/-0.3). As gamma-spinel is considered to be a dominant mineral phase of the transition-zone of the Earth's mantle (400--670 km depth), the relatively high value of K0' for gamma-spinel may help explain the rapid increase with depth of seismic velocities through the transition zone. The thermodynamics, mechanisms and kinetics of pressure-induced amorphization are not well understood. We report here new studies indicating little or no entropy difference between the crystalline and glassy states of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite). Additional work on the pressure

  4. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  5. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.;

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...... temperatures. The A feature of the melting curve which suggests itself as a thermometric fixed point is found to be T//A equals 2. 75 plus or minus 0. 11 mK. The agreement between this value and independent measurements of T//A, based on nuclear or electronic paramagnetism, Johnson noise thermometry...

  6. Pressure Dependence of the Charge-Density-Wave Gap in Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, A.; /Zurich, ETH; Arcangeletti, E.; Perucchi, A.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; /Rome U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH

    2009-12-14

    We investigate the pressure dependence of the optical properties of CeTe{sub 3}, which exhibits an incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) state already at 300 K. Our data are collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 9 GPa. The energy for the single particle excitation across the CDW gap decreases upon increasing the applied pressure, similarly to the chemical pressure by rare-earth substitution. The broadening of the bands upon lattice compression removes the perfect nesting condition of the Fermi surface and therefore diminishes the impact of the CDW transition on the electronic properties of RTe{sub 3}.

  7. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  8. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be optim

  9. Density measurements under pressure for the binary system (ethanol plus methylcyclohexane)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Lugo, L.; Fernandez, J.

    2005-01-01

    The density of the asymmetrical binary system composed of ethanol and methylcyclohexane has been measured under pressure using a vibrating tube densimeter. The measurements have been performed for eight different compositions as well as the pure compounds at eight temperatures in the range 283.15...

  10. Molecular dissociation and shock-induced cooling in fluid nitrogen at high densities and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radousky, H. B.; Nellis, W. J.; Ross, M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Radiative temperatures and electrical conductivities were measured for fluid nitrogen compressed dynamically to pressures of 18-90 GPa, temperatures of 4000-14,000 K, and densities of 2-3 g/cu cm. The data show a continuous phase transition above 30 GPa shock pressure and confirm that (delta-P/delta-T)v is less than 0, as indicated previously by Hugoniot equation-of-state experiments. The first observation of shock-induced cooling is also reported. The data are interpreted in terms of molecular dissociation, and the concentration of dissociated molecules is calculated as a function of density and temperature.

  11. Energy density dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano-city, Nagano (Japan); Sawada, K. [Shinshu University, Nagano-city, Nagano (Japan); Tanaka, Y. [Kanazawa University, Kakuma-cho, Kanzawa-city, Ishikawa (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Insitute for Fusion Science, Toki-city, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The recovery of tritium in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue for safety. So far, the oxidation procedure using an atmospheric pressure plasma is expected to be part of the recovery method. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen oxidation by plasma chemistry, we have investigated the dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency on gas flow rate and input power in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma. It has been found that the combustion efficiency depends on energy density of absorbed microwave power. Hence, the energy density is considered as a key parameter for combustion processes. Also neutral gas temperatures inside and outside the plasma were measured by an optical emission spectroscopy method and thermocouple. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature in the plasma is much higher than the outside temperature of plasma. The high neutral gas temperature may affect the combustion reaction. (authors)

  12. Lattice QCD at finite temperature and density from Taylor expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In the first part, I present an overview of recent Lattice QCD simulations at finite temperature and density. In particular, we discuss fluctuations of conserved charges: baryon number, electric charge and strangeness. These can be obtained from Taylor expanding the QCD pressure as a function of corresponding chemical potentials. Our simulations were performed using quark masses corresponding to physical pion mass of about 140 MeV and allow a direct comparison to experimental data from ultra-relativistic heavy ion beams at hadron colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In the second part, we discuss computational challenges for current and future exascale Lattice simulations with a focus on new silicon developments from Intel and NVIDIA.

  13. High pressure study of high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souliou, Sofia-Michaela

    2014-09-29

    The current thesis studies experimentally the effect of high external pressure on high-T{sub c} superconductors. The structure and lattice dynamics of several members of the high-T{sub c} cuprate and Fe-based superconductors families were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction under well-controlled, hydrostatic high pressure and low temperature conditions. The lattice dynamics of the high-T{sub c} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} have been investigated systematically by Raman spectroscopy as a function of doping (x = 0.95, 0.75, 0.60, 0.55, and 0.45) and external pressure. Under ambient pressure conditions, in addition to the Raman modes expected from group theory, we observe new Raman active phonons upon cooling the underdoped samples, at temperatures well above the superconducting transition temperature. The doping dependence and the onset temperatures of the new Raman features suggest that they are associated with the incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) state recently discovered in underdoped cuprates using synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques. Under high pressure conditions (from 2 to 12 GPa), our Raman measurements on highly ordered underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.55} samples do not show any of the new Raman phonons seen at ambient pressure. High pressure and low temperature Raman measurements have been performed on the underdoped superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}. A clear renormalization of some of the Raman phonons is seen below T{sub c} as a result of the changes in the phonon self-energy upon the opening of the superconducting gap, with the most prominent one being that of the B{sub 1g}-like buckling phonon mode. The amplitude of this renormalization strongly increases with pressure, resembling the effect of hole doping in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. At ∝ 10 GPa, the system undergoes a reversible pressure-induced structural phase transition to a non-centrosymmmetric structure (space group

  14. Plastic Foam Withstands Greater Temperatures And Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A.; Macarthur, Doug

    1993-01-01

    Improved plastic foam suitable for use in foam-core laminated composite parts and in tooling for making fiber/matrix-composite parts. Stronger at high temperatures, more thermally and dimensionally stable, machinable, resistant to chemical degradation, and less expensive. Compatible with variety of matrix resins. Made of polyisocyanurate blown with carbon dioxide and has density of 12 to 15 pounds per cubic feet. Does not contibute to depletion of ozone from atmosphere. Improved foam used in cores of composite panels in such diverse products as aircraft, automobiles, railroad cars, boats, and sporting equipment like surfboards, skis, and skateboards. Also used in thermally stable flotation devices in submersible vehicles. Machined into mandrels upon which filaments wound to make shells.

  15. Critical Temperature Characteristics of Layered High-Temperature Superconductor Under Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Fang-Ying

    2009-01-01

    We consider a Ginzburg-Landau modified model of layered high-temperature superconductor under pres-sure. We have theoretically studied the relation between the pressure and the temperature of layered high-temperature superconductor. If the pressure is not a constant, we have a relation of quadratic equation between the pressure and the temperature of layered high-temperature superconductor. In a special case, we find the critical temperature decreases with further increasing pressure. In another special case, the critical temperature increases with further increasing pressure.

  16. Meson properties at finite temperature and baryon density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, M.; Klimt, S.; Weise, W. (Inst. of Theoretical Physics, Univ. Regensburg (Germany))

    1992-06-22

    We use the generalized SU(3) version of the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model to discuss properties of mesons, constituent quarks and vacuum structure as a function of density and temperature in compressed matter. Systematic low-density expansions are derived. In particular, we show that effects due to finite quasi-particle size are important in stabilizing the density and temperature dependence of the pion mass. (orig.).

  17. Molecular dynamics of water at high temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodholt, John; Wood, Bernard

    1990-09-01

    There are currently no precise P-V-T data for water at pressures above 8.9 kbars and temperatures above 900°C. Many petrological processes in the lower crust and upper mantle take place under more extreme conditions, however and petrologists commonly rely on empirical equations of state such as the modified Redlich-Kwong equation (MRK) to extrapolate the low pressure data. In this study we have taken an alternative approach and attempted to simulate the P-V-T properties of water using molecular dynamics. The TIP4P intermolecular potential for H 2O ( JORGENSEN et al., 1983) has had considerable success predicting the properties of water at low temperatures and pressures up to 10 kbar ( MADURA et al., 1988). We have extended its application by making molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at a density of 1.0 g/cc from 300 to 2300 K and 0.5 to 40 kbars. The results agree with the P-V-T data of BURNHAM et al. (1969) (up to 10 kbars) with an average error of under 2%. This is a much better concordance than is obtained with any of the currently used versions of MRK. At 300 kbars and 2000 K the MD simulations predict densities within 8% of those obtained in the shock wave experiments of KORMER (1968). This is a very good agreement given the fact that water ionizes to some extent at high pressures ( MITCHELL and NELLIS, 1982) and we have made no provisions for this effect. We conclude that molecular dynamics simulations provide the possibility of estimating P-V-T properties in the upper mantle P-T regime with very good accuracy.

  18. Relative contributions of temperature and salinity to seasonal mixed layer density changes and horizontal density gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Gregory C.; Schmidtko, Sunke; Lyman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature and salinity both contribute to ocean density, including its seasonal cycle and spatial patterns in the mixed layer. Temperature and salinity profiles from the Argo Program allow construction and analysis of a global, monthly, mixed layer climatology. Temperature changes dominate the seasonal cycle of mixed layer density in most regions, but salinity changes are dominant in the tropical warm pools, Arctic, and Antarctic. Under the Intertropical Convergence Zone, temperature and sa...

  19. Critical temperature of metallic hydrogen sulfide at 225-GPa pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The Eliashberg theory generalized for electron—phonon systems with a nonconstant density of electron states and with allowance made for the frequency behavior of the electron mass and chemical potential renormalizations is used to study T c in the SH3 phase of hydrogen sulfide under pressure. The phonon contribution to the anomalous electron Green's function is considered. The pairing within the total width of the electron band and not only in a narrow layer near the Fermi surface is taken into account. The frequency and temperature dependences of the complex mass renormalization Re Z(ω), the density of states N(ɛ) renormalized by the electron—phonon interactions, and the electron—phonon spectral function obtained computationally are used to calculate the anomalous electron Green's function. A generalized Eliashberg equation with a variable density of electron states has been solved. The frequency dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the order parameter in the SH3 phase has been obtained. The value of T c ≈ 177 K in the SH3 phase of hydrogen sulfide at pressure P = 225 GPa has been determined by solving the system of Eliashberg equations.

  20. Density and solidiifcation feeding model of vacuum counter-pressure cast aluminum alloy under grade-pressuring conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-song Yan; Huan Yu; Gang Lu; Bo-wen Xiong; Suai Xu

    2016-01-01

    The density of vacuum counter-pressure cast aluminum alloy samples under grade-pressuring condition was studied. The effect of grade pressure difference and time on the density of aluminum aloys was discussed, and the solidiifcation feeding model under grade-pressuring condition was established. The results indicate the grade-pressured solidiifcation feeding ability of vacuum counter-pressure casting mainly depends on grade pressure difference and time. With the increase of grade pressure difference, the density of al the aluminum aloy samples increases, and the trend of change in density from the pouring gate to the top location is first decreasing gradually and then increasing. In addition, in obtaining the maximum density, the optimal grade-pressuring time is different for samples with different wal thicknesses, and the solidiifcation time when the solid volume fraction of aluminum aloy reaches about 0.65 appears to be the optimal beginning time for grade-pressuring.

  1. Determination of coronal temperatures from electron density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J F

    2011-01-01

    The most popular method for determining coronal temperatures is the scale-height-method (shm). It is based on electron density profiles inferred from White Light (WL) brightness measurements of the corona during solar eclipses. This method has been applied to several published coronal electron density models. The calculated temperature distributions reach a maximum at r > 1.3 RS, and therefore do not satisfy one of the conditions for applying the shm method. Another method is the hydrostatic equilibrium method (hst), which enables coronal temperature distributions to be determined, providing solutions to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation. The temperature maximas using the hst method are almost equal to those obtained using the shm method, but the temperature peak is always at significantly lower altitude when the hst-method is used than when the shm-method is used. A third and more recently developed method, dyn, can be used for the same published electron density profiles. The temperature distributions ob...

  2. Towards Photonics Enabled Quantum Metrology of Temperature, Pressure and Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Douglass, Kevin; Fedchak, Jim; Scherschligt, Julia; Hendricks, Jay; Ricker, Jacob; Strouse, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a brief overview of photonic sensor and standards development that is currently undergoing in the thermodynamic metrology group at NIST in the areas of temperature, pressure, vacuum and time-resolved pressure measurements.

  3. High Accuracy, Miniature Pressure Sensor for Very High Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SiWave proposes to develop a compact, low-cost MEMS-based pressure sensor for very high temperatures and low pressures in hypersonic wind tunnels. Most currently...

  4. Design and Evaluation of a Pressure and Temperature Monitoring System for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Farve Daneshvar Fard; Sahar Moghimi; Reza Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pressure ulcers are tissue damages resulting from blood flow restriction, which occurs when the tissue is exposed to high pressure for a long period of time. These painful sores are common in patients and elderly, who spend extended periods of time in bed or wheelchair. In this study, a continuous pressure and temperature monitoring system was developed for pressure ulcer prevention. Materials and Methods The monitoring system consists of 64 pressure and 64 temperature sensors on...

  5. Molecular Density Functional Theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. With this correction, molecular density functional theory gives, at a modest computational cost, quantita...

  6. Phase transitions in Cd3P2 at high pressures and high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yel'kin, F.S.; Sidorov, V.A.; Waskowska, A.;

    2008-01-01

    The high-pressure, high-temperature structural behaviour of Cd3P2 has been studied using electrical resistance measurements, differential thermal analysis, thermo baric analysis and X-ray diffraction. At room temperature, a phase transformation is observed at 4.0 GPa in compression....... The experimental zero-pressure bulk modulus of the low-pressure phase is 64.7(7) GPa, which agrees quite well with the calculated value of 66.3 GPa using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method within the local density approximation. Tentatively, the high-pressure phase has an orthorhombic crystal...

  7. Monitoring temperature and pressure over surfaces using sensitive paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Viramontes, J. Ascención; Moreno Hernández, David; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Morán Loza, José Miguel; García Arreola, Alicia

    2007-03-01

    Two techniques for monitoring temperature and pressure variations over surfaces using sensitive paints are presented. The analysis is done by the acquisition of a set of images of the surface under analysis. The surface is painted by a paint called Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) for pressure measurements and Temperature Sensitive Paints (TSP) for temperature measurements. These kinds of paints are deposited over the surface under analysis. The recent experimental advances in calibration process are presented in this paper.

  8. Plasma density perturbation caused by probes at low gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Natalia; Godyak, Valery

    2017-09-01

    An analysis of plasma parameter perturbations caused by a spherical probe immersed into a spherical plasma is presented for arbitrary collisionality and arbitrary ratios of probe to plasma dimensions. The plasma was modeled by the fluid plasma equations with ion inertia and nonlinear ion friction force that dominate plasma transport at low gas pressures. Significant depletion of the plasma density around the probe surface has been found. The area of plasma depletion coincides with the sensing area of different kinds of magnetic and microwave probes and will therefore lead to errors in data inferred from measurements with such probes.

  9. Fiber Grating Sensor with Enhanced Pressure and Temperature Sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yun-Qi; GUO Zhuan-Yun; LIU Zhi-Guo; ZHAO Dong-Hui; GE Chun-Feng; DONG Xiao-Yi

    2000-01-01

    A technique is used to enhance the pressure and temperature sensitivity of a fiber Bragg grating sensor. The grating is packaged by using polymer jacket, which exhibits no significant chirp due to the adoption of the special technique. The measured pressure and temperature sensitivity of the structured grating is 6.28×10-5 / MPa and5.18×10-5/℃. The wavelength shift due to pressure and temperature can be enhanced about 31.5 times for pressure and 7.7 times for temperature.

  10. Pressure Controlled Heat Pipe for Precise Temperature Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research project will develop Pressure Controlled Heat Pipes (PCHPs) for precise temperature control (milli-Kelvin level). Several...

  11. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  12. Anode Spot Formation in Low Pressure and Temperature He Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Brett; Barnat, Edward; Hopkins, Matthew; Baalrud, Scott; Yee, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    When a small electrode is biased sufficiently above the plasma potential in a low temperature plasma, the electron impact ionization of neutral species near the electrode becomes significant. At neutral gas pressures of 1-100mTorr, it has been previously observed that if this ionization rate is sufficiently high, a double layer may form near the electrode. In some cases the double layer will move outward, separating a high potential plasma attached to the electrode surface from the bulk plasma. This phenomenon is known as an anode spot. A model has been developed describing the formation of anode spots based on observations from 2D particle-in-cell simulations. In this model ionization leads to the buildup of an ion rich region adjacent to the electrode, which modifies the potential structure in a way that traps electrons near the electrode surface. This leads to the formation of a quasineutral plasma near the electrode surface. When the density of this plasma is large enough, the double layer expands due to a pressure imbalance. Observations from PIC simulations were found to be consistent with time resolved measurements of the electron density from laser collision induced fluorescence, and with plasma emission measurements. This research was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000 and by the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program under Contract Number DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  13. Temperature Dependence Viscosity and Density of Different Biodiesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to assess the effect of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME concentration in diesel fuel on its viscosity and density behaviour. The density and dynamic viscosity were observed at various mixing ratios of RME and diesel fuel. All measurements were performed at constant temperature of 40 °C. Increasing ratio of RME in diesel fuel was reflected in increased density value and dynamic viscosity of the blend. In case of pure RME, pure diesel fuel, and a blend of both (B30, temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was examined. Temperature range in the experiment was −10 °C to 80 °C. Considerable temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was found and demonstrated for all three samples. This finding is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and reference data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 3rd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.796, −0.948, and −0.974 between measured and calculated values were found. Temperature dependence of density was modeled using a 2nd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.994, −0.979, and −0.976 between measured and calculated values were acquired. The proposed models can be used for flow behaviour prediction of RME, diesel fuel, and their blends.

  14. Plasmaspheric H+, He+, O+, He++, and O++ Densities and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort H.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmaspheric densities and temperatures for five ion species have recently become available, even though these quantities were derived some time ago from the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer onboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite over the years 1981-1984. The quantitative properties will be presented. Densities are found to have one behavior with lessor statistical variation below about L=2 and another with much greater variability above that Lshell. Temperatures also have a behavior difference between low and higher L-values. The density ratio He++/H+ is the best behaved with values of about 0.2% that slightly increase with increasing L. Unlike the He+/H+ density ratio that on average decreases with increasing Lvalue, the O+/H+ and O++/H+ density ratios have decreasing values below about L=2 and increasing average ratios at higher L-values. Hydrogen ion temperatures range from about 0.2 eV to several 10s of eV for a few measurements, although the bulk of the observations are of temperatures below 3 eV, again increasing with L-value. The temperature ratios of He+/H+ are tightly ordered around 1.0 except for the middle plasmasphere between L=3.5 and 4.5 where He+ temperatures can be significantly higher. The temperatures of He++, O+, and O++ are consistently higher than H+.

  15. Plasmaspheric H+, He+, He++, O+, and O++ Densities and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, G. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmaspheric densities and temperatures for five ion species have recently become available, even though these quantities were derived some time ago from the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer onboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite over the years 1981-1984. The quantitative properties will be presented. Densities are found to have one behavior with lessor statistical variation below about L=2 and another with much greater variability above that Lshell. Temperatures also have a behavior difference between low and higher L-values. The density ratio He++/H+ is the best behaved with values of about 0.2% that slightly increase with increasing L. Unlike the He+/H+ density ratio that on average decreases with increasing Lvalue, the O+/H+ and O++/H+ density ratios have decreasing values below about L=2 and increasing average ratios at higher L-values. Hydrogen ion temperatures range from about 0.2 eV to several 10s of eV for a few measurements, although the bulk of the observations are of temperatures below 3 eV, again increasing with L-value. The temperature ratios of He+/H+ are tightly ordered around 1.0 except for the middle plasmasphere between L=3.5 and 4.5 where He+ temperatures can be significantly higher. The temperatures of He++, O+, and O++ are consistently higher than H+.

  16. Measurement of improved pressure dependence of superconducting transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, S.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a technique for making electrical transport measurements in a diamond anvil cell at liquid helium temperature having in situ pressure measurement option, permitting accurate pressure determination at any low temperature during the resistance measurement scan. In general, for four-probe resistivity measurements on a polycrystalline sample, four fine gold wires are kept in contact with the sample with the help of the compression from the soft solid (usually alkali halides such as NaCl, KCl, etc.) acting as a pressure-transmitting medium. The actual pressure on the sample is underestimated if not measured from a ruby sphere placed adjacent to the sample and at that very low temperature. Here, we demonstrate the technique with a quasi-four-probe resistance measurement on an Fe-based superconductor in the temperature range 1.2-300 K and pressures up to 8 GPa to find an improved pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature.

  17. CONSTRUCTION OF EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION FOR RESEARCHING OF DENSITY AND SATURATED VAPOR PRESSURE (SVP OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharchenko P. M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The most important physical properties that characterize the substance are density and saturated vapor pressure (SVP. These parameters are required for the development of new technical processes in the petroleum and chemical industries, design of pipelines, pumping and fuel equipment, etc. Existing methods for calculating of density near and on the saturation lines are imperfect, and finding of the analytic dependence of SVP of petroleum products from all defining parameters associated with great difficulties. The purpose of present work is an experimental research and development of methods for calculating the density (specific volume near and on saturation lines, and saturated vapor pressure of gasoline straight-run fraction derived from petroleums from three fields: Mangyshlaksky, Trinity-Anastasevsky and West Siberian. The choice of objects for research is due to the necessity of creating methods for calculating of density and SVP of oils obtained from various hydrocarbon group composition petroleums. Area of state parameters in the present work by temperature (20 ÷ 320°C and pressure (0,03 ÷ 30 MPa provides the ability to research gasoline fractions to supercritical regions. Measurement of density and SVP of petroleum fractions performed with help of a specially created for this purpose experimental installation

  18. Temperature dependence of densities of Sb and Bi melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG HaoRan; SUN ChunJing; WANG Rui; QI XiaoGang; ZHANG Ning

    2007-01-01

    The densities of Sb and Bi melts were investigated by an improved Archimedean method. The results show that the density of the Sb melt decreases linearly with increasing temperature, but the density of the Bi melt firstly increases and then decreases as the temperature increases. There is a maximum density value of 10.002 g/cm3 at 310℃, about 39℃ above the melting point. The temperature dependence of the Sb melt is well fitted with the expression ρ= 6.8590-5.8105×10-4T, and that of the Bi melt is fitted with ρ=10.3312-1.18×10-3T. The results were discussed from a microstructure viewpoint.

  19. Baryon number fluctuations at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wei-jie; Rennecke, Fabian; Schaefer, Bernd-Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We investigate baryon number fluctuations for finite temperature and density in two-flavor QCD. This is done within a QCD-improved low-energy effective theory in an extension of the approach put forward in [1,2]. In the present work we aim at improving the predictive power of this approach for large temperatures and density, that is, for small collision energies. This is achieved by taking into account the full frequency dependence of the quark dispersion. This ensures the necessary Silver Blaze property of finite density QCD for the first time, which so far was only implemented approximately. Moreover, we show that Polyakov loop fluctuations have a sizeable impact at large temperatures and density. The results for the kurtosis of baryon number fluctuations are compared to previous effective theory results, lattice results and recent experimental data from STAR.

  20. High pressure and anesthesia: pressure stimulates or inhibits bacterial bioluminescence depending upon temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, S; Kamaya, H; Ueda, I

    1988-10-01

    Although high pressure is often viewed as a nonspecific stimulus counteracting anesthesia, pressure can either excite or inhibit biological activity depending on the temperature at application. Temperature and pressure are two independent variables that determine equilibrium quantity, e.g., the state of organisms in terms of activity and anesthesia depth. We used the light intensity of luminous bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) as an activity parameter, and studied the effects of pressure and anesthetics on the bacteria's light intensity at various temperatures. The light intensity was greatest at about 30 degrees C at ambient pressure. When the system was pressurized up to 204 atm, the temperature for maximum light intensity was shifted to higher temperatures. Above the optimal temperature for the maximal light intensity, high pressure increased the light intensity. Below the optimal temperature, pressure decreased light intensity. Pressure only shifts the reaction equilibrium to the lower volume state (Le Chatelier's principle). When the volume of the excited state is larger than the resting state, high pressure inhibits excitation, and vice versa. Halothane 0.008 atm and isoflurane 0.021 atm inhibited the light intensity both above and below the optimal temperature. When pressurized, the light intensity increased in the high temperature range but decreased in the low temperature range, as in the control. Thus, high pressure seemingly potentiated the anesthetic action at low temperatures. When the ratio of the light intensity in bacteria exposed to anesthesia and those not exposed to anesthesia was plotted against the pressure, however, the value approached unity in proportion to the pressure increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. 高压下硝基甲烷分子温度的密度泛函计算%Density functional theory study on the temperature of nitromethane molecule under pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董光兴; 葛素红; 李德华

    2015-01-01

    用密度泛函理论在B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2P)计算水平上对硝基甲烷分子进行了结构优化、频率和热化学分析.发现:在相同温度条件下改变压强,分子熵函数产生了改变,当温度和压强条件相同时,对于不同物质熵函数的改变是相同的.以热力学理论中麦克斯韦关系为基础,通过计算等温过程中分子的熵函数对压强的变化率,用数值拟合方法得到不同压强条件下分子温度的表达式: T=T0+(1-B)[18.3858+0.5392P] V0,式中T0、V0分别表示分子系统初态的温度和体积, T、V分别表示系统在末态的温度和体积, B是体积的压缩比.在选定参数的情况下该表达式可以计算不同压强条件下CHNO含能材料的分子温度.同时,以硝基甲烷为验证,选取基本参数V0和B,计算其在C-J条件对应的爆压14GPa下,分子温度为3461K,对应爱因斯坦温度,相当于3228cm-1的能量,在实验中该能量足以激发硝基甲烷分子内振动能量重新分配过程,有可能激发C-N键的红外振动而引起单分子分解反应的发生.因此,此表达式可用于预测含能材料撞击点火过程单分子分解可能的反应通道.%In the present paper B3LYP method complied with the 6 -311++G(2p, 2d) basis set was em-ployed to investigate the molecular property of nitromethane .Based on a systematic study of the molecular struc-ture, electronic energy , normal vibration mode and thermal chemical functions in nitromethane via the lowest sin -glet, it is found that the decrease of entropy with pressure is evident if we keep the temperature constant .Based on Maxwell relations of the thermodynamic we deduced the fitting equation as follow: T =T0 +( 1 -B ) [18.3858+0.5392P] V0 , which can calculate the temperature of the energetic molecules under different pres-sures.Further more, the temperature of the nitromethane under 14GPa is 3461K, which equates to

  2. Cubic silicon carbide and boron nitride as possible primary pressure calibrants for high pressure and temperature scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, K. K.; Goncharov, A. F.; Tkachev, S. N.; Prakapenka, V.

    2010-12-01

    K. K. Zhuravlev, A. F. Goncharov Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington DC, 20015 V. Prakapenka, S. N. Tkachev CARS, the University of Chicago, Bldg. 434A, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass. Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 Abstract Since its introduction, ruby-based pressure scale (Mao et al., 1986) has been the most commonly used by the high-pressure scientific community. However, it has limited use at elevated temperatures, due to the weakening and broadening of the ruby fluorescence line. The recent developments in the field of high temperature, high pressure physics and geophysics require some alternative pressure scale, which will be capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 3000 K. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) was recently (Goncharov et al., 2005) proposed as the possible pressure calibrant. It has been suggested that the simultaneous use of x-ray diffraction to measure density and Brillouin spectroscopy to obtain elastic properties of the crystal can be used to construct the pressure scale independent of any other pressure standards, i.e. cBN can be a primary pressure calibrant. However, the acoustic velocities of cBN are very close to those of diamond and, therefore, are hard to resolve in experiment at high pressures in diamond-anvil cell. Another possible primary pressure calibrant is cubic silicon carbide (SiC-3C). Its density and elastic parameters are quite different from the diamond ones and it is stable over the broad range of temperatures and pressures (up to 1 Mbar). SiC-3C is transparent and allows the use of Brillouin spectroscopy. Additionally, SiC-3C has two strong Raman lines, which can be used for the optical in situ pressure measurements. We report our experimental data on both cBN and SiC-3C and show that they, indeed, can be used in constructing reliable and accurate high-pressure, high-temperature scale. We performed single crystal x-ray diffraction and Brillouin

  3. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Allshouse, Michael R; Morrison, Philip J; Swinney, Harry L

    2016-01-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field $\\mathbf{J} = p \\mathbf{u}$, which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields, $p$ and $\\mathbf{u}$. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous $\\mathbf{J}(x,z,t)$ from density perturbations alone: a Green's function-based calculation yields $p$, and $\\mathbf{u}$ is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: the Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations, and the result for $\\mathbf{J}$ is found to agree typically to within $1\\%$ with $\\mathbf{J}$ computed directly using $p$ and $ \\mathbf{u}$ from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to densit...

  4. Effects of pressure and temperature on gate valve unwedging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerell, P.S.; Harrison, D.H.; Hayes, P.W.; Simons, J.W.; Walker, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    The stem thrust required to unwedge a gate valve is influenced by the pressure and temperature when the valve is closed and by the changes in these conditions between closure and opening. {open_quotes}Pressure locking{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}thermal binding{close_quotes} refer to situations where pressure and temperature effects cause the unwedging load to be much higher than normal. A model of these phenomena has been developed. Wedging (closure) is modeled as developing an {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} between the disk and its seat rings in the valve. The effects of pressure and temperature are analyzed to determine the change in this disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes}. Flexibilities, of the disk, body, stem and yoke strongly influence the unwedging thrust. Calculations and limited comparisons to data have been performed for a range of valve designs and scenarios. Pressure changes can increase the unwedging load when there is either a uniform pressure decrease, or a situation where the bonnet pressure exceeds the pressures in the adjacent piping. Temperature changes can increase the unwedging load when: (1) valve closure at elevated system temperature produces a delayed stem expansion, (2) a temperature increase after closure produces a bonnet pressure increase, or (3) a temperature change after closure produces an increase in the disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} or disk-to-seat friction.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.315 - Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration. 1065.315 Section 1065.315 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.315 Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration. (a) Calibrate...

  6. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  7. Evidence of the existence of the high-density and low-density phases in deeply-cooled confined heavy water under high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin, E-mail: sowhsin@mit.edu [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Liu, Kao-Hsiang [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Harriger, Leland; Leão, Juscelino B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    The average density of D{sub 2}O confined in a nanoporous silica matrix (MCM-41-S) is studied with neutron scattering. We find that below ∼210 K, the pressure-temperature plane of the system can be divided into two regions. The average density of the confined D{sub 2}O in the higher-pressure region is about 16% larger than that in the lower-pressure region. These two regions could represent the so-called “low-density liquid” and “high-density liquid” phases. The dividing line of these two regions, which could represent the associated 1st order liquid-liquid transition line, is also determined.

  8. Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pavese, Franco

    2013-01-01

    This 2nd edition volume of Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements follows the first publication in 1992. It collects a much larger set of information, reference data, and bibliography in temperature and pressure metrology of gaseous substances, including the physical-chemical issues related to gaseous substances. The book provides solutions to practical applications where gases are used in different thermodynamic conditions. Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements, 2nd edition is the only comprehensive survey of methods for pressure measurement in gaseous media used in the medium-to-low pressure range closely connected with thermometry. It assembles current information on thermometry and manometry that involve the use of gaseous substances which are likely to be valid methods for the future. As such, it is an important resource for the researcher. This edition is updated through the very latest scientific and technical developments of gas-based temperature and pressure measurem...

  9. Density and Temperature Measurements in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2003-10-01

    We present electron density and temperature measurements from an active region observed above the limb with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Density-sensitive line ratios from Si VIII and S X indicate densities greater than 108 cm-3 as high as 200" (or 145 Mm) above the limb. At these heights, static, uniformly heated loop models predict densities close to 107 cm-3. Differential emission measure analysis shows that the observed plasma is nearly isothermal with a mean temperature of about 1.5 MK and a dispersion of about 0.2 MK. Both the differential emission measure and the Si XI/Si VIII line ratios indicate only small variations in the temperature at the heights observed. These measurements confirm recent observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer of ``overdense'' plasma at temperatures near 1 MK in solar active regions. Time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations suggest that impulsive heating models can account for the large densities, but they have a difficult time reproducing the narrow range of observed temperatures. The observations of overdense, nearly isothermal plasma in the solar corona provide a significant challenge to theories of coronal heating.

  10. Temperature field simulation of gob influenced by atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 罗海珠; 梁运涛; 王继仁

    2015-01-01

    The current temperature field model of mine gob does not take the boundary conditions of the atmospheric pressure into account, while the actual atmospheric pressure is influenced by weather, so as to produce differences between ventilation negative pressure of the working face and the negative pressure of gas drainage in gob, thus interfering the calculated results of gob temperature field. According to the characteristics of the actual air flow and temperature change in gob, a two-dimensional temperature field model of the gob was built, and the relational model between the air pressure of intake and outlet of the gob and the atmospheric pressure was established, which was introduced into the boundary conditions of temperature field to conduct calculation. By means of analysis on the simulation example, and comparison with the traditional model, the results indicate that atmospheric pressure change had notable impact on the distribution of gob temperature field. The laboratory test system of gob temperature field was constructed, and the relative error between simulated and measured value was no greater than 9.6%, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed model. This work offers theoretical basis for accurate calculation of temperature and prediction of ignition source in mine gob, and has important implications on preventing spontaneous combustion of coal.

  11. Vacuum energy density and pressure of a massive scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Fernando Daniel; Fulling, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    With a view toward application of the Pauli-Villars regularization method to the Casimir energy of boundaries, we calculate the expectation values of the components of the stress tensor of a confined massive field in 1+1 space-time dimensions. Previous papers by Hays and Fulling are bridged and generalized. The Green function for the time-independent Schrödinger equation is constructed from the Green function for the whole line by the method of images; equivalently, the one-dimensional system is solved exactly in terms of closed classical paths and periodic orbits. Terms in the energy density and in the eigenvalue density attributable to the two boundaries individually and those attributable to the confinement of the field to a finite interval are distinguished so that their physical origins are clear. Then the pressure is found similarly from the cylinder kernel, the Green function associated most directly with an exponential frequency cutoff of the Fourier mode expansion. Finally, we discuss how the theory could be rendered finite by the Pauli-Villars method.

  12. Vacuum energy density and pressure of a massive scalar field

    CERN Document Server

    Mera, Fernando Daniel

    2014-01-01

    With a view toward application of the Pauli-Villars regularization method to the Casimir energy of boundaries, we calculate the expectation values of the components of the stress tensor of a confined massive field in 1+1 space-time dimensions. Previous papers by Hays and Fulling are bridged and generalized. The Green function for the time-independent Schrodinger equation is constructed from the Green function for the whole line by the method of images; equivalently, the one-dimensional system is solved exactly in terms of closed classical paths and periodic orbits. Terms in the energy density and in the eigenvalue density attributable to the two boundaries individually and those attributable to the confinement of the field to a finite interval are distinguished so that their physical origins are clear. Then the pressure is found similarly from the cylinder kernel, the Green function associated most directly with an exponential frequency cutoff of the Fourier mode expansion. Finally, we discuss how the theory ...

  13. Temperature control for high pressure processes up to 1400 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, K.; Mathys, A.; Heinz, V.; Knorr, D.

    2008-07-01

    Pressure- assisted sterilisation is an emerging technology. Hydrostatic high pressure can reduce the thermal load of the product and this allows quality retention in food products. To guarantee the safety of the sterilisation process it is necessary to investigate inactivation kinetics especially of bacterial spores. A significant roll during the inactivation of microorganisms under high pressure has the thermodynamic effect of the adiabatic heating. To analyse the individual effect of pressure and temperature on microorganism inactivation an exact temperature control of the sample to reach ideal adiabatic conditions and isothermal dwell times is necessary. Hence a heating/cooling block for a high pressure unit (Stansted Mini-Food-lab; high pressure capillary with 300 μL sample volume) was constructed. Without temperature control the sample would be cooled down during pressure built up, because of the non-adiabatic heating of the steel made vessel. The heating/cooling block allows an ideal adiabatic heat up and cooling of the pressure vessel during compression and decompression. The high pressure unit has a pressure build-up rate up to 250 MPa s-1 and a maximum pressure of 1400 MPa. Sebacate acid was chosen as pressure transmitting medium because it had no phase shift over the investigate pressure and temperature range. To eliminate the temperature difference between sample and vessel during compression and decompression phase, the mathematical model of the adiabatic heating/cooling of water and sebacate acid was implemented into a computational routine, written in Test Point. The calculated temperature is the setpoint of the PID controller for the heating/cooling block. This software allows an online measurement of the pressure and temperature in the vessel and the temperature at the outer wall of the vessel. The accurate temperature control, including the model of the adiabatic heating opens up the possibility to realise an ideal adiabatic heating and cooling as

  14. Temperature control for high pressure processes up to 1400 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reineke, K; Mathys, A; Knorr, D [Berlin University of Technology, Department of Food Biotechnology and Food Process Engineering, Koenigin-Luise-Str. 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Heinz, V [German Institute of Food Technology, p. o. box: 1165, D-49601, Quackenbrueck (Germany)], E-mail: alexander.mathys@tu-berlin.de

    2008-07-15

    Pressure- assisted sterilisation is an emerging technology. Hydrostatic high pressure can reduce the thermal load of the product and this allows quality retention in food products. To guarantee the safety of the sterilisation process it is necessary to investigate inactivation kinetics especially of bacterial spores. A significant roll during the inactivation of microorganisms under high pressure has the thermodynamic effect of the adiabatic heating. To analyse the individual effect of pressure and temperature on microorganism inactivation an exact temperature control of the sample to reach ideal adiabatic conditions and isothermal dwell times is necessary. Hence a heating/cooling block for a high pressure unit (Stansted Mini-Food-lab; high pressure capillary with 300 {mu}L sample volume) was constructed. Without temperature control the sample would be cooled down during pressure built up, because of the non-adiabatic heating of the steel made vessel. The heating/cooling block allows an ideal adiabatic heat up and cooling of the pressure vessel during compression and decompression. The high pressure unit has a pressure build-up rate up to 250 MPa s{sup -1} and a maximum pressure of 1400 MPa. Sebacate acid was chosen as pressure transmitting medium because it had no phase shift over the investigate pressure and temperature range. To eliminate the temperature difference between sample and vessel during compression and decompression phase, the mathematical model of the adiabatic heating/cooling of water and sebacate acid was implemented into a computational routine, written in Test Point. The calculated temperature is the setpoint of the PID controller for the heating/cooling block. This software allows an online measurement of the pressure and temperature in the vessel and the temperature at the outer wall of the vessel. The accurate temperature control, including the model of the adiabatic heating opens up the possibility to realise an ideal adiabatic heating and

  15. Compliant Foil Journal Bearing Performance at Alternate Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Puleo, Bernadette J.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental test program has been conducted to determine the highly loaded performance of current generation gas foil bearings at alternate pressures and temperatures. Typically foil bearing performance has been reported at temperatures relevant to turbomachinery applications but only at an ambient pressure of one atmosphere. This dearth of data at alternate pressures has motivated the current test program. Two facilities were used in the test program, the ambient pressure rig and the high pressure rig. The test program utilized a 35 mm diameter by 27 mm long foil journal bearing having an uncoated Inconel X-750 top foil running against a shaft with a PS304 coated journal. Load capacity tests were conducted at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 krpm at temperatures from 25 to 500 C and at pressures from 0.1 to 2.5 atmospheres. Results show an increase in load capacity with increased ambient pressure and a reduction in load capacity with increased ambient temperature. Below one-half atmosphere of ambient pressure a dramatic loss of load capacity is experienced. Additional lightly loaded foil bearing performance in nitrogen at 25 C and up to 48 atmospheres of ambient pressure has also been reported. In the lightly loaded region of operation the power loss increases for increasing pressure at a fixed load. Knowledge of foil bearing performance at operating conditions found within potential machine applications will reduce program development risk of future foil bearing supported turbomachines.

  16. Exact conditions on the temperature dependence of density functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Kieron; Grabowski, Paul E; Pribram-Jones, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Universal exact conditions guided the construction of most ground-state density functional approximations in use today. We derive the relation between the entropy and Mermin free energy density functionals for thermal density functional theory. Both the entropy and sum of kinetic and electron-electron repulsion functionals are shown to be monotonically increasing with temperature, while the Mermin functional is concave downwards. Analogous relations are found for both exchange and correlation. The importance of these conditions is illustrated in two extremes: the Hubbard dimer and the uniform gas.

  17. Exact conditions on the temperature dependence of density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.; Smith, J. C.; Grabowski, P. E.; Pribram-Jones, A.

    2016-05-01

    Universal exact conditions guided the construction of most ground-state density functional approximations in use today. We derive the relation between the entropy and Mermin free energy density functionals for thermal density functional theory. Both the entropy and sum of kinetic and electron-electron repulsion functionals are shown to be monotonically increasing with temperature, while the Mermin functional is concave downwards. Analogous relations are found for both exchange and correlation. The importance of these conditions is illustrated in two extremes: the Hubbard dimer and the uniform gas.

  18. Heat Transport Simulation for Atmospheric-Pressure High-Density Microgap Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2006-02-01

    Atmospheric-pressure cw high-density plasma can be produced in a microgap between two knife-edge electrodes by microwave excitation. A possible application of such a plasma is as an excimer light source and for this purpose the gas temperature in the plasma is a particularly important parameter. In this paper we report a fluid dynamic simulation of heat transport in the microgap plasma and compare the results with previously studied experimental gas temperature characteristics (e.g., dependence on the microwave power and the forced gas flow rate). The simulation explains reasonably well the experimental results when the effect of local gas density change on the gas heating process is taken into consideration. Discussion is given that the existence of thermally driven convection in the microgap plasma indicated in a preliminary report is incorrect.

  19. Exploring charge density analysis in crystals at high pressure: data collection, data analysis and advanced modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Genoni, Alessandro; Meyer, Benjamin; Krawczuk, Anna; Macchi, Piero

    2017-08-01

    The possibility to determine electron-density distribution in crystals has been an enormous breakthrough, stimulated by a favourable combination of equipment for X-ray and neutron diffraction at low temperature, by the development of simplified, though accurate, electron-density models refined from the experimental data and by the progress in charge density analysis often in combination with theoretical work. Many years after the first successful charge density determination and analysis, scientists face new challenges, for example: (i) determination of the finer details of the electron-density distribution in the atomic cores, (ii) simultaneous refinement of electron charge and spin density or (iii) measuring crystals under perturbation. In this context, the possibility of obtaining experimental charge density at high pressure has recently been demonstrated [Casati et al. (2016). Nat. Commun. 7, 10901]. This paper reports on the necessities and pitfalls of this new challenge, focusing on the species syn-1,6:8,13-biscarbonyl[14]annulene. The experimental requirements, the expected data quality and data corrections are discussed in detail, including warnings about possible shortcomings. At the same time, new modelling techniques are proposed, which could enable specific information to be extracted, from the limited and less accurate observations, like the degree of localization of double bonds, which is fundamental to the scientific case under examination.

  20. Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hong; Yao, Minjie; Zhao, Wei-Qin

    2008-06-01

    The Friedberg-Lee model is studied at finite temperature and density. By using the finite temperature field theory, the effective potential of the Friedberg-Lee model and the bag constant B(T) and B(T,μ) have been calculated at different temperatures and densities. It is shown that there is a critical temperature TC≃106.6 MeV when μ=0 MeV and a critical chemical potential μ≃223.1 MeV for fixing the temperature at T=50 MeV. We also calculate the soliton solutions of the Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density. It turns out that when T⩽TC (or μ⩽μC), there is a bag constant B(T) [or B(T,μ)] and the soliton solutions are stable. However, when T>TC (or μ>μC) the bag constant B(T)=0 MeV [or B(T,μ)=0 MeV] and there is no soliton solution anymore, therefore, the confinement of quarks disappears quickly.

  1. The Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Hong; Zhao, Wei-Qin

    2007-01-01

    The Friedberg-Lee model is studied at finite temperature and density. By using the finite temperature field theory, the effective potential of the Friedberg-Lee model and the bag constant $B(T)$ and $B(T,\\mu)$ have been calculated at different temperatures and densities. It is shown that there is a critical temperature $T_{C}\\simeq 106.6 \\mathrm{MeV}$ when $\\mu=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$ and a critical chemical potential $\\mu \\simeq 223.1 \\mathrm{MeV}$ for fixing the temperature at $T=50 \\mathrm{MeV}$. We also calculate the soliton solutions of the Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density. It turns out that when $T\\leq T_{C}$ (or $\\mu \\leq \\mu_C$), there is a bag constant $B(T)$ (or $B(T,\\mu)$) and the soliton solutions are stable. However, when $T>T_{C}$ (or $\\mu>\\mu_C$) the bag constant $B(T)=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$ (or $B(T,\\mu)=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$) and there is no soliton solution anymore, therefore, the confinement of quarks disappears quickly.

  2. Molecular hydrogen emission as a density and temperature indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Ferland, Gary J.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Loh, Edwin D.; Fabian, Andy C.; Williams, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Infrared observations have discovered a variety of objects, including filaments in the Crab Nebula and cool-core clusters of galaxies, where the 1-0 S(1) line is stronger than the infrared H I lines. A variety of processes could be responsible for this emission. Although many complete shock or PDR calculations of emission have been published, we know of no previous simple calculation that shows the emission spectrum and level populations of thermally excited low-density . We present a range of purely thermal collisional simulations, corresponding to constant gas kinetic temperature at different densities. We consider the cases where the collisions affecting H2 are predominantly with atomic or molecular hydrogen. The resulting level population (often called "excitation") diagrams show that excitation temperatures are sometimes lower than the gas kinetic temperature when the density is too low for the level populations to go to LTE. The atomic case goes to LTE at much lower densities than the molecular case due to larger collision rates. At low densities for the v=1 and 2 vibrational manifolds level populations are quasi-thermal, which could be misinterpreted as showing the gas is in LTE at high density. At low densities for the molecular case the level population diagrams are discontinuous between v=0 and 1 vibrational manifolds and between v=2, J=0, 1 and other higher J levels within the same vibrational manifold. These jumps could be used as density diagnostics. We show how much the H2 mass would be underestimated using the 1-0 S(1) line strength if the density is below that required for LTE. We give diagnostic diagrams showing level populations over a range of density and temperature. The density where the level populations are given by a Boltzmann distribution relative to the total molecular abundance (required to get the correct H2 mass), is shown for various cases. We discuss the implications of these results for the interpretation of H2 observations of the

  3. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS. The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry–Perot interferometer (EFPI with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF acid and femtosecond (FS laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of \\(s_p\\ = 2–10 \\(\\frac{\\text{nm}}{\\text{kPa}}\\ and a resolution of better than \\(\\Delta P\\ = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H\\(_2\\O. A static pressure test in 38 cmH\\(_2\\O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H\\(_2\\O in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by \\(k=10.7\\ \\(\\frac{\\text{pm}}{\\text{K}}\\, which results in a temperature resolution of better than \\(\\Delta T\\ = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  4. Structural modifications of GeO2 glass under high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Antoine; Molherac, Rémy; Champagnon, Bernard; Martinet, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Vitreous GeO2 has been compressed at high temperature to investigate the effect of thermal activation on the structural reorganization during compression. The measurements were performed in-situ using micro Raman spectroscopy under pressure up to 6 GPa and temperature up to 400 °C. The evolution of the Raman shift of the main band (400-500 cm-1) with temperature during compression evidences a pressure window around 3 GPa within which temperature has a remarkable influence on the structure, in particular, the intermediate range order. We find that this change is well correlated with previous ex-situ density measurements from high pressure-high temperature densifications. Moreover, coordination changes from tetrahedrally (GeO4) to octahedrally (GeO6) coordinated GeO2 are accelerated with the heating during the compression.

  5. Measuring the Densities of Aqueous Glasses at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Dan, Ritwik; Moreau, David W; Thorne, Robert

    2017-06-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the vitreous phase cryogenic temperature densities of aqueous mixtures, and other samples that require rapid cooling, to prepare the desired cryogenic temperature phase. Microliter to picoliter size drops are cooled by projection into a liquid nitrogen-argon (N2-Ar) mixture. The cryogenic temperature phase of the drop is evaluated using a visual assay that correlates with X-ray diffraction measurements. The density of the liquid N2-Ar mixture is adjusted by adding N2 or Ar until the drop becomes neutrally buoyant. The density of this mixture and thus of the drop is determined using a test mass and Archimedes principle. With appropriate care in drop preparation, management of gas above the liquid cryogen mixture to minimize icing, and regular mixing of the cryogenic mixture to prevent density stratification and phase separation, densities accurate to <0.5% of drops as small as 50 pL can readily be determined. Measurements on aqueous cryoprotectant mixtures provide insight into cryoprotectant action, and provide quantitative data to facilitate thermal contraction matching in biological cryopreservation.

  6. Temperature and Density Measurements in a Quiet Coronal Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Warshall, Andrew D.

    2002-06-01

    Many previous studies have used emission line or broadband filter ratios to infer the presence of temperature gradients in the quiet solar corona. Recently it has been suggested that these temperature gradients are not real, but result from the superposition of isothermal loops with different temperatures and density scale heights along the line of sight. A model describing this hydrostatic weighting bias has been developed by Aschwanden & Acton. In this paper we present the application of the Aschwanden & Acton differential emission measure model to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) observations of a quiet coronal streamer. Simultaneous Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) observations show increases in the filter ratios with height above the limb, indicating an increase in temperature. The application of the Aschwanden & Acton model to these SUMER data, however, show that the temperature is constant with height and that the distribution of temperatures in the corona is much too narrow for the hydrostatic weighting bias to have any effect on the SXT filter ratios. We consider the possibility that there is a tenuous hot component (~3 MK) that accounts for the SXT observations. We find that a hot plasma with an emission measure sufficient to reproduce the observed SXT fluxes would also produce significant count rates in the high-temperature emission lines in the SUMER wavelength range. These lines are not observed, and we conclude that the SUMER spectra are not consistent with the SXT filter ratio temperatures. Calculations from a hydrodynamic loop model suggest that nonuniform footpoint heating may be consistent with the temperatures and densities observed at most heights, consistent with the recent analysis of relatively cool (~1 MK) active region loops. We also find, however, that at the lowest heights the observed densities are smaller than those predicted by uniform or footpoint heating.

  7. Design and Evaluation of a Pressure and Temperature Monitoring System for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farve Daneshvar Fard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pressure ulcers are tissue damages resulting from blood flow restriction, which occurs when the tissue is exposed to high pressure for a long period of time. These painful sores are common in patients and elderly, who spend extended periods of time in bed or wheelchair. In this study, a continuous pressure and temperature monitoring system was developed for pressure ulcer prevention. Materials and Methods The monitoring system consists of 64 pressure and 64 temperature sensors on a 40×50 cm2 sheet. Pressure and temperature data and the corresponding maps were displayed on a computer in real-time. Risk assessment could be performed by monitoring and recording absolute pressure and temperature values, as well as deviations over time. Furthermore, a posture detection procedure was proposed for sitting posture identification. Information about the patient’s movement history may help caregivers make informed decisions about the patient’s repositioning and ulcer prevention strategies. Results Steady temporal behaviour of the designed system and repeatability of the measurements were evaluated using several particular tests. The results illustrated that the system could be utilized for continuous monitoring of interface pressure and temperature for pressure ulcer prevention. Furthermore, the proposed method for detecting sitting posture was verified using a statistical analysis. Conclusion A continuous time pressure and temperature monitoring system was presented in this study. This system may be suited for pressure ulcer prevention given its feasibility for simultaneous monitoring of pressure and temperature and alarming options. Furthermore, a method for detecting different sitting postures was proposed and verified. Pressure ulcers in wheelchair-bound patients may be prevented using this sitting posture detection method.

  8. Temperature and relative density of atomic hydrogen in a multicusp H sup minus volume source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneteau, A.M.; Hollos, G.; Bacal, M. (Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionises, Laboratoire du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, (France)); Bretagne, J. (Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, LA73 du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France))

    1990-06-15

    The Balmer {beta} and {gamma} line shapes have been analyzed to determine the relative density and the temperature of hydrogen atoms in magnetic multicusp plasma generators. Results for a 90-V, 4--40-mTorr, 1--18-A conventional multicusp plasma generator and a 50-V, 4-mTorr, 1--15-A hybrid multicusp plasma generator are presented. The relative number density of hydrogen atoms increased smoothly with pressure and discharge current but never exceeded 10%. The absolute atomic number density in a 90-V 10-A discharge varied in proportion with pressure. The atomic temperature (in the 0.1--0.4-eV range) decreased with pressure and slowly increased with the discharge current. The role of atoms in the processes determining the H{sup {minus}} temperature and the H{sub 2} vibrational and rotational temperatures is discussed. The results confirm that in multicusp negative-ion sources collisional excitation of ground state atoms and molecules by energetic electrons is the dominant process in Balmer-{beta} and -{gamma} light emission.

  9. Atomic temperature and density in multicusp H sup minus volume sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneteau, A.M.; Hollos, G.; Leroy, R.; Berlemont, P.; Bacal, M. (Laboratoire du C.N.R.S., Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)); Bertagne, J. (Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, LA73 du CNRS, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France))

    1990-08-05

    The Balmer {beta} and {gamma} line shapes have been analyzed to determine the relative density and the temperature of hydrogen atoms in magnetic multicusp plasma generators. Results for a 90 V, 4--40 mTorr, 1--18 A conventional multicusp plasma generator and a 50 V, 4 mTorr, 1--15 A hybrid multicusp plasma generator are presented. The relative number density of hydrogen atoms increases smoothly with pressure and discharge current but never exceeds 10%. The absolute atomic number density in a 90 V--10 A discharge varies in proportion with pressure. The atomic temperature (in the 0.1--0.4 eV range) decreases with pressure and slowly increases with the discharge current. The role of atoms in the processes determining the H{sup {minus}} temperature and the H{sub 2} vibrational and rotational temperatures is discussed. The results confirm that in multicusp negative ion sources collisional excitation of ground-state atoms and molecules by energetic electrons is the dominant process in Balmer {beta} and {gamma} light emission.

  10. Lattice QCD Results at Finite Temperature and Density

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z

    2003-01-01

    Recent lattice results on QCD at finite temperatures and densities are reviewed. Two new and independent techniques give compatible results for physical quantities. The phase line separating the hadronic and quark-gluon plasma phases, the critical endpoint and the equation of state are discussed.

  11. New primary pressure calibrants for high pressure and temperature scale: SiC-3C and cBN are possible candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, Kirill; Goncharov, Alexander; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2011-03-01

    Since the invention of a diamond-anvil cell, various high-pressure scales for in situ pressure measurements have been realized. Ruby-based pressure scale (Mao et al., 1986) is the best known and high-pressure scientific community has been using it for over two decades. However, it has limited use at elevated temperatures, due to the weakening and broadening of the ruby fluorescence line. The recent developments in the field of high temperature, high pressure physics and geophysics require some alternative pressure scale, capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 3000 K. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) was recently proposed as the possible pressure calibrant. It has been suggested that the simultaneous use of x-ray diffraction to measure density and Brillouin spectroscopy to obtain elastic properties of the crystal can be used to construct the pressure scale independent of any other pressure standards. However, the acoustic velocities of cBN are very close to those of diamond and, therefore, are hard to resolve in experiment in diamond-anvil cell. Another possible primary pressure calibrant is cubic silicon carbide (SiC-3C). We performed single crystal x-ray diffraction and Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1 Mbar in pressure at room temperature in the diamond-anvil cell and show that cBN and SiC-3C, indeed, can be used in constructing reliable and accurate high-pressure, high-temperature scale.

  12. A method enabling simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement using a single piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantlović, Miloš; Jokić, Ivana; Lazić, Žarko; Smiljanić, Milče; Obradov, Marko; Vukelić, Branko; Jakšić, Zoran; Stanković, Srđan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present a high-performance, simple and low-cost method for simultaneous measurement of pressure and temperature using a single piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor. The proposed measurement method utilizes the parasitic temperature sensitivity of the sensing element for both pressure measurement correction and temperature measurement. A parametric mathematical model of the sensor was established and its parameters were calculated using the obtained characterization data. Based on the model, a real-time sensor correction for both pressure and temperature measurements was implemented in a target measurement system. The proposed method was verified experimentally on a group of typical industrial-grade piezoresistive sensors. The obtained results indicate that the method enables the pressure measurement performance to exceed that of typical digital industrial pressure transmitters, achieving at the same time the temperature measurement performance comparable to industrial-grade platinum resistance temperature sensors. The presented work is directly applicable in industrial instrumentation, where it can add temperature measurement capability to the existing pressure measurement instruments, requiring little or no additional hardware, and without adverse effects on pressure measurement performance.

  13. Temperature induced pore fluid pressurization in geomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of the thermal response of the fluid-saturated porous materials in undrained condition is presented. It has been demonstrated that the thermal pressurization phenomenon is controlled by the discrepancy between the thermal expansion of the pore fluid and of the solid phase, the stress-dependency of the compressibility and the non-elastic volume changes of the porous material. For evaluation of the undrained thermo-poro-elastic properties of saturated porous materials in conventional triaxial cells, it is important to take into account the effect of the dead volume of the drainage system. A simple correction method is presented to correct the measured pore pressure change and also the measured volumetric strain during an undrained heating test. It is shown that the porosity of the tested material, its drained compressibility and the ratio of the volume of the drainage system to the one of the tested sample, are the key parameters which influence the most the error induced on the measuremen...

  14. Thermal equation of state of synthetic orthoferrosilite at lunar pressures and temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; Jacobs, M.H.G.; van den Berg, A.P.; Wehber, M.; Lathe, C.; McCammon, C.A.; van Westrenen, W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron-rich orthopyroxene plays an important role in models of the thermal and magmatic evolution of the Moon, but its density at high pressure and high temperature is not well-constrained. We present in situ measurements of the unit-cell volume of a synthetic polycrystalline end-member orthoferrosili

  15. Electron density and temperature in NIO1 RF source operated in oxygen and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbisan, M.; Zaniol, B.; Cavenago, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Zanini, M.

    2017-08-01

    The NIO1 experiment, built and operated at Consorzio RFX, hosts an RF negative ion source, from which it is possible to produce a beam of maximum 130 mA in H- ions, accelerated up to 60 kV. For the preliminary tests of the extraction system the source has been operated in oxygen, whose high electronegativity allows to reach useful levels of extracted beam current. The efficiency of negative ions extraction is strongly influenced by the electron density and temperature close to the Plasma Grid, i.e. the grid of the acceleration system which faces the source. To support the tests, these parameters have been measured by means of the Optical Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic. This technique has involved the use of an oxygen-argon mixture to produce the plasma in the source. The intensities of specific Ar I and Ar II lines have been measured along lines of sight close to the Plasma Grid, and have been interpreted with the ADAS package to get the desired information. This work will describe the diagnostic hardware, the analysis method and the measured values of electron density and temperature, as function of the main source parameters (RF power, pressure, bias voltage and magnetic filter field). The main results show that not only electron density but also electron temperature increase with RF power; both decrease with increasing magnetic filter field. Variations of source pressure and plasma grid bias voltage appear to affect only electron temperature and electron density, respectively.

  16. An exospheric temperature model from CHAMP thermospheric density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Libin; Lei, Jiuhou; Sutton, Eric; Dou, Xiankang; Fang, Hanxian

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effective exospheric temperature, named as T∞, derived from thermospheric densities measured by the CHAMP satellite during 2002-2010 was utilized to develop an exospheric temperature model (ETM) with the aid of the NRLMSISE-00 model. In the ETM, the temperature variations are characterized as a function of latitude, local time, season, and solar and geomagnetic activities. The ETM is validated by the independent GRACE measurements, and it is found that T∞ and thermospheric densities from the ETM are in better agreement with the GRACE data than those from the NRLMSISE-00 model. In addition, the ETM captures well the thermospheric equatorial anomaly feature, seasonal variation, and the hemispheric asymmetry in the thermosphere.

  17. The QCD equation of state at high temperature and small density from the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Chuan

    2008-03-15

    In this thesis we have analyzed bulk thermodynamic properties of QCD at high temperature and small but non-vanishing baryon density on lattices. We have used the integration method to calculate the pressure at zero chemical potentials. The thermodynamic quantities are normalized such that they vanish at zero temperature. The zero temperature calculations are thus needed for both calibrating the lattices and the subtraction procedure for the normalizations. In this study, we have scanned a wide range of temperature and constructed a line of constant physics, on which the strange pseudo-scalar meson mass and kaon mass are kept at their physical values and the light pseudo-scalar meson mass is about 220 MeV. Our calculations are mostly carried out on lattices with cut-offs a=1/4 T and 1/6 T, where T is the system temperature. All thermodynamic quantities, such as pressure, energy density as well as energy-momentum trace anomaly, show small cut-off effects. We have also calculated the trace anomaly at high temperatures on N=8 lattices to check that the lattice cut-off effects are under control. In order to study the QCD thermodynamics at small chemical potentials, we have used the Taylor expansion method. The pressure is expanded in terms of quark chemical potentials and the expansion coefficients at zero chemical potentials are calculated up to the fourth order on both N=4 and 6 lattices. Using these coefficients thermodynamic quantities, e.g. pressure and number densities, have been constructed and shown. (orig.)

  18. Engineering a laser remote sensor for atmospheric pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Korb, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A system for the remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is described. Resonant lines in the 7600 Angstrom oxygen A band region are used and an organic dye laser beam is tuned to measure line absorption changes with temperature or pressure. A reference beam outside this band is also transmitted for calibration. Using lidar techniques, profiling of these parameters with altitude can be accomplished.

  19. Density measurements under pressure for the binary system 1-propanol plus toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2005-01-01

    The density of the binary system composed of 1-propanol and toluene has been measured under pressure using a vibrating-tube densimeter. The measurements have been performed for four different compositions as well as the pure compounds at four temperatures in the range of (303.15 to 333.15) K and ...... but also due to the electron donor- acceptor-type formation of hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl group of 1-propanol and the pi electrons of toluene because aromatic hydrocarbons can act as electron donors....

  20. The Internal Pressure and Cohesive Energy Density of Liquid Metallic Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Yizhak

    2017-02-01

    The internal pressures, P_{int}, of practically all the liquid metallic elements in the periodic table up to plutonium (except highly radioactive ones) at their melting points were calculated from data in the literature. They are compared with the respective cohesive energy densities, ced, obtained from the literature data too. The ratios P_{int}{/}ced for various liquids are ranked as follows: molten salts < polar/hydrogen-bonded molecular solvents ˜ liquid metals < room temperature ionic liquids < nonpolar molecular solvents, and the reverse of this list reflects the relative strengths of the mutual interactions of the particles constituting these liquids.

  1. Structural analysis of liquid aluminum at high pressure and high temperature using the hard sphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Daijo; Kono, Yoshio; Shen, Guoyin

    2016-10-01

    The structure of liquid aluminum is measured up to 6.9 GPa and 1773 K using a multi-angle energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction method in a Paris-Edinburgh press. The effect of pressure and temperature on the structure and density of liquid aluminum is analyzed by means of the hard sphere model. Peak positions in the structure factor of liquid aluminum show a nearly constant value with varying temperatures at ˜1-2 GPa and slightly change with varying pressures up to 6.9 GPa at 1173-1773 K. In contrast, the height of the first peak in the structure factor significantly changes with varying pressures and temperatures. Hard sphere model analysis shows that the structure of liquid aluminum in the pressure-temperature range of this study is controlled mostly by the packing fraction with only a minor change in hard sphere diameters. The obtained packing fractions and hard sphere diameters are used to calculate densities of liquid aluminum at high pressure-temperature conditions.

  2. Acetone photophysics at 282 nm excitation at elevated pressure and temperature. I: absorption and fluorescence experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason; Mittal, Gaurav; Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-06-01

    This is the first in a series of two papers that presents new experimental data to extend the range of acetone photophysics to elevated pressure and temperature conditions. In this work, a flexible static and flow system is designed and characterized to study the independent as well as coupled effect of elevated pressure and temperature on acetone photophysics over pressures of 0.05‒4.0 MPa and temperatures of 295‒750 K for 282 nm excitation wavelength in nitrogen and air as bath gases. Experimental results show that at 282 nm excitation, relative fluorescence quantum yield increases with increasing pressure, decreases with increasing temperature, and that the pressure sensitivity varies weakly with elevated temperature. The previously assumed linearity of fluorescence with tracer number density is shown to only be valid over a small range. Additionally, acetone fluorescence is only moderately quenched in the presence of oxygen. The present findings yield insight into the competition between the non-radiative and collisional rates at elevated temperature and pressure, as well as provide validation datasets for an updated fluorescence model developed in the second paper.

  3. A Vacuum Microelectronic Pressure Sensor Array Integrated with Temperature Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jie; XIA Shanhong; CHEN Shaofeng

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a microsystemthat integrates a Vacuum Microelectronic pressuresensor array with a temperature sensor. The Vac-uum Microelectronic pressure sensor array consists of4 × 4 sensing elements. The temperature sensor is aPt-thin-film resistor. Computer aided design is usedto optimize the structure.

  4. Densification of MgSiO3 glass with pressure and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, A; Gaudio, Sarah; Lesher, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The density and structure of MgSiO3 glass (v-En) recovered from a series of annealing experiments up to 1000°C at 2.0, 5.5 and 8.5 GPa have been investigated using Archimedes' method and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The densities of recovered glasses are found to be a complex function...... of pressure and temperature. At room temperature, compression up to 8.5 GPa, followed by decompression, yields a glass with a density within 0.6 % of the 1-atm value. Likewise, the 1-atm density is fully recovered in glass heated up to ~500°C at 2.0 GPa at higher pressures. A sharp increase in recovered...... density is observed between 500°C and 800°C at 2.0 GPa, 200°C and 500°C at 5.5 GPa and from room-T and 300°C at 8.5 GPa. At higher annealing temperatures the changes in density are more modest. This break in slope occurs for a glass density of 2.89 g/cm3 at 2.0 GPa and 2.95 g/cm3 at 5.5 and 8.5 GPa. Above...

  5. LX-17 Deflagration at High Pressures and Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, J; Maienschein, J; Black, K; DeHaven, M; Wardell, J

    2006-10-23

    We measure the laminar deflagration rate of LX-17 (92.5 wt% TATB, 7.5 wt% Kel-F 800) at high pressure and temperature in a strand burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of thermal explosion violence. Simultaneous measurements of flame front time-of-arrival and temporal pressure history allow for the direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Additionally, deflagrating surface areas are calculated in order to provide quantitative insight into the dynamic surface structure during deflagration and its relationship to explosion violence. Deflagration rate data show that LX-17 burns in a smooth fashion at ambient temperature and is represented by the burn rate equation B = 0.2P{sup 0.9}. At 225 C, deflagration is more rapid and erratic. Dynamic deflagrating surface area calculations show that ambient temperature LX-17 deflagrating surface areas remain near unity over the pressure range studied.

  6. Combined NMR moisture, temperature and pressure measurements during heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pel L.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For model validation, quantitative measurements of the evolution of moisture, temperature, and pressure distributions in time are needed. For this purpose, we have developed an NMR setup to measure the moisture transport in heated building materials. The measured combined moisture content and temperature profiles give a unique insight in the moisture transport and dehydration kinetics inside concrete during fire. These measurements give the first quantitative proof for the build-up of a moisture peak due to the vapor pressure build-up. In this study we have also combined for the first time the measurement of the moisture and temperature profiles with the measurement of the pressure at one position, which show that the pressure build up is directly related to the moisture profiles.

  7. Dissociation and ionization equilibria of deuterium fluid over a wide range of temperatures and densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R. [Department of Physics, College of Science, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 15551, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the dissociation and ionization equilibria of deuterium fluid over a wide range of temperatures and densities. The partition functions for molecular and atomic species are evaluated, in a statistical-mechanically consistent way, implementing recent developments in the literature and taking high-density effects into account. A new chemical model (free energy function) is introduced in which the fluid is considered as a mixture of diatomic molecules, atoms, ions, and free electrons. Intensive short range hard core repulsion is taken into account together with partial degeneracy of free electrons and Coulomb interactions among charged particles. Samples of computational results are presented as a set of isotherms for the degree of ionization, dissociated fraction of molecules, pressure, and specific internal energy for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Predictions from the present model calculations show an improved and sensible physical behavior compared to other results in the literature.

  8. Temperature and temporal dependence of neutral density transmittance standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, A.; Hamlin, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    The Schott series of NG glasses are frequently used to manufacture neutral density transmittance standards for validation of spectrophotometer systems as well as for comparisons of regular spectral transmittance scales. A study has been made of the temperature and temporal dependence of transmittance in these types of filters. The temperature dependence of transmittance is found to scale as -ln(T). The filter transmittance was found to vary significantly with time shortly after manufacture but appears to be stabilizing nine months after beginning measurements.

  9. Innovations in plantar pressure and foot temperature measurements in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, S A

    2016-01-01

    Plantar pressure and temperature measurements in the diabetic foot primarily contribute to identifying abnormal values that increase risk for foot ulceration, and they are becoming increasingly more integrated in clinical practice and daily life of the patient. While plantar pressure measurements have long been present, only recently evidence shows their importance in ulcer prevention, as a data-driven approach to therapeutic footwear provision. The long-term monitoring of plantar pressures with the option to provide feedback, when alarming pressure levels occur, is a promising development in this area, although more technical and clinical validation is required. Shear is considered important in ulcer aetiology but is technically difficult to measure. Innovative research is underway to assess if foot temperature can act as a useful surrogate for shear. Because the skin heats up before it breaks down, frequent monitoring of foot temperature can identify these warning signals. This approach has shown to be effective in preventing foot ulcers. Innovation in diagnostic methods for foot temperature monitoring and evidence on cost effectiveness will likely facilitate implementation. Finally, monitoring of adherence to offloading treatment using temperature-based sensors has proven to be a feasible and relevant method with a wide range of possible research and patient care applications. These innovations in plantar pressure and temperature measurements illustrate an important transfer in diabetic foot care from subjective to objective evaluation of the high-risk patient. They demonstrate clinical value and a large potential in helping to reduce the patient and economic burden of diabetic foot disease.

  10. High-pressure-high-temperature treatment of natural diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Royen, J V

    2002-01-01

    The results are reported of high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) treatment experiments on natural diamonds of different origins and with different impurity contents. The diamonds are annealed in a temperature range up to 2000 sup o C at stabilizing pressures up to 7 GPa. The evolution is studied of different defects in the diamond crystal lattice. The influence of substitutional nitrogen atoms, plastic deformation and the combination of these is discussed. Diamonds are characterized at room and liquid nitrogen temperature using UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectrometry. The economic implications of diamond HPHT treatments are discussed.

  11. Strong anharmonicity induces quantum melting of charge density wave in 2 H -NbSe2 under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Maxime; Errea, Ion; Le Tacon, Mathieu; Souliou, Sofia-Michaela; Garbarino, Gaston; Cario, Laurent; Bosak, Alexey; Mauri, Francesco; Calandra, Matteo; Rodière, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The pressure and temperature dependence of the phonon dispersion of 2 H -NbSe2 is measured by inelastic x-ray scattering. A strong temperature dependent soft phonon mode, reminiscent of the charge density wave (CDW), is found to persist up to a pressure as high as 16 GPa, far above the critical pressure at which the CDW disappears at 0 K. By using ab initio calculations beyond the harmonic approximation, we obtain an accurate, quantitative description of the (P ,T ) dependence of the phonon spectrum. Our results show that the rapid destruction of the CDW under pressure is related to the zero mode vibrations—or quantum fluctuations—of the lattice renormalized by the anharmonic part of the lattice potential. The calculations also show that the low-energy longitudinal acoustic mode that drives the CDW transition barely contributes to superconductivity, explaining the insensitivity of the superconducting critical temperature to the CDW transition.

  12. Charge, density and electron temperature in a molecular ultracold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Ortega-Arroyo, J; Godin, P J; Grant, E R

    2009-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of NO entrained in a supersonic molecular beam releases electrons as it evolves to form an ultracold plasma. The size of this signal, compared with that extracted by the subsequent application of a pulsed electric field, determines the absolute magnitude of the plasma charge. This information, combined with the number density of ions, supports a simple thermochemical model that explains the evolution of the plasma to an ultracold electron temperature.

  13. Temperature and density effects on the nucleon mass splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, H R; Fanchiotti, H; Garc, C A

    1996-01-01

    The finite temperature and finite density dependence of the neu\\-tron-proton mass difference is analysed in a purely hadronic framework where the \\rho-\\omega mixing is crucial for this isospin symmetry breakdown. The problem is handled within Thermo Field Dynamics. The present results, consistent with partial chiral and charge symmetry restoration, improve the experimental data fit for the energy difference between mirror nuclei.

  14. Temperature and density effects on the nucleon mass splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, H.R.; Epele, L.N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Garcia Canal, C.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata C.C. 67, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    1996-04-01

    The finite temperature and finite density dependence of the neutron-proton mass difference is analyzed in a purely hadronic framework where the {rho}-{omega} mixing is crucial for this isospin symmetry breakdown. The problem is handled within thermofield dynamics. The present results, consistent with partial chiral and charge symmetry restoration, improve the experimental data fit for the energy difference between mirror nuclei. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Reduced density matrix functional theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldsiefen, Tim

    2012-10-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) is highly successful in many fields of research. There are, however, areas in which its performance is rather limited. An important example is the description of thermodynamical variables of a quantum system in thermodynamical equilibrium. Although the finite-temperature version of DFT (FT-DFT) rests on a firm theoretical basis and is only one year younger than its brother, groundstate DFT, it has been successfully applied to only a few problems. Because FT-DFT, like DFT, is in principle exact, these shortcomings can be attributed to the difficulties of deriving valuable functionals for FT-DFT. In this thesis, we are going to present an alternative theoretical description of quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. It is based on the 1-reduced density matrix (1RDM) of the system, rather than on its density and will rather cumbersomly be called finite-temperature reduced density matrix functional theory (FT-RDMFT). Its zero-temperature counterpart (RDMFT) proved to be successful in several fields, formerly difficult to address via DFT. These fields include, for example, the calculation of dissociation energies or the calculation of the fundamental gap, also for Mott insulators. This success is mainly due to the fact that the 1RDM carries more directly accessible ''manybody'' information than the density alone, leading for example to an exact description of the kinetic energy functional. This sparks the hope that a description of thermodynamical systems employing the 1RDM via FT-RDMFT can yield an improvement over FT-DFT. Giving a short review of RDMFT and pointing out difficulties when describing spin-polarized systems initiates our work. We then lay the theoretical framework for FT-RDMFT by proving the required Hohenberg-Kohn-like theorems, investigating and determining the domain of FT-RDMFT functionals and by deriving several properties of the exact functional. Subsequently, we present a perturbative method to

  16. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper in TPT, DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of an NFL football. We focus on the rate of pressure recovery that occurs when a cold football (either wet or dry) is returned to the warm locker room environment where the pressure was initially measured. Both studies stem from the so-called NFL "Deflategate" controversy in which footballs that initially met a minimum internal pressure requirement were rechecked at halftime of the AFC Championship game, and in some cases were reported to have fallen below the minimum pressure requirement. The question is whether the pressure changes were due to environmental exposure or rather to some air being released from the balls, or both.

  17. Method transfer from high-pressure liquid chromatography to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. II. Temperature and pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Leśko, Marek; Cavazzini, Alberto; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-07-03

    The importance of the generated temperature and pressure gradients in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) are investigated and compared to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug Omeprazole, together with three other model compounds (with different chemical characteristics, namely uncharged, positively and negatively charged) were used. Calculations of the complete temperature profile in the column at UHPLC conditions showed, in our experiments, a temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of 16 °C and a difference of 2 °C between the column center and the wall. Through van't Hoff plots, this information was used to single out the decrease in retention factor (k) solely due to the temperature gradient. The uncharged solute was least affected by temperature with a decrease in k of about 5% while for charged solutes the effect was more pronounced, with k decreases up to 14%. A pressure increase of 500 bar gave roughly 5% increase in k for the uncharged solute, while omeprazole and the other two charged solutes gave about 25, 20 and 15% increases in k, respectively. The stochastic model of chromatography was applied to estimate the dependence of the average number of adsorption/desorption events (n) and the average time spent by a molecule in the stationary phase (τs) on temperature and pressure on peak shape for the tailing, basic solute. Increasing the temperature yielded an increase in n and decrease in τs which resulted in less skew at high temperatures. With increasing pressure, the stochastic modeling gave interesting results for the basic solute showing that the skew of the peak increased with pressure. The conclusion is that pressure effects are more pronounced for both retention and peak shape than the temperature effects for the polar or charged compounds in our study.

  18. On the density dependent hadron field theory at finite temperature and its thermodynamical consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Avancini, S S; Chiapparini, M; Peres-Menezes, D

    2004-01-01

    In this work we study in a formal way the density dependent hadron field theory at finite temperature for nuclear matter. The thermodynamical potential and related quantities, as energy density and pressure are derived in two different ways. We first obtain the thermodynamical potential from the grand partition function, where the Hamiltonian depends on the density operator and is truncated at first order. We then reobtain the thermodynamical potential by calculating explicitly the energy density in a Thomas-Fermi approximation and considering the entropy of a fermi gas. The distribution functions for particles and antiparticles are the output of the minimization of the thermodynamical potential. It is shown that in the mean field theory the thermodynamical consistency is achieved. The connection with effective chiral lagrangians with Brown-Rho scaling is discussed.

  19. Structural stability of high entropy alloys under pressure and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Azkar S.; Su, Y.; Liu, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The stability of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) is a key issue before their selection for industrial applications. In this study, in-situ high-pressure and high-temperature synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on three typical HEAs Ni20Co20Fe20Mn20Cr20, Hf25Nb25Zr25Ti......25, and Re25Ru25Co25Fe25 (at. %), having face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and hexagonal close-packed (hcp) crystal structures, respectively, up to the pressure of ∼80 GPa and temperature of ∼1262 K. Under the extreme conditions of the pressure and temperature, all three studied...... HEAs remain stable up to the maximum pressure and temperatures achieved. For these three types of studied HEAs, the pressure-dependence of the volume can be well described with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are found to be 88.3 GPa and 4...

  20. $\\mu$SR-Measurements under High Pressure and at Low Temperatures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    High pressure causes changes in the volume available to each atom in a solid and will therefore influence local properties like the electronic charge and spin densities and, in the case of magnetic materials, the spin ordering.\\\\ \\\\ The positive muon is known to be an interesting probe particle for the study of certain problems in magnetism. It has in fact been used for one high pressure experiment earlier in CERN, but the present experiments aim at more systematic studie For this purpose it is necessary to carry out pressure experiments at low temperatures. The new experiments use a helium gas pressure system, which covers the temperature range 10-300 K at pressures up to 14 Kbar.\\\\ \\\\ Experiments are in progress on \\item 1)~~~~Ferromagnetic metals like Fe, Co, Ni where the pressure dependence of the local magnetic field ~~~is studied at 77 K and at room temperature. \\item 2)~~~~Knight shifts in semimetals, where in the case of Sb strong variations with temperature and ~~~pressure are observed. \\end{enumerat...

  1. Investigation on high temperature vapor pressure of UO 2 containing simulated fission-product elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, T.; Ohtsubo, A.; Ishii, T.

    1984-06-01

    During the hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) of a fast breeder reactor (FBR), the temperature of the fuel would rise above 3000 K. The experimental data concerning the saturated fuel vapor pressure are necessary for the analysis of the HCDA. In this study, the UO 2 containing Cs, Ba, Ag, or Sn was used to simulate the irradiated fuel in the FBR. The saturated vapor pressure of pure UO 2 and UO 2 containing Cs, Ba, Ag, or Sn at 3000 to 5000 K was measured dynamically with a pulse laser and a torsion pendulum. The surface of a specimen on the pendulum was heated to eject vapor by the injection of a giant pulse ruby laser beam. The pressure of the ejected vapor was measured by both the maximum rotation angle of the pendulum and the duration of vapor ejection. The saturated vapor pressure was theoretically calculated by using the ejected vapor pressure. The surface temperature of the specimen was estimated from the irradiated energy density measured with a laser energy meter. The saturated vapor pressure of UO 2 at 3640 to 5880 K measured in this study was near the extrapolated value of Ackermann's low temperature data. The vapor pressure of UO 2 containing Cs, Ba, Ag or Sn was higher than that of UO 2. The saturated vapor pressure of UO 2 and a solid fission products system was calculated by using these experimental data.

  2. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Akio

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than ~ 1 × 1021 m-3 is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is ~ 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  3. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Akio, E-mail: komori@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than {approx} 1 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is {approx} 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  4. High-temperature and high-pressure phase transitions in uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, J.; Bottin, F.

    2017-02-01

    The phase diagram of uranium has been explored up to 100 GPa and 2000 K by means of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The lattice dynamics and energetics of the stable phases observed experimentally in this range of pressure and temperature are studied in this work. The phonon spectra of the α and γ phases are shown to evolve strongly as a function of temperature, unveiling the huge anharmonic effects present in this material. If the elastics constants and the bulk and shear moduli of the γ phase do not disclose any temperature effects, the shear modulus of the α phase decreases strongly as a function of temperature. Using the pressure- and temperature-dependent vibrational density of states and the Gibbs free energy of these two structures, we found a line transition between the α and γ phases which slightly underestimates the experimental one. Coherently with experiments, the bct structure is never found stable between 0 and 100 GPa.

  5. Passive Resistor Temperature Compensation for a High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zong; Liang, Ting; Jia, Pinggang; Hong, Yingping; Qi, Lei; Lei, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wangwang; Zhang, Diya; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-07-22

    The main limitation of high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors is the variation of output voltage with operating temperature, which seriously reduces their measurement accuracy. This paper presents a passive resistor temperature compensation technique whose parameters are calculated using differential equations. Unlike traditional experiential arithmetic, the differential equations are independent of the parameter deviation among the piezoresistors of the microelectromechanical pressure sensor and the residual stress caused by the fabrication process or a mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficients. The differential equations are solved using calibration data from uncompensated high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. Tests conducted on the calibrated equipment at various temperatures and pressures show that the passive resistor temperature compensation produces a remarkable effect. Additionally, a high-temperature signal-conditioning circuit is used to improve the output sensitivity of the sensor, which can be reduced by the temperature compensation. Compared to traditional experiential arithmetic, the proposed passive resistor temperature compensation technique exhibits less temperature drift and is expected to be highly applicable for pressure measurements in harsh environments with large temperature variations.

  6. Passive Resistor Temperature Compensation for a High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Yao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main limitation of high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors is the variation of output voltage with operating temperature, which seriously reduces their measurement accuracy. This paper presents a passive resistor temperature compensation technique whose parameters are calculated using differential equations. Unlike traditional experiential arithmetic, the differential equations are independent of the parameter deviation among the piezoresistors of the microelectromechanical pressure sensor and the residual stress caused by the fabrication process or a mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficients. The differential equations are solved using calibration data from uncompensated high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. Tests conducted on the calibrated equipment at various temperatures and pressures show that the passive resistor temperature compensation produces a remarkable effect. Additionally, a high-temperature signal-conditioning circuit is used to improve the output sensitivity of the sensor, which can be reduced by the temperature compensation. Compared to traditional experiential arithmetic, the proposed passive resistor temperature compensation technique exhibits less temperature drift and is expected to be highly applicable for pressure measurements in harsh environments with large temperature variations.

  7. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  8. In Situ Density Measurement of Basaltic Melts at High Pressure by X-ray Absorption Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, R.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Urakawa, S.; Katayama, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Density of silicate melt at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior. However, because of experimental difficulties, the density of magma at high pressure is poorly known. Katayama et al. (1996) recently developed a new in situ density measurement method for metallic melts, based on the density dependency of X-ray absorption in the sample. In this study, we tried to measure the density of basaltic melt by this absorption method. When X-ray is transmitted to the sample, the intensity of the transmitted X-ray beam (I) is expressed as follows; I=I0exp(-μ ρ t), where I0 is the intensity of incident X-ray beam, μ is the mass absorption coefficient, ρ is the density of the sample, and t is the thickness of the sample. If t and μ are known, we can determine the density of the sample by measuring I and I0. This is the principle of the absorption method for density measurement. In this study, in order to determine t, we used a single crystalline diamond cylinder as a sample capsule, diamond is less compressive and less deformable so that even at high pressure t (thickness of the sample at the point x) is expressed as follows; t = 2*(R02-x2)1/2, R0 is the inner radius of cylinder at the ambient condition, and x is distance from a center of the capsule. And diamond also shows less absorption so that this make it possible to measure the density of silicate melt with smaller absorption coefficient than metallic melts. In order to know the μ of the sample, we measured both densities (ρ ) and absorptions (I/I0) for some glasses and crystals with same composition of the sample at the ambient condition, and calculated as fallows; μ =ln(I/I0)/ρ . Experiments were made at the beamline (BL22XU) of SPring-8. For generation of high pressure and high temperature, we used DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus (SMAP180) there. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the edge-length of 6 mm. The energy of monochromatic X

  9. Equation of state of fluid helium at high temperatures and densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Lingcang; CHEN; Qifeng; GU; Yunjun; ZHANG; Ying; ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Hugoniot curves and shock temperatures of gas helium with initial temperature 293 K and three initial pressures 0.6, 1.2, and 5.0 Mpa were measured up to 15000 K using a two-stage light-gas gun and transient radiation pyrometer. It was found that the calculated Hugoniot EOS of gas helium at the same initial pressure using Saha equation with Debye-Hückel correction was in good agreement with the experimental data. The curve of the calculated shock wave velocity with the particle velocity of gas helium which is shocked from the initial pressure 5 Mpa and temperature 293 K, I.e., the D~u relation, D = C0+λu (u < 10 km/s, λ = 1.32) in a low pressure region, is approximately parallel with the fitted D~u (λ = 1.36) of liquid helium from the experimental data of Nellis et al. Our calculations show that the Hugoniot parameterλis independent of the initial density ρ0. The D~u curves of gas helium will transfer to another one and approach a limiting value of compression when their temperature elevates to about 18000 K and the ionization degree of the shocked gas helium reaches 10-3.

  10. Effects of temperature and pressure on Rhizomucor miehei lipase stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Marilyne; Combes, Didier

    2003-04-10

    Both high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure induce irreversible deactivation of enzymes. They enable the enzyme's thermodynamic parameters to be determined and are used to study the mechanisms involved in biochemical systems. The effect of these two factors on the stability of Rhizomucor miehei lipase have been investigated. The stability criterion used was residual hydrolytic activity of the lipase. Experimental and theoretical parameters, obtained by linear regression analysis, were compared with theoretical kinetics in order to validate the series-type inactivation model. The lipase of R. miehei was deactivated by either thermal or pressure treatment. Moreover conformational studies made by fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that the conformational changes induced by pressure were different from those induced by temperature. In addition they show that after thermal deactivation there were less intermolecular hydrogen bonded structures formed than was the case for deactivation by high pressure.

  11. Low-density lipoproteins investigated under high hydrostatic pressure by elastic incoherent neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J; Martinez, N; Lehofer, B; Prassl, R

    2017-07-01

    Human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a highly complex nano-particle built up of various lipid classes and a single large protein moiety (apoB-100) owning essential physiological functions in the human body. Besides its vital role as a supplier of cholesterol and fat for peripheral tissues and cells, it is also a known key player in the formation of atherosclerosis. Due to these important roles in physiology and pathology the elucidation of structural and dynamical details is of great interest. In the current study we drew a broader picture of LDL dynamics using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) as a function of specified temperature and pressure points. We not only investigated a normolipidemic LDL sample, but also a triglyceride-rich and an oxidized one to mimic pathologic conditions as found under hyperlipidemic conditions or in atherosclerotic plaques, respectively. We could show that pressure has a significant effect on atomic motions in modified forms of LDL, whereas the normolipidemic sample seems to cope much better with high-pressure conditions irrespective of temperature. These findings might be explained by the altered lipid composition, which is either caused through elevated triglyceride content or modifications through lipid peroxidation.

  12. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Vinet, Pascal; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of the experimental data for the pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals is presented. The method combines Lindemann's law, the Debye model, and a first-order equation of state with the experimental observation that the Grueneisen parameter divided by the volume is constant. It is observed that, based on these assumptions, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the normalized melting temperature versus the logarithm of the normalized pressure are straight lines. It is found that the normalized-melting--temperature versus normalized-pressure curves accurately satisfy the linear relationship for Al, Ag, Au, Cs, Cu, K, Na, Pt, and Rb. In addition, this technique provides a sensitive tool for detecting phase transitions.

  13. Alternating current calorimetry at very high pressure and low temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelm, H

    2002-01-01

    The specific heat of CePd sub 2 sub . sub 0 sub 2 Ge sub 1 sub . sub 9 sub 8 has been measured with an ac calorimetric technique up to 22 GPa for temperatures in the range 0.3 K <=T <=10 K. A thermocouple allowed the temperature oscillations to be read when an ac heating current was sent through the sample. The inverse of the thermovoltage V sub a sub c recorded at low temperature exhibits a pronounced anomaly as a function of pressure. It is shown that 1/V sub a sub c extrapolated to zero temperature is a measure of the Sommerfeld coefficient gamma.

  14. PT Symmetry and QCD: Finite Temperature and Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Ogilvie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of PT symmetry to quantum chromodynamics (QCD, the gauge theory of the strong interactions, is explored in the context of finite temperature and density. Two significant problems in QCD are studied: the sign problem of finite-density QCD, and the problem of confinement. It is proven that the effective action for heavy quarks at finite density is PT-symmetric. For the case of 1+1 dimensions, the PT-symmetric Hamiltonian, although not Hermitian, has real eigenvalues for a range of values of the chemical potential μ, solving the sign problem for this model. The effective action for heavy quarks is part of a potentially large class of generalized sine-Gordon models which are non-Hermitian but are PT-symmetric. Generalized sine-Gordon models also occur naturally in gauge theories in which magnetic monopoles lead to confinement. We explore gauge theories where monopoles cause confinement at arbitrarily high temperatures. Several different classes of monopole gases exist, with each class leading to different string tension scaling laws. For one class of monopole gas models, the PT-symmetric affine Toda field theory emerges naturally as the effective theory. This in turn leads to sine-law scaling for string tensions, a behavior consistent with lattice simulations.

  15. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Man's curiosity and fascination with diamonds date back to ancient times. The knowledge of the many properties of diamond is recorded during Biblical times. Antoine Lavoisier determined the composition of diamond by burning in O2 to form CO2. With the then existing awareness of graphite as carbon, the race began to convert graphite to diamond. The selective chemical synthesis of diamond has been pursued by Cagniard, Hannay, Moisson and Parson. On the basis of the thermodynamically predicted equilibrium line of diamond and graphite, P W Bridgman attempted extraordinary conditions of high temperature (>2200°C) and pressure (>100,000 atm) for the allotropic conversion of graphite to diamond. H T Hall was the first to successfully form bulk diamond by realizing the kinetic restrictions to Bridgman's (thermodynamic) high pressure high temperature direct allotropic conversion. Moreover, Hall identified catalysts for the faster kinetics of diamond formation. H M Strong determined the import of the liquid catalyst during Hall's catalytic synthesis. W G Eversole discovered the slow metastable low pressure diamond formation by pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition with the molecular hydrogen etching of the rapidly forming stable graphitic carbon. J C Angus determined the import of atomic hydrogen for faster etching for faster diamond growth at low pressure. S Matsumoto has developed plasma and hot filament technology for faster hydrogen and carbon radical generations at low pressure for faster diamond formation. However the metastable low pressure chemical vapor depositions by plasma and hot filament are prone to polycrystalline films. From Bridgman to Hall to Eversole, Angus and Matsumoto, much knowledge has developed of the importance of pressure, temperature, transition metal catalyst, liquid state of metal (metal radicals atoms) and the carbon radical intermediates for diamond synthesis. Here we advance this understanding of diamond formation by demonstrating the external

  16. Pressure and temperature development in solar heating system during stagnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon; Chen, Ziqian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of stagnation in solar collectors and the effects it will have on the collector loop. At a laboratory test stand at the Technical University of Denmark, a pressurized solar collector loop was designed to test different numbers of collectors and different designs...... of the pipes of the solar collector loop. During the investigation the pre-pressure of the expansion vessel and system filling pressure was changed. The investigations showed that a large pressurised expansion vessel will protect the collector loop from critically high temperatures as long as the solar...

  17. Pressure and temperature development in solar heating system during stagnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon; Chen, Ziqian

    2010-01-01

    of the pipes of the solar collector loop. During the investigation the pre-pressure of the expansion vessel and system filling pressure was changed. The investigations showed that a large pressurised expansion vessel will protect the collector loop from critically high temperatures as long as the solar......This paper presents an investigation of stagnation in solar collectors and the effects it will have on the collector loop. At a laboratory test stand at the Technical University of Denmark, a pressurized solar collector loop was designed to test different numbers of collectors and different designs...

  18. High-pressure-low-temperature x-ray power diffractometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syassen, K; Holzapfel, W B

    1978-08-01

    A high-pressure technique for x-ray diffraction studies at low temperatures is described. The system consists of a Bridgman anvil type high-pressure device with either tungsten carbide or boron carbide anvils, a liquid He cryostat, and x-ray diffractometer operating in Debye-Scherrer geometry. The newly developed boron carbide anvil cell is capable of containing a liquid pressure transmitting medium. The precision of the lattice parameter determination is discussed and the effect of nonisostatic stress components on the diffraction pattern is examined.

  19. Anisotropy of the superconducting transition temperature under uniaxial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. J.; Lin, H. Q.; Yin, W. G.; Gong, C. D.; Habermeier, H.-U.

    2001-12-01

    The superconducting transition temperature Tc is calculated as a function of uniaxial pressure along the a, b, c directions for optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ on the basis of a hole dispersion of the anisotropic t-J model. There is a good qualitative agreement with experiments. We show that the uniaxial pressure effect on Tc in the ab plane is due to the anisotropies of the hole dispersion and the in-plane pairing interaction, whereas the reduction of Tc under uniaxial compression along the c axis mainly results from the pressure-induced increase of hole concentration of the CuO2 plane.

  20. Soft Wire Seals For High Temperatures And Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Soft metal wires used to make O-ring and similar seals for vessels, flanges, and fittings subject to pressures equal to or greater than 1,000 psi and temperatures equal to or greater than 100 degrees C. Seals containing soft metal wires made inexpensively because fabricated to looser tolerances like those of lower-temperature, lower-pressure elastomeric-O-ring seals, which they resemble. Seals also made with noncircular grooves and with soft metals other than aluminum. For example, gold performs well, though expensive. For other applications, silver good choice.

  1. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  2. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  3. LHDAC setup for high temperature and high pressure studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Nishant N., E-mail: nnpatel@barc.gov.in; Meenakshi, S., E-mail: nnpatel@barc.gov.in; Sharma, Surinder M., E-mail: nnpatel@barc.gov.in [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    A ytterbium fibre laser (λ = 1.07 μm) based laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) facility has been recently set up at HP and SRPD, BARC for simultaneous high temperature and high pressure investigation of material properties. Synthesis of GaN was carried out at pressure of ∼9 GPa and temperature of ∼1925 K in a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell (DAC) using the LHDAC facility. The retrieved sample has been characterized using our laboratory based micro Raman setup.

  4. Argon diffusion from biotite at high temperature and pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈道公; 贾命命; 李彬贤; 陆全明; 谢鸿森; 侯渭

    1995-01-01

    t The experiments of argon diffusion dynamics for biotite were carried out at 700 -1000℃ and 0.5 - 2,0 GPa and the diffusion coefficient and activation energy using different models have been calculated. The results indicate that the pressure does affect the argon diffusion and its effect is opposite to that of temperature. When p increases, the activation energy increases and diffusion coefficient decreases. The relation between pressure, closure temperature and cooling rate has been obtained. It is postulated that in low T and high p conditions, the argon diffusion from the environment to the system could occur and incur the appearance of the external argon in minerals.

  5. Low density lipoproteins as circulating fast temperature sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Prassl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential physiological significance of the nanophase transition of neutral lipids in the core of low density lipoprotein (LDL particles is dependent on whether the rate is fast enough to integrate small (+/-2 degrees C temperature changes in the blood circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using sub-second, time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering technology with synchrotron radiation, we have monitored the dynamics of structural changes within LDL, which were triggered by temperature-jumps and -drops, respectively. Our findings reveal that the melting transition is complete within less than 10 milliseconds. The freezing transition proceeds slowly with a half-time of approximately two seconds. Thus, the time period over which LDL particles reside in cooler regions of the body readily facilitates structural reorientation of the apolar core lipids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low density lipoproteins, the biological nanoparticles responsible for the transport of cholesterol in blood, are shown to act as intrinsic nano-thermometers, which can follow the periodic temperature changes during blood circulation. Our results demonstrate that the lipid core in LDL changes from a liquid crystalline to an oily state within fractions of seconds. This may, through the coupling to the protein structure of LDL, have important repercussions on current theories of the role of LDL in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  6. Power density analysis and optimization of a regenerated closed variable-temperature heat reservoir Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingen Chen; Junlin Zheng; Fengrui Sun [Naval Univ. of Engineering, Faculty 306, Wuhan (China); Chih Wu [US Naval Academy, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2001-06-07

    In this paper, the power density, defined as the ratio of power output to the maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the objective for performance analysis and optimisation of an irreversible regenerated closed Brayton cycle coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs from the viewpoint of finite time thermodynamics (FTT) or entropy generation minimisation (EGM). The analytical formulae about the relations between power density and pressure ratio are derived with the heat resistance losses in the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and the regenerator, the irreversible compression and expansion losses in the compressor and turbine, the pressure drop losses at the heater, cooler and regenerator as well as in the piping, and the effect of the finite thermal capacity rate of the heat reservoirs. The obtained results are compared with those results obtained by using the maximum power criterion, and the advantages and disadvantages of maximum power density design are analysed. The maximum power density optimisation is performed in two stages. The first is to search the optimum heat conductance distribution corresponding to the optimum power density among the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and the regenerator for a fixed total heat exchanger inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the optimum power density between the working fluid and the high-temperature heat source for a fixed ratio of the thermal capacitance rates of two heat reservoirs. The influences of some design parameters, including the effectiveness of the regenerator, the inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs, the effectiveness of the heat exchangers between the working fluid and the heat reservoirs, the efficiencies of the compressor and the turbine, and the pressure recovery coefficient, on the optimum heat conductance

  7. Power density analysis and optimization of a regenerated closed variable-temperature heat reservoir Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingen Chen; Junlin Zheng; Fengrui Sun [Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan (China). Faculty 306; Chih Wu [US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    2001-06-07

    In this paper, the power density, defined as the ratio of power output to the maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the objective for performance analysis and optimization of an irreversible regenerated closed Brayton cycle coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs from the viewpoint of finite time thermodynamics (FTT) or entropy generation minimization (EGM). The analytical formulae about the relations between power density and pressure ratio are derived with the heat resistance losses in the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and the regenerator, the irreversible compression and expansion losses in the compressor and turbine, the pressure drop losses at the heater, cooler and regenerator as well as in the piping, and the effect of the finite thermal capacity rate of the heat reservoirs. The obtained results are compared with those results obtained by using the maximum power criterion, and the advantages and disadvantages of maximum power density design are analysed. The maximum power density optimization is performed in two stages. The first is to search the optimum beat conductance distribution corresponding to the optimum power density among the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and the regenerator for a fixed total heat exchanger inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the optimum power density between the working fluid and the high-temperature heat source for a fixed ratio of the thermal capacitance rates of two heat reservoirs. The influences of some design parameters, including the effectiveness of the regenerator, the inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs, the effectiveness of the heat exchangers between the working fluid and the heat reservoirs, the efficiencies of the compressor and the turbine, and the pressure recovery coefficient, on the optimum heat conductance distribution, the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching, and the maximum power density are provided by

  8. Exploring nuclear magnetic resonance at the highest pressure. Closing the pseudogap under pressure in a high temperature superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Thomas

    2013-05-13

    In the present work, a novel probe design for high pressure NMR experiments in gem anvil cells (GAC) was used which places a small microcoil inside the high pressure volume as the detection coil. Based on tests carried out at ambient pressure and high pressure of 42 kbar it is demonstrated that this approach is indeed feasible and results in an increase of sensitivity by two orders of magnitude compared to previous GAC-NMR designs. The design was then successfully employed in the investigation of the electronic properties of metallic aluminum and the high temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} at pressures of up to 101 kbar. Because of its improved sensitivity and the potential to achieve even higher pressures, the microcoil GAC-NMR setup should prove useful in the investigation of materials under high pressure conditions in the future. In the case of metallic aluminum, the effect of pressure on the electronic density of states at the Fermi level was probed via the Knight-shift K and the spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} at room temperature up to a pressure of 101 kbar, extending the pressure range of previous NMR measurements by a factor of 14 [72]. Most notably, a decrease of K(p) by 11% is detected in the investigated pressure range that is inconsistent with a free electron behavior of the density of states. Numerical band structure calculations that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data suggest that the observed changes of K and T{sub 1} are due to a kink in the electronic states at a Lifshitz-transition at about 75 kbar which has not been observed previously. A further decrease of K by a factor of 2 is predicted to occur in the pressure range up to 300 kbar. In addition, an increase of the NMR linewidths of the metallic aluminum signal was observed above about 42 kbar that is inconsistent with a pure dipolar linewidth. Based on an analysis of the field dependence of this effect it was ascribed to a small additional

  9. Effects of pressure on aqueous chemical equilibria at subzero temperatures with applications to Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G.M.; Kargel, J.S.; Catling, D.C.; Jakubowski, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure plays a critical role in controlling aqueous geochemical processes in deep oceans and deep ice. The putative ocean of Europa could have pressures of 1200 bars or higher on the seafloor, a pressure not dissimilar to the deepest ocean basin on Earth (the Mariana Trench at 1100 bars of pressure). At such high pressures, chemical thermodynamic relations need to explicitly consider pressure. A number of papers have addressed the role of pressure on equilibrium constants, activity coefficients, and the activity of water. None of these models deal, however, with processes at subzero temperatures, which may be important in cold environments on Earth and other planetary bodies. The objectives of this work were to (1) incorporate a pressure dependence into an existing geochemical model parameterized for subzero temperatures (FREZCHEM), (2) validate the model, and (3) simulate pressure-dependent processes on Europa. As part of objective 1, we examined two models for quantifying the volumetric properties of liquid water at subzero temperatures: one model is based on the measured properties of supercooled water, and the other model is based on the properties of liquid water in equilibrium with ice. The relative effect of pressure on solution properties falls in the order: equilibrium constants(K) > activity coefficients (??) > activity of water (aw). The errors (%) in our model associated with these properties, however, fall in the order: ?? > K > aw. The transposition between K and ?? is due to a more accurate model for estimating K than for estimating ??. Only activity coefficients are likely to be significantly in error. However, even in this case, the errors are likely to be only in the range of 2 to 5% up to 1000 bars of pressure. Evidence based on the pressure/temperature melting of ice and salt solution densities argue in favor of the equilibrium water model, which depends on extrapolations, for characterizing the properties of liquid water in electrolyte

  10. Characteristics of temporal evolution of particle density and electron temperature in helicon discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiong; Cheng, Mousen; Guo, Dawei; Wang, Moge; Li, Xiaokang

    2017-10-01

    On the basis of considering electrochemical reactions and collision relations in detail, a direct numerical simulation model of a helicon plasma discharge with three-dimensional two-fluid equations was employed to study the characteristics of the temporal evolution of particle density and electron temperature. With the assumption of weak ionization, the Maxwell equations coupled with the plasma parameters were directly solved in the whole computational domain. All of the partial differential equations were solved by the finite element solver in COMSOL MultiphysicsTM with a fully coupled method. In this work, the numerical cases were calculated with an Ar working medium and a Shoji-type antenna. The numerical results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of temporal evolution of the electron and ground atom density, which can be explained by the ion pumping effect. The evolution of the electron temperature is controlled by two schemes: electromagnetic wave heating and particle collision cooling. The high RF power results in a high peak electron temperature while the high gas pressure leads to a low steady temperature. In addition, an OES experiment using nine Ar I lines was conducted using a modified CR model to verify the validity of the results by simulation, showing that the trends of temporal evolution of electron density and temperature are well consistent with the numerically simulated ones.

  11. Equation of state in the generalized density scaling regime studied from ambient to ultra-high pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, A.; Koperwas, K.; Paluch, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, based on the effective intermolecular potential with well separated density and configuration contributions and the definition of the isothermal bulk modulus, we derive two similar equations of state dedicated to describe volumetric data of supercooled liquids studied in the extremely wide pressure range related to the density range, which is extremely wide in comparison with the experimental range reached so far in pressure-volume-temperature measurements of glass-forming liquids. Both the equations comply with the generalized density scaling law of molecular dynamics versus h(ρ)/T at different densities ρ and temperatures T, where the scaling exponent can be in general only a density function γ(ρ) = d ln h/d ln ρ as recently argued by the theory of isomorphs. We successfully verify these equations of state by using data obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones liquid. As a very important result, we find that the one-parameter density function h(ρ) analytically formulated in the case of this prototypical model of supercooled liquid, which implies the one-parameter density function γ(ρ), is able to scale the structural relaxation times with the value of this function parameter determined by fitting the volumetric simulation data to the equations of state. We also show that these equations of state properly describe the pressure dependences of the isothermal bulk modulus and the configurational isothermal bulk modulus in the extremely wide pressure range investigated by the computer simulations. Moreover, we discuss the possible forms of the density functions h(ρ) and γ(ρ) for real glass formers, which are suggested to be different from those valid for the model of supercooled liquid based on the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential.

  12. High pressure-low temperature processing of food proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay, Eliane; Picart, Laetitia; Regnault, Stéphanie; Thiebaud, Maryse

    2006-03-01

    High pressure-low temperature (HP-LT) processing is of interest in the food field in view of: (i) obtaining a "cold" pasteurisation effect, the level of microbial inactivation being higher after pressurisation at low or sub-zero than at ambient temperature; (ii) limiting the negative impact of atmospheric pressure freezing on food structures. The specific effects of freezing by fast pressure release on the formation of ice I crystals have been investigated on oil in water emulsions stabilized by proteins, and protein gels, showing the formation of a high number of small ice nuclei compared to the long needle-shaped crystals obtained by conventional freezing at 0.1 MPa. It was therefore of interest to study the effects of HP-LT processing on unfolding or dissociation/aggregation phenomena in food proteins, in view of minimizing or controlling structural changes and aggregation reactions, and/or of improving protein functional properties. In the present studies, the effects of HP-LT have been investigated on protein models such as (i) beta-lactoglobulin, i.e., a whey protein with a well known 3-D structure, and (ii) casein micelles, i.e., the main milk protein components, the supramolecular structure of which is not fully elucidated. The effects of HP-LT processing was studied up to 300 MPa at low or sub-zero temperatures and after pressure release, or up to 200 MPa by UV spectroscopy under pressure, allowing to follow reversible structural changes. Pressurisation of approximately 2% beta-lactoglobulin solutions up to 300 MPa at low/subzero temperatures minimizes aggregation reactions, as measured after pressure release. In parallel, such low temperature treatments enhanced the size reduction of casein micelles.

  13. Thermodynamic properties of standard seawater: extensions to high temperatures and pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Safarov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of (p, ρ, T properties of standard seawater with practical salinity S≈35, temperature T=(273.14 to 468.06 K and pressures, p, up to 140 MPa are reported with the reproducibility of the density measurements observed to be in the average percent deviation range Δρ/ρ=±(0.01 to 0.03%. The measurements are made with a newly constructed vibration-tube densimeter which is calibrated using double-distilled water, methanol and aqueous NaCl solutions. Based on these and previous measurements, an empirical expression for the density of standard seawater has been developed as a function of pressure and temperature. This equation is used to calculate other volumetric properties including isothermal compressibility, isobaric thermal expansibility, differences in isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, the thermal pressure coefficient, internal pressure and the secant bulk modulus. The results can be used to extend the present equation of state of seawater to higher temperatures for pressure up to 140 MPa.

  14. Thermophoresis of dissolved molecules and polymers: Consideration of the temperature-induced macroscopic pressure gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Semen; Schimpf, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The movement of molecules and homopolymer chains dissolved in a nonelectrolyte solvent in response to a temperature gradient is considered a consequence of temperature-induced pressure gradients in the solvent layer surrounding the solute molecules. Local pressure gradients are produced by nonuniform London-van der Waals interactions, established by gradients in the concentration (density) of solvent molecules. The density gradient is produced by variations in solvent thermal expansion within the nonuniform temperature field. The resulting expression for the velocity of the solute contains the Hamaker constants for solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions, the radius of the solute molecule, and the viscosity and cubic coefficient of thermal expansion of the solvent. In this paper we consider an additional force that arises from directional asymmetry in the interaction between solvent molecules. In a closed cell, the resulting macroscopic pressure gradient gives rise to a volume force that affects the motion of dissolved solutes. An expression for this macroscopic pressure gradient is derived and the resulting force is incorporated into the expression for the solute velocity. The expression is used to calculate thermodiffusion coefficients for polystyrene in several organic solvents. When these values are compared to those measured in the laboratory, the consistency is better than that found in previous reports, which did not consider the macroscopic pressure gradient that arises in a closed thermodiffusion cell. The model also allows for the movement of solute in either direction, depending on the relative values of the solvent and solute Hamaker constants.

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF CAVITATION FLOW UNDER HIGH PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei-guo; ZHANG Ling-xin; SHAO Xue-ming

    2011-01-01

    The numerical simulation of cavitation flow on a 2D NACA0015 hydrofoil under high pressure and temperature is performed. The Singhal's cavitation model is adopted combined with an improved RNG k-ε turbulence model to study the cavitation flow. The thermal effect in the cavitation flow is taken into account by introducing the energy equation with a source term based on the latent heat transfer. The code is validated by a case of a hydrofoil under two different temperatures in a comparison between the simulation and the experiment. Computational results show that the latent heat of vaporization has a significant impact on the cavitation process in the high temperature state, and the cavity in the high temperature state is thinner and shorter than that in a normal state with the same cavitation number, due to the fact that the heat absorption in the cavitation area reduces the local temperature and the saturated vapor pressure. This numerical study provides some guidance for the design of machineries in the High Pressure and Temperature (HPT) state.

  16. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, K.-I. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); International Center for Space Weather Study and education, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  17. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.; Liu, W. T.

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both Te in low frequency mode and Ne in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (fUHR). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  18. Recommended reference materials for realization of physicochemical properties pressure-volume-temperature relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Herington, E F G

    1977-01-01

    Recommended Reference Materials for Realization of Physicochemical Properties presents recommendations of reference materials for use in measurements involving physicochemical properties, namely, vapor pressure; liquid-vapor critical temperature and critical pressure; orthobaric volumes of liquid and vapor; pressure-volume-temperature properties of the unsaturated vapor or gas; and pressure-volume-temperature properties of the compressed liquid. This monograph focuses on reference materials for vapor pressures at temperatures up to 770 K, as well as critical temperatures and critical pressures

  19. Force-free collisionless current sheet models with non-uniform temperature and density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Allanson, O.

    2017-09-01

    We present a class of one-dimensional, strictly neutral, Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium distribution functions for force-free current sheets, with magnetic fields defined in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions, extending the results of Abraham-Shrauner [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102117 (2013)] to allow for non-uniform density and temperature profiles. To achieve this, we use an approach previously applied to the force-free Harris sheet by Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)]. In one limit of the parameters, we recover the model of Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)], while another limit gives a linear force-free field. We discuss conditions on the parameters such that the distribution functions are always positive and give expressions for the pressure, density, temperature, and bulk-flow velocities of the equilibrium, discussing the differences from previous models. We also present some illustrative plots of the distribution function in velocity space.

  20. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs) offer important and unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing. And they are well suited to serve together synergistically. TEC and MFHPs operate through working-fluid vaporization, condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures. TEC and MFHPs have apparently simple, isolated performance mechanisms that are somewhat similar. And they also have obviously difficult, complected material problems that again are somewhat similar. Intensive investigation reveals that aspects of their operating cycles and material problems tend to merge: high-temperature material effects determine the level and lifetime of performance. Simplified equations verify the preceding statement for TEC and MFHPs. Material properties and interactions exert primary influences on operational effectiveness. And thermophysicochemical stabilities dictate operating temperatures which regulate the thermoemissive currents of TEC and the vaporization flow rates of MFHPs. Major high-temperature material problems of TEC and MFHPs have been solved. These solutions lead to productive, cost-effective applications of current TEC and MFHPs - and point to significant improvements with anticipated technological gains.

  1. Survival of charged rho condensation at high temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hao; Huang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The charged vector $\\rho$ mesons in the presence of external magnetic fields at finite temperature $T$ and chemical potential $\\mu$ have been investigated in the framework of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. We compute the masses of charged $\\rho$ mesons numerically as a function of the magnetic field for different values of temperature and chemical potential. The self-energy of the $\\rho$ meson contains the quark-loop contribution, i.e. the leading order contribution in $1/N_c$ expansion. The charged $\\rho$ meson mass decreases with the magnetic field and drops to zero at a critical magnetic field $eB_c$, which means that the charged vector meson condensation, i.e. the electromagnetic superconductor can be induced above the critical magnetic field. Surprisingly, it is found that the charged $\\rho$ condensation can even survive at high temperature and density. At zero temperature, the critical magnetic field just increases slightly with the chemical potential, which indicates that the charged $\\rho$ condensatio...

  2. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  3. Pressure and temperature effects in homopolymer blends and diblock copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frielinghaus, H.; Schwahn, D.; Mortensen, K.;

    1997-01-01

    contribution of the Flory-Huggins parameter at larger pressure fields. This gives rise to a shift of the phase boundaries to higher temperatures and to a strong reduction of the Ginzburg parameter. Diblock copolymers show a different behavior. Neither the entropic term of the Flory-Huggins parameter nor...

  4. Pressure and temperature effects in homopolymer blends and diblock copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frielinghaus, H.; Schwahn, D.; Mortensen, K.;

    1997-01-01

    fluctuations. Phase boundaries, the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter and the Ginzburg number were obtained. The packing of the molecules changes with pressure. Therefore, the degree of thermal fluctuation as a function of packing and temperature was studied. While in polymer blends packing leads, in some...... of the entropic and of the enthalpic parts, respectively, of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter....

  5. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  6. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  7. Modeling Study of High Pressure and High Temperature Reservoir Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varzandeh, Farhad

    to 250 °C and 2400 bar, in the deep petroleum reservoirs. Furthermore, many of these deep reservoirs are found offshore, including the North Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, making the development even more risky. On the other hand, development of these high pressure high temperature (HPHT) fields can...

  8. Pulse Radiolysis at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, Knud

    1981-01-01

    A set-up enabling pulse radiolysis measurements at high temperatures (up to 320°C) and high pressures (up to 140 bar) has been constructed in collaboration between Risö National Laboratory and Studsvik Energiteknik. The cell has been used for experiments with aqueous solutions with the purpose...

  9. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  10. Binary Collision Density in a Non-Ideal Gas as a Function of Particle Density, Collision Diameter, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2017-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, binary collision density in a dense non-ideal gas with Lennard-Jones interactions is investigated. It is shown that the functional form of the dependence of collision density on particle density and collision diameter remains the same as that for an ideal gas. The temperature dependence of the collision density, however, has a very different form at low temperatures, where it decreases as temperature increases. But at higher temperatures the functional form becomes the same as that for an ideal gas.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimund, Kevin K. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Wilson, Aaron D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π/(1+√w⁻¹), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at “maximum power density operating pressure” requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  12. Molecular density functional theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume, E-mail: g.jeanmairet@fkf.mpg.de; Levesque, Maximilien, E-mail: maximilien.levesque@ens.fr [École Normale Supérieure - PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 8640 PASTEUR, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr [SIS2M, LIONS, CEA, Saclay (France); Borgis, Daniel [École Normale Supérieure - PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 8640 PASTEUR, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Maison de la Simulation, USR 3441, CEA - CNRS - INRIA - Univ. Paris-Sud - Univ. de Versailles, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2015-04-21

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. The solvation free energy of small molecular solutes like n-alkanes and hard sphere solutes whose radii range from angstroms to nanometers is now in quantitative agreement with reference all atom simulations. The macroscopic liquid-gas surface tension predicted by the theory is comparable to experiments. This theory gives an alternative to the empirical hard sphere bridge correction used so far by several authors.

  13. High cell density cultivation of recombinant yeasts and bacteria under non-pressurized and pressurized conditions in stirred tank bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Arnd; Bartsch, Stefan; Husemann, Bernward; Engel, Philip; Schroer, Kirsten; Ribeiro, Betina; Stöckmann, Christoph; Seletzky, Juri; Büchs, Jochen

    2007-10-31

    This study demonstrates the applicability of pressurized stirred tank bioreactors for oxygen transfer enhancement in aerobic cultivation processes. The specific power input and the reactor pressure was employed as process variable. As model organism Escherichia coli, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Corynebacterium glutamicum were cultivated to high cell densities. By applying specific power inputs of approx. 48kWm(-3) the oxygen transfer rate of a E. coli culture in the non-pressurized stirred tank bioreactor was lifted up to values of 0.51moll(-1)h(-1). When a reactor pressure up to 10bar was applied, the oxygen transfer rate of a pressurized stirred tank bioreactor was lifted up to values of 0.89moll(-1)h(-1). The non-pressurized stirred tank bioreactor was able to support non-oxygen limited growth of cell densities of more than 40gl(-1) cell dry weight (CDW) of E. coli, whereas the pressurized stirred tank bioreactor was able to support non-oxygen limited growth of cell densities up to 225gl(-1) CDW of A. adeninivorans, 89gl(-1) CDW of S. cerevisiae, 226gl(-1) CDW of C. glutamicum and 110gl(-1) CDW of E. coli. Compared to literature data, some of these cell densities are the highest values ever achieved in high cell density cultivation of microorganisms in stirred tank bioreactors. By comparing the specific power inputs as well as the k(L)a values of both systems, it is demonstrated that only the pressure is a scaleable tool for oxygen transfer enhancement in industrial stirred tank bioreactors. Furthermore, it was shown that increased carbon dioxide partial pressures did not remarkably inhibit the growth of the investigated model organisms.

  14. Optical properties of parabolic quantum dots with dressed impurity: Combined effects of pressure, temperature and laser intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaseghi, B., E-mail: vaseghi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Rezaei, G.; Sajadi, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper simultaneous effects of pressure, temperature and laser radiation on the optical absorption coefficient and refractive index of a spherical quantum dot with parabolic confinement and dressed impurity are studied. By means of matrix diagonalization technique, energy eigenvalues and functions are evaluated and used to find the optical properties of the system via density operator method. It is shown that linear and nonlinear optical properties strongly depend on pressure, temperature and dressing laser intensity. The interesting point is that the influence of laser radiation depends on pressure and temperature.

  15. Cryogenic tunnel measurement of total temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, W.-F.; Rosson, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A newly developed, 3-mm-diam, dual hot-wire aspirating probe was used to measure the time-resolved stagnation temperature and pressure in a transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. Measurements were taken in the freestream of the settling chamber and test section. Data were also obtained in the unsteady wake shed from an airfoil oscillating at 5 Hz. The investigation revealed the presence of large fluctuations in the settling chamber occuring at the blade passing frequency of the driving fan of the tunnel. These fluctuations decrease at the test section. The rms value of the fluctuating stagnation pressure decreased from 17.5 percent in the settling chamber to 3.7 percent in the test section. Fluctuating stagnation temperature decreased from 12.3 percent to 8.4 percent. Measurements in the wake of the oscillating airfoil showed a fluctuating stagnation temperature of as much as 42 K in rms value.

  16. Exploring nuclear magnetic resonance at the highest pressure. Closing the pseudogap under pressure in a high temperature superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Thomas

    2013-05-13

    In the present work, a novel probe design for high pressure NMR experiments in gem anvil cells (GAC) was used which places a small microcoil inside the high pressure volume as the detection coil. Based on tests carried out at ambient pressure and high pressure of 42 kbar it is demonstrated that this approach is indeed feasible and results in an increase of sensitivity by two orders of magnitude compared to previous GAC-NMR designs. The design was then successfully employed in the investigation of the electronic properties of metallic aluminum and the high temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} at pressures of up to 101 kbar. Because of its improved sensitivity and the potential to achieve even higher pressures, the microcoil GAC-NMR setup should prove useful in the investigation of materials under high pressure conditions in the future. In the case of metallic aluminum, the effect of pressure on the electronic density of states at the Fermi level was probed via the Knight-shift K and the spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} at room temperature up to a pressure of 101 kbar, extending the pressure range of previous NMR measurements by a factor of 14 [72]. Most notably, a decrease of K(p) by 11% is detected in the investigated pressure range that is inconsistent with a free electron behavior of the density of states. Numerical band structure calculations that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data suggest that the observed changes of K and T{sub 1} are due to a kink in the electronic states at a Lifshitz-transition at about 75 kbar which has not been observed previously. A further decrease of K by a factor of 2 is predicted to occur in the pressure range up to 300 kbar. In addition, an increase of the NMR linewidths of the metallic aluminum signal was observed above about 42 kbar that is inconsistent with a pure dipolar linewidth. Based on an analysis of the field dependence of this effect it was ascribed to a small additional

  17. Speckle measurements of density and temperature profiles in a model gas circuit breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, P. C.; Panousis, E.; Carstensen, J.; Doiron, C. B.; Färber, R.

    2015-01-01

    Speckle imaging was used to measure the density and temperature distribution in the arc zone of a model high voltage circuit breaker during the high current phase and under conditions simulating those present during current-zero crossings (current-zero-like arc); the arc was stabilized by a transonic, axial flow of synthetic air. A single probe beam was used; thus, accurate reconstruction was only possible for axially symmetric gas flows and arc channels. The displacement of speckles with respect to a reference image was converted to a line-of-sight integrated deflection angle, which was in turn converted into an axially symmetric refractive index distribution using a multistep process that made use of the inverse Radon transform. The Gladstone-Dale relation, which gives the index of refraction as a function of density, was extended to high temperatures by taking into account dissociation and ionization processes. The temperature and density were determined uniquely by assuming that the pressure distribution in the case of cold gas flow (in the absence of an arc) is not modified significantly by the arc. The electric conductivity distribution was calculated from the temperature profile and compared to measurements of the arc voltage and to previous results published in the literature for similar experimental conditions.

  18. Vibrational and Raman Spectroscopic Study of Cubic Boron Nitride Under Pressure Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Sharad Babu; Mankad, Venu; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2017-08-01

    Pressure-dependent mechanical, vibrational and Raman spectroscopic study of the cubic boron nitride in context of recent experimental Raman spectroscopic has been performed using the ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. Detailed analysis of the pressure-dependent mechanical and phonon properties shows that the pressure significantly affects the elastic constants and phonon frequencies. There is a systematic variation of elastic properties with pressure while a polynomial expression is used to fit the pressure dependence of the Raman shift. The longitudinal optical-transverse optical (LO-TO) splitting reduces with pressure, and the intensity of both LO and TO peaks start diminishing after 750 GPa. The phonon dispersion curves up to 1000 GPa indicate its dynamical stability. The lower slope of frequency versus pressure for the LO and TO modes at higher pressures suggests its use for pressure calibration at higher pressures.

  19. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K; Ridley, Christopher J; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  20. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J. Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  1. New equations for density, entropy, heat capacity, and potential temperature of a saline thermal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongbing; Feistel, Rainer; Koch, Manfred; Markoe, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    A set of fitted polynomial equations for calculating the physical variables density, entropy, heat capacity and potential temperature of a thermal saline fluid for a temperature range of 0-374 °C, pressure range of 0.1-100 MPa and absolute salinity range of 0-40 g/kg is established. The freshwater components of the equations are extracted from the recently released tabulated data of freshwater properties of Wagner and Pruß [2002. The IAPWS formulation 1995 for the thermodynamic properties of ordinary water substance for general and scientific use. Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data 31, 387-535]. The salt water component of the equation is based on the near-linear relationship between density, salinity and specific heat capacity and is extracted from the data sets of Feistel [2003. A new extended Gibbs thermodynamic potential of seawater. Progress in Oceanography 58, 43-114], Bromley et al. [1970. Heat capacities and enthalpies of sea salt solutions to 200 °C. Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data 15, 246-253] and Grunberg [1970. Properties of sea water concentrates. In: Third International Symposium on Fresh Water from the Sea, vol. 1, pp. 31-39] in a temperature range 0-200 °C, practical salinity range 0-40, and varying pressure and is also calibrated by the data set of Millero et al. [1981. Summary of data treatment for the international high pressure equation of state for seawater. UNESCO Technical Papers in Marine Science 38, 99-192]. The freshwater and salt water components are combined to establish a workable multi-polynomial equation, whose coefficients were computed through standard linear regression analysis. The results obtained in this way for density, entropy and potential temperature are comparable with those of existing models, except that our new equations cover a wider temperature—(0-374 °C) than the traditional (0-40 °C) temperature range. One can apply these newly established equations to the calculation of in-situ or

  2. Dehydration Temperature of Serpentine at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures by Electrical Conductivity Method and Its Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋茂双; 谢鸿森; 等

    1996-01-01

    Dehydration temperatures of serpentine were measured in the pressure range between 1.0GPa and 5.0GPa by using the electrical conductivity metod simultaneously at high temperatures and high pressures.The results show that with increasing pressure th dehydration temperature of antigorite increases slightly below 2.0GPa ,but drops markedly above2.0GPa .This strongly suggests that high pressure would favor the dehydration of serpentine minerals and the water released thereby would be an important source of fluids involved in magmatism in a subduction zone and mantle metasomatism,Meanwhile,the greatly enhanced electric conductivity in the presence of water may be one of the reasons underlying the occurrence of a high-conductivity zone in the lower crust.

  3. Densidades y Propiedades Volumétricas de Mezclas N,N-Dimetilformamida + Agua a Presión Constante de 98.93 kPa y a varias Temperaturas Densities and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures N,N-Dimethylformamide + Water at Constant Pressure of 98.93 kPa and various Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel S Páez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo proporciona un conjunto de datos volumétricos para evaluar la influencia de la concentración y la temperatura sobre las interacciones moleculares entre N, N-Dimetilformamida (DMF y agua. Con este propósito e midió la densidad de mezclas acuosas binarias de DMF sobre el rango completo de concentración, a la presión de 98.93 kPa y a temperaturas desde 293,15K a 313,15K usando un densímetro de tubo vibratorio. Se calculó los volúmenes molares de exceso, volúmenes molares parciales y volúmenes molares parciales a dilución infinita. Los volúmenes molares parciales a dilución infinita de DMF en solución acuosa fueron obtenidos por extrapolación a cada temperatura. Los volúmenes molares de exceso fueron calculados a partir de los datos de densidad y correlacionados usando la ecuación polinomial de Redlich-Kister. La DMF presenta un comportamiento hidrofóbico similar a otros solutos orgánicos en medio acuoso, como alcoholes y polioles.This work provides a set of volumetric data to evaluate the influence of the concentration and the temperature on the molecular interactions between N, N-Dimetilformamida (DMF and water. Densities of binary aqueous mixtures of N, N-Dimethylformamide (DMF were measured over the entire composition range at constant pressure of 98.93 kPa and at temperatures from 293,15K and 313,15K using a vibrating-tube densimeter. Excess molar volumes and partial molar volume at infinite dilution were also calculated. The partial molar volumes at infinite dilution of DMF in aqueous solution were obtained by extrapolation at each temperature. The excess molar volumes were calculated from density data and fitted to the Redlich-Kister polynomial equation. The DMF presents a hydrophobic behavior similar to other organic solutes in water such alcohols and polyols.

  4. Aqueous Geochemistry at High Pressures and High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Jay D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-05-21

    This project is aimed at experimental characterization of the sound velocities, equations of state (EOS), and derived physical and chemical properties of aqueous solutions and carbon dioxide at extreme pressure and temperature conditions relevant to processes occurring in the interior of the Earth. Chemical transport, phase changes (including melting), fluid-solid reactions, and formation of magmatic liquids at convergent plat boundaries are a key motivation for this project. Research in this area has long been limited by the extreme experimental challenges and lack of data under the appropriate pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions. The vast majority of studies of aqueous geochemistry relevant to terrestrial problems of fluid-rock interactions have been conducted at 0.3 GPa or less, and the widely used Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state for aqueous species is applicable only at ~ < 0.5 GPa. These limits are unfortunate because fluid flow and reactions plays a central role in many deeper environments. Recent efforts including our own, have resulted in new experimental techniques that now make it possible to investigate properties of homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria involving aqueous species and minerals over a much broader range of pressure and temperature appropriate for deep crustal and upper mantle processes involving water-rich fluids. We carried out 1) Brillouin scattering measurements of the equations of state and molar volume of water and carbon dioxide to over 10 GPa and 870K using precise resistance heating of samples under pressure in the diamond anvil cell, and 2) the phase diagrams of the water and CO2, and 3) Exploring new experimental approaches, including CO2 laser heating of samples in a diamond cell, to measurements of sound velocities, EOS, and phase relations by Brillouin scattering to far greater pressures and temperatures.

  5. THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF 1-BUTYL-3-METHYLIMIDAZOLIUM BIS(TRIFLUOROMETHYLSULFONYLIMIDE AT HIGH TEMPERATURES AND PRESSURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hamidova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pressure-density-temperature (p, ρ ,T data of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide [BMIM][NTF2] at T = (273.15 to 413.15 K and pressures up to p =140 MPa are reported with an estimated experimental relative combined standard uncertainty of Δ ρ / ρ = ±(0.01 to 0.08% in density. The measurements were carried out with a newly constructed Anton-Paar DMA HPM vibration-tube densimeter. The system was calibrated using double-distilled water, aqueous NaCl solution, methanol, toluene and acetone. An empirical equation of state for fitting the (p, ρ ,T data of [BMIM][NTF2] has been developed as a function of pressure and temperature. This equation is used for the calculation of the thermophysical properties of the ionic liquid, such as isothermal compressibility, isobaric thermal expansibility, thermal pressure coefficient, internal pressure, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, speed of sound and isentropic expansibility.

  6. Alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperature and pressure of 250 °C and 42 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    A new type of alkaline electrolysis cells with nickel foam based gas diffusion electrodes and KOH (aq) immobilized in mesoporous SrTiO3 has been developed and tested at temperatures and pressures up to 250 °C and 42 bar, respectively. Current densities of 1.0 A cm−2 have been measured at a cell...... voltage of 1.5 V without the use of expensive noble metal catalysts. High electrical efficiency and current density combined with relatively small production costs may lead to both reduced investment and operating costs for hydrogen and oxygen production....

  7. Sensitivity of CO2 migration estimation on reservoir temperature and pressure uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston; Doughty, Christine

    2008-11-01

    The density and viscosity of supercritical CO{sub 2} are sensitive to pressure and temperature (PT) while the viscosity of brine is sensitive primarily to temperature. Oil field PT data in the vicinity of WESTCARB's Phase III injection pilot test site in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California, show a range of PT values, indicating either PT uncertainty or variability. Numerical simulation results across the range of likely PT indicate brine viscosity variation causes virtually no difference in plume evolution and final size, but CO{sub 2} density variation causes a large difference. Relative ultimate plume size is almost directly proportional to the relative difference in brine and CO{sub 2} density (buoyancy flow). The majority of the difference in plume size occurs during and shortly after the cessation of injection.

  8. Variable-density effects on the worth of pressure data for characterizing aquifer permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seonkyoo; Kang, Peter; Williams, John

    2017-04-01

    We investigate variable-density effects on the worth of pressure data for estimating aquifer permeability. In variable-density flow and transport in porous media, the pressure distribution is transient even without changes in boundary conditions because the variable-density gradient itself can induce gravity currents. This means that the transient pressure distribution is implicitly coupled with additional information from the variable-density gradient, and consequently the data can be more informative than in density invariant cases for aquifer characterization. To systematically investigate the informativeness of the transient pressure data, we analyze the performance of permeability characterization employing the pressure data under various levels of variable-density effects. The variable-density effects can be controlled by a mixed convection ratio, which is a ratio between two characteristic convections: free convection due to a density gradient and forced convection due to a hydraulic gradient. A 2D density-dependent flow and transport model is established to simulate a coastal aquifer system where density flow occurs due to density difference between saline seawater and fresh water. An ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with convariance localization and inflation is used to sequentially estimate heterogeneous aquifer permeability fields by conditioning on real-time pressure head data. The performance of the permeability estimation is analyzed in terms of accuracy of estimated permeability fields, and predictability of arrival times of breakthrough curves in a push-pull setting. The analysis shows that the accuracy and predictability of the inverse estimation can be most improved when the free convection is balanced with the forced convection, which corresponds to the mixed convection ratio being one. This demonstrates that the pressure data is most informative for characterizing aquifer permeability fields when the two characteristic convections are balanced.

  9. The measured temperature and pressure of EDC37 detonation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J. W.; Richley, J. C.; Sutton, B. D.; Price, E.; Ota, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the experimentally determined temperature and pressure of the detonation products of EDC37; a HMX based conventional high explosive. These measurements were performed on a series of cylinder tests. The temperature measurements were undertaken at the end of the cylinder with optical fibres observing the bare explosive through a LiF window. The temperature of the products was measured for approximately 2 µs using single colour pyrometry, multicolour pyrometry and also using time integrated optical emission spectroscopy with the results from all three methods being broadly consistent. The peak temperature was found to be ≈ 3600 K dropping to ≈ 2400 K at the end of the measurement window. The spectroscopy was time integrated and showed that the emission spectra can be approximated using a grey body curve between 520 - 800 nm with no emission or absorption lines being observed. The pressure was obtained using an analytical method which requires the velocity of the expanding cylinder wall and the velocity of detonation. The pressure drops from an initial CJ value of ≈ 38 GPa to ≈ 4 GPa after 2 µs.

  10. The correlations of ions density with geomagnetic activity and solar dynamic pressure in cusp region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO JianGuang; SHI JianKui; ZHANG TieLong; LIU ZhenXing; A. FAZAKERLEY; H. R(E)ME; Ⅰ. DANDOURAS; E. LUCEK

    2007-01-01

    A statistical study of the properties of ions (O+, He+ and H+) measured by the Cluster-Ⅱ in cusp region as a function of the solar wind dynamic pressure and geomagnetic index Kp respectively was made during the summer and fall of 2001 -2003. The main results are that: (1) O+ ion density responds in a significant way to geomagnetic index Kp, and He+ ion density is not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp,both of them have a significant positive correlation with solar wind dynamic pressure; (2) H+ ion density is also observed to increase with solar wind dynamic pressure, and not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp.

  11. Boron nitrides synthesized directly from the elements at high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, M.; Yoo, C.S.; Akella, J.; Cynn, H.

    1996-11-01

    We use angle-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction, laser sample heating, and diamond-anvil cells to follow in-situ chemical reactions directly between elemental boron and nitrogen. The structures of the solid reaction products vary with pressure. Below 10 GPa, hexagonal BN is the product; cubic or wurzite BN form at higher pressures. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, another hexagonal allotrope occurs which seems to be a new highly transparent, low density h`-BN. No direct reactions occur at ambient temperature even at pressures as high as 50 GPa, implying that a large activation barrier limits the kinetics of these exothermic processes. Laser heating overcomes the large kinetic activation barrier and initiates spontaneous, self-sustaining exothermic reactions even at moderate pressures.

  12. Analysis of the impact of coolant density variations in the high efficiency channel of a pressure tube super critical water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scriven, M.G.; Hummel, D.W.; Novog, D.R.; Luxat, J.C. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The Pressure Tube (PT) Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) is based on a light water coolant operating at pressures above the thermodynamic critical pressure; a separate low temperature and low pressure moderator. The coolant density changes by an order of magnitude depending on its local enthalpy in the porous ceramic insulator tube. This causes significant changes in the neutron transport characteristics, axially and radially, in the fuel channel. This work performs lattice physics calculations for a 78-element Pu-Th fuel at zero burnup and examines the effect of assumptions related to coolant density in the radial direction of a HEC, using the neutron transport code WIMS-AECL. (author)

  13. Extended Opacity Tables with Higher Temperature-Density-Frequency Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Mark; Orban, Chris; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical models for plasma opacities underpin our understanding of radiation transport in many different astrophysical objects. These opacity models are also relevant to HEDP experiments such as ignition scale experiments on NIF. We present a significantly expanded set of opacity data from the widely utilized Opacity Project, and make these higher resolution data publicly available through OSU's portal with dropbox.com. This expanded data set is used to assess how accurate the interpolation of opacity data in temperature-density-frequency dimensions must be in order to adequately model the properties of most stellar types. These efforts are the beginning of a larger project to improve the theoretical opacity models in light of experimental results at the Sandia Z-pinch showing that the measured opacity of Iron disagrees strongly with all current models.

  14. Experimental charge density of hematite in its magnetic low temperature and high temperature phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissmann, R; Fuess, H; Tsuda, K

    2012-09-01

    Structural parameters of hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)), including the valence electron distribution, were investigated using convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) in the canted antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature and in the collinear antiferromagnetic phase at 90K. The refined charge density maps are interpreted as a direct result of electron-electron interaction in a correlated system. A negative deformation density was observed as a consequence of closed shell interaction. Positive deformation densities are interpreted as a shift of electron density to antibinding molecular orbitals. Following this interpretation, the collinear antiferromagnetic phase shows the characteristic of a Mott-Hubbard type insulator whereas the high temperature canted antiferromagnetic phase shows the characteristic of a charge transfer insulator. The break of the threefold symmetry in the canted antiferromagnetic phase was correlated to the presence of oxygen-oxygen bonding, which is caused by a shift of spin polarized charge density from iron 3d-orbitals to the oxygen ions. We propose a triangular magnetic coupling in the oxygen planes causing a frustrated triangular spin arrangement with all spins lying in the oxygen planes. This frustrated arrangement polarizes the super-exchange between iron ions and causes the spins located at the iron ions to orient in the same plane, perpendicular to the threefold axis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Temperature and Density Structure of a Recurring Active Region Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Mulay, Sargam M; Mason, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of a recurring jet observed on October 31, 2011 by SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT and Hinode/EIS. We discuss the physical parameters of the jet such as density, differential emission measure, peak temperature, velocity and filling factor obtained using imaging and spectroscopic observations. A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed at the region of the jet-spire and the footpoint using EIS observations and also by combining AIA and XRT observations. The DEM curves were used to create synthetic spectra with the CHIANTI atomic database. The plasma along the line-of-sight in the jet-spire and jet-footpoint was found to be peak at 2.0 MK. We calculated electron densities using the Fe XII ($\\lambda$186/$\\lambda$195) line ratio in the region of the spire (Ne = 7.6x$10^{10}$ $cm^{-3}$) and the footpoint (1.1x$10^{11}$ $cm^{-3}$). The plane-of-sky velocity of the jet is found to be 524 km/s. The resulting EIS DEM values are in good agreement with those obtained from AIA-XRT. There is no in...

  16. Vapour pressures, densities, and viscosities of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system and (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Antonio de [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Castilla - La Mancha, Avda. de Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain); Donate, Marina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Castilla - La Mancha, Avda. de Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain); Rodriguez, Juan F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Castilla - La Mancha, Avda. de Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: juan.rromero@uclm.es

    2006-02-15

    Measurements of thermophysical properties (vapour pressure, density, and viscosity) of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system LiBr:CH{sub 3}COOK = 2:1 by mass ratio and the (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system LiBr:CH{sub 3}CH(OH)COONa = 2:1 by mass ratio were measured. The system, a possible new working fluid for absorption heat pump, consists of absorbent (LiBr + CH{sub 3}COOK) or (LiBr + CH{sub 3}CH(OH)COONa) and refrigerant H{sub 2}O. The vapour pressures were measured in the ranges of temperature and absorbent concentration from T = (293.15 to 333.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.50, densities and viscosities were measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.40. The experimental data were correlated with an Antoine-type equation. Densities and viscosities were measured in the same range of temperature and absorbent concentration as that of the vapour pressure. Regression equations for densities and viscosities were obtained with a minimum mean square error criterion.

  17. Pressurized Recuperator For Heat Recovery In Industrial High Temperature Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recuperators and regenerators are important devices for heat recovery systems in technological lines of industrial processes and should have high air preheating temperature, low flow resistance and a long service life. The use of heat recovery systems is particularly important in high-temperature industrial processes (especially in metallurgy where large amounts of thermal energy are lost to the environment. The article presents the process design for a high efficiency recuperator intended to work at high operating parameters: air pressure up to 1.2 MPa and temperature of heating up to 900°C. The results of thermal and gas-dynamic calculations were based on an algorithm developed for determination of the recuperation process parameters. The proposed technical solution of the recuperator and determined recuperation parameters ensure its operation under maximum temperature conditions.

  18. Experimental charge density of hematite in its magnetic low temperature and high temperature phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theissmann, R., E-mail: ralf.theissmann@kronosww.com [Faculty of Engineering and CeNIDE (Center for NanoIntegration Duisburg-Essen), University of Duisburg-Essen, Bismarckstr. 81, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Fuess, H. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Tsuda, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, 980-8577 Sendai (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Structural parameters of hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), including the valence electron distribution, were investigated using convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) in the canted antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature and in the collinear antiferromagnetic phase at 90 K. The refined charge density maps are interpreted as a direct result of electron-electron interaction in a correlated system. A negative deformation density was observed as a consequence of closed shell interaction. Positive deformation densities are interpreted as a shift of electron density to antibinding molecular orbitals. Following this interpretation, the collinear antiferromagnetic phase shows the characteristic of a Mott-Hubbard type insulator whereas the high temperature canted antiferromagnetic phase shows the characteristic of a charge transfer insulator. The break of the threefold symmetry in the canted antiferromagnetic phase was correlated to the presence of oxygen-oxygen bonding, which is caused by a shift of spin polarized charge density from iron 3d-orbitals to the oxygen ions. We propose a triangular magnetic coupling in the oxygen planes causing a frustrated triangular spin arrangement with all spins lying in the oxygen planes. This frustrated arrangement polarizes the super-exchange between iron ions and causes the spins located at the iron ions to orient in the same plane, perpendicular to the threefold axis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative CBED was used to study hematite ({alpha}-Fe2O3). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure and charge density of both antiferromagnetic phases were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topological charge density analysis was combined with a Bader analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transition from a Mott-Hubbard to a charge transfer insulator is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A frustrated triangular magnetic coupling in the oxygen planes is proposed.

  19. Coesite Formation at Ambient Pressure and Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Martínez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial crystallization of silica xerogel in the form of coesite has been obtained at low-pressure conditions and temperatures of ∼565∘C, in samples containing chlorophyll aggregates dispersed in amorphous silica. Silica xerogel samples were prepared by the sol-gel method using an ethanol:H2O:TEOS molar ratio of 4:11.6:1 and loaded with extracts from frozen spinach leaves. The silica xerogel microstructure of the powders was studied as a function of annealing temperature. It was found that partial crystallization of the glass matrix in the form of coestite was obtained at lower pressure than those specified by the phase diagram. Chlorophyll aggregates were added to the starting solutions which, upon thermal treatments, form small colloidal particles in the glass matrix. The presence of coesite is corroborated by the Rietveld refinement method.

  20. Solid Nitrogen at Extreme Conditions of High Pressure and Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A; Gregoryanz, E

    2004-04-05

    We review the phase diagram of nitrogen in a wide pressure and temperature range. Recent optical and x-ray diffraction studies at pressures up to 300 GPa and temperatures in excess of 1000 K have provided a wealth of information on the transformation of molecular nitrogen to a nonmolecular (polymeric) semiconducting and two new molecular phases. These newly found phases have very large stability (metastability) range. Moreover, two new molecular phases have considerably different orientational order from the previously known phases. In the iota phase (unlike most of other known molecular phases), N{sub 2} molecules are orientationally equivalent. The nitrogen molecules in the theta phase might be associated into larger aggregates, which is in line with theoretical predictions on polyatomic nitrogen.

  1. Electrical conductivity of rocks at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhomenko, E. I.; Bondarenko, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The results of studies of the electrical conductivity in the most widely distributed types of igneous rocks, at temperatures of up to 1200 C, at atmospheric pressure, and also at temperatures of up to 700 C and at pressures of up to 20,000 kg/sq cm are described. The figures of electrical conductivity, of activaation energy and of the preexponential coefficient are presented and the dependence of these parameters on the petrochemical parameters of the rocks are reviewed. The possible electrical conductivities for the depository, granite and basalt layers of the Earth's crust and of the upper mantle are presented, as well as the electrical conductivity distribution to the depth of 200 to 240 km for different geological structures.

  2. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  3. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  4. Elasticity of hcp cobalt at high pressure and temperature: a quasi-harmonic case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonangeli, D; Krisch, M; Farber, D L; Ruddle, D G; Fiquet, G

    2007-11-30

    We performed high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on a single crystal of hcp cobalt at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature, deriving 4 of the 5 independent elements of the elastic tensor. Our experiments indicate that the elasticity of hcp-Co is well described within the frame of a quasi-harmonic approximation and that anharmonic high-temperature effects on the elastic moduli, sound velocities and elastic anisotropy are minimal at constant density. These results support the validity of the Birch's law and represent an important benchmark for ab initio thermal lattice dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations.

  5. Interfacial tension and surface pressure of high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, and related lipid droplets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Lamberg, Antti; Lehtivaara, Maria; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2012-01-01

    .... Interfacial tension and surface pressure of these particles are of great interest because they are related to the shape and the stability of the droplets and to protein adsorption at the interface...

  6. Prediction of Minimum Spouting Velocity at Elevated Pressures and Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Minimum spouting velocity (Ums) is one of the most important flow characteristics for proper design and operation of spouted bed reactors. Many correlations for Ums have been published since spouted bed technology was initiated in 1955. In this paper, a new correlation is developed for Ums based on 767 published experimental data covering both high pressure and high temperature conditions. The calculated and the measured results of Ums are in better agreement than other published correlations.

  7. Extended irreversible thermodynamics and the quality of temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalekar, Anil A.

    1999-08-01

    It is reiterated that without a Gibbs-Duhem equation no thermodynamic description ofirreversible and reversible processes exists. It is shown with the help of Gibbs-Duhem equation of extended irreversible thermodynamics that the physical contents of intensive quantities, the temperature and the pressure, do not change in going from reversible to irreversible processes. This confirms well with the earlier demonstrations of Eu and Garcia-Colin.

  8. Generation of High Pressure and Temperature by Converging Detonation Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Singh

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Generation of high pressure and temperature has various applications in defence. Several techniques, viz flying plate method, collapsing of linear, convergence of detonation waves in solid explosives, have been established in this connection. In the present paper, converging detonation waves in solid explosives, where variable heat of detonation is being added to the front, is studied, by using Whitham's characteristics rule. Results are compared with those reported elsewhere.

  9. Generation of High Pressure and Temperature by Converging Detonation Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, V. P.; Shukla, S K

    1987-01-01

    Generation of high pressure and temperature has various applications in defence. Several techniques, viz flying plate method, collapsing of linear, convergence of detonation waves in solid explosives, have been established in this connection. In the present paper, converging detonation waves in solid explosives, where variable heat of detonation is being added to the front, is studied, by using Whitham's characteristics rule. Results are compared with those reported elsewhere.

  10. Generation of high pressure and temperature by converging detonation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, V. P.; Shukla, S. K.

    1987-07-01

    Generation of high pressure and temperature has various applications in defense. Several techniques, viz flying plate method, collapsing of linear, convergence of detonation waves in solid explosives, have been established in this connection. In this paper, converging detonation waves in solid explosives, where variable heat of detonation is being added to the front, are studied by using Whitham's characteristics rule. Results are compared with those reported elsewhere.

  11. Pulse Radiolysis at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, Knud

    1980-01-01

    A cell for pulse radiolytic measurements up to temperatures of 320°C and pressures of 14 MPa is constructed. The activation energy of the reaction OH + Cu2+ is determined to 13.3 kJ × mol−1 (3.2 kcal × mol−1). A preliminary study of the reaction e−aq + e−aq yields an activation energy of 22 kJ × ...

  12. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  13. Rheological assessment of nanofluids at high pressure high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) fluids are commonly encountered in industry, for example in cooling and/or lubrications applications. Nanofluids, engineered suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a base fluid, have shown prospective as industrial cooling fluids due to their enhanced rheological and heat transfer properties. Nanofluids can be potentially utilized in oil industry for drilling fluids and for high pressure water jet cooling/lubrication in machining. In present work rheological characteristics of oil based nanofluids are investigated at HPHT condition. Nanofluids used in this study are prepared by dispersing commercially available SiO2 nanoparticles (~20 nm) in a mineral oil. The basefluid and nanofluids with two concentrations, namely 1%, and 2%, by volume, are considered in this investigation. The rheological characteristics of base fluid and the nanofluids are measured using an industrial HPHT viscometer. Viscosity values of the nanofluids are measured at pressures of 100 kPa to 42 MPa and temperatures ranging from 25°C to 140°C. The viscosity values of both nanofluids as well as basefluid are observed to have increased with the increase in pressure. Funded by Qatar National Research Fund (NPRP 08-574-2-239).

  14. High-pressure and high-temperature differential scanning calorimeter for combined pressure-concentration-temperature measurements of hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauron, Ph; Bielmann, M; Bissig, V; Remhof, A; Züttel, A

    2009-09-01

    The design and construction of a high-pressure (200 bar) and high-temperature (600 degrees C) heat-flow differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) for the in situ investigation of the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions of hydrides is presented. In combination with a pressure-concentration-temperature (pcT) system, simultaneous thermodynamic and volumetric measurements become accessible. Due to the high thermal conductivity of hydrogen, only the sample cell and the reference cell are exposed to hydrogen and the remaining system is under ambient conditions. This separation has the advantage that the calibration factor is independent of the hydrogen pressure. The internal empty volume of the combined system is as low as possible to maximize the precision of the pcT measurements. The calorimetric block of the DSC is designed with a silver/copper alloy and the temperature measurements are made resistively with platinum temperature sensors (Pt 100). The instrument was calibrated and its operability was successfully studied on the example of the hydrogen sorption behavior of LaNi(5).

  15. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Beth, Arnaud; Toublanc, Dominique; Dandouras, Iannis; Mazelle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities c...

  16. Electronic and Elastic Properties of CaMg2 Alloy Phase under Various Pressures by Density Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Jia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influencing effect of pressure on structural, elastic and electronic properties of CaMg2 Laves phase is mainly investigated. The optimized structural parameters at zero pressure are a = b = 6.250Å, c = 10.101Å, which has good agreement with the experimental and theoretical values. The elastic constants are calculated, and then the bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and anisotropy factor are determined. The results show that the applied pressure is beneficial to the elastic properties of CaMg2. The analysis of electronic density of states (DOS and Mulliken electron population reveal the bonding characteristics in CaMg2 crystal. Finally, the Debye temperatures under different pressures are obtained from the average sound velocity.

  17. Temperature and density structure of a recurring active region jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Zanna, Giulio Del; Mason, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present a study of a recurring jet observed on October 31, 2011 by the Atmosphereic Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. We discuss the physical parameters of the jet that are obtained using imaging and spectroscopic observations, such as density, differential emission measure, peak temperature, velocity, and filling factor. Methods: A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed at the region of the jet spire and the footpoint using EIS observations and also by combining AIA and XRT observations. The resulting EIS DEM curves were compared to those obtained with AIA-XRT. The DEM curves were used to create synthetic spectra with the CHIANTI atomic database. The predicted total count rates for each AIA channel were compared with the observed count rates. The effects of varying elemental abundances and the temperature range for the DEM inversion were investigated. Spectroscopic diagnostics were used to obtain an electron number density distribution for the jet spire and the jet footpoint. Results: The plasma along the line of sight in the jet spire and jet footpoint was found to be peak at 2.0 MK (log T [K] = 6.3). We calculated electron densities using the Fe XII (λ186/λ195) line ratio in the region of the spire (Ne = 7.6 × 1010 cm-3) and the footpoint (1.1 × 1011 cm-3). The plane-of-sky velocity of the jet is found to be 524 km s-1. The resulting EIS DEM values are in good agreement with those obtained from AIA-XRT. The synthetic spectra contributing to each AIA channel confirms the multi-thermal nature of the AIA channels in both regions. There is no indication of high temperatures, such as emission from Fe XVII (λ254.87) (log T [K] = 6.75) seen in the jet spire. In the case of the jet footpoint, synthetic spectra predict weak contributions from Ca XVII (λ192.85) and Fe XVII (λ254.87). With further investigation, we confirmed

  18. Elastic and piezoelectric properties, sound velocity and Debye temperature of (B3) boron–bismuth compound under pressure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Daoud; N Bioud; N Lebgaa

    2013-11-01

    Pseudopotential plane-wave method (PP–PW) based on density functional theory (DFT) and density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) within the Teter and Pade exchangecorrelation functional form of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) is applied to study the effect of pressure on the elastic and piezoelectric properties of the (B3) boron–bismuth compound. The phase transition, the independent elastic stiffness constants, the bulk modulus, the direct and converse piezoelectric coefficients, the longitudinal, transverse, and average sound velocities, and finally the Debye temperature under pressure are studied. The results obtained are generally lower than the available theoretical data (experimental data are not available) reported in the literature.

  19. 对、邻二甲苯和醋酸二元液体混合物在不同温度和压力下的密度和超额摩尔体积%Density and Excess Molar Volume of Binary Mixtures of p-Xylene+Acetic Acid and o-Xylene+Acetic Acid at Different Temperatures and Pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨天宇; 夏淑倩; 邸志国; 马沛生

    2008-01-01

    A new apparatus was designed with a thick-walled glass capillary, electric heater tube with red copper and heat preservation. The thick-walled glass capillary was used for its advantages of resistance to acid corrosion and pressure, and ease of observation. The experimental densities over the entire range of mole fraction for the bi- nary mixture of p-xylene+acetic acid and o-xylene+acetic acid were measured using the new apparatus at tempera- tures ranging from 313.15K to 473.15K and pressure ranging from 0.20 to 2.0 MPa. The density values were used in the determination of excess molar volumes, VE. The Redlich-Kister equation was used to fit the excess molar volume values, and the coefficients and estimate of the standard error values were presented. The experimental re- suits prove that the density measurement apparatus is successful.

  20. Microwave diagnostic for the determination of the electron temperature of a low density shock-heated argon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C. P.; Exberger, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The diffraction, defocusing and beam bending effects of microwaves transmitted through a bounded shock-heated argon plasma with low electron density are investigated with the purpose of developing an accurate method for electron temperature (Te) determination. This report describes the evaluation technique and presents results for an argon plasma with pressure between 3 and 10 torr, and T2 between 5500 and 9500 K. The electron temperature values obtained have a range of uncertainty between -20% and +10% only. The electron temperature is equal or lower by approximately 1000 K in comparison to the heavy particle temperature (T2).

  1. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathys, A; Knorr, D [Berlin University of Technology, Department of Food Biotechnology and Food Process Engineering, Koenigin-Luise-Str. 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Heinz, V [German Institute of Food Technology, p. o. box 1165, D-49601, Quackenbrueck (Germany)], E-mail: alexander.mathys@tu-berlin.de

    2008-07-15

    The mechanism of inactivation of bacterial spores by heat and pressure is still a matter of discussion. Obviously, the change of the dissociation equilibrium under pressure and temperature plays a dominant role in inactivation of microorganisms. Heat and pressure inactivation of Geobacillus. stearothermophilus spores at different initial pH-values in ACES and phosphate buffer confirmed this view. Thermal inactivation in ACES buffer at 122 deg. C resulted in higher logarithmic reductions. Contrary, after pressure treatment at 900 MPa with 80 deg. C phosphate buffer showed higher inactivation. These results indicated the different dissociation equilibrium shifts in buffer systems by heat and pressure. Due to preparation, storage and handling of highly concentrated spore suspensions the clumping and the formation of aggregates can hardly be avoided. Consequently, the impact of the agglomeration size distribution on the quantitative assessment of G. stearothermophilus spore inactivation was determined by using a three-fold dynamic optical backreflexion measurement. Two limiting cases have been discriminated in mathematical modelling: three dimensional, spherical packing for maximum spore count and two dimensional, circular packing for minimum spore count of a particular agglomerate. Thermal inactivation studies have been carried out in thin glass capillaries, where by using numerical simulations the non isothermal conditions were modelled and taken into account. It is shown that the shoulder formation often found in thermal spore inactivation can sufficiently be described by first-order inactivation kinetics when the agglomeration size is considered. In case of high pressure inactivation agglomerations could be strongly changed by high forces at compression and especially decompression phase. The physiological response of Bacillus licheniformis spores to high pressure was investigated using multiparameter flow cytometry. Spores were treated by high pressure at 150 MPa

  2. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, A.; Heinz, V.; Knorr, D.

    2008-07-01

    The mechanism of inactivation of bacterial spores by heat and pressure is still a matter of discussion. Obviously, the change of the dissociation equilibrium under pressure and temperature plays a dominant role in inactivation of microorganisms. Heat and pressure inactivation of Geobacillus. stearothermophilus spores at different initial pH-values in ACES and phosphate buffer confirmed this view. Thermal inactivation in ACES buffer at 122°C resulted in higher logarithmic reductions. Contrary, after pressure treatment at 900 MPa with 80°C phosphate buffer showed higher inactivation. These results indicated the different dissociation equilibrium shifts in buffer systems by heat and pressure. Due to preparation, storage and handling of highly concentrated spore suspensions the clumping and the formation of aggregates can hardly be avoided. Consequently, the impact of the agglomeration size distribution on the quantitative assessment of G. stearothermophilus spore inactivation was determined by using a three-fold dynamic optical backreflexion measurement. Two limiting cases have been discriminated in mathematical modelling: three dimensional, spherical packing for maximum spore count and two dimensional, circular packing for minimum spore count of a particular agglomerate. Thermal inactivation studies have been carried out in thin glass capillaries, where by using numerical simulations the non isothermal conditions were modelled and taken into account. It is shown that the shoulder formation often found in thermal spore inactivation can sufficiently be described by first-order inactivation kinetics when the agglomeration size is considered. In case of high pressure inactivation agglomerations could be strongly changed by high forces at compression and especially decompression phase. The physiological response of Bacillus licheniformis spores to high pressure was investigated using multiparameter flow cytometry. Spores were treated by high pressure at 150 MPa with 37

  3. Shock wave velocity and shock pressure for low density powders : A novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  4. SHOCK-WAVE VELOCITY AND SHOCK PRESSURE FOR LOW-DENSITY POWDERS - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKEN, DK; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  5. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, K., E-mail: kazuhiro-matsuda@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Yao, M. [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tamura, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Katoh, M. [A.L.M.T. Corp., Iwasekoshi-Machi 2, Toyama 931-8543 (Japan); Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M. [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  6. Kinetics of hydrolysis of 1-benzoyl-1,2,4-triazole in aqueous solution as a function of temperature near the temperature of maximum density, and the isochoric controversy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandamer, MJ; Buurma, NJ; Engberts, JBFN; Reis, JCR; Buurma, Niklaas J.; Reis, João C.R.

    2003-01-01

    At temperatures above and below the temperature of maximum density, TMD, for water at ambient pressure, pairs of temperatures exist at which the molar volumes of water are equal. First-order rate constants for the pH-independent hydrolysis of 1-benzoyl-1,2,4-triazole in aqueous solution at pairs of

  7. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of multilayered spherical quantum dots: Effects of geometrical size, hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, M.J. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz 71555-313 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, G., E-mail: grezaei2001@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazari, M. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz 71555-313 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Based on the effective mass and parabolic one band approximations, simultaneous effects of the geometrical size, hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure, and temperature on the intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in multilayered spherical quantum dots are studied. Energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated using the fourth-order Runge–Kutta method and optical properties are obtained using the compact density matrix approach. The results indicate that the hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure, temperature and geometrical parameters such as the well and barrier widths have a great influence on the linear, the third-order nonlinear and the total optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes. -- Highlights: • Hydrogenic impurity effects on the optical properties of a MSQD are investigated. • Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects are also studied. • Hydrogenic impurity has a great influence on the linear and nonlinear ACs and RICs. • Hydrostatic pressure and temperature change the linear and nonlinear ACs and RICs.

  8. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Synthesis and microdiffraction at extreme pressures and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Meng, Yue

    2013-10-07

    High pressure compounds and polymorphs are investigated for a broad range of purposes such as determine structures and processes of deep planetary interiors, design materials with novel properties, understand the mechanical behavior of materials exposed to very high stresses as in explosions or impacts. Synthesis and structural analysis of materials at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature entails remarkable technical challenges. In the laser heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), very high pressure is generated between the tips of two opposing diamond anvils forced against each other; focused infrared laser beams, shined through the diamonds, allow to reach very high temperatures on samples absorbing the laser radiation. When the LH-DAC is installed in a synchrotron beamline that provides extremely brilliant x-ray radiation, the structure of materials under extreme conditions can be probed in situ. LH-DAC samples, although very small, can show highly variable grain size, phase and chemical composition. In order to obtain the high resolution structural analysis and the most comprehensive characterization of a sample, we collect diffraction data in 2D grids and combine powder, single crystal and multigrain diffraction techniques. Representative results obtained in the synthesis of a new iron oxide, Fe4O5 (1) will be shown.

  10. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  11. Ammonia oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yu; Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation experiments were conducted at high pressure (30 bar and 100 bar) under oxidizing and stoichiometric conditions, respectively, and temperatures ranging from 450 to 925 K. The oxidation of ammonia was slow under stoichiometric conditions in the temperature range investigated. Under...... oxidizing conditions the onset temperature for reaction was 850–875 K at 30 bar, while at 100 bar it was about 800 K, with complete consumption of NH3 at 875 K. The products of reaction were N2 and N2O, while NO and NO2 concentrations were below the detection limit even under oxidizing conditions. The data...... was satisfactory. The main oxidation path for NH3 at high pressure under oxidizing conditions is NH3⟶+OH NH2⟶+HO2,NO2 H2NO⟶+O2 HNO⟶+O2 NO ⟶+NH2 N2. The modeling predictions are most sensitive to the reactions NH2 + NO = NNH + OH and NH2 + HO2 = H2NO + OH, which promote the ammonia consumption by forming OH...

  12. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  13. Cryogenic Pressure Calibrator for Wide Temperature Electronically Scanned (ESP) Pressure Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulcon, Nettie D.

    2001-01-01

    Electronically scanned pressure (ESP) modules have been developed that can operate in ambient and in cryogenic environments, particularly Langley's National Transonic Facility (NTF). Because they can operate directly in a cryogenic environment, their use eliminates many of the operational problems associated with using conventional modules at low temperatures. To ensure the accuracy of these new instruments, calibration was conducted in a laboratory simulating the environmental conditions of NTF. This paper discusses the calibration process by means of the simulation laboratory, the system inputs and outputs and the analysis of the calibration data. Calibration results of module M4, a wide temperature ESP module with 16 ports and a pressure range of +/- 4 psid are given.

  14. Density of Liquid Steel over Temperature Range of 1 803-1 873 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    The density of three kinds of liquid steel was measured by a modified sessile drop method over the temperature range of 1 803-1 873 K. It is found that the density of liquid steels decreases with increasing temperature and carbon content in steel. Both of the density and its absolute temperature coefficient of studied steels are smaller than the literature values of pure iron. The molar volume of the steels increases with increasing temperature.

  15. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O. H. S.; Lamberg, A.; Lehtivaara, M.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively) are essentia...... of interfacial tension becomes significant for particles with a radius of similar to 5 nm, when the area per molecule in the surface region is...

  16. Ice Particles Trapped by Temperature Gradients at mbar Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kelling, Thorben; Dürmann, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    In laboratory experiments we observe that ice particles (\\leq100 \\mu m) entrained in a low pressure atmosphere (~1 mbar) get trapped by temperature gradients between three reservoirs at different tempertature. Confining elements are a peltier element at 250 K (bottom), a liquid nitrogen reservoir at 77 K (top) and the surrounding vacuum chamber at 293 K. Particle levitation and trapping is modeled by an interplay of thermophoresis, photophoresis and gravity. A number of ice particles are trapped simultaneously in close spatial distance to each other at least up to minutes and are accessible for further experiments.

  17. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of measurement microphones is affected by changes in the environmental conditions, mainly temperature and static pressure. This rate of change has been the object of previous studies focused on Laboratory Standard microphones. The literature describes frequency dependent values...... lumped parameter models or numerical calculations. Any of these possibilities require knowledge of the construction details of the microphones, particularly the geometry of the back cavity, and the properties of the membrane. This paper presents an introductory study of the effect of the environmental...

  18. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of condenser measurement microphones depends on the environmental conditions due to the changes in the acoustic properties of the enclosed air between diaphragm and back-electrode and in the cavity behind the backelectrode. A theoretical investigation has been performed based...... of the microphone. The static pressure and temperature coefficients were determined experimentally for about twenty samples of type BK 4160 and BK 4180 microphones. The results agree almost perfectly with the predictions for BK 4160, while some modifications of the lumped parameter values are called for to make...

  19. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of measurement microphones is affected by changes in the environmental conditions, mainly temperature and static pressure. This rate of change has been the object of previous studies focused on Laboratory Standard microphones. The literature describes frequency dependent values...... for these coefficients which are used for calibration purposes. Working standard microphones are not exempt of these influences. However, manufacturers usually provide a low frequency value of the environmental coefficient. While in some applications the influence of this coefficient may be negligible, in others it may...

  20. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  1. Potassium-Rich Ices at High Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M. R.; Scott, H. P.; Aarestad, E.; Prakapenka, V.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary interiors requires that the pressure-volume-temperature properties of phases present within the body be well understood. The high-pressure polymorphs of H2O have been studied extensively, due to the abundance of ice phases in icy moons and likely vast number of extra-solar planetary bodies, with only select studies evaluating impurity-laden ices. In this study, ice formed from a 1.6 mole percent KCl-bearing aqueous solution was studied up to 33 GPa and 650 K, and the incorporation of K+ and Cl- into the ice VII structure was documented. The compression data at 300 K were fit with a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and yielded K, K/, and V0 of 24.7±0.9 GPa, 4.44±0.09, and 39.17±0.15 Å3, respectively. Thermal expansion coefficients were also determined for several isothermal compression curves at elevated temperatures, and a P-V-T equation of state will be presented. The melting of ice VII with incorporated K+ and Cl- was determined up to 625 K and 10.6 GPa and was fit by using a Simon-Glatzel equation. The melting curve is systematically depressed relative to the melting curve of pure H2O by approximately 45 K and 80 K at 4 and 11 GPa, respectively. Interestingly, a portion of the K+ and Cl- contained within the ice VII structure was observed to exsolve with increasing temperature and pressure. This suggests that an internal differentiating process could concentrate a K-rich phase deep within H2O-rich planets, and we speculate that this could supply an additional source of heat through the radioactive decay of 40K. Birch (1951; JGR, 56, 107-126) has estimated that 40K contributes 2.7 μcal/g.year for each wt.% of K, and our results suggest at least 3.33 wt.% can be incorporated into the structure of ice VII, thus making it a source of heat rather than just a conductive layer. In conclusion, our data illustrate a mechanism that may concentrate K at depth and impact the supposed pressure and temperature within moderate

  2. Measurements of Rotational Temperatures in Atmospheric-Pressure Capillary Plasma Electrode (CPE) Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figus, Margaret; Abramzon, Nina; Becker, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    We report the results of rotational temperature measurements in atmospheric-pressure capillary plasma electrode (CPE) discharges in ambient air using the unresolved N2 second positive band. Assuming that the emitting N2 molecules can be described by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution characterized by a single rotational temperature, this temperature is determined from a fit of the measured emission spectrum to a calculated spectrum. If the emitting species are in equilibrium with the bulk gas in the plasma, then this temperature can be interpreted as the gas kinetic temperature in the plasma. We determined rotational temperatures for three different plasma regions: inside the capillary by analyzing radiation emitted along the axis of the capillary, between the capillaries, and perpendicular to the axis of the capillary. Each region has a different plasma density and, therefore, a different gas temperature with the plasma inside the capillary being the hottest. We also measured the rotational temperatures in each region as a function of the plasma power. As expected, the rotational temperatures increase with increasing discharge power. Work supported by the NSF and by ARO through a DURIP award.

  3. Pressure--volume--temperature properties of perfluorocyclobutane: equations of state, virial coefficients, and intermolecular potential energy functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douslin, D.R.; Moore, R.T.; Waddington, G.

    1959-11-01

    Studies of the pressure-volume-temperature properties of perfluorocyclobutane, in the ranges 3-394 atm and 30-350/sup 0/, yielded values of gas compressibility, critical constants, vapor pressure and orthobaric liquid and vapor densities. The results were correlated by the Beattie Bridgeman, Benedict Webb Rubin, and Martin-Hou equations of state and by the Stockmayer and the Kihara intermolecular potential energy functions. The merits of the several correlational methods are discussed.

  4. Experimental and modelling study of the densities of the hydrogen sulphide + methane mixtures at 253, 273 and 293 K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez Perez, Alfonso; Valtz, Alain; Coquelet, Christophe; PARICAUD, Patrice; Chapoy, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Densities of three binary mixtures of hydrogen sulphide and methane (xH 2 S + (1-x) CH 4), with mole fractions of 0.1315, 0.1803 and 0.2860 of acid gas, were determined experimentally at three temperatures (253, 273 and 293) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa. Densities were measured continuously using a high temperature and high pressure Vibrating Tube densitometer (VTD), Anton Paar DMA 512. The SAFT-VR Mie, PR and GERG2008 equations of state (EoS) are used to describe t...

  5. Experimental study on liquid immiscibility of lamprophyre-sulfide melt at high temperature and high pressure and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; HUANG Zhilong; ZHU Chengming

    2009-01-01

    With lamprophyre and pyrite from the Laowangzhai gold deposit, Yunnan Province, China, as starting materials, and at pressures from 1.5 to 3.0 GPa and temperatures from 1160 to 1560℃, an experimental study was carried out on the liquid immiscibility of lamprophyre-sulfide melt at high temperature and ultra-high pressure in the DS-29A cubic 3600T/6-type high pressure apparatus. Results showed that the liquid immiscibility of lampropyre-sulfide melt in the magmatic system would happen during the early magmatic evolution (high temperature and high pressure conditions) and was controlled by temperature and pressure. The sulfide melt which was separated from the lamprophyric melt would make directional movement in the temperature and pressure field and assemble in the low-temperature and low-pressure region. Because the density of SM is higher than that of the lamprophyric melt, the former would gather together at the bottom of the magma chamber and there would exist a striking boundary between the two melts. On the other hand, the results also suggested that there would be little possibility for lamprophyric magma to carry massive gold, and lamprophyres can't provide many of ore-forming materials (Au) in the processes of gold mineralization.

  6. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  7. High temperature superconductivity in sulfur and selenium hydrides at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Livas, José A.; Sanna, Antonio; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-03-01

    Due to its low atomic mass, hydrogen is the most promising element to search for high-temperature phononic superconductors. However, metallic phases of hydrogen are only expected at extreme pressures (400 GPa or higher). The measurement of the record superconducting critical temperature of 203 K in a hydrogen-sulfur compound at 160 GPa of pressure [A.P. Drozdov, M.I. Eremets, I.A. Troyan, arXiv:1412.0460; [cond-mat.supr-con] (2014); A.P. Drozdov, M.I. Eremets, I.A. Troyan, V. Ksenofontov, S.I. Shylin, Nature 525, 73 (2015)], shows that metallization of hydrogen can be reached at significantly lower pressure by inserting it in the matrix of other elements. In this work we investigate the phase diagram and the superconducting properties of the H-S systems by means of minima hopping method for structure prediction and density functional theory for superconductors. We also show that Se-H has a similar phase diagram as its sulfur counterpart as well as high superconducting critical temperature. We predict H3Se to exceed 120 K superconductivity at 100 GPa. We show that both H3Se and H3S, due to the critical temperature and peculiar electronic structure, present rather unusual superconducting properties. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70020-0

  8. Magnetic transition temperatures follow crystallographic symmetry in samarium under high-pressures and low-temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig R.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal samarium (Sm) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to high-pressure up to 47 GPa and low-temperature to 10 K. The two magnetic transitions at 106 K and 14 K in the α-Sm phase, attributed to antiferromagnetic ordering on hexagonal and cubic layers respectively, collapse in to one magnetic transition near 10 GPa when Sm assumes a double hexagonal close packed (dhcp) phase. On further increase in pressure above 34 GPa, the magnetic transitions split again as Sm adopts a hexagonal-hP3 structure indicating different magnetic transition temperatures for different crystallographic sites. A model for magnetic ordering for the hexagonal-hP3 phase in samarium has been proposed based on the experimental data. The magnetic transition temperatures closely follow the crystallographic symmetry during α-Sm  →  dhcp  →  fcc/dist.fcc  →  hP3 structure sequence at high-pressures and low-temperatures.

  9. Temperature and Population Density Effects on Locomotor Activity of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, T. M.; Faurby, S.; Kjærsgaard, A.

    2013-01-01

    activity was measured for both sexes and at four densities (with mixed sexes) during a full light and dark (L:D) cycle at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C. Locomotor activity during daytime increased with temperature at all densities until reaching 30°C and then decreased. High-density treatments...

  10. High pressure/high temperature thermogravimetric apparatus. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this instrumentation grant was to acquire a state-of-the-art, high pressure, high temperature thermogravimetric apparatus (HP/HT TGA) system for the study of the interactions between gases and carbonaceous solids for the purpose of solving problems related to coal utilization and applications of carbon materials. The instrument that we identified for this purpose was manufactured by DMT (Deutsche Montan Technologies)--Institute of Cokemaking and Coal Chemistry of Essen, Germany. Particular features of note include: Two reactors: a standard TGA reactor, capable of 1100 C at 100 bar; and a high temperature (HT) reactor, capable of operation at 1600 C and 100 bar; A steam generator capable of generating steam to 100 bar; Flow controllers and gas mixing system for up to three reaction gases, plus a separate circuit for steam, and another for purge gas; and An automated software system for data acquisition and control. The HP/TP DMT-TGA apparatus was purchased in 1996 and installed and commissioned during the summer of 1996. The apparatus was located in Room 128 of the Prince Engineering Building at Brown University. A hydrogen alarm and vent system were added for safety considerations. The system has been interfaced to an Ametek quadruple mass spectrometer (MA 100), pumped by a Varian V250 turbomolecular pump, as provided for in the original proposed. With this capability, a number of gas phase species of interest can be monitored in a near-simultaneous fashion. The MS can be used in a few different modes. During high pressure, steady-state gasification experiments, it is used to sample, measure, and monitor the reactant/product gases. It can also be used to monitor gas phase species during nonisothermal temperature programmed reaction (TPR) or temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments.

  11. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Paul; Mussack, Katie; Orban, Chris; Colgan, James; Ducret, Jean-Eric; Fontes, Christopher J.; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Heeter, Robert F.; Kilcrease, Dave; Le Pennec, Maelle; Mancini, Roberto; Perry, Ted; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine; Trantham, Matt

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. This discrepancy has led to an investigation of opacities through laboratory experiments and improved opacity models for many of the larger contributors to the sun’s opacity, including iron and oxygen. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al, 2015]. Although these results are still controversial, repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for C, O and Fe to address the solar abundance issue [Colgan, 2013]. Armstrong et al [2014] have also implemented changes in the ATOMIC code for low-Z elements. However, no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions.This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDPLP, grant No. DE-NA0001840, and the NLUF Program, grant No. DE-NA0000850, and through LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  12. Deciphering Pressure-Temperature path of the Stak eclogites (Pakistan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanari, Pierre; Vidal, Olivier; Engi, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The Stak massif is located in the NW Himalaya syntaxis (northern Pakistan) and corresponds to a newly recognized occurrence of continental eclogite formed during the subduction of the northern margin of the Indian continent. This high pressure (HP) to ultra-high pressure (UHP) unit was extensively retrogressed during the Himalayan collision. This retrogressed metamorphic event occurs under lower pressure and is associated with the replacement of eclogite-facies minerals by amphibolite-facies minerals. We propose a continuous pressure-temperature (P-T) path assessed from a single thin-section, using a micro-cartographic approach with the program XMapTools (more details at http://www.xmaptools.com). This method uses electron microprobe X-ray compositional maps of a small thin-section area of 520 μm × 670 μm showing three assemblages. The HP assemblage (1) made of garnet + omphacite + phengite. This first assemblage is destabilized into (2) symplectites of clinopyroxene + amphibole + plagioclase. The low-pressure assemblage (3) is made of amphibole + plagioclase +/- biotite and is associated to the late collisional event. The study of the chemical images is followed by the calculations of ~200.000 P-T estimates using for each assemblage appropriate thermometers and barometers from the literature. This study shows that the Stak eclogite underwent prograde metamorphism, increasing from 650°C and 2.4 GPa to the pressure peak conditions of 750°C and 2.5 GPa. Then this unit is retrogressed to 700-650°C and 1.6-0.9 GPa under amphibolite-facies conditions. The estimated peak metamorphic P-T conditions and P-T path are similar to those of the Kaghan and Tso Morari HP/UHP massifs in NW Himalaya. We propose that these two HP/UHP massifs and the Stak massif define a large HP to UHP province covering more than 500 km × 150 km partly covered by the Kohistan-Ladakh arc and metamorphic Tethyan series. This NW Himalayan province is comparable in size to the Dabie-Sulu province

  13. Development of a pressure based vortex-shedding meter: measuring unsteady mass-flow in variable density gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, C. L.; Winroth, M.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2016-08-01

    An entirely pressure-based vortex-shedding meter has been designed for use in practical time-dependent flows. The meter is capable of measuring mass-flow rate in variable density gases in spite of the fact that fluid temperature is not directly measured. Unlike other vortex meters, a pressure based meter is incredibly robust and may be used in industrial type flows; an environment wholly unsuitable for hot-wires for example. The meter has been tested in a number of static and dynamic flow cases, across a range of mass-flow rates and pressures. The accuracy of the meter is typically better than about 3% in a static flow and resolves the fluctuating mass-flow with an accuracy that is better than or equivalent to a hot-wire method.

  14. [Reducing patient pressure sore incidence density in the pediatric surgical intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chen; Chang, Shiow-Ru; Tang, Chi-Min

    2014-04-01

    Our unit recorded 21 cases of pressure sores from January 2011 to June 2011. The resulting pressure-sore incidence density of 0.74% exceeded the Taiwan Clinical Performance Indicator (TCPI) for medical centers (0.62%) as well as the mean incidence density for our unit (0.55%) during the same period in 2010. We developed this project to decrease the incidence density of pressure sores at our pediatric-surgical-intensive-care unit from 0.74% to 0.31%. Strategies implemented included: 1. providing on-the-job education; 2. providing bedside teaching; 3. developing a series of pictures to illustrate proper sitting, lying, and changing positions and the proper fixation of catheters; 4. implementing a reminder mechanism; 5. introducing pressure-preventing devices; 6. and establishing an audit team. Incidence density decreased from 0.74% (Jan. to Jun. 2011) to 0.18% (Mar. to Jul. 2012). We demonstrated that the developed improvement program effectively reduced the incidence density of pressure sores and increased the quality of nursing care.

  15. HIGH TEMPERATURE HIGH PRESSURE THERMODYNAMIC MEASUREMENTS FOR COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2000-05-01

    The flow VLE apparatus designed and built for a previous project was upgraded and recalibrated for data measurements for this project. The modifications include better and more accurate sampling technique, addition of a digital recorder to monitor temperature and pressure inside the VLE cell, and a new technique for remote sensing of the liquid level in the cell. VLE data measurements for three binary systems, tetralin-quinoline, benzene--ethylbenzene and ethylbenzene--quinoline, have been completed. The temperature ranges of data measurements were 325 C to 370 C for the first system, 180 C to 300 C for the second system, and 225 C to 380 C for the third system. The smoothed data were found to be fairly well behaved when subjected to thermodynamic consistency tests. SETARAM C-80 calorimeter was used for incremental enthalpy and heat capacity measurements for benzene--ethylbenzene binary liquid mixtures. Data were measured from 30 C to 285 C for liquid mixtures covering the entire composition range. An apparatus has been designed for simultaneous measurement of excess volume and incremental enthalpy of liquid mixtures at temperatures from 30 C to 300 C. The apparatus has been tested and is ready for data measurements. A flow apparatus for measurement of heat of mixing of liquid mixtures at high temperatures has also been designed, and is currently being tested and calibrated.

  16. Deflagration Behavior of PBX 9501 at Elevated Temperature and Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, J L; Koerner, J G

    2008-04-15

    We report the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 at pressures up to 300 MPa and temperatures of 150-180 C where the sample has been held at the test temperature for several hours before ignition. The purpose is to determine the effect on the deflagration behavior of material damage caused by prolonged exposure to high temperature. This conditioning is similar to that experienced by an explosive while it being heated to eventual explosion. The results are made more complicated by the presence of a significant thermal gradient along the sample during the temperature ramp and soak. Three major conclusions are: the presence of nitroplasticizer makes PBX 9501 more thermally sensitive than LX-04 with an inert Viton binder; the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 is more extreme and more inconsistent than that of LX-04; and something in PBX 9501 causes thermal damage to 'heal' as the deflagration proceeds, resulting in a decelerating deflagration front as it travels along the sample.

  17. Analysis of thermal expansivity of iron (Fe) metal at ultra high temperature and pressure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepika Kandpal; B R K Gupta

    2007-01-01

    In the present investigation we have explained the thermal and compression properties of HCP iron (Fe) at high pressure with variable temperature (isobars) and at high temperature with variable pressure (isotherm). The usual Tait equation of state is modified by incorporating the effect of thermal pressure. The calculated values of pressure for different isotherms and isochors and thermal expansivity () as a function of both temperature and pressure have been compared with those values obtained by Isaak et al and Wasserman et al.

  18. HINDERED DIFFUSION OF ASPHALTENES AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Guin; Ganesh Ramakrishnan

    1999-10-07

    During this time period, experiments were performed to study the diffusion controlled uptake of quinoline and a coal asphaltene into porous carbon catalyst pellets. Cyclohexane and toluene were used as solvents for quinoline and the coal asphaltene respectively. The experiments were performed at 27 C and 75 C, at a pressure of 250 psi (inert gas) for the quinoline/cyclohexane system. For the coal asphaltene/toluene system, experiments were performed at 27 C, also at a pressure of 250 psi. These experiments were performed in a 20 cm{sup 3} microautoclave, the use of which is advantageous since it is economical from both a chemical procurement and waste disposal standpoint due to the small quantities of solvents and catalysts used. A C++ program was written to simulate data using a mathematical model which incorporated both diffusional and adsorption mechanisms. The simulation results showed that the mathematical model satisfactorily fitted the adsorptive diffusion of quinoline and the coal asphaltene onto a porous activated carbon. For the quinoline/cyclohexane system, the adsorption constant decreased with an increase in temperature. The adsorption constant for the coal asphaltene/toluene system at 27 C was found to be much higher than that of the quinoline/cyclohexane system at the same temperature. Apparently the coal asphaltenes have a much greater affinity for the surface of the carbon catalyst than is evidenced by the quinoline molecule.

  19. Single crystal elasticity of majoritic garnet at high pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamato, M. G.; Kurnosov, A.; Boffa Ballaran, T.; Frost, D. J.; Ziberna, L.; Giannini, M.; Trots, D. M.; Tkachev, S. N.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2013-12-01

    Seismological observations are fundamental for understanding the chemistry and structure of the Earth's interior, providing a tangible method for tracing the chemical anomalies caused by the subduction of oceanic lithosphere. The mineral garnet is a dominant component of subducted mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB) in the upper mantle and transition zone and as such can influence its physical-chemical properties. Among garnet minerals, the high pressure structured majoritic garnet, is stable throughout the entire transition zone, being volumetrically the most abundant mineral phase in this region. In order to constrain the seismic appearance and buoyancy of subducting slabs into the Earth's transition zone, the knowledge of the elastic properties and density of majoritic garnet at high pressures and temperatures is of crucial importance. Here, we report for the first time the P-V-T equation of state and Vs and Vp sound velocities of single crystals of majoritic garnet (Mg3.24Al1.53Si3.23O12) simultaneously determined by means of Brillouin spectroscopy and X ray diffraction, up to 30 GPa and 880 K. Measurements were performed on single-crystals synthesized in a multianvil apparatus at 17 GPa and 1900 °C and loaded in a diamond anvil cell with Ne as a pressure transmitting medium. A single crystal of Sm:YAG, whose fluorescence has been calibrated against an absolute pressure determination, was used as a pressure calibrant. In addition, ruby chips were used to accurately derive the temperature inside the cell. A specially designed internal resistive heater was placed around the diamonds for achieving high temperatures. An accurate pressure scale is a major issue in the investigation of physical properties of mantle minerals at the depth and temperature required to understand the Earth's interior. In this study, simultaneous measurements of density and sound velocities at the same conditions, allowed accurate determinations of the absolute pressure. We combine our

  20. Research data supporting "Determining pressure-temperature phase diagrams of materials"

    OpenAIRE

    Baldock, Robert J.N.; Partay, Livia B.; Bartok, Albert P.; Payne, Michael C.; Csanyi, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-temperature phase diagrams of the Lennard-Jones system, aluminium and nickel titanium as reported in the paper "Determining pressure-temperature phase diagrams of materials", together with example nested sampling output for aluminium and nickel titanium calculations. This research data supports “Determining pressure-temperature phase diagrams of materials” which has been published in “Physical Review B”. Research data supporting “Determining pressure-temperature phase diagrams...

  1. Influence of high-pressure-low-temperature treatment on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Shen; G. Urrutia Benet; S. Brul; D. Knorr

    2005-01-01

    High pressure inactivation processes, especially at subzero temperatures, were performed on Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells at various pressure, temperature and time combinations. Whilst atmospheric pressure, lowering the temperature for various periods to as low as 45 -C was found to have minor

  2. Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) Gauging of an Isothermal Cryogenic Propellant Tank Pressurized with Gaseous Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging of a liquid oxygen/liquid nitrogen tank pressurized with gaseous helium that was supplied by a high-pressure cryogenic tank simulating a cold helium supply bottle on a spacecraft. The fluid inside the test tank was kept isothermal by frequent operation of a liquid circulation pump and spray system, and the propellant tank was suspended from load cells to obtain a high-accuracy reference standard for the gauging measurements. Liquid quantity gauging errors of less than 2 percent of the tank volume were obtained when quasi-steady-state conditions existed in the propellant and helium supply tanks. Accurate gauging required careful attention to, and corrections for, second-order effects of helium solubility in the liquid propellant plus differences in the propellant/helium composition and temperature in the various plumbing lines attached to the tanks. On the basis of results from a helium solubility test, a model was developed to predict the amount of helium dissolved in the liquid as a function of cumulative pump operation time. Use of this model allowed correction of the basic PVT gauging calculations and attainment of the reported gauging accuracy. This helium solubility model is system specific, but it may be adaptable to other hardware systems.

  3. A simple microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter for operation at high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher; Jundt, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter that is simple to assemble, operates at elevated temperature and pressure, and can be operated with a lock-in amplifier. The sensor has a flow rate sensitivity greater than 2° of phase shift per 1 g/min of mass flow and is benchmarked with flow rates ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 g/min. The internal volume is 15 μl and uses off-the-shelf optical components to measure the tube motion. We demonstrate that fluid density can be calculated from the frequency of the resonating element with proper calibration.

  4. Combined temperature and density series for fluid-phase properties. I. Square-well spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J. Richard [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325-3906 (United States); Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-4200 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Cluster integrals are evaluated for the coefficients of the combined temperature- and density-expansion of pressure: Z = 1 + B{sub 2}(β) η + B{sub 3}(β) η{sup 2} + B{sub 4}(β) η{sup 3} + ⋯, where Z is the compressibility factor, η is the packing fraction, and the B{sub i}(β) coefficients are expanded as a power series in reciprocal temperature, β, about β = 0. The methodology is demonstrated for square-well spheres with λ = [1.2-2.0], where λ is the well diameter relative to the hard core. For this model, the B{sub i} coefficients can be expressed in closed form as a function of β, and we develop appropriate expressions for i = 2-6; these expressions facilitate derivation of the coefficients of the β series. Expanding the B{sub i} coefficients in β provides a correspondence between the power series in density (typically called the virial series) and the power series in β (typically called thermodynamic perturbation theory, TPT). The coefficients of the β series result in expressions for the Helmholtz energy that can be compared to recent computations of TPT coefficients to fourth order in β. These comparisons show good agreement at first order in β, suggesting that the virial series converges for this term. Discrepancies for higher-order terms suggest that convergence of the density series depends on the order in β. With selection of an appropriate approximant, the treatment of Helmholtz energy that is second order in β appears to be stable and convergent at least to the critical density, but higher-order coefficients are needed to determine how far this behavior extends into the liquid.

  5. Combined temperature and density series for fluid-phase properties. I. Square-well spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J. Richard; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2015-09-01

    Cluster integrals are evaluated for the coefficients of the combined temperature- and density-expansion of pressure: Z = 1 + B2(β) η + B3(β) η2 + B4(β) η3 + ⋯, where Z is the compressibility factor, η is the packing fraction, and the Bi(β) coefficients are expanded as a power series in reciprocal temperature, β, about β = 0. The methodology is demonstrated for square-well spheres with λ = [1.2-2.0], where λ is the well diameter relative to the hard core. For this model, the Bi coefficients can be expressed in closed form as a function of β, and we develop appropriate expressions for i = 2-6; these expressions facilitate derivation of the coefficients of the β series. Expanding the Bi coefficients in β provides a correspondence between the power series in density (typically called the virial series) and the power series in β (typically called thermodynamic perturbation theory, TPT). The coefficients of the β series result in expressions for the Helmholtz energy that can be compared to recent computations of TPT coefficients to fourth order in β. These comparisons show good agreement at first order in β, suggesting that the virial series converges for this term. Discrepancies for higher-order terms suggest that convergence of the density series depends on the order in β. With selection of an appropriate approximant, the treatment of Helmholtz energy that is second order in β appears to be stable and convergent at least to the critical density, but higher-order coefficients are needed to determine how far this behavior extends into the liquid.

  6. Laboratory measurement of longitudinal wave velocity of artificial gas hydrate under different temperatures and pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The longitudinal wave velocity and attenuation measurements of artificial gas hy- drate samples at a low temperature are reported. And the temperature and pressure dependence of longitudinal wave velocity is also investigated. In order to under- stand the acoustic properties of gas hydrate, the pure ice, the pure tetrahydrofuran (THF), the pure gas hydrate samples and sand sediment containing gas hydrate are measured at a low temperature between 0℃ and –15℃. For the pure ice, the pure THF and the pure gas hydrate samples, whose density is 898 kg/m3, 895 kg/m3 and 475 kg/m3, the velocity of longitudinal wave is respectively 3574 m/s, 3428 m/s and 2439 m/s. For synthesized and compacted samples, the velocity of synthesized samples is lower than that of compacted samples. The velocities increase when the densities of the samples increase, while the attenuation decreases. Under the con- dition of low temperature, the results show that the velocity is slightly affected by the temperature. The results also show that wave velocities increase with the in- crease of piston pressures. For example, the velocity of one sample increases from 3049 up to 3337 m/s and the other increases from 2315 up to 2995 m/s. But wave velocity decreases from 3800 to 3546 m/s when the temperature increases from –15℃ to 5℃ and changes significantly close to the melting point. Formation con- ditions of the two samples are the same but with different conversion ratios of wa- ter. The results of the experiment are important for exploration of the gas hydrate resources and development of acoustic techniques.

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma System for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Matthew; Staack, David

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in using plasmas for additive manufacturing, however these methods use high temperature plasmas to melt the material. We have developed a novel technique of additive manufacturing using a low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet. The jet is attached to the head of a 3D printer to allow for precise control of the plasma's location. Various methods are employed to deposit the material, including using a vaporized precursor or depositing a liquid precursor directly onto the substrate or into the plasma via a nebulizer. Various materials can be deposited including metals (copper using copper (II) acetylacetonate), polymers (PMMA using the liquid monomer), and various hydrocarbon compounds (using alcohols or a 100% methane DBD jet). The rastering pattern for the 3D printer was modified for plasma deposition, since it was originally designed for thermoplastic extrusion. The design constraints for fill pattern selection for the plasma printer are influenced by substrate heating, deposition area, and precursor consumption. Depositions onto pressure and/or temperature sensitive substrates can be easily achieved. Deposition rates range up to 0.08 cm3/hr using tris(2-methoxyethoxy)(vinyl)silane, however optimization can still be done on the system to improve the deposition rate. For example higher concentration of precursor can be combined with faster motion and higher discharge powers to increase the deposition rate without overheating the substrate.

  8. Synthesis of MgB2 at Low Temperature and Autogenous Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. R. Mackinnon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available High quality, micron-sized interpenetrating grains of MgB2, with high density, are produced at low temperatures (~420 °C < T < ~500 °C under autogenous pressure by pre-mixing Mg powder and NaBH4 and heating in an Inconel 601 alloy reactor for 5–15 h. Optimum production of MgB2, with yields greater than 75%, occurs for autogenous pressure in the range 1.0 MPa to 2.0 MPa, with the reactor at ~500 °C. Autogenous pressure is induced by the decomposition of NaBH4 in the presence of Mg and/or other Mg-based compounds. The morphology, transition temperature and magnetic properties of MgB2 are dependent on the heating regime. Significant improvement in physical properties accrues when the reactor temperature is held at 250 °C for >20 min prior to a hold at 500 °C.

  9. REFERENCE ON THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES: DENSITY AND VISCOSITY OF WATER FOR ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Yusibani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A reference on thermophysical properties, density and viscosity, for water at atmospheric pressure has been developed in MS Excel (as a macros. Patterson’s density equations and Kestin’s viscosity equations have been chosen as a basic equation in the VBA programming as a user-defined function. These results have been compared with REFPROF as a wellknow standart reference

  10. Human respiration at rest in rapid compression and at high pressures and gas densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, R.; Lambertsen, C. J.; Strauss, R.; Clark, J. M.; Puglia, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    The ventilation (V), end-tidal PCO2 (PACO2), and CO2 elimination rate were determined in men at rest breathing CO2-free gas over the pressure range 1-50 ATA and the gas density range 0.4-25 g/l, during slow and rapid compressions, at stable elevated ambient pressures and during slow decompressions. Progressive increase in pulmonary gas flow resistance due to elevation of ambient pressure and inspired gas density to the He-O2 equivalent of 5000 feet of seawater was found to produce a complex pattern of change in PACO2. It was found that as both ambient pressure and pulmonary gas flow resistance were progressively raised, PACO2 at first increased, went through a maximum, and then declined towards values near the 1 ATA level. It is concluded that this pattern of PACO2 change results from the interaction on ventilation of the increase in pulmonary resistance due to the elevation of gas density with the increase in respiratory drive postulated as due to generalized central nervous system excitation associated with exposure to high hydrostatic pressure. It is suggested that a similar interaction exists between increased gas flow resistance and the increase in respiratory drive related to nitrogen partial pressure and the resulting narcosis.

  11. Measurement of solar wind electron density and temperature in the shocked region of Venus and the density and temperature of photoelectrons within the ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, William C.; Jones, Douglas E.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Knadler, Charles E.

    2016-08-01

    Presented herein are measurements of the solar wind electron number density and temperature near and within the bow shock of Venus. The measurements were made by the Pioneer Venus mission Orbiter Retarding Potential Analyzer operating in its suprathermal electron mode. The measurements are essentially point measurements. The spacecraft travels approximately 0.8 km during the 0.1 s time interval required to record a single I-V curve. The dual measurement of a density and temperature is obtained from one sweep by least squares fitting a mathematical Maxwellian expression to the I-V curve. The distance between successive measurements is approximately 100 km. In many orbits, when the spacecraft is crossing or traveling within the bow shock, the derived densities and temperatures (high density, high temperature (HDHT)) are large, densities of the order of 100 cm-3 and temperatures of the order of several hundred eV. We interpret these HDHT measurements as measurements in regions where the large, directed kinetic energy of the solar wind ions is being degraded into randomized, more thermal-like energy distributions of the electrons and ions through wave-particle interactions. The HDHT values define the electron energy distribution in the limited energy interval 0 to 50 eV. We assume that the underlying electron flux distributions are flat topped like those measured in the Earth's bow shock. We also report densities and temperatures of EUV produced photoelectron energy distributions measured within the ionosphere.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation for baryon-quark phase transition at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Akimura, Y; Yoshinaga, N; Chiba, S; Akimura, Yuka; Maruyama, Toshiki; Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Chiba, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    We study the baryon-quark phase transition in a molecular dynamics (MD) of quark degrees of freedom at finite temperature and density. The baryon state at low density and temperature, and the deconfined quark state at high density and temperature are reproduced. We investigate the equations of state of matters with different $u$-$d$-$s$ compositions. Then we draw phase diagrams in the temperature-density plane by this simulation. It is found that the baryon-quark transition is sensitive to the quark width.

  13. Brittle Creep of Tournemire Shale: Orientation, Temperature and Pressure Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhi; Bonnelye, Audrey; Dick, Pierre; David, Christian; Chen, Mian; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. Here, we conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France. Conventional tri-axial experiments were carried under two different temperatures (26˚ C, 75˚ C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1 along, perpendicular and 45˚ to bedding). Following the methodology developed by Heap et al. [2008], differential stress was first increased to ˜ 60% of the short term peak strength (10-7/s, Bonnelye et al. 2016), and then in steps of 5 to 10 MPa every 24 hours until brittle failure was achieved. In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1˜15 minutes, enabling us to monitor the evolution of elastic wave speed anisotropy. Temporal evolution of anisotropy was illustrated by inverting acoustic velocities to Thomsen parameters. Finally, samples were investigated post-mortem using scanning electron microscopy. Our results seem to contradict our traditional understanding of loading rate dependent brittle failure. Indeed, the brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed ˜50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. At higher temperatures, the creep failure strength of our samples was slightly reduced and deformation was characterized with faster 'steady-state' creep axial strain rates at each steps, and larger final axial strain

  14. Herschel/HIFI spectral line survey of the Orion Bar. Temperature and density differentiation near the PDR surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Z.; Choi, Y.; Ossenkopf-Okada, V.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Bergin, E. A.; Gerin, M.; Joblin, C.; Röllig, M.; Simon, R.; Stutzki, J.

    2017-02-01

    /or densities outside this range include the H2CO transitions tracing a very high temperature (315 K) and density (1.4 × 106 cm-3) component and SO corresponding to the lowest temperature (56 K) measured as a part of this line survey. Conclusions: The observed lines/species reveal a range of physical conditions (gas density/temperature) involving structures at high density/high pressure, making the traditional clump/interclump picture of the Orion Bar obsolete.

  15. Lattice dynamics of CaSiO3 at high temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holiday, A.; Sun, T.; Zhang, D.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Cubic CaSiO3-perovskite is a minor but important phase of the Earth's lower mantle. Its thermodynamics and elastic properties have been investigated by multiple techniques but its behavior at lower mantle conditions is still elusive. It is a mechanically unstable phase at low temperatures but it is stabilized at lower mantle temperatures. We have investigated its vibrational properties at high pressures and temperatures of the lower mantle. We have projected ionic velocities from ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories onto vibrational normal modes and computed the mode-mode correlation functions from which we extract phonon frequencies and life times at finite temperatures. These correlations clearly indicate that normal modes with imaginary frequencies at 0 K are stabilized with increasing temperature. To overcome the finite size effect inherent in molecular dynamics simulations, a renormalized second-order force constant matrix in real space is constructed from the phonon frequencies at finite temperature and the phonon polarization vectors. Phonon dispersions and vibrational density of states are then determined by Fourier interpolation using the renormalized force constant matrix. These temperature dependent dispersions allow us to investigate thermodynamics and thermal elastic properties at lower mantle conditions.

  16. Lattice dynamics of cubic CaSiO3 perovskite at high temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2013-03-01

    Cubic CaSiO3-perovskite is a minor but important phase of the Earth's lower mantle. It is a mechanically unstable phase at low temperatures but it is stabilized at lower mantle temperatures. We have investigated its vibrational properties at high pressures and temperatures of the lower mantle. We have projected ionic velocities from ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories onto vibrational normal modes and computed the mode-mode correlation function from which we extract phonon frequencies and life times at finite temperatures. These correlations clearly indicate that normal modes with imaginary frequencies at 0 K are stabilized with increasing temperature. To overcome the finite size effect inherent in molecular dynamics simulations, a renormalized second-order force constant matrix in real space is constructed from the phonon frequencies at finite temperature and the phonon polarization vectors. Phonon dispersions and vibrational density of states are then determined by Fourier interpolation using the renormalized force matrix. These temperature dependent dispersions allow us to investigate thermodynamics and thermal elastic properties at lower mantle conditions. Supported by NSF Grants EAR-1047626 and EAR-0810272.

  17. NDT tools for life assessment of high temperature pressure components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Site, C.; De Petris, C.; Mennuti, C. [ISPESL, Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Creep damage of pressure equipment involves a great variety of high temperature components ranging from superheaters, reheaters, furnaces, reactors, etc. Consequence of failures of these components are of high economic and safety concern. Moreover, the probability of failure of high temperature components is now increasing due to frequent cyclic of power plants imposed by a deregulated market and the search for increasing temperatures in ultrasupercritical plants. In this scenario, a complete NDT campaign is necessary both during the design stage and during the in-service stage. The choice of the specific NDT technique for each component type is of great importance. In this work an overview of the existing NDT techniques for creep designed and operated components are presented. Together with metallographic replica, which is still considered the fundamental tool for creep damage assessment in the majority of materials, other NDT techniques which are able to detect creep cavity or cracks are presented and compared: ultrasonic techniques (tofd and phased-arrays), acoustic emission, holographic interferometry. In the second part of this paper the ability of some NDT tools to support residual life assessments are discussed. Among the most interesting tools are oxide scale ultrasonic measurement, micro-hardness testing, small-punch testing and on-stream deformation measurement. This tools are not strictly devoted to detecting creep defects (such as microcavities or microcracks) rather they give useful information related to creep damage, such as component deformation, material degradation and maximum service temperature. Moreover, a global procedure developed by ISPESL for inspection planning and interpretation of results of NDT examination according to a risk-based approach is presented. Eventually the new features of EN 13445-5 ''Creep Amendments'' concerning inspection and testing on creep designed components are briefly illustrated. (orig.)

  18. Phase diagram of Mo at high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M

    2008-10-01

    We report values of the Poisson Ratios for shock compressed Mo, calculated from the sound speed measurements, which provide evidence that the 210 GPa ({approx}4100K) transition cannot be a bcc-hcp transition, as originally proposed. Instead, we find the transition is from the bcc to a noncrystalline phase. For pressures above 210 GPa, the Poisson Ratio increases steadily with increasing temperature, approaching the liquid value of 0.5 at 390 GPa({approx}10,000K), suggesting the presence of a noncrystalline solid-liquid mixture. Free energy model calculations were used to show that the low melting slope of Mo, and the phase diagram, can be explained by the presence of local liquid structures. A new phase diagram is proposed for Mo that is constrained by the experimental evidence.

  19. [Genesis study of omphacite at high pressure and high temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ben-Fu; Yi, Li; Wang, Duo-Jun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Xue-Wu; Liu, Lei; Cui, Yue-Ju

    2013-11-01

    The melting and recrystallizing experiments of alkali basalt powder and mixture of pure oxides mixed as stoichiometry were performed at 3 GPa and 1 200 degrees C. Electronic microprobe analysis and Raman spectra showed that the recrystallized products were omphacites, the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the Raman peak was narrow and its shape was sharp, which is attributed to the stable Si-O tetrahedral structure and the high degree of order in omphacite. Based on the results of previous studies, the influencing factors of omphacite genesis and its primary magma were discussed. The results showed that the formation of omphacite could be affected by many factors, such as the composition of parent rocks, the concentration of fluid in the system and the conditions of pressure and temperature. This result could support some experimental evidences on the genesis studies of omphacite and eclogite.

  20. Systems and methods for pressure and temperature measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challener, William Albert; Airey, Li

    2016-12-06

    A measurement system in one embodiment includes an acquisition module and a determination module. The acquisition module is configured to acquire resonant frequency information corresponding to a sensor disposed in a remote location from the acquisition module. The resonant frequency information includes first resonant frequency information for a first resonant frequency of the sensor corresponding to environmental conditions of the remote location, and also includes second resonant frequency information for a different, second resonant frequency of the sensor corresponding to the environmental conditions of the remote location. The determination module is configured to use the first resonant frequency information and the second resonant frequency information to determine the temperature and the pressure at the remote location.

  1. Constant pressure and temperature discrete-time Langevin molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Farago, Oded

    2014-11-21

    We present a new and improved method for simultaneous control of temperature and pressure in molecular dynamics simulations with periodic boundary conditions. The thermostat-barostat equations are built on our previously developed stochastic thermostat, which has been shown to provide correct statistical configurational sampling for any time step that yields stable trajectories. Here, we extend the method and develop a set of discrete-time equations of motion for both particle dynamics and system volume in order to seek pressure control that is insensitive to the choice of the numerical time step. The resulting method is simple, practical, and efficient. The method is demonstrated through direct numerical simulations of two characteristic model systems-a one-dimensional particle chain for which exact statistical results can be obtained and used as benchmarks, and a three-dimensional system of Lennard-Jones interacting particles simulated in both solid and liquid phases. The results, which are compared against the method of Kolb and Dünweg [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 4453 (1999)], show that the new method behaves according to the objective, namely that acquired statistical averages and fluctuations of configurational measures are accurate and robust against the chosen time step applied to the simulation.

  2. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyte-González, R.; Palomares, J. M.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, ne, and temperatures, Te, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on ne and Te along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher ne. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, Te is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field ne decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa ne shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. Te is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas.

  3. Full-density, net-shape powder consolidation using dynamic magnetic pulse pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelluri, Bhanu; Barber, John P.

    1999-07-01

    The full-density consolidation of powders into net-shape parts yields high green strength, low shrinkage, short sinter times, superior mechanical properties, and low manufacturing costs. The conventional lowcost, single-press, single-sinter process typically densifies powders at less than 65 percent green density. This article describes the Magnepress™ process, a powder-processing technique wherein pulsed magnetic pressures consolidate powders into full-density parts without admixed lubricants or binders. The Magnepress technique is especially suitable for producing net-shape products with radial symmetry (e.g., rods, cylindrical parts with internal features, tubular shapes, and high aspect-ratio specimens).

  4. Charged impurity scattering limited low temperature resistivity of low density silicon inversion layers

    OpenAIRE

    Sarma, S. Das; Hwang, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    We calculate within the Boltzmann equation approach the charged impurity scattering limited low temperature electronic resistivity of low density $n$-type inversion layers in Si MOSFET structures. We find a rather sharp quantum to classical crossover in the transport behavior in the $0 - 5$K temperature range, with the low density, low temperature mobility showing a strikingly strong non-monotonic temperature dependence, which may qualitatively explain the recently observed anomalously strong...

  5. REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL TEMPERATURE ANALYSIS OF CANDIDATE VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans D. Gougar; Cliff B. Davis; George Hayner; Kevan Weaver

    2006-10-01

    Analyses were performed to determine maximum temperatures in the reactor pressure vessel for two potential Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs during normal operation and during a depressurized conduction cooldown accident. The purpose of the analyses was to aid in the determination of appropriate reactor vessel materials for the VHTR. The designs evaluated utilized both prismatic and pebble-bed cores that generated 600 MW of thermal power. Calculations were performed for fluid outlet temperatures of 900 and 950 °C, corresponding to the expected range for the VHTR. The analyses were performed using the RELAP5-3D and PEBBED-THERMIX computer codes. Results of the calculations were compared with preliminary temperature limits derived from the ASME pressure vessel code. Because PEBBED-THERMIX has not been extensively validated, confirmatory calculations were also performed with RELAP5-3D for the pebble-bed design. During normal operation, the predicted axial profiles in reactor vessel temperature were similar with both codes and the predicted maximum values were within 2 °C. The trends of the calculated vessel temperatures were similar during the depressurized conduction cooldown accident. The maximum value predicted with RELAP5-3D during the depressurized conduction cooldown accident was about 40 °C higher than that predicted with PEBBED. This agreement is considered reasonable based on the expected uncertainty in either calculation. The differences between the PEBBED and RELAP5-3D calculations were not large enough to affect conclusions concerning comparisons between calculated and allowed maximum temperatures during normal operation and the depressurized conduction cooldown accident.

  6. Shock wave reflection induced detonation (SWRID) under high pressure and temperature condition in closed cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Qi, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, P.; He, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-09-01

    Super-knock is one of the major obstacles for improving power density in advanced internal combustion engines (ICE). This work studied the mechanism of super-knock initiation using a rapid compression machine that simulated conditions relevant to ICEs and provided excellent optical accessibility. Based on the high-speed images and pressure traces of the stoichiometric iso-octane/oxygen/nitrogen combustion under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, it was observed that detonation was first initiated in the near-wall region as a result of shock wave reflection. Before detonation was initiated, the speed of the combustion wave front was less than that of the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed (around 1840 m/s). In the immediate vicinity of the initiation, the detonation speed was much higher than that of the C-J detonation.

  7. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G. P.; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-01

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ˜20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  8. The Effects of Temperature, Pressure, and Humidity Variations on 100 Meter Sprint Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Mureika, J R

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that ``equivalent'' sprint race times run with different accompanying wind speeds or at different altitudes are anything but equivalent races. The drag force acting on a sprinter is a function of air density and the relative wind speed, where the former has traditionally been calculated using the race venue's elevation above sea level. However, air density variation is dependent on more than just altitude. This work will quantify how changes in air temperature, barometric pressure, and humidity levels influence 100 m sprint performances. When these effects are considered in combination, the corrections to performances can be very large. The results suggest that a non-negligible difference in race times can be expected for ``equivalent'' performances run with the same wind speed at the same venue or physical altitude, but under different atmospheric conditions.

  9. Baroclinic pressure gradient difference schemes of subtracting the local averaged density stratification in sigma coordinates models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shouxian; ZHANG Wenjing

    2008-01-01

    Much has been written of the error in computing the baroclinic pressure gradient (BPG) with sigma coordinates in ocean or atmos- pheric numerical models. The usual way to reduce the error is to subtract area-averaged density stratification of the whole computa- tion region. But if there is great difference between the area-averaged and the local averaged density stratification, the error will be obvious. An example is given to show that the error from this method may be larger than that from no correction sometimes. The definition of local area is put forward. Then, four improved BPG difference schemes of subtracting the local averaged density strat- ification are designed to reduce the error. Two of them are for diagnostic calculation (density field is fixed), and the others are for prognostic calculation (density field is not fixed). The results show that the errors from these schemes all significantly decrease.

  10. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I.; Mazelle, C.

    2016-03-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities compared with the pure gravity case (i.e. the Chamberlain profiles), in particular at noon and midnight. We finally show the existence of an exopause that appears naturally as the external limit for bounded particles, above which all particles are escaping.

  11. Electronic ground state OH(X) radical in a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Che A.; Clark, Shane M.; Wu, Wei; Wang, Chuji

    2016-10-01

    The wide applicability of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in biomedicine stems from the presence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species generated in these plasma jets. Knowing the absolute concentration of these reactive species is of utmost importance as it is critical, along with the particle flux obtained from the plasma feed gas flow rate to ensure that the correct dosage is applied during applications. In this study, we investigate and report the ground state OH(X) number density acquired using cavity ringdown spectroscopy, along the propagation axis (z-axis) of a cold atmospheric pressure helium plasma plume. The jet was generated by a repetitively pulsed mono-polar square wave of duration 1 μs running at a frequency of 9.9 kHz. The voltage supplied was 6.5 kV with the helium flow rate fixed at 3.6 standard liters per minute. The rotational and vibrational temperatures are simulated from the second positive system of nitrogen, N 2(C3πu-B3πg) , with the rotational temperature being spatially constant at 300 K along the propagation axis of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet while the vibrational temperature is 3620 K at the beginning of the plume and is observed to decrease downstream. The OH(A) emission intensity obtained via optical emission spectroscopy was observed to decrease downstream of the plasma jet. The OH(X) number density along the propagation axis was initially 2.2 × 1013 molecules cm-3 before increasing to a peak value of 2.4 × 1013 molecules cm-3, from which the number density was observed to decrease to 2.2 × 1013 molecules cm-3 downstream of the plasma jet. The total OH(A, X) in the plasma jet remained relatively constant along the propagation axis of the plasma jet before falling off at the tip of the jet. The increase in vibrational temperature downstream and the simultaneous measurements of both the excited state OH(A) and the ground state OH(X) reported in this study provide insights into the formation and consumption of this

  12. Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel Riza

    2010-09-01

    This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

  13. Nucleons and isobars at finite density ({rho}) and temperature (T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenni, R. [Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Genova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Genoa (Italy); Dey, J. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Maulana Azad Coll., Calcutta (India); Dey, M. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Calcutta 700 073 (India)

    2001-09-01

    The importance of studying matter at high {rho} increases as more astrophysical data becomes available from recently launched spacecrafts. The importance of high-T studies derives from heavy-ion data. In this paper we set up a formalism to study the nucleons and isobars with long- and short-range potentials non-pertubatively, bosonizing and expanding semi-classically the Feyman integrals up to one loop. We address the low-density, finite-T problem first, the case relevant to heavy-ion collisions, hoping to address the high-density case later. Interactions change the nucleon and isobar numbers at different {rho} and T non-trivially. (orig.)

  14. Nucleons and Isobars at finite density ($\\rho$) and temperature (T)

    CERN Document Server

    Cenni, R; Dey, M; Cenni, Rinaldo; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2001-01-01

    The importance of studying matter at high $\\rho$ increases as more astrophysical data becomes available from recently launched spacecrafts. The importance of high T studies derives from heavy ion data. In this paper we set up a formalism to study the nucleons and isobars with long and short range potentials non-pertubatively, bosonizing and expanding semi-classically the Feyman integrals up to one loop. We address the low density, finite T problem=A0 first, the case relevant to heavy ion collisions, hoping to adresss the high density case later. Interactions change the nucleon and isobar numbers at different $\\rho$ and T non-trivially.

  15. Metal azides under pressure: An emerging class of high energy density materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Vaitheeswaran; K Ramesh Babu

    2012-11-01

    Metal azides are well-known for their explosive properties such as detonation or deflagration. As chemically pure sources of nitrogen, alkali metal azides under high pressure have the ability to form polymeric nitrogen, an ultimate green high energy density material with energy density three times greater than that of known high energetic materials. With this motive, in this present work, we try to address the high-pressure behaviour of LiN3 and KN3 by means of density functional calculations. All the calculations are performed with the inclusion of van derWaals interactions at semi empirical level, as these materials are typical molecular solids. We found that both LiN3 and KN3 are structurally stable up to the studied pressure range of 60 GPa and 16 GPa, respectively. At ambient conditions both the materials are insulators with a gap of 3.48 eV (LiN3) and 4.08 eV (KN3) and as pressure increases the band gap decreases and show semiconducting nature at high pressures.We also found that the compressibility of both the crystals is anisotropic which is in good agreement with experiment. Our theoretical study proved that the materials under study may have the ability to form polymeric nitrogen because of the decrease in interazide ion distance and possible overlapping of N atomic orbitals.

  16. Determination of dislocation density in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes by x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Isaenkova, Perlovich; Cheong, Y. M.; Kim, S. S.; Yim, K. S.; Kwon, Sang Chul

    2000-11-01

    For X-ray determination of the dislocation density in CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes, a program was developed, using the Fourier analysis of X-ray line profiles and calculation of dislocation density by values of the coherent block size and the lattice distortion. The coincidence of obtained values of c- and a-dislocations with those, determined by the X-ray method for the same tube in AECL, was assumed to be the main criterion of validity of the developed program. The final variant of the program allowed to attain a rather close coincidence of calculated dislocation densities with results of AECL. The dislocation density was determined in all the zirconium grains with different orientations based on the texture of the stree-relieved CANDU tube. The complete distribution of c-dislocation density in -Zr grains depecding on their crystallographic orientations was constructed. The distribution of a-dislocation density within the texture maximum at L-direction, containing prismatic axes of all grains, was constructed as well. The analysis of obtained distributions testifies that -Zr grains of the stree-relieved CANDU tube significantly differ in their dislocation densities. Plotted diagrams of correlation between the dislocation density and the pole density allow to estimate the actual connection between texture and dislocation distribution in the studied tube. The distributions of volume fractions of all the zirconium grains depending on their dislocation density were calculated both for c- and a-dislocations. The distributions characterizes quantitatively the inhomogeneity of substructure conditions in the stress-relieved CANDU tube. the optimal procedure for determination of Nb content in {beta}-phases of CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes was also established.

  17. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of uranium at high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, R Q; Yang, L H; Moriarty, J A

    2008-01-22

    Constant-volume quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations of uranium (U) have been carried out over a range of pressures and temperatures that span the experimentally observed solid orthorhombic {alpha}-U, body-centered cubic (bcc), and liquid phases, using an ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential method within the generalized gradient approximation of density functional theory. A robust U pseudopotential has been constructed for these simulations that treats the 14 valence and outer-core electrons per atom necessary to calculate accurate structural and thermodynamic properties up to 100 GPa. Its validity has been checked by comparing low-temperature results with experimental data and all-electron full-potential linear-muffin-tin-orbital calculations of several different uranium solid structures. Calculated QMD energies and pressures for the equation of state of uranium in the solid and liquid phases are given, along with results for the Grueneisen parameter and the specific heat. We also present results for the radial distribution function, bond-angle distribution function, electronic density of states, and liquid diffusion coefficient, as well as evidence for short-range order in the liquid.

  18. Communication: Effect of density on the physical aging of pressure-densified polymethylmethacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalini, R.; Roland, C. M.

    2017-09-01

    The rate of physical aging of glassy polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), followed from the change in the secondary relaxation with aging, is found to be independent of the density, the latter controlled by the pressure during glass formation. Thus, the aging behavior of the secondary relaxation is the same whether the glass is more compacted or less dense than the corresponding equilibrium liquid. This equivalence in aging of glasses formed under different pressures indicates that local packing is the dominant variable governing the glassy dynamics. The fact that pressure densification yields different glass structures is at odds with a model for non-associated materials having dynamic properties exhibited by PMMA, such as density scaling of the relaxation time and isochronal superposition of the relaxation dispersion.

  19. Topological Pressure and Coding Sequence Density Estimation in the Human Genome

    CERN Document Server

    Koslicki, David

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by concepts from ergodic theory, we give new insight into coding sequence (CDS) density estimation for the human genome. Our approach is based on the introduction and study of topological pressure: a numerical quantity assigned to any finite sequence based on an appropriate notion of `weighted information content'. For human DNA sequences, each codon is assigned a suitable weight, and using a window size of approximately 60,000bp, we obtain a very strong positive correlation between CDS density and topological pressure. The weights are selected by an optimization procedure, and can be interpreted as quantitative data on the relative importance of different codons for the density estimation of coding sequences. This gives new insight into codon usage bias which is an important subject where long standing questions remain open. Inspired again by ergodic theory, we use the weightings on the codons to define a probability measure on finite sequences. We demonstrate that this measure is effective in disti...

  20. Viscosity and density of methanol/water mixtures at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J. G.; Kurata, F.; Swift, G. W.

    1968-01-01

    Viscosity and density are measured at low temperatures for three methanol/water mixtures. Viscosity is determined by a modified falling cylinder method or a calibrated viscometer. Density is determined by the volume of each mixture contained in a calibrated glass cell placed in a constant-temperature bath.

  1. Wireless contactless pressure measurement of an LC passive pressure sensor with a novel antenna for high-temperature applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晨; 谭秋林; 薛晨阳; 张文栋; 李运芝; 熊继军

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel antenna is proposed for high-temperature testing, which can make the high-temperature pressure characteristics of a wireless passive ceramic pressure sensor demonstrated at up to a temperature of 600 ◦C. The design parameters of the antenna are similar to those of the sensor, which will increase the coupling strength between the sensor and testing antenna. The antenna is fabricated in thick film integrated technology, and the properties of the alumina ceramic and silver ensure the feasibility of the antenna in high-temperature environments. The sensor, coupled with the ceramic antenna, is investigated using a high-temperature pressure testing platform. The experimental measurement results show that the pressure signal in a harsh environment can be detected by the frequency diversity of the sensor.

  2. Particle Densities of the Atmospheric-Pressure Argon Plasmas Generated by the Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Li, Li; Wang, Yunuan; Xiu, Xianwu; Wang, Chao; Song, Yuzhi

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure argon plasmas have received increasing attention due to their high potential in many industrial and biomedical applications. In this paper, a 1-D fluid model is used for studying the particle density characteristics of the argon plasmas generated by the pulsed dielectric barrier discharges. The temporal evolutions of the axial particle density distributions are illustrated, and the influences of changing the main discharge conditions on the averaged particle densities are researched by independently varying the various discharge conditions. The calculation results show that the electron density and the ion density reach two peaks near the momentary cathodes during the rising and the falling edges of the pulsed voltage. Compared with the charged particle densities, the densities of the resonance state atom Arr and the metastable state atom Arm have more uniform axial distributions, reach higher maximums and decay more slowly. During the platform of the pulsed voltage and the time interval between the pulses, the densities of the excited state atom Ar* are far lower than those of the Arr or the Arm. The averaged particle densities of the different considered particles increase with the increases of the amplitude and the frequency of the pulsed voltage. Narrowing the discharge gap and increasing the relative dielectric constant of the dielectric also contribute to the increase of the averaged particle densities. The effects of reducing the discharge gap distance on the neutral particle densities are more significant than the influences on the charged particle densities. supported by Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (No. ZR2015AQ008), and Project of Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program of China (No. J15LJ04)

  3. Measurement of the Density of Base Fluids at Pressures 0.422 to 2.20 Gpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. O.; Bergstroem, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of pressure on the density of six base fluids is experimentally studied for a range of pressures from 0.422 to 2.20 GPa. An important parameter used to describe the results is the change in relative volume with change in pressure dv sub r/dp. For pressures less than the solidification pressure (p ps) a small change in pressure results in a large change in dv sub r/ps. For pressures greater than the solidification pressure (p ps) there is no change in dv sub r/dp with changing pressure. The solidification pressures of the base fluids varies considerably, as do the slopes that the experimental data assumes for p ps. A new formula is developed that describes the effect of pressure on density in terms of four constants. These constants vary for the different base fluids tested.

  4. Development of density-functional theory for a plasmon-assisted superconducting state: application to lithium under high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Ryosuke; Arita, Ryotaro

    2013-08-02

    We extend the density-functional theory for superconductors (SCDFT) to take account of the dynamical structure of the screened Coulomb interaction. We construct an exchange-correlation kernel in the SCDFT gap equation on the basis of the random-phase approximation, where electronic collective excitations such as plasmons are properly treated. Through an application to fcc lithium under high pressures, we demonstrate that our new kernel gives higher transition temperatures (T(c)) when the plasmon and phonon cooperatively mediate pairing and it improves the agreement between the calculated and experimentally observed T(c). The present formalism opens the door to nonempirical studies on unconventional electron mechanisms of superconductivity based on density-functional theory.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.120 - Fuel properties and fuel temperature and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and pressure. 1065.120 Section 1065.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... properties and fuel temperature and pressure. (a) Use fuels as specified in the standard-setting part, or as... engine manufacturer specifies fuel temperature and pressure tolerances and the location where they are to...

  6. Silicate melt structure at high temperatures and pressures: concepts and questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A great deal is now known about the structure of glass-forming silicate (and other oxide) liquids, from decades of research on quenched glasses of interest to the geosciences and technology. However, specific structural information and derived general concepts from such studies are only the starting point for thinking about melts at temperatures far above the glass transition, and for high pressures and compositions that do not result in quenchable glasses. This talk will attempt to briefly summarize what we know about temperature and pressure effects on melt structure, emphasizing questions yet to be clearly answered. As examples of the latter, we are yet to have a quantitative structural explanation of the all-important configurational entropy and enthalpy of even simple silicate compositions, suggesting that short-lived and possibly ill-defined defect structures account for much of the non-vibrational energy taken up on heating to liquidus temperatures. At least in the pressure range before major increases in silicon coordination (which probably includes the upper mantle source regions for most modern mafic magmas), known changes in cation coordination are not enough to account for known changes in density, either at high T/P or in quenched and decompressed glasses. And even the basic concepts of silicate melt structure, such as `network formers' and `network modifiers' are inadequate in a high pressure liquid comprised primarily of cations with 6, 7 or 8-fold coordination. Such kinds of questions pose important and intriguing challenges for structural thinking based on improved computational models and rapid advances in in-situ, high P/T structural measurements.

  7. High performance PEMFC stack with open-cathode at ambient pressure and temperature conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Rosa, D.T.; Pinto, D.G.; Silva, V.S. [SRE - Solucoes Racionais de Energia, S.A., Poligono Industrial do Alto do Ameal, Ramalhal (Portugal); Silva, R.A.; Rangel, C.M. [INETI, Unidade de Electroquimica de Materiais, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2007-12-15

    An open-air cathode proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was developed. This paper presents a study of the effect of several critical operating conditions on the performance of an 8-cell stack. The studied operating conditions such as cell temperature, air flow rate and hydrogen pressure and flow rate were varied in order to identify situations that could arise when the PEMFC stack is used in low-power portable PEMFC applications. The stack uses an air fan in the edge of the cathode manifolds, combining high stoichiometric oxidant supply and stack cooling purposes. In comparison with natural convection air-breathing stacks, the air dual-function approach brings higher stack performances, at the expense of having a lower use of the total stack power output. Although improving the electrochemical reactions kinetics and decreasing the polarization effects, the increase of the stack temperature lead to membrane excessive dehydration (loss of sorbed water), increasing the ohmic resistance of the stack (lower performance). The results show that the stack outputs a maximum power density of 310mW/cm{sup 2} at 790mA/cm{sup 2} when operating at ambient temperature, atmospheric air pressure, self-humidifying, air fan voltage at 5.0 V and 250 mbar hydrogen relative pressure. For the studied range of hydrogen relative pressure (150-750 mbar), it is found that the stack performance is practically not affected by this operation condition, although a slightly higher power output for 150 mbar was observed. On the other hand, it is found that the stack performance increases appreciably when operated with forced air convection instead of natural convection. Finally, the continuous fuel flow operation mode does not improve the stack performance in comparison with the hydrogen dead-end mode, in spite of being preferable to operate the stack with hydrogen flow rates above 0.20 l/min. (author)

  8. Effects of pressure and temperature on the yield strength of tantalum and rhenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Joseph Allan

    The effects of pressure and temperature on the yield strength of tantalum and the effects of pressure on the yield strength of rhenium were investigated using ruby fluorescence. A new Raman system with a motorized stage and near diffraction limit was built to map 2-dimensionally, the pressures inside of a diamond anvil cell. The 2-dimensional data is used to create contour maps and surface plots of the pressures and calculate the pressure gradients induced in the samples. Using the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, the final sample thickness, and the pressure gradients, the yield strength as a function of temperature and pressure are calculated.

  9. Stability of very-high pressure arc discharges against perturbations of the electron temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M. S. [Departamento de Fisica, Ciencias Exactas e Engenharia, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Municipio, Funchal 9000 (Portugal); Hechtfischer, U. [Philips Lighting, BU Automotive Lamps, Technology, Philipsstrasse 8, Aachen 52068 (Germany)

    2012-04-01

    We study the stability of the energy balance of the electron gas in very high-pressure plasmas against longitudinal perturbations, using a local dispersion analysis. After deriving a dispersion equation, we apply the model to a very high-pressure (100 bar) xenon plasma and find instability for electron temperatures, T{sub e}, in a window between 2400 K and 5500-7000 K x 10{sup 3} K, depending on the current density (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2}). The instability can be traced back to the Joule heating of the electron gas being a growing function of T{sub e}, which is due to a rising dependence of the electron-atom collision frequency on T{sub e}. We then analyze the T{sub e} range occurring in very high-pressure xenon lamps and conclude that only the near-anode region exhibits T{sub e} sufficiently low for this instability to occur. Indeed, previous experiments have revealed that such lamps develop, under certain conditions, voltage oscillations accompanied by electromagnetic interference, and this instability has been pinned down to the plasma-anode interaction. A relation between the mechanisms of the considered instability and multiple anodic attachments of high-pressure arcs is discussed.

  10. Cavitation erosion of silver plated coating at different temperatures and pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Shuji; Motoi, Yoshihiro [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fuku-shi, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Kikuta, Kengo; Tomaru, Hiroshi [IHI Corperation, TOYOSU IHI BUILDING, 1-1, Toyosu 3-chome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 1358710 (Japan)

    2014-04-11

    Cavitation often occurs in inducer pumps used for space rockets. Silver plated coating on the inducer liner faces the damage of cavitation. Therefore, it is important to study about the cavitation erosion resistance for silver plated coating at several operating conditions in the inducer pumps. In this study, the cavitation erosion tests were carried for silver plated coating in deionized water and ethanol at several liquid temperatures (273K–400K) and pressures (0.10MPa–0.48MPa). The mass loss rate is evaluated in terms of thermodynamic parameter Σ proposed by Brennen [9], suppression pressure p–p{sub v} (p{sub v}: saturated vapor pressure) and acoustic impedance ρc (ρ: density and c: sound speed). Cavitation bubble behaviors depending on the thermodynamic effect and the liquid type were observed by high speed video camera. The mass loss rate is formulated by thermodynamic parameter Σ, suppression pressure p–p{sub v} and acoustic impedance ρc.

  11. High temperature and pressure effects on the elastic properties of B2 intermetallics AgRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lili; Wu, Xiaozhi; Li, Weiguo; Wang, Rui; Liu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    The high temperature and pressure effects on the elastic properties of the AgRE (RE=Sc, Tm, Er, Dy, Tb) intermetallic compounds with B2 structure have been performed from first principle calculations. For the temperature range 0-1000 K, the second order elastic constants for all the AgRE intermetallic compounds follow a normal behavior: they decrease with increasing temperature. The pressure dependence of the second order elastic constants has been investigated on the basis of the third order elastic constants. Temperature and pressure dependent elastic anisotropic parameters A have been calculated based on the temperature and pressure dependent elastic constants.

  12. High-pressure density measurements for the binary system ethanol plus heptane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, G.; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Baylaucq, A.

    2006-01-01

    The density of the asymmetrical binary system composed of ethanol and heptane has been measured (630 points) for nine different compositions including the pure compounds at five temperatures in the range (293.15 to 333.15) K and 14 isobars up to 65 MPa with a vibrating-tube densimeter, The experi......The density of the asymmetrical binary system composed of ethanol and heptane has been measured (630 points) for nine different compositions including the pure compounds at five temperatures in the range (293.15 to 333.15) K and 14 isobars up to 65 MPa with a vibrating-tube densimeter...

  13. One-Component Pressure-Temperature Phase Diagrams in the Presence of Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Gamboa, Julio; Martire, Daniel O.; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2010-01-01

    One-component phase diagrams are good approximations to predict pressure-temperature ("P-T") behavior of a substance in the presence of air, provided air pressure is not much higher than the vapor pressure. However, at any air pressure, and from the conceptual point of view, the use of a traditional "P-T" phase diagram is not strictly correct. In…

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Liquid Phosphorus at High Temperature and Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-Ning; ZHAO Gang; LIU Chang-Song; ZHU Zhen-Gang

    2008-01-01

    By performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the mierostructure, dynam-ical and electronic properties of liquid phosphorus (P) under high temperature and pressure. In our simulations, the calculated coordination number (CN) changes discontinuously with density, and seems to increase rapidly after liquid P is compressed to 2.5 g/cm3. Under compression, liquid P shows the first-order liquid-liquid phase transition from the molecular liquid composed of the tetrahedral P4 molecules to complex polymeric form with three-dimensional network structure, accompanied by the nonmetal to metal transition of the electronic structure. The order parameters Q6 and Q4 are sensitive to the microstructural change of liquid P. By calculating diffusion coefficients, we show the dynamical anomaly of liquid P by compression. At lower temperatures, a maximum exists at the diffusion coefficients as a function of density; at higher temperatures, the anomalous behavior is weakened. The excess entropy shows the same phenom-ena as the diffusion coefficients. By analysis of the angle distribution functions and angular limited triplet correlation functions, we can clearly find that the Peierls distortion in polymeric form of liquid P is reduced by further compression.

  15. Nucleons and Isobars at finite density ($\\rho$) and temperature (T)

    OpenAIRE

    Cenni, Rinaldo; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2001-01-01

    The importance of studying matter at high $\\rho$ increases as more astrophysical data becomes available from recently launched spacecrafts. The importance of high T studies derives from heavy ion data. In this paper we set up a formalism to study the nucleons and isobars with long and short range potentials non-pertubatively, bosonizing and expanding semi-classically the Feyman integrals up to one loop. We address the low density, finite T problem=A0 first, the case relevant to heavy ion coll...

  16. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the state density and optical transitions in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindez-Ramirez, G; Perez-Merchancano, S T [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Cauca, calle 5 4-70, Popayan (Colombia); Paredes Gutierrez, H [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Gonzalez, J D, E-mail: jdavid0831@gmail.co [Grupo de Investigacion en teorIa de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Magdalena, A.A. 731, Santa Marta (Colombia)

    2010-09-01

    Using the effective mass approximation and variational method we have computed the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the absorption and photoluminescence spectra in spherical quantum dot GaAs-(Ga, Al) As, considering a finite confinement potential of this particular work we show the optical transitions in quantum of various sizes in the presence of hydrogenic impurities and hydrostatic pressure effects. Our first result describes the spectrum of optical absorption of 500 A QD for different values of hydrostatic pressure P = 0, 20 and 40 Kbar. The absorption peaks are sensitive to the displacement of the impurity center to the edge of the quantum dot and even more when the hydrostatic pressure changes in both cases showing that to the extent that these two effects are stronger quantum dots respond more efficiently. Also this result can be seen in the study of the photoluminescence spectrum as in the case of acceptor impurities consider them more efficiently capture carriers or electrons that pass from the conduction band to the valence band. Density states with randomly distributed impurity show that the additional peaks in the curves of the density of impurity states appear due to the presence of the additional hydrostatic pressure effects.

  17. Macroscopic Expressions of Molecular Adiabatic Compressibility of Methyl and Ethyl Caprate under High Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxi Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular compressibility, which is a macroscopic quantity to reveal the microcompressibility by additivity of molecular constitutions, is considered as a fixed value for specific organic liquids. In this study, we introduced two calculated expressions of molecular adiabatic compressibility to demonstrate its pressure and temperature dependency. The first one was developed from Wada’s constant expression based on experimental data of density and sound velocity. Secondly, by introducing the 2D fitting expressions and their partial derivative of pressure and temperature, molecular compressibility dependency was analyzed further, and a 3D fitting expression was obtained from the calculated data of the first one. The third was derived with introducing the pressure and temperature correction factors based on analogy to Lennard-Jones potential function and energy equipartition theorem. In wide range of temperatures (293pressures (0.1

    pressure and temperature of molecular compressibility was certified.

  18. Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on nonlinear optical rectification in a lens shape InAs/GaAs quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzaieene, L., E-mail: lotfi.bouzaiene@fsm.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Micro-optoelectronique et Nanostructures, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, Universite de Monastir (Tunisia); Ben Mahrsia, R.; Baira, M.; Sfaxi, L.; Maaref, H. [Laboratoire de Micro-optoelectronique et Nanostructures, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, Universite de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2013-03-15

    We have performed theoretical calculation of the nonlinear optical rectification in a lens shape InAs/GaAs quantum dot (0D). The combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the nonlinear optical rectification in lens-shaped InAs QDs are studied under the compact density matrix formalism and the effective mass approximation. From our calculation, it is found that the subband energies and optical rectification susceptibility are quite sensitive to the applied hydrostatic pressure and temperature. The results show that the resonant peak of the optical rectification can be red-shifted or blue-shifted and their intensity also varied by external probes such as hydrostatic pressure and temperature. In addition, the oscillator strength is strongly affected by these parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical calculation of the nonlinear optical rectification in a lens shape InAs/GaAs quantum dot was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical rectification susceptibility is quite sensitive to the applied hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oscillator strength is strongly affected by the applied hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  19. Pressure-temperature Phase Diagram of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Eriita

    2010-01-01

    Based on a pressure-temperature (P-T) phase diagram model of the Earth, Jones & Lineweaver (2010) described uninhabited terrestrial liquid water. Our model represents the atmosphere, surface, oceans and interior of the Earth - allowing the range of P-T conditions in terrestrial environments to be compared to the phase regime of liquid water. Here we present an overview and additional results from the Earth model on the location of the deepest liquid water on Earth and the maximum possible extent of the terrestrial biosphere. The intersection of liquid water and terrestrial phase space indicates that the deepest liquid water environments in the lithosphere occur at a depth of ~ 75 km. 3.5 % of the volume of the Earth is above 75 km depth. Considering the 3.5 % of the volume of the Earth where liquid water exists, ~ 12% of this volume is inhabited by life while the remaining ~ 88% is uninhabited. This is distinct from the fraction of the volume of liquid water occupied by life. We find that at least 1% of t...

  20. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkin, V.M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A.P.; Devyatkin, S.I.; Dyachkov, A.V.; Ignatova, S.I.; Kerzhanovich, V.V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V.I.; Sanotskiy, Y.V.

    1986-05-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  1. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkin, V. M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A. P.; Devyatkin, S. I.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Ignatova, S. I.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V. I.; Sanotskiy, Y. V.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  2. Spectroscopic Methods for Determination of Excitation Temperatures of High-Pressure Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu; WEN Xiaohui; ZHAN Rujuan; YANG Weihong

    2007-01-01

    A method to determine excitation temperatures based on the optical emission spectroscopy(OES)and Fermi-Dirac distribution was set up,and the temperatures of pure-argon and mixed-gases at different pressures were investigated.In this way we set up a standard process to get the excitation temperatures of plasmas operated at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures.

  3. Visual Aid to Demonstrate Change of State and Gas Pressure with Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Shahrokh

    2011-01-01

    Demonstrations are used in chemistry lectures to improve conceptual understanding by direct observation. The visual aid described here is designed to demonstrate the change in state of matter with the change of temperature and the change of pressure with temperature. Temperature is presented by the rate of airflow and pressure is presented by…

  4. High Density Planar High Temperature Superconducting Josephson Junctions Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    TIT,) 3 dependance . At lower temperatures it follows a (1 - T/T,)2 depen- dance ........ ................................... 57 4.7 Shapiro steps in...70 4.23 Dependance of the critical current for a ten junction array on mi- crowave power ..................................... 71 4.24 Resistance vs...GHz microwave radiation. (b) Microwave power dependance of the critical current and 1st-order Shapiro step. 76 5.2 (a) Single junction critical current

  5. Chemical sputtering of graphite by low temperature nitrogen plasmas at various substrate temperatures and ion flux densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Tanyeli, I.; De Temmerman, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of chemical sputtering yields of graphite exposed to low temperature nitrogen plasmas. The influence of surface temperature and incoming ion energy on the sputtering yields has been investigated in two distinct ion flux density regimes. Sputtering yields grow consistently with

  6. Evolutive characteristics of aromatics under high pressure and temperature of deep lithosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis of lignite in closed systems was conducted at temperatures from 400 to 700℃ and pressure from 1 to 3 GPa in order to investigate the evolutive characteristics of aromatics and the effects of pressure and temperature on the maturation of organic matter under the extreme conditions. The total yield of liquid hydrocarbons decreased with increasing pressure and the aromatics shows more mature with increasing temperature at a given pressure. The data indicate that high pressure significantly suppresses the thermal evolution of geological organic matter especially at lower temperature, but favors the cyclization, polymerization and aromatization of pyrolysate. The pressure effect on maturation of organic matter is nonlinear. Therefore, it can be inferred that sediment organic-matters in the subducted slab could be retained in the deep lithosphere, and the results are also significant for understanding the accumulation and preservation of petroleum in deep reservoirs.key wordshigh pressure and high temperature, lignite, aromatic hydrocarbon, maturation, isomerzation, petroleum in deep reservoirs

  7. Two-Dimensional Electron Density Measurement of Positive Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is crucially important for systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species utilized in wide ranging applications such as medical treatment, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, ozone production and environmental pollutant processing. However, electron density measurement during the propagation of the atmospheric-pressure streamers is extremely difficult by using the conventional localized type measurement systems due to the streamer initiation jitters and the irreproducibility in the discharge paths. In order to overcome the difficulties, single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurement was conducted by using a Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensor. The Shack-Hartmann sensor with a temporal resolution of 2 ns was applied to pulsed positive streamer discharges generated in an air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density a few ns after the streamer initiation was 7*1021m-3 and uniformly distributed along the streamer channel. The electron density and its distribution profile were compared with a previous study simulating similar streamers, demonstrating good agreement. This work was supported in part by JKA and its promotion funds from KEIRIN RACE. The authors like to thank Mr. Kazuaki Ogura and Mr. Kaiho Aono of The University of Tokyo for their support during this work.

  8. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi X; Chen, Xiang R; Geng, Hua Y

    2016-01-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position o...

  9. Rapid inactivation of Penicillium digitatum spores using high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Ohta, Takayuki; Aomatsu, Akiyoshi; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2010-04-01

    A promising, environmentally safe method for inactivating fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum, a difficult-to-inactivate food spoilage microorganism, was developed using a high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The NEAPP employing Ar gas had a high electron density on the order of 1015 cm-3. The spores were successfully and rapidly inactivated using the NEAPP, with a decimal reduction time in spores (D value) of 1.7 min. The contributions of ozone and UV radiation on the inactivation of the spores were evaluated and concluded to be not dominant, which was fundamentally different from the conventional sterilizations.

  10. Pressure and surface tension of soild-liquid interface using Tarazona density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   The weighted density functional theory proposed by Tarazona is applied to study the solid-liquid interface. In the last two decades the weighted density functional became a useful tool to consider the properties of inhomogeneous liquids. In this theory, the role of the size of molecules or the particles of which the matter is composed, was found to be important. In this resarch we study a hard sphere fluid beside a hard wall. For this study the liquid is an inhomogeneous system. We use the definition of the direct correlation function as a second derivative of free energy with respect to the density. We use this definition and the definition of the weighting function, then we minimize the grand potential with respect to the density to get the Euler Lagrange equation and we obtain an integral equation to find the inhomogeneous density profile. The obtained density profile as a function of the distance from the wall, for different bulk density is plotted in three dimensions. We also calculate the pressure and compare it with the Carnahan-starling results, and finally we obtained the surface tension at liquid-solid interface and compared it with the results of Monte Carlo simulation.

  11. Temperature dependence of Hall electron density of GaN-based heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Feng; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Hao Yue

    2004-01-01

    The theoretic calculation and analysis of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density of a sample AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has been carried out in the temperature range from 77 to 300K. The densities of the twodimensional electron gas and the bulk electrons are solved by self-consistent calculation of one-dimensional Schrodinger and Poisson equations at different temperatures, which allow for the variation of energy gap and structure strain, and are used for evaluation of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density. The calculated Hall electron density agrees with the measured one quite well with the appropriate bulk mobility data. Analysis revealed that for the temper ature range considered, even in the heterostructures with a small bulk conductance the factors that determine the Hall mobility and electron density could be of different sources, and not just the two-dimensional electron gas as generally supposed.

  12. Thermodynamic extension of density-functional theory. II. Finite-temperature ensemble spin-density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Balawender, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The formalism developed in the first paper of the series [arXiv:0901.1060v3] is applied to two thermodynamic systems: (i) of three global observables (the energy, the total electron number and the spin number), (ii) of one global observable (the internal electron energy) and two local (position-dependent) observables (the total electron density and the spin density). The two-component potential of the many-electron system of interest is constructed of a scalar external potential and a collinear magnetic field (coupled only with the spin operator). Various equilibrium characteristics of two systems are defined and investigated. Conditions for the equivalence between two systems (the same equilibrium density matrix demanded) are derived and thoroughly discussed. The applicability of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem is extended to the thermodynamic spin-density functional theory. Obtained results provide a rigorous mathematical foundation for future derivation of the zero-temperature limit of this theory and determina...

  13. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-10-01

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Sm-type → dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GPa and a temperature of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.

  14. Adsorption mechanism of different coal ranks under variable temperature and pressure conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qing-ling

    2008-01-01

    Variable temperature and pressure adsorption tests were conducted on four coal samples with different coal ranks, under simulated temperatures and pressures corresponding to coal reservoirs at different depths. The regularity of the variation in the amounts of adsorption by coals under variable temperature and pressure and 30 ~C isothermal conditions are compared and the adsorption characteristics of coal under the composite effect of temperature and pressure were obtained. The adsorption test and data processing method of coal under variable temperature and pressure are presented and the effect of the mechanism of tempera-ture and pressure on the adsorption capacity of coal has been studied. The research results are of significant importance in the in-vestigation of coalbed methane storage mechanism and for the prediction of the amounts of coalbed methane at various depths.

  15. Phonon Density of States and Sound Velocities of an Iron-Nickel Alloy at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Murphy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological and cosmochemical studies suggest Earth's core is primarily composed of iron with ~5 to 10 wt% nickel and some light elements [e.g., 1]. Therefore, understanding the behavior of Fe-Ni alloys at high pressure is important for interpreting seismic data and for modeling the interior of the Earth. While many studies have investigated the properties of pure Fe at high pressure, the elastic and vibrational properties of Fe-Ni alloys at high pressure are not well known. We measured sound velocities and thermodynamic properties of 95%-enriched 57Fe alloyed with 10 wt% Ni at high-pressures in a Ne pressure medium. Measurements of high statistical quality were performed with nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) at 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source [e.g., 2 & 3]. The sample volume was determined at each compression point with in-line x-ray diffraction at 3ID-B before and after each NRIXS measurement. In this contribution, we will present derived partial phonon density of states, Debye sound velocities, and compressional and shear sound velocities for Fe0.9-Ni0.1 at high-pressures. [1] McDonough, W.F. (2004): Compositional Model for the Earth's Core. Elsevier Ltd., Oxford. [2] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2011.07.001. [3] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Grüneisen parameter of hcp-Fe to 171 GPa, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL049531.

  16. Pressure dependence of the optical properties of the charge-density-wave compound LaTe2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavagnini, M.; Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Arcangeletti, E.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; /Rome U.; Perucchi, A.; /INFM, Trieste; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    We report the pressure dependence of the optical response of LaTe{sub 2}, which is deep in the charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state even at 300 K. The reflectivity spectrum is collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 7 GPa. We extract the energy scale due to the single particle excitation across the CDW gap and the Drude weight. We establish that the gap decreases upon compressing the lattice, while the Drude weight increases. This signals a reduction in the quality of nesting upon applying pressure, therefore inducing a lesser impact of the CDW condensate on the electronic properties of LaTe{sub 2}. The consequent suppression of the CDW gap leads to a release of additional charge carriers, manifested by the shift of weight from the gap feature into the metallic component of the optical response. On the contrary, the power-law behavior, seen in the optical conductivity at energies above the gap excitation and indicating a weakly interacting limit within the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid scenario, seems to be only moderately dependent on pressure.

  17. Investigation of structure and hydrogen bonding of superhydrous phase B (HT) under pressure using first-principles density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poswal, H. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.; Sikka, S. K.

    2010-03-01

    High-pressure behaviour of superhydrous phase B (high temperature; HT) of Mg10Si3O14(OH)4 (Shy B) is investigated with the help of density functional theory-based first-principles calculations. In addition to the lattice parameters and equation of state, we use these calculations to determine the positional parameters of atoms as a function of pressure. Our results show that the compression induced structural changes involve cooperative distortions in the full geometry of the hydrogen bonds. The bond-bending mechanism proposed by Hofmeister et al. (Vibrational spectra of dense hydrous magnesium silicates at high pressure: Importance of the hydrogen bond angle, Am. Miner. 84 (1999), pp. 454-464) for hydrogen bonds to relieve the heightened repulsion due to short H- - -H contacts is not found to be effective in Shy B. The calculated O-H bond contraction is consistent with the observed blue shift in the stretching frequency of the hydrogen bond. These results establish that one can use first-principles calculations to obtain reliable insights into the pressure-induced bonding changes of complex minerals.

  18. Development of high temperature superconductors having high critical current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gye Wong; Kim, C. J.; Lee, H.G.; Kwon, S. C.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. B.; Park, J. Y.; Jung, C. H

    2000-08-01

    Fabrication of high T{sub c} superconductors and its applications for electric power device were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies. High quality YBCO superconductors was fabricated by melt texture growth, top-seeded melt growth process and multi-seeded melt growth process and the properties was compared. The critical current density of the melt processed YBCO superconductors was about few 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and the levitation force was 50 N. The processing time needed for the growth of the 123 single grain was greatly reduced by applying multi-seeding without no significant degradation of the levitation force. The multi-seeded melt growth process was confirmed as a time-saving and cost-effective method for the fabrication of bulk superconductors with controlled crystallographic orientation.

  19. Revisiting strong coupling QCD at finite baryon density and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Fromm, M

    2008-01-01

    The strong coupling limit ($\\beta_{gauge}=0$) of lattice QCD with staggered fermions enjoys the same non-perturbative properties as continuum QCD, namely confinement and chiral symmetry breaking. In contrast to the situation at weak coupling, the sign problem which appears at finite density can be brought under control for a determination of the full (mu,T) phase diagram by Monte Carlo simulations. Further difficulties with efficiency and ergodicity of the simulations, especially at the strongly first-order, low-T, finite-mu transition, are addressed respectively with a worm algorithm and multicanonical sampling. Our simulations reveal sizeable corrections to the old results of Karsch and Muetter. Comparison with analytic mean-field determinations of the phase diagram shows discrepancies of O(10) in the location of the QCD critical point.

  20. Simultaneous visualization of oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets in serpentine fuel cell during power generation for understanding reaction distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanohashi, Kazuhiro; Suga, Takeo; Uchida, Makoto; Ueda, Toshihide; Nagumo, Yuzo; Inukai, Junji; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the reaction distributions inside a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is essential for the higher performance and durability. We have developed a new see-through cell and visualized the distributions of oxygen partial pressure and current density inside a running PEFC at the temperature of 40 and 80 °C and the relative humidity of 53%. The oxygen utilization was changed from 0% to 80% by changing the current density. At higher oxygen utilizations, the current density was higher and therefore the water generation. Generated water droplets in the flow channel were also visualized, allowing for the simultaneous visualization of the distribution of the oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets. By combining the observations of all three parameters, the reactions inside a membrane-electrode assembly were discussed.

  1. High-pressure pulsed avalanche discharges: Formulas for required preionization density and rate for homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenning, N.; Axnaes, I.; Nilsson, J.O.; Eninger, J.E. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    The requirements on preionization for the formation of spatially homogeneous pulsed avalanche discharges are examined. The authors derive two formulas which apply in the case of a slowly rising electric field, one which gives the required preionization density at breakdown, and one which gives the required preionization rate. These quantities are expressed as functions of the electrochemical properties of the gas, the neutral density, and the electric field rise time. They also treat the statistical effect that the electrons tend to form groups, in contrast to being randomly distributed in space, during the prebreakdown phase. This process is found to increase the required preionization rate significantly, typically by a factor of five for a discharge at atmospheric pressure. Homogeneous high-pressure discharges have been used for laser excitation, and have also been proposed for chemical plasma processing (ozone production) because of their good scaling properties and high efficiency.

  2. Effect of interband interactions on the pressure dependence on transition temperature of MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu A.; Abah, Obinna

    2015-12-01

    A two-band BCS model with interactions, both phonon and non-phonon induced interactions, were employed to investigate the pressure dependence on superconducting transition temperature of two-band superconductor. We derived the transition temperature and its pressure dependence within Bogoliubov--Valatin formalism for magnesium diboride superconductor. We examined the influence of interband interactions on transition temperature at varying pressure and analyzed the relevance of this calculation in magnesium diboride, MgB2.

  3. Technology trends in high temperature pressure transducers: The impact of micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Joseph R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the implications of micromachining technology on the development of high temperature pressure transducers. The introduction puts forth the thesis that micromachining will be the technology of choice for the next generation of extended temperature range pressure transducers. The term micromachining is defined, the technology is discussed and examples are presented. Several technologies for high temperature pressure transducers are discussed, including silicon on insulator, capacitive, optical, and vibrating element. Specific conclusions are presented along with recommendations for development of the technology.

  4. Temperature dependence of the liquid eutectic lead-lithium alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alchagirov; Boris; B.; Mozgovoi; Alexandr; G.; Taova; Tamara; M.

    2005-01-01

    Lead-lithium alloys are of great interest for practice as the advanced materials to be used in new technique, nuclear energetics, and so forth. Terefore, study on the physico-chemical properties of the latter is of major significance. An analysis of the available literature shows that there are a few works, devoted to study of Pb-Li alloys densities. However, temperature dependence of the density ρ(T), and its temperature coefficientK=dρ/dT for eutectic alloy were obtained by either extrapolation of the density data up to the eutectic alloy's composition, or calculation method. There is a certain discrepancy amounting to as high as 4%, while the allowable error in the density measurements is less than 0.5%. The discrepancy between the results for the temperature coefficients of density amounts to 80%.In this work we present the experimental data on the temperature dependence of Ph0.83 Li0.17 eutectic alloy's density in the temperature range 520K to 643 K. The alloys were prepared using Pb and Li with 99. 999% and 99.8% contents of the basic elements, respectively. We use the improved device, which permits to get the results with error less than 0. 15%. The results of 115 measurements of density in 520K to 643K temperature range were processed by the least-square method. Density polytherm of Pb0.83 Li0. 17 eutectic alloy is described by linear equation ρ(T) =9507.89-0. 79813(T-508) , kg/m3 ,where T is the absolute temperature by K. Mearsurement error was 0. 12% at 95% reliability.Discrepancy in the temperature coefficient data was 1.08%.Thus, the temperature dependence of the Pb-Li eutectic alloy density was studied by the precise two-capillary method. The obtained results may be recommended as the most reliable reference data.

  5. Effect of temperature and pressure on the dynamics of nanoconfined propane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, Siddharth, E-mail: gautam.25@osu.edu; Liu, Tingting, E-mail: gautam.25@osu.edu; Welch, Susan; Cole, David [School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 275 Mendenhall Laboratory, 125 S Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Rother, Gernot [Geochemistry and Interfacial Science Group, Chemical Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Jalarvo, Niina [Jülich Center for Neutron Sciences (JCNS-1), Forschungszentrum Jülich Outstation at Spallation Neutron Source(SNS), Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mamontov, Eugene [Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-04-24

    We report the effect of temperature and pressure on the dynamical properties of propane confined in nanoporous silica aerogel studied using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). Our results demonstrate that the effect of a change in the pressure dominates over the effect of temperature variation on the dynamics of propane nano-confined in silica aerogel. At low pressures, most of the propane molecules are strongly bound to the pore walls, only a small fraction is mobile. As the pressure is increased, the fraction of mobile molecules increases. A change in the mechanism of motion, from continuous diffusion at low pressures to jump diffusion at higher pressures has also been observed.

  6. The reactions of CuO at high pressure and high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, G Z; Wang, X C; Ma, H A; Guo, X B; Liu, J T; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    The decomposition behaviour of CuO is studied at high temperature and high pressure. Experimental pressure and temperature determine the result. In the region of higher temperature and pressure (>=5.5 GPa, >=1400 deg. C), the product is just copper. In the region of lower temperature and pressure (< 5.0 GPa, < 1100 deg. C), CuO does not decompose. Between the two regions, the product is a mixture of Cu and Cu sub 2 O or a mixture of Cu sub 2 O and CuO.

  7. High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

    2012-09-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this

  8. A conversion model of graphite to ultrananocrystalline diamond via laser processing at ambient temperature and normal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, X. D., E-mail: renxd@ujs.edu.cn; Yang, H. M.; Zheng, L. M.; Tang, S. X.; Ren, N. F.; Xu, S. D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, S. Q. [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technical, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2014-07-14

    The synthesis mechanism of ultrananocrystalline diamond via laser shock processing of graphite suspension was presented at room temperature and normal pressure, which yielded the ultrananocrystalline diamond in size of about 5 nm. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and laser Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the nano-crystals. The transformation model and growth restriction mechanism of high power density with short-pulsed laser shocking of graphite particles in liquid was put forward.

  9. The role of photoionization in negative corona discharge: The influences of temperature, humidity, and air pressure on a corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H. Y.; Lu, B. X.; Wang, M.; Guo, Q. F.; Feng, Q. K.

    2017-10-01

    The swarm parameters of the negative corona discharge are improved to calculate the discharge model under different environmental conditions. The effects of temperature, humidity, and air pressure are studied using a conventional needle-to-plane configuration in air. The electron density, electric field, electron generation rate, and photoelectron generation rate are discussed in this paper. The role of photoionization under these conditions is also studied by numerical simulation. The photoelectrons generated in weak ionization region are proved to be dominant.

  10. High-temperature-pressure Polymerized Resin-infiltrated Ceramic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, J.F.; Ruse, D.; Phan, A.C.; Sadoun, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce composite blocks (CB) for CAD/CAM applications by high-temperature-pressure (HT/HP) polymerization of resin-infiltrated glass-ceramic networks. The effect of network sintering and the absence/presence of initiator was investigated. Mechanical properties were determined and compared with those of Paradigm MZ100 (3M ESPE) blocks and HT/HP polymerized experimental “classic” CB, in which the filler had been incorporated by conventional mixing. The networks were made   from glass-ceramic powder (VITA Zahnfabrik) formed by slip casting and were either sintered or not. They were silanized, infiltrated by urethane dimethacrylate, with or without initiator, and polymerized under HT/HP (300 MPa, 180°C) to obtain resin-infiltrated glass-ceramic network (RIGCN) CB. HT/HP polymerized CB were also made from an experimental “classic” composite. Flexural strength (σf), fracture toughness (KIC), and Vickers hardness were determined and analyzed by one- or two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffé multiple-means comparisons (α = 0.05), and Weibull statistics (for σf). Fractured surfaces were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of RIGCN CB were significantly higher. Sintering induced significant increases in σf and hardness, while the initiator significantly decreased hardness. The results suggested that RIGCN and HT/HP polymerization could be used to obtain CB with superior mechanical properties, suitable for CAD/CAM applications. PMID:24186559

  11. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  12. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  13. Phase transition in finite density and temperature lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rui; Gong, Ming; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhao-Feng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Meng, Xiang-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the chiral condensate in lattice QCD at finite temperature and finite chemical potential. The study was done using two flavors of light quarks and with a series of $\\beta$ and $ma$ at the lattice size $24\\times12^{2}\\times6$. The calculation was done in the Taylar expansion formalism. We are able to calculate the first and second order derivatives of $\\langle\\bar{\\psi}\\psi\\rangle$ in both isoscalar and isovector channels. With the first derivatives being small, we find that the second derivatives are sizable close to the phase transition and the magnitude of $\\bar{\\psi}\\psi$ decreases under the influence of finite chemical potential in both channels.

  14. Dyson-Schwinger Equation Density, Temperature and Continuum Strong QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, C D

    2000-01-01

    Continuum strong QCD is the application of models and continuum quantum field theory to the study of phenomena in hadronic physics, which includes; e.g., the spectrum of QCD bound states and their interactions; and the transition to, and properties of, a quark gluon plasma. We provide a contemporary perspective, couched primarily in terms of the Dyson-Schwinger equations but also making comparisons with other approaches and models. Our discourse provides a practitioners' guide to features of the Dyson-Schwinger equations [such as confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking] and canvasses phenomenological applications to light meson and baryon properties in cold, sparse QCD. These provide the foundation for an extension to hot, dense QCD, which is probed via the introduction of the intensive thermodynamic variables: chemical potential and temperature. We describe order parameters whose evolution signals deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration, and chronicle their use in demarcating the quark gluon...

  15. A new phase diagram of water under negative pressure: The rise of the lowest-density clathrate s-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yingying; Zhu, Chongqin; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xiaoxiao; Su, Yan; Jiang, Xue; Meng, Sheng; Zhao, Jijun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Ice and ice clathrate are not only omnipresent across polar regions of Earth or under terrestrial oceans but also ubiquitous in the solar system such as on comets, asteroids, or icy moons of the giant planets. Depending on the surrounding environment (temperature and pressure), ice alone exhibits an exceptionally rich and complicated phase diagram with 17 known crystalline polymorphs. Water molecules also form clathrate compounds with inclusion of guest molecules, such as cubic structure I (s-I), cubic structure II (s-II), hexagonal structure H (s-H), tetragonal structure T (s-T), and tetragonal structure K (s-K). Recently, guest-free clathrate structure II (s-II), also known as ice XVI located in the negative-pressure region of the phase diagram of water, is synthesized in the laboratory and motivates scientists to reexamine other ice clathrates with low density. Using extensive Monte Carlo packing algorithm and dispersion-corrected density functional theory optimization, we predict a crystalline clathrate of cubic structure III (s-III) composed of two large icosihexahedral cavities (8(6)6(8)4(12)) and six small decahedral cavities (8(2)4(8)) per unit cell, which is dynamically stable by itself and can be fully stabilized by encapsulating an appropriate guest molecule in the large cavity. A new phase diagram of water ice with TIP4P/2005 (four-point transferable intermolecular potential/2005) model potential is constructed by considering a variety of candidate phases. The guest-free s-III clathrate with ultralow density overtakes s-II and s-H phases and emerges as the most stable ice polymorph in the pressure region below -5834 bar at 0 K and below -3411 bar at 300 K.

  16. Two-resonance probe for measuring electron density in low-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. Y.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for measuring double-checked electron density using two types of microwave resonance is presented. Simultaneous measurement of the resonances (plasma and quarter-wavelength resonator resonances), which were used for the cutoff probe (CP) and hairpin probe (HP), was achieved by the proposed microwave resonance probe. The developed two-resonance probe (TRP) consists of parallel separated coaxial cables exposing the radiation and detection tips. The structure resembles that of the CP, except the gapped coaxial cables operate not only as a microwave feeder for the CP but also as a U- shaped quarter-wavelength resonator for the HP. By virtue of this structure, the microwave resonances that have typically been used for measuring the electron density for the CP and HP were clearly identified on the microwave transmission spectrum of the TRP. The two types of resonances were measured experimentally under various power and pressure conditions for the plasma. A three-dimensional full-wave simulation model for the TRP is also presented and used to investigate and reproduce the resonances. The electron densities inferred from the resonances were compared and showed good agreement. Quantitative differences between the densities were attributed to the effects of the sheath width and spatial density gradient on the resonances. This accessible technique of using the TRP to obtain double-checked electron densities may be useful for comparative study and provides complementary uses for the CP and HP.

  17. Energy Density in Aligned Nanowire Arrays Irradiated with Relativistic Intensities: Path to Terabar Pressure Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, J.; Bargsten, C.; Hollinger, R.; Shylaptsev, V.; Wang, S.; Rockwood, A.; Wang, Y.; Keiss, D.; Capeluto, M.; Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, A.; Tommasini, R.; London, R.; Park, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-high-energy-density (UHED) plasmas, characterized by energy densities >1 x 108 J cm-3 and pressures greater than a gigabar are encountered in the center of stars and in inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the world's largest lasers. Similar conditions can be obtained with compact, ultra-high contrast, femtosecond lasers focused to relativistic intensities onto aligned nanowire array targets. Here we report the measurement of the key physical process in determining the energy density deposited in high aspect ratio nanowire array plasmas: the energy penetration. By monitoring the x-ray emission from buried Co tracer segments in Ni nanowire arrays irradiated at an intensity of 4 x 1019 W cm-2, we demonstrate energy penetration depths of several μm, leading to UHED plasmas of that size. Relativistic 3D particle-in-cell-simulations validated by these measurements predict that irradiation of nanostructures at increased intensity will lead to a virtually unexplored extreme UHED plasma regime characterized by energy densities in excess of 8 x 1010 J cm-3, equivalent to a pressure of 0.35 Tbar. This work was supported by the Fusion Energy Program, Office of Science of the U.S Department of Energy, and by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  18. Novel Temperature-Independent FBG-type Pressure Sensor with Step-Coated Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a novel technique is presented for an FBG with the step-coated polymers, which can be used for the measurement of the temperature-independent pressure in the temperature range between 5 and 50℃.

  19. Structure and magnetism of cobalt at high pressure and low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchio, R.; Marini, C.; Kvashnin, Y. O.; Kantor, I.; Mathon, O.; Garbarino, G.; Meneghini, C.; Anzellini, S.; Occelli, F.; Bruno, P.; Dewaele, A.; Pascarelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of cobalt were investigated under high pressure (160 GPa) and low temperature (50 K), by synchrotron K-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction. A quasihydrostatic equation of state was measured up to 160 GPa. We found that uniaxial stress plays a role in the hexagonal close packed-face centered cubic (hcp-fcc) structural transition pressure. Also, our data provide the first experimental evidence that changes of the c /a ratio pressure derivative are related to the magnetic behavior. The complete extinction of ferromagnetism is observed above 130 GPa in a mixed hcp-fcc phase with no recovery upon cooling to 50 K, indicating that cobalt at 150 GPa is very likely nonmagnetic, i.e., characterized by zero local spin polarization. Density functional theory calculations point out that the K-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) signal is related to the 4 p orbital moment rather than to the total spin moment and allow us to get a deeper insight into the K-edge XMCD measurements interpretation. The combination of novel theoretical results and experimental outputs provides a detailed scenario of the structural and magnetic properties of cobalt at these extreme conditions answering some previously unsolved issues.

  20. Thermoelastic properties of liquid Fe-C revealed by sound velocity and density measurements at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Yuta; Terasaki, Hidenori; Urakawa, Satoru; Takubo, Yusaku; Kuwabara, Soma; Kishimoto, Shunpachi; Watanuki, Tetsu; Machida, Akihiko; Katayama, Yoshinori; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    Carbon is one of the possible light elements in the cores of the terrestrial planets. The P wave velocity (VP) and density (ρ) are important factors for estimating the chemical composition and physical properties of the core. We simultaneously measured the VP and ρ of Fe-3.5 wt % C up to 3.4 GPa and 1850 K by using ultrasonic pulse-echo method and X-ray absorption methods. The VP of liquid Fe-3.5 wt % C decreased linearly with increasing temperature at constant pressure. The addition of carbon decreased the VP of liquid Fe by about 2% at 3 GPa and 1700 K and decreased the Fe density by about 2% at 2 GPa and 1700 K. The bulk modulus of liquid Fe-C and its pressure (P) and temperature (T) effects were precisely determined from directly measured ρ and VP data to be K0,1700 K = 83.9 GPa, dKT/dP = 5.9(2), and dKT/dT = -0.063 GPa/K. The addition of carbon did not affect the isothermal bulk modulus (KT) of liquid Fe, but it decreased the dK/dT of liquid Fe. In the ρ-VP relationship, VP increases linearly with ρ and can be approximated as VP (m/s) = -6786(506) + 1537(71) × ρ (g/cm3), suggesting that Birch's law is valid for liquid Fe-C at the present P-T conditions. Our results imply that at the conditions of the lunar core, the elastic properties of an Fe-C core are more affected by temperature than those of Fe-S core.

  1. SU($4$) Polyakov linear-sigma model at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Diab, Abdel Magied; Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Dahab, Eiman Abou El

    2016-01-01

    In mean-field approximation, the SU($4$) Polyakov linear - sigma model (PLSM) is constructed in order to characterize the quark-hadron phase structure in a wide range of temperatures and densities. The chiral condensates $\\sigma_l$, $\\sigma_s$ and $\\sigma_c$ for light, strange and charm quarks, respectively, and the deconfinement order-parameters $\\phi$ and $\\phi^*$ shall be analyzed at finite temperatures and densities. We conclude that the critical temperatures corresponding to charm condensates are greater than that to strange and light ones, respectively. Thus, the charm condensates are likely not affected by the QCD phase transition. Furthermore, increasing the chemical potentials decreases the corresponding critical temperatures.

  2. Unusual high-density and saline aqueous inclusions in ultrahigh pressure metamor-phic rocks from Sulu terrane in eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Kun; ZHANG Zeming; A. M. van den Kerkhof; XIAO Yilin; XU Zhiqin; J. Hoefs

    2003-01-01

    Primary high-density fluid inclusions were identified in garnet from ultrahigh pressure eclogite in the southern part of the Sulu terrane. They occur isolatedly or in cluster together with relatively low-density two-phase inclusions. The eutectic temperature of the inclusions is as low as ≤ -52℃. A bubble was nucleated in a liquid inclusion during the specific stage of cyclic cooling-heating runs, and the liquid-gas homogenization temperature was measured to be ≤-12.5℃. The composition of the inclusions modeled by the system CaCl2-NaCl-H2O, yields the fluid density of 1.27 g/cm3 that corresponds to a pressure of ca. 2.4 Gpa at the temperature of peak eclogite-facies metamorphism, close to the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic conditions. During the exhumation of the eclogite the inclusions reacted with the host mineral, forming hydrous silicate minerals that resulted in lowering of the fluid density and its transformation to multi-phase inclusions.

  3. Effect of monounsaturated fatty acids on high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and blood pressure in healthy men and women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the studies described in this thesis was to examine the effect of monounsaturated fatty acids on the distribution of serum cholesterol over high-density and low-density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) and on blood pressure in healthy men and women. High levels of LDL cholesterol and bl

  4. Effect of monounsaturated fatty acids on high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and blood pressure in healthy men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the studies described in this thesis was to examine the effect of monounsaturated fatty acids on the distribution of serum cholesterol over high-density and low-density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) and on blood pressure in healthy men and women. High levels of LDL cholesterol

  5. Phase stability of TiH{sub 2} under high pressure and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selva Vennila, R.; Durygin, A.; Saxena, S.K. [Center for Study of Matter at Extreme Conditions (CeSMEC), Florida International University, VH-150, University Park, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Merlini, Marco [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 38043 (France); Wang, Zhongwu [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Phase stability of titanium hydride (TiH{sub 2}) was studied at high pressure-high temperature conditions using synchrotron radiation under non-hydrostatic conditions. Resistive heating method was used to heat the sample to a maximum temperature of 873 K in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) under pressure up to 12 GPa. Pressure-temperature behavior was studied by varying the temperature upto 823 K in steps of 50 K with pressure variations within 3 GPa. Structural phase transformation from tetragonal (I4/mmm) to cubic (Fm-3 m) was observed with increase in temperature. Tetragonal phase was found to be stabilized when the sample was subjected to pressure and temperature cycle. (author)

  6. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1981 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1981 to 2005 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  7. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1956 to 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1956 to 1980 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  8. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1912 to 1930

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1912 to 1930 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  9. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1931 to 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1931 to 1955 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  10. QUALITY OF Pinus elliottii PARTICLE BOARDS BONDED WITH POLYURETHANE ADHESIVE UNDER VARIOUS COMBINATIONS OF TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez Benigno Paes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to produce homogeneous layer particle boards with residues of Pinus elliottii wood adhered with polyurethane adhesive to castor oil plant base and to evaluate the effect of the combination of pressure and temperature in the quality of the particle boards produced. To do so, 12 particle boards were manufactured, subdivided into four treatments in function of the pressure (2.0; 3.0; 3.5; and 3.5 MPa and temperature (90; 90; 50; and 60 ºC. The particleboards were sectioned in test samples, and accomplished by physical-mechanical tests for the determination of density, swelling and absorption of water (0-2h; 2-24h; e 0-24h; rupture module and elasticity module in static bending, internal ligation and screw withdrawal. The particle boards pressed with pressure of 3.0 MPa and temperature of 90 ºC and that with pressure of 3.5 MPa and temperature of 60 ºC presented the best  results. The higher temperature of pressing was the predominant variable in the quality of those particle boards manufactured.

  11. Density-temperature scaling of the fragility in a model glass-former

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical quantities e.g. diffusivity and relaxation time for some glass-formers may depend on density and temperature through a specific combination, rather than independently, allowing the representation of data over ranges of density and temperature as a function of a single scaling variable...... of the activation free energy in the Adam-Gibbs relation, is consistent with the exponent values obtained by other means....

  12. Stress control of heterogeneous nanocrystalline diamond sphere through pressure-temperature tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Han, Jingjing; Hu, Qiwei; Chen, Yang; Liu, Fangming; Liu, Yinjuan; Gou, Li; He, Duanwei; Zhan, Guodong

    2017-03-01

    The hollow nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) sphere, a promising ablator material for inertial confinement fusion capsule, is generally fabricated by the chemical vapor deposition method. Herein, we report on a method to transform hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings on spherical molybdenum (Mo) substrates into nanocrystalline diamond films via a designed high pressure high temperature (HPHT) treatment that balances the mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficient between a diamond coating and the Mo substrate through the difference in the bulk modulus. The results show that the density and strength of the diamond shell increase significantly and the residual stress is eliminated as well. The methodology of the designed HPHT treatment can not only provide an alternative way to fabricate NCD spheres but also can apply to other heterogeneous material stress control applications.

  13. Time evolution of chiral phase transition at finite temperature and density in the linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Koide, Tomoi; Maruyama, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Faculty of Science, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    There are various approaches to nonequilibrium system. We use the projection operator method investigated by F. Shibata and N. Hashitsume on the linear sigma model at finite temperature and density. We derive a differential equation of the time evolution for the order parameter and pion number density in chiral phase transition. (author)

  14. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  15. A Wireless Passive LC Resonant Sensor Based on LTCC under High-Temperature/Pressure Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Shen, Dandan; Wei, Tanyong; Tan, Qiulin; Luo, Tao; Zhou, Zhaoying; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-07-10

    In this work, a wireless passive LC resonant sensor based on DuPont 951 ceramic is proposed and tested in a developed high-temperature/pressure complex environment. The test results show that the measured resonant frequency varies approximately linearly with the applied pressure; simultaneously, high temperature causes pressure signal drift and changes the response sensitivity. Through the theoretical analysis of the sensor structure model, it is found that the increase in the dielectric constant and the decrease in the Young's modulus of DuPont 951 ceramic are the main causes that affect the pressure signal in high-temperature measurement. Through calculations, the Young's modulus of DuPont 951 ceramic is found to decrease rapidly from 120 GPa to 65 GPa within 400 °C. Therefore, the LC resonant pressure sensor needs a temperature compensation structure to eliminate the impact of temperature on pressure measurement. Finally, a temperature compensation structure is proposed and fabricated, and the pressure response after temperature compensation illustrates that temperature drift is significantly reduced compared with that without the temperature compensation structure, which verifies the feasibility the proposed temperature compensation structure.

  16. Pressure cycle rheology of nanofluids at ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza; Yrac, Rommel; Amani, Mahmood

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of particles dispersed in a base fluid (or drilling fluid) are commonly used in oil industry to aid the drilling of oil well into the ground. Nanofluids, the colloidal suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a basefluid, have also shown potentials as cooling and abrasive fluids. Utilizing them along with drilling fluids under cyclic high-pressure loadings have not been investigated so far. In the present work, rheological characteristics of silicon oil based nanofluids (prepared with alumina nanoparticles) under pressures up to 1000 bar are investigated using a high-pressure viscometer. The rheological characteristics of nanofluids are measured and are compared with that of the basefluid under increasing and decreasing pressures. Relative viscosity variations of nanofluids were observed to have influenced by the shear rate. In addition, under cyclic high-pressure loading viscosity values of nanofluids are observed to have reduced. This reduction in viscosity at the second pressure cycle could have been caused by the de-agglomeration of particles in the first cycle while working a high-pressure and high-shear condition.

  17. Estimation of Joule heating effect on temperature and pressure distribution in electrokinetic-driven microchannel flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chein, Reiyu; Yang, Yeong Chin; Lin, Yushan

    2006-02-01

    In this study we present simple analytical models that predict the temperature and pressure variations in electrokinetic-driven microchannel flow under the Joule heating effect. For temperature prediction, a simple model shows that the temperature is related to the Joule heating parameter, autothermal Joule heating parameter, external cooling parameter, Peclet number, and the channel length to channel hydraulic diameter ratio. The simple model overpredicted the thermally developed temperature compared with the full numerical simulation, but in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The factors that affect the external cooling parameters, such as the heat transfer coefficient, channel configuration, and channel material are also examined based on this simple model. Based on the mass conservation, a simple model is developed that predicts the pressure variations, including the temperature effect. An adverse pressure gradient is required to satisfy the mass conservation requirement. The temperature effect on the pressure gradient is via the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity and electroosmotic velocity.

  18. High pressure low temperature hot pressing method for producing a zirconium carbide ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockeram, Brian V.

    2017-01-10

    A method for producing monolithic Zirconium Carbide (ZrC) is described. The method includes raising a pressure applied to a ZrC powder until a final pressure of greater than 40 MPa is reached; and raising a temperature of the ZrC powder until a final temperature of less than 2200.degree. C. is reached.

  19. Numerical analysis of accidental hydrogen releases from high pressure storage at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Melideo, Daniele; Baraldi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    ) and temperatures (down to 20 K), e.g. cryogenic compressed gas storage covers pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures between 33 K and 338 K. Accurate calculations of high pressure releases require real gas EOS. This paper compares a number of EOS to predict hydrogen properties typical in different storage types...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.215 - Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors. 1065.215 Section 1065.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Measurement of Engine Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.215 Pressure transducers, temperature sensors...

  1. Temperature and pressure measurement based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with gas absorption linewidth detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yunxia; Liu, Tiegen; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ranran

    2014-11-01

    A gas temperature and pressure measurement method based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) detecting linewidth of gas absorption line was proposed in this paper. Combined with Lambert-Beer Law and ideal gas law, the relationship between temperature, pressure and gas linewidth with Lorentzian line shape was investigated in theory. Taking carbon monoxide (CO) at 1567.32 nm for example, the linewidths of gas absorption line in different temperatures and pressures were obtained by simulation. The relationship between the linewidth of second harmonic and temperature, pressure with the coefficient 0.025 pm/K and 0.0645 pm/kPa respectively. According to the relationship of simulation results and detected linewidth, the undefined temperature and pressure of CO gas were measured. The gas temperature and pressure measurement based on linewidth detection, avoiding the influence of laser intensity, is an effective temperature and pressure measurement method. This method also has the ability to detect temperature and pressure of other gases with Lorentzian line shape.

  2. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1-200 bar and temperature range 300-1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients...

  3. Anomalous dependence of the heat capacity of supercooled water on pressure and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Stepanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some papers, dependences of the isobaric heat capacity of water versus pressure and temperature were obtained. It is shown that these dependences contradict both the dependence of heat capacity on temperature for supercooled water, and an important thermodynamic equation for the dependence of heat capacity on pressure. A possible explanation for this contradiction is proposed.

  4. Transformation of ZSM-5 Zeolite Under High Pressure and High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓旸; 赵旭东; 侯为民; 苏文辉

    1994-01-01

    The effect of pressure and temperature on the stability of all-silicon ZSM-5 zeolite is re-ported for the first time.It has been found that ZSM-5 zeolite is directly transformed into ZSM-11 zeolite un-der the pressure of 4.0 GPa at room temperature and that this transformation is irreversible.ZSM-5 zeoliteis transformed into β-quartz by high pressure quenching,which is obtained for the first time at room temper-ature,and coesite under high pressure and high temperature.

  5. Dispersed-phase structure of pressure-atomized sprays at various gas densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, L.-K.; Wu, P.-K.; Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The dispersed-phase structure of the dense-spray region of pressure-atomized sprays was studied for atomization breakup conditions, considering large-scale (9.5 mm initial diameter) water jets in still air at ambient pressures of 1, 2, and 4 atm., with both fully-developed turbulent pipe flow and nonturbulent slug flow at the jet exit. Drop sizes and velocities, and liquid volume fractions and fluxes, were measured using holography. Measurements were compared with predictions based on the locally-homogeneous flow approximation as well as recent correlations of drop sizes after primary breakup of turbulent and nonturbulent liquids. The dispersed-flow region beyond the liquid surface was relatively dilute (liquid volume fractions less than 0.1 percent), with significant separated-flow effects throughout, and evidence of near-limit secondary breakup and drop deformation near the liquid surface. Turbulent primary breakup predictions were satisfactory at atmospheric pressure, where the correlation was developed, but failed to predict observed trends of decreasing drop sizes with increasing gas density due to aerodynamic effects; in contrast, the laminar primary breakup predictions successfully treated the relatively small effects of gas density for this breakup mechanism. Effects of liquid turbulence at the jet exit were qualitatively similar to single-phase flows, yielding faster mixing rates with increased turbulence levels even though drop sizes tended to increase as well.

  6. The influence of temperature and salinity variability on the upper ocean density and mixed layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Helber

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The relative influence of both temperature and salinity on the mixed layer depth (MLD is evaluated using a relationship of binned regressions of MLD on vertical density compensation and isothermal layer depth (ILD from a global set of in situ profile observations. Our approach is inspired by the observations of the difference between the MLD and the sonic layer depth (SLD that evolve seasonally around the global ocean. In this article, we hypothesize that vertical density compensation governs SLD-MLD differences and can be used for mapping the relative influence of temperature and salinity on upper ocean structure. The Turner angle, computed between the surface and 200 m (bulk Turner angle, BTA, serves as a measure of vertical density compensation that quantifies times and areas where either temperature or salinity is destabilizing. For temperature destabilization the ocean exhibits cool/fresh overlying hot/salty water. For salinity destabilization the ocean exhibits hot/salty overlying cool/fresh water. These two classes of density compensation have seasonal variability with different geographical characteristics. Profiles with salinity controlled stable density and destabilizing temperature gradient are found most often at high latitudes. Profiles with temperature controlled stable density and destabilizing salinity gradient are found in the tropics and subtropics of all oceans. Results indicate that about half of the ocean has vertical density compensation that is a necessary condition for SLD-MLD differences. While density compensation is necessary, it is not a sufficient condition for predicting the dependence of MLD on BTA. Density compensation is the dominant factor in MLD variability in heavy river input and subduction regions that cover only ~14% of the ocean.

  7. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  8. Path-integral simulation of ice VII: Pressure and temperature effects

    CERN Document Server

    Herrero, Carlos P

    2015-01-01

    Effects of pressure and temperature on structural and thermodynamic properties of ice VII have been studied by using path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations. Temperatures between 25 and 450 K, as well as pressures up to 12 GPa were considered. Interatomic interactions were modeled by using the effective q-TIP4P/F potential for flexible water. We analyze the pressure dependence of the molar volume, bulk modulus, interatomic distances, kinetic energy, and atomic delocalization at various temperatures. Results of PIMD simulations are compared with those derived from a quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) of vibrational modes, which helps to assess the importance of anharmonic effects, as well as the influence of the different modes on the properties of ice VII. The accuracy of the QHA for describing this high-pressure phase decreases for rising temperature, but this approximation becomes more reliable as pressure grows, since anharmonicity becomes less relevant. Comparisons with low-pressure cubic ice ...

  9. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  10. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though density-functional-theory-based first-principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational efficiency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quantification of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) -based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures at thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC-based force estimators and use them to gain insight into how well the local liquid structure is captured by different density functionals. We find that TPSS, BLYP, and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative differences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and we estimate the magnitudes of these effects when possible.

  11. Effects of Temperature and Pressure on a Novel 1,3,4-Oxadiazole Derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ji-Feng; HAN Yong-Hao; TANG Ben-Chen; GAO Chun-Xiao; LI Min; ZOU Guang-Tian

    2005-01-01

    @@ The electrical resistivity variation of 1,4-bis[(4-methylphenyl)- 1,3, 4-oxadiazolyl]phenylene ( OXD- 1 ) microcrystal is studied under variable pressure and temperature conditions by a quasi four-probe method in a diamond anvil cell.The sample resistivity is calculated with a finite element analysis method.The temperature and pressure dependencies of resistivity of OXD-1 microcrystal are measured up to 150 ℃ and 15 GPa.The resistivity decrease with temperature increasing indicates that OXD-1 exhibits an organic-semiconductor transport property in the experimental pressure region.With pressure increasing, the resistivity of OXD-1 increases firstly and reaches the maximum at about 6.2 GPa, and then begins to decrease as the pressure increases continuously.In situ x-ray diffraction data under pressure provide obvious prove that the anomaly of resistivity variation at 6.2 GPa is caused by the pressure-induced amorphism of OXD-1.

  12. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  13. Thermodynamic Predictions of Thermal Expansivity and Elastic Compliances at High Temperatures and Pressures Applied to Perovskite Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of near zero thermal expansion coefficients at very high pressures is explored for application to the Earth's core materials and mantle dynamics. The pressures in the Earth are large enough to effectively reduce thermal expansion coefficients to values which will decouple heat from mechanical work. It is shown that at pressures below the bulk modulus the thermal expansion coefficient will approach zero in all simple linear-elastic crystalline models. Advanced models of crystalline elastic solids based on interatomic potentials and density functional theory are shown to violate Gibb's potential for a solid, crystalline material described by three elastic matrix compliance entries; it is established that the temperature dependence of S 11 and S 12 are thermodynamically identical; it is also established that the pressure dependence of S 11 and S 12 are thermodynamically identical. The basis for thermal energy in materials is the phonon energy in solids. However, it is noted that heat capacity measurements which are obtained from constant pressure heat capacity conditions converted to constant volume values on isobars are not in the correct state when compared to theoretical models; at atmospheric pressure there may be very little difference between these states but at very high pressures the effect may be major. Very large pressures always reduce thermal expansion coefficients; the importance of very small thermal expansion coefficients is discussed in relation to physical processes deep in the core and mantle of the Earth.

  14. The Grüneisen Parameter of NaCl at High Pressures and Temperatures: a Molecular Dynamics Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Ling-Cang; CHEN Qi-Feng; CUI Shou-Xin; JING Fu-Qian

    2005-01-01

    @@ The isotherms and Griineisen parameters are calculated by using the molecular dynamics (MD) method with an improved Tosi-Fumi pair potential. The results show that the approximate power law dependence of the Griineisen parameter on compression γ = γo( V/Vo )q, with q ≈ 1.078, holds in the temperature range from 298 to 1073K and pressure range from 0 to 60 GPa, and that the Griineisen parameter for a given density of 2.16g/cm3varies with temperature in a wind range from 300 to 10000K, expressed by γ = 1.052 + 0.582exp(-T/4878.56).

  15. Ruby pressure scale in a low-temperature diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Zekko, Yumiko; Jarrige, Ignace; Lin, Jung-Fu; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Ishii, Hirofumi; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2012-12-01

    Laser-excited N and R fluorescence lines of heavily doped ruby have been studied up to 26 GPa at low temperatures. While the intensity of the R lines at ambient pressure significantly decreases with decreasing temperature, the intensity of N lines originating from exchange-coupled Cr ion pairs is enhanced at low temperatures. The pressure induced wavelength shift of the N lines at 19 K is well fitted with an empirical formula similar to the equation for the R1 line, showing that the intense N line could be used as an alternative pressure scale at low temperatures. We also observe continuous increase in non-hydrostaticity with increasing pressure at low temperatures when silicone oil and 4:1 mixture of methanol and ethanol are used as pressure media.

  16. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of organic crystal paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Spencer J.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2016-01-01

    High-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) Raman spectroscopy studies have been performed on the organic crystal paracetamol in a diamond anvil cell utilizing boron-doped heating diamond anvil. Isobaric measurements were conducted at pressures up to 8.5 GPa and temperature up to 520 K in five different experiments. Solid state phase transitions from monoclinic Form I  →  orthorhombic Form II were observed at various pressures and temperatures as well as transitions from Form II  →  unknown Form IV. The melting temperature for paracetamol was observed to increase with increasing pressures to 8.5 GPa. This new data is combined with previous ambient temperature high-pressure Raman and x-ray diffraction data to create the first HPHT phase diagram of paracetamol.

  17. Pressure- and temperature-driven phase transitions in HgTe quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Yahniuk, I.; But, D. B.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Knap, W.; Teppe, F.

    2016-12-01

    We present theoretical investigations of pressure- and temperature-driven phase transitions in HgTe quantum wells grown on a CdTe buffer. Using the eight-band k .p Hamiltonian we calculate evolution of energy-band structure at different quantum well widths with hydrostatic pressure up to 20 kbars and temperature ranging up to 300 K. In particular, we show that, in addition to temperature, tuning of hydrostatic pressure allows us to drive transitions between semimetal, band insulator, and topological insulator phases. Our realistic band-structure calculations reveal that the band inversion under hydrostatic pressure and temperature may be accompanied by nonlocal overlapping between conduction and valence bands. The pressure and temperature phase diagrams are presented.

  18. Influence of coolant temperature and pressure on destructive forces at fuel failure in the NSRR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusagaya, Kazuyuki [Global Nuclear Fuel - Japan Co., Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takehiko; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-01-01

    In order to design a new experimental capsule to be used in the NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) experiment with the temperature and pressure conditions in a typical commercial BWR, coolant temperature and pressure influence is estimated for destructive forces during fuel rod failure in the experiment simulating reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). Considering steam property dependence on temperature and pressure, it is qualitatively shown that the destructive forces in the BWR operation condition are smaller than those in the room temperature and atmospheric pressure condition. Water column velocity, which determines impact by water hammer, is further investigated quantitatively by modeling the experimental system and water hammer phenomenon. As a result, the maximum velocity of the water column in the BWR operation conditions is calculated to be only about 10% of that in the room temperature and atmospheric pressure condition. (author)

  19. Construction Of A Piezoelectric-Based Resonance Ceramic Pressure Sensor Designed For High-Temperature Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Belavič Darko; Bradeško Andraž; Zarnik Marina Santo; Rojac Tadej

    2015-01-01

    In this work the design aspects of a piezoelectric-based resonance ceramic pressure sensor made using low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology and designed for high-temperature applications is presented. The basic pressure-sensor structure consists of a circular, edge-clamped, deformable diaphragm that is bonded to a ring, which is part of the rigid ceramic structure. The resonance pressure sensor has an additional element – a piezoelectric actuator – for stimulating oscillation of ...

  20. Changes of structure and dipole moment of water with temperature and pressure: a first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongdong; Dai, Jiayu; Yuan, Jianmin

    2011-07-14

    The changes of structure and distribution of dipole moment of water with temperatures up to 2800 K and densities up to 2.2 g/cm(3) are investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics. Along the isochore of 1.0 g/cm(3), the structure of liquid water above 800 K is dramatically different from that at ambient conditions, where the hydrogen-bonds network collapses. Along the isotherm of 1800 K, the transition from the liquid state to an amorphous superionic phase occurs at 2.0 g/cm(3) (32.9 GPa), which is not observed along the isotherm of 2800 K. With increasing temperature, the average dipole moment of water molecules is decreased arising from the weakened polarization by the collapse of the hydrogen-bonds network, while it is contrarily increased with compression due to the strengthening effect upon the polarization of water molecules. Both higher temperature and pressure broaden the distribution of dipole moment of water molecules due to the enhanced intramolecular charge fluctuations.

  1. Influence of processing temperature on microstructure and microhardness of copper subjected to high-pressure torsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cu samples were subjected to high-pressure torsion (HPT) with up to 6 turns at room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT),respectively.The effects of temperature on grain refinement and microhardness variation were investigated.For the samples after HPT processing at RT,the grain size reduced from 43 μm to 265 nm,and the Vickers microhardness increased from HV52 to HV140.However,for the samples after HPT processing at LNT,the value of microhardness reached its maximum of HV150 near the center of the sample and it decreased to HV80 at the periphery region.Microstructure observations revealed that HPT straining at LNT induced lamellar structures with thickness less than 100 nm appearing near the central region of the sample,but further deformation induced an inhomogeneous distribution of grain sizes,with submicrometer-sized grains embedded inside micrometer-sized grains.The submicrometer-sized grains with high dislocation density indicated their nonequilibrium nature.On the contrary,the micrometer-sized grains were nearly free of dislocation,without obvious deformation trace remaining in them.These images demonstrated that the appearance of micrometer-sized grains is the result of abnormal grain growth of the deformed fine grains.

  2. Effect of Phase Purity on Dislocation Density of Pressurized-Reactor Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy Grown InN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Takuya; Liu, Yuhuai; Kimura, Takeshi; Zhang, Yuantao; Prasertsuk, Kiattiwut; Watanabe, Haruna; Usami, Noritaka; Katayama, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    The effect of the metastable zincblende (ZB) InN inclusion in the stable wurtzite (WZ) InN on the threading dislocation densities (TDDs) of an InN film grown by pressurized-reactor metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy has been studied by X-ray diffraction measurements. InN films are directly grown on c-plane sapphire substrates with nitrided surfaces at 1600 Torr with the different growth temperature from 500 to 700 °C. Films including ZB-InN show the correlation between the ZB volume fraction and the edge component of TDDs, not the screw component of TDDs. This result can be crystallographically understood by a simple model explaining how the ZB structure is included, i.e., ZB domains existing side-by-side with WZ domains and twined ZB domains. This can be clearly observed by electron backscatter diffraction.

  3. Effect of pressure on closure temperature of a trace element in cooling petrological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Closure temperature is important to many diffusion-related problems involving cooling. The classic model of Dodson and its modifications for cooling petrological systems are formulated at constant pressure. Many petrologic processes involve changes in both temperature and pressure. The effect of changing pressure on diffusional loss in cooling petrological systems has not been considered in Dodson's model. During upwelling, the decompression rate is related to the cooling rate through the slope of the upwelling path. Simple analytical expressions for the average or mean closure temperature and closure pressure in cooling-upwelling mono-mineralic and bi-mineralic systems are obtained by noting that both temperature and pressure decrease as a function of time along the upwelling path. These pressure-adjusted equations are nearly identical to closure temperature equations for isobaric cases if one replaces the activation energy and pre-exponential factor for diffusion in the isobaric formulations by the path-dependent activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The latter also depend on the slope of the upwelling path. The competing effects between pressure and temperature on diffusion during upwelling result in reductions in the effective activation enthalpy for diffusion and exchange enthalpy for partitioning, which in turn leads to systematic deviations in closure temperatures from cases of constant pressure. For systems with large activation volume for diffusion, it may be possible to deduce upwelling path and upwelling rate from closure temperatures and closure pressures of selected elements. Examples of closure temperature and closure pressure for REE diffusion in garnet and clinopyroxene and in garnet-clinopyroxene aggregates are presented and discussed in the context of the minor's rule and the REE-in-garnet-clinopyroxene thermobarometer. Closure temperatures for middle-to-heavy REE in garnet-clinopyroxene aggregates are controlled primarily by diffusion in

  4. Energy-Based Tetrahedron Sensor for High-Temperature, High-Pressure Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Kent L.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic energy-based probe has been developed that incorporates multiple acoustic sensing elements in order to obtain the acoustic pressure and three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity. With these quantities, the user can obtain various energy-based quantities, including acoustic energy density, acoustic intensity, and acoustic impedance. In this specific development, the probe has been designed to operate in an environment characterized by high temperatures and high pressures as is found in the close vicinity of rocket plumes. Given these capabilities, the probe is designed to be used to investigate the acoustic conditions within the plume of a rocket engine or jet engine to facilitate greater understanding of the noise generation mechanisms in those plumes. The probe features sensors mounted inside a solid sphere. The associated electronics for the probe are contained within the sphere and the associated handle for the probe. More importantly, the design of the probe has desirable properties that reduce the bias errors associated with determining the acoustic pressure and velocity using finite sum and difference techniques. The diameter of the probe dictates the lower and upper operating frequencies for the probe, where accurate measurements can be acquired. The current probe design implements a sphere diameter of 1 in. (2.5 cm), which limits the upper operating frequency to about 4.5 kHz. The sensors are operational up to much higher frequencies, and could be used to acquire pressure data at higher frequencies, but the energy-based measurements are limited to that upper frequency. Larger or smaller spherical probes could be designed to go to lower or higher frequency range

  5. Pressure-temperature dependence of growth bottlenecks and phenotypic transitions of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert J.

    2012-02-01

    A vast majority of bacteria and archaea can grow in diverse environmental conditions. The range of those conditions include high pressures, high temperature, low temperature, high salinity, low and high pH etc. We investigate the growth bottlenecks and phenotypic transitions of Escherichia coli (E. coli), a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure and temperature. We find that E.coli can grow and proliferate in a wide range of pressures (1-400 atm) and temperatures (23-40 deg C). Moreover, we find that the division time of E. coli increases monotonically upon increasing pressure and exhibits a sharp increase in division time at pressures between 250-400 atm for all the temperatures investigated in our experiments. The sharp change in division time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. Coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose that this phenotypics changes in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing pressure. Furthermore, we propose an irreversible stochastic model of cell phenotype switching. We find that model fits well the experimental data. We discuss our experimental results in the light of structural and so the functional changes in proteins and structural changes in membranes at different pressure and temperature.

  6. Experimental study on pressure and temperature distributions for low mass flux steam jet in subcooled water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN JunJie; WU XinZhuang; CHONG DaoTong

    2009-01-01

    A low mass flux steam jet in subcooled water was experimentally investigated. The transition of flow pattern from stable jet to condensation oscillation was observed at relatively high water temperature. The axial total pressures, the axial and radial temperature distributions were measured in the jet region. The results indicated that the pressure and temperature distributions were mainly influenced by the water temperature. The correlations corrected with water temperature were given to predict the dimen-sionless axial pressure peak distance and axial temperature distributions in the jet region, the results showed s good agreement between the predictions and experiments. Moreover, the self-similarity property of the radial temperature was obtained, which agreed well with Gauss distribution. In present work, all the dimensionless properties were mainly dependent on the water temperature but weakly on the nozzle size under a certain steam mass flux.

  7. High hydrostatic pressure specifically affects molecular dynamics and shape of low-density lipoprotein particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M.; Lehofer, B.; Martinez, N.; Ollivier, J.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Prassl, R.; Peters, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lipid composition of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its physicochemical characteristics are relevant for proper functioning of lipid transport in the blood circulation. To explore dynamical and structural features of LDL particles with either a normal or a triglyceride-rich lipid composition we combined coherent and incoherent neutron scattering methods. The investigations were carried out under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), which is a versatile tool to study the physicochemical behavior of biomolecules in solution at a molecular level. Within both neutron techniques we applied HHP to probe the shape and degree of freedom of the possible motions (within the time windows of 15 and 100 ps) and consequently the flexibility of LDL particles. We found that HHP does not change the types of motion in LDL, but influences the portion of motions participating. Contrary to our assumption that lipoprotein particles, like membranes, are highly sensitive to pressure we determined that LDL copes surprisingly well with high pressure conditions, although the lipid composition, particularly the triglyceride content of the particles, impacts the molecular dynamics and shape arrangement of LDL under pressure.

  8. Incommensurate atomic density waves in the high-pressure IVb phase of barium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Arakcheeva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The host–guest structures of elements at high pressure discovered a decade ago still leave many open questions due to the lack of precise models based on full exploitation of the diffraction data. This concerns in particular Ba IV, which is stable in the range 12–45 GPa. With the example of phase Ba IVb, which is characterized here for the first time, a systematic analysis is presented of possible host–guest structure models based on high-quality single-crystal diffraction data obtained with synchrotron radiation at six different pressures between 16.5 and 19.6 GPa. It is shown that a new incommensurately modulated (IM structure model better fits the experimental data. Unlike the composite models which are commonly reported for the Ba IV phases, the IM model reveals a density wave and its pressure-dependent evolution. The crucial role played by the selected model in the interpretation of structure evolution under pressure is discussed. The findings give a new experimental basis for a better understanding of the nature of host–guest structures.

  9. Experimental density data and excess molar volumes of coconut biodiesel + n-hexadecane and coconut biodiesel + diesel at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. R. Mesquita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The density of the pure component (n-hexadecane, pure pseudo-components (coconut biodiesel and diesel and pseudo-binary mixtures of coconut biodiesel with n-hexadecane (or + diesel were measured at temperatures 293.15, 313.15, 333.15, 353.15 and 373.15 K and atmospheric pressure, over the entire composition range (mole fractions from 0.1 to 0.9, with a step de 0.1. Densities were determined using an Anton Paar SVM 3000 viscodensimeter. Experimental density values decreased with the increase of the temperature. The excess molar volumes of the pseudo-binary mixtures were calculated by using the experimental values of density. Excess molar volumes were correlated with the Redlich-Kister polynomial expansions. Excess molar volumes show positive and negative values in the two systems studied. Excess partial volumes at infinite dilution were calculated for coconut biodiesel, n-hexadecane and diesel in the mixtures studied.

  10. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature and isospin density with the functional renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyue; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2017-07-01

    The pion superfluid and the corresponding Goldstone and soft modes are investigated in a two-flavor quark-meson model with a functional renormalization group. By solving the flow equations for the effective potential and the meson two-point functions at finite temperature and isospin density, the critical temperature for the superfluid increases sizeably in comparison with solving the flow equation for the potential only. The spectral function for the soft mode shows clearly a transition from meson gas to quark gas with increasing temperature and a crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of quarks with increasing isospin density.

  11. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  12. Temperature and population density effects on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, T M; Faurby, S; Kjærsgaard, A; Pertoldi, C; Loeschcke, V; Hald, B; Bahrndorff, S

    2013-12-01

    The behavior of ectotherm organisms is affected by both abiotic and biotic factors. However, a limited number of studies have investigated the synergistic effects on behavioral traits. This study examined the effect of temperature and density on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (L.). Locomotor activity was measured for both sexes and at four densities (with mixed sexes) during a full light and dark (L:D) cycle at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C. Locomotor activity during daytime increased with temperature at all densities until reaching 30°C and then decreased. High-density treatments significantly reduced the locomotor activity per fly, except at 15°C. For both sexes, daytime activity also increased with temperature until reaching 30 and 35°C for males and females, respectively, and thereafter decreased. Furthermore, males showed a significantly higher and more predictable locomotor activity than females. During nighttime, locomotor activity was considerably lower for all treatments. Altogether the results of the current study show that there is a significant interaction of temperature and density on daytime locomotor activity of M. domestica and that houseflies are likely to show significant changes in locomotor activity with change in temperature.

  13. Large-strain time-temperature equivalence in high density polyethylene for prediction of extreme deformation and damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray G.T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Time-temperature equivalence is a widely recognized property of many time-dependent material systems, where there is a clear predictive link relating the deformation response at a nominal temperature and a high strain-rate to an equivalent response at a depressed temperature and nominal strain-rate. It has been found that high-density polyethylene (HDPE obeys a linear empirical formulation relating test temperature and strain-rate. This observation was extended to continuous stress-strain curves, such that material response measured in a load frame at large strains and low strain-rates (at depressed temperatures could be translated into a temperature-dependent response at high strain-rates and validated against Taylor impact results. Time-temperature equivalence was used in conjuction with jump-rate compression tests to investigate isothermal response at high strain-rate while exluding adiabatic heating. The validated constitutive response was then applied to the analysis of Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion of HDPE, a tensile analog to Taylor impact developed at LANL. The Dyn-Ten-Ext test results and FEA found that HDPE deformed smoothly after exiting the die, and after substantial drawing appeared to undergo a pressure-dependent shear damage mechanism at intermediate velocities, while it fragmented at high velocities. Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion, properly coupled with a validated constitutive model, can successfully probe extreme tensile deformation and damage of polymers.

  14. INVESTIGATION ON STABILITY OF PZT/EPOXY PIEZOCOMPOSITE WITH PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Likun Wang; Yuanyuan Wan; Li Li; Lei Qin; Yi Lu

    2009-01-01

    With the universal test machine and temperature test chamber, the effect of pres-sure and temperature on the behavior of 1-3 and 1-3-2 piezocomposites prepared with PZT/epoxy in our lab has been investigated through electrical impedance and dielectric analysis. The per-mittivity, resonant frequency and dielectric loss of the composites have been measured under vertical stress and temperature, and the variety of the material properties under pressure and temperature could also be obtained. The pressure and temperature stability of the composites have been assessed through experiments. The data of these two types of composites indicated that the stability of 1-3-2 composite with pressure was better than that of 1-3 composite, and two composites have almost the same dielectric stability with temperature. However, 1-3-2 composite showed slower frequency variation than 1-3 composite.

  15. Computation of compressible flows with high density ratio and pressure ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rong-san

    2008-01-01

    The WENO method, RKDG method, RKDG method with original ghost fluid method, and RKDG method with modified ghost fluid method are applied to single-medium and two-medium air-air, air-liquid compressible flows with high density and pressure ratios. We also provide a numerical comparison and analysis for the above methods. Numerical results show that, compared with the other methods, the RKDG method with modified ghost fluid method can obtain high resolution results and the correct position of the shock, and the computed solutions are converged to the physical solutions as the mesh is refined.

  16. N Vibrational Temperatures and OH Number Density Measurements in a NS Pulse Discharge Hydrogen-Air Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yichen; Winters, Caroline; Jans, Elijah R.; Frederickson, Kraig; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2017-06-01

    This work presents time-resolved measurements of nitrogen vibrational temperature, translational-rotational temperature, and absolute OH number density in lean hydrogen-air mixtures excited in a diffuse filament nanosecond pulse discharge, at a pressure of 100 Torr and high specific energy loading. The main objective of these measurements is to study a possible effect of nitrogen vibrational excitation on low-temperature kinetics of HO2 and OH radicals. N2 vibrational temperature and gas temperature in the discharge and the afterglow are measured by ns broadband Coherent Anti-Stokes Scattering (CARS). Hydroxyl radical number density is measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) calibrated by Rayleigh scattering. The results show that the discharge generates strong vibrational nonequilibrium in air and H2-air mixtures for delay times after the discharge pulse of up to 1 ms, with peak vibrational temperature of Tv ≈ 2000 K at T ≈ 500 K. Nitrogen vibrational temperature peaks ≈ 200 μs after the discharge pulse, before decreasing due to vibrational-translational relaxation by O atoms (on the time scale of a few hundred μs) and diffusion (on ms time scale). OH number density increases gradually after the discharge pulse, peaking at t 100-300 μs and decaying on a longer time scale, until t 1 ms. Both OH rise time and decay time decrease as H2 fraction in the mixture is increased from 1% to 5%. OH number density in a 1% H2-air mixture peaks at approximately the same time as vibrational temperature in air, suggesting that OH kinetics may be affected by N2 vibrational excitation. However, preliminary kinetic modeling calculations demonstrate that OH number density overshoot is controlled by known reactions of H and O radicals generated in the plasma, rather than by dissociation by HO2 radical in collisions with vibrationally excited N2 molecules, as has been suggested earlier. Additional measurements at higher specific energy loadings and kinetic modeling

  17. Predicting monsoon rainfall and pressure indices from sea surface temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The relationship between the sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indian Ocean and monsoon rainfall has been examined by using 21 years data set (1967-87) of MOHSST.6 (Met. Office Historical Sea Surface Temperature data set, obtained from U.K. Met...

  18. Effects of Supercritical Fluids, Pressure, Temperature, and Molecular Structure on the Rheological Properties of Molten Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Eon; Dealy, John M.

    2008-07-01

    Since high pressures are involved in most plastics forming processes, reliable high-pressure rheological data are required for the simulation of the processes. The effect of pressure is in some ways the reverse of that of temperature; for example increasing temperature decreases the viscosity, while pressure increases it. Supercritical fluids (SCFs) such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen can act as physical blowing agents in the manufacture of foams and as plasticizers to reduce melt viscosity during processing. The effects of dissolved SCF, pressure, and temperature on the rheological properties of a melt must be known to achieve optimum processing conditions. We used a rotational rheometer and a high-pressure sliding plate rheometer, in which the shear strain, temperature, pressure, and SCF concentration are all uniform. A shear stress transducer senses the stress in the center of the sample to avoid edge effects. It was possible to use shift factors for temperature, pressure and SCF (CO2 or N2) concentration to obtain a master curve. The effect of temperature could be described by the Arrhenius or WLF models, and the effect of pressure was described by the Barus equation. The effect of SCF concentration could be described by the Fujita-Kishimoto equation. The relative effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity were quantified. To study the effects of short and long chain branching and a phenyl side group, three polymers were used: polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene. We quantified the effects of short- and long-chain branching, pressure, temperature and dissolved SCF on the rheological properties of these three polymers by use of shift factors.

  19. High temperature and pressure effects on the elastic properties of B2 intermetallics AgRE

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Lili; Wu Xiaozhi; Li Weiguo; Wang Rui; Liu Qing

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature and pressure effects on the elastic properties of the AgRE (RE=Sc, Tm, Er, Dy, Tb) intermetallic compounds with B2 structure have been performed from first principle calculations. For the temperature range 0-1000 K, the second order elastic constants for all the AgRE intermetallic compounds follow a normal behavior: they decrease with increasing temperature. The pressure dependence of the second order elastic constants has been investigated on the ...

  20. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-08-31

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  1. Phase relation of CaSO4 at high pressure and temperature up to 90 GPa and 2300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Taku; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Inoue, Toru

    2016-05-01

    Calcium sulfate (CaSO4), one of the major sulfate minerals in the Earth's crust, is expected to play a major role in sulfur recycling into the deep mantle. Here, we investigated the crystal structure and phase relation of CaSO4 up to ~90 GPa and 2300 K through a series of high-pressure experiments combined with in situ X-ray diffraction. CaSO4 forms three thermodynamically stable polymorphs: anhydrite (stable below 3 GPa), monazite-type phase (stable between 3 and ~13 GPa) and barite-type phase (stable up to at least 93 GPa). Anhydrite to monazite-type phase transition is induced by pressure even at room temperature, while monazite- to barite-type transition requires heating at least to 1500 K at ~20 GPa. The barite-type phase cannot always be quenched from high temperature and is distorted to metastable AgMnO4-type structure or another modified barite structure depending on pressure. We obtained the pressure-volume data and density of anhydrite, monazite- and barite-type phases and found that their densities are lower than those calculated from the PREM model in the studied P-T conditions. This suggests that CaSO4 is gravitationally unstable in the mantle and fluid/melt phase into which sulfur dissolves and/or sulfate-sulfide speciation may play a major role in the sulfur recycling into the deep Earth.

  2. Graphene, a material for high temperature devices; intrinsic carrier density, carrier drift velocity, and lattice energy

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Yan; Wang, Li; Jin, Kuijuan; Wang, Wenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Heat has always been a killing matter for traditional semiconductor machines. The underlining physical reason is that the intrinsic carrier density of a device made from a traditional semiconductor material increases very fast with a rising temperature. Once reaching a temperature, the density surpasses the chemical doping or gating effect, any p-n junction or transistor made from the semiconductor will fail to function. Here, we measure the intrinsic Fermi level (|E_F|=2.93k_B*T) or intrinsic carrier density (n_in=3.87*10^6 cm^-2 K^-2*T^2), carrier drift velocity, and G mode phonon energy of graphene devices and their temperature dependencies up to 2400 K. Our results show intrinsic carrier density of graphene is an order of magnitude less sensitive to temperature than those of Si or Ge, and reveal the great potentials of graphene as a material for high temperature devices. We also observe a linear decline of saturation drift velocity with increasing temperature, and identify the temperature coefficients of ...

  3. Invited Article: High-pressure techniques for condensed matter physics at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yejun; Jaramillo, R.; Wang, Jiyang; Ren, Yang; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2010-04-01

    Condensed matter experiments at high pressure accentuate the need for accurate pressure scales over a broad range of temperatures, as well as placing a premium on a homogeneous pressure environment. However, challenges remain in diamond anvil cell technology, including both the quality of various pressure transmitting media and the accuracy of secondary pressure scales at low temperature. We directly calibrate the ruby fluorescence R1 line shift with pressure at T=4.5 K using high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction measurements of the silver lattice constant and its known equation of state up to P=16 GPa. Our results reveal a ruby pressure scale at low temperatures that differs by 6% from the best available ruby scale at room T. We also use ruby fluorescence to characterize the pressure inhomogeneity and anisotropy in two representative and commonly used pressure media, helium and methanol:ethanol 4:1, under the same preparation conditions for pressures up to 20 GPa at T=5 K. Contrary to the accepted wisdom, both media show equal levels of pressure inhomogeneity measured over the same area, with a consistent ΔP /P per unit area of ±1.8%/(104 μm2) from 0 to 20 GPa. The helium medium shows an essentially constant deviatoric stress of 0.021±0.011 GPa up to 16 GPa, while the methanol:ethanol mixture shows a similar level of anisotropy up to 10 GPa, above which the anisotropy increases. The quality of both pressure media is further examined under the more stringent requirements of single crystal x-ray diffraction at cryogenic temperature. For such experiments we conclude that the ratio of sample-to-pressure chamber volume is a critical parameter in maintaining sample quality at high pressure, and may affect the choice of pressure medium.

  4. Invited article: High-pressure techniques for condensed matter physics at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yejun; Jaramillo, R; Wang, Jiyang; Ren, Yang; Rosenbaum, T F

    2010-04-01

    Condensed matter experiments at high pressure accentuate the need for accurate pressure scales over a broad range of temperatures, as well as placing a premium on a homogeneous pressure environment. However, challenges remain in diamond anvil cell technology, including both the quality of various pressure transmitting media and the accuracy of secondary pressure scales at low temperature. We directly calibrate the ruby fluorescence R1 line shift with pressure at T=4.5 K using high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction measurements of the silver lattice constant and its known equation of state up to P=16 GPa. Our results reveal a ruby pressure scale at low temperatures that differs by 6% from the best available ruby scale at room T. We also use ruby fluorescence to characterize the pressure inhomogeneity and anisotropy in two representative and commonly used pressure media, helium and methanol:ethanol 4:1, under the same preparation conditions for pressures up to 20 GPa at T=5 K. Contrary to the accepted wisdom, both media show equal levels of pressure inhomogeneity measured over the same area, with a consistent DeltaP/P per unit area of +/-1.8 %/(10(4) microm(2)) from 0 to 20 GPa. The helium medium shows an essentially constant deviatoric stress of 0.021+/-0.011 GPa up to 16 GPa, while the methanol:ethanol mixture shows a similar level of anisotropy up to 10 GPa, above which the anisotropy increases. The quality of both pressure media is further examined under the more stringent requirements of single crystal x-ray diffraction at cryogenic temperature. For such experiments we conclude that the ratio of sample-to-pressure chamber volume is a critical parameter in maintaining sample quality at high pressure, and may affect the choice of pressure medium.

  5. Invited article : High pressure standards for condensed matter physics at low temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Y.; Jaramillo, R.; Wang, J.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-04-01

    Condensed matter experiments at high pressure accentuate the need for accurate pressure scales over a broad range of temperatures, as well as placing a premium on a homogeneous pressure environment. However, challenges remain in diamond anvil cell technology, including both the quality of various pressure transmitting media and the accuracy of secondary pressure scales at low temperature. We directly calibrate the ruby fluorescence R1 line shift with pressure at T = 4.5 K using high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction measurements of the silver lattice constant and its known equation of state up to P = 16 GPa. Our results reveal a ruby pressure scale at low temperatures that differs by 6% from the best available ruby scale at room T. We also use ruby fluorescence to characterize the pressure inhomogeneity and anisotropy in two representative and commonly used pressure media, helium and methanol:ethanol 4:1, under the same preparation conditions for pressures up to 20 GPa at T = 5 K. Contrary to the accepted wisdom, both media show equal levels of pressure inhomogeneity measured over the same area, with a consistent {Delta}P/P per unit area of {+-}1.8?%/(10{sup 4}{mu}m{sup 2}) from 0 to 20 GPa. The helium medium shows an essentially constant deviatoric stress of 0.021{+-}/{+-}0.011 GPa up to 16 GPa, while the methanol:ethanol mixture shows a similar level of anisotropy up to 10 GPa, above which the anisotropy increases. The quality of both pressure media is further examined under the more stringent requirements of single crystal x-ray diffraction at cryogenic temperature. For such experiments we conclude that the ratio of sample-to-pressure chamber volume is a critical parameter in maintaining sample quality at high pressure, and may affect the choice of pressure medium.

  6. Hydrogen and carbon vapour pressure isotope effects in liquid fluoroform studied by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, Takao; Mitome, Ryota; Yanase, Satoshi [Sophia Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    2017-06-01

    H/D and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C vapour pressure isotope effects (VPIEs) in liquid fluoroform (CHF{sub 3}) were studied at the MPW1PW91/6-31 ++ G(d) level of theory. The CHF{sub 3} monomer and CHF{sub 3} molecules surrounded by other CHF{sub 3} molecules in every direction in CHF{sub 3} clusters were used as model molecules of vapour and liquid CHF{sub 3}. Although experimental results in which the vapour pressure of liquid {sup 12}CHF{sub 3} is higher than that of liquid {sup 12}CDF{sub 3} and the vapour pressure of liquid {sup 13}CHF{sub 3} is higher than that of liquid {sup 12}CHF{sub 3} between 125 and 212 K were qualitatively reproduced, the present calculations overestimated the H/D VPIE and underestimated the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C VPIE. Temperature-dependent intermolecular interactions between hydrogen and fluorine atoms of neighbouring molecules were required to explain the temperature dependences of both H/D and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C VPIEs.

  7. Low-Pressure Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    titanium carbide and titanium boride from the elements without applying isostatic pressure. The experimental study was limited to the synthesis of... titanium carbide and titanium bioride with and without a nickel matrix phase. SHS is now state of the art in the Soviet Union for the production of

  8. Comparison of energy efficiency and power density in pressure retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural → anthropogenic → engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the

  9. Comparison of Energy Efficiency and Power Density in Pressure Retarded Osmosis and Reverse Electrodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, NY; Elimelech, M

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural -> anthropogenic -> engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the

  10. Novel High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Utilizing SiC Integrated Circuit Twin Ring Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, M.; Neudeck, P.; Spry, D.; Meredith, R.; Jordan, J.; Prokop, N.; Krasowski, M.; Beheim, G.; Hunter, G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes initial development and testing of a novel high temperature capacitive pressure sensor system. The pressure sensor system consists of two 4H-SiC 11-stage ring oscillators and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. One oscillator has the capacitive pressure sensor fixed at one node in its feedback loop and varies as a function of pressure and temperature while the other provides a pressure-independent reference frequency which can be used to temperature compensate the output of the first oscillator. A two-day repeatability test was performed up to 500C on the oscillators and the oscillator fundamental frequency changed by only 1. The SiCN capacitive pressure sensor was characterized at room temperature from 0 to 300 psi. The sensor had an initial capacitance of 3.76 pF at 0 psi and 1.75 pF at 300 psi corresponding to a 54 change in capacitance. The integrated pressure sensor system was characterized from 0 to 300 psi in steps of 50 psi over a temperature range of 25 to 500C. The pressure sensor system sensitivity was 0.113 kHzpsi at 25C and 0.026 kHzpsi at 500C.

  11. Effects of pressure and temperature on the thermal properties of a salt and a quartz monzonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-03-27

    Measurements have been made of thermal conductivity, diffusivity, and linear expansion as a function of temperature (to 573 K) and hydrostatic pressure (to 50 MPa) on two rocks, Avery Island domal salt and Climax Stock quartz monzonite. For Avery Island salt the thermal properties do not show any pressure dependence and are approximately the same values as for single crystal halite at 0.1 MPa. The lack of pressure dependence is attributed to the high symmetry of halite (cubic) and to its low strength, both of which inhibit brittle fracturing. For Climax Stock quartz monzonite no pressure dependence of thermal diffusivity has been resolved, but conductivity does show a drop of approximately 10% with decreasing pressure from 50 to 3 MPa. The pressure dependence is not measurably altered by heating the rock to as high as 473 K under 50 MPa. Our measurements so far on the thermal conductivity of quartz monzonite vs temperature and pressure are in agreement with predictions of the Walsh and Decker (1966) model of thermal conductivity vs crack porosity based on independent measurements of crack porosity vs temperature and pressure for the same quartz monzonite. Heating to temperatures greater than 473 K at 50 MPa, or heating to lower temperatures at lower pressures, should substantially reduce thermal conductivity of the quart monzonite.

  12. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  13. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Vela, Alberto, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  14. Modeled Seasonal Variations of Firn Density Induced by Steady State Surface Air Temperature Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Li; Zwally, H. Jay; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal variations of firn density in ice-sheet firn layers have been attributed to variations in deposition processes or other processes within the upper firn. A recent high-resolution (mm scale) density profile, measured along a 181 m core from Antarctica, showed small-scale density variations with a clear seasonal cycle that apparently was not-related to seasonal variations in deposition or known near-surface processes (Gerland and others 1999). A recent model of surface elevation changes (Zwally and Li, submitted) produced a seasonal variation in firn densification, and explained the seasonal surface elevation changes observed by satellite radar altimeters. In this study, we apply our 1-D time-dependent numerical model of firn densification that includes a temperature-dependent formulation of firn densification based on laboratory measurements of grain growth. The model is driven by a steady-state seasonal surface temperature and a constant accumulation rate appropriate for the measured Antarctic ice core. The modeled seasonal variations in firn density show that the layers of snow deposited during spring to mid-summer with the highest temperature history compress to the highest density, and the layers deposited during later summer to autumn with the lowest temperature history compress to the lowest density. The initial amplitude of the seasonal difference of about 0.13 reduces to about 0.09 in five years and asymptotically to 0.92 at depth, which is consistent with the core measurements.

  15. Pressure- and Temperature-Dependent Study of Heusler Alloys Cu2MGa (M = Cr and V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dinesh C.; Ghosh, Sukriti

    2017-04-01

    Full-potential computation of the electronic, magnetic, elastic and thermodynamic properties of Cu2MGa (M = Cr and V) alloys has been performed in the most stable Fm-3 m phase. The equilibrium lattice parameter is 5.9660 Å for Cu2CrGa and 5.9629 Å for Cu2VGa in the stable state. The application of mBJ potential has also found no energy gap in these alloys in either of the spin channels, hence they are metallic. The total and partial density of states, second-order elastic constants and their combinations are computed to show the electronic, magnetic, stability and brittle or ductile nature of these alloys, which are reported for the first time. Cauchy's pressure and Pugh's index predict Cu2CrGa to be brittle and Cu2VGa to be ductile. Both the materials are stiff enough to break. We have found that both the compounds are anisotropic, ferromagnetic and metallic in nature. We have used quasi-harmonic approximations to study the pressure and temperature variation of the thermodynamic properties of these alloys.

  16. Alumina ceramic based high-temperature performance of wireless passive pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Wu, Guozhu; Guo, Tao; Tan, Qiulin

    2016-12-01

    A wireless passive pressure sensor equivalent to inductive-capacitive (LC) resonance circuit and based on alumina ceramic is fabricated by using high temperature sintering ceramic and post-fire metallization processes. Cylindrical copper spiral reader antenna and insulation layer are designed to realize the wireless measurement for the sensor in high temperature environment. The high temperature performance of the sensor is analyzed and discussed by studying the phase-frequency and amplitude-frequency characteristics of reader antenna. The average frequency change of sensor is 0.68 kHz/°C when the temperature changes from 27°C to 700°C and the relative change of twice measurements is 2.12%, with high characteristic of repeatability. The study of temperature-drift characteristic of pressure sensor in high temperature environment lays a good basis for the temperature compensation methods and insures the pressure signal readout accurately.

  17. Alumina ceramic based high-temperature performance of wireless passive pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Wu, Guozhu; Guo, Tao; Tan, Qiulin

    2016-07-01

    A wireless passive pressure sensor equivalent to inductive-capacitive (LC) resonance circuit and based on alumina ceramic is fabricated by using high temperature sintering ceramic and post-fire metallization processes. Cylindrical copper spiral reader antenna and insulation layer are designed to realize the wireless measurement for the sensor in high temperature environment. The high temperature performance of the sensor is analyzed and discussed by studying the phase-frequency and amplitude-frequency characteristics of reader antenna. The average frequency change of sensor is 0.68 kHz/°C when the temperature changes from 27°C to 700°C and the relative change of twice measurements is 2.12%, with high characteristic of repeatability. The study of temperature-drift characteristic of pressure sensor in high temperature environment lays a good basis for the temperature compensation methods and insures the pressure signal readout accurately.

  18. Density of biofuel in function of temperature; Densidade de biocombustiveis em funcao da temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Melina C.J.; Lopes, Afonso [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCAV/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Engenharia Rural], email: melina_cais@yahoo.com.br; Camara, Felipe T. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Cariri, CE (Brazil); Lima, Leomar P. [Instituto Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (IFTM), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Considering the oil a non-renewable natural resource, Biodiesel is an alternative fuel, the same being renewable, biodegradable and made from vegetable oil or residual transesterified with anhydrous alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. This study aimed to evaluate the density of biodiesel methyl filtered residual oil from the university cafeteria, biodiesel methyl filtered hydrogenated fat residual McDonald's and the density of the mixture of 50% of residual oil from the university cafeteria with 50% of hydrogenated fat residual McDonald's all a function of temperature (10 deg C to 70 deg C). The experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Engineering Department of UNESP-Jaboticabal, SP. Was used 3x13x7 factorial experimental design, which represent three types of biodiesel, 13 July and the temperatures of the mixtures. We conclude that the residual oil biodiesel university restaurant density was lower, while biodiesel from hydrogenated fat from McDonald's and the mixture had higher densities, but differ from each other. The diesel (B0) had the lowest density and Biodiesel (B100) the largest. The B0 and B5 blends did not differ regarding density, but differed from the mix B15, B25, B50, B75 and B100. For all the mixtures tested, with the increase of temperature decreased the density. (author)

  19. Temperature effects on wood anatomy, wood density, photosynthesis and biomass partitioning of Eucalyptus grandis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D S; Montagu, K D; Conroy, J P

    2007-02-01

    Wood density, a gross measure of wood mass relative to wood volume, is important in our understanding of stem volume growth, carbon sequestration and leaf water supply. Disproportionate changes in the ratio of wood mass to volume may occur at the level of the whole stem or the individual cell. In general, there is a positive relationship between temperature and wood density of eucalypts, although this relationship has broken down in recent years with wood density decreasing as global temperatures have risen. To determine the anatomical causes of the effects of temperature on wood density, Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden seedlings were grown in controlled-environment cabinets at constant temperatures from 10 to 35 degrees C. The 20% increase in wood density of E. grandis seedlings grown at the higher temperatures was variously related to a 40% reduction in lumen area of xylem vessels, a 10% reduction in the lumen area of fiber cells and a 10% increase in fiber cell wall thickness. The changes in cell wall characteristics could be considered analogous to changes in carbon supply. Lumen area of fiber cells declined because of reduced fiber cell expansion and increased fiber cell wall thickening. Fiber cell wall thickness was positively related to canopy CO2 assimilation rate (Ac), which increased 26-fold because of a 24-fold increase in leaf area and a doubling in leaf CO2 assimilation rate from minima at 10 and 35 degrees C to maxima at 25 and 30 degrees C. Increased Ac increased seedling volume, biomass and wood density; but increased wood density was also related to a shift in partitioning of seedling biomass from roots to stems as temperature increased.

  20. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Gliding arc discharges have generally been used to generate non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. Temperature distributions of a gliding arc are of great interest both for fundamental plasma research and for practical applications. In the presented studies, translational, rotational...... and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  1. Simultaneous measurement of electron temperature and density by a line pair method in the RFP plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masayuki; Shimizu, S.; Ogawa, H.; Shinohara, T.

    2009-11-01

    A line-pair-method has been applied for a simultaneous measurement of the electron temperature and density in ATRAS RFP plasma. Three helium spectrum lines (668nm, 706nm, 728nm) were measured during the discharge at the same time and the electron temperature and density is estimated by using a Collision-Radiation model. To get the signal of the helium impunity line from the RFP discharge, the RFP plasma in the hydrogen gas with a few mixed helium gas was formed. In the typical ATRAS RFP discharge of the plasma current of 60kA, the electron temperature was approximately 50-150 eV and the electron density is the order of 10^18 m-3. During the discharge, the change of the temperature and density are mutually related and this correlation was the almost reverse phase. The periodically change of the temperature and density were also observed. This change synchronizes with a periodically increase of the averaged toroidal magnetic field, which is caused by the toroidal rotation of the increase of the toroidal magnetic field. This rotation, which is deeply related with dynamo effect, makes the plasma energy lose and particles also diffuse toward the plasma edge. As a result, the recycling of the particle and energy are occurred at the same time.

  2. Influence of excitation frequency on helium metastable density in atmospheric pressure DBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Sadeghi, N.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric-pressure helium was sustained over a wide range of excitation frequencies (50 kHz to 15 MHz). Emission spectroscopy and resonant absorption and laser absorption on He(23S) metastable atoms have been used to characterize different plasma regimes, which with increasing frequency changes from a low pressure glow discharge (APGD) to Townsend-like mode (TL) and finally to a continuously sustained plasma. This later can be in Ω mode (with uniform E-field) or RF- α mode (with sheath formation). Depending on applied power, the time-averaged He(23S) density remains below 3 1016 m-3 in TL and Ω modes, can reach 7 1016 m-3 in APGD and RF- α modes and up to 4 1017 m-3 in a combination of APGD and RF- α modes (Hybrid). Time-resolved He(23S) densities show an overshoot on the ignition phase, which in RF- α mode can be attributed to a secondary source of ionization involving metastable atoms.

  3. EFFECT OF CROSSLINK DENSITY ON THE HIGH PRESSURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF UHMWPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Ebru; Beckos, Christine Godleski; Ghali, Bassem W.; Lozynsky, Andrew J.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a bearing surface material for total joint implants. It is radiation cross-linked for high wear resistance and is melted or treated with vitamin E for oxidative stability. We investigated high pressure crystallization (HPC) of irradiated UHMWPE as an alternative method to improve the mechanical strength while stabilizing the residual free radicals from radiation crosslinking. HPC of uncross-linked UHMWPE has resulted in the formation of extended chain crystals and increased crystallinity, leading to improved strength. We hypothesized that increased cross-link density would hinder crystallization during HPC due to decreased chain mobility. Therefore, we investigated the crystalline structure and tensile mechanical properties of high pressure crystallized 25-, 65- and 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPE. We also determined free radical content and wear. The strength of 25- and 65-kGy irradiated UHMWPEs was improved by HPC with increased crystallinity and crystal size. 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPE did not show improved strength, supporting our hypothesis that decreased chain mobility would hinder crystal formation and strength improvement. None of the HPC irradiated UHMWPEs contained detectable free radicals and their wear properties were maintained, suggesting oxidative and mechanical stability in the long term. Therefore, HPC can be used effectively for imparting oxidative stability while strength improvement can be achieved for irradiated UHMWPE with low to moderate crosslink density. PMID:19213055

  4. Double Ionization Gauge for Atmosphere Density/Pressure Measurements On Board the Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, V.; Shturkov, O.; Balugin, N.; Zhurin, S.; Kusov, A.

    2015-09-01

    A description of the ionization gauge for atmospheric density/pressure measurements on board a Russian meteorological rocket is presented. Its operation is based on the principle employed in an ionization gauge. The measuring density/pressure range is 1 06 102 kg/m3 / 10 ~ - 10 mm Hg. There are two output channels for ion and electron current measurements, respectively. The calibration curves are in a fairly good agreement with the classical electron impact ionization theory. The calibration error is less than 7%, that has been definitely confirmed through laboratory bench calibration. This rocket-borne device does not require pre-flight sealing. It greatly simplifies the design of the flight device. The ionization source is an electron flux emitted from the surface of a semi-impermeable metal plate under the influence of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. The vUv radiation source is a portable glow-discharge krypton lamp. The flight instrument has been tested for shock loads up to 200 g for rocket measurement applications.

  5. Effect of sputtering pressure on stacking fault density and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoPt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Woong; Oh, Young-Wan; Kim, Dae-Hoon; Kim, Jai-Young; Park, Byong-Guk

    2016-09-01

    We report the effects of Ar sputtering pressure on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in disordered CoPt alloys via the modulation of stacking fault density. The coercivity and anisotropy field of CoPt alloys are gradually enlarged with an increase in Ar sputtering pressure from 3 mTorr to 30 mTorr. Structural analyses using transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and x-ray reflectivity show that the structural properties of the samples, such as roughness or grain size, are not significantly changed by variations in Ar sputtering pressure. On the other hand, in-plane x-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the stacking fault density is reduced in films grown under higher pressure, and instead favors HCP stacking. Our results suggest that perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoPt alloys can be enhanced by the growth of the sample under a high Ar sputtering pressure, which decreases stacking fault density.

  6. Gas temperature determination in an argon non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure from broadenings of atomic emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubero, C.; Rodero, A.; Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Gamero, A.; García, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    In this work a new spectroscopic method, allowing gas temperature determination in argon non-thermal plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure, is presented. The method is based on the measurements of selected pairs of argon atomic lines (Ar I 603.2 nm/Ar I 549.6 nm, Ar I 603.2 nm/Ar I 522.1 nm, Ar I 549.6 nm/Ar I 522.1 nm). For gas temperature determination using the proposed method, there is no need of knowing the electron density, neither making assumptions on the degree of thermodynamic equilibrium existing in the plasma. The values of the temperatures obtained using this method, have been compared with the rotational temperatures derived from the OH ro-vibrational bands, using both, the well-known Boltzmann-plot technique and the best fitting to simulated ro-vibrational bands. A very good agreement has been found.

  7. Critical temperature of metallic hydrogen at a pressure of 500 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Eliashberg theory generalized for electron-phonon systems with a variable electron density of states is used to study T c in the I41/AMD phase of metallic hydrogen under compression taking into account the frequency behavior of the renormalization of the mass of the electron and the chemical potential. The phonon contribution to the anomalous electron Green's function is considered. Pairing is taken into account within the entire electron band rather than in a narrow region near the Fermi surface. The frequency and temperature dependences of the complex renormalization of the mass Re Z(ω), as well as the density of states N(ω) renormalized by the electron-phonon coupling and the spectral function of the electron-phonon coupling, which are obtained in calculations, are used to calculate the anomalous electron Green's function. The frequency dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the order parameter in the I41/AMD phase is obtained. The solution of the system of Eliashberg equations gives the value T c = 217 K in the I41/AMD phase of hydrogen at a pressure of 500 GPa.

  8. Rotating Pressure and Temperature Measurements on Scale Model Fans Using Luminescent Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure and temperature sensitive paint (PSP, TSP) technology is a rapidly developing measurement technique that is widely accepted in external aerodynamic wind tunnel measurements. Almost all quantitative full field measurements have been on stationary surfaces. Rotating pressure and temperature measurements were successfully acquired during scale-model fan tests in the NASA Lewis Research Center 9 foot by 15 foot low speed wind tunnel at speeds as high as 9500 RPM. The use of PSP and TSP on rotating surfaces presents additional challenges to data acquisition. This paper describes in detail the techniques used to acquire global rotating pressure and temperature measurements and overcome the problems associated with this type of measurement. These include illumination and detection problems associated with moving surfaces, temperature dependence of PSP and limited emitted light available from short duration illumination sources. Solutions to these problems as well as pressure and temperature results will be discussed.

  9. Leak detection in medium density polyethylene (MDPE) pipe using pressure transient method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M. M.; Ghazali, M. F.; PiRemli, M. A.; Hamat, A. M. A.; Adnan, N. F.

    2015-12-01

    Water is an essential part of commodity for a daily life usage for an average person, from personal uses such as residential or commercial consumers to industries utilization. This study emphasizes on detection of leaking in medium density polyethylene (MDPE) pipe using pressure transient method. This type of pipe is used to analyze the position of the leakage in the pipeline by using Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Method (EEMD) with signal masking. Water hammer would induce an impulse throughout the pipeline that caused the system turns into a surge of water wave. Thus, solenoid valve is used to create a water hammer through the pipelines. The data from the pressure sensor is collected using DASYLab software. The data analysis of the pressure signal will be decomposed into a series of wave composition using EEMD signal masking method in matrix laboratory (MATLAB) software. The series of decomposition of signals is then carefully selected which reflected intrinsic mode function (IMF). These IMFs will be displayed by using a mathematical algorithm, known as Hilbert transform (HT) spectrum. The IMF signal was analysed to capture the differences. The analyzed data is compared with the actual measurement of the leakage in term of percentage error. The error recorded is below than 1% and it is proved that this method highly reliable and accurate for leak detection.

  10. Investigation of temperature characteristic of MEMS-based optical fiber pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinde; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Bofu; Xue, Lei; Mei, Yunqiao; Pu, Yi; Yin, Jishou; Qin, Zunqi; Zou, Shengliang

    2013-12-01

    We fabricated MEMS-based optical fiber pressure sensor with anodic bonding. The vacuum-sealed microcavity with a thin silicon diaphragm is used as sensing element and its deformation characteristics determine the pressure measurement performance. Considering residual gas inside Fabry-Perot cavity and the thermal properties of material, we established a sensor's temperature response mathematical model based on ideal gas equation and elastic theory. Temperature experiment of this sensor was carried out under vacuum. This work will provide a guide of temperature compensation process for achieving high precision pressure measurement.

  11. The effect of temperature and pressure on the oxygen reduction reactions in polyelectrolyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdcroft, S.; Abdou, M.S.; Beattie, P.; Basura, V. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The effect of temperature and pressure on the oxygen reduction reaction in polyelectrolyte membranes was described. Polyelectrolytes chosen for the experiment differed in composition, weight and flexibility of the polymer chains. The study was conducted in a solid state electrochemical cell at temperatures between 30 and 95 degrees C and in the pressure range of 1 to 5 atm. The solubility of oxygen in these membranes was found to follow Henry`s Law, while the diffusion coefficient decreased with pressure. The effect of temperature on the solubility of oxygen and the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in the membranes was similar to that observed in solution electrolytes. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Spin-polarized versus chiral condensate in quark matter at finite temperature and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providencia, Joao

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low-energy ef......It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low......-energy effective model that the chiral symmetry is broken again by the spin-polarized condensate on increasing the quark number density, while chiral symmetry restoration occurs, in which the chiral condensate disappears at a certain density....

  13. Laser diagnostics on atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas, including cryoplasmas, in environments around room and cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Noritaka; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Yasui, Ryoma; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Cryoplasmas, the plasma gas temperature (T g) of which can be controlled continuously below room temperature, show various unique and advantageous properties depending on T g. Recently, the T g dependence of plasma chemistry related to metastable helium (Hem) has been revealed in helium cryoplasmas. However, T g was only estimated by thermal calculation from the temperature outside the plasmas. In this study, for better evaluation of T g, near-infrared laser heterodyne interferometry (NIR-LHI) measurements were conducted in atmospheric pressure helium pulsed discharge plasmas at around room and cryogenic ambient temperatures (T a). The maximum difference between T g and T a was evaluated as 47 K at T a  =  300 K with 282 mW power consumption. To further investigate the T g dependence of plasma chemical reactions related to Hem, laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) was performed on the same discharge plasmas to measure the Hem density and lifetime. The Hem lifetime was longer at lower T g, i.e. the lifetime at T g  =  145 K (9.6 µs) was seven times longer than that at T g  =  386 K (1.4 µs). By comparing the results with the numerically simulated rates of Hem quenching reactions taking T g into account, the mechanism of the Hem quenching reaction was revealed to vary with T g even though the main quenching reaction was a three-body collision at all T g. In this manner, the combination of NIR-LHI with LAS led directly to the T g dependence of Hem quenching reactions.

  14. Asymmetry energy of nuclear matter: Temperature and density dependence, and validity of semi-empirical formula

    CERN Document Server

    Bordbar, G H; Taghizade, M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have done a completely microscopic calculation using a many-body variational method based on the cluster expansion of energy to compute the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter. In our calculations, we have employed the $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. We have also investigated the temperature and density dependence of asymmetry energy. Our results show that the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter depends on both density and temperature. We have also studied the effects of different terms in the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter. These investigations indicate that at different densities and temperatures, the contribution of parabolic term is very substantial with respect to the other terms. Therefore, we can conclude that the parabolic approximation is a relatively good estimation, and our calculated binding energy of asymmetric nuclear matter is in a relatively good agreement with that of semi-empirical mass formula. However, for the accurate calculations, it is better to consider the effects of o...

  15. High thermal power density heat transfer apparatus providing electrical isolation at high temperature using heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention is directed to transferring heat from an extremely high temperature source to an electrically isolated lower temperature receiver. The invention is particularly concerned with supplying thermal power to a thermionic converter from a nuclear reactor with electric isolation. Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. If the receiver requires gratr thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparative low thermal power densities through the electrically nonconducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  16. Electron number density and temperature measurements in laser produced brass plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, A. A.; Mostafa, N. Y.; Abdel-Aal, M. S.; Shaban, H. A.

    2010-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used for brass plasma diagnostic using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated, including repetition rate, number of laser shots on sample, and laser energy. The plasma temperatures and the electron number densities were determined from the emission spectra of LIBS. Cu and Zn spectral lines were used for excitation temperature calculation using Saha-Boltzmann distribution as well as line pair ratio. It was found that, the excitation temperature calculated by using Saha-Boltzmann distribution and line pair ratio methods are not the same. The electron number density has been evaluated from the Stark broadening of Hα transition at 656.27 nm and the calculated electron number density is agreement with literature.

  17. The Grid Density Dependence of the Unsteady Pressures of the J-2X Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmauch, Preston B.

    2011-01-01

    The J-2X engine was originally designed for the upper stage of the cancelled Crew Launch Vehicle. Although the Crew Launch Vehicle was cancelled the J-2X engine, which is currently undergoing hot-fire testing, may be used on future programs. The J-2X engine is a direct descendent of the J-2 engine which powered the upper stage during the Apollo program. Many changes including a thrust increase from 230K to 294K lbf have been implemented in this engine. As part of the design requirements, the turbine blades must meet minimum high cycle fatigue factors of safety for various vibrational modes that have resonant frequencies in the engine's operating range. The unsteady blade loading is calculated directly from CFD simulations. A grid density study was performed to understand the sensitivity of the spatial loading and the magnitude of the on blade loading due to changes in grid density. Given that the unsteady blade loading has a first order effect on the high cycle fatigue factors of safety, it is important to understand the level of convergence when applying the unsteady loads. The convergence of the unsteady pressures of several grid densities will be presented for various frequencies in the engine's operating range.

  18. Microwave techniques for electron density measurements in low pressure RF plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheltukhin, Viktor; Gafarov, Ildar; Shemakhin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Results of the experimental studying of RF plasma jet at low pressure in the range of 10 - 300 Pa is presented. The electron density distribution both in inductive and in capacitive coupled RF discharges was measured at 1.76 MHz and 13.56 MHz consequently. We used three independent microwave diagnostic techniques such as free space (the ``two-frequency'' and ``on the cut-off signal'') and a resonator. It is found that the electron density in the RF plasma jets is by 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in the decaying plasma jet, and by 1-2 orders of magnitude less than in the RF plasma torch. Thus the RF plasma jet is similar to the additional discharge between the electrodes or the coil and the vacuum chamber walls. As a consequence, the formation of the positive charge sheath near the specimen placed in plasma stream is observed. It is found that the maximum of ionization degree as well as more uniform electron density distribution across the stream is observed in the range of the gas flow rate Gg = 0 . 06 - 0 . 12 g/s and the discharge power Pd = 0 . 5 - 2 . 5 kW. The work was funded by RFBR, according to the research projects No. 16-31-60081 mol_a_dk.

  19. [Investigation on the electron density of a micro-plasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-chen; Zhao, Na; Liu, Wei-yuan; Liu, Zhi-qiang

    2010-07-01

    In the present paper, a micro-hollow cathode discharge setup was used to generate micro-plasma jet in flowing mixture of Ar and N2 at atmospheric pressure. The characteristics of the micro-plasma jet were investigated by means of optical method and electrical one. It has been found that breakdown occurs in the gas between the two electrodes when the input power of electric source is increased to a certain value. Plasma appears along the gas flow direction when the mixed gas flows from the aperture of the micro-hollow cathode, and the length of plasma reaches 4 mm. The discharge current is quasi-continuous, and the duration of discharge pulse is about 0.1 micros. Electron density was studied by using Einstein equation and Stark broadening of spectral lines from the emission spectrum respectively. It was found that the results of electron density calculated by the two methods are consistent with the order of 10(15) x cm(-3). It was also found that the electron density is almost independent of power. A qualitative explanation to the phenomenon is given based on the gas discharge theory.

  20. Structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of AuIn{sub 2} crystal under pressure: A first-principles density functional theory calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ching-Feng [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Hsien-Chie, E-mail: hccheng@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Hwa, E-mail: whchen@pme.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The mechanical and thermodynamic properties of AuIn{sub 2} are reported for the first time. • The calculated lattice constants and elastic properties of AuIn{sub 2} are consistent with the literature data. • The results reveal that AuIn{sub 2} demonstrates low elastic anisotropy, low hardness and high ductility. • It is worth to note that the anisotropic AuIn{sub 2} tends to become elastically isotropic as hydrostatic pressure increases. - Abstract: The structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of cubic AuIn{sub 2} crystal in the cubic fluorite structure, and also their temperature, hydrostatic pressure and direction dependences are investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The optimized lattice constants of AuIn{sub 2} single crystal are first evaluated, by which its hydrostatic pressure-dependent elastic constants are also derived. Then, the hydrostatic pressure-dependent mechanical characteristics of the single crystal, including ductile/brittle behavior and elastic anisotropy, are explored according to the characterized angular character of atomic bonding, Zener anisotropy factor and directional Young’s modulus. Moreover, the polycrystalline elastic properties of AuIn{sub 2}, such as bulk modulus, shear modulus and Young’s modulus, and its ductile/brittle and microhardness characteristics are assessed versus hydrostatic pressure. Finally, the temperature-dependent Debye temperature and heat capacity of AuIn{sub 2} single crystal are investigated by quasi-harmonic Debye modeling. The present results reveal that AuIn{sub 2} crystal demonstrates low elastic anisotropy, low hardness and high ductility. Furthermore, its heat capacity strictly follows the Debye T{sup 3}-law at temperatures below the Debye temperature, and reaches the Dulong–Petit limit at temperatures far above the Debye temperature.