WorldWideScience

Sample records for density temperature magnetic

  1. Temperature and phase-space density of a cold atom cloud in a quadrupole magnetic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, S. P.; Mishra, S. R.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India)

    2014-08-15

    We present studies on modifications in the temperature, number density and phase-space density when a laser-cooled atom cloud from optical molasses is trapped in a quadrupole magnetic trap. Theoretically, for a given temperature and size of the cloud from the molasses, the phase-space density in the magnetic trap is shown first to increase with increasing magnetic field gradient and then to decrease with it after attaining a maximum value at an optimum value of the magnetic-field gradient. The experimentally-measured variation in the phase-space density in the magnetic trap with changing magnetic field gradient is shown to exhibit a similar trend. However, the experimentally-measured values of the number density and the phase-space density are much lower than the theoretically-predicted values. This is attributed to the experimentally-observed temperature in the magnetic trap being higher than the theoretically-predicted temperature. Nevertheless, these studies can be useful for setting a higher phase-space density in the trap by establishing an optimal value of the field gradient for a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  2. Internal Magnetic Field, Temperature and Density Measurements on Magnetized HED plasmas using Pulsed Polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    The goals were to collaborate with the MSX project and make the MSX platform reliable with a performance where pulsed polarimetry would be capable of adding a useful measurement and then to achieve a first measurement using pulsed polarimetry. The MSX platform (outside of laser blow off plasmas adjacent to magnetic fields which are low beta) is the only device that can generate high-beta magnetized collisionless supercritical shocks, and with a large spatial size of ~10 cm. Creating shocks at high Mach numbers and investigating the dynamics of the shocks was the main goal of the project. The MSX shocks scale to astrophysical magnetized shocks and potentially throw light on the generation of highly energetic particles via a mechanism like the Fermi process.

  3. Internal Magnetic Field, Temperature and Density Measurements on Magnetized HED plasmas using Pulsed Polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Roger J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-10-20

    The goals were to collaborate with the MSX project and make the MSX platform reliable with a performance where pulsed polarimetry would be capable of adding a useful measurement and then to achieve a first measurement using pulsed polarimetry. The MSX platform (outside of laser blow off plasmas adjacent to magnetic fields which are low beta) is the only device that can generate high-beta magnetized collisionless supercritical shocks, and with a large spatial size of ~10 cm. Creating shocks at high Mach numbers and investigating the dynamics of the shocks was the main goal of the project. The MSX shocks scale to astrophysical magnetized shocks and potentially throw light on the generation of highly energetic particles via a mechanism like the Fermi process.

  4. Impact of rotating resonant magnetic perturbation fields on plasma edge electron density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoschus, H.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Reiser, D.; Unterberg, B.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Jakubowski, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Rotating resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields impose a characteristic modulation to the edge electron density n e (r, t) and temperature T e (r, t) fields, which depends on the relative rotation f rel between external RMP field and plasma fluid. The n e (r, t) and T e (r, t) fields measured in the edge (r/a = 0.9–1.05) of TEXTOR L-mode plasmas are in close correlation with the local magnetic vacuum topology for low relative rotation f rel = −0.2 kHz. In comparison with the 3D neutral and plasma transport code EMC3-Eirene, this provides substantial experimental evidence that for low relative rotation level and high resonant field amplitudes (normalized radial field strength B r 4/1 /B t =2×10 -3 ), a stochastic edge with a remnant island chain dominated by diffusive transport exists. Radially outside a helical scrape-off layer, the so-called laminar zone embedded into a stochastic domain is found to exist. In contrast for high relative rotation of f rel = 1.8 kHz, the measured modulation of n e is shifted by π/2 toroidally with respect to the modelled vacuum topology. A pronounced flattening in T e (r) and a reduction in n e (r) is measured at the resonant flux surface and represents a clear signature for a magnetic island, which is phase shifted with respect to the vacuum island position. A correlated shift of the laminar zone radially outwards at the very plasma edge is observed suggesting that the actual near-field structure at the perturbation source is determined by the plasma response as well. (paper)

  5. Contactless estimation of critical current density and its temperature dependence using magnetic measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Youssef, A.; Baničová, L.; Švindrych, Zdeněk; Janů, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 5 (2010), s. 1036-1037 ISSN 0587-4246. [Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism /14./. Košice, 06.07.2010-09.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : superconductivity * critical state * Bean model * critical current density Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.467, year: 2010

  6. Effect of Magnetic Flux Density and Applied Current on Temperature, Velocity and Entropy Generation Distributions in MHD Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kiyasatfar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, simulation of steady state, incompressible and fully developed laminar flow has been conducted in a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD pump. The governing equations are solved numerically by finite-difference method. The effect of the magnetic flux density and current on the flow and temperature distributions in a MHD pump is investigated. The obtained results showed that controlling the flow and the temperature is possible through the controlling of the applied current and the magnetic flux. Furthermore, the effects of the magnetic flux density and current on entropy generation in MHD pump are considered. Our presented numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data showed in literature.

  7. Dependence of the critical current density on the history of magnetic field and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuepfer, H.

    1976-08-01

    The dependence of the volume pinning force on different paths taken to arrive at a state (H,T) is investigated. The local magnetic induction is measured by means of an ac technique on samples with different Hsub(c), kappa, pinning centres and densities. Line pinning and a distorted flux line lattice are properties of those samples which show the above mentioned history dependence. Using the model of E.J. Kramer it is deduced the reason of the history effect is the dependence of the shear modulus on the defect structure of the flux line lattice. The differences occur in the lower field region and are also observed in materials with kappa approximately = 40 and large volume pinning forces. (orig.) [de

  8. Spatiotemporal response of plasma edge density and temperature to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, R; Fuchs, J C; McDermott, R; Rathgeber, S K; Suttrop, W; Wolfrum, E; Willensdorfer, M

    2012-01-01

    Non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MPs) were successfully applied at ASDEX Upgrade to substantially reduce the plasma energy loss and peak divertor power load that occur concomitant with type-I edge localized modes (ELMs). The response of electron density edge profiles and temperature and pressure pedestal-top values to MPs are reported. ELM mitigation is observed above an edge density threshold and independent of the MPs being resonant or non-resonant with the edge safety factor. The edge electron collisionality appears not to be appropriate to separate mitigated from non-mitigated discharges for the present high-collisionality plasmas. No significant change in the position or gradient of the edge density profile could be observed for the transition into the ELM-mitigated phase, except from the effect of the three-dimensional MP field which leads to an apparent profile shift. An increase in the density and decrease in the temperature at the pedestal-top balance such that the pressure saturates at the value of the pre-mitigated phase. The plasma stored energy, the normalized plasma pressure, and the H-mode quality factor follow closely the evolution of the pedestal-top pressure and thus remain almost unaffected. The temporal evolution of the ion effective charge shows that the impurity content does not increase although flushing through type-I ELMs is missing. The type-I ELMs are replaced in the mitigated phase by small-scale and high-frequency edge perturbations. The effect of the small bursts on the density profile, which is correlated with a transient increase of the divertor thermoelectric current, is small compared with the effect of the type-I ELMs. The residual scatter of the profiles in the mitigated phase is small directly after the transition into the ELM-mitigated phase and increases again when the pressure saturates at the value of the pre-mitigated phase. (paper)

  9. Magnet and device for magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder, H.; Rem, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    A planar magnet for magnetic density separation, comprising an array of pole pieces succeeding in longitudinal direction of a mounting plane, each pole piece having a body extending transversely along the mounting plane with a substantially constant cross section that includes a top segment that is

  10. Probes for investigating the effect of magnetic field, field orientation, temperature and strain on the critical current density of anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes in a split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwong, P; Higgins, J S; Hampshire, D P

    2014-06-01

    We present the designs of probes for making critical current density (Jc) measurements on anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes as a function of field, field orientation, temperature and strain in our 40 mm bore, split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet. Emphasis is placed on the design of three components: the vapour-cooled current leads, the variable temperature enclosure, and the springboard-shaped bending beam sample holder. The vapour-cooled brass critical-current leads used superconducting tapes and in operation ran hot with a duty cycle (D) of ~0.2. This work provides formulae for optimising cryogenic consumption and calculating cryogenic boil-off, associated with current leads used to make J(c) measurements, made by uniformly ramping the current up to a maximum current (I(max)) and then reducing the current very quickly to zero. They include consideration of the effects of duty cycle, static helium boil-off from the magnet and Dewar (b'), and the maximum safe temperature for the critical-current leads (T(max)). Our optimized critical-current leads have a boil-off that is about 30% less than leads optimized for magnet operation at the same maximum current. Numerical calculations show that the optimum cross-sectional area (A) for each current lead can be parameterized by LI(max)/A = [1.46D(-0.18)L(0.4)(T(max) - 300)(0.25D(-0.09)) + 750(b'/I(max))D(10(-3)I(max)-2.87b') × 10⁶ A m⁻¹ where L is the current lead's length and the current lead is operated in liquid helium. An optimum A of 132 mm(2) is obtained when I(max) = 1000 A, T(max) = 400 K, D = 0.2, b' = 0.3 l h(-1) and L = 1.0 m. The optimized helium consumption was found to be 0.7 l h(-1). When the static boil-off is small, optimized leads have a boil-off that can be roughly parameterized by: b/I(max)  ≈ (1.35 × 10(-3))D(0.41) l h(‑1) A(-1). A split-current-lead design is employed to minimize the rotation of the probes during the high current measurements in our high

  11. Probes for investigating the effect of magnetic field, field orientation, temperature and strain on the critical current density of anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes in a split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunwong, P.; Higgins, J. S.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the designs of probes for making critical current density (J c ) measurements on anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes as a function of field, field orientation, temperature and strain in our 40 mm bore, split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet. Emphasis is placed on the design of three components: the vapour-cooled current leads, the variable temperature enclosure, and the springboard-shaped bending beam sample holder. The vapour-cooled brass critical-current leads used superconducting tapes and in operation ran hot with a duty cycle (D) of ∼0.2. This work provides formulae for optimising cryogenic consumption and calculating cryogenic boil-off, associated with current leads used to make J c measurements, made by uniformly ramping the current up to a maximum current (I max ) and then reducing the current very quickly to zero. They include consideration of the effects of duty cycle, static helium boil-off from the magnet and Dewar (b ′ ), and the maximum safe temperature for the critical-current leads (T max ). Our optimized critical-current leads have a boil-off that is about 30% less than leads optimized for magnet operation at the same maximum current. Numerical calculations show that the optimum cross-sectional area (A) for each current lead can be parameterized by LI max /A=[1.46D −0.18 L 0.4 (T max −300) 0.25D −0.09 +750(b ′ /I max )D 10 −3 I max −2.87b ′ ]× 10 6 A m −1 where L is the current lead's length and the current lead is operated in liquid helium. An optimum A of 132 mm 2 is obtained when I max = 1000 A, T max = 400 K, D = 0.2, b ′ = 0.3 l h −1 and L = 1.0 m. The optimized helium consumption was found to be 0.7 l h −1 . When the static boil-off is small, optimized leads have a boil-off that can be roughly parameterized by: b/I max  ≈ (1.35 × 10 −3 )D 0.41 l h ‑1  A −1 . A split-current-lead design is employed to minimize the rotation of the probes during the high current measurements in

  12. Ultrasonic level, temperature, and density sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.C.; Miller, G.N.

    1982-01-01

    A sensor has been developed to measure simultaneously the level, temperature, and density of the fluid in which it is immersed. The sensor is a thin, rectangular stainless steel ribbon which acts as a waveguide and is housed in a perforated tube. The waveguide is coupled to a section of magnetostrictive magnetic-coil transducers. These tranducers are excited in an alternating sequence to interrogate the sensor with both torsional ultrasonic waves, utilizing the Wiedemann effect, and extensional ultrasonic waves, using the Joule effect. The measured torsional wave transit time is a function of the density, level, and temperature of the fluid surrounding the waveguide. The measured extensional wave transit time is a function of the temperature of the waveguide only. The sensor is divided into zones by the introduction of reflecting surfaces at measured intervals along its length. Consequently, the transit times from each reflecting surface can be analyzed to yield a temperature profile and a density profile along the length of the sensor. Improvements in acoustic wave dampener and pressure seal designs enhance the compatibility of the probe with high-temperature, high-radiation, water-steam environments and increase the likelihood of survival in such environments. Utilization of a microcomputer to automate data sampling and processing has resulted in improved resolution of the sensor

  13. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and

  14. Magnetization of High Density Hadronic Fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Providencia, Constanca; da Providencia, João

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper the magnetization of a high density relativistic fluid of elementary particles is studied. At very high densities, such as may be found in the interior of a neutron star, when the external magnetic field is gradually increased, the energy of the normal phase of the fluid...... in the particle fluid. For nuclear densities above 2 to 3 rho(0), where rho(0) is the equilibrium nuclear density, the resulting magnetic field turns out to be rather huge, of the order of 10(17) Gauss....

  15. Commissioning and modification of the low temperature scanning polarization microscope (TTSPM) and imaging of the local magnetic flux density distribution in superconducting niobium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenzweig, Matthias Sebastian Peter

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation is separated into two different parts, which will be presented in the following. Part I of the dissertation is about the commissioning and the modification of the ''low-temperature scanning polarization microscope'' which was designed in a previous dissertation of Stefan Guenon [1]. A scanning polarization microscope has certain advantages compared to conventional polarization microscopes. With a scanning polarization microscope it is easily possible to achieve a high illumination intensity, which is important to realize a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the confocal design of the scanning polarization microscope improves the resolution of the microscope by a factor of 1.4. Normally, it is not necessary to post-process the images by means of differential frame method to eliminate the contrast of non-magnetic origin. In contrast to conventional polarization microscopes the low-temperature scanning polarization microscope is able to image electronic transport properties via beam-induced voltage variation in addition to the magneto-optical effects. In this dissertation, it was possible to demonstrate the performance capability of the scanning polarization microscope at room temperature as well as at low temperatures. The investigation of the polar Kerr-effect has been carried out with a BaFe 12 O 19 -test sample whereas the measurements of the longitudinal Kerr-effect have been carried out with an in-plane magnetized acceleration sensor. Furthermore, an independent room temperature construction for out-of-plane measurements in a magnetic field up to 1 Tesla has been designed and implemented within the framework of a diploma thesis, supervised by the author of this dissertation. Using this construction, it was possible to gain experimental results regarding the interlayer exchange coupling between iron-terbium alloys (Fe 1-x Tb x ) and cobalt-platinum multilayers (vertical stroke Co/Pt vertical stroke n ). Indeed, it has been

  16. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-03

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  17. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salsbury Jr., Freddie [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules.

  18. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salsbury, Freddie Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules

  19. Extreme enhancement of blocking temperature by strong magnetic dipoles interaction of α-Fe nanoparticle-based high-density agglomerate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kura, H; Takahashi, M; Ogawa, T

    2011-01-01

    High-volume fraction α-Fe nanoparticle (NP) agglomerates were prepared using chemically synthesized NPs. In the agglomerate, NPs are separated by surfactant and NP superlattice with a hexagonal close-packed structure is locally realized. Volume fractions of NPs at 20% and 42% were obtained in agglomerates consisting of 2.9 nm and 8.2 nm diameter NPs, respectively. The high saturation magnetization of α-Fe NPs and high volume fraction of NPs in the agglomerate provide strong magnetic dipole-dipole interaction. The interaction energy of the agglomerate became much larger than the anisotropic energy of individual NPs. As a result, the blocking temperature of the 8.2 nm NP agglomerate was significantly enhanced from 52.2 K to around 500 K. (fast track communication)

  20. High Temperature Superconductor Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079328; de Rijk, Gijs; Dhalle, Marc

    2016-11-10

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding $20T$. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and development before they can be applied in a practical accelerator magnet. In order to study HTS in detail, a five tesla demonstrator magnet named Feather-M2 is designed and constructed. The magnet is based on ReBCO coated conductor, which is assembled into a $10kA$ class Roebel cable. A new and optimized Aligned Block layout is used, which takes advantage of the anisotropy of the conductor. This is achieved by providing local alignment of the Roebel cable in the coil windings with the magnetic field lines. A new Network Model capable of analyzing transient electro-magnetic and thermal phenomena in coated conductor cables and coils is developed. This model is necessary to solve critical issues in coated conductor ac...

  1. Effects of positron density and temperature on ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma: Oblique propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Mehdipoor, M.

    2009-01-01

    Ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves are investigated in a magnetized three-component plasma consisting of cold ions, isothermal hot electrons, and positrons. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to the Korteweg de Vries equation using the standard reductive perturbation (multiple-scale) technique. Theoretical and numerical analyses confirm significant effects of the presence of positrons and the dependence of the electron to positron temperature ratio on the amplitude and the width of IA solitary waves. It is shown that the rarefactive and compressive IA solitary excitations can propagate when the propagation angle θ satisfies 0≤θ 0 , whereas their width depends strictly on B 0 . The numerical analysis has been done based on the typical numerical data from a pulsar magnetosphere.

  2. Temperature expansions for magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cangemi, D.; Dunne, G.

    1996-01-01

    We derive finite temperature expansions for relativistic fermion systems in the presence of background magnetic fields, and with nonzero chemical potential. We use the imaginary-time formalism for the finite temperature effects, the proper-time method for the background field effects, and zeta function regularization for developing the expansions. We emphasize the essential difference between even and odd dimensions, focusing on 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions. We concentrate on the high temperature limit, but we also discuss the T=0 limit with nonzero chemical potential. Copyright copyright 1996 Academic Press, Inc

  3. Recycling of WEEE by magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, B.; Giacometti, L.; Di Maio, F.; Rem, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The paper introduces a new recycling method of WEEE: Magnetic Density Separation. By using this technology, both grade and recovery rate of recycled products are over 90%. Good separations are not only observed in relatively big WEEE samples, but also in samples with smaller sizes or electrical

  4. Space potential, temperature, and density profile measurements on RENTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoch, P.M.

    1983-05-01

    Radial profiles of the space potential, electron temperature, and density have been measured on RENTOR with a heavy-ion-beam probe. The potential profile has been compared to predictions from a stochastic magnetic field fluctuation theory, using the measured temperature and density profiles. The comparison shows strong qualitative agreement in that the potential is positive and the order of T/sub e//e. There is some quantitative disagreement in that the measured radial electric fields are somewhat smaller than the theoretical predictions. To facilitate this comparison, a detailed analysis of the possible errors has been completed

  5. A viscosity and density meter with a magnetically suspended rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, Mikulas; Strharsky, Igor; Hrmo, Igor

    2003-01-01

    A device for measuring the viscosity and density of liquids is presented. It is a Couette-type viscometer that uses a submerged rotor to measure the viscosity without errors originating in the contact of the rotor with the sample/air boundary. The inner cylinder is a glass rotor suspended in the liquid, and the outer cylinder is also made of glass. The rotor is stabilized on the axis of the outer cylinder by an electromagnetic force controlled by feedback from the rotor's vertical position. In the lower part of the rotor is an aluminum cylinder located in a magnetic field generated by rotating permanent magnets. The interaction of this rotating magnetic field with eddy currents generated in the aluminum cylinder causes rotation of the rotor. This rotation is optically detected, and viscosity is calculated from the measured angular velocity of rotor. The density of the liquid is calculated from the applied vertical equilibrating force. A computer controls the whole measurement. The device works at constant temperature or while scanning temperature. The sample volume is 1.6 ml, and the accuracy of measurement of both viscosity and density is ∼0.1%. The range of measured densities is (0.7-1.4) g/ml, and viscosity can be measured in the range (3x10 -4 -0.3) Pa s. The shear rate of the viscosity measurement varies in the range (20-300) s-1. The accuracy of the temperature measurement is 0.02 K

  6. Quantum fields at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    These lectures are an elementary introduction to standard many-body techniques applied to the study of quantum fields at finite temperature and density: perturbative expansion, linear response theory, quasiparticles and their interactions, etc... We emphasize the usefulness of the imaginary time formalism in a wide class of problems, as opposed to many recent approaches based on real time. Properties of elementary excitations in an ultrarelativistic plasma at high temperature or chemical potential are discussed, and recent progresses in the study of the quark-gluon plasma are briefly reviewed

  7. Stochastic density functional theory at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytter, Yael; Rabani, Eran; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi

    2018-03-01

    Simulations in the warm dense matter regime using finite temperature Kohn-Sham density functional theory (FT-KS-DFT), while frequently used, are computationally expensive due to the partial occupation of a very large number of high-energy KS eigenstates which are obtained from subspace diagonalization. We have developed a stochastic method for applying FT-KS-DFT, that overcomes the bottleneck of calculating the occupied KS orbitals by directly obtaining the density from the KS Hamiltonian. The proposed algorithm scales as O (" close=")N3T3)">N T-1 and is compared with the high-temperature limit scaling O temperature. The method has been implemented in a plane-waves code within the local density approximation (LDA); we demonstrate its efficiency, statistical errors, and bias in the estimation of the free energy per electron for a diamond structure silicon. The bias is small compared to the fluctuations and is independent of system size. In addition to calculating the free energy itself, one can also use the method to calculate its derivatives and obtain the equations of state.

  8. Materials for room temperature magnetic refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl Hansen, B.

    2010-07-15

    Magnetic refrigeration is a cooling method, which holds the promise of being cleaner and more efficient than conventional vapor-compression cooling. Much research has been done during the last two decades on various magnetic materials for this purpose and today a number of materials are considered candidates as they fulfill many of the requirements for a magnetic refrigerant. However, no one material stands out and the field is still active with improving the known materials and in the search for a better one. Magnetic cooling is based on the magnetocaloric effect, which causes a magnetic material to change its temperature when a magnetic field is applied or removed. For room temperature cooling, one utilizes that the magnetocaloric effect peaks near magnetic phase transitions and so the materials of interest all have a critical temperature within the range of 250 - 310 K. A magnetic refrigerant should fulfill a number of criteria, among these a large magnetic entropy change, a large adiabatic temperature change, preferably little to no thermal or magnetic hysteresis and the material should have the stability required for long term use. As the temperature range required for room temperature cooling is some 40 - 50 K, the magnetic refrigerant should also be able to cover this temperature span either by exhibiting a very broad peak in magnetocaloric effect or by providing the opportunity for creating a materials series with varying transition temperatures. (Author)

  9. Materials for Room Temperature Magnetic Refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Britt Rosendahl

    Magnetic refrigeration is a cooling method, which holds the promise of being cleaner and more efficient than conventional vapor-compression cooling. Much research has been done during the last two decades on various magnetic materials for this purpose and today a number of materials are considered...... candidates as they fulfill many of the requirements for a magnetic refrigerant. However, no one material stands out and the field is still active with improving the known materials and in the search for a better one. Magnetic cooling is based on the magnetocaloric effect, which causes a magnetic material...... to change its temperature when a magnetic field is applied or removed. For room temperature cooling, one utilizes that the magnetocaloric effect peaks near magnetic phase transitions and so the materials of interest all have a critical temperature within the range of 250 – 310 K. A magnetic refrigerant...

  10. Spontaneous magnetization in high-density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constanca

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that spontaneous magnetization occurs due to the anomalous magnetic moments of quarks in high-density quark matter under the tensor-type four-point interaction. The spin polarized condensate for each flavor of quark appears at high baryon density, which leads to the spontaneous magnet...

  11. High current density magnets for INTOR and TIBER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Henning, C.D.; Kerns, J.A.; Slack, D.S.; Summers, L.T.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1986-12-01

    The adoption of high current density, high field, superconducting magnets for INTOR and TIBER would prove beneficial. When combined with improved radiation tolerance of the magnets to minimize the inner leg shielding, a substantial reduction in machine dimensions and capital costs can be achieved. Fortunately, cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) which are capable of the desired enhancements are being developed. Because conductor stability in a CICC depends more on the trapped helium enthalpy, rather than the copper resistivity, higher current densities of the order of 40 A/mm 2 at 12 T are possible. Radiation damage to the copper stabilizer is less important because the growth in resistance is a second-order effect on stability. Such CICC conductors lend themselves naturally to niobium-tin utilization, with the benefits of the high current-sharing temperature of this material being taken to advantage in absorbing radiation heating. When the helium coolant is injected at near the critical pressure, Joule-Thompson expansion in the flow path tends to stabilize the fluid temperature at under 6 K. Thus, higher fields, as well as higher current densities, can be considered for INTOR or TIBER

  12. Presentation: 3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous densities

    OpenAIRE

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Slides for the presentation "3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous densities" given at the 2013 AGU Meeting of the Americas in Cancun, Mexico.   Note: There was an error in the title of the talk. The correct title should be "3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous magnetization"   Abstract: We present a new 3D magnetic inversion algorithm based on the computationally efficient method of planting anomalous densities. The algorithm consists of an iterative growth of the an...

  13. Temperature dependency of silicon structures for magnetic field gradient sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabsch, Alexander; Rosenberg, Christoph; Stifter, Michael; Keplinger, Franz

    2018-02-01

    This work describes the temperature dependence of two sensors for magnetic field gradient sensors and demonstrates a structure to compensate for the drift of resonance frequency over a wide temperature range. The temperature effect of the sensing element is based on internal stresses induced by the thermal expansion of material, therefore FEM is used to determine the change of the eigenvalues of the sensing structure. The experimental setup utilizes a Helmholtz coil system to generate the magnetic field and to excite the MEMS structure with Lorentz forces. The MEMS structure is placed on a plate heated with resistors and cooled by a Peltier element to control the plate temperature. In the second part, we describe how one can exploit temperature sensitivity for temperature measurements and we show the opportunity to include the temperature effect to increase the sensitivity of single-crystal silicon made flux density gradient sensors.

  14. Gravitational collapse of a magnetized fermion gas with finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Gaspar, I. [Instituto de Geofisica y Astronomia (IGA), La Habana (Cuba); Perez Martinez, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Sussman, Roberto A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico); Ulacia Rey, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    We examine the dynamics of a self-gravitating magnetized fermion gas at finite temperature near the collapsing singularity of a Bianchi-I spacetime. Considering a general set of appropriate and physically motivated initial conditions, we transform Einstein-Maxwell field equations into a complete and self-consistent dynamical system amenable for numerical work. The resulting numerical solutions reveal the gas collapsing into both, isotropic (''point-like'') and anisotropic (''cigar-like''), singularities, depending on the initial intensity of the magnetic field. We provide a thorough study of the near collapse behavior and interplay of all relevant state and kinematic variables: temperature, expansion scalar, shear scalar, magnetic field, magnetization, and energy density. A significant qualitative difference in the behavior of the gas emerges in the temperature range T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -6} and T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -3}. (orig.)

  15. PT Symmetry and QCD: Finite Temperature and Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Ogilvie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of PT symmetry to quantum chromodynamics (QCD, the gauge theory of the strong interactions, is explored in the context of finite temperature and density. Two significant problems in QCD are studied: the sign problem of finite-density QCD, and the problem of confinement. It is proven that the effective action for heavy quarks at finite density is PT-symmetric. For the case of 1+1 dimensions, the PT-symmetric Hamiltonian, although not Hermitian, has real eigenvalues for a range of values of the chemical potential μ, solving the sign problem for this model. The effective action for heavy quarks is part of a potentially large class of generalized sine-Gordon models which are non-Hermitian but are PT-symmetric. Generalized sine-Gordon models also occur naturally in gauge theories in which magnetic monopoles lead to confinement. We explore gauge theories where monopoles cause confinement at arbitrarily high temperatures. Several different classes of monopole gases exist, with each class leading to different string tension scaling laws. For one class of monopole gas models, the PT-symmetric affine Toda field theory emerges naturally as the effective theory. This in turn leads to sine-law scaling for string tensions, a behavior consistent with lattice simulations.

  16. Atomic and ionic density measurement by laser absorption spectroscopy of magnetized or non-magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gourrierec, P.

    1989-11-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy is an appreciated diagnostic in plasma physics to measure atomic and ionic densities. We used it here more specifically on metallic plasmas. Firstly, a uranium plasma was created in a hollow cathode. 17 levels of U.I and U.II (12 for U.I and 5 for U.II) are measured by this method. The results are compared with the calculated levels of two models (collisional-radiative and LTE). Secondly, the theory of absorption in presence of a magnetic field is recalled and checked. Then, low-density magnetized plasma produced on our ERIC experiment (acronym for Experiment of Resonance Ionic Cyclotron), have been diagnosed successfully. The use of this technique on a low density plasma has not yet been published to our knowledge. The transverse temperature and the density of a metastable atomic level of a barium plasma has been derived. The evolution of a metastable ionic level of this element is studied in terms of two source parameters (furnace temperature and injected hyperfrequency power) [fr

  17. Reduced density matrix functional theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldsiefen, Tim

    2012-10-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) is highly successful in many fields of research. There are, however, areas in which its performance is rather limited. An important example is the description of thermodynamical variables of a quantum system in thermodynamical equilibrium. Although the finite-temperature version of DFT (FT-DFT) rests on a firm theoretical basis and is only one year younger than its brother, groundstate DFT, it has been successfully applied to only a few problems. Because FT-DFT, like DFT, is in principle exact, these shortcomings can be attributed to the difficulties of deriving valuable functionals for FT-DFT. In this thesis, we are going to present an alternative theoretical description of quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. It is based on the 1-reduced density matrix (1RDM) of the system, rather than on its density and will rather cumbersomly be called finite-temperature reduced density matrix functional theory (FT-RDMFT). Its zero-temperature counterpart (RDMFT) proved to be successful in several fields, formerly difficult to address via DFT. These fields include, for example, the calculation of dissociation energies or the calculation of the fundamental gap, also for Mott insulators. This success is mainly due to the fact that the 1RDM carries more directly accessible ''manybody'' information than the density alone, leading for example to an exact description of the kinetic energy functional. This sparks the hope that a description of thermodynamical systems employing the 1RDM via FT-RDMFT can yield an improvement over FT-DFT. Giving a short review of RDMFT and pointing out difficulties when describing spin-polarized systems initiates our work. We then lay the theoretical framework for FT-RDMFT by proving the required Hohenberg-Kohn-like theorems, investigating and determining the domain of FT-RDMFT functionals and by deriving several properties of the exact functional. Subsequently, we present a perturbative method to

  18. Reduced density matrix functional theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldsiefen, Tim

    2012-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is highly successful in many fields of research. There are, however, areas in which its performance is rather limited. An important example is the description of thermodynamical variables of a quantum system in thermodynamical equilibrium. Although the finite-temperature version of DFT (FT-DFT) rests on a firm theoretical basis and is only one year younger than its brother, groundstate DFT, it has been successfully applied to only a few problems. Because FT-DFT, like DFT, is in principle exact, these shortcomings can be attributed to the difficulties of deriving valuable functionals for FT-DFT. In this thesis, we are going to present an alternative theoretical description of quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. It is based on the 1-reduced density matrix (1RDM) of the system, rather than on its density and will rather cumbersomly be called finite-temperature reduced density matrix functional theory (FT-RDMFT). Its zero-temperature counterpart (RDMFT) proved to be successful in several fields, formerly difficult to address via DFT. These fields include, for example, the calculation of dissociation energies or the calculation of the fundamental gap, also for Mott insulators. This success is mainly due to the fact that the 1RDM carries more directly accessible ''manybody'' information than the density alone, leading for example to an exact description of the kinetic energy functional. This sparks the hope that a description of thermodynamical systems employing the 1RDM via FT-RDMFT can yield an improvement over FT-DFT. Giving a short review of RDMFT and pointing out difficulties when describing spin-polarized systems initiates our work. We then lay the theoretical framework for FT-RDMFT by proving the required Hohenberg-Kohn-like theorems, investigating and determining the domain of FT-RDMFT functionals and by deriving several properties of the exact functional. Subsequently, we present a perturbative method to iteratively construct

  19. A magnetic suspension system for measuring liquid density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Centeno González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Density is a derived quantity of mass and length; it is defined as mass per volume unit and its SI unit is kg/m3. National metrology institutes have been designing and building their own magnetic suspension systems during the last 5 decades for making fluid density measurements; this has allowed them to carry out research into liquids and gases’ physical characteristics. This paper was aimed at designing and developing a magnetic suspension system for a magnetic balance used in determining liquid density to be used in CENAM’s metrology density laboratories.

  20. Low-temperature susceptibility of concentrated magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnikov, Alexander F.; Lebedev, Alexander V.

    2004-09-01

    The initial susceptibility of concentrated magnetic fluids (ferrocolloids) has been experimentally investigated at low temperatures. The results obtained indicate that the interparticle dipole-dipole interactions can increase the susceptibility by several times as compared to the Langevin value. It is shown that good agreement between recent theoretical models and experimental observations can be achieved by introducing a correction for coefficients in the series expansion of susceptibility in powers of density and aggregation parameter. A modified equation for equilibrium susceptibility is offered to sum over corrections made by Kalikmanov (Statistical Physics of Fluids, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2001) and by B. Huke and M. Lücke (Phys. Rev. E 67, 051403, 2003). The equation gives good quantitative agreement with the experimental data in the wide range of temperature and magnetic particles concentration. It has been found that in some cases the magnetic fluid solidification occurs at temperature several tens of kelvins higher than the crystallization temperature of the carrier liquid. The solidification temperature of magnetic fluids is independent of particle concentration (i.e., magneto-dipole interparticle interactions) and dependent on the surfactant type and carrier liquid. This finding allows us to suggest that molecular interactions and generation of some large-scale structure from colloidal particles in magnetic fluids are responsible for magnetic fluid solidification. If the magnetic fluid contains the particles with the Brownian relaxation mechanism of the magnetic moment, the solidification manifests itself as the peak on the "susceptibility-temperature" curve. This fact proves the dynamic nature of the observed peak: it arises from blocking the Brownian mechanism of the magnetization relaxation.

  1. Magnetic moment densities in selected UTX compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javorský, P.; Schweizer, J.; Givord, F.; Boucherle, J.-X.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Diviš, M.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Sechovský, V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 350, - (2004), e131-e134 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0550 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : uranium compound * polarized neutron scattering * magnetic moment Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.679, year: 2004

  2. Broadband magnetic and density fluctuations in the TCA tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenstein, Ch.; Keller, R.; Pochelon, A.; Ryter, F.; Sawley, M.L.; Simm, W.; Weisen, H.

    1987-01-01

    The results of comparative studies of broadband magnetic and density fluctuations during ohmic discharges in the TCA tokamak are described. Long coherence lengths are observed in poloidal and toroidal directions between magnetic probes in the scrape-off layer. A phase contrast diagnostic provides a newly accessible range of density fluctuations in the bulk plasma with very long wavelengths. Langmuir probes provide similar measurements in the scrape-off layer. Statistical dispersion relations for both density and magnetic fluctuations are deduced and are shown to be substantially different. Low mean poloidal wavenumbers (m ∼ 2 at 100 kHz) are obtained for the magnetic fluctuations, in contrast to the much higher values measured for density fluctuations. The difference between magnetic and density fluctuations is also reflected in different scalings with plasma parameters and with electron confinement time. The helicity of the coherent magnetic structures is analyzed to show that interior regions of the plasma, such as the q = 2 region contribute to the magnetic activity at the edge. This explains why the magnetic fluctuations measured at the edge are likely to reflect the confinement properties of the bulk plasma. The results of detailed probe rotation experiments and coherence measurements give indications of the physical nature and origin of magnetic fluctuations

  3. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  4. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  5. Effects of magnetic flux densities on microstructure evolution and magnetic properties of molecular-beam-vapor-deposited nanocrystalline Fe_3_0Ni_7_0 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yongze; Wang, Qiang; Li, Guojian; Ma, Yonghui; Du, Jiaojiao; He, Jicheng

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe_3_0Ni_7_0 (in atomic %) thin films were prepared by molecular-beam-vapor deposition in magnetic fields with different magnetic flux densities. The microstructure evolution of these thin films was studied by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy; the soft magnetic properties were examined by vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature. The results show that all our Fe_3_0Ni_7_0 thin films feature an fcc single-phase structure. With increasing magnetic flux density, surface roughness, average particle size and grain size of the thin films decreased, and the short-range ordered clusters (embryos) of thin films increased. Additionally, the magnetic anisotropy in the in-plane and the coercive forces of the thin films gradually reduced with increasing magnetic flux density. - Highlights: • With increasing magnetic flux density, average particle size of films decreased. • With increasing magnetic flux density, surface roughness of thin films decreased. • With increasing magnetic flux density, short-range ordered clusters increased. • With increasing magnetic flux density, the coercive forces of thin films reduced. • With increasing magnetic flux density, soft magnetic properties are improved.

  6. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrie, N. P., E-mail: kyrie@fpl.gpi.ru; Markov, V. S., E-mail: natalya.kyrie@yandex.ru; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  7. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrie, N. P.; Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  8. Temperature dependence in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, James; Paysen, Hendrik; Kosch, Olaf; Trahms, Lutz; Wiekhorst, Frank

    2018-05-01

    Experimental results are presented demonstrating how temperature can influence the dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in liquid suspension, when exposed to alternating magnetic fields in the kilohertz frequency range. The measurements used to probe the nanoparticle systems are directly linked to both the emerging biomedical technique of magnetic particle imaging (MPI), and to the recently proposed concept of remote nanoscale thermometry using MNPs under AC field excitation. Here, we report measurements on three common types of MNPs, two of which are currently leading candidates for use as tracers in MPI. Using highly-sensitive magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS), we demonstrate significant and divergent thermal dependences in several key measures used in the evaluation of MNP dynamics for use in MPI and other applications. The temperature range studied was between 296 and 318 Kelvin, making our findings of particular importance for MPI and other biomedical technologies. Furthermore, we report the detection of the same temperature dependences in measurements conducted using the detection coils within an operational preclinical MPI scanner. This clearly shows the importance of considering temperature during MPI development, and the potential for temperature-resolved MPI using this system. We propose possible physical explanations for the differences in the behaviors observed between the different particle types, and discuss our results in terms of the opportunities and concerns they raise for MPI and other MNP based technologies.

  9. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbations to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development

  10. Iso-geometric shape optimization of magnetic density separators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang Manh, Nguyen; Evgrafov, Anton; Gravesen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The waste recycling industry increasingly relies on magnetic density separators. These devices generate an upward magnetic force in ferro-fluids allowing to separate the immersed particles according to their mass density. Recently, a new separator design has been proposed that significantly...... reduces the required amount of permanent magnet material. The purpose of this paper is to alleviate the undesired end-effects in this design by altering the shape of the ferromagnetic covers of the individual poles. Design/methodology/approach The paper represents the shape of the ferromagnetic pole...

  11. Temperature and carrier density dependence of anisotropy in supercurrent density in layered cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.P.; Tewari, B.S.; Ajay

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effect of temperature and carrier density on anisotropy in supercurrent density in bilayer cuprate superconductors. Here, we have considered a tight binding bilayered Hubbard Hamiltonian containing intra and interlayer attractive interactions. The situation considered here is similar to a SIS junction. We have got the expressions for the superconducting order parameters, carrier density and anisotropy in superconducting density (I ab /I c ) for such SIS junction. The numerical analysis show that the anisotropy in the supercurrent density depends on temperature and carrier density in layered high T c cuprates. (author)

  12. Analyzing Forensic Evidence Based on Density with Magnetic Levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Lockett, Matthew; Mirica, Katherine A.; Mace, Charles R.; Blackledge, Robert D.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining the density of contact trace objects with magnetic levitation (MagLev). MagLev measurements accurately determine the density (±0.0002 g/cm3) of a diamagnetic object and are compatible with objects that are nonuniform in shape and size. The MagLev device (composed of two permanent magnets with like poles facing) and the method described provide a means of accurately determining the density of trace objects. This method is inexpensive, rapid, and ve...

  13. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdős, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  14. Permanent magnets composed of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Roy; Chen, In-Gann; Liu, Jay; Lau, Kwong

    1991-01-01

    A study of persistent, trapped magnetic field has been pursued with high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The main effort is to study the feasibility of utilization of HTS to fabricate magnets for various devices. The trapped field, when not in saturation, is proportional to the applied field. Thus, it should be possible to replicate complicated field configurations with melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7 (MT-Y123) material, bypassing the need for HTS wires. Presently, materials have been developed from which magnets of 1.5 T, at 77 K, can be fabricated. Much higher field is available at lower operating temperature. Stability of a few percent per year is readily attainable. Results of studies on prototype motors and minimagnets are reported.

  15. A Designed Room Temperature Multilayered Magnetic Semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Dinah Simone; Charilaou, Michalis; Bordel, Catherine; Duchin, Ryan; Barriga, Alexander; Farmer, Adam; Hellman, Frances; Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    A room temperature magnetic semiconductor has been designed and fabricated by using an epitaxial antiferromagnet (NiO) grown in the (111) orientation, which gives surface uncompensated magnetism for an odd number of planes, layered with the lightly doped semiconductor Al-doped ZnO (AZO). Magnetization and Hall effect measurements of multilayers of NiO and AZO are presented for varying thickness of each. The magnetic properties vary as a function of the number of Ni planes in each NiO layer; an odd number of Ni planes yields on each NiO layer an uncompensated moment which is RKKY-coupled to the moments on adjacent NiO layers via the carriers in the AZO. This RKKY coupling oscillates with the AZO layer thickness, and it disappears entirely in samples where the AZO is replaced with undoped ZnO. The anomalous Hall effect data indicate that the carriers in the AZO are spin-polarized according to the direction of the applied field at both low temperature and room temperature. NiO/AZO multilayers are therefore a promising candidate for spintronic applications demanding a room-temperature semiconductor.

  16. LTCC magnetic components for high density power converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebourgeois, Richard; Labouré, Eric; Lembeye, Yves; Ferrieux, Jean-Paul

    2018-04-01

    This paper deals with multilayer magnetic components for power electronics application and specifically for high frequency switching. New formulations based on nickel-zinc-copper spinel ferrites were developed for high power and high frequency applications. These ferrites can be sintered at low temperature (around 900°C) which makes them compatible with the LTCC (Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics) technology. Metallic parts of silver or gold can be fully integrated inside the ferrite while guaranteeing the integrity of both the ferrite and the metal. To make inductors or transformers with the required properties, it is mandatory to have nonmagnetic parts between the turns of the winding. Then it is essential to find a dielectric material, which can be co-sintered both with the ferrite and the metal. We will present the solution we found to this problem and we will describe the results we obtained for a multilayer co-sintered transformer. We will see that these new components have good performance compared with the state of the art and are very promising for developing high density switching mode power supplies.

  17. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    tics—emission lines. Dwivedi, Curdt & Wilhelm (1997, 1999a) carried out an observing sequence based on a theoretical study by Dwivedi & Mohan (1995), with intercombination/forbidden. Ne VI and Mg VI lines, which are formed at essentially the same temperature. (4 × 105 K), according to Arnaud & Rothenflug (1985).

  18. Effect of high magnetic fields on the charge density wave properties of KMo 6O 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rötger, A.; Dumas, J.; Marcus, J.; Schlenker, C.; Ulmet, J. P.; Audouard, A.; Askenazy, S.

    1992-03-01

    The electrical resistivity of the purple bronze KMo 6O 17 has been studied between 2 and 88 K with pulsed magnetic fields up to 35 T. Several anomalies are found on the curves Δρ/ρ(B) at different temperatures. The low field results are compared with previous measurements of susceptibility and magnetization. A phase diagram which may show a field displaced charge density wave instability and field induced transitions is proposed.

  19. Role of ion magnetization in formation of radial density profile in magnetically expanding plasma produced by helicon antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sonu; Ghosh, Soumen; Bose, Sayak; Barada, Kshitish K.; Pal, Rabindranath; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.

    2018-04-01

    Experimentally, the density profile in the magnetic nozzle of a helicon antenna based plasma device is seen to be modified from being centrally peaked to that of hollow nature as the external magnetic field is increased. It occurs above a characteristic field value when the ions become magnetized in the expansion chamber. The density profile in the source chamber behind the nozzle, however, remains peaked on-axis irrespective of the magnetic field. The electron temperature there is observed to be hollow and this nature is carried to the expansion chamber along the field line. In the electron energy distribution near the off axis peak location, a high energy tail exists. Rotation of these tail electrons in the azimuthal direction due to the gradient-B drift in the expansion chamber leads to an additional off-axis ionization and forms the hollow density profile. It seems that if the ions are not magnetized, then the off-axially produced additional plasma is not confined and the density profile retains the on-axis peak nature. The present experiment successfully demonstrates how the knowledge of the ion magnetization together with tail electrons significantly contributes to the design of an efficient helicon plasma based thruster.

  20. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the

  1. Magnetic force microscopy of thin film media for high density magnetic recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porthun, Steffen; Porthun, S.; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses various aspect of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) for use in the field of high density magnetic recording. After an introduction of the most important magnetic imaging techniques, an overview is given of the operation and theory of MFM. The developments in instrumentation, MFM

  2. High temperature superconductors for fusion magnets -influence of neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudy, M.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    In this work authors present the results of study of influence of neutron irradiation of high temperature superconductors for fusion magnets. High temperature superconductors (type of YBCO (Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxygen)) are strong candidates to be applied in the next step of fusion devices. Defects induced by fast neutrons are effective pinning centres, which can significantly improve critical current densities and reduce J c anisotropy. Due to induced lattice disorder, T c is reduced. Requirements for ITER (DEMO) are partially achieved at 64 K.

  3. Density-functional theory for internal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, Erik I.

    2018-01-01

    A density-functional theory is developed based on the Maxwell-Schrödinger equation with an internal magnetic field in addition to the external electromagnetic potentials. The basic variables of this theory are the electron density and the total magnetic field, which can equivalently be represented as a physical current density. Hence, the theory can be regarded as a physical current density-functional theory and an alternative to the paramagnetic current density-functional theory due to Vignale and Rasolt. The energy functional has strong enough convexity properties to allow a formulation that generalizes Lieb's convex analysis formulation of standard density-functional theory. Several variational principles as well as a Hohenberg-Kohn-like mapping between potentials and ground-state densities follow from the underlying convex structure. Moreover, the energy functional can be regarded as the result of a standard approximation technique (Moreau-Yosida regularization) applied to the conventional Schrödinger ground-state energy, which imposes limits on the maximum curvature of the energy (with respect to the magnetic field) and enables construction of a (Fréchet) differentiable universal density functional.

  4. Volume and density changes of biological fluids with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal expansion of human blood, plasma, ultrafiltrate, and erythrocycte concentration at temperatures in the range of 4-48 C is studied. The mechanical oscillator technique which has an accuracy of 1 x 10 to the -5 th g/ml is utilized to measure fluid density. The relationship between thermal expansion, density, and temperature is analyzed. The study reveals that: (1) thermal expansion increases with increasing temperature; (2) the magnitude of the increase declines with increasing temperature; (3) thermal expansion increases with density at temperatures below 40 C; and (4) the thermal expansion of intracellular fluid is greater than that of extracellular fluid in the temperature range of 4-10 C, but it is equal at temperatures greater than or equal to 40 C.

  5. Critical temperature gradient and critical current density in thin films of a type I superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heubener, R P

    1968-12-16

    Measurements of the critical temperature gradient and the critical current density in superconducting lead films in a transverse magnetic field indicate that the critical current flows predominantly along the surface of the films and that the critical surface currents contribute only very little to the Lorentz force on a fluxoid.

  6. Small magnetic energy storage systems using high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on magnetic energy storage for power systems that has been considered for commercial utility power, air and ground mobile power sources, and spacecraft applications. Even at the current technology limits of energy storage (100 KJ/Kg*), superconducting magnetic energy storage inductors do not offer a strong advantage over state-of-the-art batteries. The commercial utility application does not have a weight and volume limitation, and is under intense study in several countries for diurnal cycle energy storage and high power delivery. The advent of high temperature superconductors has reduced one of the penalties of superconducting magnetic energy storage in that refrigeration and cryocontainers become greatly simplified. Still, structural and current density issues that limit the energy density and size of superconducting inductors do not change. Cold weather starting of aircraft engines is an application where these limitations are not as significant, and where current systems lack performance. The very cold environments make it difficult to achieve high power densities in state-of-the-art batteries and hydraulically activated starters. The same cold environments make it possible to cool superconducting systems for weeks using a single charge of liquid nitrogen. At the same, the ground carts can handle the size and weight of superconducting magnetic storage (SMES) devices

  7. Density and temperature measurement using CARS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirth, A.; Vollrath, K.

    1979-01-01

    Coherent Anti Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) a technique derived from nonlinear optics offers two major advantages compared with the spontaneous Raman method: improved scattering efficiency and spatial coherence of the scattered signal. The theory of the coherent mixing in resonant media serves as a quantitative background of the CARS technique. A review of several applications on plasma physics and gasdynamics is given, which permits to consider the CARS spectroscopy as a potential method for nonintrusive measurement of local concentration and temperature in gas flows and reactive media. (Auth.)

  8. Electron temperatures within magnetic clouds between 2 and 4 AU: Voyager 2 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, E. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1998-08-01

    We have performed an analysis of Voyager 2 plasma electron observations within magnetic clouds between 2 and 4 AU identified by Burlaga and Behannon [1982]. The analysis has been confined to three of the magnetic clouds identified by Burlaga and Behannon that had high-quality data. The general properties of the plasma electrons within a magnetic cloud are that (1) the moment electron temperature anticorrelates with the electron density within the cloud, (2) the ratio Te/Tp tends to be >1, and (3) on average, Te/Tp~7.0. All three results are consistent with previous electron observations within magnetic clouds. Detailed analyses of the core and halo populations within the magnetic clouds show no evidence of either an anticorrelation between the core temperature TC and the electron density Ne or an anticorrelation between the halo temperature TH and the electron density. Within the magnetic clouds the halo component can contribute more than 50% of the electron pressure. The anticorrelation of Te relative to Ne can be traced to the density of the halo component relative to the density of the core component. The core electrons dominate the electron density. When the density goes up, the halo electrons contribute less to the electron pressure, so we get a lower Te. When the electron density goes down, the halo electrons contribute more to the electron pressure, and Te goes up. We find a relation between the electron pressure and density of the form Pe=αNeγ with γ~0.5.

  9. Magnetic behavior study of samarium nitride using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Narayan N.; Mankad, Venu H.; Dabhi, Shweta D.; Patel, Anjali; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, the state-of-art density functional theory is employed to study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of samarium nitride (SmN). We have performed calculation for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states in rock-salt phase. The calculated results of optimized lattice parameter and magnetic moment agree well with the available experimental and theoretical values. From energy band diagram and electronic density of states, we observe a half-metallic behaviour in FM phase of rock salt SmN in while metallicity in AFM I and AFM III phases. We present and discuss our current understanding of the possible half-metallicity together with the magnetic ordering in SmN. The calculated phonon dispersion curves shows dynamical stability of the considered structures. The phonon density of states and Eliashberg functional have also been analysed to understand the superconductivity in SmN.

  10. Minnealloy: a new magnetic material with high saturation flux density and low magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehedi, Md; Jiang, Yanfeng; Suri, Pranav Kumar; Flannigan, David J.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2017-09-01

    We are reporting a new soft magnetic material with high saturation magnetic flux density, and low magnetic anisotropy. The new material is a compound of iron, nitrogen and carbon, α‧-Fe8(NC), which has saturation flux density of 2.8  ±  0.15 T and magnetic anisotropy of 46 kJ m-3. The saturation flux density is 27% higher than pure iron, a widely used soft magnetic material. Soft magnetic materials are very important building blocks of motors, generators, inductors, transformers, sensors and write heads of hard disk. The new material will help in the miniaturization and efficiency increment of the next generation of electronic devices.

  11. Magnetic fluctuations associated with density fluctuations in the tokamak edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Gentle, K.W.; Ritz, C.P.; Rhodes, T.L.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic density and potential fluctuations occurring with high amplitude near the edge of a tokamak are correlated with components of the fluctuating magnetic field measured outside the limiter radius. It has been established that this turbulence is associated with fluctuations in current as well as density and potential. The correlation extends for substantial toroidal distances, but only if the probes are displaced approximately along field lines, consistent with the short coherence lengths poloidally but long coherence lengths parallel to the field which are characteristic for this turbulence. Furthermore, the correlation can be found only with density fluctuations measured inside the limiter radius; density fluctuations behind the limiter have no detectable magnetic concomitant for the toroidally spaced probes used here. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 12 refs, 3 figs

  12. Uniform magnetic fields in density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, Erik I.; Laestadius, Andre; Helgaker, Trygve; Kvaal, Simen; Teale, Andrew M.

    2018-01-01

    We construct a density-functional formalism adapted to uniform external magnetic fields that is intermediate between conventional density functional theory and Current-Density Functional Theory (CDFT). In the intermediate theory, which we term linear vector potential-DFT (LDFT), the basic variables are the density, the canonical momentum, and the paramagnetic contribution to the magnetic moment. Both a constrained-search formulation and a convex formulation in terms of Legendre-Fenchel transformations are constructed. Many theoretical issues in CDFT find simplified analogs in LDFT. We prove results concerning N-representability, Hohenberg-Kohn-like mappings, existence of minimizers in the constrained-search expression, and a restricted analog to gauge invariance. The issue of additivity of the energy over non-interacting subsystems, which is qualitatively different in LDFT and CDFT, is also discussed.

  13. Magnetic Method to Characterize the Current Densities in Breaker Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machkour, Nadia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to use magnetic induction measurements from a low voltage breaker arc, to reconstruct the arc's current density. The measurements were made using Hall effect sensors, which were placed close to, but outside the breaking device. The arc was modelled as a rectangular current sheet, composed of a mix of threadlike current segments and with a current density varying across the propagation direction. We found the magnetic induction of the arc is a convolution product of the current density, and a function depending on the breaker geometry and arc model. Using deconvolution methods, the current density in the electric arc was determined.The method is used to study the arc behavior into the breaker device. Notably, position, arc size, and electric conductivity could all be determined, and then used to characterize the arc mode, diffuse or concentrated, and study the condition of its mode changing

  14. Quasispin model of itinerant magnetism: High-temperature theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    The high-temperature properties of itinerant magnetic systems are examined by using the coherent-potential approximation. We assume a local moment on each atom so that at elevated temperatures there is a number of reversed spins. The coherent potential is solved, and from that the moment on each atom is determined self-consistently. It is found that when the condition for ferromagnetic ordering is satisfied, the local moments persist even above the critical temperature. Conversely, if local moments do not exist at high temperatures, the system can at most condense into a spin-density-wave state. Furthermore, spin-flip scatterings of the conduction electrons from the local moments give rise to additional correlation not treated in the coherent-potential approximation. This correlation energy is an important part of the coupling energy of the local moments. The relations between our work and the theories of Friedel, Hubbard, and others are discussed

  15. Microwave characteristics of low density flaky magnetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenqiang, Zhang; Deyuan, Zhang; Jun, Cai

    2013-01-01

    Diatomite coated with thin Fe films were obtained by the Chemical Vapor Deposition process. The resultant Fe-coated flaky diatomite particles had low densities (2.7–4.0 g/cm 3 ) and high saturation magnetization (93–157 emu/g). Annealing treatment led to grain growth and an increased saturation magnetization. The high frequency properties of the composites consisting of Fe-coated flaky diatomite particles and wax were investigated. The permittivity and permeability increased with increasing flaky magnetic particles content in the composite and increasing the Fe weight percentage of the particles. The reflection loss of the composite was found dependent on the absorber material thickness, wax:flaky magnetic particles ratios, the Fe content, as well as the annealing treatment. At a thickness of 1 mm, the composite records a minimum reflection loss of −18 dB at 6 GHz. - Highlights: ► We synthesize the flaky magnetic particles with the diatomite as template. ► The flaky magnetic particles coating layers are constituted by α-Fe. ► The flaky magnetic particles have good static magnetic properties. ► The flaky magnetic particles are a kind light weight high performance microwave absorber

  16. Replacing critical rare earth materials in high energy density magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, R. William

    2012-02-01

    High energy density permanent magnets are crucial to the design of internal permanent magnet motors (IPM) for hybride and electric vehicles and direct drive wind generators. Current motor designs use rare earth permanent magnets which easily meet the performance goals, however, the rising concerns over cost and foreign control of the current supply of rare earth resources has motivated a search for non-rare earth based permanent magnets alloys with performance metrics which allow the design of permanent magnet motors and generators without rare earth magnets. This talk will discuss the state of non-rare-earth permanent magnets and efforts to both improve the current materials and find new materials. These efforts combine first principles calculations and meso-scale magnetic modeling with advance characterization and synthesis techniques in order to advance the state of the art in non rare earth permanent magnets. The use of genetic algorithms in first principle structural calculations, combinatorial synthesis in the experimental search for materials, atom probe microscopy to characterize grain boundaries on the atomic level, and other state of the art techniques will be discussed. In addition the possibility of replacing critical rare earth elements with the most abundant rare earth Ce will be discussed.

  17. Microwave characteristics of low density flaky magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenqiang, Zhang, E-mail: zwqzwqzwqzwq@126.com [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); College of Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Deyuan, Zhang [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Jun, Cai, E-mail: jun_cai@buaa.edu.cn [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Diatomite coated with thin Fe films were obtained by the Chemical Vapor Deposition process. The resultant Fe-coated flaky diatomite particles had low densities (2.7–4.0 g/cm{sup 3}) and high saturation magnetization (93–157 emu/g). Annealing treatment led to grain growth and an increased saturation magnetization. The high frequency properties of the composites consisting of Fe-coated flaky diatomite particles and wax were investigated. The permittivity and permeability increased with increasing flaky magnetic particles content in the composite and increasing the Fe weight percentage of the particles. The reflection loss of the composite was found dependent on the absorber material thickness, wax:flaky magnetic particles ratios, the Fe content, as well as the annealing treatment. At a thickness of 1 mm, the composite records a minimum reflection loss of −18 dB at 6 GHz. - Highlights: ► We synthesize the flaky magnetic particles with the diatomite as template. ► The flaky magnetic particles coating layers are constituted by α-Fe. ► The flaky magnetic particles have good static magnetic properties. ► The flaky magnetic particles are a kind light weight high performance microwave absorber.

  18. Low temperature anomaly of light stimulated magnetization and heat capacity of the 1D diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffe, Chernet Amente

    2018-03-01

    This article reports magnetization and specific heat capacity anomalies in one dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductors observed at very low temperatures. Based on quantum field theory double time temperature dependent Green function technique is employed to evaluate magnon dispersion and the time correlation function. It is understood that magnon-photon coupling and magnetic impurity concentration controls both, such that near absolute temperature magnetization is nearly zero and abruptly increase to saturation level with decreasing magnon-photon coupling strength. We also found out dropping of magnetic specific heat capacity as a result of increase in magnetic impurity concentration x, perhaps because of inter-band disorder that would suppress the enhancement of density of spin waves.

  19. Low temperature anomaly of light stimulated magnetization and heat capacity of the 1D diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernet Amente Geffe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reports magnetization and specific heat capacity anomalies in one dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductors observed at very low temperatures. Based on quantum field theory double time temperature dependent Green function technique is employed to evaluate magnon dispersion and the time correlation function. It is understood that magnon-photon coupling and magnetic impurity concentration controls both, such that near absolute temperature magnetization is nearly zero and abruptly increase to saturation level with decreasing magnon-photon coupling strength. We also found out dropping of magnetic specific heat capacity as a result of increase in magnetic impurity concentration x, perhaps because of inter-band disorder that would suppress the enhancement of density of spin waves.

  20. Properties of plasma sheath with ion temperature in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinyuan; Wang Feng; Sun Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    The plasma sheath properties in a strong magnetic field are investigated in this work using a steady state two-fluid model. The motion of ions is affected heavily by the strong magnetic field in fusion devices; meanwhile, the effect of ion temperature cannot be neglected for the plasma in such devices. A criterion for the plasma sheath in a strong magnetic field, which differs from the well-known Bohm criterion for low temperature plasma sheath, is established theoretically with a fluid model. The fluid model is then solved numerically to obtain detailed sheath information under different ion temperatures, plasma densities, and magnetic field strengths.

  1. Temperature Dependence Viscosity and Density of Different Biodiesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to assess the effect of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME concentration in diesel fuel on its viscosity and density behaviour. The density and dynamic viscosity were observed at various mixing ratios of RME and diesel fuel. All measurements were performed at constant temperature of 40 °C. Increasing ratio of RME in diesel fuel was reflected in increased density value and dynamic viscosity of the blend. In case of pure RME, pure diesel fuel, and a blend of both (B30, temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was examined. Temperature range in the experiment was −10 °C to 80 °C. Considerable temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was found and demonstrated for all three samples. This finding is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and reference data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 3rd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.796, −0.948, and −0.974 between measured and calculated values were found. Temperature dependence of density was modeled using a 2nd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.994, −0.979, and −0.976 between measured and calculated values were acquired. The proposed models can be used for flow behaviour prediction of RME, diesel fuel, and their blends.

  2. The Properties of the Space-Charge and Net Current Density in Magnetized Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatami, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is used to investigate the properties of positive space-charge and net current density in the sheath region of magnetized, collisional plasmas with warm positive ions. It is shown that an increase in the ion-neutral collision frequency, as well as the magnitude of the external magnetic field, leads to an increase in the net current density across the sheath region. The results also show that the accumulation of positive ions in the sheath region increases by increasing the ion-neutral collision frequency and the magnitude of the magnetic field. In addition, it is seen that an increase in the positive ion temperatures causes a decrease in the accumulation of positive ions and the net current density in the sheath region. (basic plasma phenomena)

  3. Temperature dependent spin momentum densities in Ni-Mn-In alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahuja, B L; Dashora, Alpa; Vadkhiya, L; Heda, N L; Priolkar, K R; Lobo, Nelson; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Singh, Sanjay; Barman, S R

    2010-01-01

    The spin-dependent electron momentum densities in Ni 2 MnIn and Ni 2 Mn 1.4 In 0.6 shape memory alloy using magnetic Compton scattering with 182.2 keV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation are reported. The magnetic Compton profiles were measured at different temperatures ranging between 10 and 300 K. The profiles have been analyzed mainly in terms of Mn 3d electrons to determine their role in the formation of the total spin moment. We have also computed the spin polarized energy bands, partial and total density of states, Fermi surfaces and spin moments using full potential linearized augmented plane wave and spin polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker methods. The total spin moments obtained from our magnetic Compton profile data are explained using both the band structure models. The present Compton scattering investigations are also compared with magnetization measurements.

  4. Ultrasound imaging for quantitative evaluation of magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanaee, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to an investigation of the potential and technological possibilities of an inline ultrasound system as a quality control system for wet recycling of solid waste. The main targeted recycling technology is magnetic density separation (MDS), a novel technique that was

  5. Density functional theory study of structure, electronic and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHIJIT DUTTA

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... magnetic properties of non-metal (Group 13) doped stable. Rhn(n = 2−8) ... Deformed electron density was found to be higher in the case of Rh5B, Rh4Al, Rh7Al and ...... systems: Modeling of surface alloys and alloy surfaces.

  6. Maximum thermal energy density in magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppi, B.

    1977-01-01

    The consequences of the limiting value of β that follows from analyzing the onset of high temperature ballooning modes is examined in high temperature regimes where the ideal MHD approximation is not strictly valid and for finite-β configurations exhibiting the main features of those that are obtained by magnetic flux conservation. These modes are localized over periodically space intervals of a given magnetic field line and are driven by the combined effects of finite plasma pressure and the locally unfavorable magnetic curvature. The effects of finite β, insofar as they shorten the effective connection length, steepen the pressure gradient, and influence the magnetic well dug by the plasma, are studied using a model dispersion relation. 14 references

  7. Analyzing forensic evidence based on density with magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Matthew R; Mirica, Katherine A; Mace, Charles R; Blackledge, Robert D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining the density of contact trace objects with magnetic levitation (MagLev). MagLev measurements accurately determine the density (± 0.0002 g/cm(3) ) of a diamagnetic object and are compatible with objects that are nonuniform in shape and size. The MagLev device (composed of two permanent magnets with like poles facing) and the method described provide a means of accurately determining the density of trace objects. This method is inexpensive, rapid, and verifiable and provides numerical values--independent of the specific apparatus or analyst--that correspond to the absolute density of the sample that may be entered into a searchable database. We discuss the feasibility of MagLev as a possible means of characterizing forensic-related evidence and demonstrate the ability of MagLev to (i) determine the density of samples of glitter and gunpowder, (ii) separate glitter particles of different densities, and (iii) determine the density of a glitter sample that was removed from a complex sample matrix. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Density limits imposed by the microstructure of magnetic recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental limit of magnetic recording density on conventional media is set by the grain size. Once this grain size limit is reached, only a reduction of the grain size allows an increased SNR and thus an increased areal density. It is shown that, whilst maintaining thermal stability, scaling demands that the required anisotropy energy density K is proportional to the areal density, or the square of the areal density if the medium thickness reaches the critical thickness 4√(A/K) (A is the exchange stiffness of the material). Recording onto materials with such a high anisotropy requires some form of a write-assist. It is furthermore shown that the grain size limit cannot be obtained with intergranular exchange present, and six different requirements are listed that constitute ideal media. An alternative path for increasing areal density of magnetic recording is to use patterned media, where each bit contains only one grain. In this case, written-in errors dominate system performance and the maximum achievable areal density is estimated to be about 6 Tbit/in 2 . Patterned media need to exhibit narrow distributions of their physical and structural properties with standard deviations of the order of 5% or less

  9. Chiral and parity anomalies at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisakyan, A.N.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Solganik, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Two closely related topological phenomena are studied at finite density and temperature. These are chiral anomaly and Chern-Simons term. By using different methods it is shown that μ 2 =m 2 is the crucial point for Chern-Simons term at zero temperature. So when μ 2 2 , μ influence disappears and we get the usual Chern-Simons term. On the other hand, when μ 2 >m 2 , the Chern-Simons term vanishes because of nonzero density of background fermions. It occurs that the chiral anomaly doesn't depend on density and temperature. The connection between parity anomalous Chern-Simons term and chiral anomaly is generalized on finite density. These results hold in any dimension both in Abelian and in non-Abelian cases

  10. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Magnetism of Ba4Ru3O10 revealed by density functional calculations: Structural trimers behaving as coupled magnetic dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Andres; Radtke, Guillaume; Klein, Yannick; Rousse, Gwenaelle

    2013-03-01

    From a simple ionic picture, the only magnetically active ions in this compound are the three Ru4+ atoms which form trimers of faced shared RuO6 octahedral. The Ru atom in the middle of the trimer (named Ru(1)) is cristallographically inequivalent to the ones at the corners (named Ru(2)). A naïve analysis of the magnetic properties of this compound compatible with the expected low spin magnetic configuration of the Ru ions would predict a complicate magnetic order at low temperature involving the Ru(1) and Ru(2) ions and a high temperature susceptibility corresponding to three S=1 ions per unit cell. In spite of that, we demonstrate in this work, from density functional calculations, that under the influence of Ru-Ru covalent bonding, the structural trimers behave in an extended range of temperature from 0 to 600K, as strong (S = 1) antiferromagnetic dimers. Our calculations of the effective exchange interactions show a strong intra-dimer interaction and a weaker inter-dimer one which explains the antiferromagnetic order observed below TN = 105 K and the magnetic susceptibility in the intermediate and high temperature range (from TN=105K up to 612 K).

  12. Measurement of temperature, electric conductivity and density of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevova, I.; Nefedov, A.; Oberman, F.; Urinson, A.

    1982-01-01

    Three instruments are briefly described developed by the High Temperatures Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences for the measurement of plasma temperature, electric conductivity and density. The temperature measuring instrument uses as a standard a light source whose temperature may significantly differ from plasma temperature because three light fluxes are compared, namely the flux emitted by the plasma, the flux emitted directly by the standard source, and the flux emitted by the standard source after passage through the plasma. The results of measurement are computer processed. Electric conductivity is measured using a coil placed in a probe which is automatically extended for a time of maximally 0.3 seconds into the plasma stream. The equipment for measuring plasma density consists of a special single-channel monochromator, a temperature gauge, a plasma pressure gauge, and of a computer for processing the results of measurement. (Ha)

  13. Positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based magnetic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yiwei; Wang, Baomin; Zhan, Qingfeng; Tang, Zhenhua; Yang, Huali; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Zhenghu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Xie, Yali; Zhu, Xiaojian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Junling; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy is decreased with increasing temperature in normal magnetic materials, which is harmful to the thermal stability of magnetic devices. Here, we report the realization of positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in a novel composite combining β-phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with magnetostrictive materials (magnetostrictive film/PVDF bilayer structure). We ascribe the enhanced magnetic anisotropy of the magnetic film at elevated temperature to the st...

  14. Magnetic Fluctuations in Pair-Density-Wave Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Morten H.; Jacobsen, Henrik; Maier, Thomas A.; Andersen, Brian M.

    2016-04-01

    Pair-density-wave superconductivity constitutes a novel electronic condensate proposed to be realized in certain unconventional superconductors. Establishing its potential existence is important for our fundamental understanding of superconductivity in correlated materials. Here we compute the dynamical magnetic susceptibility in the presence of a pair-density-wave ordered state and study its fingerprints on the spin-wave spectrum including the neutron resonance. In contrast to the standard case of d -wave superconductivity, we show that the pair-density-wave phase exhibits neither a spin gap nor a magnetic resonance peak, in agreement with a recent neutron scattering experiment on underdoped La1.905 Ba0.095 CuO4 [Z. Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 177002 (2014)].

  15. Study of nuclear level density parameter and its temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Behkami, A. N.

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear level density ρ is the basic ingredient required for theoretical studies of nuclear reaction and structure. It describes the statistical nuclear properties and is expressed as a function of various constants of motion such as number of particles, excitation energy and angular momentum. In this work the energy and spin dependence of nuclear level density will be presented and discussed. In addition the level density parameter α will be extracted from this level density information, and its temperature and mass dependence will be obtained

  16. Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez De Tejada, H. A.; Durand-Manterola, H. J.; Lundin, R.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Sauvaud, J.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake H. Pérez-de-Tejada1, H. Durand-Manterola1, R. Lundin2, S. Barabash2, T. L. Zhang3, A. Sauvaud4, M. Reyes-Ruiz5. 1 - Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, México, D. F. 2 - Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Umea, Sweden 3 - Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria 4 - CESR, Toulouse, France 5 - Institute of Astronomy, UNAM, Ensenada, México Measurements conducted in the Venus wake with the magnetometer and the Aspera-4 plasma instrument of the Venus Express spacecraft show that average values of the kinetic energy density of the plasma in that region are comparable to average local values of the magnetic energy density. Observations were carried out in several orbits of the Venus Express near the midnight plane and suggest that the total energy content in the Venus wake is distributed with nearly comparable values between the plasma and the magnetic field. Processes associated with the solar wind erosion of planetary ions from the polar magnetic regions of the ionosphere are involved in the comparable distribution of both energy components.

  17. Expansion Of The Magnetic Flux Density Field In Toroidal Harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2290414; Bottura, Luca; Felcini, Enrico

    CERN (Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire) is recognized worldwide as the main research laboratory in the field of particle physics. Inevitably, all this requires the use of the most advanced technologies, both from the point of view of the instruments and the analytical descriptive methods. One of the numerous potentials of the work carried out at CERN concerns the possibility of exploiting the aforementioned technologies even in contexts distant from the physics of particles, with the result of influencing the technological advancement of many areas. For example, one of the most widely employed theories at CERN, regarding the analytical description of the magnetic flux density inside solenoidal magnets (or approximable as such under suitable assumptions) for the acceleration of particles, is the so-called multipole expansion. This is a two-dimensional or three-dimensional analysis of the distribution of the magnetic flux density generated by the windings of a magnet. The magnet in question ca...

  18. High-density-plasma diagnostics in magnetic-confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahoda, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The lectures will begin by defining high density in the context of magnetic confinement fusion research and listing some alternative reactor concepts, ranging from n/sub e/ approx. 2 x 10 14 cm -3 to several orders of magnitude greater, that offer potential advantages over the main-line, n/sub e/ approx. 1 x 10 14 cm -3 , Tokamak reactor designs. The high density scalings of several major diagnostic techniques, some favorable and some disadvantageous, will be discussed. Special emphasis will be given to interferometric methods, both electronic and photographic, for which integral n/sub e/dl measurements and associated techniques are accessible with low wavelength lasers. Reactor relevant experience from higher density, smaller dimension devices exists. High density implies high β, which implies economies of scale. The specialized features of high β diagnostics will be discussed

  19. Magnetic resonance studies of atomic hydrogen gas at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, W.N.; Morrow, M.; Jochemsen, R.; Statt, B.W.; Kubik, P.R.; Marsolais, R.M.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Landesman, A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a pulsed low temperature discharge in a closed cell containing H 2 and 4 He, we have been able to store a low density (approximately 10 12 atoms/cc) gas of atomic hydrogen for periods of order one hour in zero magnetic field and T=1 K. Pulsed magnetic resonance at the 1420 MHz hyperfine transition has been used to study a number of the properties of the gas, including the recombination rate H + H + 4 He→H 2 + 4 He, the hydrogen spin-exchange relaxation rates, the diffusion coefficient of H in 4 He gas and the pressure shift of the hyperfine frequency due to the 4 He buffer gas. Here we discuss the application of hyperfine frequency shifts as a probe of the H-He potential, and as a means for determining the binding energy of H on liquid helium

  20. Chern-Simons term at finite density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisakyan, A.N.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Solganik, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Chern-Simons topological term dynamical generation in the effective action is obtained at arbitrary finite density and temperature. By using the proper time method and perturbation theory it is shown that at zero temperature μ 2 = m 2 is the crucial point for Chern-Simons term. So when μ 2 2 , μ influence disappears and we get the usual Chern-Simons term. On the other hand, when μ 2 > m 2 , the Chern-Simons term vanishes because of nonzero density of background fermions. In particular for massless case parity anomaly is absent at any finite density or temperature. This result holds in any odd dimension both in Abelian and in non-Abelian cases

  1. Level-density parameter of nuclei at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Stout, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of particle-particle (hole-hole) and of particle-hole ring diagrams to the nuclear level-density parameter at finite temperature is calculated. We first derive the correlated grand potential with the above ring diagrams included to all orders by way of a finite temperature RPA equation. An expression for the correlated level-density parameter is then obtained by differentiating the grand potential. Results obtained for the 40 Ca nucleus with realistic matrix elements derived from the Paris potential are presented. The contribution of the RPA correlations is found to be important, being significantly larger than typical Hartree-Fock results. The temperature dependence of the level-density parameter derived in the present work is generally similar to that obtained in a schematic model. Comparison with available experimental data is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Effect of pairing in nuclear level density at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhine Kumar, A.K.; Modi, Swati; Arumugam, P.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear level density (NLD) has been an interesting topic for researchers, due its importance in many aspects of nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear medicine, and other applied areas. The calculation of NLD helps us to understand the energy distribution of the excited levels of nuclei, entropy, specific heat, reaction cross sections etc. In this work the effect of temperature and pairing on level-density of the nucleus 116 Sn has been studied

  3. Distribution of temperature coefficient density for muons in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmenko V.S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, several dozens of new muon detectors have been built. When studying cosmic-ray intensity variations with these detectors, located deep in the atmosphere, it is necessary to calculate all characteristics, including the distribution of temperature coefficient density for muons in the atmosphere, taking into account their specific geometry. For this purpose, we calculate the density of temperature coefficients of muon intensity in the atmosphere at various zenith angles of detection at sea level and at various depths underground for different absorption ranges of primary protons and pions in the atmosphere.

  4. Ionospheric midlatitude electric current density inferred from multiple magnetic satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shore, R. M.; Whaler, K. A.; Macmillan, S.

    2013-01-01

    A method for inferring zonal electric current density in the mid-to-low latitude F region ionosphere is presented. We describe a method of using near-simultaneous overflights of the Ørsted and CHAMP satellites to define a closed circuit for an application of Ampère's integral law to magnetic data...... for estimates of main and crustal magnetic fields. Current density in the range ±0.1 μA/m2 is resolved, with the distribution of electric current largely matching known features such as the Appleton anomaly. The currents appear unmodulated at times of either high-negative Dst or high F10.7, which has...... implications for any future efforts to model their effects. We resolve persistent current intensifications between geomagnetic latitudes of 30 and 50° in the postmidnight, predawn sector, a region typically thought to be relatively free of electric currents. The cause of these unexpected intensifications...

  5. High temperature superconductor cable concepts for fusion magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078397

    2013-01-01

    Three concepts of high temperature superconductor cables carrying kA currents (RACC, CORC and TSTC) are investigated, optimized and evaluated in the scope of their applicability as conductor in fusion magnets. The magnetic field and temperature dependence of the cables is measured; the thermal expansion and conductivity of structure, insulation and filling materials are investigated. High temperature superconductor winding packs for fusion magnets are calculated and compared with corresponding low temperature superconductor cases.

  6. Electron density and temperature in NIO1 RF source operated in oxygen and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbisan, M.; Zaniol, B.; Cavenago, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Zanini, M.

    2017-08-01

    The NIO1 experiment, built and operated at Consorzio RFX, hosts an RF negative ion source, from which it is possible to produce a beam of maximum 130 mA in H- ions, accelerated up to 60 kV. For the preliminary tests of the extraction system the source has been operated in oxygen, whose high electronegativity allows to reach useful levels of extracted beam current. The efficiency of negative ions extraction is strongly influenced by the electron density and temperature close to the Plasma Grid, i.e. the grid of the acceleration system which faces the source. To support the tests, these parameters have been measured by means of the Optical Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic. This technique has involved the use of an oxygen-argon mixture to produce the plasma in the source. The intensities of specific Ar I and Ar II lines have been measured along lines of sight close to the Plasma Grid, and have been interpreted with the ADAS package to get the desired information. This work will describe the diagnostic hardware, the analysis method and the measured values of electron density and temperature, as function of the main source parameters (RF power, pressure, bias voltage and magnetic filter field). The main results show that not only electron density but also electron temperature increase with RF power; both decrease with increasing magnetic filter field. Variations of source pressure and plasma grid bias voltage appear to affect only electron temperature and electron density, respectively.

  7. Study of flow fractionation characteristics of magnetic chromatography utilizing high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fukui, Yoshihiro Shoji, Jun Ogawa, Tetsuo Oka, Mitsugi Yamaguchi, Takao Sato, Manabu Ooizumi, Hiroshi Imaizumi and Takeshi Ohara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present numerical simulation of separating magnetic particles with different magnetic susceptibilities by magnetic chromatography using a high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The transient transport is numerically simulated for two kinds of particles having different magnetic susceptibilities. The time evolutions were calculated for the particle concentration in the narrow channel of the spiral arrangement placed in the magnetic field. The field is produced by the highly magnetized high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The numerical results show the flow velocity difference of the particle transport corresponding to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility, as well as the possible separation of paramagnetic particles of 20 nm diameter.

  8. Study of flow fractionation characteristics of magnetic chromatography utilizing high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Satoshi; Shoji, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Jun; Oka, Tetsuo; Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Sato, Takao; Ooizumi, Manabu; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Ohara, Takeshi

    2009-02-01

    We present numerical simulation of separating magnetic particles with different magnetic susceptibilities by magnetic chromatography using a high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The transient transport is numerically simulated for two kinds of particles having different magnetic susceptibilities. The time evolutions were calculated for the particle concentration in the narrow channel of the spiral arrangement placed in the magnetic field. The field is produced by the highly magnetized high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The numerical results show the flow velocity difference of the particle transport corresponding to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility, as well as the possible separation of paramagnetic particles of 20 nm diameter.

  9. Equivalent Circulation Density Analysis of Geothermal Well by Coupling Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuhua Zheng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The accurate control of the wellbore pressure not only prevents lost circulation/blowout and fracturing formation by managing the density of the drilling fluid, but also improves productivity by mitigating reservoir damage. Calculating the geothermal pressure of a geothermal well by constant parameters would easily bring big errors, as the changes of physical, rheological and thermal properties of drilling fluids with temperature are neglected. This paper researched the wellbore pressure coupling by calculating the temperature distribution with the existing model, fitting the rule of density of the drilling fluid with the temperature and establishing mathematical models to simulate the wellbore pressures, which are expressed as the variation of Equivalent Circulating Density (ECD under different conditions. With this method, the temperature and ECDs in the wellbore of the first medium-deep geothermal well, ZK212 Yangyi Geothermal Field in Tibet, were determined, and the sensitivity analysis was simulated by assumed parameters, i.e., the circulating time, flow rate, geothermal gradient, diameters of the wellbore, rheological models and regimes. The results indicated that the geothermal gradient and flow rate were the most influential parameters on the temperature and ECD distribution, and additives added in the drilling fluid should be added carefully as they change the properties of the drilling fluid and induce the redistribution of temperature. To ensure the safe drilling and velocity of pipes tripping into the hole, the depth and diameter of the wellbore are considered to control the surge pressure.

  10. Magnetic field influence on the spin-density wave of the organic conductor (TMTSF)2NO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomic, S.; Biskup, N.; Korin-Hamzic, B.; Basletic, M.; Hamzic, A.; Maki, K.; Fabre, J.M.; Bechgaard, K.

    1993-01-01

    We present the influence of a transverse magnetic field on the spin-density wave (SDW) ground state of the organic conductor (TMTSF) 2 NO 3 . Magnetic field increases the single-particle activation energy. A finite magnetic field (H C ) induces discontinuities in the magnetoresistance behaviour and its value is temperature dependent. The threshold electric field (E T ) for the SDW sliding increases in a magnetic field. All observed effects are strongly angle-dependent indicating that they are determined by the magnetic field component along the least-conduction (c * ) direction. We discuss these results in the framework of a theoretical model for the SDW with large imperfect nesting. (orig.)

  11. Influence of aliphatic amides on the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Andrés Felipe; Romero, Carmen M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The addition of amides decreases the temperature of maximum density of water suggesting a disruptive effect on water structure. • The amides in aqueous solution do not follow the Despretz equation in the concentration range considered. • The temperature shift Δθ as a function of molality is represented by a second order equation. • The Despretz constants were determined considering the dilute concentration region for each amide solution. • Solute disrupting effect of amides becomes smaller as its hydrophobic character increases. - Abstract: The influence of dissolved substances on the temperature of the maximum density of water has been studied in relation to their effect on water structure as they can change the equilibrium between structured and unstructured species of water. However, most work has been performed using salts and the studies with small organic solutes such as amides are scarce. In this work, the effect of acetamide, propionamide and butyramide on the temperature of maximum density of water was determined from density measurements using a magnetic float densimeter. Densities of aqueous solutions were measured within the temperature range from T = (275.65–278.65) K at intervals of 0.50 K in the concentration range between (0.10000 and 0.80000) mol·kg −1 . The temperature of maximum density was determined from the experimental results. The effect of the three amides is to decrease the temperature of maximum density of water and the change does not follow the Despretz equation. The results are discussed in terms of solute-water interactions and the disrupting effect of amides on water structure.

  12. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Zhang, Pu [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Wenzhong, E-mail: lwz7410@hust.edu.cn [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Image Processing and Intelligent Control, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  13. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models for the ......Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models...... for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending...

  14. Effect of temperature dependent properties on MHD convection of water near its density maximum in a square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankaran, S.; Hoa, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Natural convection of water near its density maximum in the presence of magnetic field in a cavity with temperature dependent properties is studied numerically. The viscosity and thermal conductivity of the water is varied with reference temperature and calculated by cubic polynomial. The finite volume method is used to solve the governing equations. The results are presented graphically in the form of streamlines, isotherms and velocity vectors and are discussed for various combinations of reference temperature parameter, Rayleigh number, density inversion parameter and Hartmann number. It is observed that flow and temperature field are affected significantly by changing the reference temperature parameter for temperature dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity cases. There is no significant effect on fluid flow and temperature distributions for temperature dependent viscosity case when changing the values of reference temperature parameter. The average heat transfer rate considering temperature-dependent viscosity are higher than considering temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity. The average Nusselt number decreases with an increase of Hartmann number. It is observed that the density inversion of water leaves strong effects on fluid flow and heat transfer due to the formation of bi-cellular structure. The heat transfer rate behaves non-linearly with density inversion parameter. The direction of external magnetic field also affect the fluid flow and heat transfer. (authors)

  15. Axial anomaly at finite temperature and finite density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Zhixin; Su Rukeng; Yu, P.K.N.

    1994-01-01

    The U(1) axial anomaly in a hot fermion medium is investigated by using the real time Green's function method. After calculating the lowest order triangle diagrams, we find that finite temperature as well as finite fermion density does not affect the axial anomaly. The higher order corrections for the axial anomaly are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Effects of Sintering Temperature on the Density And Porosity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity of sodium chloride preforms for alu- minium foam manufacturing have been investigated. Cold pressed salt preforms were sintered at 30, 760 and 790 and di erent times ranging between 6- 18 hours in a carbolite furnace at a heating rate of 5/minute. The Results of ...

  17. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions.

  18. Heisenberg spin-one chain in staggered magnetic field: A density matrix renormalization group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jizhong Lou; Xi Dai; Shaojin Qin; Zhaobin Su; Lu Yu

    1999-04-01

    Using the density matrix renormalization group technique, we calculate numerically the low energy excitation spectrum and magnetization curve of the spin-1 antiferromagnetic chain in a staggered magnetic field, which is expected to describe the physics of R 2 BaNiO 5 (R ≠ Y) family below the Neel temperature of the magnetic rare-earth (R) sublattice. These results are valid in the entire range of the staggered field, and agree with those given by the non-linear σ model study for small fields, but differ from the latter for large fields. They are consistent with the available experimental data. The correlation functions for this model are also calculated. The transverse correlations display the anticipated exponential decay with shorter correlation length, while the longitudinal correlations show explicitly the induced staggered magnetization. (author)

  19. Long-term Longitudinal Recurrences of the Open Magnetic Flux Density in the Heliosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dósa, M.; Erdős, G., E-mail: dosa.melinda@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege Miklós st 29-33 (Hungary)

    2017-04-01

    Open magnetic flux in the heliosphere is determined from the radial component of the magnetic field vector measured onboard interplanetary space probes. Previous Ulysses research has shown remarkable independence of the flux density from heliographic latitude, explained by super-radial expansion of plasma. Here we are investigating whether any longitudinal variation exists in the 50 year long OMNI magnetic data set. The heliographic longitude of origin of the plasma package was determined by applying a correction according to the solar wind travel time. Significant recurrent enhancements of the magnetic flux density were observed throughout solar cycle 23, lasting for several years. Similar, long-lasting recurring features were observed in the solar wind velocity, temperature and the deviation angle of the solar wind velocity vector from the radial direction. Each of the recurrent features has a recurrence period slightly differing from the Carrington rotation rate, although they show a common trend in time. Examining the coronal temperature data of ACE leads to the possible explanation that these long-term structures are caused by slow–fast solar wind interaction regions. A comparison with MESSENGER data measured at 0.5 au shows that these longitudinal magnetic modulations do not exist closer to the Sun, but are the result of propagation.

  20. Estimating relic magnetic fields from CMB temperature correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The temperature and polarization inhomogeneities of the cosmic microwave background might bear the mark of predecoupling magnetism. The parameters of a putative magnetized background are hereby estimated, for the first time, from the observed temperature autocorrelation as well as from the measured temperature-polarization cross correlation.

  1. Estimating relic magnetic fields from CMB temperature correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The temperature and polarization inhomogeneities of the Cosmic Microwave Background might bear the mark of pre-decoupling magnetism. The parameters of a putative magnetized background are hereby estimated from the observed temperature autocorrelation as well as from the measured temperature-polarization cross-correlation.

  2. Research and development of an aimed magnetic lead current density-magnetic field diagnostic. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A diagnostics survey was made to provide a clear definition of advanced diagnostic needs and the limitations of current approaches in addressing those needs. Special attention was given to the adequacy with which current diagnostics are interfaced to signal processing/data acquisition devices and systems. Critical evaluations of selected alternative diagnostic techniques for future R and D activities are presented. The conceptual basis of the Aimed Magnetic Lead Gradiometric system as a current density/magnetic field diagnostic is established

  3. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping

  4. Effect of glycine, DL-alanine and DL-2-aminobutyric acid on the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Carmen M.; Torres, Andres Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of α-amino acids on the temperature of maximum density of water is presented. • The addition of α-amino acids decreases the temperature of maximum density of water. • Despretz constants suggest that the amino acids behave as water structure breakers. • Despretz constants decrease as the number of CH 2 groups of the amino acid increase. • Solute disrupting effect becomes smaller as its hydrophobic character increases. - Abstract: The effect of glycine, DL-alanine and DL-2-aminobutyric acid on the temperature of maximum density of water was determined from density measurements using a magnetic float densimeter. Densities of aqueous solutions were measured within the temperature range from T = (275.65 to 278.65) K at intervals of T = 0.50 K over the concentration range between (0.0300 and 0.1000) mol · kg −1 . A linear relationship between density and concentration was obtained for all the systems in the temperature range considered. The temperature of maximum density was determined from the experimental results. The effect of the three amino acids is to decrease the temperature of maximum density of water and the decrease is proportional to molality according to Despretz equation. The effect of the amino acids on the temperature of maximum density decreases as the number of methylene groups of the alkyl chain becomes larger. The results are discussed in terms of (solute + water) interactions and the effect of amino acids on water structure

  5. Electric-field assisted switching of magnetization in perpendicularly magnetized (Ga,Mn)As films at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Ma, Jialin; Yu, Xueze; Yu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    The electric-field effects on the magnetism in perpendicularly magnetized (Ga,Mn)As films at high temperatures have been investigated. An electric-field as high as 0.6 V nm-1 is applied by utilizing a solid-state dielectric Al2O3 film as a gate insulator. The coercive field, saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy have been clearly changed by the gate electric-field, which are detected via the anomalous Hall effect. In terms of the Curie temperature, a variation of about 3 K is observed as determined by the temperature derivative of the sheet resistance. In addition, electrical switching of the magnetization assisted by a fixed external magnetic field at 120 K is demonstrated, employing the gate-controlled coercive field. The above experimental results have been attributed to the gate voltage modulation of the hole density in (Ga,Mn)As films, since the ferromagnetism in (Ga,Mn)As is carrier-mediated. The limited modulation magnitude of magnetism is found to result from the strong charge screening effect introduced by the high hole concentration up to 1.10  ×  1021 cm-3, while the variation of the hole density is only about 1.16  ×  1020 cm-3.

  6. System and method for magnetic current density imaging at ultra low magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, Michelle A.; George, John Stevens; Kraus, Robert Henry; Magnelind, Per; Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Tucker, Don; Turovets, Sergei; Volegov, Petr Lvovich

    2016-02-09

    Preferred systems can include an electrical impedance tomography apparatus electrically connectable to an object; an ultra low field magnetic resonance imaging apparatus including a plurality of field directions and disposable about the object; a controller connected to the ultra low field magnetic resonance imaging apparatus and configured to implement a sequencing of one or more ultra low magnetic fields substantially along one or more of the plurality of field directions; and a display connected to the controller, and wherein the controller is further configured to reconstruct a displayable image of an electrical current density in the object. Preferred methods, apparatuses, and computer program products are also disclosed.

  7. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  8. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in a gas blanket experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuthy, A.

    1979-02-01

    Radial profiles of electron density, temperature and H sub(β) intensity are presented for the rotating plasma device F-1. The hydrogen filling pressure, the average magnetic field strength at the midplane, and the power input to the discharge have been varied in the ranges 10-100 mTorr, 0.25-0.5 Tesla, and 0.1 to 1.5 MW, respectively. These experiments have been performed with the main purpose of studying the gas blanket (cold-mantle) state of the plasma. It is shown, that a simple spectroscopic method can be used to derive the radial distribution of the electron temperature in such plasmas. The observed peak temperatures and densities are in agreement with earlier theoretical estimates. (author)

  9. Helical patterns of magnetization and magnetic charge density in iron whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Terry L.; Hanham, Scott D.; Arrott, Anthony S.

    2018-05-01

    Studies with the (1 1 1) axis along the long axis of an iron whisker, 40 years ago, showed two phenomena that have remained unexplained: 1) In low fields, there are six peaks in the ac susceptibility, separated by 0.2 mT; 2) Bitter patterns showed striped domain patterns. Multipole columns of magnetic charge density distort to form helical patterns of the magnetization, accounting for the peaks in the susceptibility from the propagation of edge solitons along the intersections of the six sides of a (1 1 1) whisker. The stripes follow the helices. We report micromagnetic simulations in cylinders with various geometries for the cross-sections from rectangular, to hexagonal, to circular, with wide ranges of sizes and lengths, and different anisotropies, including (0 0 1) whiskers and the hypothetical case of no anisotropy. The helical patterns have been there in previous studies, but overlooked. The surface swirls and body helices are connected, but have their own individual behaviors. The magnetization patterns are more easily understood when viewed observing the scalar divergences of the magnetization as isosurfaces of magnetic charge density. The plus and minus charge densities form columns that interact with unlike charges attracting, but not annihilating as they are paid for by a decrease in exchange energy. Just as they start to form the helix, the columns are multipoles. If one could stretch the columns, the self-energy of the charges in a column would be diminished while making the attractive interactions of the unlike charges larger. The columns elongate by becoming helical. The visualization of 3-D magnetic charge distributions aids in the understanding of magnetization in soft magnetic materials.

  10. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed

  11. Temperature dependence of magnetic descriptors of Magnetic Adaptive Testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Takagi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2010), s. 509-512 ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1323; GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * magnetic hysteresis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.052, year: 2010

  12. Topological terms induced by finite temperature and density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, A.J.; Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210)

    1986-01-01

    In (3+1)-dimensional finite-temperature and -density SU(2) gauge theories with left-handed fermions, the three-dimensional Chern-Simons term (topological mass) can be induced by radiative corrections. This result is derived by use of a family's index theorem which also implies that in many other quantum field theories various additional lower-dimensional topological terms can be induced. In the high-temperature limit these terms dominate the partition function, which suggests applications to early-Universe cosmology

  13. The relationship between ionospheric temperature, electron density and solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.N.; Williams, P.J.S.

    1980-01-01

    In studying the F-region of the ionosphere several authors have concluded that the difference between the electron temperature Tsub(e) and the ion temperature Tsub(i) is related to the electron density N. It was later noted that solar activity (S) was involved and an empirical relationship of the following form was established: Tsub(e)-Tsub(i) = A-BN+CS. The present paper extends this work using day-time data over a four year period. The results are given and discussed. A modified form of the empirical relation is proposed. (U.K.)

  14. Determination of electron temperature and electron density in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is seen that the electron temperature increases from 5.8 × 102 oK to 7.83 × 104 oK as the pd is reduced from 130mm Hg × mm to 60 mm Hg × mm for argon. The electron densities increases from 2.8 × 1011/cm3 to 3.2 × 1011 /cm3 for the same variation of pds. For air the electron temperature increases from 3.6 × 104 oK to ...

  15. Solid density, low temperature plasma formation in a capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.; Jones, L.A.; Maestas, M.D.; Shepherd, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    This work discusses the ability of the authors to produce solid density, low temperature plasmas in polyurethane capillary discharges. The initial capillary diameter is 20 μm. The plasma is produced by discharging a one Ohm parallel plate waterline and Marx generator system through the capillary. A peak current of 340 kA in 300 ns heats the inner wall of the capillary, and the plasma expands into the surrounding material. The authors studied the evolution of the discharge using current and voltage probes, axial and radial streak photography, axial x-ray diode array and schlieren photography, and have estimated the peak temperature of the discharge to be approximately 10 eV and the density to be near 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/. This indicates that the plasma may approach the strongly coupled regime. They discuss their interpretation of the data and compare their results with theoretical models of the plasma dynamics

  16. Flare plasma density determination using observed temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Observed electron temperature variations derived from flux intensity ratios of whole-disk continuum soft X-ray spectra recorded by GOES satellites are presently subjected to an analysis that is based on the nonequilibrium energy balance equation in order to obtain the physical properties of a large solar flare from onset through the gradual phase. A self-similar formalism which reduces the nonlinear, second-order PDE in length and time to a more tractable, nonlinear, first-order Ricatti equation is invoked. Plasma density is the principal unknown variable contained in the Ricatti equation, which also contains first-order time derivatives and first- and second-order spatial derivatives of temperature. This methodology is presently applied to the moderate size flare of January 28, 1982, for which a density profile is deduced under various parametric conditions. 37 references

  17. Effect of substrate temperature on electrical and magnetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Figure 1. The temperature dependence of resistivity for LPMO films grown at different substrate temperatures (solid and open circles are the data in zero and 1 T magnetic field). The inset shows the variation of magnetoresistance with ...

  18. High density microelectronics package using low temperature cofirable ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, S.-L.; Hsi, C.-S.; Chen, L.-S.; Lin, W. K.

    1997-01-01

    Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC) is a relative new thick film process and has many engineering and manufacturing advantages over both the sequential thick film process and high temperature cofired ceramic modules. Because of low firing temperature, low sheet resistance metal conductors, commercial thick film resistors, and thick film capacitors can be buried in or printed on the substrates. A 3-D multilayer ceramic substrate can be prepared via laminating and co-firing process. The packing density of the LTCC substrates can be increased by this 3-D packing technology. At Kaohsiung Polytechnic Institute (KPI), a LTCC substrate system has been developed for high density packaging applications, which had buried surface capacitors and resistors. The developed cordierite-glass ceramic substrate, which has similar thermal expansion as silicon chip, is a promising material for microelectronic packaging. When the substrates were sintered at temperatures between 850-900 degree centigrade, a relative density higher than 96 % can be obtained. The substrate had a dielectric constant between 5.5 and 6.5. Ruthenium-based resistor pastes were used for resistors purposes. The resistors fabricated in/on the LTCC substrates were strongly depended on the microstructures developed in the resistor films. Surface resistors were laser trimmed in order to obtain specific values for the resistors. Material with composition Pb(Fe 2/3 W 1/3 ) x (Fe l/2 Nb l/2 ) y Ti 2 O 3 was used as dielectric material of the capacitor in the substrate. The material can be sintered at temperatures between 850-930 degree centigrade, and has dielectric constant as high as 26000. After cofiring, good adhesion between dielectric and substrate layers was obtained. Combing the buried resistors and capacitors together with the lamination of LTCC layer, a 3-dimensional multilayered ceramic package was fabricated. (author)

  19. High density microelectronics package using low temperature cofirable ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, S -L; Hsi, C -S; Chen, L -S; Lin, W K [Kaoshiung Polytechnic Institute Ta-Hsu, Kaoshiung (China)

    1998-12-31

    Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC) is a relative new thick film process and has many engineering and manufacturing advantages over both the sequential thick film process and high temperature cofired ceramic modules. Because of low firing temperature, low sheet resistance metal conductors, commercial thick film resistors, and thick film capacitors can be buried in or printed on the substrates. A 3-D multilayer ceramic substrate can be prepared via laminating and co-firing process. The packing density of the LTCC substrates can be increased by this 3-D packing technology. At Kaohsiung Polytechnic Institute (KPI), a LTCC substrate system has been developed for high density packaging applications, which had buried surface capacitors and resistors. The developed cordierite-glass ceramic substrate, which has similar thermal expansion as silicon chip, is a promising material for microelectronic packaging. When the substrates were sintered at temperatures between 850-900 degree centigrade, a relative density higher than 96 % can be obtained. The substrate had a dielectric constant between 5.5 and 6.5. Ruthenium-based resistor pastes were used for resistors purposes. The resistors fabricated in/on the LTCC substrates were strongly depended on the microstructures developed in the resistor films. Surface resistors were laser trimmed in order to obtain specific values for the resistors. Material with composition Pb(Fe{sub 2/3}W{sub 1/3}){sub x}(Fe{sub l/2}Nb{sub l/2}){sub y}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used as dielectric material of the capacitor in the substrate. The material can be sintered at temperatures between 850-930 degree centigrade, and has dielectric constant as high as 26000. After cofiring, good adhesion between dielectric and substrate layers was obtained. Combing the buried resistors and capacitors together with the lamination of LTCC layer, a 3-dimensional multilayered ceramic package was fabricated. (author)

  20. Performance Variation of Ferrite Magnet PMBLDC Motor with Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2015-01-01

    The price fluctuations of rare earth metals and the uncertainty in their availability has generated an increased interest in ferrite magnet machines. The influence of temperature on BH characteristics of the ferrite magnet differ considerably from that of the rare earth magnet and hence, requires...

  1. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otabe, E S; Kuroki, S; Nikawa, J; Matsumoto, Y; Ooba, T; Kiso, K; Hayashi, H

    2009-01-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 10 6 /ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  2. Magnetic memory effects in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockenbauer, A.

    1989-01-01

    Microwave absorption of high temperature oxide superconductors MBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (M = Y, Er, Dy, Ho, Lu, Tm, Gd) at 77 K have been studied by ESR. In granular samples diamagnetic zero-field resonance and strong ESR baseline hysteresis have been observed: for increasing field sweep - a high, for decreasing one - a low, while in constant field the baseline approaches the middle position with kinetics typical of spin-glasses. The hysteresis amplitude, i.e. the deviation of high and low baselines, possesses maximum at zero field if the sample is cooled down in zero field. In case of field cooling both the diamagnetic resonance and hysteresis maximum are shifted as a function of relative direction of the fields where the samples are cooled and measured, respectively. The shift is caused by the remanent diamagnetism of trapped fluxons. The hysteresis critically depends on the modulation amplitude of magnetic field, and no hysteresis can be observed if the microwave absorption is detected without field modulation. By applying saw-tooth sweep the spin-glass can be driven between two extreme hysteresis states, and the ESR response is rectangular for large saw-tooth amplitude and linear - for small one, while for intermediate amplitudes the recording shows characteristic memory effects. The hysteresis memory is explained in terms of loop distribution of fluxons. In the single crystal the fluxon absorptions are also detected and the separation of fluxon lines can be related to the hysteresis in granular samples. (author)

  3. Two-phase regime in the magnetic field-temperature phase diagram of a type-II superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, L.L.A.; Halterman, Klaus; Valls, Oriol T.; Goldman, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic field and temperature dependencies of the magnetic moments of superconducting crystals of V 3 Si have been studied. In a constant magnetic field and at temperatures somewhat below the superconducting transition temperature, the moments are hysteretic in temperature. However, the magnetic moment-magnetic field isotherms are reversible and exhibit features that formally resemble the pressure-volume isotherms of the liquid-gas transition. This suggests the existence of a first-order phase transition, a two-phase regime, and a critical point in the superconducting phase diagram. The two phases are disordered vortex configurations with the same magnetization, but with different vortex densities. The entropy change, determined from the data using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, is consistent with estimates based on the difference in the vortex densities of the two phases

  4. Two-phase regime in the magnetic field-temperature phase diagram of a type-II superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, L.L.A.; Halterman, Klaus; Valls, Oriol T.; Goldman, A.M

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic field and temperature dependencies of the magnetic moments of superconducting crystals of V{sub 3}Si have been studied. In a constant magnetic field and at temperatures somewhat below the superconducting transition temperature, the moments are hysteretic in temperature. However, the magnetic moment-magnetic field isotherms are reversible and exhibit features that formally resemble the pressure-volume isotherms of the liquid-gas transition. This suggests the existence of a first-order phase transition, a two-phase regime, and a critical point in the superconducting phase diagram. The two phases are disordered vortex configurations with the same magnetization, but with different vortex densities. The entropy change, determined from the data using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, is consistent with estimates based on the difference in the vortex densities of the two phases.

  5. Differences in the H-mode pedestal width of temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P A; Wolfrum, E; Günter, S; Kurzan, B; Lackner, K; Zohm, H; Groebner, R J; Osborne, T H; Ferron, J R; Snyder, P B; Beurskens, M N A; Dunne, M G

    2012-01-01

    A pedestal database was built using data from type-I ELMy H-modes of ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JET. ELM synchronized pedestal data were analysed with the two-line method. The two-line method is a bilinear fit which shows better reproducibility of pedestal parameters than a modified hyperbolic tangent fit. This was tested with simulated and experimental data. The influence of the equilibrium reconstruction on pedestal parameters was investigated with sophisticated reconstructions from CLISTE and EFIT including edge kinetic profiles. No systematic deviation between the codes could be observed. The flux coordinate system is influenced by machine size, poloidal field and plasma shape. This will change the representation of the width in different coordinates, in particular, the two normalized coordinates Ψ N and r/a show a very different dependence on the plasma shape. The scalings derived for the pedestal width, Δ, of all machines suggest a different scaling for the electron temperature and the electron density. Both cases show similar dependence with machine size, poloidal magnetic field and pedestal electron temperature and density. The influence of ion temperature and toroidal magnetic field is different on each of Δ T e and Δ n e . In dimensionless form the density pedestal width in Ψ N scales with ρ 0.6 i* , the temperature pedestal width with β p,ped 0.5 . Both widths also show a strong correlation with the plasma shape. The shape dependence originates from the coordinate transformation and is not visible in real space. The presented scalings predict that in ITER the temperature pedestal will be appreciably wider than the density pedestal. (paper)

  6. Probing High Temperature Superconductors with Magnetometry in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate the high-field magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without loss. A technique known as high-resolution torque magnetometry that was developed to directly measure the magnetization of high temperature superconductors. This technique was implemented using the 65 Tesla pulsed magnetic field facility that is part of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research addressed unanswered questions about the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, determine the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors, and shed light on the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity and on potential applications of these materials in areas such as energy generation and power transmission. Further applications of the technology resolve the novel physical phenomena such as correlated topological insulators, and spin liquid state in quantum magnets.

  7. A novel magnetic valve using room temperature magnetocaloric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Dan; Bahl, Christian; Pryds, Nini

    2012-01-01

    changes. This is made possible by the strong temperature dependence of the magnetization close to the Curie temperature of the magnetocaloric materials. Different compositions of both La0.67(Ca,Sr)0.33MnO3 and La(Fe,Co,Si)13 have been considered for use in prototype valves. Based on measured magnetization...

  8. Mechanical Properties of Low Density Alloys at Cryogenic Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, X. D.; Liu, H. J.; Li, L. F.; Yang, K.

    2006-01-01

    Low-density alloys include aluminum alloys, titanium alloys and magnesium alloys. Aluminum alloys and titanium alloys have been widely investigated and used as structural materials for cryogenic applications because of their light weight and good low-temperature mechanical properties.For aerospace applications, persistent efforts are being devoted to reducing weight and improving performance. Magnesium alloys are the lightest structural alloys among those mentioned above. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to magnesium alloys and to investigate their behaviors at cryogenic temperatures. In this paper, we have investigated the mechanical properties and microstructures of some magnesium alloys at cryogenic temperatures. Experimental results on both titanium and magnesium alloys are taken into account in considering these materials for space application

  9. Magnetic properties of the spin-density wave in (TMTSF)2X and (TMTTF)2Br

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, N.; Hosokawa, Y.; Iwasaki, H.; Nomura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Saito, G.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic properties of the spin density wave (SDW) phase in (TMTSF) 2 X (X=AsF 6 , PF 6 ) and (TMTTF) 2 Br were investigated through analyses of 1 H-NMR and static magnetization measurements. A divergent peak was observed, at the temperature T * well below the SDW transition temperature, in the 1 H spin-lattice relaxation rate in the incommensurate SDW phase of (TMTSF) 2 X. A decrease of the differential magnetic susceptibility of (TMTSF) 2 X with the field parallel to the a-axis was observed around T * . This anomaly indicates a difference of the spin canting above and below T * which divides the SDW phase. In the measurements of magnetic susceptibility on the commensurate SDW phase of (TMTTF) 2 Br, a large decrease of the spin susceptibility was observed above T SDW and non-activated type behavior in the b'-axis susceptibility is observed below the spin-flop field at low temperature. The data are discussed on the basis of commensurability. (orig.)

  10. Temperature dependence of photonic crystals based on thermoresponsive magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shengli; Bai Xuekun; Wang Lunwei

    2011-01-01

    The influence mechanisms of temperature on the band gap properties of the magnetic fluids based photonic crystals are elaborated. A method has been developed to obtain the temperature-dependent structure information (A sol /A) from the existing experimental data and then two critical parameters, i.e. the structure ratio (d/a) and the refractive index contrast (Δn) of the magnetic fluids photonic crystals are deduced for band diagram calculations. The temperature-dependent band gaps are gained for z-even and z-odd modes. Band diagram calculations display that the mid frequencies and positions of the existing forbidden bands are not very sensitive to the temperature, while the number of the forbidden bands at certain strengths of magnetic field may change with the temperature variation. The results presented in this work give a guideline for designing the potential photonic devices based on the temperature characteristics of the magnetic fluids based photonic crystals and are helpful for improving their quality. - Highlights: → Mechanisms of temperature dependence of magnetic fluids based photonic crystals are elaborated. → Properties of existing forbidden bands have relatively fine temperature stability. → Disappearance of existing forbidden band is found for some magnetic fields. → Emergence of new forbidden band with temperature is found for some magnetic fields.

  11. Complex saddle points in QCD at finite temperature and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiromichi; Ogilvie, Michael C.; Pangeni, Kamal

    2014-08-01

    The sign problem in QCD at finite temperature and density leads naturally to the consideration of complex saddle points of the action or effective action. The global symmetry CK of the finite-density action, where C is charge conjugation and K is complex conjugation, constrains the eigenvalues of the Polyakov loop operator P at a saddle point in such a way that the action is real at a saddle point, and net color charge is zero. The values of TrFP and TrFP† at the saddle point are real but not identical, indicating the different free energy cost associated with inserting a heavy quark versus an antiquark into the system. At such complex saddle points, the mass matrix associated with Polyakov loops may have complex eigenvalues, reflecting oscillatory behavior in color-charge densities. We illustrate these properties with a simple model which includes the one-loop contribution of gluons and two flavors of massless quarks moving in a constant Polyakov loop background. Confinement-deconfinement effects are modeled phenomenologically via an added potential term depending on the Polyakov loop eigenvalues. For sufficiently large temperature T and quark chemical potential μ, the results obtained reduce to those of perturbation theory at the complex saddle point. These results may be experimentally relevant for the compressed baryonic matter experiment at FAIR.

  12. Estimation of Low Concentration Magnetic Fluid Weight Density and Detection inside an Artificial Medium Using a Novel GMR Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka GOONERATNE

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia treatment has been gaining momentum in the past few years as a possible method to manage cancer. Cancer cells are different to normal cells in many ways including how they react to heat. Due to this difference it is possible for hyperthermia treatment to destroy cancer cells without harming the healthy normal cells surrounding the tumor. Magnetic particles injected into the body generate heat by hysteresis loss and temperature is increased when a time varying external magnetic field is applied. Successful treatment depends on how efficiently the heat is controlled. Thus, it is very important to estimate the magnetic fluid density in the body. Experimental apparatus designed for testing, numerical analysis, and results obtained by experimentation using a simple yet novel and minimally invasive needle type spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR sensor, to estimate low concentration magnetic fluid weight density and detection of magnetic fluid in a reference medium is reported.

  13. Melting temperature, vapor density, and vapor pressure of molybdenum pentafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jr, R F; Douglas, T B [National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. (USA). Inst. for Materials Research

    1977-12-01

    A sample of MoF/sub 5/ was prepared by reaction of MoF/sub 6/(g) and Mo(c). Melting curves of temperature against time established the melting temperature at zero impurity to be 318.85 K, the enthalpy of fusion to be 6.1 kJ mol/sup -1/ (+ - 5 per cent), and the cryoscopic impurity of the sample to be 0.15 mole per cent. In the presence of MoF/sub 6/(g) which was added to suppress disproportionation, the vapor density of MoF/sub 5/ over the liquid was measured by the transpiration method at 343, 363, and 383 K, the total MoF/sub 5/ that evaporated being determined by permanganate titration. The total vapor pressure of MoF/sub 5/ oligomers over the liquid was measured by a simple static method at 373 and 392 K, while melting temperatures were taken alternately to monitor possible contamination of the sample. Although the vapor pressures were adjusted for disproportionation, solution of MoF/sub 6/ in MoF/sub 5/ (1), and wall adsorption of MoF/sub 6/ their percentage uncertainty is probably several times that of the vapor densities. A combination of the two properties indicates the average extent of association of the saturated vapor to be near 2, which is the value for the dimer species (MoF/sub 5/)/sub 2/.

  14. Concurrent transition of ferroelectric and magnetic ordering near room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kyung-Tae; Jung, Min Hwa; He, Qing; Lee, Jin Hong; Woo, Chang Su; Chu, Kanghyun; Seidel, Jan; Jeon, Byung-Gu; Oh, Yoon Seok; Kim, Kee Hoon; Liang, Wen-I; Chen, Hsiang-Jung; Chu, Ying-Hao; Jeong, Yoon Hee; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Park, Jae-Hoon; Yang, Chan-Ho

    2011-11-29

    Strong spin-lattice coupling in condensed matter gives rise to intriguing physical phenomena such as colossal magnetoresistance and giant magnetoelectric effects. The phenomenological hallmark of such a strong spin-lattice coupling is the manifestation of a large anomaly in the crystal structure at the magnetic transition temperature. Here we report that the magnetic Néel temperature of the multiferroic compound BiFeO(3) is suppressed to around room temperature by heteroepitaxial misfit strain. Remarkably, the ferroelectric state undergoes a first-order transition to another ferroelectric state simultaneously with the magnetic transition temperature. Our findings provide a unique example of a concurrent magnetic and ferroelectric transition at the same temperature among proper ferroelectrics, taking a step toward room temperature magnetoelectric applications.

  15. A Definition of the Magnetic Transition Temperature Using Valence Bond Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornet-Somoza, Joaquim; Deumal, Mercè; Borge, Juan; Robb, Michael A

    2018-03-01

    Macroscopic magnetic properties are analyzed using Valence Bond theory. Commonly the critical temperature T C for magnetic systems is associated with a maximum in the energy-based heat capacity C p (T). Here a more broadly applicable definition of the magnetic transition temperature T C is described using the spin moment expectation value (i.e., applying the spin exchange density operator) instead of energy. Namely, the magnetic capacity C s (T) reflects variation in the spin multiplicity as a function of temperature, which is shown to be related to ∂[χT(T)]/∂T. Magnetic capacity C s (T) depends on long-range spin interactions that are not relevant in the energy-based heat capacity C p (T). Differences between C s (T) and C p (T) are shown to be due to spin order/disorder within the crystal that can be monitored via a Valence Bond analysis of the corresponding magnetic wave function. Indeed the concept of the Boltzmann spin-alignment order is used to provide information about the spin correlation between magnetic units. As a final illustration, the critical temperature is derived from the magnetic capacity for several molecular magnets presenting different magnetic topologies that have been experimentally studied. A systematic shift between the transition temperatures associated with C s (T) and C p (T) is observed. It is demonstrated that this shift can be attributed to the loss of long-range spin correlation. This suggests that the magnetic capacity C s (T) can be used as a predictive tool for the magnetic topology and thus for the synthetic chemists.

  16. Observation of Various and Spontaneous Magnetic Skyrmionic Bubbles at Room Temperature in a Frustrated Kagome Magnet with Uniaxial Magnetic Anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng; Ren, Weijun; Ding, Bei; Xu, Guizhou; Wang, Yue; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Enke; Xu, Feng; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Baogen; Zhang, Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    to various external stimuli acting as information carriers in spintronic devices. Here, the first observation of skyrmionic magnetic bubbles with variable topological spin textures formed at room temperature in a frustrated kagome Fe3 Sn2 magnet with uniaxial

  17. Low temperature Mössbauer studies on magnetic nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    in the recording industry for achieving high density infor- mation storage and in the refrigeration industry ( ... by an ultra fine grain size (< 50 nm) have created a great deal of interest in recent years by virtue of their ... The reduction in size modifies the magnetic order in these materials. The magnetic nanocomposites can be ...

  18. Magnetic field dependence of the critical current density in YBa2Cu3Ox ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.A.; Moshchalkov, V.V.; Komarkov, D.A.; Shabatin, V.P.; Gordeev, S.N.; Shelomov, D.V.

    1989-01-01

    Three magnetic field ranges corresponding to different critical current density j c behavior have been found out. They correlate with grain magnetization changes. The inverse critical current density is shown to depend linearly on the sample cross-section due to the magnetic field induced by the flowing current

  19. Low temperature London penetration depth and superfluid density in Fe-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunsoo [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The superconducting gap symmetry of the Fe-based superconductors was studied by measurements and analysis of London penetration depth and super uid density. Tunnel diode resonator technique for these measurements was implemented in a dilution refrigerator allowing for the temperatures down to 50 mK. For the analysis of the super uid density, we used both experimental studies of Al-coated samples and original thermodynamic approach based on Rutgers relation. In three systems studied, we found that the superconducting gap at the optimal doping is best described in multi-gap full gap scenario. By performing experiments on samples with arti cially introduced disorder with heavy ion irradiation, we show that evolution of the superconducting transition temperature and of the super uid density are consistent with full-gap sign changing s superconducting state. The superconducting gap develops strong modulation both in the under-doped and the over-doped regimes. In the terminal hole-doped KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, both temperature dependence of the super uid density and its evolution with increase of the scattering rate are consistent with symmetry imposed vertical line nodes in the superconducting gap. By comparative studies of hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and electron-doped Ca10-3-8, we show that the superconducting gap modulation in the under-doped regime is intrinsic and is not induced by the coexisting static magnetic order.

  20. Effects of boundary conditions on temperature and density in an EXTRAP Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.R.; Karlsson, P.

    1985-08-01

    Using the fluid equations, we examine transport in an Extrap configuration by carrying out calculations incorporating model profiles for the density and temperature. The goal of this analysis is to examine the scaling of the pinch equilibrium plasma density, temperature and radius with parameters that are characteristic for Extrap Z-pinches. These parameters include the discharge current, the neutral hydrogen filling density, an oxygen impurity fractional concentration and the condition at the pinch boundary. An Extrap Z-pinch is a pinch discharge where the current channel has a characteristic non-circular cross-section achieved by bounding the discharge by a magnetic separatrix produced when a vacuum octupole magnetic field, generated by currents in external conductors, combines with the self-magnetic field produced by the discharge current. The pinch boundary is changed from a plasma-vacuum boundary to an interface between a high-beta pinch plasma and a low-beta plasma contained in the vacuum magnetic field. The energy that is lost from the pinch region sustains this boundary layer. The introduction of a separatrix boundary around the pinch with four X-point nulls deteriorates the containment of the pinch somewhat. However the presence of the warm, low-beta plasma scrape-off layer, which provides a boundary condition on the pinch, tends to counteract the negative effects of the poorer confinement. Thus the equilibrium parameters that characterize the pinch may not be severely deteriorated by the introduction of the separatrix when the entire configuration, including the scrape-off layer, is considered. (author)

  1. High density, high magnetic field concepts for compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    One rather discouraging feature of our conventional approaches to fusion energy is that they do not appear to lend themselves to a small reactor for developmental purposes. This is in contrast with the normal evolution of a new technology which typically proceeds to a full scale commercial plant via a set of graduated steps. Accordingly' several concepts concerned with dense plasma fusion systems are being studied theoretically and experimentally. A common aspect is that they employ: (a) high to very high plasma densities (∼10 16 cm -3 to ∼10 26 cm -3 ) and (b) magnetic fields. If they could be shown to be viable at high fusion Q, they could conceivably lead to compact and inexpensive commercial reactors. At least, their compactness suggests that both proof of principle experiments and development costs will be relatively inexpensive compared with the present conventional approaches. In this paper, the following concepts are considered: (1) The staged Z-pinch, (2) Liner implosion of closed-field-line configurations, (3) Magnetic ''fast'' ignition of inertial fusion targets, (4) The continuous flow Z-pinch

  2. Temperature compensation of NdFeB permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Doose, C.

    1997-01-01

    Permanent magnet blocks of NdFeB have a relatively high maximum energy product. Because of its relatively low Curie temperature, however, NdFeB has a large temperature coefficient for its residual induction. The temperature coefficients of the relative magnetic fields (ΔB/B)/ΔT in the air gap of NdFeB dipole magnets were reduced from -1.1 x 10 -3 /c to less than 2 x 10 -5 /degree C under operating temperatures of ± 6 C. This was achieved passively by using 1.25-mm-thick strips of 30%-Ni-Fe alloy as flux shunts for the NdFeB blocks. The magnets with soft-steel poles and flux-return yokes were assembled and measured in a temperature-controlled environment

  3. Low temperature magnetic structure of MnSe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we report low temperature neutron diffraction studies on MnSe in order to understand the anomalous behaviour of their magnetic and transport prop- erties. Our study indicates that at low temperatures MnSe has two coexisting crystal structures, high temperature NaCl and hexagonal NiAs. NiAs phase ...

  4. Variable Temperature Equipment for a Commercial Magnetic Susceptibility Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Variable temperature equipment for the magnetic susceptibility balance MSB-MK1 of Sherwood Scientific, Ltd., is described. The sample temperature is controlled with streaming air heated by water in a heat exchanger. Whereas the balance as sold commercially can be used only for room temperature measurements, the setup we designed extends the…

  5. Magnetic Properties of Fe-49Co-2V Alloy and Pure Fe at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groh, Henry C., III; Geng, Steven M.; Niedra, Janis M.; Hofer, Richard R.

    2018-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a need for soft magnetic materials for fission power and ion propulsion systems. In this work the magnetic properties of the soft magnetic materials Hiperco 50 (Fe-49wt%Cr-2V) and CMI-C (commercially pure magnetic iron) were examined at various temperatures up to 600 C. Toroidal Hiperco 50 samples were made from stacks of 0.35 mm thick sheet, toroidal CMI-C specimens were machined out of solid bar stock, and both were heat treated prior to testing. The magnetic properties of a Hiperco 50 sample were measured at various temperatures up to 600 C and then again after returning to room temperature; the magnetic properties of CMI-C were tested at temperatures up to 400 C. For Hiperco 50 coercivity decreased as temperature increased, and remained low upon returning to room temperature; maximum permeability improved (increased) with increasing temperature and was dramatically improved upon returning to room temperature; remanence was not significantly affected by temperature; flux density at H = 0.1 kA/m increased slightly with increasing temperature, and was about 20% higher upon returning to room temperature; flux density at H = 0.5 kA/m was insensitive to temperature. It appears that the properties of Hiperco 50 improved with increasing temperature due to grain growth. There was no significant magnetic property difference between annealed and aged CMI-C iron material; permeability tended to decrease with increasing temperature; the approximate decline in the permeability at 400 C compared to room temperature was 30%; saturation flux density, B(sub S), was approximately equal for all temperatures below 400 C; B(sub S) was lower at 400 C.

  6. Fitting of the Thomson scattering density and temperature profiles on the COMPASS tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanikova, E.; Peterka, M.; Bohm, P.; Bilkova, P.; Aftanas, M.; Urban, J.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.; Sos, M.

    2016-01-01

    A new technique for fitting the full radial profiles of electron density and temperature obtained by the Thomson scattering diagnostic in H-mode discharges on the COMPASS tokamak is described. The technique combines the conventionally used modified hyperbolic tangent function for the edge transport barrier (pedestal) fitting and a modification of a Gaussian function for fitting the core plasma. Low number of parameters of this combined function and their straightforward interpretability and controllability provide a robust method for obtaining physically reasonable profile fits. Deconvolution with the diagnostic instrument function is applied on the profile fit, taking into account the dependence on the actual magnetic configuration.

  7. Fitting of the Thomson scattering density and temperature profiles on the COMPASS tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanikova, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Peterka, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); MFF Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Bohm, P., E-mail: bohm@ipp.cas.cz; Bilkova, P.; Aftanas, M.; Urban, J.; Hron, M.; Panek, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Sos, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    A new technique for fitting the full radial profiles of electron density and temperature obtained by the Thomson scattering diagnostic in H-mode discharges on the COMPASS tokamak is described. The technique combines the conventionally used modified hyperbolic tangent function for the edge transport barrier (pedestal) fitting and a modification of a Gaussian function for fitting the core plasma. Low number of parameters of this combined function and their straightforward interpretability and controllability provide a robust method for obtaining physically reasonable profile fits. Deconvolution with the diagnostic instrument function is applied on the profile fit, taking into account the dependence on the actual magnetic configuration.

  8. Temperature measurement of RE123 bulk superconductors on magnetizing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Kaneyama, M.; Oka, T.; Fujishiro, H.; Noto, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study on the magnetization behavior of to magnetize RE123 bulk superconductors to apply it as strong magnets. Through magnetizing process, the temperature of bulk superconductors is raised by pinning loss caused by the magnetic fluxes motion (e.g. flux jump of flux flow), and the trapped field is decreased. This paper presents the measurement of temperature changes of Sm123 bulk superconductors during the exciting process by iteratively magnetizing pulsed-field operation with reducing amplitudes (IMRA) method. Five thermocouples are put on the surface of Sm123 bulk superconductor of 46 mm in diameter. The temperatures at the center, on the growth sector boundary (GSB) line and in the sector region surrounded by GSB's line (inter-GSB region) are monitored. The temperature at a cold stage is also measured. A Hall sensor is attached near the center thermocouple to measure the trapped field. After a bulk superconductor is cooled by the GM type refrigerator until 40 K, iterative pulsed-fields of 2.32-5.42 T are applied by a magnetizing coil. When high magnetic field of 5.42 T is applied, a temperature of bulk superconductor reaches to 72.4 K and the magnetic field distribution has C form with which a part of circle is dented, and then, a trapped field is 2.28 T. When a lower magnetic field of 4.64 T is applied, a maximum temperature is 68.3 K and a trapped field is raised to 2.70 T, and moreover, the distribution becomes round shape like field-cooling method (FC). We showed clearly that heat generation by pinning loss was related to the mechanism of magnetic field capture

  9. Flux Loop Measurements of the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Magnet Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mulders, M.; Hervé, A.; Loveless, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The first attempt is made to measure the magnetic flux density in the steel blocks of the CMS magnet yoke using the standard magnet discharge with the current ramp down speed of 1.5 A/...

  10. Low temperature superconductor and aligned high temperature superconductor magnetic dipole system and method for producing high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ramesh; Scanlan, Ronald; Ghosh, Arup K.; Weggel, Robert J.; Palmer, Robert; Anerella, Michael D.; Schmalzle, Jesse

    2017-10-17

    A dipole-magnet system and method for producing high-magnetic-fields, including an open-region located in a radially-central-region to allow particle-beam transport and other uses, low-temperature-superconducting-coils comprised of low-temperature-superconducting-wire located in radially-outward-regions to generate high magnetic-fields, high-temperature-superconducting-coils comprised of high-temperature-superconducting-tape located in radially-inward-regions to generate even higher magnetic-fields and to reduce erroneous fields, support-structures to support the coils against large Lorentz-forces, a liquid-helium-system to cool the coils, and electrical-contacts to allow electric-current into and out of the coils. The high-temperature-superconducting-tape may be comprised of bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper-oxide or rare-earth-metal, barium-copper-oxide (ReBCO) where the rare-earth-metal may be yttrium, samarium, neodymium, or gadolinium. Advantageously, alignment of the large-dimension of the rectangular-cross-section or curved-cross-section of the high-temperature-superconducting-tape with the high-magnetic-field minimizes unwanted erroneous magnetic fields. Alignment may be accomplished by proper positioning, tilting the high-temperature-superconducting-coils, forming the high-temperature-superconducting-coils into a curved-cross-section, placing nonconducting wedge-shaped-material between windings, placing nonconducting curved-and-wedge-shaped-material between windings, or by a combination of these techniques.

  11. High temperature magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Sn0 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    hysteresis loop at 300 K temperature, which reflects its ferromagnetic behaviour. We confirmed ... obtained by doping magnetic transition elements such as. Mn, Fe and .... factor to account for particle shapes, λ = 1⋅5406 Å the wavelength of ...

  12. Inorganic Nanostructured High-Temperature Magnet Wires, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a high-temperature tolerant electrically-insulating coating for magnet wires. The Phase I program will result in a flexible, inorganic...

  13. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  14. Modelling of the reactive sputtering process with non-uniform discharge current density and different temperature conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasina, P; Hytkova, T; Elias, M

    2009-01-01

    The majority of current models of the reactive magnetron sputtering assume a uniform shape of the discharge current density and the same temperature near the target and the substrate. However, in the real experimental set-up, the presence of the magnetic field causes high density plasma to form in front of the cathode in the shape of a toroid. Consequently, the discharge current density is laterally non-uniform. In addition to this, the heating of the background gas by sputtered particles, which is usually referred to as the gas rarefaction, plays an important role. This paper presents an extended model of the reactive magnetron sputtering that assumes the non-uniform discharge current density and which accommodates the gas rarefaction effect. It is devoted mainly to the study of the behaviour of the reactive sputtering rather that to the prediction of the coating properties. Outputs of this model are compared with those that assume uniform discharge current density and uniform temperature profile in the deposition chamber. Particular attention is paid to the modelling of the radial variation of the target composition near transitions from the metallic to the compound mode and vice versa. A study of the target utilization in the metallic and compound mode is performed for two different discharge current density profiles corresponding to typical two pole and multipole magnetics available on the market now. Different shapes of the discharge current density were tested. Finally, hysteresis curves are plotted for various temperature conditions in the reactor.

  15. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    A 3T proof-of-principle dipole magnet for accelerator applications, based on 2nd generation high temperature superconducting tape was designed, built, and tested by a consortium under the lead of Danfysik. The magnet was designed to have a straight, circular bore with a good field region of radius...

  16. Low-temperature magnetic modification of sensitive biological materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 142, mar (2015), s. 184-188 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis * low-temperature magnetic modification * immobilized enzymes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2015

  17. Lattice QCD at finite temperature and density from Taylor expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In the first part, I present an overview of recent Lattice QCD simulations at finite temperature and density. In particular, we discuss fluctuations of conserved charges: baryon number, electric charge and strangeness. These can be obtained from Taylor expanding the QCD pressure as a function of corresponding chemical potentials. Our simulations were performed using quark masses corresponding to physical pion mass of about 140 MeV and allow a direct comparison to experimental data from ultra-relativistic heavy ion beams at hadron colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In the second part, we discuss computational challenges for current and future exascale Lattice simulations with a focus on new silicon developments from Intel and NVIDIA.

  18. Extended Opacity Tables with Higher Temperature-Density-Frequency Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Mark; Orban, Chris; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical models for plasma opacities underpin our understanding of radiation transport in many different astrophysical objects. These opacity models are also relevant to HEDP experiments such as ignition scale experiments on NIF. We present a significantly expanded set of opacity data from the widely utilized Opacity Project, and make these higher resolution data publicly available through OSU's portal with dropbox.com. This expanded data set is used to assess how accurate the interpolation of opacity data in temperature-density-frequency dimensions must be in order to adequately model the properties of most stellar types. These efforts are the beginning of a larger project to improve the theoretical opacity models in light of experimental results at the Sandia Z-pinch showing that the measured opacity of Iron disagrees strongly with all current models.

  19. Spin polarization and magnetization of conduction-band dilute-magnetic-semiconductor quantum wells with non-step-like density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simserides, Constantinos

    2005-01-01

    We study the magnetization, M, and the spin polarization, ζ, of n-doped non-magnetic-semiconductor (NMS)/narrow to wide dilute-magnetic-semiconductor (DMS)/n-doped NMS quantum wells, as a function of the temperature, T, and the in-plane magnetic field, B. Under such conditions the density of states (DOS) deviates from the occasionally stereotypic step-like form, both quantitatively and qualitatively. The DOS modification causes an impressive fluctuation of M in cases of vigorous competition between spatial and magnetic confinement. At low T, the enhanced electron spin-splitting, U oσ , acquires its bigger value. At higher T, U oσ decreases, augmenting the influence of the spin-up electrons. Increasing B, U oσ increases and accordingly electrons populate spin-down subbands while they abandon spin-up subbands. Furthermore, due to the DOS modification, all energetically higher subbands become gradually depopulated

  20. Novel High Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Space Vehicle Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Previous high temperature magnetic bearings employed electromagnets only. The work proposed in this SBIR program seeks to utilize High Temperature Permanent Magnets...

  1. Novel High Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Space Vehicle Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Previous high temperature magnetic bearings employed only electromagnets. The work proposed in this SBIR program seeks to utilize High Temperature Permanent Magnets...

  2. Magnetic refrigeration--towards room-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, E.; Tegus, O.; Li, X.W.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Modern society relies very much on readily available cooling. Magnetic refrigeration based on the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) has become a promising competitive technology for the conventional gas-compression/expansion technique in use today. Recently, there have been two breakthroughs in magnetic-refrigeration research: one is that American scientists demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator; the other one is that we discovered a new class of magnetic refrigerant materials for room-temperature applications. The new materials are manganese-iron-phosphorus-arsenic (MnFe(P,As)) compounds. This new material has important advantages over existing magnetic coolants: it exhibits a huge MCE, which is larger than that of Gd metal; and its operating temperature can be tuned from about 150 to about 335 K by adjusting the P/As ratio. Here we report on further improvement of the materials by increasing the Mn content. The large entropy change is attributed to a field-induced first-order phase transition enhancing the effect of the applied magnetic field. Addition of Mn reduces the thermal hysteresis, which is intrinsic to the first-order transition. This implies that already moderate applied magnetic fields of below 2 T may suffice

  3. Thermal investigations of a room temperature magnetic refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smaili, Arezki; Chiba, Younes [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique d' Alger (Algeria)], email: arezki.smaili@enp.edu.dz

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is a concept based on the magnetocaloric effect that some materials exhibit when the external magnetic field changes. The aim of this paper is to assess the performance of a numerical model in predicting parameters of an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator. Numerical simulations were conducted to perform a thermal analysis on an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator operating near room temperature with and without applied cooling load. Curves of temperature span, cooling capacity and thermal efficiency as functions of the operating conditions were drawn and are presented in this paper. Results showed that at fixed frequency Ql versus mf has an optimum and COP was increased with cycle frequency values. This study demonstrated that the proposed numerical model could be used to predict parameters of an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as it provides consistent results.

  4. Magnetic properties of the austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Itoh, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    2002-01-01

    The magnetization was measured for the austenitic stainless steel of SUS304, SUS304L, SUS316, and SUS316L with the temperature from 5K to 300K and the magnetic field from 0T to 10T. The field dependences of the magnetizations changed at about 0.7T and 4T. The dependence was analyzed with ranges of 0-0.5T, 1-3T, and 5-10T. There was not so much difference between those stainless steels for the usage at small fields and 300 K. The SUS316 and SUS316L samples showed large non-linearity at high fields and 5K. Therefore, SUS304 was recommended for usage at high fields and low temperatures to design superconducting magnets with the linear approximation of the field dependence of magnetization

  5. Anisotropic temperature relaxation of plasmas in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.A.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetized kinetic equation derived in an earlier paper (Hassan and Watson, 1977) is used to study the problem of relaxation of anisotropic electron and ion temperatures in a magnetized plasma. In the case of anisotropic electron temperature relaxation, it is shown that for small anisotropies the exchange of energy within the electrons between the components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field direction determine the relaxation rate. For anisotropic ion temperature relaxation it is shown that the essential mechanism for relaxation is provided by energy transfer between ions and electrons, and that the expression for the relaxation rate perpendicular to the magnetic field contains a significant term proportional to ln eta 0 ln (msub(e)/msub(i)) (where eta 0 = Ωsub(e)/ksub(D)Vsub(e perpendicular to)), in addition to the term proportional to the Coulomb logarithm. (author)

  6. Magnetic behavior of VBr2 at very low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, J.R.; Kawarazaki, S.; Hirakawa, K.

    1985-01-01

    Vanadium dibromide, along with VCl 2 and VI 2 , has a hexagonal crystal structure (CdI 2 structure) in which the magnetic coupling of vanadium ions within the c planes is much stronger than the interplane coupling. These systems are of interest as possible examples of highly frustrated two-dimensional triangular lattice antiferromagnets. This interest is encouraged by high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements, which yield Weiss constants of several hundred degrees Kelvin. In fact, magnetic transitions do not occur in these substances until temperatures of less than 50 K are reached, indicating that the antiferromagnetic interactions are frustrated. A search for possible new transitions at very low temperatures was conducted with a VBr 2 single-crystal sample mounted in the dilution refrigerator neutron diffraction facility at HFIR. The crystal was not of very good quality, but three distinct magnetic reflections were observed at 4.2 K and below

  7. Application of high-temperature superconducting permanent magnets to synchrotron radiation sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple scheme for field enhancement in synchrotron radiation sources such as undulators and wigglers is proposed, which is based on the fundamental nature of the superconducting loop where the magnetic flux is preserved. A superconductor ring placed to enclose the magnetic pole works as a kind of permanent magnet. The magnetization is performed by electromagnetic induction brought by the opening movement of the magnetic gap. Since neither additional external power supplies nor current leads are necessary, high-temperature bulk superconductors can easily be implemented in this scheme. Calculations to check the effectiveness of the new concept show that the critical current density of the superconductor is crucial to the performance of the synchrotron radiation sources based on this concept. Experiments were performed to verify the principle of the proposed scheme, which gave promising results to strongly support it.

  8. The effect of low temperature cryocoolers on the development of low temperature superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    The commercial development of reliable 4 K cryocoolers improves the future prospects for magnets made from low temperature superconductors (LTS). The hope of the developers of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has been to replace liquid helium cooled LTS magnets with HTS magnets that operate at or near liquid nitrogen temperature. There has been limited success in this endeavor, but continued problems with HTS conductors have greatly slowed progress toward this goal. The development of cryocoolers that reliably operate below 4 K will allow magnets made from LTS conductor to remain very competitive for many years to come. A key enabling technology for the use of low temperature cryocoolers on LTS magnets has been the development of HTS leads. This report describes the characteristics of LTS magnets that can be successfully melded to low-temperature cryocoolers. This report will also show when it is not appropriate to consider the use of low-temperature cryocoolers to cool magnets made with LTS conductor. A couple of specific examples of LTS magnets where cryocoolers can be used are given

  9. Field dependence of the current density of superconductors at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiergeist, R.; Hergt, R.; Erb, A.; Kummeth, P.; Winzer, K.

    1993-01-01

    An essential drawback of the high-T c superconductors (HTS) with respect to technical applications at liquid nitrogen temperature is the large degradation of their pinning properties in magnetic fields. For the field dependence of the volume pinning force often a high field tail due to thermally activated flux flow is observed. An exponential decay of the irreversible magnetization with increasing field was reported in the case of sintered material (YBCO) for the intergranular part of the magnetization while a power law decay was found for the intragranular part. Song et al. observed an exponential field dependence of the critical current density for proton-irradiated material which before irradiation showed a power law decay. Gladun et al. found an exponential decay for BSCCO-2223 tapes. The high field behaviour of BSCCO was shown to be governed by thermally activated flux creep with a logarithmic pinning barrier, which may result in an exponential decrease of the current with the external magnetic field, as argued recently by Ries et al. We will show in the present paper that the different HTS substance classes (YBCO, BSCCO, TBCCO) behave qualitatively in a similar way. (orig.)

  10. Micromagnetism and the microstructure of high-temperature permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goll, D.; Kronmueller, H.; Stadelmaier, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    Sm 2 (Co,Cu,Fe,Zr) 17 permanent magnets with their three-phase precipitation structure (cells, cell walls, and lamellae) show two characteristic features which so far are difficult to interpret but which are the prerequisites for high-temperature applications: (1) The hard magnetic properties only develop during the final step of the three-step annealing procedure consisting of homogenization, isothermal aging, and cooling. (2) Depending on the composition and on the annealing parameters, the temperature dependence of the coercivity can be easily changed from the conventional monotonic to the recent nonmonotonic behavior showing coercivities up to 1 T even at 500 K. The magnetic hardening during cooling is due to the fact that the cell walls order chemically and structurally during the cooling process. From an analysis of electron diffraction patterns of the superimposed structures existing before and after cooling it could be proven that a phase transition from a phase mixture of defective phases 2:17, 2:7, and 5:19 to the ordered 1:5 phase takes place in the cell walls during cooling. The nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the coercivity is narrowly related to the magnetic hardening mechanism which can be either pinning or nucleation and results from the magnetic and microstructural properties of the cell walls. These properties have been determined quantitatively from hysteresis loop measurements and from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Due to the temperature dependence of the intrinsic magnetic properties, the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the coercivity is found to be determined by repulsive pinning of domain walls at the cell walls at low temperatures, by attractive pinning of domain walls in the cell walls at intermediate temperatures, and by nucleation at high temperatures. This complex temperature behavior is also reflected in characteristic changes of the angular dependence of the

  11. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidoni, S. E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/CUA, Code 674, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Yoshimura, K. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Plowman, J. E., E-mail: silvina.e.guidoni@nasa.gov [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  12. Density functional calculation of the electronic and magnetic properties of α-CoV2O6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Andres; Radtke, Guillaume

    2012-02-01

    In this work, the magnetic properties of the low dimensional α-CoV2O6 system have been investigated using density-functional calculations. This system is constituted of CoO6 octahedra connected by the edges and forming one dimensional linear chains. The experimental magnetization curves recorded at very low temperature show a surprising magnetization plateau at one-third of the saturation magnetization and a strong anisotropy. The estimated Co magnetic moment is large reaching a value of 4.5 μB suggesting a large orbital contribution. Our calculations show that three different magnetic configurations for the Co are possible, the lowest energy one being a high spin configuration in agreement with the S=3/2 character of the Co+2 ion observed in this compound. Spin-orbit interactions have been included in order to calculate the magnetic anisotropy and the orbital contribution to the magnetic moment. The results are discussed in terms of crystal field splitting of the 3d orbital and a tight-binding Hamiltonian. Using a broken-symmetry formalism we have evaluated the effective exchange interactions of the Heisenberg Hamiltonian. They allow us to propose the magnetic structures corresponding to the ground state and to the observed magnetization plateaus.

  13. Low temperature behavior of magnetic domains observed using a magnetic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, S. H.; Shinde, S. R.; Ogale, S. B.; Venkatesan, T.; Greene, R. L.; Dreyer, M.; Gomez, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    A commercial atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope (MFM) was modified to cool magnetic samples down to around 100 K under a high vacuum while maintaining its routine imaging functionality. MFM images of a 120 nm thick La 0.7 Ca 0.3 MnO 3 film on a LaAlO 3 substrate at low temperature show the paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition. Evolution of magnetic domains and magnetic ripples with decreasing temperature are also observed near the edge of a 20 nm thick patterned Co film on a Si substrate. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  14. Quench protection and design of large high-current-density superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1981-03-01

    Although most large superconducting magnets have been designed using the concept of cryostability, there is increased need for large magnets which operate at current densities above the cryostable limit (greater than 10 8 Am -2 ). Large high current density superconducting magnets are chosen for the following reasons: reduced mass, reduced coil thickness or size, and reduced cost. The design of large high current density, adiabatically stable, superconducting magnets requires a very different set of design rules than either large cryostable superconducting magnets or small self-protected high current density magnets. The problems associated with large high current density superconducting magnets fall into three categories; (a) quench protection, (b) stress and training, and (c) cryogenic design. The three categories must be considered simultaneously. The paper discusses quench protection and its implication for magnets of large stored energies (this includes strings of smaller magnets). Training and its relationship to quench protection and magnetic strain are discussed. Examples of magnets, built at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and elsewhere using the design guidelines given in this report, are presented

  15. Millimeter wavelength ultralow temperature magnetic radiospectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertij, A.A.; Zvyagina, G.A.; Ivanchenko, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    The paper deals with the superlowtemperature radiospectrometric complex designed for investigation of substances in the temperature range from 4.2 to 0.3 K. The obtaining of superlow temperatures - 0.3 K is carried out in the circulation regime of 3 He. As resonance spectrometer cells it is suggested and investigated some variants allowing to obtain high sensitivity and resolution of the spectrometer, as well as minimum heat flow into the working chamber. The absorption spectra have been obtained of the HMBACrV substance designed for polarized nuclear targets at the frequencies of 75 and 150 GHz in the temperature ranges from 4.2 to 0.7 K

  16. X-ray spectroscopy for high energy-density X pinch density and temperature measurements (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.; Skobelev, I.Y.; Shlyaptseva, A.S.; Hansen, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    X pinch plasmas produced from fine metal wires can reach near solid densities and temperatures of 1 keV or even more. Plasma conditions change on time scales as short as 5-10 ps as determined using an x-ray streak camera viewing a focusing crystal spectrograph or directly viewing the plasma through multiple filters on a single test. As a result, it is possible to determine plasma conditions from spectra with ∼10 ps time resolution. Experiments and theory are now coming together to give a consistent picture of the dynamics and kinetics of these high energy density plasmas with very high temporal and spatial precision. A set of diagnostic techniques used in experiments for spectrally, temporally, and spatially resolved measurements of X pinch plasmas is described. Results of plasma parameter determination from these measurements are presented. X ray backlighting of one x-pinch by another with ∼30 ps x-ray pulses enables the dynamics and kinetics to be correlated in time

  17. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of a magnetoactive elastomer: Immobilization of the soft-magnetic filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnaruk, Andrii V.; Brunhuber, Alexander; Kalita, Viktor M.; Kulyk, Mykola M.; Snarskii, Andrei A.; Lozenko, Albert F.; Ryabchenko, Sergey M.; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic properties of a magnetoactive elastomer (MAE) filled with μm-sized soft-magnetic iron particles have been experimentally studied in the temperature range between 150 K and 310 K. By changing the temperature, the elastic modulus of the elastomer matrix was modified, and it was possible to obtain magnetization curves for an invariable arrangement of particles in the sample and in the case when the particles were able to change their position within the MAE under the influence of magnetic forces. At low (less than 220 K) temperatures, when the matrix becomes rigid, the magnetization of the MAE does not show a hysteresis behavior, and it is characterized by a negative value of the Rayleigh constant. At room temperature, when the polymer matrix is compliant, a magnetic hysteresis exists where the dependence of the differential magnetic susceptibility on the magnetic field exhibits local maxima. The appearance of these maxima is explained by the elastic resistance of the matrix to the displacement of particles under the action of magnetic forces.

  18. Makeup and uses of a basic magnet laboratory for characterizing high-temperature permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    A set of instrumentation for making basic magnetic measurements was assembled in order to characterize high intrinsic coercivity, rare earth permanent magnets with respect to short term demagnetization resistance and long term aging at temperatures up to 300 C. The major specialized components of this set consist of a 13 T peak field, capacitor discharge pulse magnetizer; a 10 in. pole size, variable gap electromagnet; a temperature controlled oven equipped with iron cobalt pole piece extensions and a removable paddle that carries the magnetization and field sensing coils; associated electronic integrators; and sensor standards for field intensity H and magnetic moment M calibration. A 1 cm cubic magnet sample, carried by the paddle, fits snugly between the pole piece extensions within the electrically heated aluminum oven, where fields up to 3.2 T can be applied by the electromagnet at temperatures up to 300 C. A sample set of demagnetization data for the high energy Sm2Co17 type of magnet is given for temperatures up to 300 C. These data are reduced to the temperature dependence of the M-H knee field and of the field for a given magnetic induction swing, and they are interpreted to show the limits of safe operation.

  19. Sensor and method for measuring the areal density of magnetic nanoparticles on a micro-array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a device for magnetic detection of binding of biological molecules on a biochip. A magnetoresistive sensor device for measuring an areal density of magnetic nanoparticles on a micro-array, the magnetic nanoparticles (15) being directly or indirectly

  20. Chiral density wave versus pion condensation at finite density and zero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jens O.; Kneschke, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    The quark-meson model is often used as a low-energy effective model for QCD to study the chiral transition at finite temperature T , baryon chemical potential μB , and isospin chemical potential μI . We determine the parameters of the model by matching the meson and quark masses, as well as the pion decay constant to their physical values using the on shell (OS) and modified minimal subtraction (MS ¯ ) schemes. In this paper, the existence of different phases at zero temperature is studied. In particular, we investigate the competition between an inhomogeneous chiral condensate and a homogeneous pion condensate. For the inhomogeneity, we use a chiral-density wave ansatz. For a sigma mass of 600 MeV, we find that an inhomogeneous chiral condensate exists only for pion masses below approximately 37 MeV. We also show that due to our parameter fixing, the onset of pion condensation takes place exactly at μIc=1/2 mπ in accordance with exact results.

  1. Numerical simulation of thermomagnetic convection of cold water near its density maximum in a square enclosure under a magnetic quadrupole field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Er; Sun, Xiaoqin; He, Yecong; Jiang, Changwei, E-mail: cw_jiang@163.com [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410114 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Natural convection of cold water near its density maximum in a square enclosure is studied numerically under the influence of a magnetic quadrupole field without gravity. A generalized model which includes a non-Boussinesq parabolic density–temperature relationship is established. The governing equations in primitive variables are discretized using the finite-volume method and solved using the SIMPLE algorithm. The effects of magnetic force number, Rayleigh number and density inversion parameter on flow and heat transfer characteristics are analyzed. The results show that the primary flow pattern depends mainly on the density inversion parameter. Multi-cellular flow structures are observed for certain ranges of density inversion parameter independent of the value of Rayleigh number and magnetic force number. The heat transfer changes non-monotonically under combined actions of the quadrupole magnetic field and density inversion. (paper)

  2. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Paul; Butler, Hannah; Trantham, Matt; Mussack, Katie; Colgan, James; Fontes, Chris; Guzik, Joyce; Kilcrease, David; Perry, Ted; Orban, Chris; Ducret, Jean-Eric; La Pennec, Maelle; Turck-Chieze, Sylvaine; Mancini, Roberto; Heeter, Robert

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al., 2015]. Repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for low-Z elements [Colgan, 2013, Armstrong 2014], however no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions. This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDLP, Grant Number DE-NA0002956, and the NLUF Program, Grant Number DE-NA0002719, and through the LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under No. DE-NA0001944.

  3. Magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors and their interaction with high energy permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwala, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic properties of sintered samples of YBCO ceramic superconductors at various temperatures were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Also, measurements of forces experienced by a well characterized rare earth-transition metal (RE-TM) permanent magnet (PM) interacting with the superconducting YBCO sample cooled in liquid nitrogen, were performed. Based upon the observed hysteretic magnetization properties of these high temperature superconductors (HTS), the HTS-PM interaction force at liquid nitrogen temperature was calculated from first principle, and finally correlated to the force measurement results. With this analysis, magnetic forces between the same HTS and PM system including the levitation as well as suspension effects at liquid-helium temperature are predicted

  4. Density of Liquid Steel over Temperature Range of 1 803-1 873 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    The density of three kinds of liquid steel was measured by a modified sessile drop method over the temperature range of 1 803-1 873 K. It is found that the density of liquid steels decreases with increasing temperature and carbon content in steel. Both of the density and its absolute temperature coefficient of studied steels are smaller than the literature values of pure iron. The molar volume of the steels increases with increasing temperature.

  5. Effects of anomalous magnetic moment and temperature on pair production in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, W.; Bauhoff, W.

    1981-01-01

    It is re-examined the problem of spontaneous pair creation in an external magnetic field. In contrast to earlier findings, it is shown that pair production does not occur due to the anomalous magnetic moment interaction. However, pairs may be observed in a situation of thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperatures. (author)

  6. The relation between the column density structures and the magnetic field orientation in the Vela C molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Angilè, F. E.; Ashton, P.; Benton, S. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Fissel, L. M.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gandilo, N. N.; Hennebelle, P.; Klein, J.; Li, Z.-Y.; Korotkov, A. L.; Martin, P. G.; Matthews, T. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Santos, F. P.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2017-07-01

    We statistically evaluated the relative orientation between gas column density structures, inferred from Herschel submillimetre observations, and the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimetre Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) at 250, 350, and 500 μm, towards the Vela C molecular complex. First, we find very good agreement between the polarization orientations in the three wavelength-bands, suggesting that, at the considered common angular resolution of 3.´0 that corresponds to a physical scale of approximately 0.61 pc, the inferred magnetic field orientation is not significantly affected by temperature or dust grain alignment effects. Second, we find that the relative orientation between gas column density structures and the magnetic field changes progressively with increasing gas column density, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation at low column densities to mostly perpendicular at the highest column densities. This observation is in agreement with previous studies by the Planck collaboration towards more nearby molecular clouds. Finally, we find a correspondencebetween (a) the trends in relative orientation between the column density structures and the projected magnetic field; and (b) the shape of the column density probability distribution functions (PDFs). In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by one clear filamentary structure, or "ridges", where the high-column density tails of the PDFs are flatter, we find a sharp transition from preferentially parallel or having no preferred relative orientation at low column densities to preferentially perpendicular at highest column densities. In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by several filamentary structures with multiple orientations, or "nests", where the maximum values of the column density are smaller than in the ridge-like sub-regions and the high-column density

  7. Prediction of d^0 magnetism in self-interaction corrected density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Pemmaraju, Chaitanya

    2010-03-01

    Over the past couple of years, the phenomenon of ``d^0 magnetism'' has greatly intrigued the magnetism community [1]. Unlike conventional magnetic materials, ``d^0 magnets'' lack any magnetic ions with open d or f shells but surprisingly, exhibit signatures of ferromagnetism often with a Curie temperature exceeding 300 K. Current research in the field is geared towards trying to understand the mechanism underlying this observed ferromagnetism which is difficult to explain within the conventional m-J paradigm [1]. The most widely studied class of d^0 materials are un-doped and light element doped wide gap Oxides such as HfO2, MgO, ZnO, TiO2 all of which have been put forward as possible d0 ferromagnets. General experimental trends suggest that the magnetism is a feature of highly defective samples leading to the expectation that the phenomenon must be defect related. In particular, based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations acceptor defects formed from the O-2p states in these Oxides have been proposed as being responsible for the ferromagnetism [2,3]. However. predicting magnetism originating from 2p orbitals is a delicate problem, which depends on the subtle interplay between covalency and Hund's coupling. DFT calculations based on semi-local functionals such as the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) can lead to qualitative failures on several fronts. On one hand the excessive delocalization of spin-polarized holes leads to half-metallic ground states and the expectation of room-temperature ferromagnetism. On the other hand, in some cases a magnetic ground state may not be predicted at all as the Hund's coupling might be under estimated. Furthermore, polaronic distortions which are often a feature of acceptor defects in Oxides are not predicted [4,5]. In this presentation, we argue that the self interaction error (SIE) inherent to semi-local functionals is responsible for the failures of LSDA and demonstrate through various examples that beyond

  8. Competing magnetic interactions and low temperature magnetic phase transitions in composite multiferroics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkar, Hitesh; Singh, V N; Kumar, Ashok; Choudhary, R J; Tomar, M; Gupta, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Novel magnetic properties and magnetic interactions in composite multiferroic oxides Pb[(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 ) 0.60 (Fe 0.67 W 0.33 ) .40 ]O 3 ] 0.80 –[CoFe 2 O 4 ] 0.20 (PZTFW–CFO) have been studied from 50 to 1000 Oe field cooled (FC) and zero field cooled (ZFC) probing conditions, and over a wide range of temperatures (4–350 K). Crystal structure analysis, surface morphology, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy images revealed the presence of two distinct phases, where micro- and nano-size spinel CFO were embedded in tetragonal PZTFW matrix and applied a significant built-in compressive strain (∼0.4–0.8%). Three distinct magnetic phase transitions were observed with the subtle effect of CFO magnetic phase on PZTFW magnetic phase transitions below the blocking temperature (T B ). Temperature dependence magnetic property m(T) shows a clear evidence of spin freezing in magnetic order with lowering in thermal vibration. Chemical inhomogeneity and confinement of nanoscale ferrimagnetic phase in paramagnetic/antiferromagnetic matrix restrict the long range interaction of spin which in turn develop a giant spin frustration. A large divergence in the FC and ZFC data and broad hump in ZFC data near 200 (±10) K were observed which suggests that large magnetic anisotropy and short range order magnetic dipoles lead to the development of superparamagnetic states in composite. (paper)

  9. Experimental investigation of optical fiber temperature sensors at cryogenic temperature and in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Ogata, M.; Nagashima, K.; Agawa, H.; Matsuura, S.; Kumagai, Y.

    2010-01-01

    If it is possible to monitor the conditions in the cryogenic equipments including the super-conducting magnets, the indication of failure can be detected beforehand and the reliability in the operation can improve. Optical fiber temperature sensing is an advantageous method in terms of heat invasion, electric insulation, etc. Therefore, the experiments which confirm the characteristics of optical fiber temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures and in high magnetic fields were performed, and the possibility of measuring under these conditions was confirmed. However, since the resolution of temperature was a problem, the method of analysis that predicts the measurements was contrived, and the method to improve the problem was examined.

  10. Operation and design selection of high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, F N; Floegel-Delor, U; Riedel, T; Rothfeld, R; Wippich, D; Goebel, B

    2004-01-01

    Axial and radial high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic bearings are evaluated by their parameters. Journal bearings possess advantages over thrust bearings. High magnetic gradients in a multi-pole permanent magnet (PM) configuration, the surrounding melt textured YBCO stator and adequate designs are the key features for increasing the overall bearing stiffness. The gap distance between rotor and stator determines the specific forces and has a strong impact on the PM rotor design. We report on the designing, building and measuring of a 200 mm prototype 100 kg HTS bearing with an encapsulated and thermally insulated melt textured YBCO ring stator. The encapsulation requires a magnetically large-gap (4-5 mm) operation but reduces the cryogenic effort substantially. The bearing requires 3 l of LN 2 for cooling down, and about 0.2 l LN 2 h -1 under operation. This is a dramatic improvement of the efficiency and in the practical usage of HTS magnetic bearings

  11. Influence of Magnetic Field on Electric Charge Transport in Holomiun Thin Films at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dudas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Holmium thin films were prepared by evaporation in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV and high precision electrical resistance measurements were performed on them as well as on holomium bulk sample in the wide temperature range from 4,2 K up to the room temperature. Electric charge transport is profoundly influenced by the magnetic structure at low temperatures and a "knee-like" resistance anomaly was observed near the transportation from paramagnetic state to basal-plane spiral structure in bulk with the Neel temperature TN=128,9 K and below ~ 122 K in thin Ho films in a thickness range from 98 nm to 215 nm. Unexpected resistance minimum at ~ 9 K and a slope´s charge of the R vs. T curve near ~ 170 K was observed in 215 nm thin film. Application of magnetic field parallel to the substrate and thin film plane for temperatures below ~ 150 K caused the decrease of resistence value with increasing magnetic flux density. Increasing suppression of the TN value up to ~ 5 K with increasing flux density value up to 5 T was observed in Ho films. 

  12. Searching for high magnetization density in bulk Fe: the new metastable Fe-6 phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umemoto, K; Himmetoglu, B; Wang, JP; Wentzcovitch, RM; Cococcioni, M

    2014-11-26

    We report the discovery of a new allotrope of iron by first principles calculations. This phase has Pmn2(1) symmetry, a six-atom unit cell (hence the name Fe-6), and the highest magnetization density (M-s) among all the known crystalline phases of iron. Obtained from the structural optimizations of the Fe3C-cementite crystal upon carbon removal, Pmn2(1) Fe-6 is shown to result from the stabilization of a ferromagnetic FCC phase, further strained along the Bain path. Although metastable from 0 to 50 GPa, the new phase is more stable at low pressures than the other well-known HCP and FCC allotropes and smoothly transforms into the FCC phase under compression. If stabilized to room temperature, for example, by interstitial impurities, Fe-6 could become the basis material for high M-s rare-earth-free permament magnets and high-impact applications such as light-weight electric engine rotors or high-density recording media. The new phase could also be key to explaining the enigmatic high M-s of Fe16N2, which is currently attracting intense research activity.

  13. Magnetic losses at high flux densities in nonoriented Fe-Si alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appino, C.; Fiorillo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Torino (Italy); Ragusa, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: carlo.ragusa@polito.it; Xie, B. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    We present and discuss power loss measurements performed in Fe-(3.5 wt%)Si nonoriented laminations up to very high flux densities. The results are obtained on disk samples using a 1D/2D single-sheet tester, where the fieldmetric and the thermometric methods are applied upon overlapping polarization ranges. The power loss in the highest polarization regimes (e.g. J{sub p}>1.8 T) is measured, in particular, by the rate of rise of temperature method, both under controlled and uncontrolled flux density waveform, the latter case emulating the conditions met in practical unsophisticated experiments. Lack of control at such extreme J{sub p} levels is conducive to strong flux distortion, but the correspondingly measured loss figure can eventually be converted to the one pertaining to sinusoidal induction at the same J{sub p} values. This is demonstrated as a specific application of the statistical theory of magnetic losses, where the usual formulation for the energy losses in magnetic sheets under distorted induction is exploited in reverse fashion.

  14. Effect of magnetic configuration on density fluctuation and particle transport in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Michael, C.; Yamagishi, O.; Ida, K.; Yamada, H.; Yoshinuma, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Kawahata, K.; Tokzawa, T.; Shoji, M.; Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Sanin, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    The study of fluctuations and particle transport is important issue in heliotron and stellarator devices as well as in tokamaks. A two dimensional phase contrast interferometer (2D PCI) was developed to investigate fluctuation characteristics, which play role in confinement. The current 2D PCI can detect fluctuations for which -1 0.3 -1 and 5< f<500kHz. With the use of magnetic shear and the 2D detector, the spatial resolution around 20% of averaged minor radius is possible presently. The strongest fluctuations are localized in the plasma edge, where density gradients are negative, but fluctuations also exist in the positive density gradient region of the hollow density profile. The phase velocity of fluctuations in the positive gradient region is close to plasma ErxBt rotation. On the other hand, fluctuations in the negative density gradient region propagate in the ion diamagnetic direction in the plasma frame and do not follow ErxBt rotation. This suggests there is a different nature of the fluctuations in the positive and negative density gradient regions. A particle transport was studied by means of density modulation experiments. The systematic study was done at Rax=3.6m, which is so-called standard configuration. The density profiles vary from peaked to hollow with increasing heating power. It was also found that particle diffusion and convection are functions of electron temperature and its gradient respectively. The magnetic configuration is another parameter, which characterizes particle confinement. At more outward shifted configurations, helical ripple becomes larger and the ergodic region becomes thicker, then neoclassical transport becomes larger. However estimated diffusion coefficients are still around one order of magnitude larger than neoclassical values in edge region, where ρ = 0.7 ∼ 1.0 and they are larger at more outward configurations. At the same time the convection velocity is found to be comparable with neoclassical prediction at Rax=3

  15. Globally optimal superconducting magnets part I: minimum stored energy (MSE) current density map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieng, Quang M; Vegh, Viktor; Brereton, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    An optimal current density map is crucial in magnet design to provide the initial values within search spaces in an optimization process for determining the final coil arrangement of the magnet. A strategy for obtaining globally optimal current density maps for the purpose of designing magnets with coaxial cylindrical coils in which the stored energy is minimized within a constrained domain is outlined. The current density maps obtained utilising the proposed method suggests that peak current densities occur around the perimeter of the magnet domain, where the adjacent peaks have alternating current directions for the most compact designs. As the dimensions of the domain are increased, the current density maps yield traditional magnet designs of positive current alone. These unique current density maps are obtained by minimizing the stored magnetic energy cost function and therefore suggest magnet coil designs of minimal system energy. Current density maps are provided for a number of different domain arrangements to illustrate the flexibility of the method and the quality of the achievable designs.

  16. High-temperature magnetoresistance study of a magnetic tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.C.; Yao, Y.D.; Chen, C.M.; Hung, James; Chen, Y.S.; Wang, W.H.; Chen, W.C.; Kao, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal stability and the spin transportation phenomenon at room temperature and 140 deg. C of a series of magnetic tunneling junctions with the structure of bottom electrode/PtMn/Pinned layer/ AlO x /CoFe/NiFe/top electrode have been investigated. The MR ratio decreases from 33.5% at room temperature to 29% at 140 deg. C. The MR ratio at room temperature increases roughly 0.8% after thermal treatment at temperatures above 60 deg. C. This is related to the thermal relaxation of the strains existing in the samples

  17. Threshold heating temperature for magnetic hyperthermia: Controlling the heat exchange with the blocking temperature of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, B.; Caraballo-Vivas, R. J.; Checca, N. R.; Zverev, V. I.; Salakhova, R. T.; Makarova, L. A.; Pyatakov, A. P.; Perov, N. S.; Tishin, A. M.; Shtil, A. A.; Rossi, A. L.; Reis, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    La0.75Sr0.25MnO3 nanoparticles with average diameter close to 20.9 nm were synthesized using a sol-gel method. Measurements showed that the heating process stops at the blocking temperaturesignificantly below the Curie temperature. Measurements of Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) as a function of AC magnetic field revealed a superquadratic power law, indicating that, in addition to usual Néel and Brown relaxation, the hysteresis also plays an important role in the mechanism of heating. The ability to control the threshold heating temperature, a low remanent magnetization and a low field needed to achieve the magnetic saturation are the advantages of this material for therapeutic magnetic hyperthermia.

  18. Influence of soft ferromagnetic sections on the magnetic flux density profile of a large grain, bulk Y–Ba–Cu–O superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M P; Wéra, L; Fagnard, J-F; Vanderheyden, B; Vanderbemden, P; Ainslie, M D; Dennis, A R; Shi, Y-H; Cardwell, D A

    2015-01-01

    Bulk, high temperature superconductors have significant potential for use as powerful permanent magnets in a variety of practical applications due to their ability to trap record magnetic fields. In this paper, soft ferromagnetic sections are combined with a bulk, large grain Y–Ba–Cu–O high temperature superconductor to form superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures. We study how the ferromagnetic sections influence the shape of the profile of the trapped magnetic induction at the surface of each structure and report the surface magnetic flux density measured by Hall probe mapping. These configurations have been modelled using a 2D axisymmetric finite element method based on the H-formulation and the results show excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements. The model has also been used to study the magnetic flux distribution and predict the behaviour for other constitutive laws and geometries. The results show that the ferromagnetic material acts as a magnetic shield, but the flux density and its gradient are enhanced on the face opposite to the ferromagnet. The thickness and saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic material are important and a characteristic ferromagnet thickness d* is derived: below d*, saturation of the ferromagnet occurs, and above d*, a weak thickness-dependence is observed. The influence of the ferromagnet is observed even if its saturation magnetization is lower than the trapped flux density of the superconductor. Conversely, thin ferromagnetic discs can be driven to full saturation even though the outer magnetic field is much smaller than their saturation magnetization. (paper)

  19. Influence of temperature on magnetic properties of silicon steel lamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junquan Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we studied the influence of thermal effect on the iron loss components by DC and AC magnetic measurement. The measured result shows that iron loss of nonoriented silicon steel is more influenced by temperature than grain oriented one. Based on loss separation model, we have found a suitable iron loss expression for nonoriented and grain oriented steels. Then a temperature dependent iron loss model is proposed, where temperature coefficient k is introduced to consider thermal effect on dynamic loss. The iron loss model is validated by all series of silicon steel stripe made by WISCO. The relative error of the model is about 11% in a wide range of 20∼400Hz, 20∼200°C, 0∼2T. The proposed model can be applicable to other types of magnetic materials as long as their resistivity rate exhibits approximately linear thermal dependence within a temperature range of 20∼200°C.

  20. Reduced one-body density matrix of Tonks–Girardeau gas at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiao-Chen; Hao Ya-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    With thermal Bose–Fermi mapping method, we investigate the Tonks–Girardeau gas at finite temperature. It is shown that at low temperature, the Tonks gas displays the Fermi-like density profiles, and with the increase in temperature, the Tonks gas distributes in wider region. The reduced one-body density matrix is diagonal dominant in the whole temperature region, and the off-diagonal elements shall vanish rapidly with the deviation from the diagonal part at high temperature. (paper)

  1. Investigating the impact of uneven magnetic flux density distribution on core loss estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niroumand, Farideh Javidi; Nymand, Morten; Wang, Yiren

    2017-01-01

    is calculated according to an effective flux density value and the macroscopic dimensions of the cores. However, the flux distribution in the core can alter by core shapes and/or operating conditions due to nonlinear material properties. This paper studies the element-wise estimation of the loss in magnetic......There are several approaches for loss estimation in magnetic cores, and all these approaches highly rely on accurate information about flux density distribution in the cores. It is often assumed that the magnetic flux density evenly distributes throughout the core and the overall core loss...

  2. Changes in density of aluminium, lead and zinc melts dependent on temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazachkov, S.P.; Kochegura, N.M.; Markovskij, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    Density of aluminium, lead and zinc in various aggregate states has been studied in a wide temperature range. The density of the above metals was found to manifest temperature hysteresis after melting and cyclic change at the temperature of melting and crystallization. These phenomena are in agreement with the Stuart model of liquid state

  3. Time dependence of magnetization of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkin, A.I.; Geshkenbein, V.B.

    1988-10-01

    Magnetization of high T c superconductors logarithmically decreases with time. There is a maximum in the temperature dependence of the coefficient at this logarithm. If one assumes that there do exist two kinds of pinning centers, then this dependence can be described in the Anderson theory of thermal creeps of Abrikosov's vortices. The temperature dependence of the critical current is also discussed. (author). 23 refs

  4. Low threading dislocation density aluminum nitride on silicon carbide through the use of reduced temperature interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Wu, Feng; Zollner, Christian; Alif, Muhammad Esmed; Saifaddin, Burhan; Almogbel, Abdullah; Iza, Michael; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.

    2017-01-01

    temperature on the AlN crystal quality, defect density, and surface morphology. The crystal quality was characterized using omega rocking curve scans and the threading dislocation density was determined by plan view transmission electron microscopy. The growth

  5. Path-integral calculation of the density of states in heavily doped strongly compensated semiconductors in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koinov, Z.G.; Yanchev, I.Y.

    1981-09-01

    The density of states in heavily doped strongly compansated semiconductors in a strong magnetic field is calculated by using the path-integral method. The case is considered when correlation exists in the impurity positions owing to the Coulomb interactions between the charged donors and acceptors during the high-temperature preparation of the samples. The semiclassical formula is rederived and corrections to it due to the long-range character of the potential and its short-range fluctuations are obtained. The density of states in the tail is studied and analytical results are given in the classical and quantum cases. (author)

  6. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    phase composition, microstructure and magnetic properties of the combustion products. The effect ... The size and shapes of the ... Figure 3 shows the effect of combustion temperature on ... ducts at 1200°C are too hard to be ground easily and.

  7. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis and magnetic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ni–Zn ferrite powders were synthesized by self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) method. X-ray diffraction, TEM and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) were used to characterize the phase composition, microstructure and magnetic properties of the combustion products. The effect of the combustion ...

  8. Neutron studies of nuclear magnetism at ultralow temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemensmeyer, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Lefmann, K.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic order in copper and silver has been investigated by neutron diffraction. Antiferromagnetic order is observed in these simple, diamagnetic metals at temperatures below 50 nK and 560 pK, respectively. Both crystallize in the FCC-symmetry which is fully frustrated for nearest...

  9. In-plane magnetic anisotropy and temperature dependence of switching field in (Ga, Mn) as ferromagnetic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, S; Terki, F; Dumas, R; Dehbaoui, M; Sadowski, J; Galéra, R M; Tran, Q-H; Charar, S

    2012-06-01

    We explore the magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor by Planar Hall Effect (PHE) measurements. Using low magnitude of applied magnetic field (i.e., when the magnitude H is smaller than both cubic Hc and uniaxial Hu anisotropy field), we have observed various shapes of applied magnetic field direction dependence of Planar Hall Resistance (PHR). In particular, in two regions of temperature. At T Tc/2 the "zigzag-shape" signal of PHR. They reflect different magnetic anisotropy and provide information about magnetization reversal process in GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor. The theoretical model calculation of PHR based on the free energy density reproduces well the experimental data. We report also the temperature dependence of anisotropy constants and magnetization orientations. The transition of easy axis from biaxial to uniaxiale axes has been observed and confirmed by SQUID measurements.

  10. Design prospect of remountable high-temperature superconducting magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hidetoshi.hashizume@qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Ito, Satoshi

    2014-10-15

    The remountable (mountable and demountable repeatedly) high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet has been proposed for huge and complex superconducting magnets in future fusion reactors to fabricate and repair easily the magnet and access inner structural components. This paper summarizes progress in R and D activities of mechanical joints of HTS conductors in terms of the electrical resistance and heat transfer performance at the joint region. The latest experimental results show the low joint resistance, 4 nΩ under 70 kA current condition using REBCO HTS conductor with mechanical lap joint system, and for the cooling system the maximum heat flux of 0.4 MW/m{sup 2} is removed by using bronze sintered porous media with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen. These values indicate that there is large possibility to design the remountable HTS magnet for fusion reactors.

  11. Low temperature magnetic behaviour of glass-covered magnetic microwires with gradient nanocrystalline microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, I. G.; Hernando, A.; Marín, P. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC, P.O. Box 155 las Rozas, Madrid 28230 (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    Slow nanocrystallization driving dynamics can be affected by the combination of two factors: sample residual stresses and sample geometry. This effect is evidenced at the initial stages of nanocrystallization of amorphous CoFeSiBCuNb magnetic microwires. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicate how crystallization at temperatures between 730 and 780 K results in a graded microstructure where the crystallization at the surface skin of the microwire, which remains almost amorphous, differs from that of the middle, where elongated grains are observed, and inner regions. However, samples annealed at higher temperatures present a homogeneous microstructure. The effect of gradient microstructure on magnetic properties has been also analyzed and a loss of bistable magnetic behaviour at low temperatures, from that obtained in the amorphous and fully nanocrystallized sample, has been observed and ascribed to changes in sign of magnetostriction for measuring temperatures below 100 K.

  12. High temperature structural and magnetic properties of cobalt nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Atmane, Kahina [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, 15 rue J.-A. de Baief, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Zighem, Fatih [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA CNRS UMR 12, IRAMIS, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Soumare, Yaghoub [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, 15 rue J.-A. de Baief, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Ibrahim, Mona; Boubekri, Rym [Universite de Toulouse, LPCNO, INSA CNRS UMR 5215, 135 av. de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Maurer, Thomas [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA CNRS UMR 12, IRAMIS, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Margueritat, Jeremie [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, 15 rue J.-A. de Baief, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Piquemal, Jean-Yves, E-mail: jean-yves.piquemal@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, 15 rue J.-A. de Baief, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Ott, Frederic; Chaboussant, Gregory [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA CNRS UMR 12, IRAMIS, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Schoenstein, Frederic; Jouini, Noureddine [LSPM, CNRS UPR 9001, Universite Paris XIII, Institut Galilee, 99 av. J.-B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Viau, Guillaume, E-mail: gviau@insa-toulouse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, LPCNO, INSA CNRS UMR 5215, 135 av. de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2013-01-15

    We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanoparticles ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X ray diffraction (XRD) and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. The coercivity can be modelled by {mu}{sub 0}H{sub C}=2(K{sub MC}+K{sub shape})/M{sub S} with K{sub MC} the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K{sub shape} the shape anisotropy constant and M{sub S} the saturation magnetization. H{sub C} decreases linearly when the temperature is increased due to the loss of the Co magnetocrystalline anisotropy contribution. At 500 K, 50% of the room temperature coercivity is preserved corresponding to the shape anisotropy contribution only. We show that the coercivity drop is reversible in the range 300-500 K in good agreement with the absence of particle alteration. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. - Graphical abstract: We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanorods ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X-ray diffraction and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic Co nanorods are prepared using the polyol process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and texture properties of the Co nanorods are preserved up to 500 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic properties of the Co nanorods are irreversibly altered above 525 K.

  13. Observation of Various and Spontaneous Magnetic Skyrmionic Bubbles at Room Temperature in a Frustrated Kagome Magnet with Uniaxial Magnetic Anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng

    2017-06-07

    The quest for materials hosting topologically protected skyrmionic spin textures continues to be fueled by the promise of novel devices. Although many materials have demonstrated the existence of such spin textures, major challenges remain to be addressed before devices based on magnetic skyrmions can be realized. For example, being able to create and manipulate skyrmionic spin textures at room temperature is of great importance for further technological applications because they can adapt to various external stimuli acting as information carriers in spintronic devices. Here, the first observation of skyrmionic magnetic bubbles with variable topological spin textures formed at room temperature in a frustrated kagome Fe3 Sn2 magnet with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy is reported. The magnetization dynamics are investigated using in situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, revealing that the transformation between different magnetic bubbles and domains is via the motion of Bloch lines driven by an applied external magnetic field. These results demonstrate that Fe3 Sn2 facilitates a unique magnetic control of topological spin textures at room temperature, making it a promising candidate for further skyrmion-based spintronic devices.

  14. Carrier density control of magnetism and Berry phases in doped EuTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Kaveh; Gui, Zhigang; Porter, Zach; Lynn, Jeffrey W.; Xu, Zhijun; Wilson, Stephen D.; Janotti, Anderson; Stemmer, Susanne

    2018-05-01

    In materials with broken time-reversal symmetry, the Berry curvature acts as a reciprocal space magnetic field on the conduction electrons and is a significant contribution to the magnetotransport properties, including the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect. Here, we report neutron diffraction, transport, and magnetization measurements of thin films of doped EuTiO3, an itinerant magnetic material, as a function of carrier density and magnetic field. These films are itinerant antiferromagnets at all doping concentrations. At low carrier densities, the magnetoresistance indicates a metamagnetic transition, which is absent at high carrier densities (>6 × 1020 cm-3). Strikingly, the crossover coincides with a sign change in the spontaneous Hall effects, indicating a sign change in the Berry curvature. We discuss the results in the context of the band structure topology and its coupling to the magnetic texture.

  15. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a noninvasive method suitable for clinical prenatal diagnosis. STUDY DESIGN: Fetal nucleated erythrocytes were separated from peripheral blood of 17 healthy pregnant women using small magnetically activated cell sorting columns (MiniMACS) following density gradient centrifug...

  16. Tilted Magnetic Levitation Enables Measurement of the Complete Range of Densities of Materials with Low Magnetic Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Soh, Siowling; Kwok, Sen Wai; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-02-03

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) of diamagnetic or weakly paramagnetic materials suspended in a paramagnetic solution in a magnetic field gradient provides a simple method to measure the density of small samples of solids or liquids. One major limitation of this method, thus far, has been an inability to measure or manipulate materials outside of a narrow range of densities (0.8 g/cm(3) MagLev"-to increase the range of densities that can be levitated magnetically. Tilting the MagLev device relative to the gravitational vector enables the magnetic force to be decreased (relative to the magnetic force) along the axis of measurement. This approach enables many practical measurements over the entire range of densities observed in matter at ambient conditions-from air bubbles (ρ ≈ 0) to osmium and iridium (ρ ≈ 23 g/cm(3)). The ability to levitate, simultaneously, objects with a broad range of different densities provides an operationally simple method that may find application to forensic science (e.g., for identifying the composition of miscellaneous objects or powders), industrial manufacturing (e.g., for quality control of parts), or resource-limited settings (e.g., for identifying and separating small particles of metals and alloys).

  17. Understory Density Characteristics in Several Midlatitude Temperature Forests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krause, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Understory density can have impacts on such military activities as cross-country mobility, bivouac, cover and concealment, and line of sight Airborne sensors provide a fairly good mechanism for measuring the overstory...

  18. Temperature-dependent surface density of alkylthiol monolayers on gold nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuepeng; Lu, Pin; Zhai, Hua; Wu, Yucheng

    2018-03-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the surface density of passivating monolayers of alkylthiol chains on gold nanocrystals at temperatures ranging from 1 to 800 K. The results show that the surface density of alkylthiol monolayer reaches a maximum value at near room temperature (200-300 K), while significantly decreases with increasing temperature in the higher temperature region (> 300 {{K}}), and slightly decreases with decreasing temperature at low temperature (< 200 {{K}}). We find that the temperature dependence of surface ligand density in the higher temperature region is attributed to the substantial ligand desorption induced by the thermal fluctuation, while that at low temperature results from the reduction in entropy caused by the change in the ordering of passivating monolayer. These results are expected helpful to understand the temperature-dependent surface coverage of gold nanocrystals.

  19. Flow behind an exponential shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric perfect gas with magnetic field and variable density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G; Sahu, P K

    2016-01-01

    A self-similar model for one-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flows behind a strong exponential shock wave driven out by a cylindrical piston moving with time according to an exponential law in an ideal gas in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field and variable density is discussed in a rotating atmosphere. The ambient medium is assumed to possess radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The initial density, the fluid velocities and magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying with time according to an exponential law. The gas is taken to be non-viscous having infinite electrical conductivity. Solutions are obtained, in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector. The effects of the variation of the initial density index, adiabatic exponent of the gas and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field behind the shock wave are investigated. It is found that the presence of the magnetic field have decaying effects on the shock wave. Also, it is observed that the effect of an increase in the magnetic field strength is more impressive in the case of adiabatic flow than in the case of isothermal flow. The assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, non-dimensional azimuthal and axial components of vorticity vector distributions in comparison to those in the case of adiabatic flow. A comparison is made between isothermal and adiabatic flows. It is obtained that an increase in the initial density variation index, adiabatic exponent and strength of the magnetic field decrease the shock strength.

  20. Quantum Simulations of Low Temperature High Energy Density Matter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Voth, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    .... Using classical molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate these equilibrium properties would predict qualitatively incorrect results for low temperature solid hydrogen, because of the highly quantum...

  1. Field, temperature, and angle dependent critical current density Jc(H,T,θ) in coated conductors obtained via contact-free methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J R; Christen, D K; Zhang Yifei; Zuev, Y L; Cantoni, C; Sinclair, J W; Chen Yimin; Selvamanickam, V

    2010-01-01

    Applications of coated conductors based on high- T c superconductors often require detailed knowledge of their critical current density J c as a function of magnetic field orientation as well as field strength and temperature. This work demonstrates experimental methods for obtaining the angularly dependent J c using contact-free magnetic measurements, and qualifies those methods using several well defined conditions. The studies complement traditional transport techniques and are readily extended to conditions of field and temperature where the current density is very large and transport methods become difficult. Results on representative materials are presented.

  2. Field, temperature, and angle dependent critical current density Jc(H,T, ) in coated conductors obtained via contact-free methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James R [ORNL; Sinclair IV, John W [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Chen, Y [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York

    2010-01-01

    Applications of coated conductors based on high-Tc superconductors often require detailed knowledge of their critical current density Jc as a function of magnetic field orientation as well as field strength and temperature. This work demonstrates experimental methods to obtain the angularly dependent Jc using contact-free magnetic measurements, and qualifies those methods using several well defined conditions. The studies complement traditional transport techniques and are readily extended to conditions of field and temperature where the current density is very large and transport methods become difficult. Results on representative materials are presented.

  3. Field, temperature, and angle dependent critical current density J{sub c}(H,T,{theta}) in coated conductors obtained via contact-free methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J R; Christen, D K; Zhang Yifei; Zuev, Y L; Cantoni, C [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6092 (United States); Sinclair, J W [Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Chen Yimin; Selvamanickam, V [SuperPower, Incorporated, 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Applications of coated conductors based on high- T{sub c} superconductors often require detailed knowledge of their critical current density J{sub c} as a function of magnetic field orientation as well as field strength and temperature. This work demonstrates experimental methods for obtaining the angularly dependent J{sub c} using contact-free magnetic measurements, and qualifies those methods using several well defined conditions. The studies complement traditional transport techniques and are readily extended to conditions of field and temperature where the current density is very large and transport methods become difficult. Results on representative materials are presented.

  4. Magnetic penetration depth δ o and critical current density in Y-BA-Cu-O crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaritsky, N.V.; Zavaritsky, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic penetration depthδ o ∼1.03 10 - 5 cm and critical current density (j c = 0.5 divided-by 1 x 10 5 A/cm 2 at T/T ∼0.98) are determined from low-field do magnetization measurements on Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 - crystals

  5. Temperature-dependent magnetic EXAFS investigation of Gd

    CERN Document Server

    Wende, H; Poulopoulos, P N; Rogalev, A; Goulon, J; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Baberschke, K

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic EXAFS (MEXAFS) is the helicity-dependent counterpart of the well-established EXAFS technique. By means of MEXAFS it is possible not only to analyze the local magnetic structure but also to learn about magnetic fluctuations. Here we present the MEXAFS of a Gd single crystal at the L sub 3 sub , sub 2 -edges in the temperature range of 10-250 K. For the first time MEXAFS was probed over a large range in reduced temperature of 0.04<=T/T sub C<=0.85 with T sub C =293 K. We show that the vibrational damping described by means of a Debye temperature of theta sub D =160 K must be taken into account for the spin-dependent MEXAFS before analyzing magnetic fluctuations. For a detailed analysis of the MEXAFS and the EXAFS, the experimental data are compared to ab initio calculations. This enables us to separate the individual single- from the multiple-scattering contributions. The MEXAFS data have been recorded at the ID 12A beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To ensure that th...

  6. Magnetic record associated with tree ring density: Possible climate proxy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kletetschka, Günther; Pruner, Petr; Venhodová, Daniela; Kadlec, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2007), s. 1-11 ISSN 1467-4866 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : palaeo-climatic indicator * sequoia tree * magnetic properties Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2007

  7. Interfacial density of states in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeClair, P.R.; Kohlhepp, J.T.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Jonge, de W.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Large zero-bias resistance anomalies as well as a collapse of magnetoresistance were observed in Co/Al2O3/Co magnetic tunnel junctions with thin Cr interfacial layers. The tunnel magnetoresistance decays exponentially with nominal Cr interlayer thickness with a length scale of ~1 Å more than twice

  8. Determination of magnetic characteristics of nanoparticles by low-temperature calorimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugulava, A.; Toklikishvili, Z. [Department of Physics, I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University,I.Chavchavadze av. 3, 0179 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Chkhaidze, S., E-mail: simon.chkhaidze@tsu.ge [Department of Physics, I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University,I.Chavchavadze av. 3, 0179 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Kekutia, Sh. [V. Chavchanidze Institute of Cybernetics, at the Technical State University, S. Euli str. 5, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

    2017-05-15

    At low temperatures, the heat capacity of a superparamagnetic “ideal gas” determined by magnetic degrees of freedom can greatly exceed the lattice heat capacity. It is shown that in the presence of an external magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the magnetic part of the heat capacity has two maxima. The relations between the temperature at which these maxima are achieved, the magnetic moment of the nanoparticles and the magnetic anisotropy constant have been obtained. Measuring the heat capacity maxima temperatures by low-temperature calorimetry methods and using the obtained relations, we can obtain the numerical values both of the magnetic moment of nanoparticles and the magnetic anisotropy constants.

  9. How systems of single-molecule magnets magnetize at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2004-01-01

    We model magnetization processes that take place through tunneling in crystals of single-molecule magnets, such as Mn12 and Fe8. These processes take place when a field H is applied after quenching to very low temperatures. Magnetic dipolar interactions and spin-flipping rules are essential ingredients of the model. The results obtained follow from Monte Carlo simulations and from the stochastic model we propose for dipole field diffusion. Correlations established before quenching are shown to later drive the magnetization process. We also show that in simple cubic lattices, m∝√(t) at time t after H is applied, as observed in Fe8, but only for 1+2log10(hd/hw) time decades, where hd is some near-neighbor magnetic dipolar field, and a spin reversal can occur only if the magnetic field acting on it is within some field window (-hw,hw). However, the √(t) behavior is not universal. For bcc and fcc lattices, m∝tp, but p≃0.7. An expression for p in terms of lattice parameters is derived. At later times the magnetization levels off to a constant value. All these processes take place at approximately constant magnetic energy if the annealing energy ɛa is larger than the tunneling window’s energy width (i.e., if ɛa≳gμBhwS). Thermal processes come in only later on to drive further magnetization growth.

  10. Contribution to the study of superconducting magnets using high transition temperature superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecrevisse, Thibault

    2012-01-01

    The new industrial superconductors using high critical temperature compounds offer new possibilities for superconducting magnetism. Indeed they allow higher magnetic field with the same classical cryogenics at 4.2 K on one hand, and on the other hand they also pave the way for superconducting magnets working between 10 K and 30 K. The high temperature superconductors are then needed in order to produce magnetic fields higher than 16 T (case of HTS dipole insert for Large Hadron Collider at CERN) or to increase the specific density stored in one SMES (Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage, in the case of the SuperSMES ANR Project).Nevertheless the indisputable assets (critical temperature, critical magnetic field, mechanical stresses) brought by the use of High critical temperature superconductors like YBCO, used in superconducting magnets, require to solve some challenges. Their behavior is still badly understood, especially during the resistive transitions. To succeed in protecting these conductors we need a new reflection on protection schemes designed to avoid the thermal and mechanical damages. The answer to the question: 'Can we use those materials in the long run inside superconducting magnets?' is now inescapable.Some answers are given here. The use of the conductors is approached through various experimental studies to understand the material (electrical characterization and modeling of the critical surface) and to define the key stages of high critical temperature superconducting magnets manufacturing (work on the junctions between conductors and pancakes). This study led to the creation of two coils in order to identify the issues related to the use of YBCO tapes. A numerical thermo-electrical model of the high critical temperature superconductor has been developed and a numerical code based on the CEA software CASTEM (Finish Elements Model) allowed to study the resistive transition (or quench) behavior of those conductor and coil. The code has been

  11. A pedestal temperature model with self-consistent calculation of safety factor and magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onjun, T; Siriburanon, T; Onjun, O

    2008-01-01

    A pedestal model based on theory-motivated models for the pedestal width and the pedestal pressure gradient is developed for the temperature at the top of the H-mode pedestal. The pedestal width model based on magnetic shear and flow shear stabilization is used in this study, where the pedestal pressure gradient is assumed to be limited by first stability of infinite n ballooning mode instability. This pedestal model is implemented in the 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code, where the safety factor and magnetic shear are solved self-consistently in both core and pedestal regions. With the self-consistently approach for calculating safety factor and magnetic shear, the effect of bootstrap current can be correctly included in the pedestal model. The pedestal model is used to provide the boundary conditions in the simulations and the Multi-mode core transport model is used to describe the core transport. This new integrated modeling procedure of the BALDUR code is used to predict the temperature and density profiles of 26 H-mode discharges. Simulations are carried out for 13 discharges in the Joint European Torus and 13 discharges in the DIII-D tokamak. The average root-mean-square deviation between experimental data and the predicted profiles of the temperature and the density, normalized by their central values, is found to be about 14%

  12. High Temperature Superconducting Magnets with Active Control for Attraction Levitation Transport Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry; Jenkins, Richard G.; Goodall, Roger M.; Macleod, Colin; ElAbbar, Abdallah A.; Campbell, Archie M.

    1996-01-01

    A research program, involving 3 British universities, directed at quantifying the controllability of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) magnets for use in attraction levitation transport systems will be described. The work includes measurement of loss mechanisms for iron cored HTS magnets which need to produce a flux density of approx. 1 tesla in the airgap between the magnet poles and a ferromagnetic rail. This flux density needs to be maintained and this is done by introducing small variations of the magnet current using a feedback loop, at frequencies up to 10 Hz to compensate for load changes, track variation etc. The test magnet assemblies constructed so far will be described and the studies and modelling of designs for a practical levitation demonstrator (using commercially obtained HTS tape) will be discussed with particular emphasis on how the field distribution and its components, e.g., the component vector normal to the broad face of the tape, can radically affect design philosophy compared to the classical electrical engineering approach. Although specifically aimed at levitation transport the controllability data obtained have implications for a much wider range of applications.

  13. Field and temperature scaling of the critical current density in commercial REBCO coated conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Senatore, Carmine; Bonura, Marco; Kulich, Miloslav; Mondonico, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Scaling relations describing the electromagnetic behaviour of coated conductors (CCs) greatly simplify the design of REBCO-based devices. The performance of REBCO CCs is strongly influenced by fabrication route, conductor architecture and materials, and these parameters vary from one manufacturer to the others. In the present work we have examined the critical surface for the current density, Jc(T,B,θ ), of coated conductors from six different manufacturers: American Superconductor Co. (US), Bruker HTS GmbH (Germany), Fujikura Ltd. (Japan), SuNAM Co. Ltd. (Korea), SuperOx ZAO (Russia) and SuperPower Inc. (US). Electrical transport and magnetic measurements were performed at temperatures between 4.2 K and 77 K and in magnetic field up to 19 T. Experiments were conducted at three different orientations of the field with respect to the crystallographic c-axis of the REBCO layer, θ = 0deg , 45deg and 90deg , in order to probe the angular anisotropy of Jc. In spite of the large variability of CCs performance, ...

  14. Parallel-beam correlation technique for measuring density fluctuations in plasmas with strong magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1981-04-01

    A laser diagnostic scheme is described which facilitates localization of density fluctuations along the line of sight. The method exploits both the generally observed anisotropy of density fluctuations in low-beta plasmas, as well as the twisting of the magnetic field which occurs across the minor diameter of reversed-field pinches, spheromaks, etc. Both interferometric and schlieren variations are discussed

  15. Magnetic flux density distribution in superconducting cylinders of arbitrary cross section subjected to an axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournet, G.

    1982-07-01

    We show here how the application of the critical state model allows one to determine the magnetic flux density B⃗ in each point of a superconducting cylinder with an arbitrary cross section subjected to axial magnetic fields Hz; the B = 0 boundaries of the regions occupied by the vortices are so defined. We successively consider the cases where the critical current density Jc is either isotropic (constant or an arbitrary function of B) or tensorial, which means, for our problem, the use of two components Jcx and Jcy (either constant or depending on B but Jcx/Jcy remaining constant).

  16. Patterned magnetic thin films for ultra high density recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haast, M.A.M.

    This thesis describes the results of a research project in the field of high bit-density data-storage media. More specifically, the material aspects of the novel recording technique using patterned media have been studied. The aim of the work was the design, realization and characterization of such

  17. Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    bonding) between the salt beads at all the temperatures in which sintering was performed. .... and the sintering of some covalent solids and low- stability ceramics. The entire sintering process is gen- erally considered to occur in ...

  18. The impact of edge gradients in the pressure, density, ion temperature, and electron temperature on edge-localized modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude of the energy and particle fluxes in simulations of edge-localized modes (ELMs) is determined by the edge gradients in the pressure, density, ion temperature, and electron temperature. The total edge pressure gradient is the dominant influence on ELMs by far. An increase (decrease) of merely 2% in the pressure gradient results in an increase (decrease) of more than a factor of ten in the size of the ELM bursts. At a fixed pressure gradient, the size of the ELM bursts decreases as the density gradient increases, while the size of the bursts increases as the electron temperature gradient or, especially, the ion temperature gradient increases.

  19. Superconductors with low critical temperature for electro-magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.

    2002-07-01

    Among the superconductors with low critical temperature that are used to build magnets, NbTi has reached a development state that allows a massive production for big equipment of physics and an industrial production in the domain of medicine imaging. The material that might challenge the supremacy of NbTi is Nb 3 Sn but some technical difficulties have yet to be overcome. This report begins with a review of the different industrial processes used to produce superconducting wires based on the NbTi and Nb 3 Sn materials. The transition from the superconducting state to the resistive normal state is described for both materials, the magnetizing of multi-wire superconducting cables is also presented. The author details the different patterns of wires in cables and proposes a formulary that allows the determination, in some simple cases,of energy losses that are generated in a superconducting cable by a variable magnetic field. (A.C.)

  20. Low temperature magnetic characterization of EuO1-x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimal, Gaurab; Tang, Jinke

    EuO is a widely studied magnetic semiconductor. It is an ideal case of a Heisenberg ferromagnet as well as a model magnetic polaron system. The interesting aspect of this material is the existance of magnetic polarons in the low temperature region. We study the properties of oxygen deficient EuO prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Besides normal ferromagnetic transitions near 70K and 140K, we observe a different transition at 16K. We also observe a shift in the coercivity for field cooling versus zero field cooling. Possible mechanisms driving these behaviors will be discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DEFG02-10ER46728) and by the School of Energy Resources of the University of Wyoming.

  1. Probing a dusty magnetized plasma with self-excited dust-density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadsen, Benjamin; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    A cloud of nanodust particles is created in a reactive argon-acetylene plasma. It is then transformed into a dusty magnetized argon plasma. Plasma parameters are obtained with the dust-density wave diagnostic introduced by Tadsen et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 113701 (2015), 10.1063/1.4934927]. A change from an open to a cylindrically enclosed nanodust cloud, which was observed earlier, can now be explained by a stronger electric confinement if a vertical magnetic field is present. Using two-dimensional extinction measurements and the inverse Abel transform to determine the dust density, a redistribution of the dust with increasing magnetic induction is found. The dust-density profile changes from being peaked around the central void to being peaked at an outer torus ring resulting in a hollow profile. As the plasma parameters cannot explain this behavior, we propose a rotation of the nanodust cloud in the magnetized plasma as the origin of the modified profile.

  2. Density-temperature scaling of the fragility in a model glass-former

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    . Such a scaling, referred to as density-temperature (DT) scaling, is exact for liquids with inverse power law (IPL) interactions but has also been found to be approximately valid in many non-IPL liquids. We have analyzed the consequences of DT scaling on the density dependence of the fragility in a model glass......Dynamical quantities e.g. diffusivity and relaxation time for some glass-formers may depend on density and temperature through a specific combination, rather than independently, allowing the representation of data over ranges of density and temperature as a function of a single scaling variable......-former. We find the density dependence of kinetic fragility to be weak, and show that it can be understood in terms of DT scaling and deviations of DT scaling at low densities. We also show that the Adam-Gibbs relation exhibits DT scaling and the scaling exponent computed from the density dependence...

  3. Magnetic superelevation design of Halbach permanent magnet guideway for high-temperature superconducting maglev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wuyang; Qian, Nan; Zheng, Jun; Huang, Huan; Zhang, Ya; Deng, Zigang

    2017-07-01

    To improve the curve negotiating ability of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev system, a special structure of magnetic superelevation for double-pole Halbach permanent magnet guideway (PMG) was designed. The most significant feature of this design is the asymmetrical PMG that forms a slanting magnetic field without affecting the smoothness of the PMG surface. When HTS maglev vehicle runs through curves with magnetic superelevation, the vehicle will slant due to asymmetry in magnetic field and the flux-pinning effect of onboard HTS bulks. At the same time, one component of the levitation force provides a part of the centripetal force that reduces lateral acceleration of the vehicle and thus enhances its curve negotiating ability. Furthermore, the slant angle of magnetic superelevation can be adjusted by changing the materials and the thickness of the added permanent magnets. This magnetic superelevation method, together with orographic uplift, can be applied to different requirements of PMG designs. Besides, the applicability of this method would benefit future development of high-speed HTS maglev system.

  4. Use of high temperature superconductors for future fusion magnet systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietz, W H [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Celentano, G; Della Corte, A [Superconductivity Division, ENEA - Frascati Research Center, Frascati (Italy); Goldacker, W; Heller, R; Komarek, P; Kotzyba, G; Nast, R; Obst, B; Schlachter, S I; Schmidt, C; Zahn, G [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Pasztor, G; Wesche, R [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Villingen (Switzerland); Salpietro, E; Vostner, A [European Fusion Development Agreement, Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    With the construction of ITER the feasibility of a fusion machine will be demonstrated. To commercialize fusion it is essential to keep losses as small as possible in future fusion power plants. One major component where losses can be strongly reduced is the cooling system. For example in ITER where efficiency is not a major goal, a cooling power of 64 kW at 4.4 K is foreseen taking more than 20 MW electric power. Considering the size of future commercial fusion machines this consumption of electric power for cooling will even be higher. With a magnet system working at 20 K a fusion machine would work more efficient by a factor of 5-10 with respect to electric power consumption for cryogenics. Even better than that, would be a machine with a magnet system operating at 65 K to 77 K. In this case liquid nitrogen could be used as coolant saving money for investment and operation costs. Such an increase in the operating temperature of the magnet system can be achieved by the use of High- Temperature Superconductors (HTS). In addition the use of HTS would allow much smaller efforts for thermal shielding and alternative thermal insulation concepts may be possible, e.g. for an HTS bus bar system. This contribution will give an overview about status, promises and challenges of HTS conductors on the way to an HTS fusion magnet system beyond ITER. (author)

  5. Stress analysis in high-temperature superconductors under pulsed field magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haowei; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2018-04-01

    Bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) have a high critical current density and can trap a large magnetic field. When bulk superconductors are magnetized by the pulsed field magnetization (PFM) technique, they are also subjected to a large electromagnetic stress, and the resulting thermal stress may cause cracking of the superconductor due to the brittle nature of the sample. In this paper, based on the H-formulation and the law of heat transfer, we can obtain the distributions of electromagnetic field and temperature, which are in qualitative agreement with experiment. After that, based on the dynamic equilibrium equations, the mechanical response of the bulk superconductor is determined. During the PFM process, the change in temperature has a dramatic effect on the radial and hoop stresses, and the maximum radial and hoop stress are 24.2 {{MPa}} and 22.6 {{MPa}}, respectively. The mechanical responses of a superconductor for different cases are also studied, such as the peak value of the applied field and the size of bulk superconductors. Finally, the stresses are also presented for different magnetization methods.

  6. Prospects of High Temperature Superconductors for fusion magnets and power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, Walter H.; Barth, Christian; Drotziger, Sandra; Goldacker, Wilfried; Heller, Reinhard; Schlachter, Sonja I.; Weiss, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • An overview of HTS application in fusion is given. • BSCCO application for current leads is discussed. • Several approaches to come to a high current HTS cable are shown. • Open issues and benefits of REBCO high current HTS cables are discussed. -- Abstract: During the last few years, progress in the field of second-generation High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) was breathtaking. Industry has taken up production of long length coated REBCO conductors with reduced angular dependency on external magnetic field and excellent critical current density jc. Consequently these REBCO tapes are used more and more in power application. For fusion magnets, high current conductors in the kA range are needed to limit the voltage during fast discharge. Several designs for high current cables using High Temperature Superconductors have been proposed. With the REBCO tape performance at hand, the prospects of fusion magnets based on such high current cables are promising. An operation at 4.5 K offers a comfortable temperature margin, more mechanical stability and the possibility to reach even higher fields compared to existing solutions with Nb 3 Sn which could be interesting with respect to DEMO. After a brief overview of HTS use in power application the paper will give an overview of possible use of HTS material for fusion application. Present high current HTS cable designs are reviewed and the potential using such concepts for future fusion magnets is discussed

  7. Study of the implementation of high temperature superconductors to accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleiter, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Particle colliders are the main tool for investigating and understanding the fundamental laws of physics. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), is a circular accelerator which steers and collides two counter-rotating protons beams. It has four collision points where detectors are placed to analyze the products emerging from the collisions. In a synchrotron machine a magnetic flux density is used to guide and focus particles around the orbit. The maximum energy that a circular machine with a given geometry can achieve is limited by the maximum strength of the dipole magnetic flux density. There is therefore an interest in the particle physics community in searching for dipole magnets with higher strength. The LHC has a beam trajectory radius of 4.3 km and a collision center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The accelerator employs 1232 large superconducting Nb-Ti dipole magnets operated at a flux density of up to 8.3 T in a bath of superfluid helium at 1.9 K. Energies higher than that achieved with the LHC require magnets made from superconductors with higher upper critical flux density. Nb 3 Sn is an option for magnets operated up to about 14 T. The level of energies of the type being discussed for a potential energy upgrade of the LHC machine - 33 TeV- would require the use of high temperature superconductors (HTS). Three technical HTS are available today: YBCO, Bi-2212 and Bi-2223. At low temperature YBCO conductors present both irreversible flux density and current density in excess of those measured in Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 conductors. In addition, YBCO can be used as reacted conductor, which makes its use for applications simpler than Bi-2212, which requires heat treatment at high temperature and in oxygen atmosphere after cabling and winding. The level of currents required for application to accelerator magnets, which is above 10 kA at the nominal operating temperature and flux density, excludes the use of single strands. The high current and high current density

  8. An experimental magnetic moment determination method based on spatial harmonic analysis of magnetic flux density signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Getman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical aspects of an experimental determination method for residual and inductive magnetic moments of a technical object are considered. As input data, the technical object magnetic induction signatures obtained under its linear movement near a pair of three-component sensors are used. A magnetic signature integration technique based on spatial harmonic analysis of the magnetic field represented by twenty-four multipole coefficients is introduced.

  9. Enhanced Energy Density in Permanent Magnets using Controlled High Magnetic Field during Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, William G [ORNL; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Constantinides, Steven [ORNL

    2016-05-05

    This ORNL Manufacturing Demonstraction Facility (MDF) technical collaboration focused on the use of high magnetic field processing (>2Tesla) using energy efficient large bore superconducting magnet technology and high frequency electromagnetics to improve magnet performance and reduce the energy budget associated with Alnico thermal processing. Alnico, alloys containing Al, Ni, Co and Fe, represent a class of functional nanostructured alloys, and show the greatest potential for supplementing or replacing commercial Nd-based rare-earth alloy magnets.

  10. Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging dealing with low temperature objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tomoya; Shiotani, Seiji; Isobe, Tomonori

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, the medical examiner system is not widespread, the rate of autopsy is low, and many medical institutions therefore perform postmortem imaging using clinical equipment. Postmortem imaging is performed to clarify cause of death, select candidates for autopsy, make a guide map for autopsy, or provide additional information for autopsy. Findings are classified into 3 categories: cause of death and associated changes, changes induced by cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and postmortem changes. Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging shows characteristic changes in signal intensity related to low body temperature after death; they are low temperature images. (author)

  11. Auto-oscillations of temperature and defect density in impure crystals under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selishchev, P.A.; Sugakov, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    Appearance of auto-oscillations in temperature and defect density of impurity crystals under irradiation is studied. It is shown that at certain critical parameters stationary distribution of temperature and defect density of the sample irradiated becomes unstable as regards the formation of temporal dissipative structures: auto-oscillations of temperature and defect density. Critical parameters are determined (the rate of defect formation, temperature of crystal environment, etc.) and the frequency of appearing auto-oscillations, its dependence on irradiation conditions and crystal properties are found

  12. Temperature Variation of the Magnetic Structure of HoSb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nils Axel; Kjems, Jørgen; Vogt, O.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used to show that the magnetic moment vector in the antiferromagnet HoSb changes direction as a function of temperature below TN=5.7K. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with a recent theoretical prediction by Jensen et al. (1980) which ascribe the ...... the changing directions to a competition between the crystal fields and the dipolar interactions....

  13. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  14. Quantum oscillations in the parent magnetic phase of an iron arsenide high temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, Suchitra E; Gillett, J; Lau, P H C; Lonzarich, G G; Harrison, N; Mielke, C H; Singh, D J

    2008-01-01

    We report measurements of quantum oscillations in SrFe 2 As 2 -which is an antiferromagnetic parent of the iron arsenide family of superconductors-known to become superconducting under doping and the application of pressure. The magnetic field and temperature dependences of the oscillations between 20 and 55 T in the liquid helium temperature range suggest that the electronic excitations are those of a Fermi liquid. We show that the observed Fermi surface comprising small pockets is consistent with the formation of a spin-density wave. Our measurements thus demonstrate that high T c superconductivity can occur on doping or pressurizing a conventional metallic spin-density wave state. (fast track communication)

  15. XES studies of density of states of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiolek, Gabriel

    1991-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopic studies concerning the superconducting crystals, thin films, and ceramics of the Y-Ba-Cu-O, Tm-Ba-Cu-O, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O types are presented. The contributions of the 13d(9)L, 13d(10)L, 13d(10)LL, and 13d(10)L(2) configurations, where L denotes a ligand hole at the oxygen orbitals in the spectroscopic pattern of these superconductors are discussed. An attempt to connect the x-ray 'as registered' Cu L(alpha) emission spectra with the density of states close to the Fermi level, considering an influence of the CuL3 absorption edge, is presented. The corrected intensity distributions below the Fermi level are found to correspond to the theoretical density of states. Furthermore, an approach to the average valence of copper basing on the account of the self-absorption and fluorescence effects and on the configurations listed above is shown. The average valence of copper in the materials investigated is estimated to lie in the range of +2.10 to 2.32 when the formal trivalent copper is considered as that characterized by the 13d(9)L configuration. The density of states at the Fermi level was estimated to be 2.4 states/eV-cell for a Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O crystal and 3.6 states/eV-cell for a Tl-Ba-Ca-CU-O ceramic.

  16. High current densities in superconducting films from magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, T.R.; Gupta, A.; Koren, G.; Gross, R.

    1990-01-01

    Epitaxial thin films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x made by laser ablation have the CuO planes parallel to the film surface. In the CuO planes critical currents of J C ∼40 x 10 6 amps/cm 2 are found at 5K in zero field. Multi-layered films with Gd replacing Y each .01μm in thickness have J C nearly 140 x 10 6 amps/cm 2 . This higher value is perhaps due to additional point defects. Perpendicular to the CuO planes magnetization studies indicate strong pinning effects attributed to the CuO planes acting as barriers to flux motion

  17. Increased osteoblast density in the presence of novel calcium phosphate coated magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareta, Rajesh A; Webster, Thomas J; Taylor, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Bone diseases (including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and bone cancer) are of great concern to the medical world. Drugs are available to treat such diseases, but often these drugs are not specifically targeted to the site of the disease and, thus, lack an immediate directed therapeutic effect. The optimal drug delivery system should enhance healthy bone growth with high specificity to the site of bone disease. It has been previously shown that magnetic nanoparticles can be directed in the presence of a magnetic field to any part of the body, allowing for site-specific drug delivery and possibly an immediate increase in bone density. The objective of the present study was to build off of this evidence and determine the density of osteoblasts (bone forming cells) in the presence of various uncoated and coated magnetic nanoparticles that could eventually be used in drug delivery applications. Results showed that some magnetic nanoparticles (specifically, γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) significantly promoted osteoblast density (that is, cells per well) after 5 and 8 days of culture compared to controls (no particles). These magnetic nanoparticles were further coated with calcium phosphate (CaP; the main inorganic component of bone) to tailor them for treating various bone diseases. The coatings were conducted in the presence of either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or citric acid (CA) to reduce magnetic nanoparticle agglomeration, a common problem resulting from the use of nanoparticles which decreases their effectiveness. Results with these coatings showed that magnetic nanoparticles, specifically (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ), coated in the presence of BSA significantly increased osteoblast density compared to controls after 1 day. In this manner, this study provided unexpected evidence that CaP-coated γ-Fe 2 O 3 magnetic nanoparticles increased osteoblast density (compared to no particles) and, thus, should be further studied to treat numerous bone diseases

  18. Raman spectroscopic characterization of CH4 density over a wide range of temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Linbo; Chou, I-Ming; Burruss, Robert; Hu, Ruizhong; Bi, Xianwu

    2014-01-01

    The positions of the CH4 Raman ν1 symmetric stretching bands were measured in a wide range of temperature (from −180 °C to 350 °C) and density (up to 0.45 g/cm3) using high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsule. The results show that the Raman band shift is a function of both methane density and temperature; the band shifts to lower wavenumbers as the density increases and the temperature decreases. An equation representing the observed relationship among the CH4 ν1 band position, temperature, and density can be used to calculate the density in natural or synthetic CH4-bearing inclusions.

  19. Construction of high current density SC magnets and their thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, K.; Katase, A.; Kobayashi, M.; Wake, M.; Suzuki, K.

    1979-07-01

    Pancake type solenoid magnets are constructed which have a similar cooling characteristics to a pulsed dipole magnet for a synchrotron. A metal inpregnated braided cable is used to test a long sample of the cable. The detailed performances of the magnets and cable are examined with respect to achieved fields, training effect and ac losses. The stability theories which have been proposed so far are not adequate to these high current density magnets, so that a new method is developed to estimate the magnet stability. The minimum energy of thermal disturbances (MQE) which causes a quenching is measured by experiment and is compared with the calculation. The calculated values of MQE are in good agreement with the experimental results. The performance of the pancake magnet is discussed on the basis of MQE. (author)

  20. Approximate solution of the Saha equation - temperature as an explicit function of particle densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Saha equation for a plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium (TE) is approximately solved to give the temperature as an explicit function of population densities. It is shown that the derived expressions for the Saha temperature are valid approximations to the exact solution. An application of the approximate temperature to the calculation of TE plasma parameters is also described. (orig.)

  1. Breaking the current density threshold in spin-orbit-torque magnetic random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Yuan, H. Y.; Wang, X. S.; Wang, X. R.

    2018-04-01

    Spin-orbit-torque magnetic random access memory (SOT-MRAM) is a promising technology for the next generation of data storage devices. The main bottleneck of this technology is the high reversal current density threshold. This outstanding problem is now solved by a new strategy in which the magnitude of the driven current density is fixed while the current direction varies with time. The theoretical limit of minimal reversal current density is only a fraction (the Gilbert damping coefficient) of the threshold current density of the conventional strategy. The Euler-Lagrange equation for the fastest magnetization reversal path and the optimal current pulse is derived for an arbitrary magnetic cell and arbitrary spin-orbit torque. The theoretical limit of minimal reversal current density and current density for a GHz switching rate of the new reversal strategy for CoFeB/Ta SOT-MRAMs are, respectively, of the order of 105 A/cm 2 and 106 A/cm 2 far below 107 A/cm 2 and 108 A/cm 2 in the conventional strategy. Furthermore, no external magnetic field is needed for a deterministic reversal in the new strategy.

  2. "Ring rain" on Saturn's ionosphere: densities and temperatures from 2011 observations and re-detection in 2013 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, J.; Moore, L.; Melin, H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Oliversen, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    In ground-based observations using the 10 meter W. M. Keck telescope in 2011, we discovered that the "ring rain" which falls on Saturn from the rings (along magnetic field lines) leaves an imprint on the upper-atmospheric H3+ ion. H3+ emissions were brightest where water products are expected to fall. Through subsequent modeling of the upper atmosphere, it became clear that an influx of water products (e.g. H2O+, O+, etc.) would act to soak up electrons - something that would otherwise destroy H3+ through recombination - and lead to a higher H3+ density and therefore emission. Here we present the first re-detections of the imprint of "ring rain" on Saturn's ionospheric H3+ from ground-based Keck telescope data from 2013. Observed intensities at low-latitudes decreased by an order of magnitude from 2011 to 2013, likely due to a decrease in upper atmospheric temperature by 100 K. A new analysis of 2011 observations revealed temperatures and densities as a function of latitude on Saturn for the first time. Where water influx is expected, H3+ column densities are high (as models predicted) and temperatures are low. While the latter was unexpected, the effect of ring rain on electron densities is stronger at lower altitudes. Therefore, as ring rain enhances density at lower altitudes where the temperature is lower, it should result in the emitting column of H3+ having a lower average temperature. These results come at a critical time as the Cassini spacecraft completes all orbits between planet and rings, with the opportunity to sample the forces and material fluxes related to ring rain.

  3. High plasma rotation velocity and density transitions by biased electrodes in RF produced, magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Shoichiro; Shinohara, Shunjiro

    2001-01-01

    A large density profile modification was successfully obtained by voltage biasing to electrodes inserted in a RF (radio frequency) produced, magnetized plasma, and formation of strong shear of azimuthal plasma rotation velocity in a supersonic regime was found. For the case of biasing to an electrode near the central plasma region, two types of density transitions were observed in the outer plasma region: one was an oscillatory transition between two states, and the other was a transition from high to low density states with a large reduction of density fluctuations. (author)

  4. High plasma rotation velocity and density transitions by biased electrodes in RF produced, magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Shoichiro; Shinohara, Shunjiro [Kyushu Univ., Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A large density profile modification was successfully obtained by voltage biasing to electrodes inserted in a RF (radio frequency) produced, magnetized plasma, and formation of strong shear of azimuthal plasma rotation velocity in a supersonic regime was found. For the case of biasing to an electrode near the central plasma region, two types of density transitions were observed in the outer plasma region: one was an oscillatory transition between two states, and the other was a transition from high to low density states with a large reduction of density fluctuations. (author)

  5. Development of high temperature superconductors having high critical current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Gye Wong; Kim, C. J.; Lee, H.G.; Kwon, S. C.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. B.; Park, J. Y.; Jung, C. H.

    2000-08-01

    Fabrication of high T c superconductors and its applications for electric power device were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies. High quality YBCO superconductors was fabricated by melt texture growth, top-seeded melt growth process and multi-seeded melt growth process and the properties was compared. The critical current density of the melt processed YBCO superconductors was about few 10,000 A/cm 2 and the levitation force was 50 N. The processing time needed for the growth of the 123 single grain was greatly reduced by applying multi-seeding without no significant degradation of the levitation force. The multi-seeded melt growth process was confirmed as a time-saving and cost-effective method for the fabrication of bulk superconductors with controlled crystallographic orientation

  6. Development of high temperature superconductors having high critical current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gye Wong; Kim, C. J.; Lee, H.G.; Kwon, S. C.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. B.; Park, J. Y.; Jung, C. H

    2000-08-01

    Fabrication of high T{sub c} superconductors and its applications for electric power device were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies. High quality YBCO superconductors was fabricated by melt texture growth, top-seeded melt growth process and multi-seeded melt growth process and the properties was compared. The critical current density of the melt processed YBCO superconductors was about few 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and the levitation force was 50 N. The processing time needed for the growth of the 123 single grain was greatly reduced by applying multi-seeding without no significant degradation of the levitation force. The multi-seeded melt growth process was confirmed as a time-saving and cost-effective method for the fabrication of bulk superconductors with controlled crystallographic orientation.

  7. Electron temperature and density profiles measurement in the TJ-1 tokamak by Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, C.; Zurro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Electron temperature and density profiles of ohmically heated hydrogen plasmas in the TJ-1 tokamak have been measured by Thomson scattering. The temperature profile peaks sharply in the central region while the density profile is very flat. Temperature values between 100 and 390 eV have been measured for densities in the range of 5.10 12 to 2.6.10 13 cm -3 . Parameters characterizing TJ-1 plasma, such as confinement times Z eff , have been deduced from experimental data. Energy confinement times are compared with experimental scaling laws. (author)

  8. Simulation of a coupled dynamic system of temperature and density in a fusion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, M.N.; Weiland, J.; Wilhelmsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Simulation studies of a coupled system of equations for the evolution of temperature and density have been performed. The results are presented in graphs displaying the evolution in time of the temperature and density profiles, as well as in phase-plane plots, relating the central values of temperature and density. Particular emphasis is devoted to the particle and heat pinch effects, which tend to counter-balance the ordinary diffusion, and to co-operate with the alpha particle heating in sustaining plasma equilibrium. Oscillatory approaches to equilibria are recorded. 28 refs., 20 figs

  9. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-Tc superconductor in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2004-01-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents

  10. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high- Tc superconductor in external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2004-10-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents.

  11. Low temperature X-ray imaging of magnetic flux patterns in high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Claudia; Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Bechtel, Michael; Schütz, Gisela; Albrecht, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We present X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) microscopy results obtained at liquid nitrogen temperatures on the high-Tc superconductor YBCO (YBa2Cu3O7-δ). The magnetic flux distribution arising from electric currents in the superconductor is detected and visualized using soft-magnetic Co40Fe40B20 (CoFeB) as sensor layer and XMCD as contrast mechanism. It has been shown that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer directly corresponds to magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and hence can be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors [Stahl et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 104515 (2014)]. The existing scanning UHV X-ray microscopy setup MAXYMUS at the synchrotron BESSY II in Berlin has been upgraded for that purpose: we use a nitrogen based MMR Micro Miniature Joule-Thompson Cryostat with temperature range from 75 K to 580 K. The capability of the method is demonstrated on two different superconducting samples, an optimally doped thin film and a melt-textured block.

  12. Lateral temperature variations at the core-mantle boundary deduced from the magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies of the secular variation of the earth's magnetic field over periods of a few centuries have suggested that the pattern of fluid motion near the surface of earth's outer core may be strongly influenced by lateral temperature variations in the lowermost mantle. This paper introduces a self-consistent method for finding the temperature variations near the core surface by assuming that the dynamical balance there is geostrophic and that lateral density variations there are thermal in origin. As expected, the lateral temperature variations are very small. Some agreement is found between this pattern and the pattern of topography of the core-mantle boundary, but this does not conclusively answer to what extent core surface motions are controlled by the mantle, rather than being determined by processes in the core.

  13. Laboratory experiments on the magnetic field and neutral density limits on CIV interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.; Brenning, N.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory experiments are reported which determine the magnetic field and neutral density limit for Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) interaction in the impact configuration. A combination of microwave interferometry and spectroscopy has been used to measure how the electron energy distribution varies with the neutral density and the magnetic field strength. The efficiency of the CIV process is evaluated in terms of the efficiency factor η of energy transfer to the electron. This efficiency is studied as function of the ratio V A /V 0 between the Alfven velocity and the plasma stream velocity and the ratio ν i /ω gi between the ionization frequency and the ion gyro frequency. With other parameters kept constant, V A /V 0 is proportional to the square root of the magnetic field, while ν i /ω gi is proportional to the neutral density. We have found that these two dimensionless parameters are coupled in such a fashion that a stronger magnetic field can compensate for a lower neutral density. For our strongest magnetic field, corresponding to V A /V 0 = 4, CIV interaction is found to occur for a comparatively low value ν i /ω gi ∼ 0.1. For V A /V 0 = 1, we found a clear absence of CIV interaction even for ν i /ω gi approaching unity. (authors)

  14. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-T c superconductor in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the measured results of the two-dimensional flux density distribution of a YBCO bulk under applied AC magnetic fields with various frequency. Melt-processed oxide superconductors have been developed in order to obtain strong pinning forces. Various electric mechanical systems or magnetic levitation systems use those superconductors. The major problem is that cracks occur because the bulk superconductors are brittle. The bulk may break in magnetizing process after cracks make superconducting state instable. The trapped flux density and the permanent current characteristics of bulk superconductors have been analyzed, so as to examine the magnetizing processes or superconducting states of the bulk. In those studies, the two-dimensional surface flux density distributions of the bulk in static fields are discussed. On the other hand, the distributions in dynamic fields are little discussed. We attempted to examine the states of the bulk in the dynamic fields, and made a unique experimental device which has movable sensors synchronized with AC applied fields. As a result, the two-dimensional distributions in the dynamic fields are acquired by recombining the one-dimensional distributions. The dynamic states of the flux of the bulk and the influences of directions of cracks are observed from the distributions. In addition, a new method for measuring two-dimensional flux density distribution under dynamic magnetic fields is suggested

  15. Instability of the Shukla mode in a dusty plasma containing equilibrium density and magnetic field inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Bharuthram, R.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that the dispersive Shukla mode [P.K. Shukla, Phys. Lett. A 316, 238 (2003)] can become unstable in the presence of equilibrium density and magnetic field inhomogeneities in a dusty plasma. A new dispersion relation for our nonuniform dusty magnetoplasma is derived and analyzed to show the modification of the Shukla mode frequency and its amplification due to combined action of the plasma density and magnetic field gradients. The present instability may account for the origin of low-frequency electromagnetic turbulence in molecular clouds and in cometary plasmas

  16. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Weimin.

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f parallel B r >. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence

  17. Development of large high current density superconducting solenoid magnets for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1977-05-01

    The development of a unique type of large superconducting solenoid magnet, characterized by very high current density windings and a two-phase helium tubular cooling system is described. The development of the magnet's conceptual design and the construction of two test solenoids are described. The successful test of the superconducting coil and its tubular cooling refrigeration system is presented. The safety, environmental and economic impacts of the test program on future developments in high energy physics are shown. Large solid angle particle detectors for colliding beam physics will analyze both charged and neutral particles. In many cases, these detectors will require neutral particles, such as gamma rays, to pass through the magnet coil with minimum interaction. The magnet coils must be as thin as possible. The use of superconducting windings allows one to minimize radiation thickness, while at the same time maximizing charged particle momentum resolution and saving substantial quantities of electrical energy. The results of the experimental measurements show that large high current density solenoid magnets can be made to operate at high stored energies. The superconducting magnet development described has a positive safety and environmental impact. The use of large high current density thin superconducting solenoids has been proposed in two high energy physics experiments to be conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Cornell University as a result of the successful experiments described

  18. Influence of an axial magnetic field on the density profile of capillary plasma channels

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, V V; Toma, E S; Bijkerk, F

    2003-01-01

    A narrow capillary plasma channel, with a sizeable depletion of the electron density on the channel axis, has been proposed to guide a laser pulse over a length of several to several tens of centimetres. We discuss the possibility to significantly improve the wave-guiding properties of such a channel by applying an axial magnetic field. Our analytical and numerical studies show that a pulsed axial magnetic field of 10 T in a hydrogen capillary plasma at a pressure of 50 Torr will reduce the on-axis plasma density by a factor of three, and the full width at half maximum of the density profile by a factor of two. The resulting parabolic plasma density profile is expected to be more efficient in guiding laser pulses.

  19. Visualization and simulation of density driven convection in porous media using magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, James A.; Pinder, George F.; Gonyea, Jay V.; Hipko, Scott; Watts, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is used to observe solute transport in a 40 cm long, 26 cm diameter sand column that contained a central core of low permeability silica surrounded by higher permeability well-sorted sand. Low concentrations (2.9 g/L) of Magnevist, a gadolinium based contrast agent, produce density driven convection within the column when it starts in an unstable state. The unstable state, for this experiment, exists when higher density contrast agent is present above the lower density water. We implement a numerical model in OpenFOAM to reproduce the observed fluid flow and transport from a density difference of 0.3%. The experimental results demonstrate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging in observing three-dimensional gravity-driven convective-dispersive transport behaviors in medium scale experiments.

  20. Magnetism and thermodynamic properties of a spin-1/2 ferrimagnetic diamond XY chain in magnetic fields at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Tai-Min; Ma, Yan-Ming; Ge, Chong-Yuan; Sun, Shu-Sheng; Jia, Wei-Ye; Li, Qing-Yun; Shi, Xiao-Fei; Li, Lin; Zhu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    The elementary excitation spectra of a one-dimensional ferrimagnetic diamond chain in the spin-1/2 XY model at low temperatures have been calculated by using an invariant eigen-operator (IEO) method, the energies of elementary excitations in different specific cases are discussed, and the analytic solutions of three critical magnetic field intensities (H C1 , H C2 , and H peak ) are given. The magnetization versus external magnetic field curve displays a 1/3 magnetization plateau at low temperatures, in which H C1 is the critical magnetic field intensity from the disappearance of the 1/3 magnetization plateau to spin-flop states, H C2 is the critical magnetic field intensity from spin-flop states to the saturation magnetization, and H peak is the critical magnetic field intensity when the temperature magnetization shows a peak in the external magnetic field. The temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat show a double peak structure. The entropy and the magnetic susceptibility versus external magnetic field curves also exhibit a double peak structure, and the positions of the two peaks correspond to H C1 and H C2 , respectively. This derives from the competition among different types of energies: the temperature-dependent thermal disorder energy, the potential energy of the spin magnetic moment, the ferromagnetic exchange interaction energy, and the anti-ferromagnetic exchange interaction energy. However at low temperatures, the specific heat as a function of external magnetic field curve exhibits minima at the above two critical points (H C1 and H C2 ). The origins of the above phenomena are discussed in detail.

  1. Confinement properties of JET plasmas with different temperature and density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, M.L.; Balet, B.; Bhatnagar, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    The confinement properties of plasmas with substantially different temperature and density profiles have been analysed. The effects of fast particles and energy pedestals on the overall confinement of plasma energy in limiter (L-mode) and X-point (L- and H-modes) discharges heated by NBI or ICRF or both are determined. The importance of the bootstrap current when such energy pedestals are formed is noted. Using sets of consistent experimental data, including ion temperature profile measurements, the local transport properties are compared in the L- and H-phases of a single null X-point medium density NBI heated discharge, the ''enhanced'' confinement phase of a limiter high density pellet-fuelled and ICRF heated discharge, the hot-ion phase of a double null X-point low density NBI heated discharge and the hot-ion and H-phases of a double null X-point low density high temperature NBI heated discharge. (author)

  2. Density determination of nail polishes and paint chips using magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peggy P.

    Trace evidence is often small, easily overlooked, and difficult to analyze. This study describes a nondestructive method to separate and accurately determine the density of trace evidence samples, specifically nail polish and paint chip using magnetic levitation (MagLev). By determining the levitation height of each sample in the MagLev device, the density of the sample is back extrapolated using a standard density bead linear regression line. The results show that MagLev distinguishes among eight clear nail polishes, including samples from the same manufacturer; separates select colored nail polishes from the same manufacturer; can determine the density range of household paint chips; and shows limited levitation for unknown paint chips. MagLev provides a simple, affordable, and nondestructive means of determining density. The addition of co-solutes to the paramagnetic solution to expand the density range may result in greater discriminatory power and separation and lead to further applications of this technique.

  3. Density functional approach for the magnetism of β-TeVO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saúl, A.; Radtke, G.

    2014-03-01

    Density functional calculations have been carried out to investigate the microscopic origin of the magnetic properties of β-TeVO4. Two different approaches, based either on a perturbative treatment of the multiorbital Hubbard model in the strongly correlated limit or on the calculation of supercell total energy differences, have been employed to evaluate magnetic couplings in this compound. The picture provided by these two approaches is that of weakly coupled frustrated chains with ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor and antiferromagnetic second-nearest-neighbor couplings. These results, differing substantially from previous reports, should motivate further experimental investigations of the magnetic properties of this compound.

  4. Magnetic edge states in MoS2 characterized using density-functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Hinnemann, B.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2009-01-01

    It is known that the edges of a two-dimensional slab of insulating MoS2 exhibit one-dimensional metallic edge states, the so-called "brim states." Here, we find from density-functional theory calculations that several edge structures, which are relevant for the hydrodesulfurization process......, are magnetic. The magnetism is an edge phenomenon associated with certain metallic edge states. Interestingly, we find that among the two low-index edges, only the S edge displays magnetism under hydrodesulfurization conditions. In addition, the implications of this on the catalytic activity are investigated...

  5. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1931 to 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1931 to 1955 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  6. Effects of Temperature on the Density of Water Based Drilling Mud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Effects of Temperature on the Density of Water Based Drilling Mud. EBIKAPAYE ... Commons Attribution License (CCL), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any .... is tapped briskly on the side until air bubbles are.

  7. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1912 to 1930

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1912 to 1930 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  8. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1956 to 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1956 to 1980 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  9. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1981 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1981 to 2005 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  10. Discontinuities of Green functions in field theory at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobes, R.L.; Semenoff, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    We derive systematic rules for calculating the imaginary parts of Minkowski space Green functions in quantum field theory at finite temperature and density. Self-energy corrections are used as an example of the application of these rules. (orig.)

  11. Computation of demagnetizing fields and particle distribution in magnetic fluid with inhomogeneous density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    A new algorithm for calculating magnetic fields in a concentrated magnetic fluid with inhomogeneous density is proposed. Inhomogeneity of the fluid is caused by magnetophoresis. In this case, the diffusion and magnetostatic parts of the problem are tightly linked together and are solved jointly. The dynamic diffusion equation is solved by the finite volume method and, to calculate the magnetic field inside the fluid, an iterative process is performed in parallel. The solution to the problem is sought in Cartesian coordinates, and the computational domain is decomposed into rectangular elements. This technique eliminates the need to solve the related boundary-value problem for magnetic fields, accelerates computations and eliminates the error caused by the finite sizes of the outer region. Formulas describing the contribution of the rectangular element to the field intensity in the case of a plane problem are given. Magnetic and concentration fields inside the magnetic fluid filling a rectangular cavity generated under the action of the uniform external filed are calculated. - Highlights: ▶ New algorithm for calculating magnetic field intense magnetic fluid with account of magnetophoresis and diffusion of particles. ▶ We do not need to solve boundary-value problem, but we accelerate computations and eliminate some errors. ▶ We solve nonlinear flow equation by the finite volume method and calculate magnetic and focus fields in the fluid for plane case.

  12. Spectroscopic measurements of the density and electronic temperature at the plasma edge in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lediankine, A.

    1996-01-01

    The profiles of temperature and electronic density at the plasma edge are important to study the wall-plasma interaction and the radiative layers in the Tokamak plasmas. The laser ablation technique of the lithium allows to measure the profile of electronic density. To measure the profile of temperature, it has been used for the first time, the injection of a fluorine neutral atoms beam. The experiments, the results are described in this work. (N.C.)

  13. Measurement of the temperature of density maximum of water solutions using a convective flow technique

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley, M.F.; McGlynn, D.; Mooney, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A technique is described which yields an accurate measurement of the temperature of density maximum of fluids which exhibit such anomalous behaviour. The method relies on the detection of changes in convective flow in a rectangular cavity containing the test fluid.The normal single-cell convection which occurs in the presence of a horizontal temperature gradient changes to a double cell configuration in the vicinity of the density maximum, and this transition manifests itself in changes in th...

  14. Spinstand demonstration of areal density enhancement using two-dimensional magnetic recording (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippman, Thomas; Brockie, Richard; Coker, Jon; Contreras, John; Galbraith, Rick; Garzon, Samir; Hanson, Weldon; Leong, Tom; Marley, Arley; Wood, Roger; Zakai, Rehan; Zolla, Howard; Duquette, Paul; Petrizzi, Joe

    2015-05-01

    Exponential growth of the areal density has driven the magnetic recording industry for almost sixty years. But now areal density growth is slowing down, suggesting that current technologies are reaching their fundamental limit. The next generation of recording technologies, namely, energy-assisted writing and bit-patterned media, remains just over the horizon. Two-Dimensional Magnetic Recording (TDMR) is a promising new approach, enabling continued areal density growth with only modest changes to the heads and recording electronics. We demonstrate a first generation implementation of TDMR by using a dual-element read sensor to improve the recovery of data encoded by a conventional low-density parity-check (LDPC) channel. The signals are combined with a 2D equalizer into a single modified waveform that is decoded by a standard LDPC channel. Our detection hardware can perform simultaneous measurement of the pre- and post-combined error rate information, allowing one set of measurements to assess the absolute areal density capability of the TDMR system as well as the gain over a conventional shingled magnetic recording system with identical components. We discuss areal density measurements using this hardware and demonstrate gains exceeding five percent based on experimental dual reader components.

  15. Spinstand demonstration of areal density enhancement using two-dimensional magnetic recording (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippman, Thomas; Brockie, Richard; Contreras, John; Garzon, Samir; Leong, Tom; Marley, Arley; Wood, Roger; Zakai, Rehan; Zolla, Howard; Coker, Jon; Galbraith, Rick; Hanson, Weldon; Duquette, Paul; Petrizzi, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Exponential growth of the areal density has driven the magnetic recording industry for almost sixty years. But now areal density growth is slowing down, suggesting that current technologies are reaching their fundamental limit. The next generation of recording technologies, namely, energy-assisted writing and bit-patterned media, remains just over the horizon. Two-Dimensional Magnetic Recording (TDMR) is a promising new approach, enabling continued areal density growth with only modest changes to the heads and recording electronics. We demonstrate a first generation implementation of TDMR by using a dual-element read sensor to improve the recovery of data encoded by a conventional low-density parity-check (LDPC) channel. The signals are combined with a 2D equalizer into a single modified waveform that is decoded by a standard LDPC channel. Our detection hardware can perform simultaneous measurement of the pre- and post-combined error rate information, allowing one set of measurements to assess the absolute areal density capability of the TDMR system as well as the gain over a conventional shingled magnetic recording system with identical components. We discuss areal density measurements using this hardware and demonstrate gains exceeding five percent based on experimental dual reader components

  16. Spinstand demonstration of areal density enhancement using two-dimensional magnetic recording (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippman, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Lippman@hgst.com; Brockie, Richard; Contreras, John; Garzon, Samir; Leong, Tom; Marley, Arley; Wood, Roger; Zakai, Rehan; Zolla, Howard [HGST, a Western Digital Company, San Jose, California 95119 (United States); Coker, Jon; Galbraith, Rick; Hanson, Weldon [HGST, a Western Digital Company, Rochester, Minnesota 55901 (United States); Duquette, Paul; Petrizzi, Joe [Avago Technologies, San Jose, California 95131 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Exponential growth of the areal density has driven the magnetic recording industry for almost sixty years. But now areal density growth is slowing down, suggesting that current technologies are reaching their fundamental limit. The next generation of recording technologies, namely, energy-assisted writing and bit-patterned media, remains just over the horizon. Two-Dimensional Magnetic Recording (TDMR) is a promising new approach, enabling continued areal density growth with only modest changes to the heads and recording electronics. We demonstrate a first generation implementation of TDMR by using a dual-element read sensor to improve the recovery of data encoded by a conventional low-density parity-check (LDPC) channel. The signals are combined with a 2D equalizer into a single modified waveform that is decoded by a standard LDPC channel. Our detection hardware can perform simultaneous measurement of the pre- and post-combined error rate information, allowing one set of measurements to assess the absolute areal density capability of the TDMR system as well as the gain over a conventional shingled magnetic recording system with identical components. We discuss areal density measurements using this hardware and demonstrate gains exceeding five percent based on experimental dual reader components.

  17. The correlation between superparamagnetic blocking temperatures and peak temperatures obtained from ac magnetization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Daniel Esmarch; Moerup, Steen; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2008-01-01

    We study the correlation between the superparamagnetic blocking temperature T B and the peak positions T p observed in ac magnetization measurements for nanoparticles of different classes of magnetic materials. In general, T p = α+βT B . The parameters α and β are different for the in-phase (χ') and out-of-phase (χ'') components and depend on the width σ V of the log-normal volume distribution and the class of magnetic material (ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic). Consequently, knowledge of both α and β is required if the anisotropy energy barrier KV and the attempt time τ 0 are to be reliably obtained from an analysis based solely on the peak positions

  18. Deep structure of the Mid-Norwegian continental margin (the Vøring and Møre basins) according to 3-D density and magnetic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maystrenko, Yuriy Petrovich; Gernigon, Laurent; Nasuti, Aziz; Olesen, Odleiv

    2018-03-01

    A lithosphere-scale 3-D density/magnetic structural model of the Møre and Vøring segments of the Mid-Norwegian continental margin and the adjacent areas of the Norwegian mainland has been constructed by using both published, publically available data sets and confidential data, validated by the 3-D density and magnetic modelling. The obtained Moho topography clearly correlates with the major tectonic units of the study area where a deep Moho corresponds to the base of the Precambrian continental crust and the shallower one is located in close proximity to the younger oceanic lithospheric domain. The 3-D density modelling agrees with previous studies which indicate the presence of a high-density/high-velocity lower-crustal layer beneath the Mid-Norwegian continental margin. The broad Jan Mayen Corridor gravity low is partially related to the decreasing density of the sedimentary layers within the Jan Mayen Corridor and also has to be considered in relation to a possible low-density composition- and/or temperature-related zone in the lithospheric mantle. According to the results of the 3-D magnetic modelling, the absence of a strong magnetic anomaly over the Utgard High indicates that the uplifted crystalline rocks are not so magnetic there, supporting a suggestion that the entire crystalline crust has a low magnetization beneath the greater part of the Vøring Basin and the northern part of the Møre Basin. On the contrary, the crystalline crust is much more magnetic beneath the Trøndelag Platform, the southern part of the Møre Basin and within the mainland, reaching a culmination at the Frøya High where the most intensive magnetic anomaly is observed within the study area.

  19. Propagation of magnetoacoustic waves in the solar atmosphere with random inhomogeneities of density and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutova, M.

    1990-08-01

    Effects of strong and random inhomogeneities of the magnetic fields, plasma density, and temperature in the solar atmosphere on the properties of magnetoacoustic waves of arbitrary amplitudes are studied. The procedure which allows one to obtain the averaged equation containing the nonlinearity of a wave, dispersion properties of a system, and dissipative effects is described. It is shown that depending on the statistical properties of the medium, different scenarios of wave propagation arise: in the predominance of dissipative effects the primary wave is damped away in the linear stage and the efficiency of heating due to inhomogeneities is much greater than that in homogeneous medium. Depending on the interplay of nonlinear and dispersion effects, the process of heating can be afforded through the formation of shocks or through the storing of energy in a system of solitons which are later damped away. Our computer simulation supports and extends the above theoretical investigations. In particular the enhanced dissipation of waves due to the strong and random inhomogeneities is observed and this is more pronounced for shorter waves

  20. The finite temperature density matrix and two-point correlations in the antiferromagnetic XXZ chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhmann, Frank; Hasenclever, Nils P.; Seel, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    We derive finite temperature versions of integral formulae for the two-point correlation functions in the antiferromagnetic XXZ chain. The derivation is based on the summation of density matrix elements characterizing a finite chain segment of length m. On this occasion we also supply a proof of the basic integral formula for the density matrix presented in an earlier publication.

  1. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.M.; Mazzucato, E.; Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R.E.; Domier, C.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Lee, K.C.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Smith, D.R.; Yuh, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k (perpendicular) ρ s ∼< 10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  2. Advancing density functional theory to finite temperatures: methods and applications in steel design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickel, T; Grabowski, B; Körmann, F; Neugebauer, J

    2012-02-08

    The performance of materials such as steels, their high strength and formability, is based on an impressive variety of competing mechanisms on the microscopic/atomic scale (e.g. dislocation gliding, solid solution hardening, mechanical twinning or structural phase transformations). Whereas many of the currently available concepts to describe these mechanisms are based on empirical and experimental data, it becomes more and more apparent that further improvement of materials needs to be based on a more fundamental level. Recent progress for methods based on density functional theory (DFT) now makes the exploration of chemical trends, the determination of parameters for phenomenological models and the identification of new routes for the optimization of steel properties feasible. A major challenge in applying these methods to a true materials design is, however, the inclusion of temperature-driven effects on the desired properties. Therefore, a large range of computational tools has been developed in order to improve the capability and accuracy of first-principles methods in determining free energies. These combine electronic, vibrational and magnetic effects as well as structural defects in an integrated approach. Based on these simulation tools, one is now able to successfully predict mechanical and thermodynamic properties of metals with a hitherto not achievable accuracy.

  3. Optimized design of a high-power-density PM-assisted synchronous reluctance machine with ferrite magnets for electric vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiping

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a permanent magnet (PM-assisted synchronous reluctance machine (PMASynRM using ferrite magnets with the same power density as rareearth PM synchronous motors employed in Toyota Prius 2010. A suitable rotor structure for high torque density and high power density is discussed with respect to the demagnetization of ferrite magnets, mechanical strength and torque ripple. Some electromagnetic characteristics including torque, output power, loss and efficiency are calculated by 2-D finite element analysis (FEA. The analysis results show that a high power density and high efficiency of PMASynRM are obtained by using ferrite magnets.

  4. Relativistic Random-Phase Approximation with Density-dependent Meson-nucleon Couplings at Finite Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Y.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2009-01-01

    The fully self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA) framework based on effective interactions with a phenomenological density dependence is extended to finite temperatures. The RRPA configuration space is built from the spectrum of single-nucleon states at finite temperature obtained by the temperature dependent relativistic mean field (RMF-T) theory based on effective Lagrangian with density dependent meson-nucleon vertex functions. As an illustration, the dependence of binding energy, radius, entropy and single particle levels on temperature for spherical nucleus 2 08P b is investigated in RMF-T theory. The finite temperature RRPA has been employed in studies of giant monopole and dipole resonances, and the evolution of resonance properties has been studied as a function of temperature. In addition, exotic modes of excitation have been systematically explored at finite temperatures, with an emphasis on the case of pygmy dipole resonances.(author)

  5. Finite temperature fermion condensate, charge and current densities in a (2+1)-dimensional conical space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Bezerra de Mello, E.R. [Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Braganca, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Saharian, A.A. [Yerevan State University, Department of Physics, Yerevan (Armenia)

    2016-06-15

    We evaluate the fermion condensate and the expectation values of the charge and current densities for a massive fermionic field in (2+1)-dimensional conical spacetime with a magnetic flux located at the cone apex. The consideration is done for both irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. The expectation values are decomposed into the vacuum expectation values and contributions coming from particles and antiparticles. All these contributions are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. Related to the non-invariance of the model under the parity and time-reversal transformations, the fermion condensate and the charge density have indefinite parity with respect to the change of the signs of the magnetic flux and chemical potential. The expectation value of the radial current density vanishes. The azimuthal current density is the same for both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. It is an odd function of the magnetic flux and an even function of the chemical potential. The behavior of the expectation values in various asymptotic regions of the parameters are discussed in detail. In particular, we show that for points near the cone apex the vacuum parts dominate. For a massless field with zero chemical potential the fermion condensate and charge density vanish. Simple expressions are derived for the part in the total charge induced by the planar angle deficit and magnetic flux. Combining the results for separate irreducible representations, we also consider the fermion condensate, charge and current densities in parity and time-reversal symmetric models. Possible applications to graphitic nanocones are discussed. (orig.)

  6. The electron density and temperature distributions predicted by bow shock models of Herbig-Haro objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bohm, K.H.; Raga, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The observable spatial electron density and temperature distributions for series of simple bow shock models, which are of special interest in the study of Herbig-Haro (H-H) objects are computed. The spatial electron density and temperature distributions are derived from forbidden line ratios. It should be possible to use these results to recognize whether an observed electron density or temperature distribution can be attributed to a bow shock, as is the case in some Herbig-Haro objects. As an example, the empirical and predicted distributions for H-H 1 are compared. The predicted electron temperature distributions give the correct temperature range and they show very good diagnostic possibilities if the forbidden O III (4959 + 5007)/4363 wavelength ratio is used. 44 refs

  7. Helium temperature measurements in a hot filament magnetic mirror plasma using high resolution Doppler spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, S.; McCarthy, P. J.; Ruth, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Langmuir probe and spectroscopic diagnostics are used to routinely measure electron temperature and density over a wide operating range in a reconfigured Double Plasma device at University College Cork, Ireland. The helium plasma, generated through thermionic emission from a negatively biased tungsten filament, is confined by an axisymmetric magnetic mirror configuration using two stacks of NdFeB permanent magnets, each of length 20 cm and diameter 3 cm placed just outside the 15 mm water cooling jacket enclosing a cylindrical vacuum vessel of internal diameter 25 cm. Plasma light is analysed using a Fourier Transform-type Bruker spectrometer with a highest achievable resolution of 0.08 cm-1 . In the present work, the conventional assumption of room temperature ions in the analysis of Langmuir probe data from low temperature plasmas is examined critically using Doppler spectroscopy of the 468.6 nm He II line. Results for ion temperatures obtained from spectroscopic data for a variety of engineering parameters (discharge voltage, gas pressure and plasma current) will be presented.

  8. Effect of magnetic and density fluctuations on the propagation of lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Bonoli, Paul T.

    1992-12-01

    Lower hybrid waves have been used extensively for plasma heating, current drive, and ramp-up as well as sawteeth stabilization. The wave kinetic equation for lower hybrid wave propagation is extended to include the effects of both magnetic and density fluctuations. This integral equation is then solved by Monte Carlo procedures for a toroidal plasma. It is shown that even for magnetic/density fluctuation levels on the order of 10-4, there are significant magnetic fluctuation effects on the wave power deposition into the plasma. This effect is quite pronounced if the magnetic fluctuation spectrum is peaked within the plasma. For Alcator-C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson and the Alcator Group, Proceedings of the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (IEEE, New York, 1990), Cat. No. 89CH 2820-9, p. 13] parameters, it seems possible to be able to infer information on internal magnetic fluctuations from hard x-ray data—especially since the effects of fluctuations on electron power density can explain the hard x-ray data from the JT-60 tokamak [H. Kishimoto and JT-60 Team, in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989), Vol. I, p. 67].

  9. Mass density of the Earth from a Gravito-Electro-Magnetic 5D vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Musmarra, Juan Ignacio; Anabitarte, Mariano; Bellini, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the mass density of the Earth using a Gravito-Electro-Magnetic theory on an extended 5D Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric, in which we define the vacuum. Our results are in very good agreement with that of the Dziewonski-Anderson model.

  10. Spin polarization in high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Da Providência, João; Providência, Constança

    2016-01-01

    In high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field, possible phases are investigated by using the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with tensor-type four-point interaction between quarks, as well as the axial-vector-type four-point interaction. In the tensor-type interact...

  11. Effective mass of omega meson and NNω interaction at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, S.; Su, R.; Yu, P.K.N.

    1994-01-01

    By means of the thermofield dynamical theory, the effective mass of omega meson is calculated by summing the bubble diagrams. It is found that the formula for the effective mass of the ρ meson can also be used to describe the ω meson in the low density region, but the parameter n and the critical temperature T c depend on the density. The temperature and density dependence of one omega exchage potential of nucleon-nucleon interaction are given. The conjecture of Brown and Rho about the effective masses of mesons is discussed

  12. Excess electron mobility in ethane. Density, temperature, and electric field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doeldissen, W.; Schmidt, W.F.; Bakale, G.

    1980-01-01

    The excess electron mobility in liquid ethane was measured under orthobaric conditions as a function of temperature and electric field strength up to the critical temperature at 305.33 K. The low field mobility was found to rise strongly with temperature and exhibits a maximum value of 44 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at 2 0 below the critical temperature. At temperatures above 260 K the electron drift velocity shows a sublinear field dependence at high values of the electric field strength. These observations lead to the supposition that in liquid ethane a transition from transport via localized states to transport in extended states occurs. Measurements were also performed in fluid ethane at densities from 2.4 to 12.45 mol L -1 and temperatures from 290 to 340 K. On isochores in the vicinity of the critical density, an increase of the low field mobility with temperature was observed. This effect was found to disappear both at low (rho = 2.4 mol L -1 ) and high densities (rho greater than or equal to 9.2 mol L -1 ). In this density range, a sublinear field dependence of the drift velocities at high field strengths was noted. The critical velocity associated with the appearance of hot electrons was observed to decrease with higher densities indicating a smaller fractional energy transfer in electron molecule collisions. A compilation of electron mobilities in gaseous and liquid ethane shows that, up to densitiesof rho = 9.5 mol L -1 , μ proportional to n -1 is fulfilled if temperature effects are ignored. At intermediate densities, 9 mol L -1 -1 , a density dependence of μ proportional to rho -5 is found followed by a stronger mobility decrease toward the triple point. Positive ion mobilities measured under orthobaric conditions followed Walden's rule

  13. Are radiative corrections to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein formula affected by finite temperature and density?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvat, R.

    1993-01-01

    One-loop photonic corrections to the electron-neutrino (ν e ) charged-current medium induced self-energy are examined using finite temperature field theory. It is shown that irrespective of computing radiative corrections at finite temperature and density, there are no O(α) corrections to the charged-current contribution of the ν e 's dispersion relation

  14. Investigation of temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in Fe3O4 ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemala, Humeshkar Bhaskar

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of Fe3O4 and gamma-Fe2O3 have been exploited in the biomedical fields for imaging, targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT), the production of heat using ferrofluids, colloidal suspensions of MNPs, in an external AC magnetic field (amplitude, 100-500 Oe and frequency 50 kHz -1MHz), has been explored by many researchers, both in vitro and in vivo, as an alternative viable option to treat cancer. The heat energy generated by Neel and Brownian relaxation processes of the internal magnetic spins could be used to elevate local tissue temperature to about 46 ˚C to arrest cancerous growth. MHT, due to its local nature of heating, when combined with other forms of treatment such as chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, it could become an effective therapy for cancer treatment. The efficiency of heat production in MHT is quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), defined as the power output per gram of the MNPs used. In this thesis, ferrofluids consisting of Fe3O4 MNPs of three different sizes (˜ 10 - 13 nm) coated with two different biocompatible surfactants, dextran and polyethylene glycol (PEG), have been investigated. The structural and magnetic characterization of the MNPs were done using XRD, TEM, and DC magnetization measurements. While XRD revealed the crystallite size, TEM provided the information about morphology and physical size distribution of the MNPs. Magnetic measurements of M-vs-H curves for ferrofluids provided information about the saturation magnetization (Ms) and magnetic core size distribution of MNPs. Using MHT measurements, the SAR has been studied as a function of temperature, taking into account the heat loss due to non-adiabatic nature of the experimental set-up. The observed SAR values have been interpreted using the theoretical framework of linear response theory (LRT). We found the SAR values depend on particle size distribution of MNPs, Ms (65-80 emu/g) and the magnetic

  15. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Electron and Magnetization Densities in Molecules and Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The interest of describing the ground state properties of a system in terms of one electron density (or its two spin components) is obvious, in particular due to the simple physical significance of this function. Recent experimental progress in diffraction made the measurement of charge and magnetization densities in crystalline solids possible, with an accuracy at least as good as theoretical accuracy. Theoretical developments of the many-body problem have proved the extreme importance of the one electron density function and presently, accurate methods of band structure determination become available. Parallel to the diffraction techniques, other domains of research (inelastic scattering, resonance, molecular spectroscopy) deal with quantities directly related to the one particle density. But the two types of studies do not interfere enough and one should obviously gain more information by interpreting all experiments that are related to the density together. It became necessary to have an International Sch...

  16. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  17. Calculation of the magnetic flux density distribution in type-II superconductors with finite thickness and well-defined geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forkl, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of the critical current density j c (r) in hard type-II superconductors depends strongly on their sample geometry. Rules are given for the construction of j c (r). Samples with homogeneous thickness are divided into cakelike regions with a unique current direction. The spatial magnetic flux density distribution and the magnetic polarization of such a cakelike unit cell with homogeneous current density are calculated analytically. The magnetic polarization and magnetic flux density distribution of a superconductor in the mixed state is then given by an adequate superposition of the unit cell solutions. The theoretical results show good agreement with magneto-optically determined magnetic flux density distributions of a quadratic thin superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x film. The current density distribution is discussed for several sample geometries

  18. Longitudinal and Seasonal Variations of the Electron Temperature and Density in the Low-Latitude Topside Ionosphere Observed by KOMPSAT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heejun Kim

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The electron density and temperature in the topside ionosphere are observed by the Ionosphere Measurement Sensor (IMS onboard the KOMPSAT-1, which has the sun-synchronous orbit of the altitude of 685 km and the orbital inclination of 98deg with a descending node at 22:50LT. Observations have been analyzed to determine the seasonal variations of the electron density and temperature in the low-latitude region. Only the night-time (22:50LT behavior on magnetically quiet days (Kp < 4 has been examined. Observations show a strong longitudinal and seasonal variation. Generally, in the dip equator the density increases and the temperature decreases. In equinox the latitudinal distributions of the electron density and temperature are quite symmetric about the dip equator. However, the local maximum of the density and the local minimum of the temperature shift toward the Northern hemisphere in summer solstice but the Southern hemisphere in winter solstice. Such variations are due to the influences of field-aligned plasma transport induced by F region neutral wind. Compared with the IRI95 model, the observed electron density and temperature show significant differences from those predicted by the IRI95 model.

  19. Optimization of multiply acquired magnetic flux density Bz using ICNE-Multiecho train in MREIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Oh In

    2010-01-01

    The aim of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to visualize the electrical properties, conductivity or current density of an object by injection of current. Recently, the prolonged data acquisition time when using the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method has been advantageous for measurement of magnetic flux density data, Bz, for MREIT in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the ICNE method results in undesirable side artifacts, such as blurring, chemical shift and phase artifacts, due to the long data acquisition under an inhomogeneous static field. In this paper, we apply the ICNE method to a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) multi-echo train pulse sequence in order to provide the multiple k-space lines during a single RF pulse period. We analyze the SNR of the measured multiple B z data using the proposed ICNE-Multiecho MR pulse sequence. By determining a weighting factor for B z data in each of the echoes, an optimized inversion formula for the magnetic flux density data is proposed for the ICNE-Multiecho MR sequence. Using the ICNE-Multiecho method, the quality of the measured magnetic flux density is considerably increased by the injection of a long current through the echo train length and by optimization of the voxel-by-voxel noise level of the B z value. Agarose-gel phantom experiments have demonstrated fewer artifacts and a better SNR using the ICNE-Multiecho method. Experimenting with the brain of an anesthetized dog, we collected valuable echoes by taking into account the noise level of each of the echoes and determined B z data by determining optimized weighting factors for the multiply acquired magnetic flux density data.

  20. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon's chiral periphery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos G. [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States); Weiss, Christian [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the light-front description of nucleon structure the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent transverse densities of charge and magnetization. Recent work has studied the transverse densities at peripheral distances b = O(M{pi}{sup -1}), where they are governed by universal chiral dynamics and can be computed in a model-independent manner. Of particular interest is the comparison of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities. We summarize (a) their interpretation as spin-independent and -dependent current matrix elements; (b) the leading-order chiral effective field theory results; (c) their mechanical interpretation in the light-front formulation; (d) the large-N_c limit of QCD and the role of {Delta} intermediate states; (e) the connection with generalized parton distributions and peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  1. Current densities in a pregnant woman model induced by simultaneous ELF electric and magnetic field exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cech, R; Leitgeb, N; Pediaditis, M

    2008-01-01

    The pregnant woman model SILVY was studied to ascertain to what extent the electric current densities induced by 50 Hz homogeneous electric and magnetic fields increase in the case of simultaneous exposure. By vectorial addition of the electric current densities, it could be shown that under worst case conditions the basic restrictions recommended by ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection) guidelines are exceeded within the central nervous system (CNS) of the mother, whereas in sole field exposure they are not. However, within the foetus the induced current densities do not comply with basic restrictions, either from single reference-level electric fields or from simultaneous exposure to electric and magnetic fields. Basic limits were considerably exceeded

  2. Source-Free Exchange-Correlation Magnetic Fields in Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Gross, E K U; Sanna, A; Dewhurst, J K

    2018-03-13

    Spin-dependent exchange-correlation energy functionals in use today depend on the charge density and the magnetization density: E xc [ρ, m]. However, it is also correct to define the functional in terms of the curl of m for physical external fields: E xc [ρ,∇ × m]. The exchange-correlation magnetic field, B xc , then becomes source-free. We study this variation of the theory by uniquely removing the source term from local and generalized gradient approximations to the functional. By doing so, the total Kohn-Sham moments are improved for a wide range of materials for both functionals. Significantly, the moments for the pnictides are now in good agreement with experiment. This source-free method is simple to implement in all existing density functional theory codes.

  3. Low-temperature specific heat of the quasi-two-dimensional charge-density wave compound KMo6O17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Xiong, Rui; Yin, Di; Li, Changzhen; Tang, Zheng; Wang, Ququan; Shi, Jing; Wang, Yue; Wen, Haihu

    2006-05-01

    Low temperature specific heat (Cp) of quasi-two-dimensional charge-density wave (CDW) compound KMo6O17 has been studied by a relaxation method from 2to48K under zero and 12T magnetic fields. The results show that no specific heat anomaly is found at 16K under both zero and 12T magnetic fields, although an anomaly is clearly observed in the resistivity and magnetoresistance measurements. From the data between 2 and 4K , the density of states at Fermi level is estimated as 0.2eV-1permolecule and the Debye temperature is extracted to be 418K . A bump appearing in Cp/T3 is found between 4 and 48K centered around 12.5-15K , indicating that the phason excitations contribute to the total specific heat similarly as in quasi-one-dimensional CDW conductors. Using a modified Debye model, a pinning frequency of 0.73THz for KMo6O17 is estimated from the phason contribution.

  4. Electron mobility in supercritical pentanes as a function of density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kengo; Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Nishikawa, Masaru

    1988-01-01

    The excess electron mobility in supercritical n-, iso- and neopentane was measured isothermally as a function of density. The density-normalized mobility μN in all three isomers goes through a minimum at a density below the respective critical densities, and the mobility is quite temperature-dependent in this region, then goes through a minimum. The μN behavior around the minimum in n-pentane is well accounted for by the Cohen-Lekner model with the structure factor S(K) estimated from the speed of sound, while that in iso- and neopentane is not. (author)

  5. Effects of Electron Flow Current Density on Flow Impedance of Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yong; Zou Wen-Kang; Song Sheng-Yi

    2011-01-01

    In modern pulsed power systems, magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) are used to couple power between the driver and the load. The circuit parameters of MITLs are well understood by employing the concept of flow impedance derived from Maxwell's equations and pressure balance across the flow. However, the electron density in an MITL is always taken as constant in the application of flow impedance. Thus effects of electron flow current density (product of electron density and drift velocity) in an MITL are neglected. We calculate the flow impedances of an MITL and compare them under three classical MITL theories, in which the electron density profile and electron flow current density are different from each other. It is found that the assumption of constant electron density profile in the calculation of the flow impedance is not always valid. The electron density profile and the electron flow current density have significant effects on flow impedance of the MITL. The details of the electron flow current density and its effects on the operation impedance of the MITL should be addressed more explicitly by experiments and theories in the future. (nuclear physics)

  6. Critical current measurements of high-temperature superconducting short samples at a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongjun; Liu, Huajun; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Huahui; Ci, Lu; Shi, Yi; Lei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are potential materials for high-field magnets, low-loss transmission cables, and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) due to their high upper critical magnetic field (Hc2) and critical temperature (Tc). The critical current (Ic) of HTS, which is one of the most important parameters for superconductor application, depends strongly on the magnetic fields and temperatures. A new Ic measurement system that can carry out accurate Ic measurement for HTS short samples with various temperatures (4.2-80 K), magnetic fields (0-14 T), and angles of the magnetic field (0°-90°) has been developed. The Ic measurement system mainly consists of a measurement holder, temperature-control system, background magnet, test cryostat, data acquisition system, and DC power supply. The accuracy of temperature control is better than ±0.1 K over the 20-80 K range and ±0.05 K when measured below 20 K. The maximum current is over 1000 A with a measurement uncertainty of 1%. The system had been successfully used for YBa2Cu3O7-x(YBCO) tapes Ic determination with different temperatures and magnetic fields.

  7. Critical current measurements of high-temperature superconducting short samples at a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongjun; Liu, Huajun; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Huahui; Ci, Lu; Shi, Yi; Lei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are potential materials for high-field magnets, low-loss transmission cables, and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) due to their high upper critical magnetic field (H c2 ) and critical temperature (T c ). The critical current (I c ) of HTS, which is one of the most important parameters for superconductor application, depends strongly on the magnetic fields and temperatures. A new I c measurement system that can carry out accurate I c measurement for HTS short samples with various temperatures (4.2-80 K), magnetic fields (0-14 T), and angles of the magnetic field (0°-90°) has been developed. The I c measurement system mainly consists of a measurement holder, temperature-control system, background magnet, test cryostat, data acquisition system, and DC power supply. The accuracy of temperature control is better than ±0.1 K over the 20-80 K range and ±0.05 K when measured below 20 K. The maximum current is over 1000 A with a measurement uncertainty of 1%. The system had been successfully used for YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) tapes I c determination with different temperatures and magnetic fields.

  8. Measurement of magnetic property of FePt granular media at near Curie temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.Z.; Chen, Y.J.; Leong, S.H.; An, C.W.; Ye, K.D.; Hu, J.F.

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of the magnetic switching behavior of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) media at near Curie temperature (T_c) is important for high density recording. In this study, we measured the magnetic property of FePt granular media (with room temperature coercivity ~25 kOe) at near T_c with a home built HAMR testing instrument. The local area of HAMR media is heated to near T_c by a flat-top optical heating beam. The magnetic property in the heated area was in-situ measured by a magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) testing beam. The switching field distribution (SFD) and coercive field (H_c) of the FePt granular media and their dependence on the optical heating power at near T_c were studied. We measured the DC demagnetization (DCD) signal with pulsed laser heating at different optical powers. We also measured the T_c distribution of the media by measuring the AC magnetic signal as a function of optical heating power. In a summary, we studied the SFD, H_c of the HAMR media at near T_c in a static manner. The present methodology will facilitate the HAMR media testing. - Highlights: • A flat-top optical beam homogeneously heats up HAMR media to near T_c. • When H_c of media drops to 5 kOe with optical heating, SFD is measured to be 0.6. • H_c, SFD, M_s of HAMR media at near T_c are measured with the methodology.

  9. Measurement of magnetic property of FePt granular media at near Curie temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H.Z., E-mail: YANG_Hongzhi@dsi.a-star.edu.sg; Chen, Y.J.; Leong, S.H.; An, C.W.; Ye, K.D.; Hu, J.F.

    2017-02-01

    The characterization of the magnetic switching behavior of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) media at near Curie temperature (T{sub c}) is important for high density recording. In this study, we measured the magnetic property of FePt granular media (with room temperature coercivity ~25 kOe) at near T{sub c} with a home built HAMR testing instrument. The local area of HAMR media is heated to near T{sub c} by a flat-top optical heating beam. The magnetic property in the heated area was in-situ measured by a magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) testing beam. The switching field distribution (SFD) and coercive field (H{sub c}) of the FePt granular media and their dependence on the optical heating power at near T{sub c} were studied. We measured the DC demagnetization (DCD) signal with pulsed laser heating at different optical powers. We also measured the T{sub c} distribution of the media by measuring the AC magnetic signal as a function of optical heating power. In a summary, we studied the SFD, H{sub c} of the HAMR media at near T{sub c} in a static manner. The present methodology will facilitate the HAMR media testing. - Highlights: • A flat-top optical beam homogeneously heats up HAMR media to near T{sub c}. • When H{sub c} of media drops to 5 kOe with optical heating, SFD is measured to be 0.6. • H{sub c}, SFD, M{sub s} of HAMR media at near T{sub c} are measured with the methodology.

  10. Temperature dependence of magnetically dead layers in ferromagnetic thin-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tokaç

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to study interface magnetism and magnetic dead layers in model amorphous CoFeB:Ta alloy thin-film multilayers with Curie temperatures tuned to be below room-temperature. This allows temperature dependent variations in the effective magnetic thickness of the film to be determined at temperatures that are a significant fraction of the Curie temperature, which cannot be achieved in the material systems used for spintronic devices. In addition to variation in the effective magnetic thickness due to compositional grading at the interface with the tantalum capping layer, the key finding is that at the interface between ferromagnetic film and GaAs(001 substrate local interfacial alloying creates an additional magnetic dead-layer. The thickness of this magnetic dead-layer is temperature dependent, which may have significant implications for elevated-temperature operation of hybrid ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor spintronic devices.

  11. Real-time visualization of magnetic flux densities for transcranial magnetic stimulation on commodity and fully immersive VR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivarapu, Vijay K.; Serrate, Ciro; Hadimani, Ravi L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure that uses time varying short pulses of magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. In this method, a magnetic field generator ("TMS coil") produces small electric fields in the region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. This technique can be used to excite or inhibit firing of neurons, which can then be used for treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, migraine, and depression. It is however challenging to focus the induced electric field from TMS coils to smaller regions of the brain. Since electric and magnetic fields are governed by laws of electromagnetism, it is possible to numerically simulate and visualize these fields to accurately determine the site of maximum stimulation and also to develop TMS coils that can focus the fields on the targeted regions. However, current software to compute and visualize these fields are not real-time and can work for only one position/orientation of TMS coil, severely limiting their usage. This paper describes the development of an application that computes magnetic flux densities (h-fields) and visualizes their distribution for different TMS coil position/orientations in real-time using GPU shaders. The application is developed for desktop, commodity VR (HTC Vive), and fully immersive VR CAVETM systems, for use by researchers, scientists, and medical professionals to quickly and effectively view the distribution of h-fields from MRI brain scans.

  12. Model for the orientation, magnetic field, and temperature dependence of the specific heat of CeCu6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a model calculation of the orientation, magnetic field, and temperature dependence of the specific heat C of CeCu 6 are found to be in good agreement with the single-crystal data of Amato et al. The model incorporates both the Kondo and crystal-field effects. It is suggested that the low-temperature Wilson's ratio CTchi, where chi is the susceptibility, may not change in an applied field H and that both CT and chi at low temperatures as a function of H may be proportional to the many-body density of states at the energy μH

  13. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0T yokeless permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Y; Tamada, D; Kose, K

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5°C to 45°C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The epoxy resin variation effect on microstructure and physical properties to improve bonded NdFeB flux magnetic density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnaeni, N.; Sarjono, Priyo; Muljadi; Noer, Nasrudin

    2016-01-01

    NdFeB magnets have been fabricated from a mixture of powder NdFeB (MPQ-B+) and epoxy resins (ER) with a variation of 0% wt, 2% wt, 4% wt and 6% wt. The pellets samples were made by pressing 4 tons of the mixture powder at room temperature before curing at 100°C for 1 hour. The SEM-EDX results showed the microstructure with ER were evenly smeared the NdFeB magnetic particles due to higher percent C and lower transition metals value. Sample with 2% wt epoxy resin was able to achieve the highest density of 5.35 g/cm 3 and the highest magnetic flux of 2121 Gauss. The magnetic properties characterization using the permagraph indicates that the sample pellets with 2% wt epoxy resin has a value of remanence (Br) = 4.92 kG, coercivity (Hc) = 7.76 kOe, and energy product (Bhmax) = 4.58 MGOe. Despite low remanence value in the pellet samples, the resistance to demagnetization value was still acceptable. (paper)

  15. The epoxy resin variation effect on microstructure and physical properties to improve bonded NdFeB flux magnetic density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnaeni, N.; Sarjono, Priyo; Muljadi; Noer, Nasrudin

    2016-11-01

    NdFeB magnets have been fabricated from a mixture of powder NdFeB (MPQ-B+) and epoxy resins (ER) with a variation of 0% wt, 2% wt, 4% wt and 6% wt. The pellets samples were made by pressing 4 tons of the mixture powder at room temperature before curing at 100°C for 1 hour. The SEM-EDX results showed the microstructure with ER were evenly smeared the NdFeB magnetic particles due to higher percent C and lower transition metals value. Sample with 2% wt epoxy resin was able to achieve the highest density of 5.35 g/cm3 and the highest magnetic flux of 2121 Gauss. The magnetic properties characterization using the permagraph indicates that the sample pellets with 2% wt epoxy resin has a value of remanence (Br) = 4.92 kG, coercivity (Hc) = 7.76 kOe, and energy product (Bhmax) = 4.58 MGOe. Despite low remanence value in the pellet samples, the resistance to demagnetization value was still acceptable.

  16. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Yosida-Kondo resonance for a single magnetic atom adsorbed on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dino, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki; Rodulfo, Emmanuel Tapas; Nishi, Mayuko

    2006-01-01

    Manifestations of the Kondo effect on an atomic length scale on and around a magnetic atom adsorbed on a nonmagnetic surface differ depending on the spectroscopic mode of operation of the scanning tunneling microscope. Two prominent signatures of the Kondo effect that can be observed at surfaces are the development of a sharp resonance (Yosida-Kondo resonance) at the Fermi level, which broadens with increasing temperature, and the splitting of this sharp resonance upon application of an external magnetic field. Until recently, observing the temperature and magnetic field dependence has been a challenge, because the experimental conditions strongly depend on the system's critical temperature, the so-called Kondo temperature T K . In order to clearly observe the temperature dependence, one needs to choose a system with a large T K . One can thus perform the experiments at temperatures T K . However, because the applied external magnetic field necessary to observe the magnetic field dependence scales with T K , one needs to choose a system with a very small T K . This in turn means that one should perform the experiments at very low temperatures, e.g., in the mK range. Here we discuss the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Yosida-Kondo resonance for a single magnetic atom on a metal surface, in relation to recent experimental developments

  17. Probing α -RuCl3 Beyond Magnetic Order: Effects of Temperature and Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Stephen M.; Riedl, Kira; Kaib, David; Coldea, Radu; Valentí, Roser

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies have brought α -RuCl3 to the forefront of experimental searches for materials realizing Kitaev spin-liquid physics. This material exhibits strongly anisotropic exchange interactions afforded by the spin-orbit coupling of the 4 d Ru centers. We investigate the dynamical response at finite temperature and magnetic field for a realistic model of the magnetic interactions in α -RuCl3 . These regimes are thought to host unconventional paramagnetic states that emerge from the suppression of magnetic order. Using exact diagonalization calculations of the quantum model complemented by semiclassical analysis, we find a very rich evolution of the spin dynamics as the applied field suppresses the zigzag order and stabilizes a quantum paramagnetic state that is adiabatically connected to the fully polarized state at high fields. At finite temperature, we observe large redistributions of spectral weight that can be attributed to the anisotropic frustration of the model. These results are compared to recent experiments and provide a road map for further studies of these regimes.

  18. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W.; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model

  19. Physics responsible for heating efficiency and self-controlled temperature rise of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles as heat-generating nanosources in hyperthermia treatment are still faced with many drawbacks for achieving sufficient clinical potential. In this context, increase in heating ability of magnetic nanoparticles in a biologically safe alternating magnetic field and also approach to a precise control on temperature rise are two challenging subjects so that a significant part of researchers' efforts has been devoted to them. Since a deep understanding of Physics concepts of heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is essential to develop hyperthermia as a cancer treatment with non-adverse side effects, this review focuses on different mechanisms responsible for heat dissipation in a radio frequency magnetic field. Moreover, particular attention is given to ferrite-based nanoparticles because of their suitability in radio frequency magnetic fields. Also, the key role of Curie temperature in suppressing undesired temperature rise is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, Maxim [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Airapetian, Vladimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States); NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Lin, Haosheng, E-mail: vladimir.airapetian@nasa.gov [College of Natural Sciences, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Pukalani, HI (United States)

    2016-08-09

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from 1.5 to 4 R{sub ⊙} using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 Å band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below ~2.5 R{sub ⊙}. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  1. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Kramar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131 to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4 R_odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 AA band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $sim 2.5 R_odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  2. Density of biofuel in function of temperature; Densidade de biocombustiveis em funcao da temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Melina C.J.; Lopes, Afonso [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCAV/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Engenharia Rural], email: melina_cais@yahoo.com.br; Camara, Felipe T. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Cariri, CE (Brazil); Lima, Leomar P. [Instituto Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (IFTM), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Considering the oil a non-renewable natural resource, Biodiesel is an alternative fuel, the same being renewable, biodegradable and made from vegetable oil or residual transesterified with anhydrous alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. This study aimed to evaluate the density of biodiesel methyl filtered residual oil from the university cafeteria, biodiesel methyl filtered hydrogenated fat residual McDonald's and the density of the mixture of 50% of residual oil from the university cafeteria with 50% of hydrogenated fat residual McDonald's all a function of temperature (10 deg C to 70 deg C). The experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Engineering Department of UNESP-Jaboticabal, SP. Was used 3x13x7 factorial experimental design, which represent three types of biodiesel, 13 July and the temperatures of the mixtures. We conclude that the residual oil biodiesel university restaurant density was lower, while biodiesel from hydrogenated fat from McDonald's and the mixture had higher densities, but differ from each other. The diesel (B0) had the lowest density and Biodiesel (B100) the largest. The B0 and B5 blends did not differ regarding density, but differed from the mix B15, B25, B50, B75 and B100. For all the mixtures tested, with the increase of temperature decreased the density. (author)

  3. Temperature effects on wood anatomy, wood density, photosynthesis and biomass partitioning of Eucalyptus grandis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D S; Montagu, K D; Conroy, J P

    2007-02-01

    Wood density, a gross measure of wood mass relative to wood volume, is important in our understanding of stem volume growth, carbon sequestration and leaf water supply. Disproportionate changes in the ratio of wood mass to volume may occur at the level of the whole stem or the individual cell. In general, there is a positive relationship between temperature and wood density of eucalypts, although this relationship has broken down in recent years with wood density decreasing as global temperatures have risen. To determine the anatomical causes of the effects of temperature on wood density, Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden seedlings were grown in controlled-environment cabinets at constant temperatures from 10 to 35 degrees C. The 20% increase in wood density of E. grandis seedlings grown at the higher temperatures was variously related to a 40% reduction in lumen area of xylem vessels, a 10% reduction in the lumen area of fiber cells and a 10% increase in fiber cell wall thickness. The changes in cell wall characteristics could be considered analogous to changes in carbon supply. Lumen area of fiber cells declined because of reduced fiber cell expansion and increased fiber cell wall thickening. Fiber cell wall thickness was positively related to canopy CO2 assimilation rate (Ac), which increased 26-fold because of a 24-fold increase in leaf area and a doubling in leaf CO2 assimilation rate from minima at 10 and 35 degrees C to maxima at 25 and 30 degrees C. Increased Ac increased seedling volume, biomass and wood density; but increased wood density was also related to a shift in partitioning of seedling biomass from roots to stems as temperature increased.

  4. Density mediates grasshopper performance in response to temperature manipulation and spider predation in tallgrass prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, A N; Joern, A

    2017-04-01

    Species interactions are often context-dependent, where outcomes require an understanding of influences among multiple biotic and abiotic factors. However, it remains unclear how abiotic factors such as temperature combine with important biotic factors such as density-dependent food limitation and predation to influence species interactions. Using a native grassland - grasshopper - wolf spider model food chain in tallgrass prairie, we conducted a manipulative field experiment to examine how predator-prey interactions respond to manipulations of temperature, grasshopper density, and food chain length. We find that grasshopper performance responses to temperature and predator treatments were density dependent. At high densities, grasshopper survival decreased with increased temperature when no spiders were present. When spiders were present, grasshopper survival was reduced, and this effect was strongest in the cooled treatment. In contrast, grasshopper survival did not vary significantly with spider presence or among temperature treatments at low grasshopper densities. Our results indicate that context-dependent species interactions are common and highlight the importance of understanding how and when key biotic and abiotic factors combine to influence species interactions.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of room-temperature nanofluid ferromagnetic graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, N. S.; Sergeenkov, S.; Speglich, C.; Rivera, V. A. G.; Cardoso, C. A.; Pardo, H.; Mombru, A. W.; Rodrigues, A. D.; de Lima, O. F.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.

    2009-01-01

    We report the chemical synthesis route, structural characterization, and physical properties of nanofluid magnetic graphite (NFMG) obtained from the previously synthesized bulk organic magnetic graphite (MG) by stabilizing the aqueous ferrofluid suspension with an addition of active cationic surfactant. The measured magnetization-field hysteresis curves along with the temperature dependence of magnetization confirmed room-temperature ferromagnetism in both MG and NFMG samples. (C) 2009 Americ...

  6. Calculation of induced current densities for humans by magnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Om P.; Kang, Gang

    2001-11-01

    This paper illustrates the use of the impedance method to calculate the electric fields and current densities induced in millimetre resolution anatomic models of the human body, namely an adult and 10- and 5-year-old children, for exposure to nonuniform magnetic fields typical of two assumed but representative electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices at 1 and 30 kHz, respectively. The devices assumed for the calculations are a solenoid type magnetic deactivator used at store checkouts and a pass-by panel-type EAS system consisting of two overlapping rectangular current-carrying coils used at entry and exit from a store. The impedance method code is modified to obtain induced current densities averaged over a cross section of 1 cm2 perpendicular to the direction of induced currents. This is done to compare the peak current densities with the limits or the basic restrictions given in the ICNIRP safety guidelines. Because of the stronger magnetic fields at lower heights for both the assumed devices, the peak 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the CNS tissues such as the brain and the spinal cord are increasingly larger for smaller models and are the highest for the model of the 5-year-old child. For both the EAS devices, the maximum 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the brain of the model of the adult are lower than the ICNIRP safety guideline, but may approach or exceed the ICNIRP basic restrictions for models of 10- and 5-year-old children if sufficiently strong magnetic fields are used.

  7. Calculation of induced current densities for humans by magnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, O P; Kang, G

    2001-11-01

    This paper illustrates the use of the impedance method to calculate the electric fields and current densities induced in millimetre resolution anatomic models of the human body, namely an adult and 10- and 5-year-old children, for exposure to nonuniform magnetic fields typical of two assumed but representative electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices at 1 and 30 kHz, respectively. The devices assumed for the calculations are a solenoid type magnetic deactivator used at store checkouts and a pass-by panel-type EAS system consisting of two overlapping rectangular current-carrying coils used at entry and exit from a store. The impedance method code is modified to obtain induced current densities averaged over a cross section of 1 cm2 perpendicular to the direction of induced currents. This is done to compare the peak current densities with the limits or the basic restrictions given in the ICNIRP safety guidelines. Because of the stronger magnetic fields at lower heights for both the assumed devices, the peak 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the CNS tissues such as the brain and the spinal cord are increasingly larger for smaller models and are the highest for the model of the 5-year-old child. For both the EAS devices, the maximum 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the brain of the model of the adult are lower than the ICNIRP safety guideline, but may approach or exceed the ICNIRP basic restrictions for models of 10- and 5-year-old children if sufficiently strong magnetic fields are used.

  8. Measurement of gas temperature and OH density in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    The gas temperature and OH density in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge are measured using the laser-induced predissociation fluorescence (LIPF) of OH radicals. Discharge occurs in a 13 mm point-to-plane gap in an atmospheric-pressure H 2 O(2.8%)/O 2 (2.0%)/N 2 mixture. The temperature measurement shows that (i) the temperature increases after discharge and (ii) the temperature near the anode tip (within 1 mm from the anode tip) is much higher than that of the rest of the discharge volume. Near the anode tip, the temperature increases from 500 K (t = 0 μs) to 1100 K (t = 20 μs), where t is the postdischarge time, while it increases from 400 K (t = 0 μs) to 700 K (t = 100 μs) in the rest of the discharge volume away from the anode tip. This temperature difference between the two volumes (near and far from the anode tip) causes a difference in the decay rate of OH density: OH density near the anode tip decays approximately 10 times slower than that far from the tip. The spatial distribution of OH density shows good agreement with that of the secondary streamer luminous intensity. This shows that OH radicals are mainly produced in the secondary streamer, not in the primary one

  9. Isolating peripheral lymphocytes by density gradient centrifugation and magnetic cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseron, Frederic; Marcus, Katrin; May, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Combining density gradient centrifugation with magnetic cell sorting provides a powerful tool to isolate blood cells with high reproducibility, yield, and purity. It also allows for subsequent separation of multiple cell types, resulting in the possibility to analyze different purified fractions from one donor's sample. The centrifugation step divides whole blood into peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), erythrocytes, and platelet-rich plasma. In the following, lymphocyte subtypes can be consecutively isolated from the PBMC fraction. This chapter describes enrichment of erythrocytes, CD14-positive monocytes and CD3-positive T lymphocytes. Alternatively, other cell types can be targeted by using magnetic beads specific for the desired subpopulation.

  10. Density effects on tokamak edge turbulence and transport with magnetic X-points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Ryutov, D.D.; Umansky, M.V.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Bulmer, R.H.; Russell, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Greenwald, M.; Snyder, P.B.; Mahdavi, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the 3D electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT, the 2D transport code UEDGE, and theoretical analysis of boundary turbulence and transport in a real divertor-plasma geometry and its relationship to the density limit. Key results include: (1) a transition of the boundary turbulence from resistive X-point to resistive-ballooning as a critical plasma density is exceeded; (2) formation of an X-point MARFE in 2D UEDGE transport simulations for increasing outboard radial transport as found by BOUT for increasing density; (3) identification of convective transport by localized plasma 'blobs' in the SOL at high density during neutral fueling, and decorrelation of turbulence between the midplane and the divertor leg due to strong X-point magnetic shear; (4) a new divertor-leg instability driven at high plasma beta by a radial tilt of the divertor plate. (author)

  11. Temperature dependent magnetic properties of the GaAs substrate of spin-LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, A; Harris, J S Jr; Parkin, S S P

    2006-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetization of a light emitting diode having a ferromagnetic contact (spin-LED) is measured from 2 to 300 K in magnetic fields from 30 to 70 kOe and it is found that it originates from the GaAs substrate. The magnetization of GaAs comprises a van Vleck-type paramagnetic contribution to the susceptibility which scales inversely with the band gap of the semiconductor. Thus, the temperature dependence of the band gap of GaAs accounts for the non-linear temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility of GaAs and thus, at large magnetic fields, for the spin-LED

  12. Temperature Profiles During Quenches in LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets Protected by Quench Heaters

    OpenAIRE

    Maroussov, V; Sanfilippo, S; Siemko, A

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of the magnet protection by quench heaters was studied using a novel method which derives the temperature profile in a superconducting magnet during a quench from measured voltage signals. In several Large Hadron Collider single aperture dipole models, temperature profiles and temperature gradients in the magnet coil have been evaluated in the case of protection by different sets of quench heaters and different powering and protection parameters. The influence of the insulation...

  13. Magnetization jumps in nanostructured Nd–Fe–B alloy at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neznakhin, D.S.; Bolyachkin, A.S.; Volegov, A.S.; Markin, P.E.; Andreev, S.V.; Kudrevatykh, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic properties of the nanostructured isotropic alloy on the base of Nd 2 Fe 14 B type phase were investigated at low temperatures. The evaluated average grain size of this phase was much smaller than its critical single domain diameter. Hence the magnetization and demagnetization processes were expected to be performed by coherent magnetization rotation. For such coercivity type system magnetization jumps were revealed on the demagnetization hysteresis loop branch in the vicinity of the coercive force at temperatures below 4 K. It was shown that magnetization jumps have a stochastic behavior and their number strongly depends on the temperature and the mass of measured samples. High temperature spikes corresponding to magnetization discontinuities were observed. All these results allowed to propose that magnetization jumps in nanostructured magnetics with magnetization rotation reversal processes comply with the local heating model. - Highlights: • Magnetization reversals of the nanostructured Nd–Fe–B-type alloy were obtained below 4 K. • Magnetization jumps were first observed for magnetization rotation coercivity type magnets. • Staircase magnetization reversal was explained within the framework of the local heating model

  14. Fabrication and characterization of nano-particulate PtCo media for ultra-high density perpendicular magnetic recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Dave M; Wears, M Lesley; Jollie, Michael; Choo, Desmond

    2007-01-01

    The year-on-year growth in areal recording density maintained now for half a century by the hard disk industry has required a corresponding reduction in the size of the magnetic grains comprising the storage media employed. Grain dimensions are now such that the performance of materials which thus far have served the industry well can no longer be maintained as further reduction in their volume risks breaching the superparamagnetic limit with the attendant loss of data integrity. The high magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the Ll 0 phase of PtCo allows particles as small as 4 nm diameter to remain magnetically stable in the elevated temperature environment typical of disk drive systems. A non-interacting dispersion of nanomagnetic particles suspended in an inert non-magnetic host such that each has its anisotropy axis directed perpendicular to the surface of the medium now constitutes the new ideal for a recording medium. Fabrication by a novel combination of conventional sputtering and thermal processing technologies of a medium closely approximating this ideal is demonstrated. An optimized two-stage fabrication process produces a near mono-dispersion of particles with magnetic activation volumes centred about 5 x 10 23 and crystallized in the L1 0 phase with an orientated tetragonal structure. The characteristics of this medium are discussed as a function of composition and crystalline structure. In the absence of a thermally assisted recording head, experiments are conducted on a degraded form of the medium that is shown to support perpendicular recording at linear densities in excess of 240 kfci (D50 point)

  15. Electron density and temperature profile diagnostics for C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B. H.; Kinley, J. S.; Schroeder, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The 9-point Thomson scattering diagnostic system for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas is improved and the measured electron temperature profiles are consistent with theoretical expectations. Rayleigh scattering revealed a finite line width of the ruby laser emission, which complicates density calibration. Taking advantage of the plasma wobble motion, density profile reconstruction accuracy from the 6-chord two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe interferometer data is improved.

  16. MHD Equilibrium with Reversed Current Density and Magnetic Islands Revisited: the Vacuum Vector Potential Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Braga, F.

    2013-10-01

    The solution of Grad-Shafranov equation determines the stationary behavior of fusion plasma inside a tokamak. To solve the equation it is necessary to know the toroidal current density profile. Recent works show that it is possible to determine a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium with reversed current density (RCD) profiles that presents magnetic islands. In this work we show analytical MHD equilibrium with a RCD profile and analyze the structure of the vacuum vector potential associated with these equilibria using the virtual casing principle.

  17. Temperature, larval diet, and density effects on development rate and survival of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannelle Couret

    Full Text Available Many environmental factors, biotic and abiotic interact to influence organismal development. Given the importance of Aedes aegypti as a vector of human pathogens including dengue and yellow fever, understanding the impact of environmental factors such as temperature, resource availability, and intraspecific competition during development is critical for population control purposes. Despite known associations between developmental traits and factors of diet and density, temperature has been considered the primary driver of development rate and survival. To determine the relative importance of these critical factors, wide gradients of conditions must be considered. We hypothesize that 1 diet and density, as well as temperature influence the variation in development rate and survival, 2 that these factors interact, and this interaction is also necessary to understand variation in developmental traits. Temperature, diet, density, and their two-way interactions are significant factors in explaining development rate variation of the larval stages of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. These factors as well as two and three-way interactions are significantly associated with the development rate from hatch to emergence. Temperature, but not diet or density, significantly impacted juvenile mortality. Development time was heteroskedastic with the highest variation occurring at the extremes of diet and density conditions. All three factors significantly impacted survival curves of experimental larvae that died during development. Complex interactions may contribute to variation in development rate. To better predict variation in development rate and survival in Ae. aegypti, factors of resource availability and intraspecific density must be considered in addition, but never to the exclusion of temperature.

  18. The role of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and water velocity in determining river temperature dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Grace; Malcolm, Iain A.; Sadler, Jonathan P.; Hannah, David M.

    2017-10-01

    A simulation experiment was used to understand the importance of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and flow velocity for stream energy budgets and river temperature dynamics. Water temperature and meteorological observations were obtained in addition to hemispherical photographs along a ∼1 km reach of the Girnock Burn, a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland. Data from nine hemispherical images (representing different uniform canopy density scenarios) were used to parameterise a deterministic net radiation model and simulate radiative fluxes. For each vegetation scenario, the effects of eight channel orientations were investigated by changing the position of north at 45° intervals in each hemispheric image. Simulated radiative fluxes and observed turbulent fluxes drove a high-resolution water temperature model of the reach. Simulations were performed under low and high water velocity scenarios. Both velocity scenarios yielded decreases in mean (≥1.6 °C) and maximum (≥3.0 °C) temperature as canopy density increased. Slow-flowing water resided longer within the reach, which enhanced heat accumulation and dissipation, and drove higher maximum and lower minimum temperatures. Intermediate levels of shade produced highly variable energy flux and water temperature dynamics depending on the channel orientation and thus the time of day when the channel was shaded. We demonstrate that in many reaches relatively sparse but strategically located vegetation could produce substantial reductions in maximum temperature and suggest that these criteria are used to inform future river management.

  19. ANTHEM simulation of the early time magnetic field penetration of the plasma surrounding a high density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The early time penetration of magnetic field into the low density coronal plasma of a Z-pinch fiber is studied with the implicit plasma simulation code ANTHEM. Calculations show the emission of electrons from the cathode, pinching of the electron flow, magnetic insulation of the electrons near the anode, and low density ion blow off. PIC-particle ion calculations show a late time clumping of the ion density not seen with a fluid ion treatment. 4 refs., 4 figs

  20. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta, E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Temmerman, Greg De [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oost, Guido Van [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Möller, Sören [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10{sup 23} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s and low: 9 · 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10{sup 26} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion.

  1. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Temmerman, Greg De; Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker; Oost, Guido Van; Möller, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10 23 D + /m 2 s and low: 9 · 10 21 D + /m 2 s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10 26 D + /m 2 and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion

  2. Deriving the coronal hole electron temperature: electron density dependent ionization / recombination considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, John Gerard; Perez-Suarez, David; Singh, Avninda; Chapman, Steven; Bryans, Paul; Summers, Hugh; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of appropriate theoretically derived line ratios with observational data can yield estimates of a plasma's physical parameters, such as electron density or temperature. The usual practice in the calculation of the line ratio is the assumption of excitation by electrons/protons followed by radiative decay. Furthermore, it is normal to use the so-called coronal approximation, i.e. one only considers ionization and recombination to and from the ground-state. A more accurate treatment is to include ionization/recombination to and from metastable levels. Here, we apply this to two lines from adjacent ionization stages, Mg IX 368 A and Mg X 625 A, which has been shown to be a very useful temperature diagnostic. At densities typical of coronal hole conditions, the difference between the electron temperature derived assuming the zero density limit compared with the electron density dependent ionization/recombination is small. This, however, is not the case for flares where the electron density is orders of magnitude larger. The derived temperature for the coronal hole at solar maximum is around 1.04 MK compared to just below 0.82 MK at solar minimum.

  3. Low threading dislocation density aluminum nitride on silicon carbide through the use of reduced temperature interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Foronda, Humberto M.

    2017-11-23

    In this work, reduced threading dislocation density AlN on (0 0 0 1) 6H-SiC was realized through the use of reduced temperature AlN interlayers in the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth. We explored the dependence of the interlayer growth temperature on the AlN crystal quality, defect density, and surface morphology. The crystal quality was characterized using omega rocking curve scans and the threading dislocation density was determined by plan view transmission electron microscopy. The growth resulted in a threading dislocation density of 7 × 108 cm−2 indicating a significant reduction in the defect density of AlN in comparison to direct growth of AlN on SiC (∼1010 cm−2). Atomic force microscopy images demonstrated a clear step-terrace morphology that is consistent with step flow growth at high temperature. Reducing the interlayer growth temperature increased the TD inclination and thus enhanced TD-TD interactions. The TDD was decreased via fusion and annihilation reactions.

  4. Joint refinement model for the spin resolved one-electron reduced density matrix of YTiO3 using magnetic structure factors and magnetic Compton profiles data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueddida, Saber; Yan, Zeyin; Kibalin, Iurii; Voufack, Ariste Bolivard; Claiser, Nicolas; Souhassou, Mohamed; Lecomte, Claude; Gillon, Béatrice; Gillet, Jean-Michel

    2018-04-28

    In this paper, we propose a simple cluster model with limited basis sets to reproduce the unpaired electron distributions in a YTiO 3 ferromagnetic crystal. The spin-resolved one-electron-reduced density matrix is reconstructed simultaneously from theoretical magnetic structure factors and directional magnetic Compton profiles using our joint refinement algorithm. This algorithm is guided by the rescaling of basis functions and the adjustment of the spin population matrix. The resulting spin electron density in both position and momentum spaces from the joint refinement model is in agreement with theoretical and experimental results. Benefits brought from magnetic Compton profiles to the entire spin density matrix are illustrated. We studied the magnetic properties of the YTiO 3 crystal along the Ti-O 1 -Ti bonding. We found that the basis functions are mostly rescaled by means of magnetic Compton profiles, while the molecular occupation numbers are mainly modified by the magnetic structure factors.

  5. Cylindrical implosion to measure the radiative properties of high density and temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yan; Rose, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    Cylindrical implosion is of great interest because of its excellent diagnostic access. The authors present one-dimensional numerical simulations to explore the plasma conditions that may be achieved. Combined with the numerical data, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in those targets are estimated. The authors found that it is possible to achieve a high density and temperature plasma with a relatively low temperature and density gradient using a cylindrical implosion directly-driven by a high-power laser

  6. Interpretation of fast measurements of plasma potential, temperature and density in SOL of ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Adamek, J.; Müller, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on interpretation of fast (1 µs) and local (2–4 mm) measurements of plasma density, potential and electron temperature in the edge plasma of tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Steady-state radial profiles demonstrate the credibility of the ball-pen probe. We demonstrate that floating...... potential fluctuations measured by a Langmuir probe are dominated by plasma electron temperature rather than potential. Spatial and temporal scales are found consistent with expectations based on interchange-driven turbulence. Conditionally averaged signals found for both potential and density are also...

  7. Temporal evolutions of electron temperature and density of turbulently-heated tokamak plasmas in TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the electron temperature and density are measured in a turbulent heating experiment in TRIAM-1. Skin-like profiles of the electron temperature and density are clearly observed. The anomality in the electrical resistivity of the plasma in this skin-layer is estimated, and the plasma heating in this skin-layer is regarded as being due to anomalous joule heating arising from this anomalous resistivity. The ratio of drift velocity to electron thermal velocity in the layer is also calculated, and it is shown that the conditions needed to make the current-driven ion-acoustic instability triggerable are satisfied.

  8. Kinetic theory of neutrals in a bounded plasma slab with inhomogeneous temperature and density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.B.; Agren, O.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of neutral hydrogen atoms in a hydrogen plasma slab is considered. The influence of the inhomogeneous ion temperature profile on the neutral density and distribution is discussed as well as the influence of the neutral edge energy, charge exchange, and ionization rates. The analytical solutions for the neutral density and distribution function are obtained and compared with the numerical results. The effects due to the inhomogeneous temperature profile are discussed. The recommen-dations from the viewpoint of the effects mentioned previously for the purposes of the cold-gas mantle system have been given

  9. Temperature- and density-dependent x-ray scattering in a low-Z plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.T.

    1976-06-01

    A computer program is described which calculates temperature- and density-dependent differential and total coherent and incoherent x-ray scattering cross sections for a low-Z scattering medium. Temperature and density are arbitrary within the limitations of the validity of local thermodynamic equilbrium, since ionic populations are calculated under this assumption. Scattering cross sections are calculated in the form factor approximation. The scattering medium may consist of any mixure of elements with Z less than or equal to 8, with this limitation imposed by the availability of atomic data

  10. Simultaneous measurements of temperature and density in air flows using UV laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of temperature and density using laser-induced fluorescence of oxygen in combination with Q-branch Raman scattering of nitrogen and oxygen is demonstrated in a low-speed air flow. The lowest density and temperature measured in the experiment correspond to the freestream values at Mach 5 in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for stagnation conditions of 100 atm and 1000 K. The experimental results demonstrate the viability of the optical technique for measurements that support the study of compressible turbulence and the validation of numerical codes in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel flows.

  11. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 μm radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N 2 C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation

  12. A study of influence of material properties on magnetic flux density induced in magneto rheological damper through finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurubasavaraju T. M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetorheological fluids are smart materials, which are responsive to the external stimulus and changes their rheological properties. The damper performance (damping force is dependent on the magnetic flux density induced at the annular gap. Magnetic flux density developed at fluid flow gap of MR damper due to external applied current is also dependent on materials properties of components of MR damper (such as piston head, outer cylinder and piston rod. The present paper discus about the influence of different materials selected for components of the MR damper on magnetic effect using magnetostatic analysis. Different materials such as magnetic and low carbon steels are considered for piston head of the MR damper and magnetic flux density induced at fluid flow gap (filled with MR fluid is computed for different DC current applied to the electromagnetic coil. Developed magnetic flux is used for calculating the damper force using analytical method for each case. The low carbon steel has higher magnetic permeability hence maximum magnetic flux could pass through the piston head, which leads to higher value of magnetic effect induction at the annular gap. From the analysis results it is observed that the magnetic steel and low carbon steel piston head provided maximum magnetic flux density. Eventually the higher damping force can be observed for same case.

  13. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma temperatures and electron number density in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.L.; Suri, B.M.; Gupta, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    The HCD (Hollow Cathode Discharge) lamps have been used as a source of free atoms of any metal, controllable by direct current in the lamp. The plasma parameters including neutral species temperature, atomic excitation temperature and electron number density in a see-through type, homemade uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp with neon as a buffer gas have been investigated using optical emission spectroscopic techniques. The neutral species temperature has been measured using the Doppler broadening of a neon atomic spectral line. The atomic excitation temperature has been measured using the Boltzmann plot method utilizing uranium atomic spectral lines. The electron number density has been determined from the Saha-Boltzmann equation utilizing uranium atomic and ionic spectral lines. To the best of our knowledge, all these three plasma parameters are simultaneously measured for the first time in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

  14. Salinity, temperature and density data for the Canadian Beaufort Sea shelf, March 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopky, G E; Chiperzak, D B; Lawrence, M J

    1988-01-01

    This report contains salinity, temperature and density (CTD) data collected in the waters of the Canadian Beaufort Sea Shelf during March 1988. Salinity and temperature profile data were measured using a Guildline Model 8870 probe deployed from the ice surface. Ice thickness was also measured. Density was calculated using salinity and temperature values. CTD profiles were measured at five stations. The maximum depths of profiles measured from the ice surface ranged from 31.2 to 16.8 dbar. Salinity and temperature measurements ranged from 0.35 to 34.83, and -1.87 to 1.08/sup 0/C, respectively. The data presented in this report will assist in the identification and delineation of potential habitat types, as part of the Critical Arctic Estuarine and Marine Habitat Project of the Northern Oil and Gas Program. 5 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P. D.; Miller, G. E.; Weijers, H. W.; Willering, G. P.

    2013-02-13

    The next generation of high-ï¬eld magnets that will operate at magnetic ï¬elds substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a flexible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  16. Superconductors with low critical temperature for electro-magnets; Supraconducteurs a basse temperature critique pour electroaimants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A

    2002-07-01

    Among the superconductors with low critical temperature that are used to build magnets, NbTi has reached a development state that allows a massive production for big equipment of physics and an industrial production in the domain of medicine imaging. The material that might challenge the supremacy of NbTi is Nb{sub 3}Sn but some technical difficulties have yet to be overcome. This report begins with a review of the different industrial processes used to produce superconducting wires based on the NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn materials. The transition from the superconducting state to the resistive normal state is described for both materials, the magnetizing of multi-wire superconducting cables is also presented. The author details the different patterns of wires in cables and proposes a formulary that allows the determination, in some simple cases,of energy losses that are generated in a superconducting cable by a variable magnetic field. (A.C.)

  17. New type of magnetocaloric effect: Implications on low-temperature magnetic refrigeration using an Ericsson cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeya, H.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Moorman, J.O.

    1994-01-01

    The low-temperature, high magnetic field heat capacity (1.5 to 70 K and 0 to 9.85 T), dc and ac magnetic behaviors of the compound (Gd 0.54 Er 0.46 )AlNi show that field-induced magnetic entropy change is significant and almost constant over the temperature region of ∼15 to ∼45 K. The resulting temperature dependence of the magnetocaloric effect, nearly constant over a 30+ K temperature range, is unprecedented (most magnetic materials have a caretlike shape temperature dependence). These data show that (Gd 0.54 Er 0.46 )AlNi can be used as an effective active magnetic regenerator material for an Ericsson-cycle magnetic refrigerator, and could substitute for complex composite layered materials suggested earlier

  18. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. III. Density and Magnetically Regulated Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Benjamin [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tan, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Christie, Duncan [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Nakamura, Fumitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Van Loo, Sven [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Collins, David, E-mail: ben.wu@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    We study giant molecular cloud (GMC) collisions and their ability to trigger star cluster formation. We further develop our three-dimensional magnetized, turbulent, colliding GMC simulations by implementing star formation subgrid models. Two such models are explored: (1) “Density-Regulated,” i.e., fixed efficiency per free-fall time above a set density threshold and (2) “Magnetically Regulated,” i.e., fixed efficiency per free-fall time in regions that are magnetically supercritical. Variations of parameters associated with these models are also explored. In the non-colliding simulations, the overall level of star formation is sensitive to model parameter choices that relate to effective density thresholds. In the GMC collision simulations, the final star formation rates and efficiencies are relatively independent of these parameters. Between the non-colliding and colliding cases, we compare the morphologies of the resulting star clusters, properties of star-forming gas, time evolution of the star formation rate (SFR), spatial clustering of the stars, and resulting kinematics of the stars in comparison to the natal gas. We find that typical collisions, by creating larger amounts of dense gas, trigger earlier and enhanced star formation, resulting in 10 times higher SFRs and efficiencies. The star clusters formed from GMC collisions show greater spatial substructure and more disturbed kinematics.

  19. A new temperature and humidity dependent surface site density approach for deposition ice nucleation

    OpenAIRE

    I. Steinke; C. Hoose; O. Möhler; P. Connolly; T. Leisner

    2014-01-01

    Deposition nucleation experiments with Arizona Test Dust (ATD) as a surrogate for mineral dusts were conducted at the AIDA cloud chamber at temperatures between 220 and 250 K. The influence of the aerosol size distribution and the cooling rate on the ice nucleation efficiencies was investigated. Ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) densities were calculated to quantify the ice nucleation efficiency as a function of temperature, humidity and the aerosol ...

  20. Predicted precision of ion temperature and impurity fractional density measurements using the JET collective scattering diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsitto, F.

    1992-11-01

    In a previous investigation the possibility of measuring the bulk ion temperature was considered in detail, in the context of the proposed Thomson scattering diagnostic for fast ions and alpha particles in the Joint European Torus project. In this report we give an affirmative answer to the question of whether good precision can be obtained in the simultaneous determination of the temperatures and densities of plasma ions from a collective scattering experiment provided some conditions are satisfied. (Author)

  1. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Wei; Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Li Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stone, James M., E-mail: deng@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: hli@lanl.gov, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ , of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  2. Critical current density analysis of ex situ MgB2 wire by in-field and temperature Hall probe imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolome, E; Granados, X; Cambel, V; Fedor, J; Kovac, P; Husek, I

    2005-01-01

    The irreversible magnetic behaviour at different temperatures of an ex situ Fe-alloy/MgB 2 wire, exhibiting a granular compositional distribution, was studied using an in-field, high resolution Hall probe imaging system. Quantitative information about the local current density was obtained by solving the Biot-Savart inversion problem. The flux penetration and current distribution maps obtained can be attributed to a inhomogeneous compositional 'plum-cake-like' system, consisting of large, isolated MgB 2 agglomerations embedded in a matrix of finely distributed MgB 2 +MgO. The critical current densities within the grains and their evolution with the applied magnetic field and temperature have been obtained, and compared to the mean J c (H,T) in the matrix

  3. A conceptual design of high-temperature superconducting isochronous cyclotron magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, F.; Tang, Y.; Li, J.; Ren, L.; Shi, J.

    2011-01-01

    A design of High-temperature superconducting (HTS) isochronous cyclotron magnet is proposed. The maximum magnetic field of cyclotron main magnet reaches 3 T. Laying the HTS coil aboard the magnetic pole will raise the availability of the magnetic Field. Super-iron structure can provide a high uniformity and high gradient magnetic field. Super-iron structure can raise the availability of the HTS materials. Along with the development of High-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, the technology of HTS magnet is becoming increasingly important in the Cyclotron, which catches growing numbers of scholars' attentions. Based on the analysis of the problems met in the process of marrying superconducting materials with ferromagnetic materials, this article proposes a design of HTS isochronous cyclotron magnet. The process of optimization of magnet and the methods of realizing target parameters are introduced after taking finite element software as analyzing tools.

  4. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  5. Design of a temperature measurement and feedback control system based on an improved magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhongzhou; Sun, Yi; Liu, Jie; Su, Rijian; Yang, Ming; Li, Nana; Gan, Yong; Ye, Na

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia, as a novel cancer treatment, requires precise temperature control at 315 K-319 K (42 °C-46 °C). However, the traditional temperature measurement method cannot obtain the real-time temperature in vivo, resulting in a lack of temperature feedback during the heating process. In this study, the feasibility of temperature measurement and feedback control using magnetic nanoparticles is proposed and demonstrated. This technique could be applied in hyperthermia. Specifically, the triangular-wave temperature measurement method is improved by reconstructing the original magnetization response of magnetic nanoparticles based on a digital phase-sensitive detection algorithm. The standard deviation of the temperature in the magnetic nanoparticle thermometer is about 0.1256 K. In experiments, the temperature fluctuation of the temperature measurement and feedback control system using magnetic nanoparticles is less than 0.5 K at the expected temperature of 315 K. This shows the feasibility of the temperature measurement method for temperature control. The method provides a new solution for temperature measurement and feedback control in hyperthermia.

  6. Role of the current density profile on drift wave stability in internal transport barrier reversed magnetic shear experiments at JET and Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourment, C; Hoang, G T; Eriksson, L-G; Garbet, X; Litaudon, X; Tresset, G [EURATOM-CEA Association, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-03-01

    The role of the current density profile on drift wave stability is investigated using a linear electrostatic gyro-kinetic code. The growth rates are shown to have a linear dependence on the normalized temperature gradients above a certain threshold. A parametric study of the threshold shows a dramatic stabilizing effect of negative magnetic shear, especially for large scale instabilities. A set of handy formulae fitting the threshold as a function of the magnetic shear and the safety factor is proposed. Analysis of reversed magnetic shear discharges with internal transport barrier (ITB) in JET shows that ion ITBs can be triggered by the negative magnetic shear in the core of the plasma. Subsequently, the increase of the ExB shearing rate allows for the expansion of the ITB, despite the increase of the linear growth rates due to the temperature gradient peaking. In the case of the electron ITB obtained in the Tore Supra LHEP mode, the central increase of the confinement is associated with the stabilization of large scale trapped electron modes by the negative magnetic shear effect, whereas the steep electron temperature gradient destabilizes the small scale electron temperature gradient modes, which prevent the electron heat transport to reach neoclassical levels.

  7. Effects of low central fuelling on density and ion temperature profiles in reversed shear plasmas on JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaga, H; Ide, S; Sakamoto, Y; Fujita, T [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)], E-mail: takenaga.hidenobu@jaea.go.jp

    2008-07-15

    Effects of low central fuelling on density and ion temperature profiles have been investigated using negative ion based neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in reversed shear plasmas on JT-60U. Strong internal transport barrier (ITB) was maintained in density and ion temperature profiles, when central fuelling was decreased by switching positive ion based neutral beam injection to ECH after the strong ITB formation. Similar density and ion temperature ITBs were formed for the low and high central fuelling cases during the plasma current ramp-up phase. Strong correlation between the density gradient and the ion temperature gradient was observed, indicating that particle transport and ion thermal transport are strongly coupled or the density gradient assists the ion temperature ITB formation through suppression of drift wave instabilities such as ion temperature gradient mode. These results support that the density and ion temperature ITBs can be formed under reactor relevant conditions.

  8. Effects of low central fuelling on density and ion temperature profiles in reversed shear plasmas on JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaga, H.; Ide, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Fujita, T.; JT-60 Team

    2008-07-01

    Effects of low central fuelling on density and ion temperature profiles have been investigated using negative ion based neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in reversed shear plasmas on JT-60U. Strong internal transport barrier (ITB) was maintained in density and ion temperature profiles, when central fuelling was decreased by switching positive ion based neutral beam injection to ECH after the strong ITB formation. Similar density and ion temperature ITBs were formed for the low and high central fuelling cases during the plasma current ramp-up phase. Strong correlation between the density gradient and the ion temperature gradient was observed, indicating that particle transport and ion thermal transport are strongly coupled or the density gradient assists the ion temperature ITB formation through suppression of drift wave instabilities such as ion temperature gradient mode. These results support that the density and ion temperature ITBs can be formed under reactor relevant conditions.

  9. High magnetic field magnetoresistance anomalies in the charge density wave state of the quasi-two dimensional bronze KMo6O{17}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, H.; Dumas, J.; Marcus, J.; Schlenker, C.; Vignolles, D.

    2005-12-01

    We report high magnetic field magnetoresistance measurements performed in pulsed fields up to 55 T on the quasi-two dimensional charge density wave conductor KMo{6}O{17}. Magnetoresistance curves show several anomalies below 28 T. First order transitions to smaller gap states take place at low temperature above 30 T. A phase diagram T(B) has been obtained. The angular dependence of the anomalies is reported.

  10. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10 -4 Pa Xe (3.3x10 -6 Torr Xe) to 1.1x10 -3 Pa Xe (8.4x10 -6 Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures

  11. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and Te fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-01-01

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  12. A New Tool for Separating the Magnetic Mineralogy of Complex Mineral Assemblages from Low Temperature Magnetic Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Lagroix

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One timeless challenge in rock magnetic studies, inclusive of paleomagnetism and environmental magnetism, is decomposing a sample's bulk magnetic behavior into its individual magnetic mineral components. We present a method permitting to decompose the magnetic behavior of a bulk sample experimentally and at low temperature avoiding any ambiguities in data interpretation due to heating-induced alteration. A single instrument is used to measure the temperature dependence of remanent magnetizations and to apply an isothermal demagnetization step at any temperature between 2 and 400 K. The experimental method is validated on synthetic mixtures of magnetite, hematite, goethite as well as on natural loess samples where the contributions of magnetite, goethite, hematite and maghemite are successfully isolated. The experimental protocol can be adapted to target other iron bearing minerals relevant to the rock or sediment under study. One limitation rests on the fact that the method is based on remanent magnetizations. Consequently, a quantitative decomposition of absolute concentration of individual components remains unachievable without assumptions. Nonetheless, semi-quantitative magnetic mineral concentrations were determined on synthetic and natural loess/paleosol samples in order to validate and test the method as a semi-quantitative tool in environmental magnetism studies.

  13. Properties of ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes in tokamak plasmas with inverted density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huarong; Jhang, Hogun; Hahm, T. S.; Dong, J. Q.; Wang, Z. X.

    2017-12-01

    We perform a numerical study of linear stability of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the trapped electron mode (TEM) in tokamak plasmas with inverted density profiles. A local gyrokinetic integral equation is applied for this study. From comprehensive parametric scans, we obtain stability diagrams for ITG modes and TEMs in terms of density and temperature gradient scale lengths. The results show that, for the inverted density profile, there exists a normalized threshold temperature gradient above which the ITG mode and the TEM are either separately or simultaneously unstable. The instability threshold of the TEM for the inverted density profile is substantially different from that for normal and flat density profiles. In addition, deviations are found on the ITG threshold from an early analytic theory in sheared slab geometry with the adiabatic electron response [T. S. Hahm and W. M. Tang, Phys. Fluids B 1, 1185 (1989)]. A possible implication of this work on particle transport in pellet fueled tokamak plasmas is discussed.

  14. Finite temperature effects on anisotropic pressure and equation of state of dense neutron matter in an ultrastrong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isayev, A. A.; Yang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Spin-polarized states in dense neutron matter with the recently developed Skyrme effective interaction (BSk20 parametrization) are considered in the magnetic fields H up to 10 20 G at finite temperature. In a strong magnetic field, the total pressure in neutron matter is anisotropic, and the difference between the pressures parallel and perpendicular to the field direction becomes significant at H>H th ∼10 18 G. The longitudinal pressure decreases with the magnetic field and vanishes in the critical field 10 18 c 19 G, resulting in the longitudinal instability of neutron matter. With increasing temperature, the threshold H th and critical H c magnetic fields also increase. The appearance of the longitudinal instability prevents the formation of a fully spin-polarized state in neutron matter and only the states with moderate spin polarization are accessible. The anisotropic equation of state is determined at densities and temperatures relevant to the interiors of magnetars. The entropy of strongly magnetized neutron matter turns out to be larger than the entropy of nonpolarized matter. This is caused by some specific details in the dependence of the entropy on the effective masses of neutrons with spin up and spin down in a polarized state.

  15. Voxel-wise prostate cell density prediction using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Reynolds, Hayley M; Wraith, Darren; Williams, Scott; Finnegan, Mary E; Mitchell, Catherine; Murphy, Declan; Haworth, Annette

    2018-04-26

    There are currently no methods to estimate cell density in the prostate. This study aimed to develop predictive models to estimate prostate cell density from multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) data at a voxel level using machine learning techniques. In vivo mpMRI data were collected from 30 patients before radical prostatectomy. Sequences included T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. Ground truth cell density maps were computed from histology and co-registered with mpMRI. Feature extraction and selection were performed on mpMRI data. Final models were fitted using three regression algorithms including multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS), polynomial regression (PR) and generalised additive model (GAM). Model parameters were optimised using leave-one-out cross-validation on the training data and model performance was evaluated on test data using root mean square error (RMSE) measurements. Predictive models to estimate voxel-wise prostate cell density were successfully trained and tested using the three algorithms. The best model (GAM) achieved a RMSE of 1.06 (± 0.06) × 10 3 cells/mm 2 and a relative deviation of 13.3 ± 0.8%. Prostate cell density can be quantitatively estimated non-invasively from mpMRI data using high-quality co-registered data at a voxel level. These cell density predictions could be used for tissue classification, treatment response evaluation and personalised radiotherapy.

  16. Relationship of electrical, magnetic, and mechanical properties to processing in high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blendell, J.E.; Chiang, C.K.; Cranmer, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The interrelation between processing, microstructure, and properties is an important factor in understanding the behavior of ceramic materials. This type of understanding will be particularly important in the development of the new high T/sub c/ superconducting ceramic oxides of the type Ba/sub 2/YCu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/. As an initial effort in understanding these relations, a number of properties have been measured for these superconducting ceramics and related to their microstructure and processing sequence. The Ba/sub 2/YCu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ ceramics were prepared by powder processing techniques, followed by dry pressing and sintering in both air and flowing oxygen at various temperatures. The sintered bodies were annealed at various temperatures and environments. Superconducting properties, such as the transition temperature and the width of the transition, were measured by both electrical conductivity and AC magnetic susceptibility; both of these properties show a strong sensitivity to annealing temperature and atmosphere. The microstructure and density were also strongly dependent on processing conditions. In this regard, compositional mapping proved to be an important technique for quantifying microstructural variations. Mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, hardness, and fracture toughness, which will be important for the reliable use of these materials in large scale structures, were also determined

  17. Theory of Temperature Dependence of the Magnetization in Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    -spin. The interaction is mediated by an effective alloy medium calculated using the CPA theory and elliptic densities of states. Es wird gezeigt, daß die Temperaturabhängigkeit der magnetischen Momente und die Curie-Temperatur sowie die Temperatur der ferrimagnetischen Kompensation für Gd1-xTx (T = Co, Ni und Fe) und Y......1-xCox durch ein einfaches Model1 erklärt werden können, das eine RKKY-Wechsel-wirkung zwischen den Momenten der Seltenen Erden und des Pseudo-Spins des Übergangsmetalls annimmt. Die Wechselwirkung wird durch ein effektives Legierungsmedium übermittelt, das mit der CPA-Theorie und elliptischen......It is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments and Curie and ferrimagnetic compensation temperatures for Gdl-xTx (T = Co, Ni, and Fe) and Y1-xCox can be accounted for by a simple model assuming a RKKY interaction between the rare-earth moments and the transition-metal pseudo...

  18. Computer simulations of the restricted primitive model at very low temperature and density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valeriani, C.; Camp, P. J.; Zwanikken, J.W.; Van Roij, R.; Dijkstra, M.

    2010-01-01

    The problem of successfully simulating ionic fluids at low temperature and low density states is well known in the simulation literature: using conventional methods, the system is not able to equilibrate rapidly due to the presence of strongly associated cation–anion pairs. In this paper we present

  19. Excess Molar Volumes of (Propiophenone + Toluene) and Estimated Density of Liquid Propiophenone below Its Melting Temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morávková, Lenka; Linek, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2006), s. 1240-1244 ISSN 0021-9614 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/1098 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : density * excess volume * temperature dependence Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2006

  20. Demonstrating the Temperature Dependence of Density via Construction of a Galilean Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Marie A.; Padgett, Lea W.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the construction of a Galilean thermometer out of common chemistry glassware is described. Students in a first-semester physical chemistry (thermodynamics) class can construct the Galilean thermometer as an investigation of the thermal expansivity of liquids and the temperature dependence of density. This is an excellent first…

  1. Status of electron temperature and density measurement with beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, O.; Beigman, I. L.; Vainshtein, L. A.; Schweer, B.; Kantor, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Xu, Y.; Krychowiak, M.; Lehnen, M.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.

    2008-01-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium is used at the TEXTOR tokamak as a reliable method to obtain radial profiles of electron temperature T-e(r, t) and electron density ne(r, t). In this paper the experimental realization of this method at TEXTOR and the status of the atomic physics employed

  2. Temperature and Population Density Effects on Locomotor Activity of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, T. M.; Faurby, S.; Kjærsgaard, A.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of ectotherm organisms is affected by both abiotic and biotic factors. However, a limited number of studies have investigated the synergistic effects on behavioral traits. This study examined the effect of temperature and density on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (L.). Locomot...

  3. Density and temperature diagnostics of a Ne-like germanium plasma created by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, E.; Bourgade, J.L.; Combis, P.; Jacquemot, S.; Le Breton, J.P.; Louis-Jacquet, M.; Naccache, D.; Nail, M.; Peyrusse, O.

    1987-01-01

    In the framework of X-ray laser studies, experiments on Ne-like Ge plasma have been performed by laser irradiation at λ = 1.053 μm. Amplification in lasing transitions has been observed by varying the plasma length. Theoretical calculations of excited level population allow us to determine density and temperature from line intensity ratios

  4. Effects of Temperature on the Density of Water Based Drilling Mud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    geothermal wells and for drilling deep wells. A systematic examination of rheological properties. (viscosity, Fluid loss, mud density, gel strength, pH, and yield ... gradient at the edge of the rider nearest to the fulcrum was read. The instrument is then clean and replaced. This process was repeated for a maximum temperature ...

  5. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro Gomez, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthemore, a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, is included in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (author) [es

  6. Guidelines for etching silicon MEMS structures using fluorine high-density plasmas at cryogenic temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Meint J.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gilde, M.J.; Roelofs, Gerard; Sasserath, Jay N.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    This paper presents guidelines for the deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon MEMS structures, employing SF6/O2-based high-density plasmas at cryogenic temperatures. Procedures of how to tune the equipment for optimal results with respect to etch rate and profile control are described. Profile

  7. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro Gomerz, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthermore, we have included a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (Author) 13 refs

  8. Spin-polarized versus chiral condensate in quark matter at finite temperature and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providencia, Joao

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low-energy ef...

  9. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  10. Effect of sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere on the density and coercivity of (Sm,Zr)(Co,Cu,Fe)Z permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhanov, G. S.; Dormidontov, N. A.; Kolchugina, N. B.; Dormidontov, A. G.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of heat treatments in manufacturing (Sm,Zr)(Co,Cu,Fe)Z-based permanent magnets sintered in a hydrogen atmosphere on their properties has been studied. It was shown that the dynamics of the magnetic hardening of the studied magnets during heat treatments, in whole, corresponds to available concepts of phase transformations in five-component precipitation-hardened SmCo-based alloys. Peculiarities of the studied compositions consist in the fact that the coercive force magnitude of magnets quenched from the isothermal aging temperature is higher by an order of magnitude than those available in the literature. It was noted that, in using the selected manufacturing procedure, the increase in the density of samples does not finish at the sintering stage but continues in the course of solid-solution heat treatment.

  11. Magnetic field vector and electron density diagnostics from linear polarization measurements in 14 solar prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommier, V.

    1986-01-01

    The Hanle effect is the modification of the linear polarization parameters of a spectral line due to the effect of the magnetic field. It has been successfully applied to the magnetic field vector diagnostic in solar prominences. The magnetic field vector is determined by comparing the measured polarization to the polarization computed, taking into account all the polarizing and depolarizing processes in line formation and the depolarizing effect of the magnetic field. The method was applied to simultaneous polarization measurements in the Helium D3 line and in the hydrogen beta line in 14 prominences. Four polarization parameters are measured, which lead to the determination of the three coordinates of the magnetic field vector and the electron density, owing to the sensitivity of the hydrogen beta line to the non-negligible effect of depolarizing collisions with electrons and protons of the medium. A mean value of 1.3 x 10 to the 10th power cu. cm. is derived in 14 prominences.

  12. Three-dimensional density and compressible magnetic structure in solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Owen W.; Narita, Yasuhito; Escoubet, C.-Philippe

    2018-03-01

    The three-dimensional structure of both compressible and incompressible components of turbulence is investigated at proton characteristic scales in the solar wind. Measurements of the three-dimensional structure are typically difficult, since the majority of measurements are performed by a single spacecraft. However, the Cluster mission consisting of four spacecraft in a tetrahedral formation allows for a fully three-dimensional investigation of turbulence. Incompressible turbulence is investigated by using the three vector components of the magnetic field. Meanwhile compressible turbulence is investigated by considering the magnitude of the magnetic field as a proxy for the compressible fluctuations and electron density data deduced from spacecraft potential. Application of the multi-point signal resonator technique to intervals of fast and slow wind shows that both compressible and incompressible turbulence are anisotropic with respect to the mean magnetic field direction P⟂ ≫ P∥ and are sensitive to the value of the plasma beta (β; ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure) and the wind type. Moreover, the incompressible fluctuations of the fast and slow solar wind are revealed to be different with enhancements along the background magnetic field direction present in the fast wind intervals. The differences in the fast and slow wind and the implications for the presence of different wave modes in the plasma are discussed.

  13. Magnetic fields produced by rotating symmetrical bodies with homogeneous surface charge density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espejel-Morales, R; Murguía-Romero, G; Calles, A; Cabrera-Bravo, E; Morán-López, J L

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical calculation for the stationary magnetic field produced by different rotating bodies with homogeneous and constant surface charge density. The calculation is done by superposing the magnetic field produced by a set of loops of current which mimic the magnetic field produced by belts of current defined by slices of fixed width. We consider the cases of a sphere, ellipsoids, open and closed cylinders and a combination of these in a dumbbell -like shell. We also plot their magnetic field lines using a technique that make use of the Runge–Kutta fourth-order method. Up to our knowledge, the case of closed cylinders was not calculated before. In contrast to previous results, we find that the magnetic field inside finite hollow bodies is homogeneous only in the case of a sphere. This is consequence of the fact that, for the sphere, the surface of any slice taken perpendicularly to the rotation axis, depends only on its thickness, like in the case of an infinite cylinder. (paper)

  14. Temperature and carrier-density dependence of Auger and radiative recombination in nitride optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Yan, Qimin; Steiauf, Daniel; Van de Walle, Chris G

    2013-01-01

    Nitride light-emitting diodes are a promising solution for efficient solid-state lighting, but their performance at high power is affected by the efficiency-droop problem. Previous experimental and theoretical work has identified Auger recombination, a three-particle nonradiative carrier recombination mechanism, as the likely cause of the droop. In this work, we use first-principles calculations to elucidate the dependence of the radiative and Auger recombination rates on temperature, carrier density and quantum-well confinement. Our calculated data for the temperature dependence of the recombination coefficients are in good agreement with experiment and provide further validation on the role of Auger recombination in the efficiency reduction. Polarization fields and phase-space filling negatively impact device efficiency because they increase the operating carrier density at a given current density and increase the fraction of carriers lost to Auger recombination. (paper)

  15. Superconducting permanent magnets for high-temperature operation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirsa, Miloš; Muralidhar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, Suppl. D (2004), D441-D444 ISSN 0011-4626. [Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism. Košice, 12.07.2004-15.07.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : superconducting magnets * ternary LRE-123 compounds * mesoscopic defects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  16. Selective electrochemical extraction of REEs from NdFeB magnet waste at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venkatesan, P.; Vander Hoogerstraete, Tom; Hennebel, Tom; Binnemans, Koen; Sietsma, J.; Yang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    NdFeB magnet waste is one of the important secondary resources from which rare-earth elements (REEs) can be recovered. Herein we present an electrochemical route to selectively extract REEs from the magnet waste at room temperature. First, the magnet waste was partially leached with HCl. The

  17. Magnetic domain structure of MnAs thin films as a function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, Masaki; Manago, Takashi; Akinaga, Hiroyuki; Kuramochi, Hiromi; Okabayashi, Jun

    2003-01-01

    We have investigate magnetic domain structures of MnAs thin films grown on GaAs substrates by a magnetic force microscope. We observed, by an atomic force microscope, rectangular defects along GaAs [110] direction which disperse randomly on the surface of MnAs/GaAs(001). The Curie temperature of MnAs is 45degC, and it is successfully confirmed directly by the variable temperature magnetic force microscope observation. We also investigated magnetic domain structures of MnAs/GaAs(111)B, and no apparent relation was observed between the topographic structure and the magnetic domain structure. (author)

  18. Temperature- and field-induced structural transitions in magnetic colloidal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rojas, J.; Calvo, F.

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic colloidal clusters can form chain, ring, and more compact structures depending on their size. In the present investigation we examine the combined effects of temperature and external magnetic field on these configurations by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations and a dedicated analysis based on inherent structures. Various thermodynamical, geometric, and magnetic properties are calculated and altogether provide evidence for possibly multiple structural transitions at low external magnetic field. Temperature effects are found to overcome the ordering effect of the external field, the melted stated being associated with low magnetization and a greater compactness. Tentative phase diagrams are proposed for selected sizes.

  19. Temperature, density and potential fluctuations by a swept Langmuir probe in Wendelstein 7-AS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, L.; Niedermeyer, H; Endler, M; Theimer, G; Rudyj, A; Verplancke, Ph [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Balbin, R; Hidalgo, C [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)

    1994-12-31

    Numerous experiments using a Langmuir probe to investigate the magnitude of temperature fluctuations and their contribution to heat transport in the edge region of tokamak plasmas have been carried out. Sweeping the voltage applied to a tip fast enough to ensure that the ion saturation current, floating potential and electron temperature may be assumed to be constant during the sweep is experimentally more difficult than alternative schemes but this disadvantage is compensated by the ability to measure all three of these quantities at one spatial location. Sweep frequencies up to 600 kHz have been employed to obtain the current-voltage characteristic. A radial scan in the vicinity of the velocity shear layer on W7-AS stellarator was performed. Inside and outside the shear layer the normalised magnitude of the temperature fluctuations was found to be approximately 30% larger than the magnitude of the electron density fluctuations, approaching a value of 0.12 and 0.09 respectively at a radial position 1 cm inside the shear layer. An increase in the coherency of the temperature, floating potential and density fluctuations between tips with a poloidal separation of 2 mm was also measured as the shear layer was crossed. Heat conduction produced by correlated temperature and poloidal electric field fluctuations is therefore possible. An increasing coherence of temperature and floating potential fluctuations leads to an increase in the coherence of temperature and plasma potential fluctuations as the shear layer was crossed. (author) 7 refs., 3 figs.

  20. An investigation of texturing by magnetic and mechanical techniques in high critical temperature superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschanels, X.

    1992-11-01

    The principal goal of this work is to quantify the influence of texture of ceramic superconductors ReBaCuO (Re=Dy, Y) on their critical current density (Jc). The magnetic alignment of particles at ambient temperature is the first technique who has allowed us to produce superconducting (Meissner effect) and textured ceramics. However, these materials are very brittle because of their porosity and this makes it impossible to measure their Jc. Press-forging (or creep sintering) is the second technique who has allowed us to prepare highly textured ceramics materials which are also dense. We have studied the influence of various conditions of thermomechanical treatment (sintering time and temperature, applied load, rate of deformation, density of the material at the beginning) on the texture quality. We have shown that at 900 deg, the eutectic liquid formed by BaCuO 2 , CuO and YBa 2 Cu 3 0 7-Y various mechanisms that help explain the formation of observed texture. After the oxidation stage which requires heat treatment under controlled atmospheres, we obtain superconducting ceramics (Tc=85 K). Moreover, this study also shows that the texture can improve the Jc by 400%, to 750 A/cm 2 at 77 K in the best specimens. This low value is explained by the presence of non-superconducting secondary phases and amorphous phases at the grain boundaries. (Author). 120 refs., figs., tabs

  1. The Temperature and Density from Permitted O II Lines in the Planetary Nebula NGC 7009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, M. G., Guillén Tavera, J. E., Arrieta, A., Torres-Peimbert, S.

    2017-11-01

    We present spatially- and velocity-resolved spectroscopy of NGC 7009 acquired with the UVES spectrograph at the VLT UT2/Kueyen. We use these data to determine the electron temperature and density structure based upon O II lines. We find a strong gradient in the electron temperature. It agrees with the electron temperature determined from collisionally-excited lines in part of the nebular volume, but also differs by more than 6,000 K in other parts of the nebular volume. This result supports the hypothesis that NGC 7009 contains two plasma components, one of which emits collisionally-excited lines and the other that does not. We are able to determine only a lower limit to the electron density of 10^4 cm^{-3} from the O II lines, which is higher than derived from collisionally-excited lines. We are unable to determine whether the two plasma components are in pressure equilibrium from our data, but there exist temperature and density combinations that allow this equilibrium for temperatures between 600 K and 6,000 K.

  2. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  3. Computer simulations of the restricted primitive model at very low temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeriani, Chantal; Camp, Philip J; Zwanikken, Jos W; Van Roij, Rene; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2010-01-01

    The problem of successfully simulating ionic fluids at low temperature and low density states is well known in the simulation literature: using conventional methods, the system is not able to equilibrate rapidly due to the presence of strongly associated cation-anion pairs. In this paper we present a numerical method for speeding up computer simulations of the restricted primitive model (RPM) at low temperatures (around the critical temperature) and at very low densities (down to 10 -10 σ -3 , where σ is the ion diameter). Experimentally, this regime corresponds to typical concentrations of electrolytes in nonaqueous solvents. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that the RPM has been equilibrated at such extremely low concentrations. More generally, this method could be used to equilibrate other systems that form aggregates at low concentrations.

  4. Explosive He4 burning: I. kinetics of burning at constant temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, A.M.; Ergma, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of He 4 burning at a constant temperature T> 10 9 0 K and a density rho> 10 5 g/cm 3 is considered. The regions of formation of iron group elements and lighter nuclides during He 4 burning are indicated in the rho, T plane. The dependence of the mean atomic number of the nuclides formed on the temperature and the density is determined. For the temperature T ≥4.10 9 0 K a ''neutron flash'' is found, which can lead to a change in the isotopic composition of the r- and s-process elements present. The range of rho and T in which the formation of an excess number of the elements beyond the iron peak is found

  5. Effects of Processing Temperatures of Nickel Plating on Capacitance Density of Alumina Film Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myung-Sun; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Lee, Jeon-Kook

    2015-06-01

    We observed the effects of nickel plating temperatures for controlling the surface morphologies of the deposited nickel layers on the alumina nano-pores. The alumina nano-channels were filled with nickel at various processing temperatures of 60-90 degrees C. The electrical properties of the alumina film capacitors were changed with processing temperatures. The electroless nickel plating (ENP) at 60 degrees C improved the nickel penetration into the alumina nano-channels due to the reduced reaction rate. Nickel layers are uniformly formed on the high aspect ratio alumina pores. Due to the uniform nickel electrode, the capacitance density of the alumina film capacitors is improved by the low leakage current, dissipation factor and equivalent series resistance. Alumina film capacitors made by ENP at 60 degrees C had a high capacitance density of 160 nF/cm2.

  6. Relationship between Magnetic Anisotropy below Pseudogap Temperature and Short-Range Antiferromagnetic Order in High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinari, Takao

    2018-06-01

    The central issue in high-temperature cuprate superconductors is the pseudogap state appearing below the pseudogap temperature T*, which is well above the superconducting transition temperature. In this study, we theoretically investigate the rapid increase of the magnetic anisotropy below the pseudogap temperature detected by the recent torque-magnetometry measurements on YBa2Cu3Oy [Y. Sato et al., 10.1038/nphys4205" xlink:type="simple">Nat. Phys. 13, 1074 (2017)]. Applying the spin Green's function formalism including the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction arising from the buckling of the CuO2 plane, we obtain results that are in good agreement with the experiment and find a scaling relationship. Our analysis suggests that the characteristic temperature associated with the magnetic anisotropy, which coincides with T*, is not a phase transition temperature but a crossover temperature associated with the short-range antiferromagnetic order.

  7. Room-temperature superparamagnetism due to giant magnetic anisotropy in Mo S defected single-layer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A.; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2018-04-01

    Room-temperature superparamagnetism due to a large magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of a single atom magnet has always been a prerequisite for nanoscale magnetic devices. Realization of two dimensional (2D) materials such as single-layer (SL) MoS2, has provided new platforms for exploring magnetic effects, which is important for both fundamental research and for industrial applications. Here, we use density functional theory (DFT) to show that the antisite defect (Mo S ) in SL MoS2 is magnetic in nature with a magnetic moment μ of  ∼2 μB and, remarkably, exhibits an exceptionally large atomic scale MAE =\\varepsilon\\parallel-\\varepsilon\\perp of  ∼500 meV. Our calculations reveal that this giant anisotropy is the joint effect of strong crystal field and significant spin–orbit coupling (SOC). In addition, the magnetic moment μ can be tuned between 1 μB and 3 μB by varying the Fermi energy \\varepsilonF , which can be achieved either by changing the gate voltage or by chemical doping. We also show that MAE can be raised to  ∼1 eV with n-type doping of the MoS2:Mo S sample. Our systematic investigations deepen our understanding of spin-related phenomena in SL MoS2 and could provide a route to nanoscale spintronic devices.

  8. Late summer temperature reconstruction based on tree-ring density for Sygera Mountain, southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyong; Duan, Jianping; Wang, Lily; Zhu, Haifeng

    2018-04-01

    Although several tree-ring density-based summer/late summer temperature reconstructions have been developed on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the understanding of the local/regional characteristics of summer temperature fluctuations on a long-term scale in some regions is still limited. To improve our understanding in these aspects, more local or regional summer temperature reconstructions extending back over several centuries are required. In this study, a new mean latewood density (LWD) chronology from Abies georgei var. smithii from the upper tree line of Sygera Mountain on the southeastern TP was developed to reconstruct the late summer temperature variability since 1820 CE. The bootstrapped correlation analysis showed that the LWD chronology index was significantly and positively correlated with the late summer (August-September) mean temperatures (r1950-2008 = 0.63, p < 0.001) recorded at the nearest meteorological station and that this reconstruction has considerable potential to represent the late summer temperature variability at the regional scale. Our late summer temperature reconstruction revealed three obvious cold periods (i.e., 1872-1908, 1913-1937 and 1941-1966) and two relatively warm phases (i.e., 1821-1871 and 1970-2008) over the past two centuries. Comparisons of our reconstruction with other independent tree-ring-based temperature reconstructions, glacier fluctuations and historical documental records from neighboring regions showed good agreement in these relatively cold and warm intervals. Our reconstruction exhibits an overall increasing temperature trend since the 1960s, providing new evidence supporting the recent warming of the TP. Moreover, our results also indicate that the late summer temperature variability of Sygera Mountain on the southeastern TP has potential links with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO).

  9. NdFeB magnets with zero temperature coefficient of induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, B.M.; Narasimhan, K.S.V.L.; Hurt, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature compensation for the induction of NdFeB type magnets has been investigated. A computer assisted alloy selection method was adopted to identify composition of zero temperature coefficient of induction over -50 to 200 0 C. Selected alloys were processed into magnet by the conventional powder metallurgy method. The experimental temperature coefficient on the sintered magnet correlated with the prediction satisfactory. Holmium is an essential ingredient required for temperature compensation of NdFeB magnets. A magnet, (Nd/sub 0.23/Ho/sub 0.64/Dy/sub 0.13/)/sub 15/Fe/sub 79/B/sub 6/ with B/sub r/ of 7,700 Gauss, H/sub c/ of 7,700 Oe, H/sub ci/ of 20,600 Oe, Bh/sub max/ of 14.8 MGOe and temperature coefficient of -0.029% per 0 C over -50 to +150 was obtained

  10. Density functional theory study of bulk and single-layer magnetic semiconductor CrPS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Zhou, Jia

    2016-11-01

    Searching for two-dimensional (2D) materials with multifunctionality is one of the main goals of current research in 2D materials. Magnetism and semiconducting are certainly two desirable functional properties for a single 2D material. In line with this goal, here we report a density functional theory (DFT) study of bulk and single-layer magnetic semiconductor CrPS4. We find that the ground-state magnetic structure of bulk CrPS4 exhibits the A-type antiferromagnetic ordering, which transforms to ferromagnetic (FM) ordering in single-layer CrPS4. The calculated formation energy and phonon spectrum confirm the stability of single-layer CrPS4. The band gaps of FM single-layer CrPS4 calculated with a hybrid density functional are within the visible-light range. We also study the effects of FM ordering on the optical absorption spectra and band alignments for water splitting, indicating that single-layer CrPS4 could be a potential photocatalyst. Our work opens up ample opportunities of energy-related applications of single-layer CrPS4.

  11. Transition from order to chaos, and density limit, in magnetized plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A; Zuin, M; Maiocchi, A; Marino, M; Martines, E; Galgani, L

    2012-09-01

    It is known that a plasma in a magnetic field, conceived microscopically as a system of point charges, can exist in a magnetized state, and thus remain confined, inasmuch as it is in an ordered state of motion, with the charged particles performing gyrational motions transverse to the field. Here, we give an estimate of a threshold, beyond which transverse motions become chaotic, the electrons being unable to perform even one gyration, so that a breakdown should occur, with complete loss of confinement. The estimate is obtained by the methods of perturbation theory, taking as perturbing force acting on each electron that due to the so-called microfield, i.e., the electric field produced by all the other charges. We first obtain a general relation for the threshold, which involves the fluctuations of the microfield. Then, taking for such fluctuations, the formula given by Iglesias, Lebowitz, and MacGowan for the model of a one component plasma with neutralizing background, we obtain a definite formula for the threshold, which corresponds to a density limit increasing as the square of the imposed magnetic field. Such a theoretical density limit is found to fit pretty well the empirical data for collapses of fusion machines.

  12. Low-temperature magnetism of alabandite: Crucial role of surface oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čuda, J.; Kohout, Tomáš; Filip, J.; Tuček, J.; Kosterov, A.; Haloda, J.; Skála, Roman; Santala, E.; Medřík, I.; Zbořil, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 98, 8/9 (2013), s. 1550-1556 ISSN 0003-004X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300130903 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : alabandite (MnS) * hausmannite (Mn3O4) * magnetism * troilite (FeS) * crystallization * experimental mineralogy * ferromanganese deposit * hysteresis * low temperature * magnetic anomaly * magnetic field * manganese deposit * oxidation * remanent magnetization * stoichiometry * sulfide Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.059, year: 2013

  13. Critical temperature for shape transition in hot nuclei within covariant density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Niu, Y. F.

    2018-05-01

    Prompted by the simple proportional relation between critical temperature for pairing transition and pairing gap at zero temperature, we investigate the relation between critical temperature for shape transition and ground-state deformation by taking even-even Cm-304286 isotopes as examples. The finite-temperature axially deformed covariant density functional theory with BCS pairing correlation is used. Since the Cm isotopes are the newly proposed nuclei with octupole correlations, we studied in detail the free energy surface, the Nilsson single-particle (s.p.) levels, and the components of s.p. levels near the Fermi level in 292Cm. Through this study, the formation of octupole equilibrium is understood by the contribution coming from the octupole driving pairs with Ω [N ,nz,ml] and Ω [N +1 ,nz±3 ,ml] for single-particle levels near the Fermi surfaces as it provides a good manifestation of the octupole correlation. Furthermore, the systematics of deformations, pairing gaps, and the specific heat as functions of temperature for even-even Cm-304286 isotopes are discussed. Similar to the relation between the critical pairing transition temperature and the pairing gap at zero temperature Tc=0.6 Δ (0 ) , a proportional relation between the critical shape transition temperature and the deformation at zero temperature Tc=6.6 β (0 ) is found for both octupole shape transition and quadrupole shape transition for the isotopes considered.

  14. Perturbation theory of the quark-gluon plasma at finite temperature and baryon number density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    At very high energy densities, hadronic matter becomes an almost ideal gas of quarks and gluons. In these circumstances, the effects of particle interactions are small, and to some order in perturbation theory are computable by methods involving weak coupling expansions. To illustrate the perturbative methods which may be used to compute the thermodynamic potential, the results and methods which are employed to compute to first order in α/sub s/ are reviewed. The problem of the plasmon effect, and the necessity of using non-perturbative methods when going beyond first order in α/sub s/ in evaluating the thermodynamic potential are discussed. The results at zero temperature and finite baryon number density to second order in α/sub s/ are also reviewed. The method of renormalization group improving the weak coupling expansions by replacing the expansion by an expansion in a temperature and baryon number density dependent coupling which approaches zero at high energy densities is discussed. Non-perturbative effects such as instantons are briefly mentioned and the breakdown of perturbation theory for the thermodynamical at order α/sub s/ 3 for finite temperature is presented

  15. New hybrid magnet system for structure research at highest magnetic fields and temperatures in the millikelvin region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeibidl, Peter; Ehmler, Hartmut; Tennant, Alan; Bird, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Helmholtz Centre Berlin (HZB) is a user facility for the study of structure and dynamics with neutrons and synchrotron radiation with special emphasis on experiments under extreme conditions. Neutron scattering is uniquely suited to study magnetic properties on a microscopic length scale, because neutrons have comparable wavelengths and, due to their magnetic moment, they interact with the atomic magnetic moments. At HZB a dedicated instrument for neutron scattering at extreme magnetic fields and low temperatures is under construction, the Extreme Environment Diffractometer ExED. It is projected according to the time-of-flight principle for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering and for the special geometric constraints of analysing samples in a high field magnet. The new hybrid magnet will not only allow for novel experiments, it will be at the forefront of development in magnet technology itself. With a set of superconducting and resistive coils a maximum field above 30 T will be possible. To compromise between the needs of the magnet design for highest fields and the concept of the neutron instrument, the magnetic field will be generated by means of a coned, resistive inner solenoid and a superconducting outer solenoid with horizontal field orientation. To allow for experiments down to Millikelvin Temperatures the installation of a 3 He or a dilution cryostat with a closed cycle precooling stage is foreseen.

  16. Quantal density-functional theory in the presence of a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tao; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the quantal density-functional theory (QDFT) of electrons in the presence of an external electrostatic field E(r)=-∇v(r) to include an external magnetostatic field B(r)=∇xA(r), where (v(r),A(r)) are the respective scalar and vector potentials. The generalized QDFT, valid for nondegenerate ground and excited states, is the mapping from the interacting system of electrons to a model of noninteracting fermions with the same density ρ(r) and physical current density j(r), and from which the total energy can be obtained. The properties (ρ(r),j(r)) constitute the basic quantum-mechanical variables because, as proved previously, for a nondegenerate ground state they uniquely determine the potentials (v(r),A(r)). The mapping to the noninteracting system is arbitrary in that the model fermions may be either in their ground or excited state. The theory is explicated by application to a ground state of the exactly solvable (two-dimensional) Hooke's atom in a magnetic field, with the mapping being to a model system also in its ground state. The majority of properties of the model are obtained in closed analytical or semianalytical form. A comparison with the corresponding mapping from a ground state of the (three-dimensional) Hooke's atom in the absence of a magnetic field is also made.

  17. DEMARCATE: Density-based magnetic resonance image clustering for assessing tumor heterogeneity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijoy; Banerjee, Sayantan; Kurtek, Sebastian; Narang, Shivali; Lee, Joonsang; Rao, Ganesh; Martinez, Juan; Bharath, Karthik; Rao, Arvind U K; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a crucial area of cancer research wherein inter- and intra-tumor differences are investigated to assess and monitor disease development and progression, especially in cancer. The proliferation of imaging and linked genomic data has enabled us to evaluate tumor heterogeneity on multiple levels. In this work, we examine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with brain cancer to assess image-based tumor heterogeneity. Standard approaches to this problem use scalar summary measures (e.g., intensity-based histogram statistics) that do not adequately capture the complete and finer scale information in the voxel-level data. In this paper, we introduce a novel technique, DEMARCATE (DEnsity-based MAgnetic Resonance image Clustering for Assessing Tumor hEterogeneity) to explore the entire tumor heterogeneity density profiles (THDPs) obtained from the full tumor voxel space. THDPs are smoothed representations of the probability density function of the tumor images. We develop tools for analyzing such objects under the Fisher-Rao Riemannian framework that allows us to construct metrics for THDP comparisons across patients, which can be used in conjunction with standard clustering approaches. Our analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) based Glioblastoma dataset reveal two significant clusters of patients with marked differences in tumor morphology, genomic characteristics and prognostic clinical outcomes. In addition, we see enrichment of image-based clusters with known molecular subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme, which further validates our representation of tumor heterogeneity and subsequent clustering techniques.

  18. Temperature dependence of magnetopolarons in a parabolic quantum dot in arbitrary magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Kadi; Gu Shiwei

    1993-10-01

    The temperature and the size dependence of a magnetopolaron in a harmonic quantum dot with an external magnetic field normal to the plane of the quantum dot are investigated theoretically. For a weak magnetic field (ω c LO ), both the cyclotron mass m * c+ and the cyclotron mass m * c- are the increasing functions of temperature, whereas for strong magnetic fields (ω c > ω LO ), the cyclotron mass m * c+ is the decreasing function of temperature, while the cyclotron mass m * c- is the increasing function of temperature. (author). 27 refs, 2 figs

  19. Temperature dependence of magnetization reversal in Co and Fe3O4 nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakova, Olga; Erts, Donats; Crowley, Timothy A.; Kulkarni, Jaideep S.; Holmes, Justin D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the magnetization reversal of cobalt and magnetite nanowires, 4 nm in diameter, synthesized within the pores of mesoporous silica thin films. A SQUID magnetometer was used to study the magnetic properties of the nanowire arrays over a broad temperature interval, T=1.8-300 K. The magnetization reversal process was found to be strongly temperature dependent. While a coherent rotation may occur at room temperature, a process involving the formation of domain structures takes place as the temperature decreases down to 1.8 K

  20. Bremsstrahlung spectra for Al, Cs, and Au atoms in high-temperature, high-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, L.; Pratt, R.H.; Tseng, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented from a numerical calculation for the bremsstrahlung spectrum and Gaunt factors of Al, Cs, and Au atoms in high-temperature (-T), high-density (-rho) plasmas. Plasma temperatures kT = 0.1 and 1.0 keV and plasma densities rho = rho 0 (the normal solid density) and rho = 100rho 0 are considered. This allows us to determine the generality and identify the origins of features which we had previously identified in calculations for Cs. We also now present results for the total energy loss of an electron in such a plasma. We use a relativistic multipole code which treats the bremsstrahlung process as a single-electron transition in a static screened central potential. We take for the static potential corresponding to an atom in a hot dense plasma the finite-temperature, finite-density Thomas-Fermi model. This approach corresponds to an average atom in local thermodynamic equilibrium. In comparison to isolated-neutral-atom results we observe general suppression of cross sections and a particular suppression in the tip region of the spectrum. Within this model, both superscreening and shape resonances are found in the circumstances of extreme density. At more normal densities and except for the soft-photon end, the spectrum at these energies for an atom in a hot plasma (characterized by an average degree of ionization) can be well represented by the spectrum of the corresponding isolated ion, which has a similar potential shape at the distances which characterize the process

  1. Calculating transport AC losses in stacks of high temperature superconductor coated conductors with magnetic substrates using FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainslie, Mark D.; Flack, Tim J.; Campbell, Archie M.

    2012-01-01

    Properties of stacks of HTS coated conductors with and without a magnetic substrate. Non-magnetic substrate model is consistent with existing methods. Presence of a magnetic substrate increases the total AC loss of the stack. Differences and similarities between certain tapes within stacks are explained. Ferromagnetic loss of substrate negligible in most cases except small currents/fields. In this paper, the authors investigate the electromagnetic properties of stacks of high temperature superconductor (HTS) coated conductors with a particular focus on calculating the total transport AC loss. The cross-section of superconducting cables and coils is often modeled as a two-dimensional stack of coated conductors, and these stacks can be used to estimate the AC loss of a practical device. This paper uses a symmetric two dimensional (2D) finite element model based on the H formulation, and a detailed investigation into the effects of a magnetic substrate on the transport AC loss of a stack is presented. The number of coated conductors in each stack is varied from 1 to 150, and three types of substrate are compared: non-magnetic weakly magnetic and strongly magnetic. The non-magnetic substrate model is comparable with results from existing models for the limiting cases of a single tape (Norris) and an infinite stack (Clem). The presence of a magnetic substrate increases the total AC loss of the stack, due to an increased localized magnetic flux density, and the stronger the magnetic material, the further the flux penetrates into the stack overall. The AC loss is calculated for certain tapes within the stack, and the differences and similarities between the losses throughout the stack are explained using the magnetic flux penetration and current density distributions in those tapes. The ferromagnetic loss of the substrate itself is found to be negligible in most cases, except for small magnitudes of current. Applying these findings to practical applications, where AC

  2. Anisotropic Transport and Magnetic Properties of Charge-Density-Wave Materials RSeTe_2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pei-Pei; Long Yu-Jia; Zhao Ling-Xiao; Chen Dong; Xue Mian-Qi; Chen Gen-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of RSeTe_2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd) are synthesized using LiCl/RbCl flux. Transport and magnetic properties in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the a–c plane are investigated. We find that the resistivity anisotropy ρ_⊥/ρ_‖ lies in the range 486–615 for different compounds at 2 K, indicating the highly two-dimensional character. In both the orientations, the charge-density-wave transitions start near T_C_D_W = 284(3) K, 316(3) K, 359(3) K for NdSeTe_2, PrSeTe_2, CeSeTe_2, respectively, with a considerable increase in dc resistivity. While for LaSeTe_2, no obvious resistivity anomaly is observed up to 380 K. The value of T_C_D_W increases monotonically with the increasing lattice parameters. Below T_C_D_W, slight anomalies can be observed in NdSeTe_2, PrSeTe_2 and CeSeTe_2 with onset temperature at 193(3) K, 161(3) K, 108(3) K, respectively, decreasing as lattice parameters increase. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the valence state of rare earth ions are trivalence in these compounds. Antiferromagnetic-type magnetic order is formed in CeSeTe_2 at 2.1 K, while no magnetic transition is observed in PrSeTe_2 and NdSeTe_2 down to 1.8 K. (paper)

  3. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg-1, higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  4. Temperature Dependence on Density, Viscosity, and Electrical Conductivity of Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengguo Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids are considered environmentally friendly media for various industrial applications. Basic data on physicochemical properties are significant for a new material, in terms of developing its potential applications. In this work, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium fluoride ([EMIm]F ionic liquid was synthesized via an anion metathesis process. Physical properties including the density, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability of the product were measured. The results show that the density of [EMIm]F decreases linearly with temperature increases, while dynamic viscosity decreases rapidly below 320 K and the temperature dependence of electrical conductivity is in accordance with the VFT (Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann equation. The temperature dependence of the density, conductivity, and viscosity of [EMIm]F can be expressed via the following equations: ρ = 1.516 − 1.22 × 10−3 T, σm = 4417.1exp[−953.17/(T − 166.65] and η = 2.07 × 10−7exp(−5.39 × 104/T, respectively. [EMIm]F exhibited no clear melting point. However, its glass transition point and decomposition temperature are −71.3 °C and 135 °C, respectively.

  5. Metal viscoplasticity with two-temperature thermodynamics and two dislocation densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhankar; Kar, Gurudas; Roy, Debasish; Reddy, J. N.

    2018-03-01

    Posed within the two-temperature theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we propose a model for thermoviscoplastic deformation in metals. We incorporate the dynamics of dislocation densities-mobile and forest—that play the role of internal state variables in the formulation. The description based on two temperatures appears naturally when one recognizes that the thermodynamic system undergoing viscoplastic deformation is composed of two weakly interacting subsystems, viz. a kinetic-vibrational subsystem of the vibrating atomic lattices and a configurational subsystem of the slower degrees of freedom relating to defect motion, each with its own temperature. Starting with a basic model that involves only homogeneous deformation, a three-dimensional model for inhomogeneous viscoplasticity applicable to finite deformation is charted out in an overstress driven viscoplastic deformation framework. The model shows how the coupled evolutions of mobile and forest dislocation densities, which are critically influenced by the dynamics of configurational temperature, govern the strength and ductility of the metal. Unlike most contemporary models, the current proposal also affords a prediction of certain finer details as observed in the experimental data on stress-strain behaviour of metals and this in turn enhances the understanding of the evolving and interacting dislocation densities.

  6. Determining the temperature and density distribution from a Z-pinch radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuska, W.; Lee, H.

    1997-01-01

    High temperature radiation sources exceeding one hundred eV can be produced via z-pinches using currently available pulsed power. The usual approach to compare the z-pinch simulation and experimental data is to convert the radiation output at the source, whose temperature and density distributions are computed from the 2-D MHD code, into simulated data such as a spectrometer reading. This conversion process involves a radiation transfer calculation through the axially symmetric source, assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and folding the radiation that reaches the detector with the frequency-dependent response function. In this paper the authors propose a different approach by which they can determine the temperature and density distributions of the radiation source directly from the spatially resolved spectral data. This unfolding process is reliable and unambiguous for the ideal case where LTE holds and the source is axially symmetric. In reality, imperfect LTE and axial symmetry will introduce inaccuracies into the unfolded distributions. The authors use a parameter optimization routine to find the temperature and density distributions that best fit the data. They know from their past experience that the radiation source resulting from the implosion of a thin foil does not exhibit good axial symmetry. However, recent experiments carried out at Sandia National Laboratory using multiple wire arrays were very promising to achieve reasonably good symmetry. For these experiments the method will provide a valuable diagnostic tool

  7. Estimation of Mesospheric Densities at Low Latitudes Using the Kunming Meteor Radar Together With SABER Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Wen; Xue, Xianghui; Reid, Iain M.; Younger, Joel P.; Chen, Jinsong; Chen, Tingdi; Li, Na

    2018-04-01

    Neutral mesospheric densities at a low latitude have been derived during April 2011 to December 2014 using data from the Kunming meteor radar in China (25.6°N, 103.8°E). The daily mean density at 90 km was estimated using the ambipolar diffusion coefficients from the meteor radar and temperatures from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument. The seasonal variations of the meteor radar-derived density are consistent with the density from the Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter (MSIS) model, show a dominant annual variation, with a maximum during winter, and a minimum during summer. A simple linear model was used to separate the effects of atmospheric density and the meteor velocity on the meteor radar peak detection height. We find that a 1 km/s difference in the vertical meteor velocity yields a change of approximately 0.42 km in peak height. The strong correlation between the meteor radar density and the velocity-corrected peak height indicates that the meteor radar density estimates accurately reflect changes in neutral atmospheric density and that meteor peak detection heights, when adjusted for meteoroid velocity, can serve as a convenient tool for measuring density variations around the mesopause. A comparison of the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and peak height observed simultaneously by two co-located meteor radars indicates that the relative errors of the daily mean ambipolar diffusion coefficient and peak height should be less than 5% and 6%, respectively, and that the absolute error of the peak height is less than 0.2 km.

  8. Rocket measurements of electric fields, electron density and temperature during the three phases of auroral substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.; Block, L.; Lindqvist, P.-A.

    1979-12-01

    On Jan. 27, 1979, three rocket payloads were launched from Kiruna, Sweden, into different phases of two successive auroral substorms. Among other experiments, the payloads carried the RIT double probe electric field experiments, providing electric field, electron density and temperature data, which are presented here. These are discussed in association with observations of particles, ionospheric drifts (STARE) and electric fields in the equatorial plane (GEOS). The motions of the auroral forms, as obtained from auroral pictures are compared with the E x B/B 2 drifts and the currents calculated from the rocket electric field and density measurements with the equivalent current system deduced from ground based magnetometer data (SMA). (Auth.)

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of the density and temperature gradients in the laser-heated gas jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.L.; Lee, R.W.; Auerbach, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    We have performed an analysis of the x-ray spectra produced by a 1.0TW, lambda/sub L/-0.53μm laser-irradiated gas jet. Plasmas produced by ionization of neon, argon and N 2 + SF 6 gases were included in those measurements. Plasma electron density and temperature gradients were obtained by comparison of measured spectra with those produced by computer modeling. Density gradients were also obtained using laser interferometry. The limitations of this technique for plasma diagnosis will be discussed

  10. The density of molten indium at temperatures up to 600 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alchagirov, B.B.; Khatsukov, A.M.; Mozgovoj, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid indium density measurement is carried out through the pycnometric method within the temperature range of 434-600 K both by heating and cooling. The totality of the obtained results was processed through the approximating equation. The root-mean-square deviation of the experimental data from the approximating equation does not exceed ±0.01%. The high accuracy of the obtained results is noted. The deviation of the existing data on the liquid indium density from the approximating equation is shown graphically [ru

  11. Magnetic properties of Gd5(Si1.5Ge2.5) near the temperature and magnetic field induced first order phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, E.M.; Gschneidner, K.A.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    2001-01-01

    The temperature (from 5 to 300 K) and DC magnetic field (from 0 to 90 kOe) dependencies of the DC magnetization and magnetic susceptibility, and the temperature (from 5 to 350 K) dependency of the AC magnetic susceptibility of Gd 5 (Si 1.5 Ge 2.5 ) have been studied. The temperature and/or magnetic field induced magnetic phase transition in Gd 5 (Si 1.5 Ge 2.5 ) is a first order ferromagnet-paramagnet transition. The temperature of the magnetic transition in low AC magnetic field is 206 and 217 K for cooling and heating, respectively. The DC magnetic field increases the transition temperature by ∼0.36 K/kOe indicating that the paramagnetic phase can be reversibly transformed into the ferromagnetic phase. When the magnetic field is removed, the ferromagnetic phase transforms into the paramagnetic phase showing a large remanence-free hysteresis. The magnetic phase diagram based on the isothermal magnetic field dependence of the DC magnetization at various temperatures for Gd 5 (Si 1.5 Ge 2.5 ) is proposed. The magnetic field dependence of the magnetization in the vicinity of the first order phase transition shows evidence for the formation of a magnetically heterogeneous system in the volume of Gd 5 (Si 1.5 Ge 2.5 ) specimen where the magnetically ordered (ferromagnetic) and disordered (paramagnetic) phases co-exist

  12. Using Magnetic Fields to Create and Control High Energy Density Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Mark [Sandia National Laboratory

    2012-05-09

    The recently refurbished Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is the world’s largest pulsed power driver. Z can efficiently deliver currents as large as 26 Million Amperes to centimeter scale loads. These large currents create large magnetic fields that, in turn, create very large pressures in conducting materials. These very large pressures have been used to create unique conditions for high energy density science experiments for a variety of applications. Recently, we have been exploring the use of very strong magnetic fields to significantly relax the requirements for achieving inertial confinement fusion self heating1. The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept relies on a cylindrically imploding liner, an axial magnetic field, and a laser heated fuel region. We hope to achieve significant fusion yield on the Z facility with this concept. Initial experiments assessing the growth of the Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability are promising and recent calculational work has identified an approach to achieving high gain with this concept.

  13. Radiation Shielding Utilizing A High Temperature Superconducting Magnet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Project objective is to evaluate human radiation protection and architecture utilizing existing superconducting magnet technology while attempting to significantly...

  14. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of individual glass spherules, Apollo 11, 12, and 14 lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A. N.; Sullivan, S.; Alexander, C. C.; Senftle, F. E.; Dwornik, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 14 lunar fines have been measured from room temperature to 4 K. Data taken at room temperature, 77 K, and 4.2 K, show that the soft saturation magnetization was temperature independent. In the temperature range 300 to 77 K the temperature-dependent component of the magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie law. Susceptibility measurements on these same specimens and in addition 14 similar spherules from the Apollo 11 and 12 mission show a Curie-Weiss relation at temperatures less than 77 K with a Weiss temperature of 3-7 degrees in contrast to 2-3 degrees found for tektites and synthetic glasses of tektite composition. A proposed model and a theoretical expression closely predict the variation of the susceptibility of the glass spherules with temperature.

  15. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm{sup 2} have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material.

  16. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2011-11-01

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm(2) have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  17. Density and magnetic field measurements in the Tormac IV-c plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coonrod, J.W. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Tormac is a concept for magnetically confining a high-β fusion plasma in a toroidal, stuffed line cusp. A Tormac plasma has two regions: an interior confined on the closed toroidal field lines of the stuffing field, and an exterior sheath on open, cusped field lines. The interior plasma gives the device a longer confinement time than a standard mirror, while the favorable curvature of the cusp fields allow the plasma to be stable at higher values of β (the ratio of the plasma pressure to magnetic pressure) than a totally closed configuration like Tokamak. This thesis describes the design, construction and operation of Tormac IV-c, and reports on the results, with emphasis on describing the behavior of the density compression and field penetration

  18. Oblique ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in two temperature superthermal electrons magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panwar, A.; Ryu, C. M.; Bains, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of ion acoustic cnoidal waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermal electrons modelled by kappa-type distributions. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries equation is derived, which further gives the solutions with a special type of cnoidal elliptical functions. Both compressive and rarefactive structures are found for these cnoidal waves. Nonlinear periodic cnoidal waves are explained in terms of plasma parameters depicting the Sagdeev potential and the phase curves. It is found that the density ratio of hot electrons to ions μ significantly modifies compressive/refractive wave structures. Furthermore, the combined effects of superthermality of cold and hot electrons κ c ,κ h , cold to hot electron temperature ratio σ, angle of propagation and ion cyclotron frequency ω ci have been studied in detail to analyze the height and width of compressive/refractive cnoidal waves. The findings in the present study could have important implications in understanding the physics of electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere where two temperature superthermal electrons are present

  19. Electron mobility in supercritical ethane as a function of density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Holroyd, R.A.; Sowada, U.

    1980-01-01

    The electron mobility is reported for ethane as a function of density at various temperatures above T/sub c/. The high pressure cell used permits measurements to 200 atm. Our analysis shows that theory is consistent with the ethane mobility results at low and intermediate densities. At densities less than 1 x 10 21 molecules/cm 3 electrons are scattered by isolated ethane molecules and the Lorentz equation is valid. At intermediate densities, μ/sub e/ correlates with the square of the velocity of sound, indicating that in dense fluids the adiabatic compressibility must be included. The data are consistent with a modified Cohen--Lekner equation, and the minimum in μ/sub e/N observed at densities just below d/sub c/ is qualitatively accounted for by changes in the adiabatic compressibility. Thus the concept of quasilocalization, suggested by others to qualitatively explain such minima, is unnecessary here. At higher densities an additional, unspecified, scattering mechanism becomes important

  20. Radicals mediated magnetism in Ar plasma treated high-density polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orendáč, M.; Čižmár, E.; Kažiková, V.; Orendáčová, A.; Řezníčková, A.; Kolská, Z.; Švorčík, V.

    2018-05-01

    Electron-spin resonance of high-density polyethylene treated by Ar plasma at 300 K was performed in X-band at temperatures from 2.1 K to 290 K. The observed spectra suggest presence of allyl radicals, whereas the central peak may be attributed to polyenyl radicals or dangled bonds. Pronounced narrowing of the resonance line observed above glassy temperature of polyethylene may be ascribed to thermally activated motional effect with the activation energy Ea /kB = 160 K. The absence of strong exchange interactions is suggested by negligible exchange narrowing found at 2.1 K. The suggestion is supported by the analysis of the temperature dependence of the intensity at low temperatures, which is explicable assuming the coexistence of non-interacting radicals and S = 1/2 dimers with a distribution of antiferromagnetic couplings varying from 2 K to nominally 25 K.

  1. Placed in a steady magnetic field, the flux density inside a permalloy-shielded volume decreases over hours and days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Benedict; Gould, Harvey

    2018-03-01

    Following the application of an external magnetic field to a thin-walled demagnetized Permalloy cylinder, the magnetic flux density at the center of the shielded volume decreases by roughly 20% over periods of hours to days. We measured this effect for applied magnetic fields from 0.48 A/m to 16 A/m, the latter being comparable to the Earths magnetic field at its weakest point. Delayed changes in magnetic flux density are also observed following alternating current demagnetization. We attribute these effects to delayed changes in magnetization, which have previously been observed in thin Permalloy films and small bulk samples of ferromagnetic materials. Phenomenological models of thermal activation are discussed. Some possible effects on experiments that rely on static shielding are noted.

  2. Temperature dependence of shot noise in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jiasen; Liu, Liang; Feng, J. F.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wei, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Shot noise reveals spin dependent transport properties in a magnetic tunnel junction. We report measurement of shot noise in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions, which shows a strong temperature dependence. The Fano factor used to characterize shot noise increases with decreasing temperature. A sequential tunneling model can be used to account for these results, in which a larger Fano factor results from larger spin relaxation length at lower temperatures.

  3. Transition temperature to the superconducting phase of QCD at high baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, William E.; Liu, James T.; Ren, Hai-cang

    2000-01-01

    Recent interest in the study of color superconductivity has focused on the regime of high baryon density where perturbative QCD may be employed. Based on the dominant one-gluon-exchange interaction, both the transition temperature and zero temperature gap have been determined to leading order in the coupling g. While the leading non-BCS behavior T C ∼μg -5 e -κ/g is easily obtained, the pre-exponential factor has proved more difficult to evaluate. Focusing on the transition temperature, we present a perturbative derivation of this factor, exact to leading order in g. This approach is first motivated by the study of a toy model and involves working to second order in the perturbative expansion. We compare this result to the zero temperature gap. Additionally, we extend the analysis to the case of higher angular momentum for longitudinal and transverse quark pairing. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. CRIT II electric, magnetic, and density measurements within an ionizing neutral stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, C. M.; Kelley, M. C.; Primdahl, F.; Baker, K. D.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements from rocket-borne sensors inside a high-velocity neutral barium beam show a-factor-of-six increase in plasma density in a moving ionizing front. This region was colocated with intense fluctuating electric fields at frequencies well under the lower hybrid frequency for a barium plasma. Large quasi-dc electric and magnetic field fluctuations were also detected with a large component of the current and the electric field parallel to B(0). An Alfven wave with a finite electric field component parallel to the geomagnetic field was observed to propagate along B(0), where it was detected by an instrumented subpayload.

  5. A reference system for the measurement of low-strength magnetic flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorillo, F.; Durin, G.F.; Rocchino, L.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic flux density standards traceable to the SI units have been developed at IEN-INRIM, by which dissemination for general measurement and testing activities can be pursued. The reference system covers a range of values extending from μ 0 H∼1T to μ 0 H∼10μT and is centered on the use of NMR magnetometers, calibrated coils, and stable current sources. The relative measuring uncertainty of the system is shown to increases with decreasing the field strength value and it is estimated to range between a few 10 -6 and some 10 -3

  6. Neutrino hierarchy from CP-blind observables with high density magnetized detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Rigolin, S.; Migliozzi, P.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Terranova, F.

    2008-01-01

    High density magnetized detectors are well suited to exploit the outstanding purity and intensities of novel neutrino sources like neutrino factories and beta beams. They can also provide independent measurements of leptonic mixing parameters through the observation of atmospheric muon-neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the combination of these observables from a multi-kT iron detector and a high energy beta beam; in particular, we demonstrate that even with moderate detector granularities the neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined for θ 13 values greater than 4 . (orig.)

  7. Magnetic ordering at low temperatures in some random superconducting and insulating compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueser, D.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of some investigations on the magnetic ordering phenomena in some random superconducting and insulating materials. The results are described of an investigation of the coexistence of superconductivity and random magnetic freezing in (Th,Nd)Ru 2 . On the basis of various measurements as function of temperature and external magnetic field the author found that spin glass-like freezing can occur far below the superconductivity and even that a sample may re-enter the superconducting state below a freezing temperature. Associated with the isothermal remanent magnetization of a random magnetic material he observed strong anomalies in the critical field versus temperature curves. Also a magnetic field memory effect has been found. (Auth.)

  8. Constraining snowmelt in a temperature-index model using simulated snow densities

    KAUST Repository

    Bormann, Kathryn J.; Evans, Jason P.; McCabe, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Current snowmelt parameterisation schemes are largely untested in warmer maritime snowfields, where physical snow properties can differ substantially from the more common colder snow environments. Physical properties such as snow density influence the thermal properties of snow layers and are likely to be important for snowmelt rates. Existing methods for incorporating physical snow properties into temperature-index models (TIMs) require frequent snow density observations. These observations are often unavailable in less monitored snow environments. In this study, previous techniques for end-of-season snow density estimation (Bormann et al., 2013) were enhanced and used as a basis for generating daily snow density data from climate inputs. When evaluated against 2970 observations, the snow density model outperforms a regionalised density-time curve reducing biases from -0.027gcm-3 to -0.004gcm-3 (7%). The simulated daily densities were used at 13 sites in the warmer maritime snowfields of Australia to parameterise snowmelt estimation. With absolute snow water equivalent (SWE) errors between 100 and 136mm, the snow model performance was generally lower in the study region than that reported for colder snow environments, which may be attributed to high annual variability. Model performance was strongly dependent on both calibration and the adjustment for precipitation undercatch errors, which influenced model calibration parameters by 150-200%. Comparison of the density-based snowmelt algorithm against a typical temperature-index model revealed only minor differences between the two snowmelt schemes for estimation of SWE. However, when the model was evaluated against snow depths, the new scheme reduced errors by up to 50%, largely due to improved SWE to depth conversions. While this study demonstrates the use of simulated snow density in snowmelt parameterisation, the snow density model may also be of broad interest for snow depth to SWE conversion. Overall, the

  9. Constraining snowmelt in a temperature-index model using simulated snow densities

    KAUST Repository

    Bormann, Kathryn J.

    2014-09-01

    Current snowmelt parameterisation schemes are largely untested in warmer maritime snowfields, where physical snow properties can differ substantially from the more common colder snow environments. Physical properties such as snow density influence the thermal properties of snow layers and are likely to be important for snowmelt rates. Existing methods for incorporating physical snow properties into temperature-index models (TIMs) require frequent snow density observations. These observations are often unavailable in less monitored snow environments. In this study, previous techniques for end-of-season snow density estimation (Bormann et al., 2013) were enhanced and used as a basis for generating daily snow density data from climate inputs. When evaluated against 2970 observations, the snow density model outperforms a regionalised density-time curve reducing biases from -0.027gcm-3 to -0.004gcm-3 (7%). The simulated daily densities were used at 13 sites in the warmer maritime snowfields of Australia to parameterise snowmelt estimation. With absolute snow water equivalent (SWE) errors between 100 and 136mm, the snow model performance was generally lower in the study region than that reported for colder snow environments, which may be attributed to high annual variability. Model performance was strongly dependent on both calibration and the adjustment for precipitation undercatch errors, which influenced model calibration parameters by 150-200%. Comparison of the density-based snowmelt algorithm against a typical temperature-index model revealed only minor differences between the two snowmelt schemes for estimation of SWE. However, when the model was evaluated against snow depths, the new scheme reduced errors by up to 50%, largely due to improved SWE to depth conversions. While this study demonstrates the use of simulated snow density in snowmelt parameterisation, the snow density model may also be of broad interest for snow depth to SWE conversion. Overall, the

  10. An experimental study of magnetic-field and temperature dependence on magnetic fluid’s heating power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beković, Miloš; Trlep, Mladen; Jesenik, Marko; Goričan, Viktor; Hamler, Anton

    2013-01-01

    This paper firstly presents a measurement system for determining the magnetic properties of magnetic fluids, based on three pickup coils. The accuracy of the system was tested on known samples and then used for the characterization of magnetic losses (heating power P) on the magnetic fluid sample using two different methods. The first method is based on determining the hysteresis loop area and the second on determining the complex susceptibility; and showed that both methods are equivalent. The aim of this paper was to identify the heating power of the liquid at a known value for the magnetic field, and the arbitrary temperature. Thus, we explored the actual reduction in the heating power due to the heating of the sample, which cannot be achieved without the temperature regulated heat bath using established calorimetric methods. -- Highlights: ► A new measurement system was tested with numerous samples, and results were promising. ► Magnetic fluid heating power was determined using a system of J-compensated coil. ► Complex susceptibility method results equal losses as hysteresis loops approach. ► Temperature dependent heating power was explored without the heath-bath . ► For larger magnetic fields a linear H dependence of heating power is revealed

  11. Measurement of 2D vector magnetic properties under the distorted flux density conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Shinya; Todaka, Takashi; Enokizono, Masato; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Shimoji, Hiroyasu

    2006-01-01

    Under distorted flux density condition, it is very difficult to evaluate the field intensity, because there is no criterion for the measurement. In the linear approximation, the measured field intensity waveform (MFI) is compared with the linear synthesis of field intensity waveform (LSFI) in each frequency, and it is shown that they are not in good agreement at higher induction. In this paper, we examined the 2D vector magnetic properties excited by distorted flux density, which consists of the 1st (fundamental frequency: 50 Hz), 3rd, and 5th harmonics. Improved linear synthesis of the field intensity waveform (ILSFI) is proposed as a new estimation method of the field intensity, instead of the conventional linear synthesis of field intensity waveform (LSFI). The usefulness of the proposed ILSFI is demonstrated in the comparison with the measured results

  12. Measurement of 2D vector magnetic properties under the distorted flux density conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Shinya [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 (Japan)]. E-mail: urata@mag.eee.oita-u.ac.jp; Todaka, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 (Japan); Enokizono, Masato [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 (Japan); Maeda, Yoshitaka [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 (Japan); Shimoji, Hiroyasu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Under distorted flux density condition, it is very difficult to evaluate the field intensity, because there is no criterion for the measurement. In the linear approximation, the measured field intensity waveform (MFI) is compared with the linear synthesis of field intensity waveform (LSFI) in each frequency, and it is shown that they are not in good agreement at higher induction. In this paper, we examined the 2D vector magnetic properties excited by distorted flux density, which consists of the 1st (fundamental frequency: 50 Hz), 3rd, and 5th harmonics. Improved linear synthesis of the field intensity waveform (ILSFI) is proposed as a new estimation method of the field intensity, instead of the conventional linear synthesis of field intensity waveform (LSFI). The usefulness of the proposed ILSFI is demonstrated in the comparison with the measured results.

  13. Theoretical study of the density of states and magnetic properties of LaCoO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Min; Zhang, Weiyi; Hu, Cheng; Ming, Naiben

    1998-05-01

    The density of states and magnetic properties of low-spin, high-spin, and mixing states of LaCoO3 have been studied within the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The real-space recursion method is adopted for computing the electronic structure of the disordered system. The paramagnetic high-spin state is dealt with using the usual binary alloy coherent potential approximation (CPA); an extended trinary alloy CPA approximation is developed to describe the mixing state. In agreement with experiments, our results show that the main features of the quasiparticle spectra in the mixing state are not a sensitive function of the high-spin component, but the spectrum does get broadened due to spin scattering. The increasing of the high-spin component also results in a pileup of the density of states at the Fermi energy which indicates an insulator to metal phase transition. Some limitations of the present approach are also discussed.

  14. Effect of magnetic flux-densities of up to 0.1 Tesla on copper electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cifuentes, L.; Artigas, M.; Riveros, G.; Warczok, A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of magnetic flux densities (B) between 0.0 and 0.1 Tesla on cathode and anode over potentials, cell voltage and electro deposit quality was determined fro a lab-scale copper electrowinning cell which operates at industrial current, density values. Cell voltage decreases with increasing B. The cathodic overpotential decreases by 30% when B increases from 0.0 to 0.1 T. The anodic overpotential also decreases with increasing B, but this effect is six times less than the corresponding effect on the cathodic overpotential. Cathodic effects can be predicted by an expression derived from electrochemical kinetics and magnetohydrodynamic theory. Anodic effects cannot be predicted in the same way. The size of grains and intergranular voids decreases and the surface of the electro deposit becomes smoother as B increases, which means that, in the studied conditions, the quality of the produced copper deposits improves. (Author) 26 refs

  15. Core density fluctuations in reverse magnetic shear plasmas with internal transport barrier on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazikian, R.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Kramer, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    First measurements of the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) is reported. The measurements are obtained using a newly installed correlation reflectometer operating in the upper X-mode. Before transport barrier formation in the low beam power current ramp-up phase of the discharge, reflectometer measurements indicate density fluctuation levels n-tilde/n∼0.1-0.2% and radial correlation lengths 2-3 cm (k r p i ≤0.5) in the central plasma region (r/a r p i ∼3. However, fluctuation levels are considerably higher than measured near the magnetic axis. Reflectometer measurements obtained at the foot of the ITB also indicate high fluctuation levels compared to measurements in the central region of the discharge. (author)

  16. Transverse charge and magnetization densities: Improved chiral predictions down to b=1 fms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Jose Manuel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hiller Blin, Astrid N. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany); Vicente Vacas, Manuel J. [Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Valencia (Spain). Univ. of Valencia (UV), Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular; Weiss, Christian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-03-01

    The transverse charge and magnetization densities provide insight into the nucleon’s inner structure. In the periphery, the isovector components are clearly dominant, and can be computed in a model-independent way by means of a combination of chiral effective field theory (cEFT) and dispersion analysis. With a novel N=D method, we incorporate the pion electromagnetic formfactor data into the cEFT calculation, thus taking into account the pion-rescattering effects and r-meson pole. As a consequence, we are able to reliably compute the densities down to distances b1 fm, therefore achieving a dramatic improvement of the results compared to traditional cEFT calculations, while remaining predictive and having controlled uncertainties.

  17. Exchange interactions, spin waves, and transition temperatures in itinerant magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Bruno, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 59 (2003), s. 112-147 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0943; GA AV ČR IAA1010203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : exchange interactions * itinerant magnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://psi-k.dl.ac.uk/psi-k/newsletters.html

  18. Temperature-dependence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product in Metallization Lines: A Revisit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duryat, Rahmat Saptono; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-01-01

    One of the important phenomena in Electromigration (EM) is Blech Effect. The existence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product or EM Threshold has such fundamental and technological consequences in the design, manufacture, and testing of electronics. Temperature-dependence of Blech Product had been thermodynamically established and the real behavior of such interconnect materials have been extensively studied. The present paper reviewed the temperature-dependence of EM threshold in metallization lines of different materials and structure as found in relevant published articles. It is expected that the reader can see a big picture from the compiled data, which might be overlooked when it was examined in pieces. (paper)

  19. 1998 Annual Study Report. Research and development of power storage by high-temperature superconducting flywheels (research and development of permanent magnet); 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Koon chodendo flywheel denryoku chozo kenkyu kaihatsu (eikyu jishaku no kenkyu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The permanent magnets have been investigated and developed, for eventual commercialization of a 10 MWh power storage system by high-temperature superconducting flywheel. The permanent magnet rotors have been already developed in the previous years using a praseodymium-based magnet (Pr magnet) and neodymium-based sintered magnet (Nd sintered magnet), and the target rotational speed of 30,000 rpm has been attained. For development of the magnetic circuit to produce a stronger and smoother magnetic field, magnetic flux density of the Nd sintered magnet is measured. It shows a lower magnetic flux irregularity than the Pd magnet, but there is still room for further improvement. For development of large-size permanent magnet fabrication techniques, it is confirmed that the large-size Nd sintered magnet can be easily magnetized by partial magnetizing, as is the case with the Pr magnet. In this year, the irregular magnetic flux is three-dimensionally simulated, based on the results obtained in the previous years, to find that the simulated results are in good agreement with the observed ones. The measures to solve the problems are also investigated. It is also confirmed that the large-size ring magnet can be easily magnetized by partial magnetization. (NEDO)

  20. Preparation and characterization of temperature-responsive magnetic composite particles for multi-modal cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Aihua; Chen, Qi; Ai, Fanrong; Wang, Deping; Huang, Wenhai

    2011-10-01

    The temperature-responsive magnetic composite particles were synthesized by emulsion-free polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and acrylamide (Am) in the presence of oleic acid-modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The magnetic properties and heat generation ability of the composite particles were characterized. Furthermore, temperature and alternating magnetic field (AMF) triggered drug release behaviors of vitamin B(12)-loaded composite particles were also examined. It was found that composite particles enabled drug release to be controlled through temperature changes in the neighborhood of lower critical solution temperature. Continuous application of AMF resulted in an accelerated release of the loaded drug. On the other hand, intermittent AMF application to the composite particles resulted in an "on-off", stepwise release pattern. Longer release duration and larger overall release could be achieved by intermittent application of AMF as compared to continuous magnetic field. Such composite particles may be used for magnetic drug targeting followed by simultaneous hyperthermia and drug release.