WorldWideScience

Sample records for density temperature magnetic

  1. Experimental charge density of hematite in its magnetic low temperature and high temperature phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theissmann, R., E-mail: ralf.theissmann@kronosww.com [Faculty of Engineering and CeNIDE (Center for NanoIntegration Duisburg-Essen), University of Duisburg-Essen, Bismarckstr. 81, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Fuess, H. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Tsuda, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, 980-8577 Sendai (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Structural parameters of hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), including the valence electron distribution, were investigated using convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) in the canted antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature and in the collinear antiferromagnetic phase at 90 K. The refined charge density maps are interpreted as a direct result of electron-electron interaction in a correlated system. A negative deformation density was observed as a consequence of closed shell interaction. Positive deformation densities are interpreted as a shift of electron density to antibinding molecular orbitals. Following this interpretation, the collinear antiferromagnetic phase shows the characteristic of a Mott-Hubbard type insulator whereas the high temperature canted antiferromagnetic phase shows the characteristic of a charge transfer insulator. The break of the threefold symmetry in the canted antiferromagnetic phase was correlated to the presence of oxygen-oxygen bonding, which is caused by a shift of spin polarized charge density from iron 3d-orbitals to the oxygen ions. We propose a triangular magnetic coupling in the oxygen planes causing a frustrated triangular spin arrangement with all spins lying in the oxygen planes. This frustrated arrangement polarizes the super-exchange between iron ions and causes the spins located at the iron ions to orient in the same plane, perpendicular to the threefold axis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative CBED was used to study hematite ({alpha}-Fe2O3). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure and charge density of both antiferromagnetic phases were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topological charge density analysis was combined with a Bader analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transition from a Mott-Hubbard to a charge transfer insulator is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A frustrated triangular magnetic coupling in the oxygen planes is proposed.

  2. Experimental charge density of hematite in its magnetic low temperature and high temperature phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissmann, R; Fuess, H; Tsuda, K

    2012-09-01

    Structural parameters of hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)), including the valence electron distribution, were investigated using convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) in the canted antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature and in the collinear antiferromagnetic phase at 90K. The refined charge density maps are interpreted as a direct result of electron-electron interaction in a correlated system. A negative deformation density was observed as a consequence of closed shell interaction. Positive deformation densities are interpreted as a shift of electron density to antibinding molecular orbitals. Following this interpretation, the collinear antiferromagnetic phase shows the characteristic of a Mott-Hubbard type insulator whereas the high temperature canted antiferromagnetic phase shows the characteristic of a charge transfer insulator. The break of the threefold symmetry in the canted antiferromagnetic phase was correlated to the presence of oxygen-oxygen bonding, which is caused by a shift of spin polarized charge density from iron 3d-orbitals to the oxygen ions. We propose a triangular magnetic coupling in the oxygen planes causing a frustrated triangular spin arrangement with all spins lying in the oxygen planes. This frustrated arrangement polarizes the super-exchange between iron ions and causes the spins located at the iron ions to orient in the same plane, perpendicular to the threefold axis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Radial oscillations of magnetized proto strange stars in temperature- and density-dependent quark mass model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Gupta; Asha Gupta; S Singh; J D Anand

    2003-10-01

    We report on the study of the mass–radius (–) relation and the radial oscillations of magnetized proto strange stars. For the quark matter we have employed the very recent modification, the temperature- and density-dependent quark mass model of the well-known density-dependent quark mass model. We find that the effect of magnetic field, both on the maximum mass and radial frequencies, is rather small. Also a proto strange star, whether magnetized or otherwise, is more likely to evolve into a strange star rather than transform into a black hole.

  4. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyte-González, R.; Palomares, J. M.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, ne, and temperatures, Te, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on ne and Te along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher ne. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, Te is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field ne decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa ne shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. Te is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas.

  5. Internal Magnetic Field, Temperature and Density Measurements on Magnetized HED plasmas using Pulsed Polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Roger J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-10-20

    The goals were to collaborate with the MSX project and make the MSX platform reliable with a performance where pulsed polarimetry would be capable of adding a useful measurement and then to achieve a first measurement using pulsed polarimetry. The MSX platform (outside of laser blow off plasmas adjacent to magnetic fields which are low beta) is the only device that can generate high beta magnetized collisionless supercritical shocks, and with a large spatial size of ~10 cm. Creating shocks at high Mach numbers and investigating the dynamics of the shocks was the main goal of the project. The MSX shocks scale to astrophysical magnetized shocks and potentially throw light on the generation of highly energetic particles via a mechanism like the Fermi process.

  6. Temperature and Magnetic Field Dependence of Critical Current Density of YBCO with Varying Flux Pinning Additions (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2083 TEMPERATURE AND MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS...MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b...20 ‒ 77 K. Films were prepared with pulsed laser deposition by (M/ YBCO )N multilayer or ( YBCO )1-x Mx single-target methods, for different M phases

  7. Observations of Poynting fluxes, ion temperatures and neutral densities during the March 2015 magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Huang, C. Y.; Hairston, M. R.; Sutton, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    We will present various observations regarding the geomagnetic energy input and the response of Ionosphere-Thermosphere (IT) system during the March 17, 2015 storm, the largest one in solar cycle 24. The Poynting fluxes measured by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites (F16, F17 and F18) show significant enhancements in the auroral oval and at high latitudes poleward of the auroral oval. Moreover, the ion temperatures observed by DMSP satellites (F16, F17 and F19) at magnetic latitudes greater than 80° are higher than those in the auroral oval, and the their averaged increases are 316K in the northern hemisphere and 248 K in the southern hemisphere, respectively. In addition, the neutral density residuals measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite indicate the largest values at the highest orbital latitudes. The wave-like perturbations originating at high latitudes move equatorward with decreasing amplitudes along GRACE orbits, implying a source region for Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) at polar latitudes.

  8. Development of a spectroscopic technique for simultaneous magnetic field, electron density, and temperature measurements in ICF-relevant plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, E. C.; Koch, J. A.; Presura, R.; Angermeier, W. A.; Darling, T.; Haque, S.; Mancini, R. C.; Covington, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopic techniques in the visible range are often used in plasma experiments to measure B-field induced Zeeman splitting, electron densities via Stark broadening, and temperatures from Doppler broadening. However, when electron densities and temperatures are sufficiently high, the broadening of the Stark and Doppler components can dominate the emission spectra and obscure the Zeeman component. In this research, we are developing a time-resolved multi-axial technique for measuring the Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened line emission of dense magnetized plasmas for Z-pinch and Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) accelerators. The line emission is used to calculate the electron densities, temperatures, and B-fields. In parallel, we are developing a line-shape modeling code that incorporates the broadening effects due to Stark, Doppler, and Zeeman effects for dense magnetized plasma. This manuscript presents the details of the experimental setup and line shape code, along with the results obtained from an Al iii doublet at the University of Nevada, Reno at Nevada Terawatt Facility. Future tests are planned to further evaluate the technique and modeling on other material wire array, gas puff, and DPF platforms.

  9. Curie temperature of Co-doped TiO2 as functions of carrier density and Co content evaluated from electrical transport and magnetization at low temperature regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thantip S. Krasienapibal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Curie temperature (TC of anatase Co-doped TiO2 epitaxial thin films was systematically investigated as functions of carrier density (n and Co content (x by electrical transport and magnetization measurements at low temperature regime. The estimated TC from both measurements showed similar TC. For x = 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07, non-monotonic TC vs. n relations were observed, whereas TC was monotonically increasing function of n for x = 0.10. Possible mechanism of high TC ferromagnetism for this compound was discussed.

  10. Study of the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Eduardo L.; Chiapparini, Marcelo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20559-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bracco, Mirian E. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 27537-000, Resende, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    Magnetars are neutron stars with a strong surface magnetic field. Observations of soft gamma-ray and anomalous X-ray pulsars pointed out that the surface magnetic field of magnetars is equal or even greater than 10{sup 15} G. In this work we study the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature. We describe the matter through a relativistic mean-field model with eight light baryons (baryon octet), electrons, muons and with magnetic field. As output of the numerical calculations, we obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density.

  11. Study of the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Eduardo L.; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Bracco, Mirian E.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetars are neutron stars with a strong surface magnetic field. Observations of soft gamma-ray and anomalous X-ray pulsars pointed out that the surface magnetic field of magnetars is equal or even greater than 1015 G. In this work we study the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature. We describe the matter through a relativistic mean-field model with eight light baryons (baryon octet), electrons, muons and with magnetic field. As output of the numerical calculations, we obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density.

  12. Extraction of the spatial distribution of electron temperature and density in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion implosion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kyle; Mancini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    We are testing polychromatic tomography to extract the spatial distribution of electron temperatures and densities in the cylindrical implosion plasmas created during MagLIF. Motivation for this technique stems from its successful application to spherical implosion core plasmas on Omega through the analysis of spatially resolved spectra (SRS) collected via pinhole imaging. In MagLIF, collections of SRS can be extracted from the images created by the slit imaging CRITR spectrometers. These spectra can be complemented with pinhole monochromatic images and spectra recorded with a spherical crystal spectrometer. One axially resolved and one radially resolved CRITR are field during MagLIF and information extracted from one of these SRS would be spatially integrated over a plane of finite thickness given by the spatial resolution of the instrument. In our method, we couple a model that creates synthetic sets of spectra, like those obtained from an experiment, with a Pareto genetic algorithm which searches in parameter space for the spatial distribution which best simultaneously and self-consistently fits the set of SRS/ Solutions obtained are used as the initial solution for a Levenberg-Marquadt minimization algorithm to provide a final ``fine-tuned'' solution. We are testing this method by creating synthetic ``experimental'' data and using the technique to search for the spatial distribution. The results of these feasibility studies will be discussed. The work is supported by a contract from Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. Photometric analysis of the corona during the 20 March 2015 total solar eclipse: density structures, hydrostatic temperatures and magnetic field inference

    CERN Document Server

    Bazin, C; Wittich, R; Koutchmy, S; Mouette, J; Nitschelm, C

    2015-01-01

    We present some new accurate CCD photometry analysis of the white light solar corona at the time of the last 20 March 2015 total eclipse (airborne observations on a Falcon 7X and at ground-based Svalbard). We measured coronal brightness profiles taken along radial directions from 1.001 to 3 solar radii in the northern, southern and equatorial regions, after removing the F corona and the sky background. These studies allow to evaluate the density gradients, structures and temperature heterogeneity, by considering the Thomson scattering in white light of the K corona and also emissions of the EUV Fe XII 193A (1 to 2 MK) and Fe XI 171/174 (lower temperature) simultaneously observed by SDO/AIA and SWAP Proba2 space missions. Some dispersion between the regions is noticed. The limitation of the hydrostatic equilibrium assumption in the solar atmosphere is discussed as well as the contribution of the magnetic field pressure gradients as illustrated by a comparison with the model stationary magnetic corona from Pred...

  14. Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V I; Koepke, M E; Raitses, Y

    2010-10-01

    By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

  15. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and dev

  16. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  17. Isogeometric shape optimization of magnetic density separators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang Manh, N.; Evgrafov, A.; Gravesen, J.; Lahaye, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The waste recycling industry increasingly relies on magnetic density separators. These devices generate an upward magnetic force in ferro-fluids allowing to separate the immersed particles according to their mass density. Recently a new separator design that significantly reduces the requir

  18. Isogeometric shape optimization of magnetic density separators

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The waste recycling industry increasingly relies on magnetic density separators. These devices generate an upward magnetic force in ferro-fluids allowing to separate the immersed particles according to their mass density. Recently a new separator design that significantly reduces the required amount of permanent magnet material has been proposed. The purpose of this paper is to alleviate the undesired end-effects in this design by altering the shape of the ferromagnetic covers of the...

  19. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-03

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  20. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salsbury Jr., Freddie [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules.

  1. High Temperature Superconductor Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079328; de Rijk, Gijs; Dhalle, Marc

    2016-11-10

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding $20T$. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and development before they can be applied in a practical accelerator magnet. In order to study HTS in detail, a five tesla demonstrator magnet named Feather-M2 is designed and constructed. The magnet is based on ReBCO coated conductor, which is assembled into a $10kA$ class Roebel cable. A new and optimized Aligned Block layout is used, which takes advantage of the anisotropy of the conductor. This is achieved by providing local alignment of the Roebel cable in the coil windings with the magnetic field lines. A new Network Model capable of analyzing transient electro-magnetic and thermal phenomena in coated conductor cables and coils is developed. This model is necessary to solve critical issues in coated conductor ac...

  2. Recycling of WEEE by magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, B.; Giacometti, L.; Di Maio, F.; Rem, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The paper introduces a new recycling method of WEEE: Magnetic Density Separation. By using this technology, both grade and recovery rate of recycled products are over 90%. Good separations are not only observed in relatively big WEEE samples, but also in samples with smaller sizes or electrical wire

  3. Recycling of WEEE by magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, B.; Giacometti, L.; Di Maio, F.; Rem, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The paper introduces a new recycling method of WEEE: Magnetic Density Separation. By using this technology, both grade and recovery rate of recycled products are over 90%. Good separations are not only observed in relatively big WEEE samples, but also in samples with smaller sizes or electrical wire

  4. Density Functional Theory Studies of Magnetically Confined Fermi Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇俊; 马红孺

    2001-01-01

    A theory is developed for magnetically confined Fermi gas at a low temperature based on the density functional theory. The theory is illustrated by the numerical calculation of the density distributions of Fermi atoms 40K with parameters according to DeMarco and Jin's experiment [Science, 285(1999)1703]. Our results are in close agreement with the experiment. To check the theory, we also performed calculations using our theory at a high temperature, which compared very well to the results of the classical limit.

  5. Survival of charged rho condensation at high temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hao; Huang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The charged vector $\\rho$ mesons in the presence of external magnetic fields at finite temperature $T$ and chemical potential $\\mu$ have been investigated in the framework of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. We compute the masses of charged $\\rho$ mesons numerically as a function of the magnetic field for different values of temperature and chemical potential. The self-energy of the $\\rho$ meson contains the quark-loop contribution, i.e. the leading order contribution in $1/N_c$ expansion. The charged $\\rho$ meson mass decreases with the magnetic field and drops to zero at a critical magnetic field $eB_c$, which means that the charged vector meson condensation, i.e. the electromagnetic superconductor can be induced above the critical magnetic field. Surprisingly, it is found that the charged $\\rho$ condensation can even survive at high temperature and density. At zero temperature, the critical magnetic field just increases slightly with the chemical potential, which indicates that the charged $\\rho$ condensatio...

  6. High-temperature superconducting undulator magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Kasa, Matthew; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Welp, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents test results on a prototype superconducting undulator magnet fabricated using 15% Zr-doped rare-earth barium copper oxide high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. On an 11-pole magnet we demonstrate an engineering current density, J e, of more than 2.1 kA mm‑2 at 4.2 K, a value that is 40% higher than reached in comparable devices wound with NbTi-wire, which is used in all currently operating superconducting undulators. A novel winding scheme enabling the continuous winding of tape-shaped conductors into the intricate undulator magnets as well as a partial interlayer insulation procedure were essential in reaching this advance in performance. Currently, there are rapid advances in the performance of HTS; therefore, achieving even higher current densities in an undulator structure or/and operating it at temperatures higher than 4.2 K will be possible, which would substantially simplify the cryogenic design and reduce overall costs.

  7. On the intergalactic temperature-density relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Matthew; Upton Sanderbeck, Phoebe R.

    2016-02-01

    Cosmological simulations of the low-density intergalactic medium exhibit a strikingly tight power-law relation between temperature and density that holds over two decades in density. It is found that this relation should roughly apply Δz ˜ 1-2 after a reionization event, and this limiting behaviour has motivated the power-law parameterizations used in most analyses of the Ly α forest. This relation has been explained by using equations linearized in the baryonic overdensity (which does not address why a tight power-law relation holds over two decades in density) or by equating the photoheating rate with the cooling rate from cosmological expansion (which we show is incorrect). Previous explanations also did not address why recombination cooling and Compton cooling off of the cosmic microwave background, which are never negligible, do not alter the character of this relation. We provide an understanding for why a tight power-law relation arises for unshocked gas at all densities for which collisional cooling is unimportant. We also use our results to comment on (1) how quickly fluctuations in temperature redshift away after reionization processes, (2) how much shock heating occurs in the low-density intergalactic medium, and (3) how the temperatures of collapsing gas parcels evolve.

  8. Determination of the Density of Energy States in a Quantizing Magnetic Field for Model Kane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gulyamov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For nonparabolic dispersion law determined by the density of the energy states in a quantizing magnetic field, the dependence of the density of energy states on temperature in quantizing magnetic fields is studied with the nonquadratic dispersion law. Experimental results obtained for PbTe were analyzed using the suggested model. The continuous spectrum of the energy density of states at low temperature is transformed into discrete Landau levels.

  9. Temperature and magnetization-dependent band-gap renormalization and optical many-body effects in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the Coulomb interaction induced density, temperature and magnetization dependent many-body band-gap renormalization in a typical diluted magnetic semiconductor GaMnAs in the optimally-doped metallic regime as a function of carrier density and temperature. We find a large (about 0.1 eV) band gap renormalization which is enhanced by the ferromagnetic transition. We also calculate the impurity scattering effect on the gap narrowing. We suggest that the temperature, magnetization, an...

  10. Materials for room temperature magnetic refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl Hansen, B.

    2010-07-15

    Magnetic refrigeration is a cooling method, which holds the promise of being cleaner and more efficient than conventional vapor-compression cooling. Much research has been done during the last two decades on various magnetic materials for this purpose and today a number of materials are considered candidates as they fulfill many of the requirements for a magnetic refrigerant. However, no one material stands out and the field is still active with improving the known materials and in the search for a better one. Magnetic cooling is based on the magnetocaloric effect, which causes a magnetic material to change its temperature when a magnetic field is applied or removed. For room temperature cooling, one utilizes that the magnetocaloric effect peaks near magnetic phase transitions and so the materials of interest all have a critical temperature within the range of 250 - 310 K. A magnetic refrigerant should fulfill a number of criteria, among these a large magnetic entropy change, a large adiabatic temperature change, preferably little to no thermal or magnetic hysteresis and the material should have the stability required for long term use. As the temperature range required for room temperature cooling is some 40 - 50 K, the magnetic refrigerant should also be able to cover this temperature span either by exhibiting a very broad peak in magnetocaloric effect or by providing the opportunity for creating a materials series with varying transition temperatures. (Author)

  11. Loss and temperature field calculation of high-power density permanent magnet generator for marine%船用高功率密度永磁发电机损耗及温度场计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜翔宇; 胡萌; 胡嘉磊; 李旭光

    2015-01-01

    永磁同步电机具有功率密度高、效率高、结构简单的优点,适用于船舶电力系统。针对一台船用永磁同步发电机,首先计算其定子和转子的损耗,作为温度场计算的热源;然后建立三维有限元模型,对电机水套进行温度场计算,采用流体计算软件FLUENT计算得到等效散热系数进行温度场耦合,从而计算电机本体温度场分布。通过对不同水套流速下的电机温度场的分析对比,给出了冷却系统的设计要求。%Permanent magnet generator is applied to marine power system due to its merits such as high⁃power density, high efficiency and simple structure. In this paper,the stator and rotor loss of a marine permanent magnet generator is calculated as the heat source,and then its 3⁃D finite element model is built to calculate the temperature distribution of the water chamber. The equivalent heat release coefficient is obtained by means of liquid calculation software FLUENT to carried out temperature field coupling,so as to calculate the temperature distribution of the generator. A design requirement of the cooling system is made by comparing and analyzing the temperature fields of the generator at different velocity of cooling water.

  12. On the intergalactic temperature-density relation

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological simulations of the low-density intergalactic medium exhibit a strikingly tight power-law relation between temperature and density that holds over two decades in density. It is found that this relation should roughly apply Delta z ~ 1-2 after a reionization event, and this limiting behavior has motivated the power-law parameterizations used in most analyses of the Ly-alpha forest. This relation has been explained by using equations linearized in the baryonic overdensity (which does not address why a tight power-law relation holds over two decades in density) or by equating the photoheating rate with the cooling rate from cosmological expansion (which we show is incorrect). Previous explanations also did not address why recombination cooling and Compton cooling off of the cosmic microwave background, which are never negligible, do not alter the character of this relation. We provide an understanding for why a tight power-law relation arises for unshocked gas at all densities for which collisional c...

  13. Spontaneous magnetization in high-density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constanca;

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that spontaneous magnetization occurs due to the anomalous magnetic moments of quarks in high-density quark matter under the tensor-type four-point interaction. The spin polarized condensate for each flavor of quark appears at high baryon density, which leads to the spontaneous...... magnetization due to the anomalous magnetic moments of quarks. The implications for the strong magnetic field in compact stars is discussed....

  14. Materials for Room Temperature Magnetic Refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Britt Rosendahl

    Magnetic refrigeration is a cooling method, which holds the promise of being cleaner and more efficient than conventional vapor-compression cooling. Much research has been done during the last two decades on various magnetic materials for this purpose and today a number of materials are considered...... candidates as they fulfill many of the requirements for a magnetic refrigerant. However, no one material stands out and the field is still active with improving the known materials and in the search for a better one. Magnetic cooling is based on the magnetocaloric effect, which causes a magnetic material...... to change its temperature when a magnetic field is applied or removed. For room temperature cooling, one utilizes that the magnetocaloric effect peaks near magnetic phase transitions and so the materials of interest all have a critical temperature within the range of 250 – 310 K. A magnetic refrigerant...

  15. Unconventional temperature enhanced magnetism in iron telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalinznyak, I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Xu, Zhijun [ORNL; Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Tsvelik, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Discoveries of copper and iron-based high-temperature superconductors (HTSC)1-2 have challenged our views of superconductivity and magnetism. Contrary to the pre-existing view that magnetism, which typically involves localized electrons, and superconductivity, which requires freely-propagating itinerant electrons, are mutually exclusive, antiferromagnetic phases were found in all HTSC parent materials3,4. Moreover, highly energetic magnetic fluctuations, discovered in HTSC by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) 5,6, are now widely believed to be vital for the superconductivity 7-10. In two competing scenarios, they either originate from local atomic spins11, or are a property of cooperative spin-density-wave (SDW) behavior of conduction electrons 12,13. Both assume clear partition into localized electrons, giving rise to local spins, and itinerant ones, occupying well-defined, rigid conduction bands. Here, by performing an INS study of spin dynamics in iron telluride, a parent material of one of the iron-based HTSC families, we have discovered that this very assumption fails, and that conduction and localized electrons are fundamentally entangled. In the temperature range relevant for the superconductivity we observe a remarkable redistribution of magnetism between the two groups of electrons. The effective spin per Fe at T 10 K, in the2 antiferromagnetic phase, corresponds to S 1, consistent with the recent analyses that emphasize importance of Hund s intra-atomic exchange15-16. However, it grows to S 3/2 in the disordered phase, a result that profoundly challenges the picture of rigid bands, broadly accepted for HTSC.

  16. Areal density optimizations for heat-assisted magnetic recording of high-density media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Christoph; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Suess, Dieter; Praetorius, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is hoped to be the future recording technique for high-density storage devices. Nevertheless, there exist several realization strategies. With a coarse-grained Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch model, we investigate in detail the benefits and disadvantages of a continuous and pulsed laser spot recording of shingled and conventional bit-patterned media. Additionally, we compare single-phase grains and bits having a bilayer structure with graded Curie temperature, consisting of a hard magnetic layer with high TC and a soft magnetic one with low TC, respectively. To describe the whole write process as realistically as possible, a distribution of the grain sizes and Curie temperatures, a displacement jitter of the head, and the bit positions are considered. For all these cases, we calculate bit error rates of various grain patterns, temperatures, and write head positions to optimize the achievable areal storage density. Within our analysis, shingled HAMR with a continuous laser pulse moving over the medium reaches the best results and thus has the highest potential to become the next-generation storage device.

  17. Ionospheric midlatitude electric current density inferred from multiple magnetic satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, R. M.; Whaler, K. A.; Macmillan, S.; Beggan, C.; Olsen, N.; Spain, T.; Aruliah, A.

    2013-09-01

    A method for inferring zonal electric current density in the mid-to-low latitude F region ionosphere is presented. We describe a method of using near-simultaneous overflights of the Ørsted and CHAMP satellites to define a closed circuit for an application of Ampère's integral law to magnetic data. Zonal current density from sources in only the region between the two satellites is estimated for the first time. Six years of mutually available vector magnetic data allows overlaps spanning the full 24 h range of local time twice. Solutions are computed on an event-by-event basis after correcting for estimates of main and crustal magnetic fields. Current density in the range ±0.1 μA/m2 is resolved, with the distribution of electric current largely matching known features such as the Appleton anomaly. The currents appear unmodulated at times of either high-negative Dst or high F10.7, which has implications for any future efforts to model their effects. We resolve persistent current intensifications between geomagnetic latitudes of 30 and 50° in the postmidnight, predawn sector, a region typically thought to be relatively free of electric currents. The cause of these unexpected intensifications remains an open issue. We compare our results with current density predictions made by the Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere model, a self-consistent, first-principles, three-dimensional numerical dynamic model of ionospheric composition and temperatures. This independent validation of our current density estimates highlights good agreement in the broad spatiotemporal trends we identify, which increases confidence in our results.

  18. Temperature dependence of magnetic moments of nanoparticles and their dipole interaction in magnetic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, A.V.

    2015-01-15

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out for magnetite-based fluids over a wide temperature range. The fluids were stabilized with commonly used surfactants (fatty acids) and new surfactants (polypropylene glycol and tallow acids). The coefficients of temperature dependence of the particle magnetic moments were determined by fitting of the measured and calculated values of magnetic susceptibility. The influence of the inter-particle dipole–dipole interaction on the susceptibility was taken into account in the framework of A.O. Ivanov's model. The corrections for thermal expansion were determined by density measurements of the carrier fluid. The obtained values of temperature coefficients correlate to the solidification temperature of the fluid samples. For fluids with a low solidification temperature the value of the temperature coefficient of particle magnetization coincides with its value for bulk magnetite. - Highlights: • Susceptibility measurements made for magnetic fluids over a wide temperature range. • Temperature coefficients of particle magnetization found from susceptibility data. • The value of coefficients correlates to the solidification temperature of the fluid. • For the lowest solidification temperature the coefficient corresponds to that of bulk magnetite.

  19. The density minimum at the Earth's magnetic equator

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Journal of Geophysical Research,Volume 97, pp. 1135-1150 Observations of the density structure in the plasmapause region reveal the existence of a local minimum in the total electron density at the magnetic equator.

  20. 多领域协同仿真的高密度永磁电机温升计算%Temperature Rise Calculations of High Density Permanent Magnet Motors Based on Multi-domain Co-simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琪; 鲁茜睿; 黄苏融; 张俊

    2014-01-01

    为了有效解决电机温升不易准确计算的难题,该文首先提出基于多领域协同仿真的高密度永磁电机温升计算理念,详细论述温升计算的流程。基于热传导理论,论文导出槽内绕组等效导热系数的计算方法,有效地考虑了漆包线绝缘层、浸渍漆和微孔对电机温升的影响。以一台48槽/8极高密度永磁电机样机为例,基于多领域协同仿真的计算方法,精确计算样机的铁耗、计及集肤效应的交流绕组铜耗,以及永磁体的涡流损耗和电机内的温度场。最后,进行样机的温升试验,温度场计算值与试验结果基本吻合,验证了基于多领域协同仿真的高密度永磁电机温升计算方法的准确性和有效性。%In order to accurately analyze the temperature rise of high density permanent magnet motors (HDPMM), a new temperature calculation conception of the HDPMM based on multi-domain co-simulation was proposed and its calculation process was elaborated.According to the theory of heat transfer, the calculation method of equivalent heat transfer coefficient for the stator winding was deduced, which effectively consider the influence of the wire insulation, impregnating varnish and fine air gap in slots on the temperature rise of the motor. Based on multi-domain co-simulation, a prototype of 48-slot 8-pole HDPMM was simulated for its iron losses, AC winding copper losses taking the skin effect into account, permanent magnet eddy losses,and thermal fields. The temperature of the prototype machine was tested. The good agreement between the tested data and the simulated data verifies the validity and precision of the simulation approach.

  1. Cubic ideal ferromagnets at low temperature and weak magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Christoph P.

    2017-04-01

    The low-temperature series for the free energy density, pressure, magnetization and susceptibility of cubic ideal ferromagnets in weak external magnetic fields are discussed within the effective Lagrangian framework up to three loops. The structure of the simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic lattice is taken into account explicitly. The expansion involves integer and half-integer powers of the temperature. The corresponding coefficients depend on the magnetic field and on low-energy effective constants that can be expressed in terms of microscopic quantities. Our formulas may also serve as efficiency or consistency check for other techniques like Green's function methods, where spurious terms in the low-temperature expansion have appeared. We explore the sign and magnitude of the spin-wave interaction in the pressure, magnetization and susceptibility, and emphasize that our effective field theory approach is fully systematic and rigorous.

  2. Gravitational collapse of a magnetized fermion gas with finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Gaspar, I. [Instituto de Geofisica y Astronomia (IGA), La Habana (Cuba); Perez Martinez, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Sussman, Roberto A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico); Ulacia Rey, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    We examine the dynamics of a self-gravitating magnetized fermion gas at finite temperature near the collapsing singularity of a Bianchi-I spacetime. Considering a general set of appropriate and physically motivated initial conditions, we transform Einstein-Maxwell field equations into a complete and self-consistent dynamical system amenable for numerical work. The resulting numerical solutions reveal the gas collapsing into both, isotropic (''point-like'') and anisotropic (''cigar-like''), singularities, depending on the initial intensity of the magnetic field. We provide a thorough study of the near collapse behavior and interplay of all relevant state and kinematic variables: temperature, expansion scalar, shear scalar, magnetic field, magnetization, and energy density. A significant qualitative difference in the behavior of the gas emerges in the temperature range T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -6} and T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -3}. (orig.)

  3. Cooling Concepts for High Power Density Magnetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biela, Juergen; Kolar, Johann W.

    In the area or power electronics there is a general trend to higher power densities. In order to increase the power density the systems must be designed optimally concerning topology, semiconductor selection, etc. and the volume of the components must be decreased. The decreasing volume comes along with a reduced surface for cooling. Consequently, new cooling methods are required. In the paper an indirect air cooling system for magnetic devices which combines the transformer with a heat sink and a heat transfer component is presented. Moreover, an analytic approach for calculating the temperature distribution is derived and validated by measurements. Based on these equations a transformer with an indirect air cooling system is designed for a 10kW telecom power supply.

  4. Investigation of the Critical Current Density of YBaCuO high-temperature Superconductor Ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    METSKHVARISHVILI, I. R.; KEKELIDZE, N. P.; METSKHVARISHVILI, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    The method of high harmonics is used to investigate penetration of low magnetic fields within the Y1Ba2Cu3O7 high-temperature superconductor ceramic. Given experimental results are explained by the modal dependencies between the value of critical current density and the magnetic induction B: jc(B) = jc(0){\\frac{{B02}} {{B02 + B2}}}.

  5. Controlling temperature in magnetic hyperthermia with low Curie temperature particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astefanoaei, Iordana; Dumitru, Ioan; Chiriac, Horia; Stancu, Alexandru

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermia induced by the heating of magnetic particles (MPs) in alternating magnetic field receives a considerable attention in cancer therapy. An interesting development in the studies dedicated to magnetically based hyperthermia is the possibility to control the temperature using MPs with selective magnetic absorption properties. This paper analyzes the temperature field determined by the heating of MPs having low Curie temperature (a FeCrNbB particulate system) injected within a malignant tissue, subjected to an ac magnetic field. The temperature evolution within healthy and tumor tissues was analyzed by finite element method simulations in a thermo-fluid model. The cooling effect produced by blood flowing in blood vessels was considered. This effect is intensified at the increase of blood velocity. The FeCrNbB particles, having the Curie temperature close to the therapeutic range, transfer the heat more homogeneous in the tumor keeping the temperature within the therapeutic range in whole tumor volume. Having the possibility to automatically control the temperature within a tumor, these particle type opens new research horizons in the magnetic hyperthermia.

  6. Magnetic Density of States at Low Energy in Geometrically Frustrated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaouanc, A.; de Réotier, P. Dalmas; Glazkov, V.; Marin, C.; Bonville, P.; Hodges, J. A.; Gubbens, P. C.; Sakarya, S.; Baines, C.

    2005-07-01

    Using muon-spin-relaxation measurements we show that the pyrochlore compound Gd2Ti2O7, in its magnetically ordered phase below ˜1 K, displays persistent spin dynamics down to temperatures as low as 20 mK. The characteristics of the induced muon relaxation can be accounted for by a scattering process involving two magnetic excitations, with a density of states characterized by an upturn at low energy and a small gap depending linearly on the temperature. We propose that such a density of states is a generic feature of geometrically frustrated magnetic materials.

  7. Photospheric Magnetic Free Energy Density of Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongqi

    2016-12-01

    We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions (one of them recurrent) inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with other available differently defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in Active Regions NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. The quantity 1/4π{B}n\\cdot{B}p is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear to the difference between the potential (Bp) and the non-potential magnetic field (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density shows clear changes before the powerful solar flares in Active Region NOAA 11158, which is consistent with the change in magnetic fields in the flaring lower atmosphere.

  8. Photospheric Magnetic Free Energy Density of Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hongqi

    2016-01-01

    We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with the possible different defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in active region NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. It is noticed that the quantity 1/4pi Bn.Bp is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear on the difference between the potential magnetic field (Bp) and non-potential one (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density changes obviously before the powerful solar flares in the active region NOAA 11158, it is consistent with the change of magnetic fields in the lower atmosphere with flares.

  9. Explaining Mercury's Density through Magnetic Erosion

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In protoplanetary disks, dust grains rich in metallic iron can attract each other magnetically. If they are magnetized to values near saturation, the magnetically induced collision speeds are high enough to knock off the non-magnetized, loosely bound silicates. This process enriches the surviving portions of the dust grains in metallic iron, which further enhances the magnetically mediated collisions. The magnetic enhancement to the collisional cross-section between the iron rich dust results in rapid grain growth leading to planetesimal formation. While this process of knocking off silicates, which we term "magnetic erosion", occurs only in a very limited portion of a protoplanetary disk, it is a possible explanation for Mercury's disproportionately large iron core.

  10. PT Symmetry and QCD: Finite Temperature and Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Ogilvie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of PT symmetry to quantum chromodynamics (QCD, the gauge theory of the strong interactions, is explored in the context of finite temperature and density. Two significant problems in QCD are studied: the sign problem of finite-density QCD, and the problem of confinement. It is proven that the effective action for heavy quarks at finite density is PT-symmetric. For the case of 1+1 dimensions, the PT-symmetric Hamiltonian, although not Hermitian, has real eigenvalues for a range of values of the chemical potential μ, solving the sign problem for this model. The effective action for heavy quarks is part of a potentially large class of generalized sine-Gordon models which are non-Hermitian but are PT-symmetric. Generalized sine-Gordon models also occur naturally in gauge theories in which magnetic monopoles lead to confinement. We explore gauge theories where monopoles cause confinement at arbitrarily high temperatures. Several different classes of monopole gases exist, with each class leading to different string tension scaling laws. For one class of monopole gas models, the PT-symmetric affine Toda field theory emerges naturally as the effective theory. This in turn leads to sine-law scaling for string tensions, a behavior consistent with lattice simulations.

  11. Reduced density matrix functional theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldsiefen, Tim

    2012-10-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) is highly successful in many fields of research. There are, however, areas in which its performance is rather limited. An important example is the description of thermodynamical variables of a quantum system in thermodynamical equilibrium. Although the finite-temperature version of DFT (FT-DFT) rests on a firm theoretical basis and is only one year younger than its brother, groundstate DFT, it has been successfully applied to only a few problems. Because FT-DFT, like DFT, is in principle exact, these shortcomings can be attributed to the difficulties of deriving valuable functionals for FT-DFT. In this thesis, we are going to present an alternative theoretical description of quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. It is based on the 1-reduced density matrix (1RDM) of the system, rather than on its density and will rather cumbersomly be called finite-temperature reduced density matrix functional theory (FT-RDMFT). Its zero-temperature counterpart (RDMFT) proved to be successful in several fields, formerly difficult to address via DFT. These fields include, for example, the calculation of dissociation energies or the calculation of the fundamental gap, also for Mott insulators. This success is mainly due to the fact that the 1RDM carries more directly accessible ''manybody'' information than the density alone, leading for example to an exact description of the kinetic energy functional. This sparks the hope that a description of thermodynamical systems employing the 1RDM via FT-RDMFT can yield an improvement over FT-DFT. Giving a short review of RDMFT and pointing out difficulties when describing spin-polarized systems initiates our work. We then lay the theoretical framework for FT-RDMFT by proving the required Hohenberg-Kohn-like theorems, investigating and determining the domain of FT-RDMFT functionals and by deriving several properties of the exact functional. Subsequently, we present a perturbative method to

  12. A magnetic suspension system for measuring liquid density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Centeno González

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Density is a derived quantity of mass and length; it is defined as mass per volume unit and its SI unit is kg/m3. National metrology institutes have been designing and building their own magnetic suspension systems during the last 5 decades for making fluid density measurements; this has allowed them to carry out research into liquids and gases’ physical characteristics. This paper was aimed at designing and developing a magnetic suspension system for a magnetic balance used in determining liquid density to be used in CENAM’s metrology density laboratories.

  13. Iso-geometric shape optimization of magnetic density separators

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    PurposeThe waste recycling industry increasingly relies on magnetic density separators. These devices generate an upward magnetic force in ferro-fluids allowing to separate the immersed particles according to their mass density. Recently, a new separator design has been proposed that significantly reduces the required amount of permanent magnet material. The purpose of this paper is to alleviate the undesired end-effects in this design by altering the shape of the ferromagnetic covers of the ...

  14. Novel High Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Space Vehicle Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Previous high temperature magnetic bearings employed electromagnets only. The work proposed in this SBIR program seeks to utilize High Temperature Permanent Magnets...

  15. Novel High Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Space Vehicle Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Previous high temperature magnetic bearings employed only electromagnets. The work proposed in this SBIR program seeks to utilize High Temperature Permanent Magnets...

  16. Quench in high temperature superconductor magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, J

    2013-01-01

    High field superconducting magnets using high temperature superconductors are being developed for high energy physics, nuclear magnetic resonance and energy storage applications. Although the conductor technology has progressed to the point where such large magnets can be readily envisioned, quench protection remains a key challenge. It is well-established that quench propagation in HTS magnets is very slow and this brings new challenges that must be addressed. In this paper, these challenges are discussed and potential solutions, driven by new technologies such as optical fiber based sensors and thermally conducting electrical insulators, are reviewed.

  17. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  18. Magnetization of High Density Hadronic Fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Providencia, Constanca; da Providencia, João

    2012-01-01

    of the magnetization is derived by first considering and solving the Dirac equation of a fermion in interaction with a magnetic field and with a chiral sigma-pion pair. The solution provides the energies of single-particle states. The energy of the system is found by summing up contributions from all particles...

  19. Ionospheric Electron Density during Magnetically Active Times over Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz Erbaş, Bute; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Emine Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, R. A..

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyze electron density variations over Istanbul using Dynasonde observations during the magnetically active times. In order to perform statistical analyses, we first determined magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorm intervals from October 2012 to October 2015 using Kyoto's magnetic index data. Corresponding ionospheric parameters, such as critical frequency of F2 region (foF2), maximum electron density height (hmF2), total electron density (TEC) etc. were retrieved from Dynasonde data base at Istanbul Technical University's Space Weather Laboratory. To understand the behavior of electron density during the magnetically active times, we remove the background quiet time variations first and then quantify the anomalies. In this presentation, we will report results from our preliminary analyses from the selected cases corresponding to the strong magnetic storms. Initial results show lower electron densities at noon times and higher electron densities in the late afternoon toward sunset times when compared to the electron densities of magnetically quiet times. We also compare the results with IRI and TIEGCM ionospheric models in order to understand the physical and dynamical causes of these variations. During the presentation we will also discuss the role of these changes during the magnetically active times on the GPS communications through ionosphere.

  20. Three dimensional density cavities in guide field collisionless magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Markidis, Stefano; Divin, Andrey; Goldman, Martin V; Newman, D; Andersson, Laila

    2012-01-01

    Particle-in-Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide field reveal for the first time the three dimensional features of the low density regions along the magnetic reconnection separatrices, the so-called "cavities". It is found that structures with further lower density develop within the cavities. Because their appearance is similar to the rib shape, these formations are here called "low density ribs". Their location remains approximately fixed in time and their density progressively decreases, as electron currents along the cavities evacuate them. They develop along the magnetic field lines and are supported by a strong perpendicular electric field that oscillates in space. In addition, bipolar parallel electric field structures form as isolated spheres between the cavities and the outflow plasma, along the direction of the low density ribs and of magnetic field lines.

  1. Mechanical and Thermal Characteristics of Insulation Materials for the KSTAR Magnet System at Cryogenic Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wooho; Lim, Bungsu; Kim, Myungkyu; Park, Hyunki; Kim, Keeman; Chu, Yong; Lee, Sangil

    2004-06-01

    The KSTAR(Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) superconducting magnet is electrically insulated by the composite material of epoxy resin and glass fiber (2.5 kV/mm) and Kapton (8 kV/mm). The insulation composite material of epoxy resin and glass fiber is prepared using a VPI (Vacuum Pressure Impregnation) process. The superconducting magnet is under mechanical stress caused by the large temperature difference between the operation temperature of the magnet and room temperature. The large electro-magnetic force during the operation of the magnet is also exerted on the magnet. Therefore, the characteristics of the insulation material at cryogenic temperatures are very important and the tensile stress and thermal expansion coefficient for the insulation materials of the KSTAR superconducting magnet are measured. This paper presents results on mechanical properties of the insulation material for KSTAR magnets, such as density, ultimate tensile stress and thermal contraction between room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  2. Magnetic moment densities in selected UTX compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javorsky, P.; Schweizer, J.; Givord, F.; Boucherle, J.-X.; Andreev, A.V.; Divis, M.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Sechovsky, V

    2004-07-15

    We present results of polarized neutron-diffraction studies of magnetization distribution in several isostructural UTX compounds. Besides the uranium magnetic moment, we observe a significant magnetization also on the transition-metal sites and in the interstitial region, close to the X-atom site. The values of the moments induced on the T-atoms in the U-T and T-X basal planes are rather similar for compounds with 3d-metals, UNiGa, UNiAl, and UCoAl, while a difference occurs in UPtAl. Our results are compared with literature data for URhAl and URuAl.

  3. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  4. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Jain, Nupur; Ghiran, Ionita Calin; Tasoglu, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary) and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary) relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  5. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Knowlton

    Full Text Available Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  6. Analysis of room temperature magnetic regenerative refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shir, F.; Mavriplis, C.; Bennett, L.H.; Torre, E.D. [George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States). Institute for Magnetics Research

    2005-06-01

    Results of a room temperature magnetic refrigeration test bed and an analysis using a computational model are presented. A detailed demonstration of the four sequential processes in the transient magnetocaloric regeneration process of a magnetic material is presented. The temperature profile during the transient approach to steady state operation was measured in detail. A 5 {sup o}C evolution of the difference of temperature between the hot end and the cold end of the magnetocaloric bed due to regeneration is reported. A model is developed for the heat transfer and fluid mechanics of the four sequential processes in each cycle of thermal wave propagation in the regenerative bed combined with the magnetocaloric effect. The basic equations that can be used in simulation of magnetic refrigeration systems are derived and the design parameters are discussed. (author)

  7. An SV-GMR Needle Sensor-Based Estimation of Volume Density of Magnetic Fluid inside Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Gooneratne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A spin-valve giant magneto-resistive (SV-GMR sensor of needle-type configuration is reported to estimate the volume density of magnetic fluid inside human body. The magnetic fluid is usually injected into human body to kill cancerous cell using hyperthermia-based treatment. To control the heat treatment, a good knowledge of temperature is very much essential. The SV-GMR-based needle-type sensor is used to measure the magnetic flux density of the magnetic fluid inside the human body from which the temperature is estimated. The needle-type sensor provides a semi-invasive approach of temperature determination.

  8. Magnetic field dependence of the threshold electric field in unconventional charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Virosztek, Attila; Maki, Kazumi

    2002-04-01

    Many experiments suggest that the unidentified low-temperature phase of α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 is most likely unconventional charge density wave (UCDW). To further extend this identification we present our theoretical study of the threshold electric field of UCDW in a magnetic field. The magnetic field-temperature phase diagram is very similar to those in a d-wave superconductor. The optical conductivity shows clear features characteristic to both UDW and magnetic field. We find a rather strong field dependence of the threshold electric field, which shows qualitatively good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-12-31

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

  10. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

  11. Temperature distribution in magnetized neutron star crusts

    CERN Document Server

    Geppert, U; Page, D

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the influence of different magnetic field configurations on the temperature distribution in neutron star crusts. We consider axisymmetric dipolar fields which are either restricted to the stellar crust, ``crustal fields'', or allowed to penetrate the core, ``core fields''. By integrating the two-dimensional heat transport equation in the crust, taking into account the classical (Larmor) anisotropy of the heat conductivity, we obtain the crustal temperature distribution, assuming an isothermal core. Including quantum magnetic field effects in the envelope as a boundary condition, we deduce the corresponding surface temperature distributions. We find that core fields result in practically isothermal crusts unless the surface field strength is well above $10^{15}$ G while for crustal fields with surface strength above a few times $10^{12}$ G significant deviations from isothermality occur at core temperatures inferior or equal to $10^8$ K. At the stellar surface, the cold equatorial region produce...

  12. Microscopic derivation of electromagnetic force density in magnetic dielectric media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shevchenko, A.; Hoenders, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Macroscopic force density imposed on a linear isotropic magnetic dielectric medium by an arbitrary electromagnetic field is derived by spatially averaging the microscopic Lorentz force density. The obtained expression differs from the commonly used expressions, but the energy-momentum tensor derived

  13. Permanent magnets composed of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Roy; Chen, In-Gann; Liu, Jay; Lau, Kwong

    1991-01-01

    A study of persistent, trapped magnetic field has been pursued with high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The main effort is to study the feasibility of utilization of HTS to fabricate magnets for various devices. The trapped field, when not in saturation, is proportional to the applied field. Thus, it should be possible to replicate complicated field configurations with melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7 (MT-Y123) material, bypassing the need for HTS wires. Presently, materials have been developed from which magnets of 1.5 T, at 77 K, can be fabricated. Much higher field is available at lower operating temperature. Stability of a few percent per year is readily attainable. Results of studies on prototype motors and minimagnets are reported.

  14. High temperature superconductors for magnetic suspension applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmichael, C. K.; Cooley, R. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Ma, K. B.; Lamb, M. A.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.; Chu, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) hold the promise for applications in magnetic levitation bearings, vibration damping, and torque coupling. Traditional magnetic suspension systems require active feedback and vibration controls in which power consumption and low frequency vibration are among the major engineering concerns. HTS materials have been demonstrated to be an enabling approach towards such problems due to their flux trapping properties. In our laboratory at TCSUH, we have been conducting a series of experiments to explore various mechanical applications using HTS. We have constructed a 30 lb. model flywheel levitated by a hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (HSMB). We are also developing a levitated and vibration-dampled platform for high precision instrumentation. These applications would be ideal for space usages where ambient temperature is adequate for HTS to operate properly under greatly reduced cryogenic requirements. We will give a general overview of these potential applications and discuss the operating principles of the HTS devices we have developed.

  15. Studies on Magnetization Technique of High Temperature Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    大橋, 忠巌; 荻原, 宏康

    1999-01-01

    It is known that permanent magnets produce magnetic fields up to 1T. On the other hand, magnetized high temperature superconductors can be used as "super"-permanent magnets which produce magnetic fields higher than 1T, because superconductors can trap higher magnetic fluxes than usual permanent magnets. In order to magnetize a YBCO bulk superconductor, there are two ways; a field cooling (FC) method and a zero field cooling (ZFC) method. FC is the way of magnetizing the superconductor by appl...

  16. Temperature dependence of the AGOR magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roobol, LP; Brandenburg, S; Schreuder, HW; Baron, E; Lieuvin, M

    1999-01-01

    It has been found necessary to change the magnet currents gradually during long term operation of the AGOR cyclotron due to temperature changes in the iron, which are caused by the correction coils. These changes influence the magnetisation in various ways: through a change in susceptibility, satura

  17. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdős, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  18. Iso-geometric shape optimization of magnetic density separators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang Manh, Nguyen; Evgrafov, Anton; Gravesen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The waste recycling industry increasingly relies on magnetic density separators. These devices generate an upward magnetic force in ferro-fluids allowing to separate the immersed particles according to their mass density. Recently, a new separator design has been proposed that significantly...... is obtained at the cost of a pole cover shape that differs per pole. This limitation has negligible impact on the manufacturing of the separator. The new pole cover shapes therefore lead to improved performance of the density separation. Practical implications Due to the larger uniformity the generated field......, these shapes should enable larger amounts of waste to be processed than the previous design. Originality/value This paper treats the shapes optimization of magnetic density separators systematically and presents new shapes for the ferromagnetic poles covers....

  19. Magnetism in SQUIDs at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendelbach, S.; Hover, D.; Kittel, A.; Mück, M.; Martinis, John M.; McDermott, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have characterized the temperature dependence of the flux threading dc SQUIDs cooled to millikelvin temperatures. The flux increases as 1/T as temperature is lowered; moreover, the flux change is proportional to the density of trapped vortices. The data are compatible with the thermal polarization of surface spins in the trapped fields of the vortices. In the absence of trapped flux, we observe evidence of spin-glass freezing at low temperature. These results suggest an explanation for the universal 1/f flux noise in SQUIDs and superconducting qubits.

  20. Meson properties at finite temperature and baryon density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, M.; Klimt, S.; Weise, W. (Inst. of Theoretical Physics, Univ. Regensburg (Germany))

    1992-06-22

    We use the generalized SU(3) version of the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model to discuss properties of mesons, constituent quarks and vacuum structure as a function of density and temperature in compressed matter. Systematic low-density expansions are derived. In particular, we show that effects due to finite quasi-particle size are important in stabilizing the density and temperature dependence of the pion mass. (orig.).

  1. Relative contributions of temperature and salinity to seasonal mixed layer density changes and horizontal density gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Gregory C.; Schmidtko, Sunke; Lyman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature and salinity both contribute to ocean density, including its seasonal cycle and spatial patterns in the mixed layer. Temperature and salinity profiles from the Argo Program allow construction and analysis of a global, monthly, mixed layer climatology. Temperature changes dominate the seasonal cycle of mixed layer density in most regions, but salinity changes are dominant in the tropical warm pools, Arctic, and Antarctic. Under the Intertropical Convergence Zone, temperature and sa...

  2. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the

  3. Switching current density reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Chun-Yeol [Department of Physics, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the switching current density reduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions using micromagnetic simulations. We find that the switching current density can be reduced with elongated lateral shapes of the magnetic tunnel junctions, and additional reduction can be achieved by using a noncollinear polarizer layer. The reduction is closely related to the details of spin configurations during switching processes with the additional in-plane anisotropy.

  4. Fourier transform magnetic resonance current density imaging (FT-MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ider, Yusuf Ziya; Birgul, Ozlem; Oran, Omer Faruk; Arikan, Orhan; Hamamura, Mark J; Muftuler, L Tugan

    2010-06-01

    Fourier transform (FT)-based algorithms for magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density have been developed for 2D and 3D problems. For 2D problems, where current is confined to the xy-plane and z-component of the magnetic flux density is measured also on the xy-plane inside the object, an iterative FT-MRCDI algorithm is developed by which both the current distribution inside the object and the z-component of the magnetic flux density on the xy-plane outside the object are reconstructed. The method is applied to simulated as well as actual data from phantoms. The effect of measurement error on the spatial resolution of the current density reconstruction is also investigated. For 3D objects an iterative FT-based algorithm is developed whereby the projected current is reconstructed on any slice using as data the Laplacian of the z-component of magnetic flux density measured for that slice. In an injected current MRCDI scenario, the current is not divergence free on the boundary of the object. The method developed in this study also handles this situation.

  5. Enhancement of electric and magnetic wave fields at density gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reiniusson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We use Freja satellite data to investigate irregular small-scale density variations. The observations are made in the auroral region at about 1000-1700 km. The density variations are a few percent, and the structures are found to be spatial down to a scale length of a few ion gyroradii. Irregular density variations are often found in an environment of whistler mode/lower hybrid waves and we show that at the density gradients both the electric and magnetic wave fields are enhanced.

  6. Temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in magnetic nanodots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bosung; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog, E-mail: sangkoog@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Creative Research Initiative Center for Spin Dynamics and Spin-Wave Devices, Nanospinics Laboratory, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-07

    We studied the temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in soft magnetic nanodots by micromagnetic numerical calculations within a framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert scheme. It was determined that vortex-core-switching events at non-zero temperatures occur stochastically, and that the threshold field strength increases with temperature for a given field frequency. The mechanism of core reversals at elevated temperatures is the same as that of vortex-antivortex-pair-mediated core reversals found at the zero temperature. The reversal criterion is also the out-of-plane component of a magnetization dip that should reach −p, which is to say, m{sub z,dip} = −p, where p is the original polarization, p = +1 (−1), for the upward (downward) core. By this criterion, the creation of a vortex-antivortex pair accompanies complete vortex-antivortex-annihilation-mediated core reversals, resulting in the maximum excess of the exchange energy density, ΔE{sub ex}{sup cri} ≈ 15.4 ± 0.2 mJ/cm{sup 3}. This work provides the underlying physics of vortex-core reversals at non-zero temperatures, and potentiates the real application of vortex random access memory operating at elevated temperatures.

  7. Determination of coronal temperatures from electron density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J F

    2011-01-01

    The most popular method for determining coronal temperatures is the scale-height-method (shm). It is based on electron density profiles inferred from White Light (WL) brightness measurements of the corona during solar eclipses. This method has been applied to several published coronal electron density models. The calculated temperature distributions reach a maximum at r > 1.3 RS, and therefore do not satisfy one of the conditions for applying the shm method. Another method is the hydrostatic equilibrium method (hst), which enables coronal temperature distributions to be determined, providing solutions to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation. The temperature maximas using the hst method are almost equal to those obtained using the shm method, but the temperature peak is always at significantly lower altitude when the hst-method is used than when the shm-method is used. A third and more recently developed method, dyn, can be used for the same published electron density profiles. The temperature distributions ob...

  8. Thermodynamic extension of density-functional theory. II. Finite-temperature ensemble spin-density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Balawender, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The formalism developed in the first paper of the series [arXiv:0901.1060v3] is applied to two thermodynamic systems: (i) of three global observables (the energy, the total electron number and the spin number), (ii) of one global observable (the internal electron energy) and two local (position-dependent) observables (the total electron density and the spin density). The two-component potential of the many-electron system of interest is constructed of a scalar external potential and a collinear magnetic field (coupled only with the spin operator). Various equilibrium characteristics of two systems are defined and investigated. Conditions for the equivalence between two systems (the same equilibrium density matrix demanded) are derived and thoroughly discussed. The applicability of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem is extended to the thermodynamic spin-density functional theory. Obtained results provide a rigorous mathematical foundation for future derivation of the zero-temperature limit of this theory and determina...

  9. Large Scale Magnetic Fields: Density Power Spectrum in Redshift Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajesh Gopal; Shiv K. Sethi

    2003-09-01

    We compute the density redshift-space power spectrum in the presence of tangled magnetic fields and compare it with existing observations. Our analysis shows that if these magnetic fields originated in the early universe then it is possible to construct models for which the shape of the power spectrum agrees with the large scale slope of the observed power spectrum. However requiring compatibility with observed CMBR anisotropies, the normalization of the power spectrum is too low for magnetic fields to have significant impact on the large scale structure at present. Magnetic fields of a more recent origin generically give density power spectrum ∝ 4 which doesn’t agree with the shape of the observed power spectrum at any scale. Magnetic fields generate curl modes of the velocity field which increase both the quadrupole and hexadecapole of the redshift space power spectrum. For curl modes, the hexadecapole dominates over quadrupole. So the presence of curl modes could be indicated by an anomalously large hexadecapole, which has not yet been computed from observation. It appears difficult to construct models in which tangled magnetic fields could have played a major role in shaping the large scale structure in the present epoch. However if they did, one of the best ways to infer their presence would be from the redshift space effects in the density power spectrum.

  10. Thermodynamic magnetization of two-dimensional electron gas measured over wide range of densities

    OpenAIRE

    Reznikov, M.; Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Teneh, N.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of dm/dn in Si MOSFET, where m is the magnetization of the two-dimensional electron gas and n is its density. We extended the density range of measurements from well in the metallic to deep in the insulating region. The paper discusses in detail the conditions under which this extension is justified, as well as the corrections one should make to extract dm/dn properly. At low temperatures, dm/dn was found to be strongly nonlinear already in weak magnetic fields, on a sc...

  11. Magnetic Tunnel Junction as an On-Chip Temperature Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Liyanagedera, Chamika Mihiranga; Jung, Byunghoo; Roy, Kaushik

    2017-09-18

    Temperature sensors are becoming an increasingly important component in System-on-Chip (SoC) designs with increasing transistor scaling, power density and associated heating effects. This work explores a compact nanoelectronic temperature sensor based on a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) structure. The MTJ switches probabilistically depending on the operating temperature in the presence of thermal noise. Performance evaluation of the proposed MTJ temperature sensor, based on experimentally measured device parameters, reveals that the sensor is able to achieve a conversion rate of 2.5K samples/s with energy consumption of 8.8 nJ per conversion (1-2 orders of magnitude lower than state-of-the-art CMOS sensors) for a linear sensing regime of 200-400 K.

  12. Dependence of polar hole density on magnetic and solar conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Grebowsky, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Electron densities from the Langmuir probes on the Atmospheric Explorer C and Dynamics Explorer 2 are used for analyzing the behavior of the high-altitude night-side F region polar hole as a function of solar and magnetic activity and of universal time (UT). The polar region of invariant latitude from 70 deg to 80 deg and MLT from 22 to 03 hours is examined. The strongest dependencies are observed in F10.7 and UT; a strong hemispherical difference due to the offset of the magnetic poles from the earth's rotation axis is observed in the UT dependence of the ionization hole. A seasonal variation in the dependence of ion density on solar flux is indicated, and an overall asymmetry in the density level between hemispheres is revealed, with the winter-hole density about a factor of 10 greater in the north than in the south.

  13. Microwave characteristics of low density flaky magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenqiang, Zhang, E-mail: zwqzwqzwqzwq@126.com [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); College of Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Deyuan, Zhang [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Jun, Cai, E-mail: jun_cai@buaa.edu.cn [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Diatomite coated with thin Fe films were obtained by the Chemical Vapor Deposition process. The resultant Fe-coated flaky diatomite particles had low densities (2.7–4.0 g/cm{sup 3}) and high saturation magnetization (93–157 emu/g). Annealing treatment led to grain growth and an increased saturation magnetization. The high frequency properties of the composites consisting of Fe-coated flaky diatomite particles and wax were investigated. The permittivity and permeability increased with increasing flaky magnetic particles content in the composite and increasing the Fe weight percentage of the particles. The reflection loss of the composite was found dependent on the absorber material thickness, wax:flaky magnetic particles ratios, the Fe content, as well as the annealing treatment. At a thickness of 1 mm, the composite records a minimum reflection loss of −18 dB at 6 GHz. - Highlights: ► We synthesize the flaky magnetic particles with the diatomite as template. ► The flaky magnetic particles coating layers are constituted by α-Fe. ► The flaky magnetic particles have good static magnetic properties. ► The flaky magnetic particles are a kind light weight high performance microwave absorber.

  14. Magnetic-field-tuned charge density wave in SmNiC2 and NdNiC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hechang; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.

    2017-02-01

    We report magnetic field tuned competition between magnetic order and charge density wave (CDW) states in SmNiC2 and NdNiC2 polycrystals. The destruction of CDW can be observed not only in SmNiC2 below ferromagnetic (FM) but also in NdNiC2 below antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition temperature. Moreover, the CDW states near magnetic transition temperatures can be tuned by the magnetic field for both compounds. Magnetic-field induced FM state in NdNiC2 is more effective in weakening the CDW than the AFM state at temperatures near Neel temperature T N but both ordering states have the same effect on CDW below T N. The interplay between magnetic and CDW states in SmNiC2 and NdNiC2 may be different, suggesting that these materials are good models to study correlations between magnetic and CDW wave order.

  15. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  16. A Two-Temperature Model of Magnetized Protostellar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Liang-Yao; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Chiang, Tzu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    We explore kinematics and morphologies of molecular outflows driven by young protostars using magnetohydrodynamic simulations in the context of the unified wind model of Shang et al. The model explains the observed high-velocity jet and low-velocity shell features. In this work we investigate how these characteristics are affected by the underlying temperature and magnetic field strength. We study the problem of a warm wind running into a cold ambient toroid by using a tracer field that keeps track of the wind material. While an isothermal equation of state is adopted, the effective temperature is determined locally based on the wind mass fraction. In the unified wind model, the density of the wind is cylindrically stratified and highly concentrated toward the outflow axis. Our simulations show that for a sufficiently magnetized wind, the jet identity can be well maintained even at high temperatures. However, for a high temperature wind with low magnetization, the thermal pressure of the wind gas can drive ma...

  17. Generation of localized magnetic moments in the charge-density-wave state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akzyanov, Ramil S.; Rozhkov, Alexander V.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a mechanism explaining the generation of localized magnetic moments in charge-density-wave compounds. Our model Hamiltonian describes an Anderson impurity placed in a host material exhibiting the charge-density wave. There is a region of the model's parameter space, where even weak Coulomb repulsion on the impurity site is able to localize the magnetic moment on the impurity. The phase diagram of a single impurity at T = 0 is mapped. To establish the connection with experiment, the thermodynamic properties of a random impurity ensemble is studied. Magnetic susceptibility of the ensemble diverges at low temperature; heat capacity as a function of the magnetic field demonstrates pronounced low field peak. Both features are consistent with experiments on orthorhombic TaS3 and blue bronze.

  18. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models for the ......Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models...

  19. Temperature Dependence Viscosity and Density of Different Biodiesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to assess the effect of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME concentration in diesel fuel on its viscosity and density behaviour. The density and dynamic viscosity were observed at various mixing ratios of RME and diesel fuel. All measurements were performed at constant temperature of 40 °C. Increasing ratio of RME in diesel fuel was reflected in increased density value and dynamic viscosity of the blend. In case of pure RME, pure diesel fuel, and a blend of both (B30, temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was examined. Temperature range in the experiment was −10 °C to 80 °C. Considerable temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was found and demonstrated for all three samples. This finding is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and reference data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 3rd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.796, −0.948, and −0.974 between measured and calculated values were found. Temperature dependence of density was modeled using a 2nd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.994, −0.979, and −0.976 between measured and calculated values were acquired. The proposed models can be used for flow behaviour prediction of RME, diesel fuel, and their blends.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of electron temperature and density by a line pair method in the RFP plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masayuki; Shimizu, S.; Ogawa, H.; Shinohara, T.

    2009-11-01

    A line-pair-method has been applied for a simultaneous measurement of the electron temperature and density in ATRAS RFP plasma. Three helium spectrum lines (668nm, 706nm, 728nm) were measured during the discharge at the same time and the electron temperature and density is estimated by using a Collision-Radiation model. To get the signal of the helium impunity line from the RFP discharge, the RFP plasma in the hydrogen gas with a few mixed helium gas was formed. In the typical ATRAS RFP discharge of the plasma current of 60kA, the electron temperature was approximately 50-150 eV and the electron density is the order of 10^18 m-3. During the discharge, the change of the temperature and density are mutually related and this correlation was the almost reverse phase. The periodically change of the temperature and density were also observed. This change synchronizes with a periodically increase of the averaged toroidal magnetic field, which is caused by the toroidal rotation of the increase of the toroidal magnetic field. This rotation, which is deeply related with dynamo effect, makes the plasma energy lose and particles also diffuse toward the plasma edge. As a result, the recycling of the particle and energy are occurred at the same time.

  1. Control of ion density distribution by magnetic traps for plasma electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, Oleg; Romanov, Maxim [Plasma Laboratory, National Aerospace University ' KhAI,' Kharkov 61070 (Ukraine); Fang Jinghua [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Cvelbar, Uros [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ostrikov, Kostya [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-10-01

    The effect of a magnetic field of two magnetic coils on the ion current density distribution in the setup for low-temperature plasma deposition is investigated. The substrate of 400 mm diameter is placed at a distance of 325 mm from the plasma duct exit, with the two magnetic coils mounted symmetrically under the substrate at a distance of 140 mm relative to the substrate centre. A planar probe is used to measure the ion current density distribution along the plasma flux cross-sections at distances of 150, 230, and 325 mm from the plasma duct exit. It is shown that the magnetic field strongly affects the ion current density distribution. Transparent plastic films are used to investigate qualitatively the ion density distribution profiles and the effect of the magnetic field. A theoretical model is developed to describe the interaction of the ion fluxes with the negative space charge regions associated with the magnetic trapping of the plasma electrons. Theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements, and a reasonable agreement is demonstrated.

  2. Plasmaspheric H+, He+, O+, He++, and O++ Densities and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort H.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmaspheric densities and temperatures for five ion species have recently become available, even though these quantities were derived some time ago from the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer onboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite over the years 1981-1984. The quantitative properties will be presented. Densities are found to have one behavior with lessor statistical variation below about L=2 and another with much greater variability above that Lshell. Temperatures also have a behavior difference between low and higher L-values. The density ratio He++/H+ is the best behaved with values of about 0.2% that slightly increase with increasing L. Unlike the He+/H+ density ratio that on average decreases with increasing Lvalue, the O+/H+ and O++/H+ density ratios have decreasing values below about L=2 and increasing average ratios at higher L-values. Hydrogen ion temperatures range from about 0.2 eV to several 10s of eV for a few measurements, although the bulk of the observations are of temperatures below 3 eV, again increasing with L-value. The temperature ratios of He+/H+ are tightly ordered around 1.0 except for the middle plasmasphere between L=3.5 and 4.5 where He+ temperatures can be significantly higher. The temperatures of He++, O+, and O++ are consistently higher than H+.

  3. Plasmaspheric H+, He+, He++, O+, and O++ Densities and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, G. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmaspheric densities and temperatures for five ion species have recently become available, even though these quantities were derived some time ago from the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer onboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite over the years 1981-1984. The quantitative properties will be presented. Densities are found to have one behavior with lessor statistical variation below about L=2 and another with much greater variability above that Lshell. Temperatures also have a behavior difference between low and higher L-values. The density ratio He++/H+ is the best behaved with values of about 0.2% that slightly increase with increasing L. Unlike the He+/H+ density ratio that on average decreases with increasing Lvalue, the O+/H+ and O++/H+ density ratios have decreasing values below about L=2 and increasing average ratios at higher L-values. Hydrogen ion temperatures range from about 0.2 eV to several 10s of eV for a few measurements, although the bulk of the observations are of temperatures below 3 eV, again increasing with L-value. The temperature ratios of He+/H+ are tightly ordered around 1.0 except for the middle plasmasphere between L=3.5 and 4.5 where He+ temperatures can be significantly higher. The temperatures of He++, O+, and O++ are consistently higher than H+.

  4. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  5. Magnetic structure at low temperatures in FeGe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, P. D.; Mishra, P. K.; Dube, V.; Mishra, R.; Sastry, P. U.; Ravikumar, G.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic phase of FeGe2 intermetallic is studied using low-temperature neutron diffraction and DC magnetization. Zero-magnetic-field neutron scattering data shows the presence of an antiferromagnetic phase in the low temperature range. We find the evidence of the presence of a ferromagnetic order overriding on the predominantly antiferromagnetic phase at low temperatures.

  6. Magnetocaloric effect in temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinnari Parekh; R V Upadhyay; R V Mehta

    2000-04-01

    The magnetocaloric properties of three different temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids were studied. The pyromagnetic coefficient for all the materials were obtained and it was found that this property depends on physical and magnetic properties like size, magnetization and Curie temperature. A theoretical model was developed to explain the behaviour of change in entropy with temperature.

  7. Ultrasound imaging for quantitative evaluation of magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanaee, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to an investigation of the potential and technological possibilities of an inline ultrasound system as a quality control system for wet recycling of solid waste. The main targeted recycling technology is magnetic density separation (MDS), a novel technique that was

  8. Interaction effects in high density magnetic particulate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerchez, Mihai; Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Stancu, Alexandru

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a micromagnetic study of the particulate high density recording media. The main difference in the behavior of such a system is the appearance of magnetic clusters which lead to a different behavior of the system. New hypotheses for interpreting such systems are presented.

  9. Ultrasound imaging for quantitative evaluation of magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanaee, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to an investigation of the potential and technological possibilities of an inline ultrasound system as a quality control system for wet recycling of solid waste. The main targeted recycling technology is magnetic density separation (MDS), a novel technique that was investiga

  10. Patterned magnetic thin films for ultra high density recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, J.C.; Haast, M.A.M.; Abelmann, L.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    The areal bit density of magnetic disk recording has increased since 1990 60% per year and even in the last years 100%. Extrapolation of these rates leads to recording parameters not likely to be achieved without changes in the present way of storing hard disk data. One of the possible solutions is

  11. Iso-geometric shape optimization of magnetic density separators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang Manh, Nguyen; Evgrafov, Anton; Gravesen, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The waste recycling industry increasingly relies on magnetic density separators. These devices generate an upward magnetic force in ferro-fluids allowing to separate the immersed particles according to their mass density. Recently, a new separator design has been proposed that significantly...... covers with B-splines and defines a cost functional that measures the non-uniformity of the magnetic field in an area above the poles. The authors apply an iso-geometric shape optimization procedure, which allows us to accurately represent, analyze and optimize the geometry using only a few design...... variables. The design problem is regularized by imposing constraints that enforce the convexity of the pole cover shapes and is solved by a non-linear optimization procedure. The paper validates the implementation of the algorithm using a simplified variant of the design problem with a known analytical...

  12. Analyzing forensic evidence based on density with magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Matthew R; Mirica, Katherine A; Mace, Charles R; Blackledge, Robert D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining the density of contact trace objects with magnetic levitation (MagLev). MagLev measurements accurately determine the density (± 0.0002 g/cm(3) ) of a diamagnetic object and are compatible with objects that are nonuniform in shape and size. The MagLev device (composed of two permanent magnets with like poles facing) and the method described provide a means of accurately determining the density of trace objects. This method is inexpensive, rapid, and verifiable and provides numerical values--independent of the specific apparatus or analyst--that correspond to the absolute density of the sample that may be entered into a searchable database. We discuss the feasibility of MagLev as a possible means of characterizing forensic-related evidence and demonstrate the ability of MagLev to (i) determine the density of samples of glitter and gunpowder, (ii) separate glitter particles of different densities, and (iii) determine the density of a glitter sample that was removed from a complex sample matrix. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Temperature dependence of densities of Sb and Bi melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG HaoRan; SUN ChunJing; WANG Rui; QI XiaoGang; ZHANG Ning

    2007-01-01

    The densities of Sb and Bi melts were investigated by an improved Archimedean method. The results show that the density of the Sb melt decreases linearly with increasing temperature, but the density of the Bi melt firstly increases and then decreases as the temperature increases. There is a maximum density value of 10.002 g/cm3 at 310℃, about 39℃ above the melting point. The temperature dependence of the Sb melt is well fitted with the expression ρ= 6.8590-5.8105×10-4T, and that of the Bi melt is fitted with ρ=10.3312-1.18×10-3T. The results were discussed from a microstructure viewpoint.

  14. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data.

  15. Baryon number fluctuations at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wei-jie; Rennecke, Fabian; Schaefer, Bernd-Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We investigate baryon number fluctuations for finite temperature and density in two-flavor QCD. This is done within a QCD-improved low-energy effective theory in an extension of the approach put forward in [1,2]. In the present work we aim at improving the predictive power of this approach for large temperatures and density, that is, for small collision energies. This is achieved by taking into account the full frequency dependence of the quark dispersion. This ensures the necessary Silver Blaze property of finite density QCD for the first time, which so far was only implemented approximately. Moreover, we show that Polyakov loop fluctuations have a sizeable impact at large temperatures and density. The results for the kurtosis of baryon number fluctuations are compared to previous effective theory results, lattice results and recent experimental data from STAR.

  16. Fail Safe, High Temperature Magnetic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihan, Thomas; Palazzolo, Alan; Kim, Yeonkyu; Lei, Shu-Liang; Kenny, Andrew; Na, Uhn Joo; Tucker, Randy; Preuss, Jason; Hunt, Andrew; Carter, Bart; hide

    2002-01-01

    This paper contributes to the magnetic bearing literature in two distinct areas: high temperature and redundant actuation. Design considerations and test results are given for the first published combined 538 C (1000 F) high speed rotating test performance of a magnetic bearing. Secondly, a significant extension of the flux isolation based, redundant actuator control algorithm is proposed to eliminate the prior deficiency of changing position stiffness after failure. The benefit of the novel extension was not experimentally demonstrated due to a high active stiffness requirement. In addition, test results are given for actuator failure tests at 399 C (750 F), 12,500 rpm. Finally, simulation results are presented confirming the experimental data and validating the redundant control algorithm.

  17. Strongly Driven Magnetic Reconnection in a Magnetized High-Energy-Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P.-Y.; Haberberger, D.; Hu, S. X.; Ivancic, S.; Nilson, P. M.; Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection in a magnetized high-energy-density plasma is characterized by measuring the dynamics of the plasma density and magnetic field between two counter-propagating and colliding plasma flows. The density and magnetic field were profiled using the 4 ω angular filter refractometry and fast proton deflectometry diagnostics, respectively. The plasma flows are created by irradiating oppositely placed plastic targets with 1.8-kJ, 2-ns laser beams on the OMEGA EP Laser System. The two plumes are magnetized by an externally controlled magnetic field with an x-type null point geometry with B = 0 at the midplane and B = 8 T at the targets. The interaction region is pre-filled with a low-density background plasma. The counterflowing super-Alfvénic plasma plumes sweep up and compress the magnetic field and the background plasma into a pair of magnetized ribbons, which collide, stagnate, and reconnect at the midplane, allowing for the first detailed observation of a stretched current sheet in laser-driven reconnection experiments. The measurements are in good agreement with first-principles particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and NLUF Grant DE-SC0008655.

  18. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  19. A new ring-shape high-temperature superconducting trapped-field magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie; Zhang, Min; Wang, Yawei; Li, Xiaojian; Patel, Jay; Yuan, Weijia

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a new trapped-field magnet made of second-generation high-temperature superconducting (2G HTS) rings. This so-called ring-shape 2G HTS magnet has the potential to provide much stronger magnetic fields relative to existing permanent magnets. Compared to existing 2G HTS trapped- field magnets, e.g. 2G HTS bulks and stacks, this new ring-shape 2G HTS magnet is more flexible in size and can be made into magnets with large dimensions for industrial applications. Effective magnetization is the key to being able to use trapped-field magnets. Therefore, this paper focuses on the magnetization mechanism of this new magnet using both experimental and numerical methods. Unique features have been identified and quantified for this new type of HTS magnet in the field cooling and zero field cooling process. The magnetization mechanism can be understood by the interaction between shielding currents and the penetration of external magnetic fields. An accumulation in the trapped field was observed by using multiple pulse field cooling. Three types of demagnetization were studied to measure the trapped-field decay for practical applications. Our results show that this new ring-shape HTS magnet is very promising in the trapping of a high magnetic field. As a super-permanent magnet, it will have a significant impact on large-scale industrial applications, e.g. the development of HTS machines with a very high power density and HTS magnetic resonance imaging devices.

  20. Density and Temperature Measurements in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2003-10-01

    We present electron density and temperature measurements from an active region observed above the limb with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Density-sensitive line ratios from Si VIII and S X indicate densities greater than 108 cm-3 as high as 200" (or 145 Mm) above the limb. At these heights, static, uniformly heated loop models predict densities close to 107 cm-3. Differential emission measure analysis shows that the observed plasma is nearly isothermal with a mean temperature of about 1.5 MK and a dispersion of about 0.2 MK. Both the differential emission measure and the Si XI/Si VIII line ratios indicate only small variations in the temperature at the heights observed. These measurements confirm recent observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer of ``overdense'' plasma at temperatures near 1 MK in solar active regions. Time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations suggest that impulsive heating models can account for the large densities, but they have a difficult time reproducing the narrow range of observed temperatures. The observations of overdense, nearly isothermal plasma in the solar corona provide a significant challenge to theories of coronal heating.

  1. A novel magnetic valve using room temperature magnetocaloric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Dan; Bahl, Christian; Pryds, Nini;

    2012-01-01

    Magnetocaloric materials with near-room-temperature tuneable Curie temperatures have been utilized to develop a novel magnetic valve technology. The temperature dependent attractive force between the materials and a permanent magnet assembly is used to actuate valves as a response to temperature...... changes. This is made possible by the strong temperature dependence of the magnetization close to the Curie temperature of the magnetocaloric materials. Different compositions of both La0.67(Ca,Sr)0.33MnO3 and La(Fe,Co,Si)13 have been considered for use in prototype valves. Based on measured magnetization...

  2. Ultimate temperature stability of a magnetic refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, P.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years there has been an interest in using adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration in space to cool bolometers to the 0.1-0.3 K temperature range. Two different demagnetization schemes have been proposed for such refrigerators. Both methods start the same way: an isothermal magnetization followed by an adiabatic demagnetization. Once the operating temperature is reached, the two methods differ. The first method uses feedback control to perform an isothermal demagnetization. As reported, this system is limited by the resolution of the analog-to-digital converter used. While the stability of this system is the best reported to date (0.5 mK at 200 mK for 14 h), it is several orders of magnitude worse than the theoretical limit. The second method uses a complete demagnetization and allows the temperature to drift up uncontrolled. This system has the disadvantage that the responsivity and noise of a bolometer will also drift, and so will require continuous recalibration. There is some concern that fluctuations in the temperature control system of the first method would adversely affect the bolometer performance by increasing the system noise. The purpose of this note is to present the ultimate stability limit of an isothermal demagnetization feedback control system.

  3. High temperature superconductor cable concepts for fusion magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078397

    2013-01-01

    Three concepts of high temperature superconductor cables carrying kA currents (RACC, CORC and TSTC) are investigated, optimized and evaluated in the scope of their applicability as conductor in fusion magnets. The magnetic field and temperature dependence of the cables is measured; the thermal expansion and conductivity of structure, insulation and filling materials are investigated. High temperature superconductor winding packs for fusion magnets are calculated and compared with corresponding low temperature superconductor cases.

  4. Study of flow fractionation characteristics of magnetic chromatography utilizing high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fukui, Yoshihiro Shoji, Jun Ogawa, Tetsuo Oka, Mitsugi Yamaguchi, Takao Sato, Manabu Ooizumi, Hiroshi Imaizumi and Takeshi Ohara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present numerical simulation of separating magnetic particles with different magnetic susceptibilities by magnetic chromatography using a high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The transient transport is numerically simulated for two kinds of particles having different magnetic susceptibilities. The time evolutions were calculated for the particle concentration in the narrow channel of the spiral arrangement placed in the magnetic field. The field is produced by the highly magnetized high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The numerical results show the flow velocity difference of the particle transport corresponding to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility, as well as the possible separation of paramagnetic particles of 20 nm diameter.

  5. Exact conditions on the temperature dependence of density functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Kieron; Grabowski, Paul E; Pribram-Jones, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Universal exact conditions guided the construction of most ground-state density functional approximations in use today. We derive the relation between the entropy and Mermin free energy density functionals for thermal density functional theory. Both the entropy and sum of kinetic and electron-electron repulsion functionals are shown to be monotonically increasing with temperature, while the Mermin functional is concave downwards. Analogous relations are found for both exchange and correlation. The importance of these conditions is illustrated in two extremes: the Hubbard dimer and the uniform gas.

  6. Exact conditions on the temperature dependence of density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.; Smith, J. C.; Grabowski, P. E.; Pribram-Jones, A.

    2016-05-01

    Universal exact conditions guided the construction of most ground-state density functional approximations in use today. We derive the relation between the entropy and Mermin free energy density functionals for thermal density functional theory. Both the entropy and sum of kinetic and electron-electron repulsion functionals are shown to be monotonically increasing with temperature, while the Mermin functional is concave downwards. Analogous relations are found for both exchange and correlation. The importance of these conditions is illustrated in two extremes: the Hubbard dimer and the uniform gas.

  7. A Novel Magnetic Separation Oxygen-enriched Method and the Influence of Temperature and Magnetic Field on Enrichment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li WANG; Jun CAI; Ping WU; Lige TONG; Shufeng SUN

    2007-01-01

    A novel oxygen-enriched method is presented. Using two opposite magnetic poles of two magnets with certain distance forms a magnetic space having a field intensity gradient near its borders. When air injected into the magnetic space outflows from the magnetic space via its borders, oxygen molecules in air will experience the interception effect of the gradient magnetic field, but nitrogen molecules will outflow without hindrance. Thereby the continuous oxygen enrichment is realized. The results show that the maximum increment of oxygen concentration reaches 0.49% at 298 K when the maximum product of magnetic flux density and field intensity gradient is 563T2/m. The enrichment level is significantly influenced by the gas temperature and the magnetic field. The maximum increment of oxygen concentration drops to 0.16% when the gas temperature rises to 343 K, and drops to 0.09% when the maximum product of magnetic flux density and gradient is reduced to 101 T2/m from 563T2/m.

  8. Perpendicular patterned media for high density magnetic storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Joyce Y.

    2000-11-01

    Current longitudinal thin-film media in magnetic hard- disk drives are facing an oncoming limit caused by the superparamagnetic effect, in which the individual grains in the medium become so small that they are no longer stable against thermal fluctuation. This situation is undesirable as the stored information may be lost within an unexpectedly short time frame. There have been several proposed solutions in addressing the superparamagnetic limit, and one of them is perpendicular patterned media. In this approach, a periodic array of magnetic pillars is defined lithographically on a non-magnetic substrate. Binary data of ``1'' or ``0'' can be stored in each of these elements, which have two possible magnetization directions perpendicular to the plane of the medium. In our perpendicular patterned media design, Ni columns of 150-230nm diameter with a 6:1 aspect ratio are embedded in an (AlGa)2O 3/GaAs substrate. The fabrication procedure uses a combination of high resolution electron beam lithography, dry etching, and electroplating. The high aspect ratio in the column is achieved by taking advantage of the high etching rate and selectivity of AlGaAs/GaAs over (AlGa)2O 3 in the Cl2 chemically assisted ion beam etching process. In addition to being a robust etching mask, the (AlGa)2O3 layer also plays an important role in the chemical mechanical polishing procedure to remove the overplated Ni mushrooms. Once the Ni columns are fabricated, magnetic characterization is performed using magnetic force microscopy and scanning magnetoresistance microscopy. The former measurement confirms that the electroplated Ni columns are magnetic while the latter determines whether the individual columns are stable enough to retain the recorded information. We have successfully demonstrated recording in our 170nm diameter Ni column array arranged in a square format using a commercial read/write head. This is the first demonstration of single magnetic column per bit data storage in a

  9. Electron density and temperature in NIO1 RF source operated in oxygen and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbisan, M.; Zaniol, B.; Cavenago, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Zanini, M.

    2017-08-01

    The NIO1 experiment, built and operated at Consorzio RFX, hosts an RF negative ion source, from which it is possible to produce a beam of maximum 130 mA in H- ions, accelerated up to 60 kV. For the preliminary tests of the extraction system the source has been operated in oxygen, whose high electronegativity allows to reach useful levels of extracted beam current. The efficiency of negative ions extraction is strongly influenced by the electron density and temperature close to the Plasma Grid, i.e. the grid of the acceleration system which faces the source. To support the tests, these parameters have been measured by means of the Optical Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic. This technique has involved the use of an oxygen-argon mixture to produce the plasma in the source. The intensities of specific Ar I and Ar II lines have been measured along lines of sight close to the Plasma Grid, and have been interpreted with the ADAS package to get the desired information. This work will describe the diagnostic hardware, the analysis method and the measured values of electron density and temperature, as function of the main source parameters (RF power, pressure, bias voltage and magnetic filter field). The main results show that not only electron density but also electron temperature increase with RF power; both decrease with increasing magnetic filter field. Variations of source pressure and plasma grid bias voltage appear to affect only electron temperature and electron density, respectively.

  10. Ionospheric midlatitude electric current density inferred from multiple magnetic satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shore, R. M.; Whaler, K. A.; Macmillan, S.

    2013-01-01

    A method for inferring zonal electric current density in the mid-to-low latitude F region ionosphere is presented. We describe a method of using near-simultaneous overflights of the Ørsted and CHAMP satellites to define a closed circuit for an application of Ampère's integral law to magnetic data....... Zonal current density from sources in only the region between the two satellites is estimated for the first time. Six years of mutually available vector magnetic data allows overlaps spanning the full 24 h range of local time twice. Solutions are computed on an event-by-event basis after correcting...... for estimates of main and crustal magnetic fields. Current density in the range ±0.1 μA/m2 is resolved, with the distribution of electric current largely matching known features such as the Appleton anomaly. The currents appear unmodulated at times of either high-negative Dst or high F10.7, which has...

  11. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  12. Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hong; Yao, Minjie; Zhao, Wei-Qin

    2008-06-01

    The Friedberg-Lee model is studied at finite temperature and density. By using the finite temperature field theory, the effective potential of the Friedberg-Lee model and the bag constant B(T) and B(T,μ) have been calculated at different temperatures and densities. It is shown that there is a critical temperature TC≃106.6 MeV when μ=0 MeV and a critical chemical potential μ≃223.1 MeV for fixing the temperature at T=50 MeV. We also calculate the soliton solutions of the Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density. It turns out that when T⩽TC (or μ⩽μC), there is a bag constant B(T) [or B(T,μ)] and the soliton solutions are stable. However, when T>TC (or μ>μC) the bag constant B(T)=0 MeV [or B(T,μ)=0 MeV] and there is no soliton solution anymore, therefore, the confinement of quarks disappears quickly.

  13. The Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Hong; Zhao, Wei-Qin

    2007-01-01

    The Friedberg-Lee model is studied at finite temperature and density. By using the finite temperature field theory, the effective potential of the Friedberg-Lee model and the bag constant $B(T)$ and $B(T,\\mu)$ have been calculated at different temperatures and densities. It is shown that there is a critical temperature $T_{C}\\simeq 106.6 \\mathrm{MeV}$ when $\\mu=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$ and a critical chemical potential $\\mu \\simeq 223.1 \\mathrm{MeV}$ for fixing the temperature at $T=50 \\mathrm{MeV}$. We also calculate the soliton solutions of the Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density. It turns out that when $T\\leq T_{C}$ (or $\\mu \\leq \\mu_C$), there is a bag constant $B(T)$ (or $B(T,\\mu)$) and the soliton solutions are stable. However, when $T>T_{C}$ (or $\\mu>\\mu_C$) the bag constant $B(T)=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$ (or $B(T,\\mu)=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$) and there is no soliton solution anymore, therefore, the confinement of quarks disappears quickly.

  14. Molecular hydrogen emission as a density and temperature indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Ferland, Gary J.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Loh, Edwin D.; Fabian, Andy C.; Williams, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Infrared observations have discovered a variety of objects, including filaments in the Crab Nebula and cool-core clusters of galaxies, where the 1-0 S(1) line is stronger than the infrared H I lines. A variety of processes could be responsible for this emission. Although many complete shock or PDR calculations of emission have been published, we know of no previous simple calculation that shows the emission spectrum and level populations of thermally excited low-density . We present a range of purely thermal collisional simulations, corresponding to constant gas kinetic temperature at different densities. We consider the cases where the collisions affecting H2 are predominantly with atomic or molecular hydrogen. The resulting level population (often called "excitation") diagrams show that excitation temperatures are sometimes lower than the gas kinetic temperature when the density is too low for the level populations to go to LTE. The atomic case goes to LTE at much lower densities than the molecular case due to larger collision rates. At low densities for the v=1 and 2 vibrational manifolds level populations are quasi-thermal, which could be misinterpreted as showing the gas is in LTE at high density. At low densities for the molecular case the level population diagrams are discontinuous between v=0 and 1 vibrational manifolds and between v=2, J=0, 1 and other higher J levels within the same vibrational manifold. These jumps could be used as density diagnostics. We show how much the H2 mass would be underestimated using the 1-0 S(1) line strength if the density is below that required for LTE. We give diagnostic diagrams showing level populations over a range of density and temperature. The density where the level populations are given by a Boltzmann distribution relative to the total molecular abundance (required to get the correct H2 mass), is shown for various cases. We discuss the implications of these results for the interpretation of H2 observations of the

  15. Application of evaporative cooling technology in super-high power density magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Gu, G B; Guo, S Q; Cao, R; Li, Z G; Lu, W; Zhang, X Z; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    Evaporative cooling technology utilizes phase-change heat transfer mode to achieve the cooling for heating equipment. The heat transfer capacity of evaporative cooling technology is far more than air or water cooling technology. The Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source magnet is a typical super-high power density magnet, and the evaporative cooling technology is an ideal cooling method for the coils of magnet. In this paper we show the structure and process of coils and the special design of flow channels of coolant for an experiment magnet model. Additionally, the heat transfer circulation is presented and analyzed. By the finite element method, the flow channels are optimized to rationally allocate coolant and to reduce the temperature of coils. For the experiment model, the current density of copper wire of coils is 19 A/mm(2), and the coil-windows current density is larger than 12 A/mm(2). The max temperature of coils is below 80 °C, and the total heat is about 200 kW.

  16. Performance Variation of Ferrite Magnet PMBLDC Motor with Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2015-01-01

    a different approach when deciding their operating point. In this work, laboratory measured BH curves of a ferrite magnet are used for estimating the possibility of demagnetization in a segmented axial torus (SAT) permanent magnet brushless DC (PMBLDC) motor. The BH characteristics for different temperatures...... have been used to study the performance variation of the ferrite magnet SAT PMBLDC motor with temperature. A detailed analysis is carried out to ensure that, the designed ferrite magnet motor is capable of delivering the specified torque throughout the operating speed, without any irreversible...... demagnetization of magnets. It has been shown that the ferrite magnet PMBLDC motor operation is influenced by the magnet temperature and the maximum motor speed for a given load torque decreases as the magnet temperature drops....

  17. Long-term Longitudinal Recurrences of the Open Magnetic Flux Density in the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dósa, M.; Erdős, G.

    2017-04-01

    Open magnetic flux in the heliosphere is determined from the radial component of the magnetic field vector measured onboard interplanetary space probes. Previous Ulysses research has shown remarkable independence of the flux density from heliographic latitude, explained by super-radial expansion of plasma. Here we are investigating whether any longitudinal variation exists in the 50 year long OMNI magnetic data set. The heliographic longitude of origin of the plasma package was determined by applying a correction according to the solar wind travel time. Significant recurrent enhancements of the magnetic flux density were observed throughout solar cycle 23, lasting for several years. Similar, long-lasting recurring features were observed in the solar wind velocity, temperature and the deviation angle of the solar wind velocity vector from the radial direction. Each of the recurrent features has a recurrence period slightly differing from the Carrington rotation rate, although they show a common trend in time. Examining the coronal temperature data of ACE leads to the possible explanation that these long-term structures are caused by slow–fast solar wind interaction regions. A comparison with MESSENGER data measured at 0.5 au shows that these longitudinal magnetic modulations do not exist closer to the Sun, but are the result of propagation.

  18. Measuring the Densities of Aqueous Glasses at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Dan, Ritwik; Moreau, David W; Thorne, Robert

    2017-06-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the vitreous phase cryogenic temperature densities of aqueous mixtures, and other samples that require rapid cooling, to prepare the desired cryogenic temperature phase. Microliter to picoliter size drops are cooled by projection into a liquid nitrogen-argon (N2-Ar) mixture. The cryogenic temperature phase of the drop is evaluated using a visual assay that correlates with X-ray diffraction measurements. The density of the liquid N2-Ar mixture is adjusted by adding N2 or Ar until the drop becomes neutrally buoyant. The density of this mixture and thus of the drop is determined using a test mass and Archimedes principle. With appropriate care in drop preparation, management of gas above the liquid cryogen mixture to minimize icing, and regular mixing of the cryogenic mixture to prevent density stratification and phase separation, densities accurate to <0.5% of drops as small as 50 pL can readily be determined. Measurements on aqueous cryoprotectant mixtures provide insight into cryoprotectant action, and provide quantitative data to facilitate thermal contraction matching in biological cryopreservation.

  19. Temperature and Density Measurements in a Quiet Coronal Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Warshall, Andrew D.

    2002-06-01

    Many previous studies have used emission line or broadband filter ratios to infer the presence of temperature gradients in the quiet solar corona. Recently it has been suggested that these temperature gradients are not real, but result from the superposition of isothermal loops with different temperatures and density scale heights along the line of sight. A model describing this hydrostatic weighting bias has been developed by Aschwanden & Acton. In this paper we present the application of the Aschwanden & Acton differential emission measure model to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) observations of a quiet coronal streamer. Simultaneous Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) observations show increases in the filter ratios with height above the limb, indicating an increase in temperature. The application of the Aschwanden & Acton model to these SUMER data, however, show that the temperature is constant with height and that the distribution of temperatures in the corona is much too narrow for the hydrostatic weighting bias to have any effect on the SXT filter ratios. We consider the possibility that there is a tenuous hot component (~3 MK) that accounts for the SXT observations. We find that a hot plasma with an emission measure sufficient to reproduce the observed SXT fluxes would also produce significant count rates in the high-temperature emission lines in the SUMER wavelength range. These lines are not observed, and we conclude that the SUMER spectra are not consistent with the SXT filter ratio temperatures. Calculations from a hydrodynamic loop model suggest that nonuniform footpoint heating may be consistent with the temperatures and densities observed at most heights, consistent with the recent analysis of relatively cool (~1 MK) active region loops. We also find, however, that at the lowest heights the observed densities are smaller than those predicted by uniform or footpoint heating.

  20. Lattice QCD Results at Finite Temperature and Density

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z

    2003-01-01

    Recent lattice results on QCD at finite temperatures and densities are reviewed. Two new and independent techniques give compatible results for physical quantities. The phase line separating the hadronic and quark-gluon plasma phases, the critical endpoint and the equation of state are discussed.

  1. Estimating relic magnetic fields from CMB temperature correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The temperature and polarization inhomogeneities of the Cosmic Microwave Background might bear the mark of pre-decoupling magnetism. The parameters of a putative magnetized background are hereby estimated from the observed temperature autocorrelation as well as from the measured temperature-polarization cross-correlation.

  2. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-05-22

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping.

  3. High-temperature superconductors in high-field magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, Hubertus Wilhelmus

    2009-01-01

    The properties of both BSCCO conductors and YBCO coated conductors and coils are studied to assess their applicability in high-field magnets. First, the magnetic field dependence of the critical current density in these HTS conductors is measured at 4.2 K in magnetic field conditions ranging from s

  4. Electric-field assisted switching of magnetization in perpendicularly magnetized (Ga,Mn)As films at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Ma, Jialin; Yu, Xueze; Yu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    The electric-field effects on the magnetism in perpendicularly magnetized (Ga,Mn)As films at high temperatures have been investigated. An electric-field as high as 0.6 V nm-1 is applied by utilizing a solid-state dielectric Al2O3 film as a gate insulator. The coercive field, saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy have been clearly changed by the gate electric-field, which are detected via the anomalous Hall effect. In terms of the Curie temperature, a variation of about 3 K is observed as determined by the temperature derivative of the sheet resistance. In addition, electrical switching of the magnetization assisted by a fixed external magnetic field at 120 K is demonstrated, employing the gate-controlled coercive field. The above experimental results have been attributed to the gate voltage modulation of the hole density in (Ga,Mn)As films, since the ferromagnetism in (Ga,Mn)As is carrier-mediated. The limited modulation magnitude of magnetism is found to result from the strong charge screening effect introduced by the high hole concentration up to 1.10  ×  1021 cm-3, while the variation of the hole density is only about 1.16  ×  1020 cm-3.

  5. An exospheric temperature model from CHAMP thermospheric density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Libin; Lei, Jiuhou; Sutton, Eric; Dou, Xiankang; Fang, Hanxian

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effective exospheric temperature, named as T∞, derived from thermospheric densities measured by the CHAMP satellite during 2002-2010 was utilized to develop an exospheric temperature model (ETM) with the aid of the NRLMSISE-00 model. In the ETM, the temperature variations are characterized as a function of latitude, local time, season, and solar and geomagnetic activities. The ETM is validated by the independent GRACE measurements, and it is found that T∞ and thermospheric densities from the ETM are in better agreement with the GRACE data than those from the NRLMSISE-00 model. In addition, the ETM captures well the thermospheric equatorial anomaly feature, seasonal variation, and the hemispheric asymmetry in the thermosphere.

  6. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy); Mariani, Manuel [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Firenze and INSTM, Firenze (Italy); Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Corti, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.corti@unipv.it; Borsa, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  7. Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas in the presence of an external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.; Nilson, P.; Hu, S.; Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D.; Betti, R.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection has recently been observed and studied in high-energy-density, laser-produced plasmas. These experiments are interesting both for obtaining fundamental data on reconnection, and may also be relevant for inertial fusion, as this magnetic reconnection geometry, with multiple, colliding, magnetized plasma bubbles, occurs naturally inside ICF hohlraums. We present initial results of experiments conducted on the OMEGA EP facility on magnetic reconnection between colliding, magnetized blowoff plasmas. While in previous experiments the magnetic fields were self-generated in the plasma by the Biermann battery effect, in these experiments the seed magnetic field is generated by pulsing current through a pair of external foils using the MIFEDS current generator (Magneto-Inertial Fusion Electrical Discharge System) developed at LLE. Time-resolved images of the magnetic fields and plasma dynamics are obtained from proton radiography and x-ray self-emission, respectively. We present initial results of the experiments, including comparison to ``null'' experiments with zero MIFEDS magnetic field, and associated modeling using the radiation-hydro code DRACO and the particle-in-cell code PSC.

  8. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  9. Practicality of magnetic compression for plasma density control

    CERN Document Server

    Gueroult, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Plasma densification through magnetic compression has been suggested for time-resolved control of the wave properties in plasma-based accelerators. Using particle in cell simulations with real mass ratio, the practicality of large magnetic compression on timescales shorter than the ion gyro-period is investigated. For compression times shorter than the transit time of a compressional Alfven wave across the plasma slab, results show the formation of two counter-propagating shock waves, leading to a highly non-uniform plasma density profile. Furthermore, the plasma slab displays large hydromagnetic like oscillations after the driving field has reached steady state. Peak compression is obtained when the two shocks collide in the mid-plane. At this instant, very large plasma heating is observed, and plasma $\\beta$ is estimated to be about $1$. Although these results point out a densification mechanism quite different and more complex than initially envisioned, these features could possibly be advantageous in part...

  10. Effect of electrodeposition current density on the microstructure and magnetic properties of nickel-cobalt-molybdenum alloy powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured nickel-cobalt-molybdenum alloy powders were electrodeposited from an ammonium sulfate bath. The powders mostly consist of an amorphous phase and a very small amount of nanocrystals with an mean size of less than 3 nm. An increase in deposition current density increases the amorphous phase percentage, the density of chaotically distributed dislocations and internal microstrains in the powders, while decreasing the mean nanocrystal size. The temperature range over which the structural relaxation of the powders deposited at higher current densities occurs is shifted towards lower temperatures. A change in relative magnetic permeability during structural relaxation is higher in powders deposited at higher current densities. Powder crystallization takes place at temperatures above 700ºC. The formation of the stable crystal structure causes a decrease in relative magnetic permeability. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172057

  11. The physics of ultra-high-density magnetic recording

    CERN Document Server

    Ek, Johannes; Weller, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    In this book, 17 experts in magnetic recording focus on the underlying physical mechanisms that play crucial roles in medium and transducer development for high areal density disk drives. In 11 chapters, an examination is made of the fundamental physical concepts and their impact on recording mechanisms, with special emphasis on thin-film longitudinal, perpendicular, patterned and nanoparticle media. Theoretical and experimental investigations are presented which serve to enhance our basic understanding of thin-film dynamics, medium dynamics and thermal effects. Fundamental aspects of magnetotransport are discussed and an overview is given of recording head designs.

  12. Developing a high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet for the maglev train of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    1998-10-01

    The major applications of high-temperature superconductors have mostly been confined to products in the form of wires and thin films. However, recent developments show that rare-earth REBa2Cu3O7-x and light rare-earth LREBa2Cu3O7-3 superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical-current density at 77 K and high magnetic fields. These superconductors will promote the application of bulk high-temperature superconductors in high magnetic fields; the superconducting bulk magnet for the Maglev train is one possible application.

  13. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  14. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  15. Temperature and temporal dependence of neutral density transmittance standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, A.; Hamlin, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    The Schott series of NG glasses are frequently used to manufacture neutral density transmittance standards for validation of spectrophotometer systems as well as for comparisons of regular spectral transmittance scales. A study has been made of the temperature and temporal dependence of transmittance in these types of filters. The temperature dependence of transmittance is found to scale as -ln(T). The filter transmittance was found to vary significantly with time shortly after manufacture but appears to be stabilizing nine months after beginning measurements.

  16. Charge, density and electron temperature in a molecular ultracold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Ortega-Arroyo, J; Godin, P J; Grant, E R

    2009-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of NO entrained in a supersonic molecular beam releases electrons as it evolves to form an ultracold plasma. The size of this signal, compared with that extracted by the subsequent application of a pulsed electric field, determines the absolute magnitude of the plasma charge. This information, combined with the number density of ions, supports a simple thermochemical model that explains the evolution of the plasma to an ultracold electron temperature.

  17. Temperature and density effects on the nucleon mass splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, H R; Fanchiotti, H; Garc, C A

    1996-01-01

    The finite temperature and finite density dependence of the neu\\-tron-proton mass difference is analysed in a purely hadronic framework where the \\rho-\\omega mixing is crucial for this isospin symmetry breakdown. The problem is handled within Thermo Field Dynamics. The present results, consistent with partial chiral and charge symmetry restoration, improve the experimental data fit for the energy difference between mirror nuclei.

  18. Temperature and density effects on the nucleon mass splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, H.R.; Epele, L.N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Garcia Canal, C.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata C.C. 67, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    1996-04-01

    The finite temperature and finite density dependence of the neutron-proton mass difference is analyzed in a purely hadronic framework where the {rho}-{omega} mixing is crucial for this isospin symmetry breakdown. The problem is handled within thermofield dynamics. The present results, consistent with partial chiral and charge symmetry restoration, improve the experimental data fit for the energy difference between mirror nuclei. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  20. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otabe, E S; Kuroki, S; Nikawa, J [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu Iizuka Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y [Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ooba, T [Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center, 1465-5 Aikawa-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 839-0861 (Japan); Kiso, K [Fukuoka Regional Taxation Bureau, 2-11-1 Hakataekihigashi, Hakata-ku Fukuoka, 812-8547 (Japan); Hayashi, H [Kyushu Power Electric, 2-1-47 Shiobaru Minami-ku Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: otabe@cse.kyutech.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 {+-}0.2 x 10{sup 6}/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, {rho}, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by {rho} = {rho}o exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  1. Probing the Electromagnetic Local Density of States with a Strongly Mixed Electric and Magnetic Dipole Emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Karaveli, Sinan; Zia, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We identify a solid-state quantum emitter whose room-temperature radiative decay is mediated by a nearly equal mixture of isotropic electric dipole (ED) and magnetic dipole (MD) transitions. Using energy-momentum spectroscopy, we experimentally show that the near-infrared $^3$T$_2{\\rightarrow}^3$A$_2$ emission from divalent-nickel-doped magnesium oxide (Ni$^{2+}$:MgO) is composed of $\\sim$50% MD and $\\sim$50% ED transitions. We then demonstrate that the spontaneous emission rate of these ions near planar interfaces is determined by the combined electric and magnetic local density of optical states (LDOS). This electromagnetic LDOS probes the total mode density, and thus similar to thermal emission, these unique electronic emitters effectively excite all polarizations and orientations of the electromagnetic field.

  2. Probing High Temperature Superconductors with Magnetometry in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate the high-field magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without loss. A technique known as high-resolution torque magnetometry that was developed to directly measure the magnetization of high temperature superconductors. This technique was implemented using the 65 Tesla pulsed magnetic field facility that is part of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research addressed unanswered questions about the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, determine the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors, and shed light on the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity and on potential applications of these materials in areas such as energy generation and power transmission. Further applications of the technology resolve the novel physical phenomena such as correlated topological insulators, and spin liquid state in quantum magnets.

  3. High temperature superconductivity induced by incipient magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, M.; Pereg, Y.

    1990-10-01

    We consider the BCS gap equation, with an attractive interaction λ with an upper cutoff ω 0 and lower cutoff ω 1, and a repulsive interaction μ with cutoffΓ. We consider parameters such that a superconducting solution does not exist. We add a repulsive interaction ν eith cutoff ω1 ( ω1 < ω0), and show that this repulsive interaction (that we attribute to incipient magnetism) induces a superconducting state possessing a high transition temperature. In this state, the gap function Δ(ɛ) oscillates as function of ɛ, with a period of order ω 0. We also find solutions antisymmetric in energy [ Δ( ɛ) = - Δ(- ɛ) ], which turn out to be almost degenerate with the normal, symmetric ones. We discuss the physical implications of this model. Our model thus combines a low frequency repulsion due to antiferromagnetic interactions, with excitonic attraction at intermediate frequencies, and ordinary Coulomb repulsion above that. All frequency ranges, and coupling strengths, are comparable with the bandwidth.

  4. Effect of temperature on rotational viscosity in magnetic nano fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R

    2012-10-01

    Flow behavior of magnetic nano fluids with simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature is important for its application for cooling devices such as transformer, loud speakers, electronic cooling and for its efficiency in targeted drug delivery and hyperthermia treatment. Using a specially designed horizontal capillary viscometer, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids are studied. In both these case the temperature-dependent rotational viscosity decreases, but follows a quite different mechanism. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, the reduction in rotational viscosity is due to the temperature dependence of magnetization. Curie temperature ((T)(c)) and pyromagnetic coefficient are extracted from the study. A fluid with low T(c) and high pyromagnetic coefficient is useful for thermo-sensitive cooling devices and magnetic hyperthermia. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, reduction in rotational viscosity is due to removal of physisorbed secondary surfactant on the particle because of thermal and frictional effects. This can be a good analogy for removal of drug from the magnetic particles in the case of targeted drug delivery.

  5. Spin-density-wave magnetism in dilute copper-manganese alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamelas, F.J. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Werner, S.A. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Shapiro, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mydosh, J.A. [Kammerlingh Onnes Lab., Leiden (Netherlands)

    1995-02-01

    Elastic neutron-scattering measurements on two samples of Cu alloyed with 1.3% Mn and 0.55% Mn show that the spin-density-wave (SDW) features found in more concentrated alloys persist in the limit of very dilute alloys. These features consist of temperature-dependent incommensurate peaks in magnetic neutron scattering, with positions and strengths which are fully consistent with those in the concentrated alloys. The implications of these measurements are twofold. First, it is clear from this data that SDW magnetic ordering occurs across the entire range of CuMn alloys which have typically been interpreted as spin glasses. Second, the more fundamental significance of this work is the suggestion via extrapolation that a peak in the magnetic susceptibility x(q) occurs in pure copper, at a value of q given by the Fermi-surface diameter 2k{sub F}.

  6. Vibration effect on magnetization and critical current density of superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchanskiy, Igor A.; Pan, Alexey V.; George, Jonathan; Wells, Frederick S.; Fedoseev, Sergey A.; Rozenfeld, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In this work the effect of vibrations on critical current density (J c ) of superconductors has been studied. The vibrations are shown to affect J c of all types of superconductors during their measurements, employing a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Increasing vibration frequency (f) and/or amplitude (A) leads to progressive reduction of J c as a function of magnetic field (B a ). The effect of vibrations is substantially stronger in thin films. It leads to development of unexpected kinks on {J}c({B}a) curves. Analysis of magnetization loops and relaxation of magnetization in YBCO films revealed that the vibration effect can be treated as the effective reduction of pinning potential. The asymmetry of the vibration effect in ascending and descending B a is observed, indicating differences in free energy of the corresponding vortex structures. Thermal effects induced by vibrations with large f and A are shown to have rather insignificant influence, while the vibrational vortex dynamics exhibit a strong impact. The irreversibility field ({B}{{irr}}) is shown to be instrumentally defined, and its value depends on VSM settings. In addition, the practical importance of {B}{{irr}} for J c modeling is demonstrated.

  7. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Akio

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than ~ 1 × 1021 m-3 is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is ~ 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  8. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Akio, E-mail: komori@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than {approx} 1 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is {approx} 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  9. Nonperturbative Yukawa theory at finite density and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2009-01-01

    In-medium Yukawa theory is part of the thermodynamics of the Standard Model of particle physics and is one of the main building blocks of most effective field theories of fermionic systems. By computing its pressure we investigate the nonperturbative thermodynamics at finite temperature and density using the optimized perturbation theory (OPT) framework. Our calculations are valid for arbitrary fermion and scalar masses, temperature, chemical potential, and not restricted to weak coupling. The model is considered in the presence as well as in the absence of condensates. Comparison with nonperturbative results shows that second order perturbation theory (PT) fails in the first case but performs rather well when condensates are absent, even at high-temperature regimes.

  10. Analytical computation of the magnetization probability density function for the harmonic 2D XY model

    CERN Document Server

    Palma, G

    2009-01-01

    The probability density function (PDF) of some global average quantity plays a fundamental role in critical and highly correlated systems. We explicitly compute this quantity as a function of the magnetization for the two dimensional XY model in its harmonic approximation. Numerical simulations and perturbative results have shown a Gumbel-like shape of the PDF, in spite of the fact that the average magnetization is not an extreme variable. Our analytical result allows to test both perturbative analytical expansions and also numerical computations performed previously. Perfect agreement is found for the first moments of the PDF. Also for large volume and in the high temperature limit the distribution becomes Gaussian, as it should be. In the low temperature regime its numerical evaluation is compatible with a Gumbel distribution.

  11. The calculation of coronal magnetic field and density of nonthermal electrons in the 2003 October 27 microwave burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Li Huang; Jian-Ping Li; Qi-Wu Song

    2013-01-01

    Based on Dulk and Marsh's approximate theory about nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation,one simple impulsive microwave burst with a loop-like structure is selected for radio diagnostics of the coronal magnetic field and column density of nonthermal electrons,which are calculated from the brightness temperature,polarization degree,and spectral index,as well as the turnover frequency,observed by using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph and the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters,respectively.Very strong variations (up to one or two orders of magnitude) of the calculated transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields with respect to the line-of-sight,as well as the calculated electron column density,appear in the looptop and footpoint sources during the burst.The absolute magnitude and varied range of the transverse magnetic field are evidently larger than those of the longitudinal magnetic field.The time evolution of the transverse magnetic field is always anti-correlated with that of the longitudinal magnetic field,but positively correlated with that of the electron column density.These results strongly support the idea that quantifying the energy released in a flare depends on a reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field,especially for the transverse magnetic field,and they are basically consistent with the recent theoretical and observational studies on the photospheric magnetic field in solar flares.

  12. Force-free collisionless current sheet models with non-uniform temperature and density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Allanson, O.

    2017-09-01

    We present a class of one-dimensional, strictly neutral, Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium distribution functions for force-free current sheets, with magnetic fields defined in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions, extending the results of Abraham-Shrauner [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102117 (2013)] to allow for non-uniform density and temperature profiles. To achieve this, we use an approach previously applied to the force-free Harris sheet by Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)]. In one limit of the parameters, we recover the model of Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)], while another limit gives a linear force-free field. We discuss conditions on the parameters such that the distribution functions are always positive and give expressions for the pressure, density, temperature, and bulk-flow velocities of the equilibrium, discussing the differences from previous models. We also present some illustrative plots of the distribution function in velocity space.

  13. Apparatus for accurate density measurements of fluids based on a magnetic suspension balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Maoqiong; Li, Huiya; Guo, Hao; Dong, Xueqiang; Wu, J. F.

    2012-06-01

    A new apparatus for accurate pressure, density and temperature (p, ρ, T) measurements over wide ranges of (p, ρ, T) (90 K to 290 K; 0 MPa to 3 MPa; 0 kg/m3 to 2000 kg/m3) is described. This apparatus is based on a magnetic suspension balance which applies the Archimedes' buoyancy principle. In order to verify the new apparatus, comprehensive (p, ρ, T) measurements on pure nitrogen were carried out. The maximum relative standard uncertainty is 0.09% in density. The maximum standard uncertainty in temperature is 5 mK, and that in pressure is 250 Pa for 1.5 MPa and 390 Pa for 3MPa full scale range respectively. The experimental data were compared with selected literature data and good agreements were found.

  14. Design of microchannels for cryostabilization of high temperature superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Y. S.; Hull, J. R.; Niemann, R. C.

    Microchannel cooling using subcooled liquid nitrogen is proposed to cryogenically stabilize high-temperature superconducting magnets. Various design constraints and parameters are identified and summarized. A graphical method is proposed for the design of microchannel systems. This graphical method helps to reduce the amount of work towards achieving optimum design for a specific application because there are a large number of parameters involved in the design of a microchannel system. The proposed graphical method are illustrated by three examples. The results show that a design window may appear for a given application. Any point within this window is an acceptable design. Another advantage of the graphical method is that, by selecting a design point, the design margin against various design contrains can be easily identified. Any two of the design variables can be selected as the independent variables. The choice depends on specific application and, to a certain extent, on individual preference. The three examples revealed that, for high current density applications, the most scattering constraints are the coolant temperature rise and the fin tip temperatures provided that a moderate pressure drop can be tolerated.

  15. Development of permanent magnetic refrigerator at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jiaohong; LIU Jinrong; JIN Peiyu; YAN Hongwei; QIU Jufeng; XU Laizi; ZHANG Jiuxing

    2006-01-01

    A reciprocating magnetic refrigerator was developed based on the active magneticregeneration technology. Rare earth metal Gd and intermetallic compound LaFe11.2Co0.7Si1.1 were used as the magnetic operating materials in the machine. The particles of the magnetic operating materials, with diameter of 0.5- 2 mm and total mass of 950 g, were mounted in the cooling bed. A magnetic field was assembled using NdFeB rare earth permanent magnets. It had the magneticfield space of Φ 34×200 and the magnetic induction of 1.5 T. The water at pH=10 is used as a heat transfer fluid. When the ambient temperature is 296 K, a temperature span of 18 K was achieved after operation of 45 min at a frequency of 0.178 Hz. The temperature span and the output power increase significantly with the increasing velocity of heat transfer.

  16. Low density lipoproteins as circulating fast temperature sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Prassl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential physiological significance of the nanophase transition of neutral lipids in the core of low density lipoprotein (LDL particles is dependent on whether the rate is fast enough to integrate small (+/-2 degrees C temperature changes in the blood circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using sub-second, time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering technology with synchrotron radiation, we have monitored the dynamics of structural changes within LDL, which were triggered by temperature-jumps and -drops, respectively. Our findings reveal that the melting transition is complete within less than 10 milliseconds. The freezing transition proceeds slowly with a half-time of approximately two seconds. Thus, the time period over which LDL particles reside in cooler regions of the body readily facilitates structural reorientation of the apolar core lipids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low density lipoproteins, the biological nanoparticles responsible for the transport of cholesterol in blood, are shown to act as intrinsic nano-thermometers, which can follow the periodic temperature changes during blood circulation. Our results demonstrate that the lipid core in LDL changes from a liquid crystalline to an oily state within fractions of seconds. This may, through the coupling to the protein structure of LDL, have important repercussions on current theories of the role of LDL in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  17. Rotating sample magnetometer for cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisterer, M; Hengstberger, F; Voutsinas, C S; Hörhager, N; Sorta, S; Hecher, J; Weber, H W

    2011-06-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a rotating sample magnetometer (RSM) operating in the variable temperature insert (VTI) of a cryostat equipped with a high-field magnet. The limited space and the cryogenic temperatures impose the most critical design parameters: the small bore size of the magnet requires a very compact pick-up coil system and the low temperatures demand a very careful design of the bearings. Despite these difficulties the RSM achieves excellent resolution at high magnetic field sweep rates, exceeding that of a typical vibrating sample magnetometer by about a factor of ten. In addition the gas-flow cryostat and the high-field superconducting magnet provide a temperature and magnetic field range unprecedented for this type of magnetometer.

  18. Reconstruction of conductivity and current density images using only one component of magnetic field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Yoon, Jeong-Rock; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Ohin

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) is to provide current density images of a subject using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner with a current injection apparatus. The injection current generates a magnetic field that we can measure from MR phase images. We obtain internal current density images from the measured magnetic flux densities via Ampere's law. However, we must rotate the subject to acquire all of the three components of the induced magnetic flux density. This subject rotation is impractical in clinical MRI scanners when the subject is a human body. In this paper, we propose a way to eliminate the requirement of subject rotation by careful mathematical analysis of the MRCDI problem. In our new MRCDI technique, we need to measure only one component of the induced magnetic flux density and reconstruct both cross-sectional conductivity and current density images without any subject rotation.

  19. Influence of silicon substitution and annealing temperature on the microstructure and magnetic properties of lithium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazen, S.A., E-mail: dr.saidmazen@gmail.com; Abu-Elsaad, N.I.; Nawara, A.S.

    2015-11-05

    Silicon substituted lithium ferrite with the general chemical formula Li{sub 0.5+0.5x}Si{sub x}Fe{sub 2.5−1.5x}O{sub 4}, (where, x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6) were prepared by high energy ball milling (HEBM) technique. The obtained powders were annealed at three different temperatures (700, 900 and 1000 °C) for 2 h. The phase formation, microstructure and magnetic properties with respect to annealing temperature were studied using different characterization techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), respectively. The results exhibit the formation of single phase in cubic spinel at annealing temperature 1000 °C, with a slight decrease in lattice parameter values. The bulk density of Li–Si ferrite samples increases as the annealing temperature increases. From VSM measurements it was observed that the saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) decreases with silicon content. The observed decrease in M{sub s} was explained in terms of Neel's two sublattice model according to which the magnetic moment is the vector sum of lattice magnetic moment. The magnetic measurements showed that the magnetization increases, and the coercivity decreases by increasing the annealing temperature. This is attributed to the promotion of crystallinity consequent of annealing. The permeability showed increasing trend with the increase of annealing temperature since the permeability depends on the microstructure. The Curie temperature obtained from μ{sub i}–T curves indicates that it is unaffected by silicon substitution. - Highlights: • Li–Si ferrites have been prepared by HEBM technique. • Single phase spinel structure is achieved at annealing temperature 1000 °C for 2 h. • Magnetic properties were affected by both silicon and annealing temperatures. • Curie temperature has no noticeable change with the annealing temperature.

  20. Low temperature London penetration depth and superfluid density in Fe-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunsoo [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The superconducting gap symmetry of the Fe-based superconductors was studied by measurements and analysis of London penetration depth and super uid density. Tunnel diode resonator technique for these measurements was implemented in a dilution refrigerator allowing for the temperatures down to 50 mK. For the analysis of the super uid density, we used both experimental studies of Al-coated samples and original thermodynamic approach based on Rutgers relation. In three systems studied, we found that the superconducting gap at the optimal doping is best described in multi-gap full gap scenario. By performing experiments on samples with arti cially introduced disorder with heavy ion irradiation, we show that evolution of the superconducting transition temperature and of the super uid density are consistent with full-gap sign changing s superconducting state. The superconducting gap develops strong modulation both in the under-doped and the over-doped regimes. In the terminal hole-doped KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, both temperature dependence of the super uid density and its evolution with increase of the scattering rate are consistent with symmetry imposed vertical line nodes in the superconducting gap. By comparative studies of hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and electron-doped Ca10-3-8, we show that the superconducting gap modulation in the under-doped regime is intrinsic and is not induced by the coexisting static magnetic order.

  1. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    CERN Document Server

    Jabbari, Sarah; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and are driven by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 5 times supercritical.

  2. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and might be driven in nonlinear stage of evolution by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 2.5 times supercritical.

  3. TRANSIENT TEMPERATURE FIELD IN ACTIVE THRUST MAGNETIC BEARING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Shouqun; Geng Haipeng; Guo Keqian

    2005-01-01

    A transient temperature field model in a thrust magnetic bearing is built in which the heat resources come mainly from the eddy-current loss of solid cores and the copper loss of coils. The transient temperature field, system temperature rise and the thermo-equilibrium state during the rotor starting-up are calculated considering only the copper loss and the eddy-current loss. The numerical results indicate that the temperatures in coils and in magnets rise rapidly, their thermo-equilibrium states are formed within a short time. The temperatures in a thrust-disk and in a rotor rise slowly, their thermo-equilibrium states are formed after a long period time. The temperatures of the thrust-disk and the rotor are far higher than the temperatures of coils and/or magnets after the thermo-equilibrium state has come into being.

  4. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, K.-I. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); International Center for Space Weather Study and education, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  5. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.; Liu, W. T.

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both Te in low frequency mode and Ne in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (fUHR). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  6. Practicality of magnetic compression for plasma density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma densification through magnetic compression has been suggested for time-resolved control of the wave properties in plasma-based accelerators [P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 255003 (2012)]. Using particle in cell simulations with real mass ratio, the practicality of large magnetic compression on timescales shorter than the ion gyro-period is investigated. For compression times shorter than the transit time of a compressional Alfven wave across the plasma slab, results show the formation of two counter-propagating shock waves, leading to a highly non-uniform plasma density profile. Furthermore, the plasma slab displays large hydromagnetic like oscillations after the driving field has reached steady state. Peak compression is obtained when the two shocks collide in the mid-plane. At this instant, very large plasma heating is observed, and the plasma β is estimated to be about 1. Although these results point out a densification mechanism quite different and more complex than initially envisioned, these features still might be advantageous in particle accelerators.

  7. Temperature and relative density of atomic hydrogen in a multicusp H sup minus volume source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneteau, A.M.; Hollos, G.; Bacal, M. (Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionises, Laboratoire du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, (France)); Bretagne, J. (Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, LA73 du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France))

    1990-06-15

    The Balmer {beta} and {gamma} line shapes have been analyzed to determine the relative density and the temperature of hydrogen atoms in magnetic multicusp plasma generators. Results for a 90-V, 4--40-mTorr, 1--18-A conventional multicusp plasma generator and a 50-V, 4-mTorr, 1--15-A hybrid multicusp plasma generator are presented. The relative number density of hydrogen atoms increased smoothly with pressure and discharge current but never exceeded 10%. The absolute atomic number density in a 90-V 10-A discharge varied in proportion with pressure. The atomic temperature (in the 0.1--0.4-eV range) decreased with pressure and slowly increased with the discharge current. The role of atoms in the processes determining the H{sup {minus}} temperature and the H{sub 2} vibrational and rotational temperatures is discussed. The results confirm that in multicusp negative-ion sources collisional excitation of ground state atoms and molecules by energetic electrons is the dominant process in Balmer-{beta} and -{gamma} light emission.

  8. Atomic temperature and density in multicusp H sup minus volume sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneteau, A.M.; Hollos, G.; Leroy, R.; Berlemont, P.; Bacal, M. (Laboratoire du C.N.R.S., Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)); Bertagne, J. (Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, LA73 du CNRS, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France))

    1990-08-05

    The Balmer {beta} and {gamma} line shapes have been analyzed to determine the relative density and the temperature of hydrogen atoms in magnetic multicusp plasma generators. Results for a 90 V, 4--40 mTorr, 1--18 A conventional multicusp plasma generator and a 50 V, 4 mTorr, 1--15 A hybrid multicusp plasma generator are presented. The relative number density of hydrogen atoms increases smoothly with pressure and discharge current but never exceeds 10%. The absolute atomic number density in a 90 V--10 A discharge varies in proportion with pressure. The atomic temperature (in the 0.1--0.4 eV range) decreases with pressure and slowly increases with the discharge current. The role of atoms in the processes determining the H{sup {minus}} temperature and the H{sub 2} vibrational and rotational temperatures is discussed. The results confirm that in multicusp negative ion sources collisional excitation of ground-state atoms and molecules by energetic electrons is the dominant process in Balmer {beta} and {gamma} light emission.

  9. Universal temperature dependence of the magnetization of gapped spin chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshitaka; Hotta, Chisa; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2007-08-03

    A Haldane chain under applied field is analyzed numerically, and a clear minimum of magnetization is observed as a function of temperature. We elucidate its origin using the effective theory near the critical field and propose a simple method to estimate the gap from the magnetization at finite temperatures. We also demonstrate that there exists a relation between the temperature dependence of the magnetization and the field dependence of the spin-wave velocity. Our arguments are universal for general axially symmetric one-dimensional spin systems.

  10. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs) offer important and unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing. And they are well suited to serve together synergistically. TEC and MFHPs operate through working-fluid vaporization, condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures. TEC and MFHPs have apparently simple, isolated performance mechanisms that are somewhat similar. And they also have obviously difficult, complected material problems that again are somewhat similar. Intensive investigation reveals that aspects of their operating cycles and material problems tend to merge: high-temperature material effects determine the level and lifetime of performance. Simplified equations verify the preceding statement for TEC and MFHPs. Material properties and interactions exert primary influences on operational effectiveness. And thermophysicochemical stabilities dictate operating temperatures which regulate the thermoemissive currents of TEC and the vaporization flow rates of MFHPs. Major high-temperature material problems of TEC and MFHPs have been solved. These solutions lead to productive, cost-effective applications of current TEC and MFHPs - and point to significant improvements with anticipated technological gains.

  11. Fitting of the Thomson scattering density and temperature profiles on the COMPASS tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanikova, E.; Peterka, M.; Bohm, P.; Bilkova, P.; Aftanas, M.; Sos, M.; Urban, J.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.

    2016-11-01

    A new technique for fitting the full radial profiles of electron density and temperature obtained by the Thomson scattering diagnostic in H-mode discharges on the COMPASS tokamak is described. The technique combines the conventionally used modified hyperbolic tangent function for the edge transport barrier (pedestal) fitting and a modification of a Gaussian function for fitting the core plasma. Low number of parameters of this combined function and their straightforward interpretability and controllability provide a robust method for obtaining physically reasonable profile fits. Deconvolution with the diagnostic instrument function is applied on the profile fit, taking into account the dependence on the actual magnetic configuration.

  12. Binary Collision Density in a Non-Ideal Gas as a Function of Particle Density, Collision Diameter, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2017-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, binary collision density in a dense non-ideal gas with Lennard-Jones interactions is investigated. It is shown that the functional form of the dependence of collision density on particle density and collision diameter remains the same as that for an ideal gas. The temperature dependence of the collision density, however, has a very different form at low temperatures, where it decreases as temperature increases. But at higher temperatures the functional form becomes the same as that for an ideal gas.

  13. Temperature and magnetic field induced multiple magnetic transitions in DyAg(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Parul; Chattopadhyay, M K; Sharath Chandra, L S; Sharma, V K; Roy, S B

    2011-02-09

    The magnetic properties of the rare-earth intermetallic compound DyAg(2) are studied in detail with the help of magnetization and heat capacity measurements. It is shown that the multiple magnetic phase transitions can be induced in DyAg(2) both by temperature and magnetic field. The detailed magnetic phase diagram of DyAg(2) is determined experimentally. It was already known that DyAg(2) undergoes an incommensurate to commensurate antiferromagnetic phase transition close to 10 K. The present experimental results highlight the first order nature of this phase transition, and show that this transition can be induced by magnetic field as well. It is further shown that another isothermal magnetic field induced transition or metamagnetic transition exhibited by DyAg(2) at still lower temperatures is also of first order nature. The multiple magnetic phase transitions in DyAg(2) give rise to large peaks in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity below 17 K, which indicates its potential as a magnetic regenerator material for cryocooler related applications. In addition it is found that because of the presence of the temperature and field induced magnetic phase transitions, and because of short range magnetic correlations deep inside the paramagnetic regime, DyAg(2) exhibits a fairly large magnetocaloric effect over a wide temperature window, e.g., between 10 and 60 K.

  14. Dependence of the critical temperature in overdoped copper oxides on superfluid density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božović, I.; He, X.; Wu, J.; Bollinger, A. T.

    2016-08-01

    The physics of underdoped copper oxide superconductors, including the pseudogap, spin and charge ordering and their relation to superconductivity, is intensely debated. The overdoped copper oxides are perceived as simpler, with strongly correlated fermion physics evolving smoothly into the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer behaviour. Pioneering studies on a few overdoped samples indicated that the superfluid density was much lower than expected, but this was attributed to pair-breaking, disorder and phase separation. Here we report the way in which the magnetic penetration depth and the phase stiffness depend on temperature and doping by investigating the entire overdoped side of the La2-xSrxCuO4 phase diagram. We measured the absolute values of the magnetic penetration depth and the phase stiffness to an accuracy of one per cent in thousands of samples; the large statistics reveal clear trends and intrinsic properties. The films are homogeneous; variations in the critical superconducting temperature within a film are very small (less than one kelvin). At every level of doping the phase stiffness decreases linearly with temperature. The dependence of the zero-temperature phase stiffness on the critical superconducting temperature is generally linear, but with an offset; however, close to the origin this dependence becomes parabolic. This scaling law is incompatible with the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer description.

  15. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, J; Knappe-Grüneberg, S; Gutkelch, D; Haueisen, J; Neuber, S; Schnabel, A; Burghoff, M

    2015-05-01

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  16. Flux Loop Measurements of the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Magnet Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mulders, M.; Hervé, A.; Loveless, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The first attempt is made to measure the magnetic flux density in the steel blocks of the CMS magnet yoke using the standard magnet discharge with the current ramp down speed of 1.5 A/...

  17. Temperature-Dependent Giant Magnetoimpedance Effect in Amorphous Soft Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, M.; Roy, R. K.; Panda, A. K.; Greve, D. W.; Ohodnicki, P.; McHenry, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance (GMI)-based devices offer potential as next-generation low-cost, flexible, ultrasensitive sensors. They can be used in applications that include current sensors, field sensors, stress sensors, and others. Challenging applications involve operation at high temperatures, and therefore studies of GMI temperature dependence and performance of soft magnetic materials are needed. We present a high-temperature GMI study on an amorphous soft magnetic microwire from room temperature to 560°C. The GMI ratio was observed to be nearly constant at ˜86% at low temperatures and to decrease rapidly at ˜290°C, finally reaching a near-zero value at 500°C. The rapid drop in GMI ratio at 290°C is associated with a reduction in the long-range ferromagnetic order as measured by the spontaneous magnetization ( M) at the Curie temperature ( T c). We also correlated the impedance with the magnetic properties of the material. From room temperature to 290°C, the impedance was found to be proportional to the square root of the magnetization to magnetic anisotropy ratio. Lastly, M( T) has been fit using a Handrich-Kobe model, which describes the system with a modified Brillouin function and an asymmetrical distribution of exchange interactions. We infer that the structural fluctuations of the amorphous phase result in a relatively small asymmetry in the fluctuation parameters.

  18. 8 T cryogen free magnet with variable temperature space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demikhov, E.; Kostrov, E.; Lysenko, V.; Piskunov, N.; Troitskiy, V.

    2010-06-01

    A conduction cooled 8 T superconducting magnetic system with variable temperature insert is developed and tested. The cryomagnetic system is based on a commercial two-stage pulse tube cryocooler with cooling power of 1W at 4.2 K. The compact superconducting magnet is manufactured from NbTi wire and impregnated with epoxy resin by "wet" technology. The clear diameter of variable temperature space is 20 mm. The system provides temperature range of 5.5-300 K. The variable temperature space is filled by low pressure helium gas. To eliminate the overheating of the magnet at high temperatures the heat switch is used in thermal coupling between variable temperature space and the 4K stage. The system design, manufacturing and test results are presented.

  19. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankiewicz, J H; Celinski, Z; Stupic, K F; Anderson, N R; Camley, R E

    2016-08-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  20. 8 T cryogen free magnet with variable temperature space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demikhov, E; Kostrov, E; Lysenko, V; Piskunov, N [RTI Cryomagnetic Systems, Leninsky prosp. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Troitskiy, V, E-mail: kostrov@lebedev.r [Lebedev Institute of Physics Russian Academy of Sciences, Cryogenics Department, Leninsky prosp. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-01

    A conduction cooled 8 T superconducting magnetic system with variable temperature insert is developed and tested. The cryomagnetic system is based on a commercial two-stage pulse tube cryocooler with cooling power of 1W at 4.2 K. The compact superconducting magnet is manufactured from NbTi wire and impregnated with epoxy resin by 'wet' technology. The clear diameter of variable temperature space is 20 mm. The system provides temperature range of 5.5-300 K. The variable temperature space is filled by low pressure helium gas. To eliminate the overheating of the magnet at high temperatures the heat switch is used in thermal coupling between variable temperature space and the 4K stage. The system design, manufacturing and test results are presented.

  1. Magnetic field and temperature control over Pt/Co/Ir/Co/Pt multistate magnetic logic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunov, R.; Hamadeh, A.; Fachec, T.; Lvovaa, G.; Koplak, O.; Talantsev, A.; Mangin, S.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic configurations in Pt/Co/Ir/Co/Pt synthetic ferrimagnet bilayer of strong perpendicular anisotropy have been systematically studied. Magnetization versus field hysteresis loops have been measured for different temperatures ranging from 5 to 300 K. The applied field - temperature (H-T) magnetization switching diagram has been constructed by extracting the different switching fields as a function of temperature. This switching diagram can be well explained by considering the competition between energy barrier of layer's magnetization reversal, interlayer exchange coupling, and Zeeman energy.

  2. Wide Temperature Magnetization Characteristics of Transverse Magnetically Annealed Amorphous Tapes for High Frequency Aerospace Magnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1999-01-01

    100 kHz magnetization properties of sample transverse magnetically annealed, cobalt-based amorphous and iron-based nanocrystalline tape wound magnetic cores are presented over the temperature range of -150 C to 150 C, at selected values of B(sub peak). Frequency resolved characteristics are given over the range of 50 kHz to 1 MHz, but at B(sub peak) = 0.1 T and 50 C only. Basic exciting winding current and induced voltage data were taken on bare toroidal cores, in a standard type measurement setup. A linear permeability model, which represents the core by a parallel L-R circuit, is used to interpret and present the magnetization characteristics and several figures of merit applicable to inductor materials are reviewed. The 100 kHz permeability thus derived decreases with increasing temperature for the Fe-based, nanocrystalline material, but increases roughly linearly with temperature for the two Co-based materials, as long as B(sub peak) is sufficiently low to avoid saturation effects. Due to the high permeabilities, rather low values of the 'quality factor' Q, from about 20 to below unity, were obtained over the frequency range of 50 kHz to 1 MHz (50 C, B(sub peak) = 0.1 T). Therefore these cores must be gapped in order to make up high Q or high current inductors. However, being rugged, low core loss materials with flat B-H loop characteristics, they may provide new solutions to specialty inductor applications.

  3. Magnetic Field-Temperature Phase Diagram of the Organic Conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, P.; Biberacher, W.; Kartsovnik, M. V.; Steep, E.; Balthes, E.; Weiss, H.; Müller, H.

    2000-04-01

    We present systematic magnetic torque studies of the ``magnetic field - temperature'' phase diagram of the layered organic conductor alpha-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 at fields nearly perpendicular and nearly parallel to the highly conducting plane. The shape of the phase diagram is compared to that predicted for a charge-density-wave system in a broad field range.

  4. Density of Zeros on the Lee-Yang circle obtained from magnetization data of a two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet

    OpenAIRE

    Binek, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    In order to provide an experimental access to the statistical theory of Lee and Yang (1952) the density function g(theta) of zeros on the Lee-Yang circle has been determined for the first time by analyzing isothermal magnetization data, m(H), of the Ising ferromagnet FeCl2 in axial magnetic fields, H, at temperatures 34 < T < 99K. The validity of our approach is demonstrated by the perfect agreement of magnetic specific heat data as calculated from g(theta) and m(H) via Maxwells relation, res...

  5. Inorganic Nanostructured High-Temperature Magnet Wires Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a high-temperature tolerant electrically-insulating coating for magnet wires. The Phase I program will result in a flexible, inorganic...

  6. Radiation Shielding Utilizing A High Temperature Superconducting Magnet Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project aims to leverage near-term high-temperature superconducting technologies to assess applicability of magnetic shielding for protecting against exposure...

  7. Curie temperatures of dilute magnetic semiconductors from LDA+U electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K. [ISIR, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)]. E-mail: ksato@cmp.sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp; Dederichs, P.H. [IFF, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Katayama-Yoshida, H. [ISIR, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    The magnetic properties of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) are calculated by using the local density approximation +U(LDA+U) method. In the LDA+U, occupied d-states in (Ga, Mn)As are predicted at lower energy than in the LDA and p-d exchange interaction explains calculated concentration dependence of Curie temperature very well. In (Ga, Mn)N, unoccupied d states are predicted at higher energy by LDA+U, resulting in higher Curie temperatures than in LDA at high concentrations due to the suppression of the anti-ferromagnetic super-exchange interaction.

  8. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  9. Low temperature magnetic structure of MnSe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J B C Efrem D'sa; P A Bhobe; K R Priolkar; A Das; P S R Krishna; P R Sarode; R B Prabhu

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we report low temperature neutron diffraction studies on MnSe in order to understand the anomalous behaviour of their magnetic and transport properties. Our study indicates that at low temperatures MnSe has two coexisting crystal structures, high temperature NaCl and hexagonal NiAs. NiAs phase appears below 266 K and is antiferromagnetically ordered at all temperatures while the NaCl phase orders antiferromagnetically at 130 K.

  10. Modelling of the reactive sputtering process with non-uniform discharge current density and different temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vašina, P; Hytková, T; Eliáš, M

    2009-05-01

    The majority of current models of the reactive magnetron sputtering assume a uniform shape of the discharge current density and the same temperature near the target and the substrate. However, in the real experimental set-up, the presence of the magnetic field causes high density plasma to form in front of the cathode in the shape of a toroid. Consequently, the discharge current density is laterally non-uniform. In addition to this, the heating of the background gas by sputtered particles, which is usually referred to as the gas rarefaction, plays an important role. This paper presents an extended model of the reactive magnetron sputtering that assumes the non-uniform discharge current density and which accommodates the gas rarefaction effect. It is devoted mainly to the study of the behaviour of the reactive sputtering rather that to the prediction of the coating properties. Outputs of this model are compared with those that assume uniform discharge current density and uniform temperature profile in the deposition chamber. Particular attention is paid to the modelling of the radial variation of the target composition near transitions from the metallic to the compound mode and vice versa. A study of the target utilization in the metallic and compound mode is performed for two different discharge current density profiles corresponding to typical two pole and multipole magnetics available on the market now. Different shapes of the discharge current density were tested. Finally, hysteresis curves are plotted for various temperature conditions in the reactor.

  11. Room temperature organic magnets derived from sp3 functionalized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuček, Jiří; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Błoński, Piotr; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Ugolotti, Juri; Dubecký, Matúš; Karlický, František; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-02-01

    Materials based on metallic elements that have d orbitals and exhibit room temperature magnetism have been known for centuries and applied in a huge range of technologies. Development of room temperature carbon magnets containing exclusively sp orbitals is viewed as great challenge in chemistry, physics, spintronics and materials science. Here we describe a series of room temperature organic magnets prepared by a simple and controllable route based on the substitution of fluorine atoms in fluorographene with hydroxyl groups. Depending on the chemical composition (an F/OH ratio) and sp3 coverage, these new graphene derivatives show room temperature antiferromagnetic ordering, which has never been observed for any sp-based materials. Such 2D magnets undergo a transition to a ferromagnetic state at low temperatures, showing an extraordinarily high magnetic moment. The developed theoretical model addresses the origin of the room temperature magnetism in terms of sp2-conjugated diradical motifs embedded in an sp3 matrix and superexchange interactions via -OH functionalization.

  12. Room temperature organic magnets derived from sp3 functionalized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuček, Jiří; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Błoński, Piotr; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Ugolotti, Juri; Dubecký, Matúš; Karlický, František; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-01-01

    Materials based on metallic elements that have d orbitals and exhibit room temperature magnetism have been known for centuries and applied in a huge range of technologies. Development of room temperature carbon magnets containing exclusively sp orbitals is viewed as great challenge in chemistry, physics, spintronics and materials science. Here we describe a series of room temperature organic magnets prepared by a simple and controllable route based on the substitution of fluorine atoms in fluorographene with hydroxyl groups. Depending on the chemical composition (an F/OH ratio) and sp3 coverage, these new graphene derivatives show room temperature antiferromagnetic ordering, which has never been observed for any sp-based materials. Such 2D magnets undergo a transition to a ferromagnetic state at low temperatures, showing an extraordinarily high magnetic moment. The developed theoretical model addresses the origin of the room temperature magnetism in terms of sp2-conjugated diradical motifs embedded in an sp3 matrix and superexchange interactions via –OH functionalization. PMID:28216636

  13. Influence of static magnetic field strength on the temperature resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of dc magnetic field strength on the resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) thermometer, which employs the fundamental f0 and 2f0 harmonics of the MNP magnetization induced by ac and superimposed dc magnetic fields. In ac and parallel dc magnetic fields, the strength of dc magnetic field modulates the harmonics of the MNP magnetization, which affects their temperature sensitivities and measurement signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A temperature-adjustable fluxgate-based magnetic particle spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of the MNP magnetization at different temperatures. To determine the temperature, the amplitudes of the measured f0 and 2f0 harmonics were modeled based on the static Langevin function. AC susceptibility measurements on a MNP sample demonstrate the applicability of the static Langevin function for the description of the MNP magnetization spectra at a low frequency ac magnetic field without taking into account the MNP dynamics. Our simulations and experiments show that with increasing dc magnetic field from 0.2 mT to 2.0 mT, both the amplitude of the 2f0 harmonic and the temperature sensitivity of the amplitude ratio of the 2f0 to f0 harmonics increase by a factor of about 10 in an ac magnetic field with a frequency of 70 Hz and an amplitude of 1 mT. Concomitantly, the SNR of the 2f0 harmonic significantly increases by about 20 dB. Consequently, the temperature resolution of the MNP thermometer is improved from 1.97 K to 0.26 K.

  14. Lattice QCD at finite temperature and density from Taylor expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In the first part, I present an overview of recent Lattice QCD simulations at finite temperature and density. In particular, we discuss fluctuations of conserved charges: baryon number, electric charge and strangeness. These can be obtained from Taylor expanding the QCD pressure as a function of corresponding chemical potentials. Our simulations were performed using quark masses corresponding to physical pion mass of about 140 MeV and allow a direct comparison to experimental data from ultra-relativistic heavy ion beams at hadron colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In the second part, we discuss computational challenges for current and future exascale Lattice simulations with a focus on new silicon developments from Intel and NVIDIA.

  15. Extended Opacity Tables with Higher Temperature-Density-Frequency Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Mark; Orban, Chris; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical models for plasma opacities underpin our understanding of radiation transport in many different astrophysical objects. These opacity models are also relevant to HEDP experiments such as ignition scale experiments on NIF. We present a significantly expanded set of opacity data from the widely utilized Opacity Project, and make these higher resolution data publicly available through OSU's portal with dropbox.com. This expanded data set is used to assess how accurate the interpolation of opacity data in temperature-density-frequency dimensions must be in order to adequately model the properties of most stellar types. These efforts are the beginning of a larger project to improve the theoretical opacity models in light of experimental results at the Sandia Z-pinch showing that the measured opacity of Iron disagrees strongly with all current models.

  16. Utilizing Materials With Controllable Curie Temperatures for Magnetic Actuation Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Dan; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Smith, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic force between a permanent magnet and different blocks of ferromagnetic materials was measured and calculated as a function of distance and temperature in the vicinity of the Curie temperature of the materials. The calculations were carried out using a 3-D finite-element model...... of the system. On the basis of forces predicted by the model a number of equilibrium points were calculated for a system where the magnetic force on a ferromagnetic block of material is balanced by a linear spring force. It is shown how these calculation procedures can be used as a tool for designing autonomous...

  17. Micromachined Active Magnetic Regenerator for Low Temperature Magnetic Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future science missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, very low temperature coolers for low noise...

  18. Lightweight Superconducting Magnets for Low Temperature Magnetic Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future science missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require efficient, very low temperature coolers for low noise detector...

  19. Micromachined Active Magnetic Regenerator for Low Temperature Magnetic Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future science missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, very low temperature coolers for low noise...

  20. Temperature and Density Structure of a Recurring Active Region Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Mulay, Sargam M; Mason, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of a recurring jet observed on October 31, 2011 by SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT and Hinode/EIS. We discuss the physical parameters of the jet such as density, differential emission measure, peak temperature, velocity and filling factor obtained using imaging and spectroscopic observations. A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed at the region of the jet-spire and the footpoint using EIS observations and also by combining AIA and XRT observations. The DEM curves were used to create synthetic spectra with the CHIANTI atomic database. The plasma along the line-of-sight in the jet-spire and jet-footpoint was found to be peak at 2.0 MK. We calculated electron densities using the Fe XII ($\\lambda$186/$\\lambda$195) line ratio in the region of the spire (Ne = 7.6x$10^{10}$ $cm^{-3}$) and the footpoint (1.1x$10^{11}$ $cm^{-3}$). The plane-of-sky velocity of the jet is found to be 524 km/s. The resulting EIS DEM values are in good agreement with those obtained from AIA-XRT. There is no in...

  1. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, C.; Joseph, B.; Orpe, PB; Saini, NL; Mukherjee, S.; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K.; Stanek, J.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Marcelli, A.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  2. Thermal investigations of a room temperature magnetic refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smaili, Arezki; Chiba, Younes [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique d' Alger (Algeria)], email: arezki.smaili@enp.edu.dz

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is a concept based on the magnetocaloric effect that some materials exhibit when the external magnetic field changes. The aim of this paper is to assess the performance of a numerical model in predicting parameters of an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator. Numerical simulations were conducted to perform a thermal analysis on an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator operating near room temperature with and without applied cooling load. Curves of temperature span, cooling capacity and thermal efficiency as functions of the operating conditions were drawn and are presented in this paper. Results showed that at fixed frequency Ql versus mf has an optimum and COP was increased with cycle frequency values. This study demonstrated that the proposed numerical model could be used to predict parameters of an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as it provides consistent results.

  3. Finite-temperature magnetism of FeRh compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polesya, S.; Mankovsky, S.; Ködderitzsch, D.; Minár, J.; Ebert, H.

    2016-01-01

    The temperature dependent stability of the magnetic phases of FeRh were investigated by means of total energy calculations with magnetic disorder treated within the uncompensated disordered local moment approach. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations based on the extended Heisenberg model have been performed, using exchange coupling parameters obtained from first principles. The crucial role and interplay of two factors in the metamagnetic transition in FeRh has been revealed, namely the dependence of the Fe-Fe exchange coupling parameters on the temperature-governed degree of magnetic disorder in the system and the stabilizing nature of the induced magnetic moment on Rh-sites. An important observation is the temperature dependence of these two competing factors.

  4. Nd-doped ZnO monolayer: High Curie temperature and large magnetic moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Changlong; Sun, Dan; Zhou, Long; Tian, Xiaohua; Huang, Yuewu

    2016-10-01

    We performed first-principles calculations within density-functional theory to study the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Nd-doped ZnO monolayer. The calculated results reveal that Nd-doped ZnO monolayer exhibits stable room temperature ferromagnetism with a large saturation magnetic moment of 3.99 μB per unit in ZnO monolayer. The magnetic property is contributed to the localized f sates of Nd atoms. When two Zn atoms are substituted by two Nd dopants, they tend to form ferromagnetic (FM) coupling and the estimated Curie temperature is higher than room temperature. More interesting, the impurity bands appear within the band gap of ZnO monolayer due to the introduction of Nd dopant. Our results may provide a reference for modifying the material property of ZnO monolayer and are promising as nanoscale building block in spintronic devices.

  5. High Temperature, Permanent Magnet Biased, Fault Tolerant, Homopolar Magnetic Bearing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Tucker, Randall; Kenny, Andrew; Kang, Kyung-Dae; Ghandi, Varun; Liu, Jinfang; Choi, Heeju; Provenza, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a magnetic bearing designed to operate at 1,000 F. A novel feature of this high temperature magnetic bearing is its homopolar construction which incorporates state of the art high temperature, 1,000 F, permanent magnets. A second feature is its fault tolerance capability which provides the desired control forces with over one-half of the coils failed. The construction and design methodology of the bearing is outlined and test results are shown. The agreement between a 3D finite element, magnetic field based prediction for force is shown to be in good agreement with predictions at room and high temperature. A 5 axis test rig will be complete soon to provide a means to test the magnetic bearings at high temperature and speed.

  6. Mean field theory of charge-density wave state in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Pavel; Lyubshin, Dmitrij

    2005-03-01

    We develop a mean field theory of charge-density wave (CDW) state in magnetic field and study properties of this state below the transition temperature. We show that the CDW state with shifted wave vector in high magnetic field (CDWx phase) has a double harmonic modulation on the most part of the phase diagram. At perfect nesting the single harmonic CDW state with shifted wave vector exists only in a very narrow region near the triple point. We show that the transition from CDW0 to CDWx state below the critical temperature is accompanied by a jump of the CDW order parameter and of the CDW wave vector rather than by their continuous increase. This implies a first order transition between these CDW states and explains a strong hysteresis accompanying this transition. The similarities between CDW in high magnetic field and nonuniform LOFF superconducting phase are pointed out. Our investigation provides a theoretical description for recent experiments on organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 and other compounds. In particular, we explain the higher value of the kink transition field and provide the calculation of the phase diagram in the case of perfect nesting.

  7. Calculation of static and dynamic linear magnetic response in approximate time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-01-14

    We report implementations and results of time-dependent density functional calculations (i) of the frequency-dependent magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability, (ii) of the (observable) translationally invariant linear magnetic response, and (iii) of a linear intensity differential (LID) which includes the dynamic dipole magnetizability. The density functional calculations utilized density fitting. For achieving gauge-origin independence we have employed time-periodic magnetic-field-dependent basis functions as well as the dipole velocity gauge, and have included explicit density-fit related derivatives of the Coulomb potential. We present the results of calculations of static and dynamic magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizabilities for a set of small molecules, the LID for the SF6 molecule, and dispersion curves for M-hexahelicene of the origin invariant linear magnetic response as well as of three dynamic polarizabilities: magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole, electric dipole-electric dipole, and electric dipole-magnetic dipole. We have also performed comparison of the linear magnetic response and magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability over a wide range of frequencies for H2O and SF6.

  8. Temperature and density structure of a recurring active region jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Zanna, Giulio Del; Mason, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present a study of a recurring jet observed on October 31, 2011 by the Atmosphereic Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. We discuss the physical parameters of the jet that are obtained using imaging and spectroscopic observations, such as density, differential emission measure, peak temperature, velocity, and filling factor. Methods: A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed at the region of the jet spire and the footpoint using EIS observations and also by combining AIA and XRT observations. The resulting EIS DEM curves were compared to those obtained with AIA-XRT. The DEM curves were used to create synthetic spectra with the CHIANTI atomic database. The predicted total count rates for each AIA channel were compared with the observed count rates. The effects of varying elemental abundances and the temperature range for the DEM inversion were investigated. Spectroscopic diagnostics were used to obtain an electron number density distribution for the jet spire and the jet footpoint. Results: The plasma along the line of sight in the jet spire and jet footpoint was found to be peak at 2.0 MK (log T [K] = 6.3). We calculated electron densities using the Fe XII (λ186/λ195) line ratio in the region of the spire (Ne = 7.6 × 1010 cm-3) and the footpoint (1.1 × 1011 cm-3). The plane-of-sky velocity of the jet is found to be 524 km s-1. The resulting EIS DEM values are in good agreement with those obtained from AIA-XRT. The synthetic spectra contributing to each AIA channel confirms the multi-thermal nature of the AIA channels in both regions. There is no indication of high temperatures, such as emission from Fe XVII (λ254.87) (log T [K] = 6.75) seen in the jet spire. In the case of the jet footpoint, synthetic spectra predict weak contributions from Ca XVII (λ192.85) and Fe XVII (λ254.87). With further investigation, we confirmed

  9. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidoni, S. E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/CUA, Code 674, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Yoshimura, K. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Plowman, J. E., E-mail: silvina.e.guidoni@nasa.gov [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  10. Magnetism and magnetic entropy change in LaFe11Al2Cx compounds around room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fang; Chen Yuan-Fu; Wang Guang-Jun; Sun Ji-Rong; Shen Bao-Gen

    2004-01-01

    Magnetism and magnetic entropy changes in LaFe11Al2Cx (x=0.0, 0.2 and 0.5) compounds have been investigated.The Curie temperature TC is conveniently controlled from 200K to room temperature by varying the carbon concentration. Large magnetic entropy change is obtained over a wide temperature range due to the high magnetization and the drastic decrease in the magnetization around TC. The large magnetic entropy change in wide temperature range,low cost and the convenience of controlling TC suggest that the LaFe11Al2Cx compounds are promising candidates for magnetic refrigerants in the corresponding temperature range.

  11. Tuning magnetic spirals beyond room temperature with chemical disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Mickaël; Canévet, Emmanuel; Raynaud, Adrien; Bartkowiak, Marek; Sheptyakov, Denis; Ban, Voraksmy; Kenzelmann, Michel; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina; Conder, Kazimierz; Medarde, Marisa

    2016-12-01

    In the past years, magnetism-driven ferroelectricity and gigantic magnetoelectric effects have been reported for a number of frustrated magnets featuring ordered spiral magnetic phases. Such materials are of high-current interest due to their potential for spintronics and low-power magnetoelectric devices. However, their low-magnetic ordering temperatures (typically <100 K) greatly restrict their fields of application. Here we demonstrate that the onset temperature of the spiral phase in the perovskite YBaCuFeO5 can be increased by more than 150 K through a controlled manipulation of the Fe/Cu chemical disorder. Moreover, we show that this novel mechanism can stabilize the magnetic spiral state of YBaCuFeO5 above the symbolic value of 25 °C at zero magnetic field. Our findings demonstrate that the properties of magnetic spirals, including its wavelength and stability range, can be engineered through the control of chemical disorder, offering a great potential for the design of materials with magnetoelectric properties beyond room temperature.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONTROL METHODOLOGY OF THE GIANT MAGNETOSTRICTIVE ACTUATOR BASED ON MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhenyuan; Yang Xing; Shi Chun; Guo Dongming

    2003-01-01

    According to the principle of the magnetostriction generating mechanism, the control model of giant magnetostriction material based on magnetic field and the control method with magnetic flux density are developed. Furthermore, this control method is used to develop a giant magnetostrictive micro-displacement actuator (GMA) and its driving system. Two control methods whose control variables are current intensity and magnetic flux density are compared with each other by experimental studies. Finally, effective methods on improving the linearity and control precision of micro-displacement actuator and reducing the hysteresis based on the controlling magnetic flux density are obtained.

  13. Makeup and uses of a basic magnet laboratory for characterizing high-temperature permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    A set of instrumentation for making basic magnetic measurements was assembled in order to characterize high intrinsic coercivity, rare earth permanent magnets with respect to short term demagnetization resistance and long term aging at temperatures up to 300 C. The major specialized components of this set consist of a 13 T peak field, capacitor discharge pulse magnetizer; a 10 in. pole size, variable gap electromagnet; a temperature controlled oven equipped with iron cobalt pole piece extensions and a removable paddle that carries the magnetization and field sensing coils; associated electronic integrators; and sensor standards for field intensity H and magnetic moment M calibration. A 1 cm cubic magnet sample, carried by the paddle, fits snugly between the pole piece extensions within the electrically heated aluminum oven, where fields up to 3.2 T can be applied by the electromagnet at temperatures up to 300 C. A sample set of demagnetization data for the high energy Sm2Co17 type of magnet is given for temperatures up to 300 C. These data are reduced to the temperature dependence of the M-H knee field and of the field for a given magnetic induction swing, and they are interpreted to show the limits of safe operation.

  14. Distribution of Magnetic Flux Density in Soft-Contact EMCC Rectangular Mold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin-tao; WANG En-gang; DENG An-yuan; HE Ji-cheng

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of the magnetic flux density in a soft-contact electromagnetic continuous casting (EMCC) rectangular mold was investigated. The experimental results show that with an increase in electric power, the magnetic flux density increases. The position where the maximum magnetic flux density appears will shift up when the coil moves to the top of the mold. At the same time, the maximum magnetic flux density will increase and the effective acting range of electromagnetic pressure will widen. As a result, in practice, the coil should be placed near the top part of the mold. The meniscus should be controlled near the top part of the coil, as this not only remarkably improves the billet surface quality but also saves energy. With the same electric power input, the higher the frequency, the lower the magnetic flux density.

  15. Magnetic levitation performance of high-temperature superconductor over three magnetic hills of permanent magnet guideway with iron shims of different thicknesses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuming Gong; Gang Liang; Lifeng Zhao; Yong Zhang; Yong Zhao; Xuyong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic levitation perfor-mance, including levitation force and guidance force, is important for the application of high-temperature super-conducting maglev. Both of them are not only affected by different arrays of superconductors and magnets, but also by the thickness of the iron shim between permanent magnets. In order to obtain the best levitation performance, the magnetic field distribution, levitation force, and guid-ance force of a new type of three magnetic hills of per-manent magnet guideway with iron shim of different thicknesses (4, 6, and 8 mm) are discussed in this paper. Simulation analysis and experiment results show that the guideway with iron shim of 8 mm thickness possesses the strongest magnetic field and levitation performance when the suspension gap is larger than 10 mm. However, with the decreasing of suspension gap, the guideway with iron shim of 4 mm thickness possesses the best levitation per-formance. The phenomena can be attributed to the density distribution of flux and magnetization of iron shim.

  16. Non-perturbative calculation of molecular magnetic properties within current-density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, E I; Teale, A M; Furness, J W; Lange, K K; Ekström, U; Helgaker, T

    2014-01-21

    We present a novel implementation of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory utilizing London atomic orbitals as basis functions. External magnetic fields are treated non-perturbatively, which enable the study of both magnetic response properties and the effects of strong fields, using either standard density functionals or current-density functionals-the implementation is the first fully self-consistent implementation of the latter for molecules. Pilot applications are presented for the finite-field calculation of molecular magnetizabilities, hypermagnetizabilities, and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants, focusing on the impact of current-density functionals on the accuracy of the results. Existing current-density functionals based on the gauge-invariant vorticity are tested and found to be sensitive to numerical details of their implementation. Furthermore, when appropriately regularized, the resulting magnetic properties show no improvement over standard density-functional results. An advantage of the present implementation is the ability to apply density-functional theory to molecules in very strong magnetic fields, where the perturbative approach breaks down. Comparison with high accuracy full-configuration-interaction results show that the inadequacies of current-density approximations are exacerbated with increasing magnetic field strength. Standard density-functionals remain well behaved but fail to deliver high accuracy. The need for improved current-dependent density-functionals, and how they may be tested using the presented implementation, is discussed in light of our findings.

  17. Non-perturbative calculation of molecular magnetic properties within current-density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellgren, E. I., E-mail: erik.tellgren@kjemi.uio.no; Lange, K. K.; Ekström, U.; Helgaker, T. [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Teale, A. M., E-mail: andrew.teale@nottingham.ac.uk [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Furness, J. W. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-21

    We present a novel implementation of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory utilizing London atomic orbitals as basis functions. External magnetic fields are treated non-perturbatively, which enable the study of both magnetic response properties and the effects of strong fields, using either standard density functionals or current-density functionals—the implementation is the first fully self-consistent implementation of the latter for molecules. Pilot applications are presented for the finite-field calculation of molecular magnetizabilities, hypermagnetizabilities, and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants, focusing on the impact of current-density functionals on the accuracy of the results. Existing current-density functionals based on the gauge-invariant vorticity are tested and found to be sensitive to numerical details of their implementation. Furthermore, when appropriately regularized, the resulting magnetic properties show no improvement over standard density-functional results. An advantage of the present implementation is the ability to apply density-functional theory to molecules in very strong magnetic fields, where the perturbative approach breaks down. Comparison with high accuracy full-configuration-interaction results show that the inadequacies of current-density approximations are exacerbated with increasing magnetic field strength. Standard density-functionals remain well behaved but fail to deliver high accuracy. The need for improved current-dependent density-functionals, and how they may be tested using the presented implementation, is discussed in light of our findings.

  18. Density dependent magnetic field and the equation of state of hyperonic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Casali, Rudiney Hoffmann

    2013-01-01

    We are interested on the effects, caused by strong variable density dependent magnetic fields, on hyperonic matter, its symmetry energy, equations of state and mass-radius relations. The inclusion of the anomalous magnetic moment of the particles involved in a stellar system is performed, and some results are compared with the cases that do not take this correction under consideration. The Lagrangian density used follows the nonlinear Walecka model plus the leptons subjected to an external magnetic field.

  19. Magnetic compressibility and ion-temperature-gradient-driven microinstabilities in magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zocco, A; Connor, J W

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic theory of the strongly driven ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas is developed. Stabilizing and destabilizing effects are identified, and a critical $\\beta_{e}$ (the ratio of the electron to magnetic pressure) for stabilization of the toroidal branch of the mode is calculated for magnetic equilibria independent of the coordinate along the magnetic field. Its scaling is $\\beta_{e}\\sim L_{Te}/R,$ where $L_{Te}$ is the characteristic electron temperature gradient length, and $R$ the major radius of the torus. We conjecture that a fast particle population can cause a similar stabilization due to its contribution to the equilibrium pressure gradient. For sheared equilibria, the boundary of marginal stability of the electromagnetic correction to the electrostatic mode is also given. For a general magnetic equilibrium, we find a critical length (for electromagnetic stabilization) of the extent of the unfavourable curvature along the magnetic field....

  20. Quantitative evaluation of magnetic flux density in a magnetic recording head and pseudo soft underlayer by electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Weixing; Hirata, Kei; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoichi; Kasai, Hiroto; Yanagiuchi, Katsuaki; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic interaction between the pole tip of a single-pole head and a pseudo soft underlayer in perpendicular magnetic recording was observed by electron holography. The magnetic flux density inside the soft underlayer was quantitatively evaluated. The distribution of magnetic flux density was calculated using the finite element method, and the influences of the modulation of the reference wave and stray fields were investigated by comparison with experimental results. The flux density observed was found to be underestimated due to the modulation of the phase shift in reference wave. The magnetic flux measured experimentally was larger than that inside the specimen because of the relatively large stray fields above and below the specimen in the direction of the electron beam.

  1. Conical Magnetic Bearing Development and Magnetic Bearing Testing for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Jansen, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The main proposed research of this grant were: to design a high-temperature, conical magnetic bearing facility, to test the high-temperature, radial magnetic bearing facility to higher speeds, to investigate different backup bearing designs and materials, to retrofit the high-temperature test facility with a magnetic thrust bearing, to evaluate test bearings at various conditions, and test several lubricants using a spiral orbit tribometer. A high-temperature, conical magnetic bearing facility has been fully developed using Solidworks. The facility can reuse many of the parts of the current high-temperature, radial magnetic bearing, helping to reduce overall build costs. The facility has the ability to measure bearing force capacity in the X, Y, and Z directions through a novel bearing mounting design. The high temperature coils and laminations, a main component of the facility, are based upon the current radial design and can be fabricated at Texas A&M University. The coil design was highly successful in the radial magnetic bearing. Vendors were contacted about fabrication of the high temperature lamination stack. Stress analysis was done on the laminations. Some of the components were procured, but due to budget cuts, the facility build up was stopped.

  2. Achievement of a record electron temperature for a magnetic mirror device

    CERN Document Server

    Bagryansky, P A; Lizunov, A A; Maximov, V V; Prikhodko, V V; Shalashov, A G; Soldatkina, E I; Solomakhin, A L; Yakovlev, D V

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate plasma discharges with extremely high temperature of bulk electrons at the large axially symmetric magnetic mirror device GDT (Budker Institute, Novosibirsk). According to Thomson scattering measurements, the on-axis electron temperature averaged over several sequential shots is 660 $\\pm$ 50 eV with peak values exceeding 900 eV in few shots. This corresponds to at least threefold increase as compared to previous experiments both at the GDT and at other comparable machines, thus demonstrating the maximum quasi-stationary (~1 ms) electron temperature achieved in open traps. The breakthrough is made possible with application of sophisticated electron cyclotron resonance heating in addition to standard heating by neutral beams. The reported increase of the electron temperature along with previous experiments, which demonstrated high-density plasma confinement with $\\beta\\approx$ 60%, provide a firm basis for extrapolating to fusion relevant applications of open magnetic systems.

  3. Measurement of magnetic properties at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This picture shows part of the low-mu permeameter to measure permeability of stainless steels and other low-mu materials used in superconducting magnets. The sample, a 5 mm diam., 45 mm long rod, is suspended to long leads before being inserted in the test cryostat. For the measurement the sample is surrounded by a flux- measuring coil and placed in the field of a superconducting solenoid. At a given field the sample is removed.During the removal, the voltage induced in the flux-measuring coil is time integrated giving the flux variation. This equipment was developed to select stainless steels and other low-mu materials used in the ISR Prototype Superconducting Qaudrupole. The person is W.Ansorge.

  4. Comparison between the magnetic and transport critical current densities in high critical current density melt-textured yttrium barium copper-oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L.; Meng, R. L.; Xue, Y. Y.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Using a recently developed pulsed critical current density (Jc) measuring system, the Jc of the high-Jc melt-textured YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (Y123) bulk samples has been determined. I-V curves with a voltage resolution of 0.5 microV were obtained, and transport Jc's along the a-b plane as high as 7.2 x 10 to the 4th A/sq cm were extracted. These results are comparable to the values obtained magnetically. On the other hand, transport Jc along the c axis were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller, even though the magnetic Jc along the c axis is only about five times smaller than Jc along the a-b plane. It is suggested that for the high-temperature superconducting materials which are highly anisotropic, caution should be taken when using the nontransport magnetic methods to determine Jc.

  5. High-temperature molecular magnets based on cyanovanadate building blocks: spontaneous magnetization at 230 k.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entley, W R; Girolami, G S

    1995-04-21

    The molecular-based magnetic materials Cs(2)Mn(||)[V(||)(CN)(6)] (1) and (Et(4)N)(0.5)Mn(l.25)- [V(CN)(5)].2H(2)O (2) (where Et is ethyl) were prepared by the addition of manganese(II) triflate to aqueous solutions of the hexacyanovanadate(II) ion at 0 degrees C. Whereas 1 crystallizes in a face-centered cubic lattice, 2 crystallizes in a noncubic space group. The cesium salt (1) has features characteristic of a three-dimensional ferrimagnet with a Néel transition at 125 kelvin. The tetraethylammonium salt (2) also behaves as a three-dimensional ferrimagnet with a Néel temperature of 230 kelvin; only two other molecular magnets have higher magnetic ordering temperatures. Saturation magnetization measurements indicate that in both compounds the V(II) and high-spin Mn(II) centers are antiferromagnetically coupled. Both 1 and 2 exhibit hysteresis loops characteristic of soft magnets below their magnetic phase-transition temperatures. The high magnetic ordering temperatures of these cyano-bridged solids confirm that the incorporation of early transition elements into the lattice promotes stronger magnetic coupling by enhancing the backbonding into the cyanide pi* orbitals.

  6. Magnetic record associated with tree ring density: Possible climate proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruner Petr

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A magnetic signature of tree rings was tested as a potential paleo-climatic indicator. We examined wood from sequoia tree, located in Mountain Home State Forest, California, whose tree ring record spans over the period 600 – 1700 A.D. We measured low and high-field magnetic susceptibility, the natural remanent magnetization (NRM, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM, and stability against thermal and alternating field (AF demagnetization. Magnetic investigation of the 200 mm long sequoia material suggests that magnetic efficiency of natural remanence may be a sensitive paleoclimate indicator because it is substantially higher (in average >1% during the Medieval Warm Epoch (700–1300 A.D. than during the Little Ice Age (1300–1850 A.D. where it is

  7. Magnetic transition temperatures follow crystallographic symmetry in samarium under high-pressures and low-temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig R.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal samarium (Sm) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to high-pressure up to 47 GPa and low-temperature to 10 K. The two magnetic transitions at 106 K and 14 K in the α-Sm phase, attributed to antiferromagnetic ordering on hexagonal and cubic layers respectively, collapse in to one magnetic transition near 10 GPa when Sm assumes a double hexagonal close packed (dhcp) phase. On further increase in pressure above 34 GPa, the magnetic transitions split again as Sm adopts a hexagonal-hP3 structure indicating different magnetic transition temperatures for different crystallographic sites. A model for magnetic ordering for the hexagonal-hP3 phase in samarium has been proposed based on the experimental data. The magnetic transition temperatures closely follow the crystallographic symmetry during α-Sm  →  dhcp  →  fcc/dist.fcc  →  hP3 structure sequence at high-pressures and low-temperatures.

  8. Low-temperature heat capacity of magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, A. V.

    2008-12-01

    This paper continues the previous investigation into a recently discovered phenomenon of magnetic fluid solidification at temperatures essentially exceeding the freezing point of the base fluid. Physically, this phenomenon is related to the fact that at decreasing temperatures the magnetic fluid loses fluidity (with its viscosity tending to infinity) at a temperature higher than the freezing point of the base fluid. The main factor determining the freezing point is the type of the surface-active substance covering the particles. A group of different surfactants is examined with the aim of finding the lowest possible solidification temperature. The best result is obtained for linoleic acid (-100°C). In order to gain a deeper insight into the mechanisms of fluid solidification, a series of thermophysical measurements has been done. Heat capacity measurements made for an isooctane-based magnetic fluid stabilized by oleic acid at a temperature ranging from -130°C to 0 did not reveal any noticeable heat capacity anomalies in the vicinity of the solidification temperature. This suggests that the solidification of the magnetic fluid proceeds without phase transition. The highest peak of the heat flux is observed at the freezing point of isooctane. The position of the maximum slightly changes with the concentration of magnetic particles. With an increase of the concentration the temperature of the heat flux maximum decreases. In the presence of free oleic acid in isooctane a low peak is observed at a temperature of about -15°C. The peak position is independent of the oleic acid concentration. Tables 1, Figs 7, Refs 1.

  9. Giant Magnetic Entropy Change in Manganese Perovskites near Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟伟; 王锦辉; 都有为; 陈伟

    2001-01-01

    A large magnetic entropy change about twice as high as that of pure gadolinium metal near room temperature has been discovered in manganese perovskites La0.837Ca0.098Na0.03sMn0.987O3.00(8.3 J. kg-1.K-1, at 256 K) and La0.s22Ca0.096K0.043Mn0.974O3.00 (6.8 J. kg-1.K-1, at 265K) under a magnetic field of 1.5 T. This phenomenon indicates that manganese perovskites have potential applications for magnetic refrigerants in an extended temperature range even near room temperature.

  10. Prediction of d^0 magnetism in self-interaction corrected density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Pemmaraju, Chaitanya

    2010-03-01

    Over the past couple of years, the phenomenon of ``d^0 magnetism'' has greatly intrigued the magnetism community [1]. Unlike conventional magnetic materials, ``d^0 magnets'' lack any magnetic ions with open d or f shells but surprisingly, exhibit signatures of ferromagnetism often with a Curie temperature exceeding 300 K. Current research in the field is geared towards trying to understand the mechanism underlying this observed ferromagnetism which is difficult to explain within the conventional m-J paradigm [1]. The most widely studied class of d^0 materials are un-doped and light element doped wide gap Oxides such as HfO2, MgO, ZnO, TiO2 all of which have been put forward as possible d0 ferromagnets. General experimental trends suggest that the magnetism is a feature of highly defective samples leading to the expectation that the phenomenon must be defect related. In particular, based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations acceptor defects formed from the O-2p states in these Oxides have been proposed as being responsible for the ferromagnetism [2,3]. However. predicting magnetism originating from 2p orbitals is a delicate problem, which depends on the subtle interplay between covalency and Hund's coupling. DFT calculations based on semi-local functionals such as the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) can lead to qualitative failures on several fronts. On one hand the excessive delocalization of spin-polarized holes leads to half-metallic ground states and the expectation of room-temperature ferromagnetism. On the other hand, in some cases a magnetic ground state may not be predicted at all as the Hund's coupling might be under estimated. Furthermore, polaronic distortions which are often a feature of acceptor defects in Oxides are not predicted [4,5]. In this presentation, we argue that the self interaction error (SIE) inherent to semi-local functionals is responsible for the failures of LSDA and demonstrate through various examples that beyond

  11. Analysis of recoverable current from one component of magnetic flux density in MREIT and MRCDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Oh In

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) provides a current density image by measuring the induced magnetic flux density within the subject with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been focused on extracting some useful information of the current density and conductivity distribution in the subject Omega using measured B(z), one component of the magnetic flux density B. In this paper, we analyze the map Tau from current density vector field J to one component of magnetic flux density B(z) without any assumption on the conductivity. The map Tau provides an orthogonal decomposition J = J(P) + J(N) of the current J where J(N) belongs to the null space of the map Tau. We explicitly describe the projected current density J(P) from measured B(z). Based on the decomposition, we prove that B(z) data due to one injection current guarantee a unique determination of the isotropic conductivity under assumptions that the current is two-dimensional and the conductivity value on the surface is known. For a two-dimensional dominating current case, the projected current density J(P) provides a good approximation of the true current J without accumulating noise effects. Numerical simulations show that J(P) from measured B(z) is quite similar to the target J. Biological tissue phantom experiments compare J(P) with the reconstructed J via the reconstructed isotropic conductivity using the harmonic B(z) algorithm.

  12. Influence of Magnetic Field on Electric Charge Transport in Holomiun Thin Films at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dudas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Holmium thin films were prepared by evaporation in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV and high precision electrical resistance measurements were performed on them as well as on holomium bulk sample in the wide temperature range from 4,2 K up to the room temperature. Electric charge transport is profoundly influenced by the magnetic structure at low temperatures and a "knee-like" resistance anomaly was observed near the transportation from paramagnetic state to basal-plane spiral structure in bulk with the Neel temperature TN=128,9 K and below ~ 122 K in thin Ho films in a thickness range from 98 nm to 215 nm. Unexpected resistance minimum at ~ 9 K and a slope´s charge of the R vs. T curve near ~ 170 K was observed in 215 nm thin film. Application of magnetic field parallel to the substrate and thin film plane for temperatures below ~ 150 K caused the decrease of resistence value with increasing magnetic flux density. Increasing suppression of the TN value up to ~ 5 K with increasing flux density value up to 5 T was observed in Ho films. 

  13. The effects of strong magnetic fields and rotation on soliton stars at finite temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We study the effects of strong magnetic fields and uniform rotation on the properties of soliton stars in Lee-Wick model when a temperature dependence is introduced into this model. We first recall the properties of the Lee-Wick model and study the properties of soliton solutions, in particular, the stability condition, in terms of the parameters of the model and in terms of the number of fermions N inside the soliton (for very large N) in the presence of strong magnetic fields and uniform rotation. We also calculate the effects of gravity on the stability properties of the soliton stars in the simple approximation of coupling the Newtonian gravitational field to the energy density inside the soliton, treating this as constant throughout. Following Cottingham and Vinh Mau, we also make an analysis at finite temperature and show the possibility of a phase transition which leads to a model with parameters similar to those considered by Lee and his colleagues but in the presence of magnetic fields and rotation. More specifically, the effects of magnetic fields and rotation on the soliton mass and transition temperature are computed explicitly. We finally study the evolution on these magnetized and rotating soliton stars with the temperature from the early universe to the present time.

  14. The relation between the column density structures and the magnetic field orientation in the Vela C molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Angilè, F. E.; Ashton, P.; Benton, S. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Fissel, L. M.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gandilo, N. N.; Hennebelle, P.; Klein, J.; Li, Z.-Y.; Korotkov, A. L.; Martin, P. G.; Matthews, T. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Santos, F. P.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2017-07-01

    We statistically evaluated the relative orientation between gas column density structures, inferred from Herschel submillimetre observations, and the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimetre Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) at 250, 350, and 500 μm, towards the Vela C molecular complex. First, we find very good agreement between the polarization orientations in the three wavelength-bands, suggesting that, at the considered common angular resolution of 3.´0 that corresponds to a physical scale of approximately 0.61 pc, the inferred magnetic field orientation is not significantly affected by temperature or dust grain alignment effects. Second, we find that the relative orientation between gas column density structures and the magnetic field changes progressively with increasing gas column density, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation at low column densities to mostly perpendicular at the highest column densities. This observation is in agreement with previous studies by the Planck collaboration towards more nearby molecular clouds. Finally, we find a correspondencebetween (a) the trends in relative orientation between the column density structures and the projected magnetic field; and (b) the shape of the column density probability distribution functions (PDFs). In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by one clear filamentary structure, or "ridges", where the high-column density tails of the PDFs are flatter, we find a sharp transition from preferentially parallel or having no preferred relative orientation at low column densities to preferentially perpendicular at highest column densities. In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by several filamentary structures with multiple orientations, or "nests", where the maximum values of the column density are smaller than in the ridge-like sub-regions and the high-column density

  15. Density of Liquid Steel over Temperature Range of 1 803-1 873 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    The density of three kinds of liquid steel was measured by a modified sessile drop method over the temperature range of 1 803-1 873 K. It is found that the density of liquid steels decreases with increasing temperature and carbon content in steel. Both of the density and its absolute temperature coefficient of studied steels are smaller than the literature values of pure iron. The molar volume of the steels increases with increasing temperature.

  16. Magnetic Signatures of Quantum Critical Points of the Ferrimagnetic Mixed Spin-(1/2, S) Heisenberg Chains at Finite Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strečka, Jozef; Verkholyak, Taras

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic mixed spin-(1/2,S) Heisenberg chains are examined using quantum Monte Carlo simulations for two different quantum spin numbers S=1 and 3/2. The calculated magnetization curves at finite temperatures are confronted with zero-temperature magnetization data obtained within the density matrix renormalization group method, which imply an existence of two quantum critical points determining a breakdown of the gapped Lieb-Mattis ferrimagnetic phase and Tomonaga-Luttinger spin-liquid phase, respectively. While a square root behavior of the magnetization accompanying each quantum critical point is gradually smoothed upon rising temperature, the susceptibility and isothermal entropy change data at low temperatures provide a stronger evidence of the zero-temperature quantum critical points through marked local maxima and minima, respectively.

  17. High temperature magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Sn0.95Co0.05O2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Mounkachi; E Salmani; M Boujnah; H Labrim; H El Moussaoui; M Hamedoun; A Benyoussef; A El Kenz; H Ez-Zahraouy; R Masrour; E K Hlil

    2014-05-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of Sn0.95Co0.05O2 nanocrystalline and diluted magnetic semiconductors have been investigated. This sample has been synthesized by co-precipitation route. Study of magnetization hysteresis loop measurements infer that the sample of Sn0.95Co0.05O2 nanoparticle shows a well-defined hysteresis loop at 300 K temperature, which reflects its ferromagnetic behaviour. We confirmed the room-temperature intrinsic ferromagnetic (FM) semiconductors by ab initio calculation, using the theory of the functional of density (DFT) by employing the method of Korringa–Kohn–Rostoker (KKR) as well as coherent potential approximation (CPA, explain the disorder effect) to systems. The ferromagnetic state energy was calculated and compared with the local-moment-disordered (LMD) state energy for local density approximation (LDA) and LDA–SIC approximation. Mechanism of hybridization and interaction between magnetic ions in Sn0.95Co0.05O2 is also investigated. To explain the origin of ferromagnetic behaviour, we give information about total and atoms projected density of state functions.

  18. Searching for high magnetization density in bulk Fe: the new metastable Fe6 phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Himmetoglu, Burak; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Cococcioni, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new allotrope of iron by first principles calculations. This phase has Pmn21 symmetry, a six-atom unit cell (hence the name Fe6), and the highest magnetization density (Ms) among all the known crystalline phases of iron. Obtained from the structural optimizations of the Fe3C-cementite crystal upon carbon removal, Pmn21 Fe6 is shown to result from the stabilization of a ferromagnetic FCC phase, further strained along the Bain path. Although metastable from 0 to 50 GPa, the new phase is more stable at low pressures than the other well-known HCP and FCC allotropes and smoothly transforms into the FCC phase under compression. If stabilized to room temperature, for example, by interstitial impurities, Fe6 could become the basis material for high Ms rare-earth-free permament magnets and high-impact applications such as light-weight electric engine rotors or high-density recording media. The new phase could also be key to explaining the enigmatic high Ms of Fe16N2, which is currently attracting intense research activity.

  19. Universal linear-temperature dependence of static magnetic susceptibility in iron-pnictides

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Su, Yue-Hua; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Weng, Zheng-Yu; Lee, Dung-Hai; Xiang, Tao

    2008-01-01

    A universal linear-temperature dependence of the uniform magnetic susceptibility has been observed in the nonmagnetic normal state of iron-pnictides. This non-Pauli and non-Curie-Weiss-like paramagnetic behavior cannot be understood within a pure itinerant picture. We argue that it results from the existence of a wide antiferromagnetic fluctuation window in which the local spin-density-wave correlations exist but the global directional order has not been established yet.

  20. Cryostabilization of high-temperature superconducting magnets with subcooled flow in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Y. S.; Hull, J. R.; Choi, U. S.

    1992-07-01

    Subcooled flow of liquid nitrogen in microchannels is proposed as a means to enhance the stability of a superconducting magnet. Analysis shows high current density or a low stabilizer fraction is obtainable in a cryostable magnet. Increase in stability (using the Stekley criterion) is directly related to coolant velocity and coolant channel aspect ratio, however, there is a corresponding increase in pressure drop of the system. Another constraint is the coolant temperature rise, which is found to be a function of coolant residence time and the coolant to conductor ratio.

  1. Three-dimensionality of field-induced magnetism in a high-temperature superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lake, B.; Lefmann, K.; Christensen, N.B.

    2005-01-01

    insulators, where each copper spin is antiparallel to its nearest neighbours(1), evolves into a fluctuating state where the spins show tendencies towards magnetic order of a longer periodicity. For certain charge-carrier densities, quantum fluctuations are sufficiently suppressed to yield static long......Many physical properties of high-temperature superconductors are two-dimensional phenomena derived from their square-planar CuO(2) building blocks. This is especially true of the magnetism from the copper ions. As mobile charge carriers enter the CuO(2) layers, the antiferromagnetism of the parent...

  2. Experimental High Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a radial, redundant-axis, magnetic bearing at temperatures to 1000 F (538 C) and rotor speeds to 15,000 RPM along with theoretical temperature and force models are presented in this paper. The experimentally measured force produced by a single C-core using 22A was 600 lb. (2.67 kN) at room temperature and 380 lb. (1.69 kN) at 1000 F (538 C). These values were compared with force predictions based on a 1D magnetic circuit analysis and a thermal analysis of gap growth as a function of temperature. Tests under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing s load capacity. One C-core required approximately 340 W of power to generate 190 lb. (8.45 kN) of magnetic force at 1000 F (538 C); however the magnetic air gap was much larger than at room temperature. The data presented is after the bearing had already operated six thermal cycles and eleven total (not consecutive) hours at 1000 F (538 C).

  3. Fault Tolerant Magnetic Bearing Testing and Conical Magnetic Bearing Development for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Clark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    During the six month tenure of the grant, activities included continued research of hydrostatic bearings as a viable backup-bearing solution for a magnetically levitated shaft system in extreme temperature environments (1000 F), developmental upgrades of the fault-tolerant magnetic bearing rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and assisting in the development of a conical magnetic bearing for extreme temperature environments, particularly turbomachinery. It leveraged work from the ongoing Smart Efficient Components (SEC) and the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) program at NASA Glenn Research Center. The effort was useful in providing technology for more efficient and powerful gas turbine engines.

  4. Charge density wave and excitonic magnetic polarons in CeTe sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kasuya, T; Takabatake, T

    2000-01-01

    Mechanisms of anomalous magnetic and transport properties in CeTe sub 2 observed recently on single-crystal samples are studied by comparing with the nonmagnetic reference material LaTe sub 2 , as well as other typical low carrier-density systems such as Ce monopnictides, doped Eu chalcogenides and Yb sub 4 As sub 3. The present system is unique on the point of low-carrier semimetal due to CDW of near perfect nesting, which is shown to be nearly independent of the spin-orbit splitting. The large residual resistivity indicates the giant molecular scattering due to excitonic states forming the distorted Wigner crystal, similar to Yb sub 4 As sub 3. At low temperatures, induced magnetic polarons cause unusual novel transport properties with a sharp peak of resistivity without any anomaly on other physical properties. This is attributed to a sharp glassy transition from an antiferromagnetic short-range ordering to the ferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic polarons within each CeTe double layer sandwiching the mo...

  5. Temperature and Population Density Effects on Locomotor Activity of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, T. M.; Faurby, S.; Kjærsgaard, A.

    2013-01-01

    activity was measured for both sexes and at four densities (with mixed sexes) during a full light and dark (L:D) cycle at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C. Locomotor activity during daytime increased with temperature at all densities until reaching 30°C and then decreased. High-density treatments...

  6. Finite-size scaling of the magnetization probability density for the critical Ising model in slab geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Cardozo, David; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetization probability density in d  =  2 and 3 dimensional Ising models in slab geometry of volume L\\paralleld-1× {{L}\\bot} is computed through Monte-Carlo simulation at the critical temperature and zero magnetic field. The finite-size scaling of this distribution and its dependence on the system aspect-ratio ρ =\\frac{{{L}\\bot}}{{{L}\\parallel}} and boundary conditions are discussed. In the limiting case ρ \\to 0 of a macroscopically large slab ({{L}\\parallel}\\gg {{L}\\bot} ) the distribution is found to scale as a Gaussian function for all tested system sizes and boundary conditions.

  7. Magnetic x-ray microscopy at low temperatures – Visualization of flux distributions in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Claudia, E-mail: stahl@is.mpg.de; Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Bechtel, Michael; Schütz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Heisenbergstraße 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University, Beethovenstraße 1, 73430 Aalen (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) microscopy at liquid nitrogen temperature has been performed on bilayers of high-T{sub c} superconducting YBCO (YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ}) and soft-magnetic Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}. This should allow us to map the magnetic flux density distribution in the current-carrying state of the superconductor with high spatial resolution. For that purpose the UHV scanning X-ray microscope MAXYMUS has been upgraded by a MMR Micro Miniature Joule-Thompson cryostat capable of temperatures between 75 K and 580 K. Resulting XMCD images of the magnetic flux density in the superconductor with a field of view ranging from millimeters to micrometers are presented. The microscope’s unique combination of total electron yield (TEY) measurements together with low temperatures offers novel possibilities concerning the current transport in superconductors on small length scales.

  8. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Paul; Mussack, Katie; Orban, Chris; Colgan, James; Ducret, Jean-Eric; Fontes, Christopher J.; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Heeter, Robert F.; Kilcrease, Dave; Le Pennec, Maelle; Mancini, Roberto; Perry, Ted; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine; Trantham, Matt

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. This discrepancy has led to an investigation of opacities through laboratory experiments and improved opacity models for many of the larger contributors to the sun’s opacity, including iron and oxygen. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al, 2015]. Although these results are still controversial, repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for C, O and Fe to address the solar abundance issue [Colgan, 2013]. Armstrong et al [2014] have also implemented changes in the ATOMIC code for low-Z elements. However, no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions.This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDPLP, grant No. DE-NA0001840, and the NLUF Program, grant No. DE-NA0000850, and through LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  9. High-Temperature, High-Load-Capacity Radial Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenza, Andrew; Montague, Gerald; Kascak, Albert; Palazzolo, Alan; Jansen, Ralph; Jansen, Mark; Ebihara, Ben

    2005-01-01

    A radial heteropolar magnetic bearing capable of operating at a temperature as high as 1,000 F (=540 C) has been developed. This is a prototype of bearings for use in gas turbine engines operating at temperatures and speeds much higher than can be withstood by lubricated rolling-element bearings. It is possible to increase the maximum allowable operating temperatures and speeds of rolling-element bearings by use of cooling-air systems, sophisticated lubrication systems, and rotor-vibration- damping systems that are subsystems of the lubrication systems, but such systems and subsystems are troublesome. In contrast, a properly designed radial magnetic bearing can suspend a rotor without contact, and, hence, without need for lubrication or for cooling. Moreover, a magnetic bearing eliminates the need for a separate damping system, inasmuch as a damping function is typically an integral part of the design of the control system of a magnetic bearing. The present high-temperature radial heteropolar magnetic bearing has a unique combination of four features that contribute to its suitability for the intended application: 1. The wires in its electromagnet coils are covered with an insulating material that does not undergo dielectric breakdown at high temperature and is pliable enough to enable the winding of the wires to small radii. 2. The processes used in winding and potting of the coils yields a packing factor close to 0.7 . a relatively high value that helps in maximizing the magnetic fields generated by the coils for a given supplied current. These processes also make the coils structurally robust. 3. The electromagnets are of a modular C-core design that enables replacement of components and semiautomated winding of coils. 4. The stator is mounted in such a manner as to provide stable support under radial and axial thermal expansion and under a load as large as 1,000 lb (.4.4 kN).

  10. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.; Holmes, A. T.; Christensen, N. B.; Hücker, M.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Rütt, U.; Zimmermann, M. V.; Forgan, E. M.; Hayden, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ~0.123, we find that a field (B~10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction at B~15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry of individual bilayers is broken by the CDW at low and high fields, allowing Fermi surface reconstruction, as recently suggested.

  11. Symmetry restoration at finite temperature with weak magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, Jorge; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena; Ayala, Alejandro; Piccinelli, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    We study symmetry restoration at finite temperature in the standard model during the electroweak phase transition in the presence of a weak magnetic field. We compute the finite temperature effective potential up to the contribution of ring diagrams, using the broken phase degrees of freedom, and keep track of the gauge parameter dependence of the results. We show that under these conditions, the phase transition becomes stronger first order.

  12. Low field magnetic measurements on high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, G.; Murphy, S.D.; Li, Z.Y.; Stewart, A.M.; Bhagat, S.M. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1989-09-01

    The authors report dc magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements on both micron size powders and sintered samples of several high temperature superconductors. The powder data confirm previous findings that the materials can be treated as conventional superconductors with s-wave pairing. The ac results on sintered slabs ar interpreted using Bean's model and yield the temperature dependence of the shielding current.

  13. High-Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are the subject of a new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army thrust with significant industry participation, and coordination with other Government agencies. The NASA/Army emphasis is on high-temperature applications for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of these engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used--resulting in a more efficient, "more electric" engine. Finally, the Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program, a joint Department of Defense/industry program, identified a need for a hightemperature (as high as 1200 F) magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in a phase III engine. This magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. It has a laminated rotor and stator made of cobalt steel. Wound around the stator are a series of electrical wire coils that form a series of electric magnets around the circumference. The magnets exert a force on the rotor. A probe senses the position of the rotor, and a feedback controller keeps it in the center of the cavity. The engine rotor, bearings, and case form a flexible structure that contains a large number of modes. The bearing feedback controller, which could cause some of these modes to become unstable, could be adapted to varying flight conditions to minimize seal clearances and monitor the health of the system. Cobalt steel has a curie point greater than 1700 F, and copper wire has a melting point beyond that. Therefore, practical limitations associated with the maximum magnetic field strength in the cobalt steel and the stress in the rotating components limit the temperature to about 1200 F. The objective of this effort is to determine the limits in temperature and speed of a magnetic bearing operating in an engine. Our approach is to use our in

  14. Laboratory Study Of Magnetic Reconnection With A Density Asymmetry Across The Current Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Joseph; Yamada, Massaaki; Ji, Hantao; Meyers,, Clayton E.; Jara-Almonte,; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18

    The effects of an upstream density asymmetry on magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant upstream density asymmetry of up to 10, the reconnecting magnetic field pro file is not signifi cantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to the quadrupolar structure in the symmetric configuration. The in-plane ion flow pattern and the electrostatic potential pro file are also affected by the density asymmetry. Strong bulk electron heating is observed near the low-density-side separatrix together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations.

  15. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  16. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the critical current in polycrystalline Ba2YCu3O(y)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, H.; Yamasaki, H.; Kimura, Y.; Higashida, Y.; Ishihara, T.

    Temperature and magnetic field dependence on the critical current density Jc of polycrystalline high-Tc oxide superconductor, Ba2YCu3O(y), have been measured. In the low magnetic field range, 0.6 to about 7 kOe, the Jc behavior changed at around 70 K. Below 70 K, Jc showed different temperature dependence between field cooling and zero-field cooling, that is, the Jc value measured when the sample was cooled in a fixed magnetic field, was different from that measured when the sample was cooled in zero magnetic field and then a magnetic field was applied. Above 70 K, however, such different temperature dependence on Jc was not observed. These experimental results can be attributed to the effects of anisotropy. A crossover between the two- and three-dimensional superconductivity is considered to occur.

  17. Magnetic Elements at Finite Temperature and Large Deviation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, R. V.; Reznikoff, M. G.; vanden-Eijnden, E.

    2005-08-01

    We investigate thermally activated phenomena in micromagnetics using large deviation theory and concepts from stochastic resonance. We give a natural mathematical definition of finite-temperature astroids, finite-temperature hysteresis loops, etc. Generically, these objects emerge when the (generalized) Arrhenius timescale governing the thermally activated barrier crossing event of magnetic switching matches the timescale at which the magnetic element is pulsed or ramped by an external field; in the special and physically relevant case of multiple-pulse experiments, on the other hand, short-time switching can lead to non-Arrhenius behavior. We show how large deviation theory can be used to explain some properties of the astroids, like their shrinking and sharpening as the number of applied pulses is increased. We also investigate the influence of the dynamics, in particular the relative importance of the gyromagnetic and the damping terms. Finally, we discuss some issues and open questions regarding spatially nonuniform magnetization.

  18. Low-temperature magnetic anisotropy in micas and chlorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Bender Koch, Christian; Lorenz, Wolfram E A;

    2014-01-01

    of magnetic susceptibility. Because diamagnetic and paramagnetic susceptibility are both linearly dependent on field, separation of the anisotropic contributions requires understanding how the degree of anisotropy of the paramagnetic susceptibility changes as a function of temperature. Note that diamagnetic...... of approximately 6.3-8.7 for individual samples of muscovite, phlogopite and chlorite on cooling from RT to 77 K and between 11.2 and 12.4 for biotite. A decrease in temperature enhances the paramagnetic anisotropy in a mineral. Biotite exhibits a relatively stronger enhancement due to the onset of magnetic......Phyllosilicates, such as micas and chlorite, are common rock-forming minerals and often show preferred orientation in deformed rocks. In combination with single-crystal anisotropy, this leads to anisotropy of physical properties in the rock, such as magnetic susceptibility. In order to effectively...

  19. In-plane magnetic anisotropy and temperature dependence of switching field in (Ga, Mn) as ferromagnetic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, S; Terki, F; Dumas, R; Dehbaoui, M; Sadowski, J; Galéra, R M; Tran, Q-H; Charar, S

    2012-06-01

    We explore the magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor by Planar Hall Effect (PHE) measurements. Using low magnitude of applied magnetic field (i.e., when the magnitude H is smaller than both cubic Hc and uniaxial Hu anisotropy field), we have observed various shapes of applied magnetic field direction dependence of Planar Hall Resistance (PHR). In particular, in two regions of temperature. At T Tc/2, the "square-shape" signal and at T > Tc/2 the "zigzag-shape" signal of PHR. They reflect different magnetic anisotropy and provide information about magnetization reversal process in GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor. The theoretical model calculation of PHR based on the free energy density reproduces well the experimental data. We report also the temperature dependence of anisotropy constants and magnetization orientations. The transition of easy axis from biaxial to uniaxiale axes has been observed and confirmed by SQUID measurements.

  20. Neutron studies of nuclear magnetism at ultralow temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemensmeyer, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Lefmann, K.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic order in copper and silver has been investigated by neutron diffraction. Antiferromagnetic order is observed in these simple, diamagnetic metals at temperatures below 50 nK and 560 pK, respectively. Both crystallize in the FCC-symmetry which is fully frustrated for nearest...

  1. Temperature dependence of magnetocurrent in a magnetic tunnel transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Min, B.C.; Sanderink, J.G.M.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetocurrent (MC) and transfer ratio has been investigated in a magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) with a ferromagnetic (FM) emitter of Co or Ni80Fe20. MTT devices of sizes ranging from 10 to 100 µm in diameter were fabricated using a standard photolithography process a

  2. Temperature Variation of the Magnetic Structure of HoSb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nils Axel; Kjems, Jørgen; Vogt, O.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used to show that the magnetic moment vector in the antiferromagnet HoSb changes direction as a function of temperature below TN=5.7K. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with a recent theoretical prediction by Jensen et al. (1980) which ascribe...

  3. Low temperature magnetic behaviour of glass-covered magnetic microwires with gradient nanocrystalline microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, I. G.; Hernando, A.; Marín, P. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC, P.O. Box 155 las Rozas, Madrid 28230 (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    Slow nanocrystallization driving dynamics can be affected by the combination of two factors: sample residual stresses and sample geometry. This effect is evidenced at the initial stages of nanocrystallization of amorphous CoFeSiBCuNb magnetic microwires. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicate how crystallization at temperatures between 730 and 780 K results in a graded microstructure where the crystallization at the surface skin of the microwire, which remains almost amorphous, differs from that of the middle, where elongated grains are observed, and inner regions. However, samples annealed at higher temperatures present a homogeneous microstructure. The effect of gradient microstructure on magnetic properties has been also analyzed and a loss of bistable magnetic behaviour at low temperatures, from that obtained in the amorphous and fully nanocrystallized sample, has been observed and ascribed to changes in sign of magnetostriction for measuring temperatures below 100 K.

  4. Optimization of Temperatures Heating Melt and Annealing Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsepelev, Vladimir; Starodubtsev, Yuri

    2017-05-01

    Taking into account the concept of the quasi-chemical model of the liquid micro-non-uniform composition and the research made on the physical properties of the Fe-based melts being crystallized, the unique technology of the melt time-temperature treatment has been developed. Amorphous ribbons produced using this technology require optimal annealing temperatures to be specifically selected. Temperature dependences of the kinematic viscosity of a multicomponent Fe72.5Cu1Nb2Mo1.5Si14B9 melt have been studied. A critical temperature is detected above which the activation energy of viscous flow of the melt changes. Upon cooling the overheated melt, the temperature curves of the kinematic viscosity become linear within the given coordinates. In amorphous ribbon produced in the mode with overheating the melt above the critical temperature, the enthalpy of crystallization grows, the following heat treatment results in an increase in magnetic permeability.

  5. Observation of Various and Spontaneous Magnetic Skyrmionic Bubbles at Room Temperature in a Frustrated Kagome Magnet with Uniaxial Magnetic Anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng

    2017-06-07

    The quest for materials hosting topologically protected skyrmionic spin textures continues to be fueled by the promise of novel devices. Although many materials have demonstrated the existence of such spin textures, major challenges remain to be addressed before devices based on magnetic skyrmions can be realized. For example, being able to create and manipulate skyrmionic spin textures at room temperature is of great importance for further technological applications because they can adapt to various external stimuli acting as information carriers in spintronic devices. Here, the first observation of skyrmionic magnetic bubbles with variable topological spin textures formed at room temperature in a frustrated kagome Fe3 Sn2 magnet with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy is reported. The magnetization dynamics are investigated using in situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, revealing that the transformation between different magnetic bubbles and domains is via the motion of Bloch lines driven by an applied external magnetic field. These results demonstrate that Fe3 Sn2 facilitates a unique magnetic control of topological spin textures at room temperature, making it a promising candidate for further skyrmion-based spintronic devices.

  6. Magnetization of a Current-Carrying Superconducting Disk with B-Dependent Critical Current Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mahdi; Babaei-Brojeny, Ali A.

    2010-11-01

    In the frame work of the critical state model (CSM), the magnetic response of a thin type-II superconducting disk that carries a radial transport current and is subjected to an applied magnetic field have been studied. To this end, we have studied the process of the magnetic flux-penetration. For a disk initially containing no magnetic flux but carrying a radial current, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, magnetic flux-penetration occurs in three stages: (1) the magnetic flux gradually penetrates from the edges of the disk until an instability occurs, (2) there is a rapid inflow of magnetic flux into the disk’s central region, which becomes resistive, and (3) magnetic flux continues to enter the disk, while persistent azimuthal currents flow in an outer annular region where the net current density is equal to J c . Also the behavior of a current-carrying disk subjected to an AC magnetic field is calculated. The magnetic flux, the current profiles and the magnetization hysteresis loops are calculated for several commonly used J c ( B) dependences. Finally, the results of the applications of the local field-dependent of the critical current density J c ( B) are compared with those obtained from the Bean model.

  7. Monte Carlo analysis for finite-temperature magnetism of Nd2Fe14B permanent magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Yuta; Matsumoto, Munehisa; Miyashita, Seiji; Akai, Hisazumi; Doi, Shotaro; Miyake, Takashi; Sakuma, Akimasa

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effects of magnetic inhomogeneities and thermal fluctuations on the magnetic properties of a rare-earth intermetallic compound, Nd2Fe14B . The constrained Monte Carlo method is applied to a Nd2Fe14B bulk system to realize the experimentally observed spin reorientation and magnetic anisotropy constants KmA(m =1 ,2 ,4 ) at finite temperatures. Subsequently, it is found that the temperature dependence of K1A deviates from the Callen-Callen law, K1A(T ) ∝M (T) 3 , even above room temperature, TR˜300 K , when the Fe (Nd) anisotropy terms are removed to leave only the Nd (Fe) anisotropy terms. This is because the exchange couplings between Nd moments and Fe spins are much smaller than those between Fe spins. It is also found that the exponent n in the external magnetic field Hext response of barrier height FB=FB0(1-Hext/H0) n is less than 2 in the low-temperature region below TR, whereas n approaches 2 when T >TR , indicating the presence of Stoner-Wohlfarth-type magnetization rotation. This reflects the fact that the magnetic anisotropy is mainly governed by the K1A term in the T >TR region.

  8. Low-Temperature Magnetic Properties of Co Antidot Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qing-Fang; JIANG Chang-Jun; FAN Xiao-Long; WANG Jian-Bo; XUE De-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Cobalt antidot arrays with different thicknesses are fabricated by rf magnetron sputtering onto porous alumina substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction are employed to characterize the morphology and crystal structure of the antidot array, respectively. The temperature dependence of magnetic properties shows that in the temperature range 5K-300K, coercivity and squareness increase firstly, reach their maximum values, then decrease. The anomalous temperature dependences of coercivity and squareness are discussed by considering the pinning effect of the antidot and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  9. Magnetic antiskyrmions above room temperature in tetragonal Heusler materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ajaya K.; Kumar, Vivek; Ma, Tianping; Werner, Peter; Pippel, Eckhard; Sahoo, Roshnee; Damay, Franoise; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically stable, vortex-like objects surrounded by chiral boundaries that separate a region of reversed magnetization from the surrounding magnetized material. They are closely related to nanoscopic chiral magnetic domain walls, which could be used as memory and logic elements for conventional and neuromorphic computing applications that go beyond Moore’s law. Of particular interest is ‘racetrack memory’, which is composed of vertical magnetic nanowires, each accommodating of the order of 100 domain walls, and that shows promise as a solid state, non-volatile memory with exceptional capacity and performance. Its performance is derived from the very high speeds (up to one kilometre per second) at which chiral domain walls can be moved with nanosecond current pulses in synthetic antiferromagnet racetracks. Because skyrmions are essentially composed of a pair of chiral domain walls closed in on themselves, but are, in principle, more stable to perturbations than the component domain walls themselves, they are attractive for use in spintronic applications, notably racetrack memory. Stabilization of skyrmions has generally been achieved in systems with broken inversion symmetry, in which the asymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction modifies the uniform magnetic state to a swirling state. Depending on the crystal symmetry, two distinct types of skyrmions have been observed experimentally, namely, Bloch and Néel skyrmions. Here we present the experimental manifestation of another type of skyrmion—the magnetic antiskyrmion—in acentric tetragonal Heusler compounds with D2d crystal symmetry. Antiskyrmions are characterized by boundary walls that have alternating Bloch and Néel type as one traces around the boundary. A spiral magnetic ground-state, which propagates in the tetragonal basal plane, is transformed into an antiskyrmion lattice state under magnetic fields applied along the tetragonal axis over a wide range of temperatures

  10. Room Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben; Palazzolo, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a three-axis, radial, heteropolar magnetic bearing at room temperature for rotor speeds up to 20,000 RPM are presented in this paper. The bearing, NASA Glenn Research Center's and Texas A&M's third generation high temperature magnetic bearing, was designed to operate in a 1000 F (540 C) environment and was primarily optimized for maximum load capacity. The experimentally measured force produced by one C-core of this bearing was 630 lb. (2.8 kN) at 16 A, while a load of 650 lbs (2.89 kN) was predicted at 16 A using 1D circuit analysis. The maximum predicted radial load for one of the three axes is 1,440 lbs (6.41 kN) at room temperature. The maximum measured load of an axis was 1050 lbs. (4.73 kN). Results of test under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing's load capacity. A single C-core required approximately 70 W of power to generate 300 lb (1.34 kN) of magnetic force. The room temperature data presented was measured after three thermal cycles up to 1000 F (540 C), totaling six hours at elevated temperatures.

  11. Simulations of magnetic hysteresis loops at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J. [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada); Ek, J. van [Western Digital Corporation, San Jose, California 94588 (United States); Mercer, J. I. [Department of Computer Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2014-09-28

    The kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm as well as standard micromagnetics are used to simulate MH loops of high anisotropy magnetic recording media at both short and long time scales over a wide range of temperatures relevant to heat-assisted magnetic recording. Microscopic parameters, common to both methods, were determined by fitting to experimental data on single-layer FePt-based media that uses the Magneto-Optic Kerr effect with a slow sweep rate of 700 Oe/s. Saturation moment, uniaxial anisotropy, and exchange constants are given an intrinsic temperature dependence based on published atomistic simulations of FePt grains with an effective Curie temperature of 680 K. Our results show good agreement between micromagnetics and kinetic Monte Carlo results over a wide range of sweep rates. Loops at the slow experimental sweep rates are found to become more square-shaped, with an increasing slope, as temperature increases from 300 K. These effects also occur at higher sweep rates, typical of recording speeds, but are much less pronounced. These results demonstrate the need for accurate determination of intrinsic thermal properties of future recording media as input to micromagnetic models as well as the sensitivity of the switching behavior of thin magnetic films to applied field sweep rates at higher temperatures.

  12. Low temperature magnetic characterisation of fire ash residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C.; Thompson, R.; Harrison, A.; Church, M. J.

    Fire ash is ideally suited to mineral magnetic studies. Both modern (generated by controlled burning experiments) and archaeological ash deposits have been studied, with the aim of identifying and quantifying fuel types used in prehistory. Low temperature magnetic measurements were carried out on the ash samples using an MPMS 2 SQUID magnetometer. The low temperature thermo-remanence cooling curves of the modern ash display differences between fuel sources. Wood and well-humified peat ash display an increase in remanence with cooling probably related to a high superparamagnetic component, consistent with room temperature frequency dependent susceptibilities of over 7%. In comparison fibrous-upper peat and peat turf display an unusual decrease in remanence, possibly due to an isotropic point of grains larger than superparamagnetic in size. The differences have been successfully utilised in unmixing calculations to quantify fuel components within four archaeological deposits from the Northern and Western Isles of Scotland.

  13. Effects of beam velocity and density on an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhao, Yong-tao; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The wakefield and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas are investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The effects of beam velocity and density on the wake and stopping power are discussed. In the presence of magnetic field, it is found that beside the longitudinal conversed V-shaped wakes, the strong whistler wave are observed when low-density and low-velocity pulses moving in plasmas. The corresponding stopping powers are enhanced due to the drag of these whistler waves. As beam velocities increase, the whistler waves disappear, and only are conversed V-shape wakes observed. The corresponding stopping powers are reduced compared with these in isotropic plasmas. When high-density pulses transport in the magnetized plasmas, the whistler waves are greatly inhibited for low-velocity pulses and disappear for high-velocity pulses. Additionally, the magnetic field reduces the stopping powers for all high-density cases.

  14. Measurement of solar wind electron density and temperature in the shocked region of Venus and the density and temperature of photoelectrons within the ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, William C.; Jones, Douglas E.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Knadler, Charles E.

    2016-08-01

    Presented herein are measurements of the solar wind electron number density and temperature near and within the bow shock of Venus. The measurements were made by the Pioneer Venus mission Orbiter Retarding Potential Analyzer operating in its suprathermal electron mode. The measurements are essentially point measurements. The spacecraft travels approximately 0.8 km during the 0.1 s time interval required to record a single I-V curve. The dual measurement of a density and temperature is obtained from one sweep by least squares fitting a mathematical Maxwellian expression to the I-V curve. The distance between successive measurements is approximately 100 km. In many orbits, when the spacecraft is crossing or traveling within the bow shock, the derived densities and temperatures (high density, high temperature (HDHT)) are large, densities of the order of 100 cm-3 and temperatures of the order of several hundred eV. We interpret these HDHT measurements as measurements in regions where the large, directed kinetic energy of the solar wind ions is being degraded into randomized, more thermal-like energy distributions of the electrons and ions through wave-particle interactions. The HDHT values define the electron energy distribution in the limited energy interval 0 to 50 eV. We assume that the underlying electron flux distributions are flat topped like those measured in the Earth's bow shock. We also report densities and temperatures of EUV produced photoelectron energy distributions measured within the ionosphere.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation for baryon-quark phase transition at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Akimura, Y; Yoshinaga, N; Chiba, S; Akimura, Yuka; Maruyama, Toshiki; Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Chiba, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    We study the baryon-quark phase transition in a molecular dynamics (MD) of quark degrees of freedom at finite temperature and density. The baryon state at low density and temperature, and the deconfined quark state at high density and temperature are reproduced. We investigate the equations of state of matters with different $u$-$d$-$s$ compositions. Then we draw phase diagrams in the temperature-density plane by this simulation. It is found that the baryon-quark transition is sensitive to the quark width.

  16. Effects of temperature and Nickel content on magnetic properties of Ni-doped ZnO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Lingling; JEUNG Won Young

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic properties of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs), Ni-doped ZnO materials, prepared by sol-gel method were investigated by measuring magnetization as functions of magnetic field.The Ni content affects the magnetic properties at low sintered temperature but it has few effects on the magnetic properties at high sintered temperature.The sintered temperature has great effects on the magnetic properties of Ni/ZnO at high original mole ratio of Ni/Zn while it has slight effects on the magnetic properties of Ni/ZnO at low original mole ratio of Ni/Zn whatever low or high sintered temperature.

  17. Generation of localized magnetic moments in the charge-density-wave state

    OpenAIRE

    Akzyanov, R. S.; Rozhkov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a mechanism explaining the generation of localized magnetic moments in charge-density-wave compounds. Our model Hamiltonian describes an Anderson impurity placed in a host material exhibiting the charge-density wave. There is a region of the model's parameter space, where even weak Coulomb repulsion on the impurity site is able to localize the magnetic moment on the impurity. The phase diagram of a single impurity at T=0 is mapped. To establish the connection with experiment thermo...

  18. Temperature-dependent magnetic EXAFS investigation of Gd

    CERN Document Server

    Wende, H; Poulopoulos, P N; Rogalev, A; Goulon, J; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Baberschke, K

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic EXAFS (MEXAFS) is the helicity-dependent counterpart of the well-established EXAFS technique. By means of MEXAFS it is possible not only to analyze the local magnetic structure but also to learn about magnetic fluctuations. Here we present the MEXAFS of a Gd single crystal at the L sub 3 sub , sub 2 -edges in the temperature range of 10-250 K. For the first time MEXAFS was probed over a large range in reduced temperature of 0.04<=T/T sub C<=0.85 with T sub C =293 K. We show that the vibrational damping described by means of a Debye temperature of theta sub D =160 K must be taken into account for the spin-dependent MEXAFS before analyzing magnetic fluctuations. For a detailed analysis of the MEXAFS and the EXAFS, the experimental data are compared to ab initio calculations. This enables us to separate the individual single- from the multiple-scattering contributions. The MEXAFS data have been recorded at the ID 12A beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To ensure that th...

  19. Determination of magnetic characteristics of nanoparticles by low-temperature calorimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugulava, A.; Toklikishvili, Z. [Department of Physics, I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University,I.Chavchavadze av. 3, 0179 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Chkhaidze, S., E-mail: simon.chkhaidze@tsu.ge [Department of Physics, I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University,I.Chavchavadze av. 3, 0179 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Kekutia, Sh. [V. Chavchanidze Institute of Cybernetics, at the Technical State University, S. Euli str. 5, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

    2017-05-15

    At low temperatures, the heat capacity of a superparamagnetic “ideal gas” determined by magnetic degrees of freedom can greatly exceed the lattice heat capacity. It is shown that in the presence of an external magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the magnetic part of the heat capacity has two maxima. The relations between the temperature at which these maxima are achieved, the magnetic moment of the nanoparticles and the magnetic anisotropy constant have been obtained. Measuring the heat capacity maxima temperatures by low-temperature calorimetry methods and using the obtained relations, we can obtain the numerical values both of the magnetic moment of nanoparticles and the magnetic anisotropy constants.

  20. Electronic and magnetic properties of spiral spin-density-wave states in transition-metal chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, M.; Ruiz-Díaz, P.; Pastor, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of one-dimensional (1D) 3 d transition-metal nanowires are investigated in the framework of density functional theory. The relative stability of collinear and noncollinear (NC) ground-state magnetic orders in V, Mn, and Fe monoatomic chains is quantified by computing the frozen-magnon dispersion relation Δ E (q ⃗) as a function of the spin-density-wave vector q ⃗. The dependence on the local environment of the atoms is analyzed by varying systematically the lattice parameter a of the chains. Electron correlation effects are explored by comparing local spin-density and generalized-gradient approximations to the exchange and correlation functional. Results are given for Δ E (q ⃗) , the local magnetic moments μ⃗i at atom i , the magnetization-vector density m ⃗(r ⃗) , and the local electronic density of states ρi σ(ɛ ) . The frozen-magnon dispersion relations are analyzed from a local perspective. Effective exchange interactions Ji j between the local magnetic moments μ⃗i and μ⃗j are derived by fitting the ab initio Δ E (q ⃗) to a classical 1D Heisenberg model. The dominant competing interactions Ji j at the origin of the NC magnetic order are identified. The interplay between the various Ji j is revealed as a function of a in the framework of the corresponding magnetic phase diagrams.

  1. Temperature Profile of Black Hole Accretion Disc with Magnetic Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Wei-Hua; WANG Ding-Xiong; XIAO Kan

    2002-01-01

    Two new mapping relations between the angular coordinate on the black hole (BH) horizon and radialcoordinate on the disc are given according to the requirement of general relativity and Maxwell's equations, and theeffects of magnetic coupling (MC) on temperature of accretion disc are investigated by comparing with pure accretion.It is shown that the MC effects on the temperature profile are related intimately to the BH spin, and the influenceon the peak value of disc temperature based on the modified mapping relations is not as great as that based on thelinear mapping.The peak value and the corresponding radius of peak value ring of disc temperature do not increasemonotonically as the increasing spin of BH, each containing a maximum for the fast-spinning BH. The value ranges ofthe bolometric luminosity and color temperature of the disc are both extended by the MC effects.

  2. Low temperature magnetic properties of DyPdBi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Chowki, S.; Mohapatra, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report the results of dc magnetization measurements in the ternary half -Heuslar alloy, DyPdBi which crystallizes in a non centrosymmetric MgAgAs type fcc structure. DyPdBi undergoes a long range antiferromagnetic type ordering below 4.0 K as inferred from the temperature dependence of dc magnetic susceptibility. Another noteworthy observation is the field induced metamagnetic transition below TN, further suggestes that the order-order field induced transition as a first order phase transition.

  3. Low temperature Mössbauer studies on magnetic nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K A Malini; M R Anantharaman; Ajay Gupta

    2004-08-01

    Nanocomposites with magnetic components possessing nanometric dimensions, lying in the range 1–10 nm, are found to be exhibiting superior physical properties with respect to their coarser sized counterparts. Magnetic nanocomposites based on gamma iron oxide embedded in a polymer matrix have been prepared and characterized. The behaviour of these samples at low temperatures have been studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy. Mössbauer studies indicate that the composites consist of very fine particles of -Fe2O3 of which some amount exists in the superparamagnetic phase. The cycling of the preparative conditions were found to increase the amount of -Fe2O3 in the matrix.

  4. The Behavior Of Asymmetric Frontal Couplings With Permanent Magnets In Magnetic Powder And High Temperature Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion DOBROTA

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is the comparative analysis of the behavior of frontal couplings with Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets in difficult environments, specific to metallurgy – such as environments with magnetic powders and high temperature – in two constructive variants: symmetric couplings and asymmetric couplings (with divided poles. The results show the superior performance of asymmetric couplings under the given conditions

  5. Fermion Density Induced Instability of the W-Boson Pair Condensate in Strong Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Poppitz, E R

    1993-01-01

    The electroweak vacuum structure in an external magnetic field close to the lower critical value is considered at finite fermion density. It is shown that the leading effect of the fermions is to reduce the symmetry of the W-pair condensate in the direction of the magnetic field. The energy is minimized by the appearance of a helicoidal structure of the condensate along the magnetic field.

  6. High frequency, high temperature specific core loss and dynamic B-H hysteresis loop characteristics of soft magnetic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop characteristics of Supermalloy and Metglas 2605SC over the frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The experimental setup used to conduct the investigation is described. The effects of the maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined.

  7. Charged impurity scattering limited low temperature resistivity of low density silicon inversion layers

    OpenAIRE

    Sarma, S. Das; Hwang, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    We calculate within the Boltzmann equation approach the charged impurity scattering limited low temperature electronic resistivity of low density $n$-type inversion layers in Si MOSFET structures. We find a rather sharp quantum to classical crossover in the transport behavior in the $0 - 5$K temperature range, with the low density, low temperature mobility showing a strikingly strong non-monotonic temperature dependence, which may qualitatively explain the recently observed anomalously strong...

  8. Temperature Dependence of Magnetization at Zero Applied Magnetic Field in Nearly Two Dimensional Ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Chomsin S.; Fujii, Muneaki

    2012-12-01

    NMR measurement have been made at low temperatures on the crystal structure of K2CuF4 and (C3H7NH3)2CuCl4 at zero applied magnetic field. 63Cu, 65Cu and 35Cl NMR have been used to measure spontaneous magnetization at the temperature range 2 K down to 30 mK. We have made the NMR experiments using a 3He-4He dilution refrigerator by conventional pulsed NMR method without external magnetic field. The magnetization at zero applied magnetic field in the nearly two-dimensional ferromagnet K2CuF4 of the experimental data is in a good agreement with Yamaji-Kondo theory and θc = 0.3, which is applied the double-time Green's function method incorporated with Tyablikov's decoupling. For temperature 1.1 K down to 0.26 K, the spontaneous magnetization of (C3H7NH3)2CuCl4 is support (t log t')-formalism from the spin wave theory.

  9. The correlation between superparamagnetic blocking temperatures and peak temperatures obtained from ac magnetization measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel Esmarch; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Mørup, Steen

    2008-01-01

    We study the correlation between the superparamagnetic blocking temperature TB and the peak positions Tp observed in ac magnetization measurements for nanoparticles of different classes of magnetic materials. In general, Tp=α+βTB . The parameters α and β are different for the in-phase (χ') and out......-of-phase (χ") components and depend on the width σv of the log-normal volume distribution and the class of magnetic material (ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic). Consequently, knowledge of both α and β is required if the anisotropy energy barrier KV and the attempt time To are to be reliably obtained from...

  10. Field and temperature scaling of the critical current density in commercial REBCO coated conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Senatore, Carmine; Bonura, Marco; Kulich, Miloslav; Mondonico, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Scaling relations describing the electromagnetic behaviour of coated conductors (CCs) greatly simplify the design of REBCO-based devices. The performance of REBCO CCs is strongly influenced by fabrication route, conductor architecture and materials, and these parameters vary from one manufacturer to the others. In the present work we have examined the critical surface for the current density, Jc(T,B,θ ), of coated conductors from six different manufacturers: American Superconductor Co. (US), Bruker HTS GmbH (Germany), Fujikura Ltd. (Japan), SuNAM Co. Ltd. (Korea), SuperOx ZAO (Russia) and SuperPower Inc. (US). Electrical transport and magnetic measurements were performed at temperatures between 4.2 K and 77 K and in magnetic field up to 19 T. Experiments were conducted at three different orientations of the field with respect to the crystallographic c-axis of the REBCO layer, θ = 0deg , 45deg and 90deg , in order to probe the angular anisotropy of Jc. In spite of the large variability of CCs performance, ...

  11. Nucleons and isobars at finite density ({rho}) and temperature (T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenni, R. [Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Genova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Genoa (Italy); Dey, J. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Maulana Azad Coll., Calcutta (India); Dey, M. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Calcutta 700 073 (India)

    2001-09-01

    The importance of studying matter at high {rho} increases as more astrophysical data becomes available from recently launched spacecrafts. The importance of high-T studies derives from heavy-ion data. In this paper we set up a formalism to study the nucleons and isobars with long- and short-range potentials non-pertubatively, bosonizing and expanding semi-classically the Feyman integrals up to one loop. We address the low-density, finite-T problem first, the case relevant to heavy-ion collisions, hoping to address the high-density case later. Interactions change the nucleon and isobar numbers at different {rho} and T non-trivially. (orig.)

  12. Nucleons and Isobars at finite density ($\\rho$) and temperature (T)

    CERN Document Server

    Cenni, R; Dey, M; Cenni, Rinaldo; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2001-01-01

    The importance of studying matter at high $\\rho$ increases as more astrophysical data becomes available from recently launched spacecrafts. The importance of high T studies derives from heavy ion data. In this paper we set up a formalism to study the nucleons and isobars with long and short range potentials non-pertubatively, bosonizing and expanding semi-classically the Feyman integrals up to one loop. We address the low density, finite T problem=A0 first, the case relevant to heavy ion collisions, hoping to adresss the high density case later. Interactions change the nucleon and isobar numbers at different $\\rho$ and T non-trivially.

  13. Tilted Magnetic Levitation Enables Measurement of the Complete Range of Densities of Materials with Low Magnetic Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Soh, Siowling; Kwok, Sen Wai; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-02-03

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) of diamagnetic or weakly paramagnetic materials suspended in a paramagnetic solution in a magnetic field gradient provides a simple method to measure the density of small samples of solids or liquids. One major limitation of this method, thus far, has been an inability to measure or manipulate materials outside of a narrow range of densities (0.8 g/cm(3) levitated magnetically. Tilting the MagLev device relative to the gravitational vector enables the magnetic force to be decreased (relative to the magnetic force) along the axis of measurement. This approach enables many practical measurements over the entire range of densities observed in matter at ambient conditions-from air bubbles (ρ ≈ 0) to osmium and iridium (ρ ≈ 23 g/cm(3)). The ability to levitate, simultaneously, objects with a broad range of different densities provides an operationally simple method that may find application to forensic science (e.g., for identifying the composition of miscellaneous objects or powders), industrial manufacturing (e.g., for quality control of parts), or resource-limited settings (e.g., for identifying and separating small particles of metals and alloys).

  14. Unconventional Temperature Enhanced Magnetism in Fe1.1Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaliznyak, Igor A.; Xu, Zhijun; Tranquada, John M.; Gu, Genda; Tsvelik, Alexei M.; Stone, Matthew B.

    2011-11-01

    Our inelastic neutron scattering study of spin excitations in iron telluride reveals remarkable thermal evolution of the collective magnetism. In the temperature range relevant for the superconductivity in FeTe1-xSex materials, where the local-moment behavior is dominated by liquidlike correlations of emergent spin plaquettes, we observe unusual, marked increase of magnetic fluctuations upon heating. The effective spin per Fe at T≈10K, in the phase with weak antiferromagnetic order, corresponds to S≈1, consistent with the recent analyses that emphasize importance of Hund’s coupling [K. Haule and G. Kotliar, New J. Phys. 11, 025021 (2009).NJOPFM1367-263010.1088/1367-2630/11/2/025021]. However, it grows to S≈3/2 in the high-T disordered phase, suggestive of the Kondo-type behavior, where local magnetic moments are entangled with the itinerant electrons.

  15. Superconductors with low critical temperature for electro-magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Devred, Arnaud

    2002-01-01

    Among the superconductors with low critical temperature that are used to build magnets, NbTi has reached a development state that allows a massive production for big equipment of physics and an industrial production in the domain of medicine imaging. The material that might challenge the supremacy of NbTi is Nb sub 3 Sn but some technical difficulties have yet to be overcome. This report begins with a review of the different industrial processes used to produce superconducting wires based on the NbTi and Nb sub 3 Sn materials. The transition from the superconducting state to the resistive normal state is described for both materials, the magnetizing of multi-wire superconducting cables is also presented. The details the different patterns of wires in cables and proposes a formulary that allows the determination, in some simple cases,of energy losses that are generated in a superconducting cable by a variable magnetic field. (A.C.)

  16. Interpretation of low-temperature data part 4: The low-temperature magnetic transition of monoclinic pyrrhotite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochette, P.; Fillion, G.; Dekkers, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Use of low temperature (LT) magnetic transitions to identify magnetic minerals that carry a remanence – either natural or laboratory-induced – at room temperature, is a classic tool in rock magnetism (e.g. Nagata et al., 1964; Kosterov, 2007). This particularly applies to magnetite (Verwey transitio

  17. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultra-thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, A

    1999-01-01

    shown that in contrast to other works the temperature driven spin reorientation transition in the monolayer is discontinuous also in the simulations, whereas in general it is continuous for the bilayer. Consequently the molecular field theory and the Monte Carlo simulations agree qualitatively. Exemplary for thicker films the influence of an external magnetic field is investigated in the bilayer, furthermore the effective anisotropies K sub n (T) of the phenomenological Landau theory are calculated numerically for the microscopic model. Analytic expressions for the dependence of the anisotropies K sub n (T) on the parameters of the model are obtained by the means of perturbation theory, which lead to a deeper understanding of the spin reorientation transition. Accordingly to this the origin for the spin reorientation transition lies in the differing temperature dependence of the dipolar and spin-orbit parts of the K sub n (T). Additionally the magnetization in the surface of the film decreases more rapidly wi...

  18. Viscosity and density of methanol/water mixtures at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J. G.; Kurata, F.; Swift, G. W.

    1968-01-01

    Viscosity and density are measured at low temperatures for three methanol/water mixtures. Viscosity is determined by a modified falling cylinder method or a calibrated viscometer. Density is determined by the volume of each mixture contained in a calibrated glass cell placed in a constant-temperature bath.

  19. High accuracy magnetic field sensors with wide operation temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'evskii, I. S.; Vinichenko, A. N.; Rubakin, D. I.; Bolshakova, I. A.; Kargin, N. I.

    2016-10-01

    n+InAs(Si) epitaxial thin films heavily doped by silicon and Hall effect magnetic field sensors based on this structures have been fabricated and studied. We have demonstrated the successful formation of highly doped InAs thin films (∼100 nm) with the different intermediate layer arrangement and appropriate electron mobility values. Hall sensors performance parameters have been measured in wide temperature range. Obtained sensitivity varied from 1 to 40 Ω/T, while the best linearity and lower temperature coefficient have been found in the higher doped samples with lower electron mobility. We attribute this to the electron system degeneracy and decreased phonon contribution to electron mobility and resistance.

  20. A Multiple Z-Pinch Configuration for the Generation of High-Density, Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, Alfonso G.

    2015-11-01

    The z-pinch is arguably the most straightforward and economical approach for the generation and confinement of hot plasmas, with a long history of theoretical investigations and experimental developments. While most of the past studies were focused on countering the natural tendency of z-pinches to develop instabilities, this study attempts to take advantage of those unstable regimes to form a quasi-stable plasma, with higher density and temperature, possibly of interest for a fusion reactor concept. For this purpose, a configuration with four z-pinch discharges, with axis parallel to each other and symmetrically positioned, is considered. Electrodes for the generation of the discharges and magnetic coils are arranged to favor the formation of concave discharge patterns. The mutual attraction from the co-streaming discharge currents enhances this pattern, leading to bent plasma streams, all nearing towards the axis. This configuration is intended to excite and sustain a ``kink'' unstable mode for each z-pinch, eventually producing either plasmoid structures, detached from each discharge, or sustained kink patterns: both these cases appear to lead to plasmas merging in the central region. The feasibility of this approach in creating a higher density, hotter, meta-stable plasma regime is investigated computationally, addressing both the kink excitation phase and the dynamics of the converging plasma columns.

  1. Magnetic flux density reconstruction using interleaved partial Fourier acquisitions in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Myung; Nam, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Oh In

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been introduced as a non-invasive modality to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density of an electrically conductive object by the injection of current. In order to measure a magnetic flux density signal in MREIT, the phase difference approach in an interleaved encoding scheme cancels the systematic artifacts accumulated in phase signals and also reduces the random noise effect. However, it is important to reduce scan duration maintaining spatial resolution and sufficient contrast, in order to allow for practical in vivo implementation of MREIT. The purpose of this paper is to develop a coupled partial Fourier strategy in the interleaved sampling in order to reduce the total imaging time for an MREIT acquisition, whilst maintaining an SNR of the measured magnetic flux density comparable to what is achieved with complete k-space data. The proposed method uses two key steps: one is to update the magnetic flux density by updating the complex densities using the partially interleaved k-space data and the other is to fill in the missing k-space data iteratively using the updated background field inhomogeneity and magnetic flux density data. Results from numerical simulations and animal experiments demonstrate that the proposed method reduces considerably the scanning time and provides resolution of the recovered B(z) comparable to what is obtained from complete k-space data.

  2. A proposed magnetic digital temperature transducer, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, T. E.; Tchernev, D. I.; Hartwig, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the feasibility of using the discontinuous permeability versus temperature characteristics of some magnetic materials for a digital temperature transducer and a thermally controlled ON-OFF switch. Simple logic converts the number of output pulse to a digital word recognizable by the system. Efforts have been concentrated on materials with Curie temperatures between 0 and 100 C. One compound has the composition Mn(5-x)Fe(x)Ge3 where the amount of iron determines the transition temperature. The other compound is Ni-Zn ferrite and has the compositon Ni(1-x)Zn(x)Fe(1.95)O4 where the nickel: zinc ratio determines the transition temperature. A detailed report of materials prepared is presented. Toroidal inductors of the material have been constructed and the change in inductance with temperature measured. In view of these initial measurements, it is felt that a transducer utilizing the permeability versus temperature characteristics of these materials has promise as a reliable and sensitive solid state digital temperature transducer.

  3. Enhanced Energy Density in Permanent Magnets using Controlled High Magnetic Field during Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Orlando [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carter, Bill [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Constantinides, Steve [Arnold Magnetic Technologies, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This ORNL Manufacturing Demonstraction Facility (MDF) technical collaboration focused on the use of high magnetic field processing (>2Tesla) using energy efficient large bore superconducting magnet technology and high frequency electromagnetics to improve magnet performance and reduce the energy budget associated with Alnico thermal processing. Alnico, alloys containing Al, Ni, Co and Fe, represent a class of functional nanostructured alloys, and show the greatest potential for supplementing or replacing commercial Nd-based rare-earth alloy magnets.

  4. The inhomogeneous ion temperature anisotropy instabilities of magnetic-field-aligned plasma sheared flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-11-01

    The stability of the magnetic field aligned sheared flow with anisotropic ion temperatures, which have the anisotropic spatial inhomogeneities across the magnetic field and are comparable with or are above the electron temperature, is investigated numerically and analytically. The ion temperatures gradients across the magnetic field affect the instability development only when the inhomogeneous is the ion temperature along the magnetic field irrespective the inhomogeneity of the ion temperature across the magnetic field. In this case, the instability is developed due to the combined effect of the ion Landau damping, velocity shear, ion temperature anisotropy, and anisotropy of the ion temperature gradients. In the case when the ion temperature along the magnetic field is homogeneous, but the ion temperature across the magnetic field is inhomogeneous, the short wavelength instability develops with the wave length less than the thermal ion Larmor radius. This instability excites due to the coupled effect of the ion Landau damping, velocity shear and ion temperature anisotropy.

  5. Three-Dimensional Charge Density Wave Order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W.; Islam, Z.; Lee, W. -S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J. -S.

    2015-11-20

    Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsets around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate inplane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and hightemperature superconductivity are intimately linked.

  6. Dst prediction for a period of high-density plasmas in magnetic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, H.; Sakurai, T.

    We examine geomagnetic effects for high-density plasmas in magnetic clouds and their relationship to solar sources. It is well known that Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field plays an important role for estimation of Dst from solar wind parameters (Burton et al.1975). However, magnetic clouds frequently carry high-density plasmas, which are interpreted as the remnants of filament. In order to clarify their geomagnetic effects, we try to estimate Dst by adopting different methods introducing effects of solar wind parameters. In our estimation the most important point is laid on the sense of Dst variation rather than its magnitude. The most suitable estimation is obtained by setting up a threshold for plasma density, in which for a case of plasma density greater than 20 /cc the Fenrich and Luhmann (1998)'s formula should be used, while in the other cases the Burton's formula are adopted. In both estimations the O'Brien and McPherron (2000)'s ring current decay time is employed. Furthermore, we examine the solar origin corresponding to the magnetic clouds and then compared characteristic signatures of the magnetic cloud with those observed on the solar surface. As a result, we confirm that the magnetic structure of interplanetary flux rope is in good agreement with the structures of the magnetic neutral line near disappearing filaments and heliospheric current sheet (HCS). On the basis of these studies, we suggest that for the geomagnetic disturbance forecast, the effect of high-density plasmas carried with magnetic clouds should be taken into account of as well as that of interplanetary magnetic field.

  7. Temperature dependent spin and orbital magnetization in TbCo{sub 2}: Magnetic Compton scattering and first-principles investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 (India); Mund, H.S. [Department of Physics, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 (India); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, Manipal University Jaipur, Jaipur 303007 (India); Dashora, Alpa [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagri, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400098 (India); Halder, Madhumita; Yusuf, S.M. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Presented temperature dependent spin momentum densities in TbCo{sub 2}. • Explored spin and orbital magnetic moments at different sites. • Contribution of local and itinerant moments in TbCo{sub 2} is explained. • First-principles calculations are performed to supplement the experiment. - Abstract: Spin-polarized Compton profiles of TbCo{sub 2} have been measured to elucidate the interesting behavior of spin and orbital moments at different temperatures. The magnetic Compton profiles (MCPs) have been analyzed in terms of site specific spin moments due to Tb-4f electrons, Co and itinerant electrons. The temperature dependence of the orbital moment has been deduced using Compton and magnetometry data ranging between 6 and 300 K. The present data exhibit a decrease in the ratio of orbital to spin moments from 43.9% to 35.0% (while going from 6 to 300 K). First-principles calculations within DFT + U scheme have also been performed to confirm the spin-, orbital- and site specific-magnetic moments in TbCo{sub 2}. An antiparallel exchange coupling between the Tb-4f and Co spin moments is found. The orbital moment is found to have a parallel coupling with the Tb spin moment, as evident from the experimental MCPs. From first-principles data it is seen that the orbital moments of Tb and Co sites are antiparallel to each other, as in the case of their spin magnetic moments. The present experimental study also shows an existence of an itinerant moment which is coupled ferromagnetically with the Tb-4f spin moment.

  8. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  9. Low-Temperature Magnetic Force Microscopy on Single Molecule Magnet-Based Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serri, Michele; Mannini, Matteo; Poggini, Lorenzo; Vélez-Fort, Emilio; Cortigiani, Brunetto; Sainctavit, Philippe; Rovai, Donella; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2017-03-08

    The magnetic properties of some single molecule magnets (SMM) on surfaces can be strongly modified by the molecular packing in nanometric films/aggregates or by interactions with the substrate, which affect the molecular orientation and geometry. Detailed investigations of the magnetism of thin SMM films and nanostructures are necessary for the development of spin-based molecular devices, however this task is challenged by the limited sensitivity of laboratory-based magnetometric techniques and often requires access to synchrotron light sources to perform surface sensitive X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) investigations. Here we show that low-temperature magnetic force microscopy is an alternative powerful laboratory tool able to extract the field dependence of the magnetization and to identify areas of in-plane and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in microarrays of the SMM terbium(III) bis-phthalocyaninato (TbPc2) neutral complex grown as nanosized films on SiO2 and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), and this is in agreement with data extracted from nonlocal XMCD measurements performed on homogeneous TbPc2/PTCDA films.

  10. Nucleons and Isobars at finite density ($\\rho$) and temperature (T)

    OpenAIRE

    Cenni, Rinaldo; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2001-01-01

    The importance of studying matter at high $\\rho$ increases as more astrophysical data becomes available from recently launched spacecrafts. The importance of high T studies derives from heavy ion data. In this paper we set up a formalism to study the nucleons and isobars with long and short range potentials non-pertubatively, bosonizing and expanding semi-classically the Feyman integrals up to one loop. We address the low density, finite T problem=A0 first, the case relevant to heavy ion coll...

  11. Magnetic structure at low temperatures in FeGe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, P. D., E-mail: pdbabu@csr.res.in [UGC-DAE-Consortium for Scientific Research, Mumbai Centre, BARC, Mumbai-400085 (India); Mishra, P. K.; Dube, V.; Ravikumar, G. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Mishra, R. [Chemistry, Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Sastry, P. U. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Magnetic phase of FeGe{sub 2} intermetallic is studied using low-temperature neutron diffraction and DC magnetization. Zero-magnetic-field neutron scattering data shows the presence of an antiferromagnetic phase in the low temperature range. We find the evidence of the presence of a ferromagnetic order overriding on the predominantly antiferromagnetic phase at low temperatures.

  12. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G; Agliata, A; Barnak, D; Brent, G; Chang, P-Y; Folnsbee, L; Gates, G; Hasset, D; Lonobile, D; Magoon, J; Mastrosimone, D; Shoup, M J; Betti, R

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  13. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  14. Effect of Sintering Temperature to Physical, Magnetic Properties and Crystal Structure on Permanent Magnet BaFe12O19 Prepared From Mill Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan; Muljadi; Sardjono, Priyo; Gulo, Fakhili; Setiabudidaya, Dedi

    2017-07-01

    Permanent magnet of Barium hexa Ferrite with formula BaFe12O19 has been made by metallurgy powder method from raw materials : Barium carbonate (BaCO3 E-merck) and Iron Oxide (Fe2O3 from mill scale). Both of raw materials have been mixed with stoichiometry composition by using a ball mill for 24 hours. The fine powder obtained from milling process was formed by using a hydraulic press at pressure 50 MPa and continued with sintering process. The sintering temperature was varied : 1150°C, 1200°C, 1250°C and 1300°C with holding time for 1 hour. The sintered samples were characterized such as : physical properties (bulk density, porosity and shrinkage), magnetic properties (flux density, remanence, coercivity and magnetic saturation) by using VSM and crystal structure by using XRD. According characterization results show that the crystal structure of BaFe12O19 does not change after sintering process, but the grain size tends to increase. The optimum condition is achieved at temperature 1250°C, and at this condition, the sample has characterization such as : bulk density = 4.35 g/cm3, porosity = 1.03% and firing shrinkage = 11.63%, flux density = 681.1 Gauss, remanence (σr) = 20.78 emu/g, coercivity (Hc) = 2058 Oe and magnetic saturation (σs) 45.16 emu/g.

  15. High Density Planar High Temperature Superconducting Josephson Junctions Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    TIT,) 3 dependance . At lower temperatures it follows a (1 - T/T,)2 depen- dance ........ ................................... 57 4.7 Shapiro steps in...70 4.23 Dependance of the critical current for a ten junction array on mi- crowave power ..................................... 71 4.24 Resistance vs...GHz microwave radiation. (b) Microwave power dependance of the critical current and 1st-order Shapiro step. 76 5.2 (a) Single junction critical current

  16. Chemical sputtering of graphite by low temperature nitrogen plasmas at various substrate temperatures and ion flux densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Tanyeli, I.; De Temmerman, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of chemical sputtering yields of graphite exposed to low temperature nitrogen plasmas. The influence of surface temperature and incoming ion energy on the sputtering yields has been investigated in two distinct ion flux density regimes. Sputtering yields grow consistently with

  17. Temperature dependence of Hall electron density of GaN-based heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Feng; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Hao Yue

    2004-01-01

    The theoretic calculation and analysis of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density of a sample AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has been carried out in the temperature range from 77 to 300K. The densities of the twodimensional electron gas and the bulk electrons are solved by self-consistent calculation of one-dimensional Schrodinger and Poisson equations at different temperatures, which allow for the variation of energy gap and structure strain, and are used for evaluation of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density. The calculated Hall electron density agrees with the measured one quite well with the appropriate bulk mobility data. Analysis revealed that for the temper ature range considered, even in the heterostructures with a small bulk conductance the factors that determine the Hall mobility and electron density could be of different sources, and not just the two-dimensional electron gas as generally supposed.

  18. Sensing magnetic flux density of artificial neurons with a MEMS device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jesus A; Herrera-May, Agustin L; García-Ramírez, Pedro J; Martinez-Castillo, Jaime; Figueras, Eduard; Flores, Amira; Manjarrez, Elías

    2011-04-01

    We describe a simple procedure to characterize a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, which exploits the Lorentz force principle. This sensor is designed to detect, in future applications, the spiking activity of neurons or muscle cells. This procedure is based on the well-known capability that a magnetic MEMS device can be used to sense a small magnetic flux density. In this work, an electronic neuron (FitzHugh-Nagumo) is used to generate controlled spike-like magnetic fields. We show that the magnetic flux density generated by the hardware of this neuron can be detected with a new MEMS magnetic field sensor. This microdevice has a compact resonant structure (700 × 600 × 5 μm) integrated by an array of silicon beams and p-type piezoresistive sensing elements, which need an easy fabrication process. The proposed microsensor has a resolution of 80 nT, a sensitivity of 1.2 V.T(-1), a resonant frequency of 13.87 kHz, low power consumption (2.05 mW), quality factor of 93 at atmospheric pressure, and requires a simple signal processing circuit. The importance of our study is twofold. First, because the artificial neuron can generate well-controlled magnetic flux density, we suggest it could be used to analyze the resolution and performance of different magnetic field sensors intended for neurobiological applications. Second, the introduced MEMS magnetic field sensor may be used as a prototype to develop new high-resolution biomedical microdevices to sense magnetic fields from cardiac tissue, nerves, spinal cord, or the brain.

  19. Commissioning and modification of the low temperature scanning polarization microscope (TTSPM) and imaging of the local magnetic flux density distribution in superconducting niobium samples; Inbetriebnahme und Modifikation eines Tieftemperatur-Raster-Polarisations-Mikroskops (TTRPM) und Abbildung der lokalen Flussdichteverteilung in supraleitenden Niob-Proben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenzweig, Matthias Sebastian Peter

    2014-07-11

    The dissertation is separated into two different parts, which will be presented in the following. Part I of the dissertation is about the commissioning and the modification of the ''low-temperature scanning polarization microscope'' which was designed in a previous dissertation of Stefan Guenon [1]. A scanning polarization microscope has certain advantages compared to conventional polarization microscopes. With a scanning polarization microscope it is easily possible to achieve a high illumination intensity, which is important to realize a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the confocal design of the scanning polarization microscope improves the resolution of the microscope by a factor of 1.4. Normally, it is not necessary to post-process the images by means of differential frame method to eliminate the contrast of non-magnetic origin. In contrast to conventional polarization microscopes the low-temperature scanning polarization microscope is able to image electronic transport properties via beam-induced voltage variation in addition to the magneto-optical effects. In this dissertation, it was possible to demonstrate the performance capability of the scanning polarization microscope at room temperature as well as at low temperatures. The investigation of the polar Kerr-effect has been carried out with a BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}-test sample whereas the measurements of the longitudinal Kerr-effect have been carried out with an in-plane magnetized acceleration sensor. Furthermore, an independent room temperature construction for out-of-plane measurements in a magnetic field up to 1 Tesla has been designed and implemented within the framework of a diploma thesis, supervised by the author of this dissertation. Using this construction, it was possible to gain experimental results regarding the interlayer exchange coupling between iron-terbium alloys (Fe{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}) and cobalt-platinum multilayers (vertical stroke Co/Pt vertical stroke {sub n

  20. Development of high temperature superconductors having high critical current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gye Wong; Kim, C. J.; Lee, H.G.; Kwon, S. C.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. B.; Park, J. Y.; Jung, C. H

    2000-08-01

    Fabrication of high T{sub c} superconductors and its applications for electric power device were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies. High quality YBCO superconductors was fabricated by melt texture growth, top-seeded melt growth process and multi-seeded melt growth process and the properties was compared. The critical current density of the melt processed YBCO superconductors was about few 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and the levitation force was 50 N. The processing time needed for the growth of the 123 single grain was greatly reduced by applying multi-seeding without no significant degradation of the levitation force. The multi-seeded melt growth process was confirmed as a time-saving and cost-effective method for the fabrication of bulk superconductors with controlled crystallographic orientation.

  1. Revisiting strong coupling QCD at finite baryon density and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Fromm, M

    2008-01-01

    The strong coupling limit ($\\beta_{gauge}=0$) of lattice QCD with staggered fermions enjoys the same non-perturbative properties as continuum QCD, namely confinement and chiral symmetry breaking. In contrast to the situation at weak coupling, the sign problem which appears at finite density can be brought under control for a determination of the full (mu,T) phase diagram by Monte Carlo simulations. Further difficulties with efficiency and ergodicity of the simulations, especially at the strongly first-order, low-T, finite-mu transition, are addressed respectively with a worm algorithm and multicanonical sampling. Our simulations reveal sizeable corrections to the old results of Karsch and Muetter. Comparison with analytic mean-field determinations of the phase diagram shows discrepancies of O(10) in the location of the QCD critical point.

  2. Temperature dependence of the liquid eutectic lead-lithium alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alchagirov; Boris; B.; Mozgovoi; Alexandr; G.; Taova; Tamara; M.

    2005-01-01

    Lead-lithium alloys are of great interest for practice as the advanced materials to be used in new technique, nuclear energetics, and so forth. Terefore, study on the physico-chemical properties of the latter is of major significance. An analysis of the available literature shows that there are a few works, devoted to study of Pb-Li alloys densities. However, temperature dependence of the density ρ(T), and its temperature coefficientK=dρ/dT for eutectic alloy were obtained by either extrapolation of the density data up to the eutectic alloy's composition, or calculation method. There is a certain discrepancy amounting to as high as 4%, while the allowable error in the density measurements is less than 0.5%. The discrepancy between the results for the temperature coefficients of density amounts to 80%.In this work we present the experimental data on the temperature dependence of Ph0.83 Li0.17 eutectic alloy's density in the temperature range 520K to 643 K. The alloys were prepared using Pb and Li with 99. 999% and 99.8% contents of the basic elements, respectively. We use the improved device, which permits to get the results with error less than 0. 15%. The results of 115 measurements of density in 520K to 643K temperature range were processed by the least-square method. Density polytherm of Pb0.83 Li0. 17 eutectic alloy is described by linear equation ρ(T) =9507.89-0. 79813(T-508) , kg/m3 ,where T is the absolute temperature by K. Mearsurement error was 0. 12% at 95% reliability.Discrepancy in the temperature coefficient data was 1.08%.Thus, the temperature dependence of the Pb-Li eutectic alloy density was studied by the precise two-capillary method. The obtained results may be recommended as the most reliable reference data.

  3. Quasilinear transport due to the magnetic drift resonance with the ion temperature gradient instability in a rotating plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Debing; Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2017-08-01

    The quasilinear transport fluxes due to the ion temperature gradient instability are calculated in a toroidal plasma, in which the magnetic drift resonance is treated rigorously. The effects of the equilibrium parallel flow and flow shear on the radial particle and heat fluxes are studied numerically in detail. In the radial component of parallel viscosity, there exist the pinches driven by the density gradient, the temperature gradient, and the curvature of the background magnetic field. The direction of these pinches is discussed. It is found that each pinch can be inward or outward, which depends crucially on the resonance condition.

  4. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly.

  5. The AC magnetic susceptibility of high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, M

    2001-01-01

    This research concerns the development of AC magnetic susceptometers and use of susceptometers in analysing high temperature superconductors. Two of the designs were a differential magnetic susceptometer (DMS) and a double coil screening susceptometer (DCSS) whose descriptions are given in detail including coil design, field measurements, susceptometer operation, experimental instrumentation, phase adjustment, susceptometer calibration and sensitivity for each design. Theoretical details are given regarding each design in order to calculate the complex external and internal susceptibility. Investigation concerning the demagnetisation factor of different geometries, and the significant features and limitation for each design are also provided. The susceptometers were applied to a wide range of YBCO samples, which includes bulk samples with different geometry (i.e. Slabs, disk, powder and thick film) and thin films with different oxygen contents. Several silver sheathed Bi-2223 tapes were also involved. This al...

  6. Excitations and magnetization density distribution in the dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor Yb14MnSb11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Garlea, V. O.; Gillon, B.; Cousson, A.; Christianson, A. D.; Lumsden, M. D.; Nagler, S. E.; Mandrus, D.; Sales, B. C.

    2017-01-01

    Yb14MnSb11 is a rare example of a Kondo lattice compound with ferromagnetic dominated RKKY interactions. As a ferromagnetic semiconductor with Tc≈53 K, it is also a potential compound for exploration of spintronic devices. Here we describe measurements which answer remaining questions regarding the energy scales of the exchange interactions, the valence, and the magnetization density distribution in this system. We find that the system consists of RKKY exchange coupled Mn2 + sites with nearest and next nearest exchange interactions dominating the magnetic spectrum with no significant magnetization density localized on other atomic sites. The extended spread of a negative magnetization around each of the Mn ions supports a Kondo screening cloud scenario for Yb14MnSb11 .

  7. Laboratory study of magnetic reconnection with a density asymmetry across the current sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Myers, Clayton E; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-08-29

    The effects of a density asymmetry across the current sheet on anti-parallel magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant density ratio of up to 10, the in-plane magnetic field profile is not significantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane Hall magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to quadrupolar in structure with the symmetric configuration. Moreover, the ion stagnation point is shifted to the low-density side, and the electrostatic potential profile also becomes asymmetric with a deeper potential well on the low-density side. Nonclassical bulk electron heating together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range is observed near the low-density-side separatrix. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations. The measured ion outflow speeds are about 40% of the theoretical values.

  8. One-loop omega-potential of charged massive fields in a constant homogeneous magnetic field at high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinichenko, I S

    2016-01-01

    The explicit expressions for the high-temperature expansions of the one-loop corrections to the omega-potential coming from the charged scalar and Dirac particles and, separately, from antiparticles in a constant homogeneous magnetic field are derived. The explicit expressions for the non-perturbative corrections to the effective action at finite temperature and density are obtained. The thermodynamic properties of a gas of charged scalars in a constant homogeneous magnetic field are analyzed in the one-loop approximation. It turns out that, in this approximation, the system suffers the first order phase transition from the diamagnetic to the superconducting state at sufficiently high densities. The improvement of the one-loop result by summing the ring diagrams is investigated. This improvement leads to a drastic change of the thermodynamic properties of the system. The gas of charged scalars passes to the ferromagnetic state in place of the superconducting one at high densities and sufficiently low temperat...

  9. Polar Behavior in a Magnetic Perovskite from A-Site Size Disorder: A Density Functional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D. J.; Park, Chul Hong

    2008-02-01

    We elucidate a mechanism for obtaining polar behavior in magnetic perovskites based on A-site disorder and demonstrate this mechanism by density functional calculations for the double perovskite (La,Lu)MnNiO6 with Lu concentrations at and below 50%. We show that this material combines polar behavior and ferromagnetism. The mechanism is quite general and may be applicable to a wide range of magnetic perovskites.

  10. Structure and magnetism of cobalt at high pressure and low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchio, R.; Marini, C.; Kvashnin, Y. O.; Kantor, I.; Mathon, O.; Garbarino, G.; Meneghini, C.; Anzellini, S.; Occelli, F.; Bruno, P.; Dewaele, A.; Pascarelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of cobalt were investigated under high pressure (160 GPa) and low temperature (50 K), by synchrotron K-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction. A quasihydrostatic equation of state was measured up to 160 GPa. We found that uniaxial stress plays a role in the hexagonal close packed-face centered cubic (hcp-fcc) structural transition pressure. Also, our data provide the first experimental evidence that changes of the c /a ratio pressure derivative are related to the magnetic behavior. The complete extinction of ferromagnetism is observed above 130 GPa in a mixed hcp-fcc phase with no recovery upon cooling to 50 K, indicating that cobalt at 150 GPa is very likely nonmagnetic, i.e., characterized by zero local spin polarization. Density functional theory calculations point out that the K-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) signal is related to the 4 p orbital moment rather than to the total spin moment and allow us to get a deeper insight into the K-edge XMCD measurements interpretation. The combination of novel theoretical results and experimental outputs provides a detailed scenario of the structural and magnetic properties of cobalt at these extreme conditions answering some previously unsolved issues.

  11. Phase transition in finite density and temperature lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rui; Gong, Ming; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhao-Feng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Meng, Xiang-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the chiral condensate in lattice QCD at finite temperature and finite chemical potential. The study was done using two flavors of light quarks and with a series of $\\beta$ and $ma$ at the lattice size $24\\times12^{2}\\times6$. The calculation was done in the Taylar expansion formalism. We are able to calculate the first and second order derivatives of $\\langle\\bar{\\psi}\\psi\\rangle$ in both isoscalar and isovector channels. With the first derivatives being small, we find that the second derivatives are sizable close to the phase transition and the magnitude of $\\bar{\\psi}\\psi$ decreases under the influence of finite chemical potential in both channels.

  12. Dyson-Schwinger Equation Density, Temperature and Continuum Strong QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, C D

    2000-01-01

    Continuum strong QCD is the application of models and continuum quantum field theory to the study of phenomena in hadronic physics, which includes; e.g., the spectrum of QCD bound states and their interactions; and the transition to, and properties of, a quark gluon plasma. We provide a contemporary perspective, couched primarily in terms of the Dyson-Schwinger equations but also making comparisons with other approaches and models. Our discourse provides a practitioners' guide to features of the Dyson-Schwinger equations [such as confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking] and canvasses phenomenological applications to light meson and baryon properties in cold, sparse QCD. These provide the foundation for an extension to hot, dense QCD, which is probed via the introduction of the intensive thermodynamic variables: chemical potential and temperature. We describe order parameters whose evolution signals deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration, and chronicle their use in demarcating the quark gluon...

  13. Measurement of induced magnetic flux density using injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures induced magnetic flux densities subject to externally injected currents in order to visualize conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. Injection currents induce magnetic flux densities that appear in phase parts of acquired MR image data. In the conventional current injection method, we inject currents during the time segment between the end of the first RF pulse and the beginning of the reading gradient in order to ensure the gradient linearity. Noting that longer current injections can accumulate more phase changes, we propose a new pulse sequence called injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) where the duration of the injection current pulse is extended until the end of the reading gradient. Since the current injection during the reading gradient disturbs the gradient linearity, we first analyze the MR signal produced by the ICNE pulse sequence and suggest a novel algorithm to extract the induced magnetic flux density from the acquired MR signal. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the new method is clearly advantageous in terms of the reduced noise level in measured magnetic flux density data. The amount of noise reduction depends on the choice of the data acquisition time and it was about 24% when we used a prolonged data acquisition time of 10.8 ms. The ICNE method will enhance the clinical applicability of the MREIT technique when it is combined with an appropriate phase artefact minimization method.

  14. Estimation of electrical conductivity distribution within the human head from magnetic flux density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a new algorithm for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), which uses only one component of the magnetic flux density to reconstruct the electrical conductivity distribution within the body. The radial basis function (RBF) network and simplex method are used in the present approach to estimate the conductivity distribution by minimizing the errors between the 'measured' and model-predicted magnetic flux densities. Computer simulations were conducted in a realistic-geometry head model to test the feasibility of the proposed approach. Single-variable and three-variable simulations were performed to estimate the brain-skull conductivity ratio and the conductivity values of the brain, skull and scalp layers. When SNR = 15 for magnetic flux density measurements with the target skull-to-brain conductivity ratio being 1/15, the relative error (RE) between the target and estimated conductivity was 0.0737 +/- 0.0746 in the single-variable simulations. In the three-variable simulations, the RE was 0.1676 +/- 0.0317. Effects of electrode position uncertainty were also assessed by computer simulations. The present promising results suggest the feasibility of estimating important conductivity values within the head from noninvasive magnetic flux density measurements.

  15. Orbital quantization in the high-magnetic-field state of a charge-density-wave system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, D.; Kartsovnik, M. V.; Grigoriev, P. D.; Biberacher, W.; Müller, H.

    2003-11-01

    A superposition of the Pauli and orbital couplings of a high magnetic field to charge carriers in a charge-density-wave (CDW) system is proposed to give rise to transitions between subphases with quantized values of the CDW wave vector. By contrast to the purely orbital field-induced density-wave effects which require a strongly imperfect nesting of the Fermi surface, the new transitions can occur even if the Fermi surface is well nested at zero field. We suggest that such transitions are observed in the organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 under a strongly tilted magnetic field.

  16. Magnetic topology and current channels in plasmas with toroidal current density inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciro, D.; Caldas, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium magnetic field inside axisymmetric plasmas with inversions on the toroidal current density is considered. Previous works have shown that internal regions with negative current density lead to non-nested magnetic surfaces inside the plasma. Following these results, we derive a general expression relating the positive and negative currents inside the non-nested surfaces. This is done in terms of an anisotropy parameter that is model-independent and is based in very general properties of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the positive currents in axisymmetric islands screen the negative one in the plasma center by reaching about twice its magnitude. Further, we illustrate these results by developing a family of analytical local solutions for the poloidal magnetic field in a region of interest that contains the inverted current. These local solutions exhibit non-nested magnetic surfaces with a combined current of at least twice the magnitude of the negative one, as prescribed from the topological arguments, and allow to study topological transitions driven by geometrical changes in the current profile. To conclude, we discuss the signatures of internal current density inversions in a confinement device and show that magnetic pitch measurements may be inappropriate to differentiate current reversals and small current holes in plasmas.

  17. 4-Component relativistic calculation of the magnetically induced current density in the group 15 heteroaromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bast, Radovan; Juselius, Jonas [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (CTCC), Department of Chemistry, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso (Norway); Saue, Trond [Institut de Chimie de Strasbourg, CNRS et Universite Louis Pasteur, Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique, 4, rue Blaise Pascal, BP 1032, F-67070 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: tsaue@chimie.u-strasbg.fr

    2009-02-17

    We present a 4-component relativistic implementation for calculating the magnetically induced current density within Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham linear response theory using a common gauge origin. We demonstrate how the current density can be decomposed into paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions by calculating separately the contributions from rotations between positive-energy orbitals and contributions from rotations between the occupied positive-energy orbitals and the virtual negative-energy orbitals, respectively. This methodology is applied to the study of the magnetically induced current density in benzene and the group 15 heteroaromatic compounds C{sub 5}H{sub 5}E (E = N, P, As, Sb, Bi). Quantitative values for the magnetically induced ring currents are obtained by numerical integration over the current flow. We have found that the diatropic ring current is sustained for the entire series of the group 15 heteroaromatic compounds-the induced ring current susceptibility of bismabenzene being 76% of the benzene result. Having employed two hybrid and two nonhybrid generalized gradient approximation functionals, the results are found to be rather insensitive to the choice of the density functional approximation. The relativistic effect is relatively small, reaching its maximum of 8% for bismabenzene. The presented 4-component relativistic methodology opens up the possibility to visualize magnetically induced current densities of aromatic heavy-element systems with both scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects included.

  18. Effect of dust charge variation on dust—acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized two—ion—temperature dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XueJu-Kui; LangHe

    2003-01-01

    The effect of dust charge variation on the dust-acoustic solitary structures is investigated in a warm magnetized two-ion-temperature dusty plasma consisting of a negatively and variably charged extremely massive dust fluid and ions of two different temperatures. It is shown that the dust charge variation as well as the presence of a second component of ions would modify the properties of the dust-acoustic solitary structures and may exite both dust-acoustic solitary holes (soliton waves with a density dip) and positive solitons (soliton waves with a density hump).

  19. Effect of dust charge variation on dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized two-ion-temperature dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛具奎; 郎和

    2003-01-01

    The effect of dust charge variation on the dust-acoustic solitary structures is investigated in a warm magnetized two-ion-temperature dusty plasma consisting of a negatively and variably charged extremely massive dust fluid and ions of two different temperatures. It is shown that the dust charge variation as well as the presence of a second component of ions would modify the properties of the dust-acoustic solitary structures and may excite both dust-acoustic solitary holes (soliton waves with a density dip) and positive solitons (soliton waves with a density hump).

  20. SU($4$) Polyakov linear-sigma model at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Diab, Abdel Magied; Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Dahab, Eiman Abou El

    2016-01-01

    In mean-field approximation, the SU($4$) Polyakov linear - sigma model (PLSM) is constructed in order to characterize the quark-hadron phase structure in a wide range of temperatures and densities. The chiral condensates $\\sigma_l$, $\\sigma_s$ and $\\sigma_c$ for light, strange and charm quarks, respectively, and the deconfinement order-parameters $\\phi$ and $\\phi^*$ shall be analyzed at finite temperatures and densities. We conclude that the critical temperatures corresponding to charm condensates are greater than that to strange and light ones, respectively. Thus, the charm condensates are likely not affected by the QCD phase transition. Furthermore, increasing the chemical potentials decreases the corresponding critical temperatures.

  1. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1981 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1981 to 2005 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  2. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1956 to 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1956 to 1980 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  3. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1912 to 1930

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1912 to 1930 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  4. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1931 to 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1931 to 1955 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  5. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    magnetic organization of carbon, metal and hydrogen radicals for lower temperature and pressure synthesis. Here we show that strong static external magnetic field (>15 T) enhances the formation of single crystal diamond at lower pressure and even atmospheric pressure with implications for much better, faster high quality diamond formation by magnetization of current high pressure and temperature technology.

  6. Non-Universal temperature dependencies of the low frequency ac magnetic susceptibility in high Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gioacchino, D.; Celani, F.; Tripodi, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Testa, A.M. [Consiglio Nazionale per le Ricerche, Monterotondo, RM, (Italy). Istituto di Chimica dei Materiali; Pace, S. [INFM, Univ. Salerno, Salerno (Italy). Dept. of Physics

    1999-07-01

    The paper is organized as follows. In Sec. 2 the non-linear diffusion problem is formulated in terms of a partial differential equation, together with the parallel resistor model for the 1-5 characteristics. To study in some detail the effects of thermally activated processes in different cases, we have chosen different temperature functional dependencies for the pinning potential, U{sub p}(T), and the critical current density, J{sub c}(T), related to particular pinning models. Local magnetic field profiles, magnetization cycles and {chi}n (T) are discussed in Sec. 3. Moreover, a comparison of numerical results with available experimental data and analytical approximated predictions is also presented. Finally, Sec. 4 is devoted to summary and conclusions.

  7. Two-dimensional Kagome phosphorus and its edge magnetism: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guodong; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2015-07-01

    By means of density functional theory calculations, we predict a new two-dimensional phosphorus allotrope with the Kagome-like lattice(Kagome-P). It is an indirect gap semiconductor with a band gap of 1.64 eV. The gap decreases sensitively with the compressive strain. In particular, shrinking the lattice beyond 13% can drive it into metallic state. In addition, both the AA and AB stacked Kagome-P multi-layer structures exhibit a bandgap much smaller than 1.64 eV. Edges in the Kagome-P monolayer probably suffer from the edge reconstruction. An isolated zigzag edge can induce antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering with a magnetic transition temperature of 23 K. More importantly, when applying a stretching strain beyond 4%, such an edge turns to possess a ferromagnetic ground state. A very narrow zigzag-edged Kagome-P ribbon displays the spin moment distribution similar to the zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon because of the coupling between the opposites edges. But the inter-edge coupling in the Kagome-P ribbon vanishes more rapidly as the ribbon width increases. These properties make it a promising material in spintronics.

  8. Two-dimensional Kagome phosphorus and its edge magnetism: a density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guodong; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2015-06-01

    By means of density functional theory calculations, we predict a new two-dimensional phosphorus allotrope with the Kagome-like lattice(Kagome-P). It is an indirect gap semiconductor with a band gap of 1.64 eV. The gap decreases sensitively with the compressive strain. In particular, shrinking the lattice beyond 13% can drive it into metallic state. In addition, both the AA and AB stacked Kagome-P multi-layer structures exhibit a bandgap much smaller than 1.64 eV. Edges in the Kagome-P monolayer probably suffer from the edge reconstruction. An isolated zigzag edge can induce antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering with a magnetic transition temperature of 23 K. More importantly, when applying a stretching strain beyond 4%, such an edge turns to possess a ferromagnetic ground state. A very narrow zigzag-edged Kagome-P ribbon displays the spin moment distribution similar to the zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon because of the coupling between the opposites edges. But the inter-edge coupling in the Kagome-P ribbon vanishes more rapidly as the ribbon width increases. These properties make it a promising material in spintronics.

  9. Density-temperature scaling of the fragility in a model glass-former

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical quantities e.g. diffusivity and relaxation time for some glass-formers may depend on density and temperature through a specific combination, rather than independently, allowing the representation of data over ranges of density and temperature as a function of a single scaling variable...... of the activation free energy in the Adam-Gibbs relation, is consistent with the exponent values obtained by other means....

  10. Optimized design of a high-power-density PM-assisted synchronous reluctance machine with ferrite magnets for electric vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiping

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a permanent magnet (PM-assisted synchronous reluctance machine (PMASynRM using ferrite magnets with the same power density as rareearth PM synchronous motors employed in Toyota Prius 2010. A suitable rotor structure for high torque density and high power density is discussed with respect to the demagnetization of ferrite magnets, mechanical strength and torque ripple. Some electromagnetic characteristics including torque, output power, loss and efficiency are calculated by 2-D finite element analysis (FEA. The analysis results show that a high power density and high efficiency of PMASynRM are obtained by using ferrite magnets.

  11. Finite temperature fermion condensate, charge and current densities in a (2+1)-dimensional conical space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Bezerra de Mello, E.R. [Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Braganca, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Saharian, A.A. [Yerevan State University, Department of Physics, Yerevan (Armenia)

    2016-06-15

    We evaluate the fermion condensate and the expectation values of the charge and current densities for a massive fermionic field in (2+1)-dimensional conical spacetime with a magnetic flux located at the cone apex. The consideration is done for both irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. The expectation values are decomposed into the vacuum expectation values and contributions coming from particles and antiparticles. All these contributions are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. Related to the non-invariance of the model under the parity and time-reversal transformations, the fermion condensate and the charge density have indefinite parity with respect to the change of the signs of the magnetic flux and chemical potential. The expectation value of the radial current density vanishes. The azimuthal current density is the same for both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. It is an odd function of the magnetic flux and an even function of the chemical potential. The behavior of the expectation values in various asymptotic regions of the parameters are discussed in detail. In particular, we show that for points near the cone apex the vacuum parts dominate. For a massless field with zero chemical potential the fermion condensate and charge density vanish. Simple expressions are derived for the part in the total charge induced by the planar angle deficit and magnetic flux. Combining the results for separate irreducible representations, we also consider the fermion condensate, charge and current densities in parity and time-reversal symmetric models. Possible applications to graphitic nanocones are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Simultaneous measurement of magnetic and density fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering and Doppler backscattering on the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, T. L.; Barada, K.; Peebles, W. A.; Crocker, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    An upgraded cross-polarization scattering (CPS) system for the simultaneous measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations B ˜ and density fluctuations ñ is presented. The system has eight radial quadrature channels acquired simultaneously with an eight-channel Doppler backscattering system (measures density fluctuations ñ and flows). 3-D ray tracing calculations based on the GENRAY ray tracing code are used to illustrate the scattering and geometric considerations involved in the CPS implementation on DIII-D. A unique quasi-optical design and IF electronics system allow direct comparison of B ˜ and ñ during dynamic or transient plasma events (e.g., Edge Localized Modes or ELMs, L to H-mode transitions, etc.). The system design allows the interesting possibility of both magnetic-density ( B ˜ -ñ) fluctuation and magnetic-temperature ( B ˜ - T ˜ ) fluctuation cross-phase measurements suitable for detailed tests of turbulence simulations.

  13. Time evolution of chiral phase transition at finite temperature and density in the linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Koide, Tomoi; Maruyama, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Faculty of Science, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    There are various approaches to nonequilibrium system. We use the projection operator method investigated by F. Shibata and N. Hashitsume on the linear sigma model at finite temperature and density. We derive a differential equation of the time evolution for the order parameter and pion number density in chiral phase transition. (author)

  14. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  15. Magnetic field-induced charge-density-wave transitions: The role of the orbital and Pauli effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsovnik, M. V.; Andres, D.; Biberacher, W.; Müller, H.

    2009-03-01

    Due to a low transition temperature and, correspondingly, a small energy gap, the charge-density-wave (CDW) state of the layered organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 is very sensitive to pressure and magnetic field. The latter couples to the CDW via two competing mechanisms: Pauli paramagnetism and orbital motion of charge carriers in a magnetic field. We study the interplay between the Pauli and orbital effects under a pressure of 2.8 kbar, in the region of the field-induced CDW (FICDW) instability. We find that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, the FICDW state is enhanced when the Zeeman splitting becomes commensurate with the orbital quantization.

  16. Magnetic field-induced charge-density-wave transitions: The role of the orbital and Pauli effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartsovnik, M.V. [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: mark.kartsovnik@wmi.badw.de; Andres, D.; Biberacher, W. [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Mueller, H. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-01

    Due to a low transition temperature and, correspondingly, a small energy gap, the charge-density-wave (CDW) state of the layered organic metal {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4} is very sensitive to pressure and magnetic field. The latter couples to the CDW via two competing mechanisms: Pauli paramagnetism and orbital motion of charge carriers in a magnetic field. We study the interplay between the Pauli and orbital effects under a pressure of 2.8 kbar, in the region of the field-induced CDW (FICDW) instability. We find that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, the FICDW state is enhanced when the Zeeman splitting becomes commensurate with the orbital quantization.

  17. Extending the density functional embedding theory to finite temperature and an efficient iterative method for solving for embedding potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen

    2016-03-01

    A key element in the density functional embedding theory (DFET) is the embedding potential. We discuss two major issues related to the embedding potential: (1) its non-uniqueness and (2) the numerical difficulty for solving for it, especially for the spin-polarized systems. To resolve the first issue, we extend DFET to finite temperature: all quantities, such as the subsystem densities and the total system's density, are calculated at a finite temperature. This is a physical extension since materials work at finite temperatures. We show that the embedding potential is strictly unique at T > 0. To resolve the second issue, we introduce an efficient iterative embedding potential solver. We discuss how to relax the magnetic moments in subsystems and how to equilibrate the chemical potentials across subsystems. The solver is robust and efficient for several non-trivial examples, in all of which good quality spin-polarized embedding potentials were obtained. We also demonstrate the solver on an extended periodic system: iron body-centered cubic (110) surface, which is related to the modeling of the heterogeneous catalysis involving iron, such as the Fischer-Tropsch and the Haber processes. This work would make it efficient and accurate to perform embedding simulations of some challenging material problems, such as the heterogeneous catalysis and the defects of complicated spin configurations in electronic materials.

  18. Ultralow temperature terahertz magnetic thermodynamics of perovskite-like SmFeO3 ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojian Fu; Xinxi Zeng; Dongyang Wang; Hao Chi Zhang; Jiaguang Han; Tie Jun Cui

    2015-01-01

    The terahertz magnetic properties of perovskite-like SmFeO3 ceramic are investigated over a broad temperature range, especially at ultralow temperatures, using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. It is shown that both resonant frequencies of quasi-ferromagnetic and quasi-antiferromagnetic modes have blue shifts with the decreasing temperature due to the enhancement of effective magnetic field. The temperature-dependent magnetic anisotropy constants are further estimated using the resonant fre...

  19. The Influence Of The Temperature Of Liquid Nitrogen On The Physical Properties Of Powder Magnetic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapelski D.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the physical properties of soft magnetic iron composites and Nd-Fe-B bonded permanent magnets measured at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen. The objective of research was a determination of influence of liquid nitrogen temperature on the magnetic properties, resistivity and mechanical properties of different powder magnetic materials. Research was carried out for three powder materials: soft magnetic, i.e. Somaloy 700, AncorLam and hard magnetic powder MQP-B used for production of bonded magnets. Composite specimens were prepared by compression moulding technology.

  20. Gamma-ray and neutron diffraction studies of CoF2: magnetostriction, electron density and magnetic moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, W; Reehuis, M; Schultz, A J

    2004-01-01

    Accurate structure factors up to sin theta/lambda = 1.6 A(-1) have been measured with 316.5 keV gamma-rays from CoF(2), both at room temperature and in the antiferromagnetic state at 10 K. The same crystal was used to collect extended time-of-flight neutron diffraction data in the two magnetic states, which allowed an accurate determination of the fluorine positional parameter. For room temperature, the standard structural parameters are reported. At 10 K, a complete charge-density study has been carried out. The total number of 3d electrons on Co is found to be 6.95 (3). The experimental populations of the d orbitals agree with expectation from crystal field theory. The fluorine valence region exhibits a strong dipolar deformation. Electronic properties at the bond critical points and integrated atomic properties are derived from the static model electron density, revealing the Co-F interactions as purely ionic. On magnetic ordering, a shift of the fluorine ions of 1.5 (4) x 10(-3) A is found which confirms a prediction from theory of optical birefringence. The effect of magnetostriction on the distortion of the ligand coordination octahedra is compared for the late members of the 3d transition-metal difluorides. From neutron powder diffraction, an ordered magnetic moment of 2.60 (4) mu(B) per cobalt ion is found. Despite the strong deviation from the ideal spin value of 3 mu(B), there is still an appreciable orbital contribution to the local magnetic moment.

  1. Universal logarithmic temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of one-dimensional electrons at critical values of magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Vekua, Temo

    2014-01-01

    We study the leading low temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of one-dimensional electrons with fixed total number of particles at the magnetic fields equal to zero temperature critical values where magnetic field induces commensurate-incommensurate quantum phase transitions. For free and repulsively interacting electrons there is only one such critical field corresponding to the transition to the fully polarized state. For attractively interacting electrons besides saturation fi...

  2. Investigation of temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in Fe3O4 ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemala, Humeshkar Bhaskar

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of Fe3O4 and gamma-Fe2O3 have been exploited in the biomedical fields for imaging, targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT), the production of heat using ferrofluids, colloidal suspensions of MNPs, in an external AC magnetic field (amplitude, 100-500 Oe and frequency 50 kHz -1MHz), has been explored by many researchers, both in vitro and in vivo, as an alternative viable option to treat cancer. The heat energy generated by Neel and Brownian relaxation processes of the internal magnetic spins could be used to elevate local tissue temperature to about 46 ˚C to arrest cancerous growth. MHT, due to its local nature of heating, when combined with other forms of treatment such as chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, it could become an effective therapy for cancer treatment. The efficiency of heat production in MHT is quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), defined as the power output per gram of the MNPs used. In this thesis, ferrofluids consisting of Fe3O4 MNPs of three different sizes (˜ 10 - 13 nm) coated with two different biocompatible surfactants, dextran and polyethylene glycol (PEG), have been investigated. The structural and magnetic characterization of the MNPs were done using XRD, TEM, and DC magnetization measurements. While XRD revealed the crystallite size, TEM provided the information about morphology and physical size distribution of the MNPs. Magnetic measurements of M-vs-H curves for ferrofluids provided information about the saturation magnetization (Ms) and magnetic core size distribution of MNPs. Using MHT measurements, the SAR has been studied as a function of temperature, taking into account the heat loss due to non-adiabatic nature of the experimental set-up. The observed SAR values have been interpreted using the theoretical framework of linear response theory (LRT). We found the SAR values depend on particle size distribution of MNPs, Ms (65-80 emu/g) and the magnetic

  3. Exploration of highly accelerated magnetic resonance elastography using high-density array coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, John C.; Yallapragada, Naresh; McDougall, Mary P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) measures tissue mechanical properties by applying a shear wave and capturing its propagation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By using high density array coils, MRE images are acquired using single echo acquisition (SEA) and at high resolutions with significantly reduced scan times. Methods Sixty-four channel uniplanar and 32×32 channel biplanar receive arrays are used to acquire MRE wave image sets from agar samples containing regions of varying stiffness. A mechanical actuator triggered by a stepped delay time introduces vibrations into the sample while a motion sensitizing gradient encodes micrometer displacements into the phase. SEA imaging is used to acquire each temporal offset in a single echo, while multiple echoes from the same array are employed for highly accelerated imaging at high resolutions. Additionally, stiffness variations as a function of temperature are studied by using a localized heat source above the sample. A custom insertable gradient coil is employed for phase compensation of SEA imaging with the biplanar array to allow imaging of multiple slices. Results SEA MRE images show a mechanical shear wave propagating into and across agar samples. A set of 720 images was obtained in 720 echoes, plus a single reference scan for both harmonic and transient MRE. A set of 2,950 wave image frames was acquired from pairs of SEA images captured during heating, showing the change in mechanical wavelength with the change in agar properties. A set of 240 frames was acquired from two slices simultaneously using the biplanar array, with phase images processed into displacement maps. Combining the narrow sensitivity patterns and SNR advantage of the SEA array coil geometry allowed acquisition of a data set with a resolution of 156 µm × 125 µm × 1,000 µm in only 64 echoes, demonstrating high resolution and high acceleration factors. Conclusions MRE using high-density arrays offers the unique ability

  4. Full-density, net-shape powder consolidation using dynamic magnetic pulse pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelluri, Bhanu; Barber, John P.

    1999-07-01

    The full-density consolidation of powders into net-shape parts yields high green strength, low shrinkage, short sinter times, superior mechanical properties, and low manufacturing costs. The conventional lowcost, single-press, single-sinter process typically densifies powders at less than 65 percent green density. This article describes the Magnepress™ process, a powder-processing technique wherein pulsed magnetic pressures consolidate powders into full-density parts without admixed lubricants or binders. The Magnepress technique is especially suitable for producing net-shape products with radial symmetry (e.g., rods, cylindrical parts with internal features, tubular shapes, and high aspect-ratio specimens).

  5. A New Density Operator Formalism for Describing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林东海; 吴钦义

    1994-01-01

    A density operator formalism has been proposed to describe the evolution of two-spin-1/2 systems in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments:The formalism is particularly convenient and has distinct physical meaning for describing the evolution of spin systems under the Hamiltonian containing non-commutable terms. Some examples are presented to demonstrate the new formalism.

  6. Density-matrix-functional calculations for matter in strong magnetic fields: Ground states of heavy atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Yngvason, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    and the electron number N tend to infinity with N/Z fixed, and the magnetic field B tends to infinity in such a way that B/Z4/3→∞. We have calculated electronic density profiles and ground-state energies for values of the parameters that prevail on neutron star surfaces and compared them with results obtained...

  7. Mass density of the Earth from a Gravito-Electro-Magnetic 5D vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Musmarra, Juan Ignacio; Bellini, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the mass density of the Earth using a Gravito-Electro-Magnetic theory on an extended 5D Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric, in which we define the vacuum. Our results are in very good agreement with that of the Dziewonski-Anderson model.

  8. Interaction-Induced Oscillations of the Tunneling Density of States in a Nonquantizing Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, A.; Aleiner, I.; Glazman, L. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We study tunneling into an interacting disordered two-dimensional electron gas in a nonquantizing magnetic field, which does not cause the standard de Haasvan Alphen oscillations. Interaction induces a new type of oscillation in the tunneling density of states with the characteristic period of cyclotron quantum {h_bar}{omega}{sub c}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Maxwell equation violation by density dependent magnetic fields in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Menezes, Débora P

    2016-01-01

    We show that the widely used density dependent magnetic field prescriptions, necessary to account for the variation of the field intensity from the crust to the core of neutron stars violate one of the Maxwell equations. We estimate how strong the violation is when different equations of state are used and check for which cases the pathological problem can be cured.

  10. The influence of temperature and salinity variability on the upper ocean density and mixed layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Helber

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The relative influence of both temperature and salinity on the mixed layer depth (MLD is evaluated using a relationship of binned regressions of MLD on vertical density compensation and isothermal layer depth (ILD from a global set of in situ profile observations. Our approach is inspired by the observations of the difference between the MLD and the sonic layer depth (SLD that evolve seasonally around the global ocean. In this article, we hypothesize that vertical density compensation governs SLD-MLD differences and can be used for mapping the relative influence of temperature and salinity on upper ocean structure. The Turner angle, computed between the surface and 200 m (bulk Turner angle, BTA, serves as a measure of vertical density compensation that quantifies times and areas where either temperature or salinity is destabilizing. For temperature destabilization the ocean exhibits cool/fresh overlying hot/salty water. For salinity destabilization the ocean exhibits hot/salty overlying cool/fresh water. These two classes of density compensation have seasonal variability with different geographical characteristics. Profiles with salinity controlled stable density and destabilizing temperature gradient are found most often at high latitudes. Profiles with temperature controlled stable density and destabilizing salinity gradient are found in the tropics and subtropics of all oceans. Results indicate that about half of the ocean has vertical density compensation that is a necessary condition for SLD-MLD differences. While density compensation is necessary, it is not a sufficient condition for predicting the dependence of MLD on BTA. Density compensation is the dominant factor in MLD variability in heavy river input and subduction regions that cover only ~14% of the ocean.

  11. Weyl fermions with arbitrary monopoles in magnetic fields: Landau levels, longitudinal magnetotransport, and density-wave ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Roy, Bitan; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically address the effects of strong magnetic fields in three-dimensional Weyl semimetals (WSMs) built out of Weyl nodes with a monopole charge n . For n =1 , 2, and 3 we realize single, double, and triple WSM, respectively, and the monopole charge n determines the integer topological invariant of the WSM. Within the linearized continuum description, the quasiparticle spectrum is then composed of Landau levels (LLs), containing exactly n number of chiral zeroth Landau levels (ZLLs), irrespective of the orientation of the magnetic field. In the presence of strong backscattering, for example (due to quenched disorder associated with random impurities), these systems generically give rise to longitudinal magnetotransport. Restricting ourselves to the quantum limit (and assuming only the subspace of the ZLLs to be partially filled) and mainly accounting for Gaussian impurities, we show that the longitudinal magnetoconductivity (LMC) in all members of the Weyl family displays a positive linear-B scaling when the field is applied along the axis that separates the Weyl nodes. But, in double and triple WSM, LMC displays a smooth crossover to a nonlinear B dependence as the field is tilted away from such a high-symmetry direction. In addition, due to the enhanced density of states, the LL quantization can trigger instabilities toward the formation of translational symmetry-breaking density-wave orderings for sufficiently weak interaction (BCS instability), which gaps out the ZLLs. Concomitantly as the temperature (magnetic field) is gradually decreased (increased) the LMC becomes negative. Thus WSMs with arbitrary monopole charge (n ) can host an intriguing interplay of LL quantization, longitudinal magnetotransport (a possible manifestation of one-dimensional chiral or axial anomaly), and density-wave ordering, when placed in a strong magnetic field.

  12. Temperature dependent small-angle neutron scattering of CTABr-magnetic fluid emulsion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Aswal; J V Joshi; P S Goyal; Rajesh Patel; R V Upadhyay; R V Mehta

    2004-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering studies have been carried out to check the structural integrity of citryltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) micelles in a magnetic fluid for different magnetic fluid concentrations at two different temperatures 303 and 333 K. It is found that the CTABr micelles grow with increasing magnetic fluid concentration and there is a decrease in the micellar size with increase in temperature.

  13. Density functional theory of superconductivity in the presence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linscheid, Andreas

    2015-03-26

    We develop the density functional theory for superconductors (SC) including a Zeeman term (SpinSCDFT) to account for the effect of a magnetic field in a SC. The density, the order parameter of SC, the magnetic density and the nuclear N-body density are reproduced by a formally non-interacting Kohn-Sham system. We derive an exchange and correlation (xc) potential based on the Sham-Schlueter equation which yields the xc potential with the same densities as resulting from a given self-energy. Eliashberg equations are derived in the same notation and the G0W0 approach is extended to a SC. We test the formalism on the electron gas and compare with the Bardeen Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) and the Eliashberg theory. Physical SpinSCDFT solutions are in qualitative agreement with BCS and Eliashberg while we can trace unphysical solutions to one of our approximations. Further, we apply the formalism to a lead monolayer on a silicone substrate which proves interesting even without a magnetic field.

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Electron and Magnetization Densities in Molecules and Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The interest of describing the ground state properties of a system in terms of one electron density (or its two spin components) is obvious, in particular due to the simple physical significance of this function. Recent experimental progress in diffraction made the measurement of charge and magnetization densities in crystalline solids possible, with an accuracy at least as good as theoretical accuracy. Theoretical developments of the many-body problem have proved the extreme importance of the one electron density function and presently, accurate methods of band structure determination become available. Parallel to the diffraction techniques, other domains of research (inelastic scattering, resonance, molecular spectroscopy) deal with quantities directly related to the one particle density. But the two types of studies do not interfere enough and one should obviously gain more information by interpreting all experiments that are related to the density together. It became necessary to have an International Sch...

  15. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon's chiral periphery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos G. [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States); Weiss, Christian [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the light-front description of nucleon structure the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent transverse densities of charge and magnetization. Recent work has studied the transverse densities at peripheral distances b = O(M{pi}{sup -1}), where they are governed by universal chiral dynamics and can be computed in a model-independent manner. Of particular interest is the comparison of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities. We summarize (a) their interpretation as spin-independent and -dependent current matrix elements; (b) the leading-order chiral effective field theory results; (c) their mechanical interpretation in the light-front formulation; (d) the large-N_c limit of QCD and the role of {Delta} intermediate states; (e) the connection with generalized parton distributions and peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  16. Velocity statistics from spectral line data effects of density-velocity correlations, magnetic field, and shear

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A; Pogosyan, D; Cho, J; Esquivel, Alejandro; Cho, Jungyeon

    2003-01-01

    In a previous work Lazarian and Pogosyan suggested a technique to extract velocity and density statistics, of interstellar turbulence, by means of analysing statistics of spectral line data cubes. In this paper we test that technique, by studying the effect of correlation between velocity and density fields, providing a systematic analysis of the noise, and exploring the effect of a linear shear. We make use of both compressible MHD simulations and synthetic data to emulate spectroscopic observations. With such synthetic spectroscopic data, we studied anisotropies of the two point statistics and related those anisotropies with the magnetic field direction. This presents a new technique for magnetic field studies. The results show that the velocity and density spectral indices measured are consistent with the analytical predictions. We identified the dominant source of error with the limited number of data points along a given line of sight. We argue that in real observations the number of emmiting elements is...

  17. The revised electromagnetic fields directive and worker exposure in environments with high magnetic flux densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-06-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers' exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker's body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices.

  18. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature and isospin density with the functional renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyue; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2017-07-01

    The pion superfluid and the corresponding Goldstone and soft modes are investigated in a two-flavor quark-meson model with a functional renormalization group. By solving the flow equations for the effective potential and the meson two-point functions at finite temperature and isospin density, the critical temperature for the superfluid increases sizeably in comparison with solving the flow equation for the potential only. The spectral function for the soft mode shows clearly a transition from meson gas to quark gas with increasing temperature and a crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of quarks with increasing isospin density.

  19. Molecular dissociation and shock-induced cooling in fluid nitrogen at high densities and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radousky, H. B.; Nellis, W. J.; Ross, M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Radiative temperatures and electrical conductivities were measured for fluid nitrogen compressed dynamically to pressures of 18-90 GPa, temperatures of 4000-14,000 K, and densities of 2-3 g/cu cm. The data show a continuous phase transition above 30 GPa shock pressure and confirm that (delta-P/delta-T)v is less than 0, as indicated previously by Hugoniot equation-of-state experiments. The first observation of shock-induced cooling is also reported. The data are interpreted in terms of molecular dissociation, and the concentration of dissociated molecules is calculated as a function of density and temperature.

  20. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  1. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0T yokeless permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Y; Tamada, D; Kose, K

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5°C to 45°C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties.

  2. Temperature and population density effects on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, T M; Faurby, S; Kjærsgaard, A; Pertoldi, C; Loeschcke, V; Hald, B; Bahrndorff, S

    2013-12-01

    The behavior of ectotherm organisms is affected by both abiotic and biotic factors. However, a limited number of studies have investigated the synergistic effects on behavioral traits. This study examined the effect of temperature and density on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (L.). Locomotor activity was measured for both sexes and at four densities (with mixed sexes) during a full light and dark (L:D) cycle at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C. Locomotor activity during daytime increased with temperature at all densities until reaching 30°C and then decreased. High-density treatments significantly reduced the locomotor activity per fly, except at 15°C. For both sexes, daytime activity also increased with temperature until reaching 30 and 35°C for males and females, respectively, and thereafter decreased. Furthermore, males showed a significantly higher and more predictable locomotor activity than females. During nighttime, locomotor activity was considerably lower for all treatments. Altogether the results of the current study show that there is a significant interaction of temperature and density on daytime locomotor activity of M. domestica and that houseflies are likely to show significant changes in locomotor activity with change in temperature.

  3. Model for the orientation, magnetic field, and temperature dependence of the specific heat of CeCu6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, A. S.

    1988-03-01

    The results of a model calculation of the orientation, magnetic field, and temperature dependence of the specific heat C of CeCu6 are found to be in good agreement with the single-crystal data of Amato et al. The model incorporates both the Kondo and crystal-field effects. It is suggested that the low-temperature Wilson's ratio C/Tχ, where χ is the susceptibility, may not change in an applied field H and that both C/T and χ at low temperatures as a function of H may be proportional to the many-body density of states at the energy μH.

  4. Low temperature sintering of MgCuZn ferrite and its electrical and magnetic properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R Murthy

    2001-08-01

    The low temperature sintering of MgCuZn ferrite was investigated using the usual ceramic method. The effect of Cu substitution on the properties of MgZn ferrites was also investigated and it was found that the densification of MgCuZn ferrite is dependent upon Cu concentration. The sintered ferrite with a density of 4.93 g/cm3 and electrical resistivity > 1011-cm was obtained for the ferrite with 12 mol% Cu at relatively low sintering temperature (910°C). The magnetic properties of the ferrites also improved by the Cu substitution. The chip inductors made of the ferrite fired at 910 C with 12 mol% Cu exhibited higher d.c. resistance. From these studies it is concluded that the good quality chip inductor can be obtained using the MgCuZn ferrites.

  5. Origin of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism for Cobalt-Doped ZnO Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Long; ZHANG Huai-Wu; WEN Qi-Ye; SONG Yuan-Qiang; SU Hua; John Q. Xiao

    2008-01-01

    @@ The pure single phase of Zn0.95Co0.05O bulks is successfully prepared by solid-state reaction method. The effects of annealing atmosphere on room-temperature ferromagnetic behaviour for the Zn0.95 Co0.05O bulks are investigated. The results show that the air-annealed samples has similar weak ferromagnetic behaviour with the as-sintered samples, but the obvious ferromagnetic behaviour is observed for the samples annealed in vacuum or Ar/H2 gas, indicating that the strong ferromagnetism is associated with high oxygen vacancies density. High saturation magnetization Ms = 0.73 μB /Co and coercivity Hc = 233.8 Oe are obtained for the Ar/H2 annealed samples with pure single phase structure. The enhanced room-temperature ferromagnetic behaviour is also found in the samples with high carrier concentration controlled by doping interstitials Zn (Zni).

  6. Real-time visualization of magnetic flux densities for transcranial magnetic stimulation on commodity and fully immersive VR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivarapu, Vijay K.; Serrate, Ciro; Hadimani, Ravi L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure that uses time varying short pulses of magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. In this method, a magnetic field generator ("TMS coil") produces small electric fields in the region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. This technique can be used to excite or inhibit firing of neurons, which can then be used for treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, migraine, and depression. It is however challenging to focus the induced electric field from TMS coils to smaller regions of the brain. Since electric and magnetic fields are governed by laws of electromagnetism, it is possible to numerically simulate and visualize these fields to accurately determine the site of maximum stimulation and also to develop TMS coils that can focus the fields on the targeted regions. However, current software to compute and visualize these fields are not real-time and can work for only one position/orientation of TMS coil, severely limiting their usage. This paper describes the development of an application that computes magnetic flux densities (h-fields) and visualizes their distribution for different TMS coil position/orientations in real-time using GPU shaders. The application is developed for desktop, commodity VR (HTC Vive), and fully immersive VR CAVETM systems, for use by researchers, scientists, and medical professionals to quickly and effectively view the distribution of h-fields from MRI brain scans.

  7. The Structure and Evolution of Magnetized Cloud Cores in a Zero--Density Background

    CERN Document Server

    Curry, C L; Curry, Charles L.; Stahler, Steven W.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular-line observations of star-forming cloud cores indicate that they are not the flattened structures traditionally considered by theory. Rather, they are elongated, perhaps in the direction of their internal magnetic field. We are thus motivated to consider the structure and evolution of axisymmetric, magnetized clouds that start from a variety of initial states, both flattened (oblate) and elongated (prolate). We devise a new technique, dubbed the $q$-method, that allows us to construct magnetostatic equilibria of any specified shape. We find, in agreement with previous authors, that the field lines in oblate clouds bend inward. However, those in prolate clouds bow outward, confining the structures through magnetic tension. We next follow the quasi-static evolution of these clouds via ambipolar diffusion, under the assumption of constant core mass. An oblate cloud either relaxes to a magnetically force-free sphere or, if sufficiently massive, flattens along its polar axis as its central density runs a...

  8. New theorem of classical electromagnetism: equilibrium magnetic field and current density are zero inside ideal conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Fiolhais, Miguel C N; Providencia, C; Nordmark, Arne B

    2010-01-01

    We prove a theorem on the magnetic energy minimum in a system of perfect, or ideal, conductors. It is analogous to Thomson's theorem on the equilibrium electric field and charge distribution in a system of conductors. We first prove Thomson's theorem using a variational principle. Our new theorem is then derived by similar methods. We find that magnetic energy is minimized when the current distribution is a surface current density with zero interior magnetic field; perfect conductors are perfectly diamagnetic. The results agree with currents in superconductors being confined near the surface. The theorem implies a generalized force that expels current and magnetic field from the interior of a conductor that loses its resistivity. Examples of solutions that obey the theorem are presented.

  9. Spin polarization in high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Providencia, Constanca; Yamamura, Masatoshi; Bohr, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field, possible phases are investigated by using the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with axial vector-type four-point interaction or tensor-type four-point interaction between quarks. In the axial vector-type interaction, it is shown that a quark spin polarized phase is realized in all region of the quark chemical potential under a strong external magnetic field within the lowest Landau level approximation. Each phase is characterized by the chiral condensate or dynamical quark mass. On the other hand, in the tensor-type interaction, it is also shown that the quark spin polarized phase does not appear even if there exists the strong external magnetic field. However, if the anomalous magnetic moment of quark is taken into account, it may be possible to realize the quark spin polarized phase.

  10. Micromagnetic model for studies on Magnetic Tunnel Junction switching dynamics, including local current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankowski, Marek, E-mail: mfrankow@agh.edu.pl; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Skowronski, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2014-02-15

    We present a model introducing the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation with a Slonczewski's Spin-Transfer-Torque (STT) component in order to take into account spin polarized current influence on the magnetization dynamics, which was developed as an Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework extension. We implement the following computations: magnetoresistance of vertical channels is calculated from the local spin arrangement, local current density is used to calculate the in-plane and perpendicular STT components as well as the Oersted field, which is caused by the vertical current flow. The model allows for an analysis of all listed components separately, therefore, the contribution of each physical phenomenon in dynamic behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) magnetization is discussed. The simulated switching voltage is compared with the experimental data measured in MTJ nanopillars.

  11. Incommensurate spin-density wave and magnetic lock-in transition in CaFe{sub 4}As{sub 3}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, P.; Chapon, L. C.; Todorov, I. S.; Chung, D. Y.; Castellan, J.-P.; Rosenkranz, S.; Osborn, R.; Toledano, P.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Materials Science Division; Rutherford Appleton Lab.; Univ. of Picardie; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-05-01

    The magnetic structure for the recently synthesized iron-arsenide compound CaFe4As3 has been studied by neutron-powder diffraction. Long-range magnetic order is detected below 85 K, with an incommensurate modulation described by the propagation vector k=(0,?,0), ??0.39. Below ?25 K, our measurements detect a first-order phase transition where ? locks into the commensurate value 3/8. A model of the magnetic structure is proposed for both temperature regimes, based on Rietveld refinements of the powder data and symmetry considerations. The structures correspond to longitudinal spin-density waves with magnetic moments directed along the b axis. A Landau analysis captures the change in thermodynamic quantities observed at the two magnetic transitions, in particular, the drop in resistivity at the lock-in transition.

  12. Spin-Density-Wave-Type Ordering of LaCoGe Revealed by 59Co- and 139La-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karube, Kosuke; Hattori, Taisuke; Ishida, Kenji; Tamura, Nobuhiko; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.

    2013-08-01

    The low-temperature magnetic properties of LaCoGe with the tetragonal CeFeSi-type structure were investigated by 59Co- and 139La-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The nuclear spin--lattice relaxation rate divided by the temperature, 1/(T1T), gradually increases with decreasing temperature and shows a kink at approximately 18 K, below which an inhomogeneous internal field appears at the Co nuclear site. These results indicate that antiferromagnetic ordering occurs below TN˜ 18 K. However, an internal field was not observed at the La nuclear site below TN. Taking all NMR results into account, we conclude that spin-density-wave (SDW)-type ordering occurs, where magnetic correlations are of the checkerboard type [\\mbi{Q}=(π,π)] in the ab-plane and have a long periodicity along the c-axis with inhomogeneous ordered moments pointing to the c-axis.

  13. Effects of Electron Flow Current Density on Flow Impedance of Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yong; ZOU Wen-Kang; SONG Sheng-Yi

    2011-01-01

    @@ In modern pulsed power systems, magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) are used to couple power between the driver and the load.The circuit parameters of MITLs are well understood by employing the concept of Sow impedance derived from Maxwell's equations and pressure balance across the flow.However, the electron density in an MITL is always taken as constant in the application of flow impedance.Thus effects of electron flow current density (product of electron density and drift velocity) in an MITL are neglected.We calculate the flow impedances of an MITL and compare them under three classical MITL theories, in which the electron density profile and electron flow current density are different from each other.It is found that the assumption of constant electron density profile in the calculation of the Sow impedance is not always valid.The electron density profile and the electron flow current density have significant effects on flow impedance of the MITL.The details of the electron flow current density and its effects on the operation impedance of the MITL should be addressed more explicitly experiments and theories in the future.

  14. The epoxy resin variation effect on microstructure and physical properties to improve bonded NdFeB flux magnetic density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnaeni, N.; Sarjono, Priyo; Muljadi; Noer, Nasrudin

    2016-11-01

    NdFeB magnets have been fabricated from a mixture of powder NdFeB (MPQ-B+) and epoxy resins (ER) with a variation of 0% wt, 2% wt, 4% wt and 6% wt. The pellets samples were made by pressing 4 tons of the mixture powder at room temperature before curing at 100°C for 1 hour. The SEM-EDX results showed the microstructure with ER were evenly smeared the NdFeB magnetic particles due to higher percent C and lower transition metals value. Sample with 2% wt epoxy resin was able to achieve the highest density of 5.35 g/cm3 and the highest magnetic flux of 2121 Gauss. The magnetic properties characterization using the permagraph indicates that the sample pellets with 2% wt epoxy resin has a value of remanence (Br) = 4.92 kG, coercivity (Hc) = 7.76 kOe, and energy product (Bhmax) = 4.58 MGOe. Despite low remanence value in the pellet samples, the resistance to demagnetization value was still acceptable.

  15. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; Recarte, V; Gómez-Polo, C

    2010-08-11

    Temperature dependences of low-field quasistatic magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transitions in an NiFeGa alloy are studied both by experiment and analytically. Pronounced reversible jumps of the magnetic susceptibility were observed near the martensitic transition temperature. A general description of the temperature dependences of the susceptibility in ferromagnetic austenite and martensite phases and the susceptibility jump at the transition is suggested. As a result, the main factors governing the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility in the magnetic shape memory alloys are revealed. The magnetic susceptibility jump value is found to be related to changes of: (i) magnetic anisotropy; (ii) magnetic domain wall geometrical constraints (those determined by the alignment and size of twin variants) and (iii) mean magnetic domain spacing.

  16. The cerium magnetic form factor and diffuse polarization in CeRh3B2 as functions of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givord, F.; Boucherle, J.-X.; Lelièvre-Berna, E.; Lejay, P.

    2004-03-01

    In the compound CeRh3B2, a rather special polarization of the conduction electrons along the c-chains of cerium atoms had been previously reported at low temperatures (Alonso et al 1998 J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 177-181 1048). The distribution of the CeRh3B2 magnetization has now been studied as a function of temperature up to 150 K—that is, above the Curie temperature of 115 K. The magnetization density maps have been obtained from polarized neutron diffraction experiments by using the maximum entropy method. The cerium form factor has also been analysed. Calculations of the form factor including several multiplets are developed and it is shown that it is necessary to take into account the influence of the higher multiplet of the Ce3+ ion. This result is coherent with the observation of a peak at high energy in the inelastic neutron spectra, indicating a very large crystal electric field splitting. Both analyses lead to the same conclusion that, on heating, the diffuse negative magnetization observed at low temperature along the cerium chains disappears at the magnetic ordering temperature. The influence of the second multiplet of the Ce3+ ion could be part of the explanation for the low value of the 4f moment and the large Curie temperature in CeRh3B2.

  17. Graphene, a material for high temperature devices; intrinsic carrier density, carrier drift velocity, and lattice energy

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Yan; Wang, Li; Jin, Kuijuan; Wang, Wenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Heat has always been a killing matter for traditional semiconductor machines. The underlining physical reason is that the intrinsic carrier density of a device made from a traditional semiconductor material increases very fast with a rising temperature. Once reaching a temperature, the density surpasses the chemical doping or gating effect, any p-n junction or transistor made from the semiconductor will fail to function. Here, we measure the intrinsic Fermi level (|E_F|=2.93k_B*T) or intrinsic carrier density (n_in=3.87*10^6 cm^-2 K^-2*T^2), carrier drift velocity, and G mode phonon energy of graphene devices and their temperature dependencies up to 2400 K. Our results show intrinsic carrier density of graphene is an order of magnitude less sensitive to temperature than those of Si or Ge, and reveal the great potentials of graphene as a material for high temperature devices. We also observe a linear decline of saturation drift velocity with increasing temperature, and identify the temperature coefficients of ...

  18. Magnetic properties and high room temperature TMR ratios of Co{sub 2}FeAl in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebke, Daniel; Kugler, Zoe; Thomas, Patrick; Schebaum, Oliver; Schaefers, Markus; Nissen, Dennis; Schmalhorst, Jan; Huetten, Andreas; Thomas, Andy [Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Physics Department, Bielefeld University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Spintronic devices have found a lot of attention in the recent years due to the possible new applications, e.g. a magnetic random access memory (MRAM). Therefore, materials with a high spin polarization such as half metallic Heusler compounds are eligible. In this work, we present low temperature tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) values of up to 270% for MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Co{sub 2}FeAl and Co-Fe electrodes. A low temperature dependence leads to high room temperature TMR values of about 150%. The bulk magnetic moment and the element specific magnetic moment at the barrier interface were examined as a function of annealing temperature by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS)/X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), respectively.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of room-temperature nanofluid ferromagnetic graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, NS; Sergeenkov, S.; Speglich, C.; Rivera, VAG; Cardoso, CA; Pardo, H.; Mombru, AW; Rodrigues, AD; de Lima, OF; Araujo-Moreira, FM

    2009-01-01

    We report the chemical synthesis route, structural characterization, and physical properties of nanofluid magnetic graphite (NFMG) obtained from the previously synthesized bulk organic magnetic graphite (MG) by stabilizing the aqueous ferrofluid suspension with an addition of active cationic surfactant. The measured magnetization-field hysteresis curves along with the temperature dependence of magnetization confirmed room-temperature ferromagnetism in both MG and NFMG samples. (C) 2009 Americ...

  20. Weak magnetic field effects on chiral critical temperature in a nonlocal Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model

    CERN Document Server

    Loewe, M; Villavicencio, C; Zamora, R

    2014-01-01

    In this article we study the nonlocal Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model with a Gaussian regulator in the chiral limit. Finite temperature effects and the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field are considered. The magnetic evolution of the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration is then obtained. Here we restrict ourselves to the case of low magnetic field values, being this a complementary discussion to the exisiting analysis in nonlocal models in the strong magnetic field regime.

  1. Analysis of a low-temperature magnetic helium pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenger, Coyne; Stewart, Walter

    In an effort to improve reliability of cryocoolers, concepts involving no moving parts are being investigated. One concept utilizes an Active Magnetic Regenerator, AMR, to produce refrigeration. However, circulation of the helium working fluid is required for operation of the device. Currently available helium pumps have moving parts and; therefore, result in poor reliability. We propose a magnetically driven pump to provide the helium circulation for the AMR. The pump utilizes the magnetocaloric effect to produce an oscillatory helium flow and; has no moving parts. An analytical model has been developed to analyze the pump's performance in conjunction with an AMR operating between 7 and 20 K. At a frequency of 1 Hz a 0.5 liter pump can produce a 0.75 g/s flow rate at 20 K at an operating pressure of 5 atm. At the liquid helium temperature a two-phase version of this pump would perform substantially better than the single-phase version. A design concept has been developed and will be presented along with the model results.

  2. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Kramar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131 to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4 R_odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 AA band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $sim 2.5 R_odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  3. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramar, Maxim; Airapetian, Vladimir; Lin, Haosheng

    2016-08-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from 1.5 to 4 R_⊙ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 Å band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below ˜ 2.5 R_⊙. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  4. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  5. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Vela, Alberto, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  6. Modeled Seasonal Variations of Firn Density Induced by Steady State Surface Air Temperature Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Li; Zwally, H. Jay; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal variations of firn density in ice-sheet firn layers have been attributed to variations in deposition processes or other processes within the upper firn. A recent high-resolution (mm scale) density profile, measured along a 181 m core from Antarctica, showed small-scale density variations with a clear seasonal cycle that apparently was not-related to seasonal variations in deposition or known near-surface processes (Gerland and others 1999). A recent model of surface elevation changes (Zwally and Li, submitted) produced a seasonal variation in firn densification, and explained the seasonal surface elevation changes observed by satellite radar altimeters. In this study, we apply our 1-D time-dependent numerical model of firn densification that includes a temperature-dependent formulation of firn densification based on laboratory measurements of grain growth. The model is driven by a steady-state seasonal surface temperature and a constant accumulation rate appropriate for the measured Antarctic ice core. The modeled seasonal variations in firn density show that the layers of snow deposited during spring to mid-summer with the highest temperature history compress to the highest density, and the layers deposited during later summer to autumn with the lowest temperature history compress to the lowest density. The initial amplitude of the seasonal difference of about 0.13 reduces to about 0.09 in five years and asymptotically to 0.92 at depth, which is consistent with the core measurements.

  7. Density of biofuel in function of temperature; Densidade de biocombustiveis em funcao da temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Melina C.J.; Lopes, Afonso [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCAV/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Engenharia Rural], email: melina_cais@yahoo.com.br; Camara, Felipe T. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Cariri, CE (Brazil); Lima, Leomar P. [Instituto Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (IFTM), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Considering the oil a non-renewable natural resource, Biodiesel is an alternative fuel, the same being renewable, biodegradable and made from vegetable oil or residual transesterified with anhydrous alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. This study aimed to evaluate the density of biodiesel methyl filtered residual oil from the university cafeteria, biodiesel methyl filtered hydrogenated fat residual McDonald's and the density of the mixture of 50% of residual oil from the university cafeteria with 50% of hydrogenated fat residual McDonald's all a function of temperature (10 deg C to 70 deg C). The experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Engineering Department of UNESP-Jaboticabal, SP. Was used 3x13x7 factorial experimental design, which represent three types of biodiesel, 13 July and the temperatures of the mixtures. We conclude that the residual oil biodiesel university restaurant density was lower, while biodiesel from hydrogenated fat from McDonald's and the mixture had higher densities, but differ from each other. The diesel (B0) had the lowest density and Biodiesel (B100) the largest. The B0 and B5 blends did not differ regarding density, but differed from the mix B15, B25, B50, B75 and B100. For all the mixtures tested, with the increase of temperature decreased the density. (author)

  8. Temperature effects on wood anatomy, wood density, photosynthesis and biomass partitioning of Eucalyptus grandis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D S; Montagu, K D; Conroy, J P

    2007-02-01

    Wood density, a gross measure of wood mass relative to wood volume, is important in our understanding of stem volume growth, carbon sequestration and leaf water supply. Disproportionate changes in the ratio of wood mass to volume may occur at the level of the whole stem or the individual cell. In general, there is a positive relationship between temperature and wood density of eucalypts, although this relationship has broken down in recent years with wood density decreasing as global temperatures have risen. To determine the anatomical causes of the effects of temperature on wood density, Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden seedlings were grown in controlled-environment cabinets at constant temperatures from 10 to 35 degrees C. The 20% increase in wood density of E. grandis seedlings grown at the higher temperatures was variously related to a 40% reduction in lumen area of xylem vessels, a 10% reduction in the lumen area of fiber cells and a 10% increase in fiber cell wall thickness. The changes in cell wall characteristics could be considered analogous to changes in carbon supply. Lumen area of fiber cells declined because of reduced fiber cell expansion and increased fiber cell wall thickening. Fiber cell wall thickness was positively related to canopy CO2 assimilation rate (Ac), which increased 26-fold because of a 24-fold increase in leaf area and a doubling in leaf CO2 assimilation rate from minima at 10 and 35 degrees C to maxima at 25 and 30 degrees C. Increased Ac increased seedling volume, biomass and wood density; but increased wood density was also related to a shift in partitioning of seedling biomass from roots to stems as temperature increased.

  9. Enhancement of the high-magnetic-field critical current density of superconducting MgB2 by proton irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugoslavsky, Y; Cohen, L F; Perkins, G K; Polichetti, M; Tate, T J; Gwilliam, R; Caplin, A D

    2001-05-31

    Magnesium diboride, MgB2, has a relatively high superconducting transition temperature, placing it between the families of low- and high-temperature (copper oxide based) superconductors. Supercurrent flow in MgB2 is unhindered by grain boundaries, making it potentially attractive for technological applications in the temperature range 20-30 K. But in the bulk material, the critical current density (Jc) drops rapidly with increasing magnetic field strength. The magnitude and field dependence of the critical current are related to the presence of structural defects that can 'pin' the quantized magnetic vortices that permeate the material, and a lack of natural defects in MgB2 may be responsible for the rapid decline of Jc with increasing field strength. Here we show that modest levels of atomic disorder induced by proton irradiation enhance the pinning of vortices, thereby significantly increasing Jc at high field strengths. We anticipate that either chemical doping or mechanical processing should generate similar levels of disorder, and so achieve performance that is technologically attractive in an economically viable way.

  10. Quark Matter in a Parallel Electric and Magnetic Field Background: Equilibrated Chiral Density Effect on Chiral Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggieri, M

    2016-01-01

    In this article we study spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking for quark matter in the background of an electric-magnetic flux tube with static, homogeneous and parallel electric field $\\bm E$ and magnetic field $\\bm B$. We use a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with a local kernel interaction to compute the relevant quantities to describe chiral symmetry breaking at finite temperature for a wide range of $E$ and $B$. We study the effect of the flux tube background on inverse catalysis of chiral symmetry breaking for $E$ and $B$ of the same order of magnitude. We then focus on the effect of equilibration of chiral density, $n_5$, produced dynamically by axial anomaly on the critical temperature. The equilibration of $n_5$, a consequence of chirality flipping processes in the thermal bath, allows for the introduction of the chiral chemical potential, $\\mu_5$, which is computed self-consistently as a function of temperature and field strength by coupling the number equation to the gap equation. We find that even if chir...

  11. Measuring the interaction force between a high temperature superconductor and a permanent magnet

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, S. O.; Jorge, G. A.; Rodriguez, E.

    1999-01-01

    Repulsive and attractive forces are both possible between a superconducting sample and a permanent magnet, and they can give place to magnetic levitation or free-suspension phenomena, respectively. We show experiments to quantify this magnetic interaction which represents a promising field regarding to short-term technological applications of high temperature superconductors. The measuring technique employs an electronic balance and a rare-earth magnet that induces a magnetic moment in a melt...

  12. Improving Recording Density of All-Optical Magnetic Storage by Using High-Pass Angular Spectrum Filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG You-Yi; ZHANG Yao-Ju

    2009-01-01

    A new design is presented to improve the magnetic recording density in all-optical magnetic storage.By using the high numerical lens with a high-pass angular spectrum filter, circularly polarized laser pulses are focused into the magneto-optic film with the perpendicular anisotropy.Magnetization of the film is induced by the inverse Faraday effect.As the obstructed angle of the filter increases the magnetic recording density increases evidently.The magnetization intensity and the sidelobe effect are also discussed.

  13. An investigation into the torque density capabilities of flux-focusing magnetic gearboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppalapati, Krishna Kiran

    Wind and many rotary based ocean energy conversion devices rely on a mechanical gearbox to increase their speed so as to match the requirements of the electromagnetic generator. However, mechanical gearboxes have a number of disadvantages such as the need for gear lubrication, no overload protection and the creation of acoustic noise. Frequently direct-drive generators are employed to overcome these issues, wherein the gearbox is removed and the shaft of the turbine is directly connected to the synchronous generator, either with an electrically excited or permanent magnet rotor. If the input speed to the generator is very low the torque must be very high in order to generate the necessary power. However, as the electrical loading of a synchronous generator is thermally limited, the size of the generator will become excessively large at high power levels. An alternative to these technologies is to consider replacing the mechanical gearbox with a magnetic gear. A magnetic gear can create speed change without any physical contact. It has inherent overload protection, and its non-contact operation offers the potential for high reliability. Despite significant progress, existing magnetic gear designs do not achieve torque densities that are competitive with mechanical gearboxes. This research has focused on designing a coaxial magnetic gear that can operate at a volumetric torque density that is comparable to a mechanical gearbox. A flux-focusing rotor topology also called spoke-type rotor magnet arrangement was adopted to improve the air-gap magnetic flux density which in turn improves the torque transferred between the rotors. Finite element analysis was utilized to conduct a parameter sweep analysis of the different geometric parameters of the magnetic gear. A sub-scale magnetic gear with a diameter of 110 mm and a scaled-up magnetic gear with a diameter of 228 mm was designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated. The torque and torque density of sub

  14. Superconductivity and magnetic field induced spin density waves in the (TMTTF)2X family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balicas, L.; Behnia, K.; Kang, W.; Canadell, E.; Auban-Senzier, P.; Jérome, D.; Ribault, M.; Fabre, J. M.

    1994-10-01

    We report magnetotransport measurements in the quasi one dimensional (Q-1-D) organic conductor (TMTTF)2Br at pressures up to 26 kbar, clown to 0.45 K in magnetic fields up to 19 T along the c^{ast} direction. It is found that a superconducting ground state is stabilized under 26 kbar at T_C = 0.8 K. No magnetic field induced spin density wave (FISDW) transitions are observed below 19T unlike other Q-1-D superconductors pertaining to the selenium series. The computed amplitude of the interchain coupling along transverse directions is unable to explain the missing; FISDW instability.

  15. Electronic and magnetic properties of Pd-Ni multilayers: Study using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Guillermina; Cabeza, Gabriela F.; Belelli, Patricia G.

    2009-10-01

    Electronic and magnetic properties of Pd-Ni multilayers have been studied using VASP method in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculations performed for different configurations (Pd n/Ni m(1 1 1), where n Pd layers are piled up over m Ni layers with n=0 to 4 and n+m=4), reveal that the important magnetic moment of Ni is significantly enhanced according as n increases due to hybridization effects between Pd and Ni mostly localized at the interface. The results also indicate that the Pd atoms are strongly polarized in the studied systems when compared with the pure metal.

  16. Electronic and magnetic properties of Pd-Ni multilayers: Study using density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Guillermina [Grupo de Materiales y Sistemas Cataliticos, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avda. Alem 1253, Bahia Blanca, B8000CPB (Argentina); Cabeza, Gabriela F. [CONICET (Argentina)], E-mail: gcabeza@uns.edu.ar; Belelli, Patricia G. [CONICET (Argentina)

    2009-10-15

    Electronic and magnetic properties of Pd-Ni multilayers have been studied using VASP method in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculations performed for different configurations (Pd{sub n}/Ni{sub m}(1 1 1), where n Pd layers are piled up over m Ni layers with n=0 to 4 and n+m=4), reveal that the important magnetic moment of Ni is significantly enhanced according as n increases due to hybridization effects between Pd and Ni mostly localized at the interface. The results also indicate that the Pd atoms are strongly polarized in the studied systems when compared with the pure metal.

  17. Finite Element Modeling of Five Phase Permanent Magnet BLDC Motor for High Power Density Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran George

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fault-tolerant capability of electrical motor drives is an essential feature in applications such as automotive, aeronautic, and many others. A multi-phase permanent-magnet BLDC motor exhibits a high fault tolerant capability hence increasing the reliability, as it can be designed to reduce the fault occurrence as well as to operate indefinitely in the presence of fault. With multi independent phases, in the event of failure of one or more, the remaining healthy phases let the motor to operate properly. This paper presents finite element modeling and results of a five-phase permanent magnet brushless motor designed for high power density application .

  18. Temperature stability and fracture toughness of Nd-Fe-B magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; QI Yuxuan; LI Xiumei

    2006-01-01

    Temperature stability and toughness of magnets are very important properties especially for application in motor. In this paper, it is found that temperature stability and toughness of magnets are improved when Fe is substituted with Co andheavy rare earth is substituted for Nd in part and suitable rich B grain-boundary phase is added. In addition, heavy rare earth substitution decreases the remanence temperature coefficient greatly, but has a little effect on Curie temperature of the magnets, which is beneficial to Nd-Fe-B magnets for the application in motor.

  19. Accelerated Testing of High Temperature Permanent Magnets for Spacecraft Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High temperature permanent magnet materials play an important role in NASA's space missions in electric propulsion, energy generation and storage and other...

  20. Spin-polarized versus chiral condensate in quark matter at finite temperature and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providencia, Joao

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low-energy ef......It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low......-energy effective model that the chiral symmetry is broken again by the spin-polarized condensate on increasing the quark number density, while chiral symmetry restoration occurs, in which the chiral condensate disappears at a certain density....

  1. Asymmetry energy of nuclear matter: Temperature and density dependence, and validity of semi-empirical formula

    CERN Document Server

    Bordbar, G H; Taghizade, M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have done a completely microscopic calculation using a many-body variational method based on the cluster expansion of energy to compute the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter. In our calculations, we have employed the $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. We have also investigated the temperature and density dependence of asymmetry energy. Our results show that the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter depends on both density and temperature. We have also studied the effects of different terms in the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter. These investigations indicate that at different densities and temperatures, the contribution of parabolic term is very substantial with respect to the other terms. Therefore, we can conclude that the parabolic approximation is a relatively good estimation, and our calculated binding energy of asymmetric nuclear matter is in a relatively good agreement with that of semi-empirical mass formula. However, for the accurate calculations, it is better to consider the effects of o...

  2. High thermal power density heat transfer apparatus providing electrical isolation at high temperature using heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention is directed to transferring heat from an extremely high temperature source to an electrically isolated lower temperature receiver. The invention is particularly concerned with supplying thermal power to a thermionic converter from a nuclear reactor with electric isolation. Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. If the receiver requires gratr thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparative low thermal power densities through the electrically nonconducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  3. Electron number density and temperature measurements in laser produced brass plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, A. A.; Mostafa, N. Y.; Abdel-Aal, M. S.; Shaban, H. A.

    2010-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used for brass plasma diagnostic using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated, including repetition rate, number of laser shots on sample, and laser energy. The plasma temperatures and the electron number densities were determined from the emission spectra of LIBS. Cu and Zn spectral lines were used for excitation temperature calculation using Saha-Boltzmann distribution as well as line pair ratio. It was found that, the excitation temperature calculated by using Saha-Boltzmann distribution and line pair ratio methods are not the same. The electron number density has been evaluated from the Stark broadening of Hα transition at 656.27 nm and the calculated electron number density is agreement with literature.

  4. Developments in lattice quantum chromodynamics for matter at high temperature and density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gert Aarts

    2015-05-01

    A brief overview of the QCD phase diagram at nonzero temperature and density is provided. It is explained why standard lattice QCD techniques are not immediately applicable for its determination, due to the sign problem. A selection of recent lattice approaches that attempt to evade the sign problem are then discussed and classified according to the underlying principle: constrained simulations (density of states, histograms), holomorphicity (complex Langevin, Lefschetz thimbles), partial summations (clusters, subsets, bags) and change in integration order (strong coupling, dual formulations).

  5. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P. D.; Miller, G. E.; Weijers, H. W.; Willering, G. P.

    2013-02-13

    The next generation of high-ï¬eld magnets that will operate at magnetic ï¬elds substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a flexible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  6. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P. D.; Miller, G. E.; Weijers, H. W.; Willering, G. P.

    2013-02-13

    The next generation of high-ï¬eld magnets that will operate at magnetic ï¬elds substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a flexible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  7. The influence of low temperature on gamma-ray irradiated permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young Chul; Cha, Hyun Gil; Kim, Chang Woo; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Young Hwan; Kang, Dong In; Kang, Young Soo

    2009-12-01

    The temperature effect on the magnetic property of gamma-ray irradiated Nd-Fe-B and Sr-Ferrite magnets has been investigated. When the permanent magnets are exposed to gamma-ray, it's magnetic and other related properties are declined with degree of dose. The decreased magnetic property by gamma-ray irradiation at low temperature is similar with the result of magnet at high temperature. The temperature effect on the gamma-ray irradiation at exposed moment is also regarded as one of the important parameters for the reduced magnetic properties. The gamma-irradiation at low temperature was carried out at 195 K, and the changed properties of two kinds of magnets before and after gamma-irradiation were comparatively studied. The increased demagnetization of the magnets were studied by Hall probe. And changed Curie temperature and micro-crystal structure of each permanent magnet by gamma-ray irradiation has been also studied. Moreover the strong and broad single line shape of ESR signal in the resonance magnetic field is attributed to unpaired electron of Fe2+ in the sample by the effect of gamma-ray irradiation.

  8. The role of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and water velocity in determining river temperature dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Grace; Malcolm, Iain A.; Sadler, Jonathan P.; Hannah, David M.

    2017-10-01

    A simulation experiment was used to understand the importance of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and flow velocity for stream energy budgets and river temperature dynamics. Water temperature and meteorological observations were obtained in addition to hemispherical photographs along a ∼1 km reach of the Girnock Burn, a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland. Data from nine hemispherical images (representing different uniform canopy density scenarios) were used to parameterise a deterministic net radiation model and simulate radiative fluxes. For each vegetation scenario, the effects of eight channel orientations were investigated by changing the position of north at 45° intervals in each hemispheric image. Simulated radiative fluxes and observed turbulent fluxes drove a high-resolution water temperature model of the reach. Simulations were performed under low and high water velocity scenarios. Both velocity scenarios yielded decreases in mean (≥1.6 °C) and maximum (≥3.0 °C) temperature as canopy density increased. Slow-flowing water resided longer within the reach, which enhanced heat accumulation and dissipation, and drove higher maximum and lower minimum temperatures. Intermediate levels of shade produced highly variable energy flux and water temperature dynamics depending on the channel orientation and thus the time of day when the channel was shaded. We demonstrate that in many reaches relatively sparse but strategically located vegetation could produce substantial reductions in maximum temperature and suggest that these criteria are used to inform future river management.

  9. Superconductors with low critical temperature for electro-magnets; Supraconducteurs a basse temperature critique pour electroaimants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A

    2002-07-01

    Among the superconductors with low critical temperature that are used to build magnets, NbTi has reached a development state that allows a massive production for big equipment of physics and an industrial production in the domain of medicine imaging. The material that might challenge the supremacy of NbTi is Nb{sub 3}Sn but some technical difficulties have yet to be overcome. This report begins with a review of the different industrial processes used to produce superconducting wires based on the NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn materials. The transition from the superconducting state to the resistive normal state is described for both materials, the magnetizing of multi-wire superconducting cables is also presented. The author details the different patterns of wires in cables and proposes a formulary that allows the determination, in some simple cases,of energy losses that are generated in a superconducting cable by a variable magnetic field. (A.C.)

  10. Quantal density functional theory (QDFT) in the presence of a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyin; Yang, Tao; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-03-01

    We present the QDFT of electrons in an external electrostatic E (r) = - ∇ v (r) and magnetostatic B (r) = ∇ × A (r) field. This is the mapping from the interacting system of electrons to one of noninteracting fermions with the same density ρ (r) and physical current density j (r) . The mapping, based on the `quantal Newtonian' first law, is in terms of `classical' fields and quantal sources, the fields being separately representative of electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle and Coulomb repulsion, and correlation-kinetic and correlation-magnetic effects. The theory is valid for ground and excited states. It is explicated by application to a ground state of the exactly solvable Hooke's atom in the presence of a magnetic field. Supported by National NSF, China and RF CUNY.

  11. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta, E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Temmerman, Greg De [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oost, Guido Van [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Möller, Sören [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10{sup 23} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s and low: 9 · 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10{sup 26} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion.

  12. Temperature effect on the magnetic property and ferroelectricity in hexaferrite SrFe12O19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Gang; Jin, Yuan; Lu, Xiaowen; Cui, Xiaopeng; Deng, Dongmei; Kang, Baojuan; Yang, Wuguo; Cao, Shixun; Zhang, Jincang

    2016-07-01

    We studied the temperature effect on magnetic and electrical properties in bulk SrFe12O19 prepared by conventional ceramic technique. The jumping behavior of magnetization has been observed under the zero-field-cooling mode, but disappeared under the field-cooled cooling mode. The spin moment of iron ions reorients below 50 K leading to the magnetic structure changes. Magnetic parameters, saturation magnetization (Ms) and coercivity field (Hc), show opposite tendency with temperature throughout the measuring range, which is mainly ascribed to the Fe3+ ions situated at 4f2 and 2b sites. The curves of electrical polarization P vs temperature T under different external magnetic field indicate the existence of ferroelectricity and magnetoelectric coupling effect at low temperature, and the transition temperature T P is about 120 K.

  13. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 69 GPa and a temperature of 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were able to track magnetic ordering temperature only till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hcp phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remains localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.

  14. MAGNETIC PROPERTY CHANGE IN AN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL SUBJECTED TO DAMAGE AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE - MICROSTRUCTURE RESPONSIBLE FOR MAGNETIC PROPERTY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Nagae; K.Aoto

    2004-01-01

    It has been found that magnetic property changes in austenitic stainless steel subjected to creep at high temperature. The change of magnetic property is mainly due to decrease the chromium concentration in the vicinity of grain boundary and transform into martensite in the area. However this result is for short-term creep. It is necessary to evaluate the long-term creep in order to develop non-destructive technique for plants. Moreover it is important to evaluate the fatigue. The change of magnetic property for those damages at high temperatures is investigated. The transformation into martensite is observed for both the long-term creep and fatigue. The magnetic regions are observed in sever deformed area and near crack. Then the formation of magnetic phases is related to the damage. The damage at high temperature can be universally evaluated.

  15. Magnetic reconnection in the presence of sheared flow and density asymmetry: Applications to the Earth's magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Belle-Hamer, A. L.; Otto, A.; Lee, L. C.

    1995-01-01

    Classical models of magnetic reconnection consist of a small diffusion region bounded by two symmetric slow shocks, across which the plasma is accelerated. Asymmetries often present in space plasmas are sheared plasma flow and dissimilar plasma densities on the two sides of current sheets. In this paper, we investigate magnetic reconnection in the presence of a shear flow and an asymmetric density across the current sheet using two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The results demonstrate that magnetic reconnection can occur only for a plasma flow velocity (in the frame of the X line) which is below the Alfven speed in each inflow region. This limits the velocity of the X line to a certain range for a given flow shear and provides an upper limit to the total velocity shear at which reconnection ceases to operate. Depending on the direction of the flow in the adjacent inflow region, the effects from the sheared flow and from the density asymmetry will compete with or enhance each other in respect to the magnitude and location of the currents which bound the outflow regions. The results are applied to the dayside and flank regions of the magnetosphere. For the dayside region where the magnetosheath flow is slow, the magnetic field transition region is thin and the accelerated flow is earthward of the sharp current layer (magnetopause). At the flanks tailward of the X line, shear flow and density asymmetry effects compete making the magnetic field transition layer broad with the high-speed flow contained within the transition region which explains corresponding observations. At the flanks sunward of the X line, shear flow and density asymmetry effects enhance each other and lead to a strong current sheet on the magnetosheath side of the accelerated flow. The total volume affected by magnetic reconnection is much larger than the steady state region. A large bulge region precedes the steady state region. Qualitatively, the bulge and the steady state

  16. Effect of Sm Volatilization on Magnetic Microstructures of Sintered Sm(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr)z Magnets at High Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Ai-Lin; FANG Yi-Kun; GUO Zhao-Hui; LI Wei; HAN Bao-Shan

    2006-01-01

    @@ We present a magnetic force microscopy study of surface magnetic microstructure changes at high temperatures in 2:17-type Sm( Co, Fe, Cu,Zr)z (z ~ 7.4) magnets. Surface magnetic microstructures are found to change greatly in parallel and vertical specimens after heat-treatment at 400℃ for one hour in vacuum of 10-5 Torr with Ar gas as protecting atmosphere. Changes of microstructures are attributed to the formation of a soft-magnetic surfaces layer in the specimens, resulting from Sm volatilization due to high temperature. This hypothesis is further confirmed by the heat-treatment experiments at 400℃ for 0.5 h and 2 h. Finally, the existence of the soft-magnetic layers, which consist primarily of Fe-Co compounds, is verified by the results of both XRD and XPS of the vertical specimens before and after heat-treatment.

  17. $\\Delta$ self-energy at finite temperature and density and the $\\pi N$ cross-section

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sourav

    2016-01-01

    The self energy of $\\Delta$-baryon is evaluated at finite temperature and density using the real time formalism of thermal field theory. The Dyson-Schwinger equation is used to get the exact thermal propagator followed by the spectral function of $\\Delta$. The $\\pi N$ scattering cross section obtained using explicit $\\Delta$ exchange is normalized to the experimental data in vacuum and its medium modification is implemented by means of the exact thermal propagator. A significant suppression of the peak is observed at higher temperature and baryon density.

  18. Binding Energy Calculation of Electrons in Statistical Potentials for Arbitrary Temperature and Matter Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunYongsheng; MengXujun

    1990-01-01

    Schroedinger's wave equation is solved in Thomas-Fermi potential including the self-interaction modification of elctrons for arbitrary matter density and temperature,In order to describe relativistic effects,the mass-velocity correction,the Darwin correction and the spin-orbit coupling terms are included in the wave equation.Calculations are presented for the Fe26 and Rb37 atoms at a few temperatures and matter densities.Comparisons of present results with other more accurate one[9] are given in Table.The data obtained by the present method are not bad.

  19. Growth, temperature and density relationships of North Sea cod ( Gadus morhua )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Jensen, Henrik; Schrum, Corinna

    2008-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the relationship between ambient temperature, cod density, fishing mortality, prey fish biomass, and growth of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua) as estimated from survey catches during the period from 1983 to 2006. Growth of young cod was positively related to temper......This study presents an analysis of the relationship between ambient temperature, cod density, fishing mortality, prey fish biomass, and growth of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua) as estimated from survey catches during the period from 1983 to 2006. Growth of young cod was positively related...

  20. Temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanostructured MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction over a wide current-pulse range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Boram; Lim, Sang Ho

    2011-07-01

    The temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanopillar of a magnetic tunnel junction sandwiched by top and bottom electrodes was calculated by the finite element method. The results for the critical condition for the current-induced magnetization switching measured over a wide current-pulse range were taken from the literature. At long pulse widths, the temperature increase was solely dependent on the magnitude of the critical current density. However, no saturation in the temperature increase occurred for short pulse widths. In this case, the temperature increase additionally depended on the pulse width, so that a broad maximum occurred in the pulse width (or the critical current density) dependence of the temperature increase. The original results for the critical condition were corrected by accounting for the temperature increase and these corrected results, together with the Slonczewski equation, were used to extract an accurate value for the thermal stability factor.

  1. High-temperature annealing effects on multiwalled carbon nanotubes: electronic structure, field emission and magnetic behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sekhar Chandra; Pao, Chih-Wen; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Chen, Huang-Chin; Chen, Yu-Shin; Wu, Shang-Lun; Ling, Dah-Chin; Lin, I-Nan; Pong, Way-Faung; Gupta, Sanju; Giorcelli, Mauro; Bianco, Stefano; Musso, Simone; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    This work elucidates the effects of high-temperature annealing on the microscopic and electronic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VBPES), respectively. The field emission and magnetization behaviors are also presented. The results of annealing are as follows: (1) MWCNTs tend to align in the form of small fringes along their length, promote graphitization and be stable in air, (2) XANES indicates an enhancement in oxygen content on the sample, implying that it can be adopted for sensing and storing oxygen gas, (3) the electron field emission current density (J) is enhanced and the turn-on electric field (E(TOE)) reduced, suggesting potential use in field emission displays and as electron sources in microwave tube amplifiers and (4) as-grown MWCNTs with embedded iron nanoparticles exhibits significantly higher coercivity approximately 750 Oe than its bulk counterpart (Fe(bulk) approximately 0.9 Oe), suggesting its potential use as low-dimensional high-density magnetic recording media.

  2. Alfvenic Ion Temperature Gradient Activities in a Weak Magnetic Shear Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, W; Li, Y Y; Shi, Z B; Du, H R; Jiang, M; Yu, L M; Yuan, B S; Li, Y G; Yang, Z C; Shi, P W; Ding, X T; Dong, J Q; Liu, Yi; Xu, M; Xu, Y H; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R

    2016-01-01

    We report the first experimental evidence of Alfvenic ion temperature gradient (AITG) modes in HL-2A Ohmic plasmas. A group of oscillations with $f=15-40$ kHz and $n=3-6$ is detected by various diagnostics in high-density Ohmic regimes. They appear in the plasmas with peaked density profiles and weak magnetic shear, which indicates that corresponding instabilities are excited by pressure gradients. The time trace of the fluctuation spectrogram can be either a frequency staircase, with different modes excited at different times or multiple modes may simultaneously coexist. Theoretical analyses by the extended generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation (GFLDR-E) reveal that mode frequencies scale with ion diamagnetic drift frequency and $\\eta_i$, and they lie in KBM-AITG-BAE frequency ranges. AITG modes are most unstable when the magnetic shear is small in low pressure gradient regions. Numerical solutions of the AITG/KBM equation also illuminate why AITG modes can be unstable for weak shear and low pressure...

  3. Emergent singular solutions of nonlocal density-magnetization equations in one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Darryl D; O Náraigh, Lennon; Tronci, Cesare

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the emergence of singular solutions in a nonlocal model for a magnetic system. We study a modified Gilbert-type equation for the magnetization vector and find that the evolution depends strongly on the length scales of the nonlocal effects. We pass to a coupled density-magnetization model and perform a linear stability analysis, noting the effect of the length scales of nonlocality on the system's stability properties. We carry out numerical simulations of the coupled system and find that singular solutions emerge from smooth initial data. The singular solutions represent a collection of interacting particles (clumpons). By restricting ourselves to the two-clumpon case, we are reduced to a two-dimensional dynamical system that is readily analyzed, and thus we classify the different clumpon interactions possible.

  4. Spin polarization in high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Da Providência, João; Providência, Constança

    2016-01-01

    In high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field, possible phases are investigated by using the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with tensor-type four-point interaction between quarks, as well as the axial-vector-type four-point interaction. In the tensor......-type interaction under the strong external magnetic field, it is shown that a quark spin polarized phase is realized in all regions of the quark chemical potential under consideration within the lowest Landau level approximation. In the axial-vector-type interaction, it is also shown that the quark spin polarized...... phase appears in the wide range of the quark chemical potential. In both the interactions, the quark mass in zero and small chemical potential regions increases which indicates that the chiral symmetry breaking is enhanced, namely the magnetic catalysis occurs....

  5. Microstructure and magnetic performance of Ni-substituted high density MnZn ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhong; LAN Zhongwen; CHEN Shengming; SUN Yueming; SUN Ke

    2006-01-01

    The effects of NiO on microstructure and magnetic properties of Mn-Zn ferrite with a nominal composition of Zn0.32Mn0.60-xNixFe2.08O4 were investigated. The calcined powder of Mn-Zn ferrite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), the fracture surface of Mn-Zn ferrite was checked by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and then the magnetic properties were measured. As a result, the substitution of Ni can cause the crystallattice constant of MnZn ferrite to decline, and the grain size to decrease, therefore improve the magnetic performance of MnZn ferrite whose density exceeds 5.0 g·cm-3.

  6. Laser Plasmas : Density oscillations in laser produced plasma decelerated by external magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N Rai; M Shukla; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents the dynamics as well as the stability of laser produced plasma expanding across the magnetic field. Observation of some high frequency fluctuations superimposed on ion saturation current along with structuring in the pin hole images of x-ray emitting plasma plume indicate the presence of instability in the plasma. Two type of slope in the variation of x-ray emission with laser intensity in the absence and presence of magnetic field shows appearance of different threshold intensity of laser corresponding to each magnetic field at which this instability or density fluctuation sets on. This instability has been identified as a large Larmor radius instability instead of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability.

  7. Non-anomalous magnetization density distribution in CeB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givord, F.; Boucherle, J.-X.; Burlet, P.; Gillon, B.; Kunii, S.

    2003-05-01

    Results of polarized neutron diffraction on the compound CeB6 are used to obtain its magnetization density distribution. The measurements are performed at two different points of the magnetic phase diagram (phase I and II). The data are analysed in direct space using the maximum entropy method, as well as in reciprocal space using the cerium form factor expansion and anisotropy. The conclusion is that, in both phases, the magnetization is localized on the cerium sites only. This result is in contradiction to a recent paper by Saitoh et al (2002 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 71 2369), claiming that, in phase II, a localized spin moment was observed at non-atomic sites.

  8. Time Ordering Effects on Hydrogen Zeeman-Stark Line Profiles in Low-Density Magnetized Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rosato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening of hydrogen lines is investigated in low-density magnetized plasmas, at typical conditions of magnetic fusion experiments. The role of time ordering is assessed numerically, by using a simulation code accounting for the evolution of the microscopic electric field generated by the charged particles moving at the vicinity of the atom. The Zeeman effect due to the magnetic field is also retained. Lyman lines with a low principal quantum number n are first investigated, for an application to opacity calculations; next Balmer lines with successively low and high principal quantum numbers are considered for diagnostic purposes. It is shown that neglecting time ordering results in a dramatic underestimation of the Stark effect on the low-n lines. Another conclusion is that time ordering becomes negligible only when ion dynamics effects vanish, as shown in the case of high-n lines.

  9. Mössbauer spectroscopy research on magnetic softening of Fe84B10C6 amorphous alloy during low-temperature annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C. C.; Wang, Y. G.; Xia, G. T.; Zhu, L.; Meng, Y.; Zhai, X. B.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanism of magnetic softening in Fe84B10C6 amorphous alloys annealed at a temperature below the crystallization temperature has been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy. With the prolongation of annealing time, saturation flux density (B\\text{S}) increases gradually but coercivity (H\\text{C}) firstly declines to a minimum and then increases drastically. All the modulations of local structure strengthen the magnetic exchange between Fe neighbor atoms during low-temperature annealing. The structural relaxation at the early stage of annealing including annihilation of excess free volume and residual stress rotates the easy axis to the ribbon plane and weakens magnetic anisotropy, while the subsequent structural relaxation contributing to chemical inhomogeneity results in the inverse situation. Thus, appropriate annealing can magnetically soften amorphous alloys. For the Fe84B10C6 amorphous alloy, soft magnetic properties are optimized when annealed at 493 K for 100 s.

  10. Supersymmetry and R-symmetry Breaking in Meta-stable Vacua at Finite Temperature and Density

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Masato; Sasaki, Shin

    2014-01-01

    We study a meta-stable supersymmetry-breaking vacuum in a generalized O'Raifeartaigh model at finite temperature and chemical potentials. Fields in the generalized O'Raifeartaigh model possess different R-charges to realize R-symmetry breaking. Accordingly, at finite density and temperature, the chemical potentials have to be introduced in a non-uniform way. Based on the formulation elaborated in our previous work we study the one-loop thermal effective potential including the chemical potentials in the generalized O'Raifeartaigh model. We perform the numerical analysis and find that the R-symmetry breaking vacua, which exist at zero temperature and zero chemical potential, are destabilized for some parameter regions. In addition, we find that there are parameter regions where new R-symmetry breaking vacua are realized even at high temperature by the finite density effects.

  11. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Kramar, Maxim; Lin, Haosheng

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4\\ \\mathrm{R}_\\odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 \\AA \\ band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $\\sim 2.5 \\ \\mathrm{R}_\\odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the a...

  12. Gauge-Origin Independent Calculations of the Anisotropy of the Magnetically Induced Current Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegl, Heike; Jusélius, Jonas; Sundholm, Dage

    2016-07-21

    Gauge-origin independent current density susceptibility tensors have been computed using the gauge-including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method. The anisotropy of the magnetically induced current density (ACID) functions constructed from the current density susceptibility tensors are therefore gauge-origin independent. The ability of the gauge-origin independent ACID function to provide quantitative information about the current flow along chemical bonds has been assessed by integrating the cross-section area of the ACID function in the middle of chemical bonds. Analogously, the current strength susceptibility passing a given plane through the molecule is obtained by numerical integration of the current flow parallel to the normal vector of the integration plane. The cross-section area of the ACID function is found to be strongly dependent on the exact location of the integration plane, which is in sheer contrast to the calculated ring-current strength susceptibilities that are practically independent of the chosen position of the integration plane. The gauge-origin independent ACID functions plotted for different isosurface values show that a visual assessment of the current flow and degree of aromaticity depends on the chosen isosurface. The present study shows that ACID functions are not an unambiguous means to estimate the degree of molecular aromaticity according to the magnetic criterion and to determine the current pathway of complex molecular rings.

  13. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing; Li, Hui; Stone, James M.

    2017-08-01

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ, of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  14. Low temperature specific heat of the Kondo-semimetal CeNiSn in zero and applied magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckl, A.; Neumaier, K.; Einzel, D.; Andres, K. [Walther-Meissner-Inst., Garching (Germany); Flaschin, S.; Kalvius, G.M. [Technical Univ. Munich, Garching (Germany). Physics Dept.; Nakamoto, G. [Japan Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Ishikawa (Japan); Takabatake, T. [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Matter

    1999-06-01

    The specific heat of several CeNiSn single crystals of various purity has been measured in the temperature range from 25 mK to 5 K and in magnetic fields from zero to 7 Tesla. At very low temperatures (below {approximately} 200 mK) the specific heat is found to vary linearly with temperature (C = {gamma}T), the coefficient {gamma} decreasing with increasing purity. Above 200 mK, the specific heat is well described as the sum of a linear and a quadratic term. An applied magnetic field affects mostly the linear term, which first slightly decreases, then strongly increases with field. In magnetic fields, a nuclear hyperfine specific heat contribution is superimposed, which is due mostly to the bare Zeeman-splitting of the {sup 115}Sn, {sup 117}Sn, {sup 119}Sn nuclei (all with spin I = 1/2 and with abundances of 0.35, 7.61, and 8.58% respectively) in the externally applied field. The results on the specific heat at very low temperatures in applied fields fit into the model of an enhanced (heavy-fermion type) density of states which is modified by coherent antiferromagnetic fluctuations into a V-shaped density of states at the Fermi energy.

  15. New method in computer simulations of electron and ion densities and temperatures in the plasmasphere and low-latitude ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available A new theoretical model of the Earth’s low- and mid-latitude ionosphere and plasmasphere has been developed. The new model uses a new method in ionospheric and plasmaspheric simulations which is a combination of the Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches in model simulations. The electron and ion continuity and energy equations are solved in a Lagrangian frame of reference which moves with an individual parcel of plasma with the local plasma drift velocity perpendicular to the magnetic and electric fields. As a result, only the time-dependent, one-dimension electron and ion continuity and energy equations are solved in this Lagrangian frame of reference. The new method makes use of an Eulerian computational grid which is fixed in space co-ordinates and chooses the set of the plasma parcels at every time step, so that all the plasma parcels arrive at points which are located between grid lines of the regularly spaced Eulerian computational grid at the next time step. The solution values of electron and ion densities Ne and Ni and temperatures Te and Ti at the Eulerian computational grid are obtained by interpolation. Equations which determine the trajectory of the ionospheric plasma perpendicular to magnetic field lines and take into account that magnetic field lines are "frozen" in the ionospheric plasma are derived and included in the new model. We have presented a comparison between the modeled NmF2 and hmF2 and NmF2 and hmF2 which were observed at the anomaly crest and close to the geomagnetic equator simultaneously by the Huancayo, Chiclayo, Talara, Bogota, Panama, and Puerto Rico ionospheric sounders during the 7 October 1957 geomagnetically quiet time period at solar maximum. The model calculations show that there is a need to revise the model local time dependence of the equatorial upward E × B drift velocity given by Scherliess and Fejer (1999 at solar maximum during quiet

  16. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  17. Effects on magnetic reconnection of a density asymmetry across the current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Tanaka

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The magnetopause (MP reconnection is characterized by a density asymmetry across the current sheet. The asymmetry is expected to produce characteristic features in the reconnection layer. Here we present a comparison between the Cluster MP crossing reported by Retinò et al. (2006 and virtual observations in two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation results. The simulation, which includes the density asymmetry but has zero guide field in the initial condition, has reproduced well the observed features as follows: (1 The prominent density dip region is detected at the separatrix region (SR on the magnetospheric (MSP side of the MP. (2 The intense electric field normal to the MP is pointing to the center of the MP at the location where the density dip is detected. (3 The ion bulk outflow due to the magnetic reconnection is seen to be biased towards the MSP side. (4 The out-of-plane magnetic field (the Hall magnetic field has bipolar rather than quadrupolar structure, the latter of which is seen for a density symmetric case. The simulation also showed rich electron dynamics (formation of field-aligned beams in the proximity of the separatrices, which was not fully resolved in the observations. Stepping beyond the simulation-observation comparison, we have also analyzed the electron acceleration and the field line structure in the simulation results. It is found that the bipolar Hall magnetic field structure is produced by the substantial drift of the reconnected field lines at the MSP SR due to the enhanced normal electric field. The field-aligned electrons at the same MSP SR are identified as the gun smokes of the electron acceleration in the close proximity of the X-line. We have also analyzed the X-line structure obtained in the simulation to find that the density asymmetry leads to a steep density gradient in the in-flow region, which may lead to a non-stationary behavior of the X-line when three-dimensional freedom is taken into account.

  18. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y.

    2013-07-01

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and additional DSC data on nanocomposites and pure PI resin. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02842a

  19. Finite Temperature and Density Effects in Higher Dimensions with and without Compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Expressions for the thermodynamic potential of a Dirac fermion gas are represented at finite temperature with the chemical potential in an ultrastatic space $R^d\\times S^N$. The high- and low- temperature expansions for the thermodynamic potential are obtained and, in particular, strongly degenerate fermi gas is investigated. For the Candelas-Weinberg model, sufficiently high "charge" density prevents the compactification of the extra space.

  20. A New Tool for Separating the Magnetic Mineralogy of Complex Mineral Assemblages from Low Temperature Magnetic Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Lagroix

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One timeless challenge in rock magnetic studies, inclusive of paleomagnetism and environmental magnetism, is decomposing a sample's bulk magnetic behavior into its individual magnetic mineral components. We present a method permitting to decompose the magnetic behavior of a bulk sample experimentally and at low temperature avoiding any ambiguities in data interpretation due to heating-induced alteration. A single instrument is used to measure the temperature dependence of remanent magnetizations and to apply an isothermal demagnetization step at any temperature between 2 and 400 K. The experimental method is validated on synthetic mixtures of magnetite, hematite, goethite as well as on natural loess samples where the contributions of magnetite, goethite, hematite and maghemite are successfully isolated. The experimental protocol can be adapted to target other iron bearing minerals relevant to the rock or sediment under study. One limitation rests on the fact that the method is based on remanent magnetizations. Consequently, a quantitative decomposition of absolute concentration of individual components remains unachievable without assumptions. Nonetheless, semi-quantitative magnetic mineral concentrations were determined on synthetic and natural loess/paleosol samples in order to validate and test the method as a semi-quantitative tool in environmental magnetism studies.

  1. Temperature and quark density effects on the chiral condensate: an AdS/QCD study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colangelo, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Giannuzzi, F.; Nicotri, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bari (Italy); Tangorra, V. [Universita degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bari (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the dependence of the chiral condensate left angle anti qq right angle on the temperature and quark density using the soft-wall holographic model of QCD, adopting geometries with black holes at finite temperature and quark chemical potential {mu}. We find that, for {mu} below a critical value, increasing the temperature the condensate decreases and vanishes at a temperature T{approx_equal}210{proportional_to} MeV (at {mu}=0). An analogous behaviour is observed increasing the chemical potential at fixed temperature. These results agree with the findings obtained by other methods. We also comment on the robustness of the results if geometries not involving black holes are adopted at low temperature, and an Hawking-Page transition is implemented. (orig.)

  2. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  3. Ion density and temperature profiles along (XGSM) and across (ZGSM) the magnetotail as observed by THEMIS, Geotail, and ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hietala, H.; Runov, A.; Shinohara, I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristics of the two-dimensional configuration of the magnetotail current sheet are important for modeling magnetotail motion/evolution and charged particle energization. Because of the magnetotail current sheet's dynamical nature, however, simultaneous plasma and magnetic field measurements at different radial distances are required to reveal this configuration. Simultaneous observations of the magnetotail current sheet from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) D (around 10RE downtail), Geotail (around 30RE downtail), and Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moons Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) P1 (around 55RE downtail) are used to study distributions of plasma (ion) density and temperature along (Earth-Sun direction) and across (north-south direction) the magnetotail. Fourteen events (each including several current sheet crossings at different downtail distances) are studied. We demonstrate that the plasma temperature along and across the magnetotail varies more significantly than plasma density does. The temperature decrease from equatorial plane to current sheet boundaries is a major contributor to the cross-tail pressure balance. The Alfven velocity VA,B calculated at the current sheet boundaries increases significantly toward the Earth from 700 km/s at lunar orbit ˜55RE to 2200 km/s around ˜10RE downtail. The corresponding energy EA=mpVA,B2 (mp is the proton mass) is 4 times larger than the plasma temperature T0 in the magnetotail's equatorial plane, whereas the ratio EA/T0 is constant along the magnetotail. The plasma temperature T0 measured around lunar orbit in the magnetotail agrees well with the simultaneously measured energy of solar wind protons mpVSW2/2 (VSW is the solar wind speed).

  4. Intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions in the electron-boson spectral density obtained from optical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2016-03-01

    We investigate temperature smearing effects on the electron-boson spectral density function (I2χ(ω)) obtained from optical data using a maximum entropy inversion method. We start with two simple model input I2χ(ω), calculate the optical scattering rates at selected temperatures using the model input spectral density functions and a generalized Allen’s formula, then extract back I2χ(ω) at each temperature from the calculated optical scattering rate using the maximum entropy method (MEM) which has been used for analysis of optical data of high-temperature superconductors including cuprates, and finally compare the resulting I2χ(ω) with the input ones. From this approach we find that the inversion process can recover the input I2χ(ω) almost perfectly when the quality of fits is good enough and also temperature smearing (or thermal broadening) effects appear in the I2χ(ω) when the quality of fits is not good enough. We found that the coupling constant and the logarithmically averaged frequency are robust to the temperature smearing effects and/or the quality of fits. We use these robust properties of the two quantities as criterions to check whether experimental data have intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions or not. We carefully apply the MEM to two material systems (one optimally doped and the other underdoped cuprates) and conclude that the I2χ(ω) extracted from the optical data contain intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions.

  5. QCD effective potential with strong magnetic fields at zero and finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Sho; Arai, Takashi; Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2014-09-01

    In this contribution, we will discuss QCD vacuum in strong magnetic fields. As a first step towards understanding the effects of magnetic fields on QCD vacuum properties, we analytically derive the Euler-Heisenberg action for QCD + QED at zero and finite temperatures. From the action, at zero temperature, we found that the chromo-magnetic field prefers to be parallel to the external magnetic field, and thus the QCD vacuum with strong magnetic fields is spatially anisotropic. This result is consistent with recent lattice data. Furthermore, the chromo-magnetic condensate increases with an increasing magnetic field, which supports the ``gluonic magnetic catalysis'' as observed in current lattice data. Next, we will discuss the effective potential with strong magnetic fields at finite temperatures. In particular, we focus on the influence of the magnetic field on the center symmetry in QCD. The pure Yang-Mills theory has the center symmetry (being spontaneously broken at high temperature), but dynamical quarks explicitly break it. We will show how the magnetic fields affect the explicit symmetry breaking, by using the effective potential for the Polyakov loop. We will also discuss the confinement-deconfinement phase transition in strong magnetic fields in terms of nonperturbative approaches such as functional renormalization group.

  6. CoxC nanorod magnets: Highly magnetocrystalline anisotropy with lower Curie temperature for potential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gendy, AA; Almugaiteeb, T; Carpenter, EE

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic CoxC nanorods with larger magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 5 x 10(5) J/m(3) as well as larger coercivity and lower Curie temperature are introduced. The particles have an average diameter of 8 nm and shows three different magnetic behaviors. The sample shows ferromagnetism up to 400 K, superparamagnetism at temperature > 400 K and magnets, magnetic sensors and contract agent for magnetic resonance imaging. (c) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Percolation Model of the Temperature Dependence of Exotic Magnetic Field in Doped Manganese Perovskites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Shao-Hua; YAO Kai-Lun; LIU Zu-Li; FU Hua-Hua

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the magnetic transitions in a (La1-xBx)2/3Ca1/3MnO3 system, which consists of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic domains, based on a magnetic theoretical percolation model In the mean-field approximation,the resistance as a function of temperature and magnetic field has been derived analytically and simulated numerically. It is found that the dependence of the critical temperature on magnetic field is linear when applied magnetic field is not too strong. Our theoretical predications are in good agreement with recent experimental observations.

  8. Zero-field and magnetic-field low-temperature heat capacity of solid-state electrotransport-purified erbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr. (Ames Laboratory and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)); Fort, D. (School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, P.O. Box 363, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01

    Zero-field (1.5--80 K) and high-magnetic-field (1.5--20 K) low-temperature heat-capacity measurements have been carried out on 99.97 at. % (99.996 wt %) pure polycrystalline erbium. The electronic specific-heat coefficient (in zero field) was found to be 8.7[plus minus]0.1 mJ/mol K[sup 2] and the Debye temperature to be 176.9[plus minus]0.4 K. The ferromagnetic'' transition of erbium around 19 K exhibits a tremendously large and sharp heat-capacity maximum of 169 J/mol K. Five other heat-capacity anomalies at 25.1, 27.5, 42, 48.9, and 51.4 K were observed. The 51.4-K peak is associated with antiferromagnetic ordering in the basal plane, and the other four anomalies are associated with spin-slip transitions between two different commensurate antiferromagnetic structures. An external magnetic field shifts the ferromagnetic heat-capacity peak toward higher temperatures with a remarkable suppression and broadening of the maximum, and reduces the total heat capacity below the magnetic ordering maximum for temperatures down to about 5 K. At lower temperatures, the high-magnetic field ([ital H][gt]5 T) increases the sample heat capacity due to an increase in both the [sup 167]Er hyperfine coupling and electronic contributions. The effective magnetic field at the nucleus increases from 7.2 MOe at [ital H]=0 to 10.3 MOe at [ital H]=9.85 T. The electronic specific constant (density of state at the Fermi level) exhibits a 15% increase at [ital H][similar to]2 T due to a spin reorientation of the basal plane moments. This change is also evident in the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity.

  9. Modeling lower critical solution temperature behavior of associating polymer brushes with classical density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kai; Marshall, Bennett D; Chapman, Walter G

    2013-09-07

    We study the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior of associating polymer brushes (i.e., poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) using classical density functional theory. Without using any empirical or temperature-dependent parameters, we find the phase transition of polymer brushes from extended to collapsed structure with increasing temperature, indicating the LCST behavior of polymer brushes. The LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes is attributed to the interplay of hydrogen bonding interactions and Lennard-Jones attractions in the system. The effect of grafting density and molecular weight on the phase behavior of associating polymer brushes has been also investigated. We find no LCST behavior at low grafting density or molecular weight. Moreover, increasing grafting density decreases the LCST and swelling ratio of polymer brushes. Similarly, increasing molecular weight decreases the LCST but increases the swelling ratio. At very high grafting density, a partial collapsed structure appears near the LCST. Qualitatively consistent with experiments, our results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes.

  10. Magnetic fields in the absence of spiral density waves - NGC 4414

    CERN Document Server

    Soida, M; Urbanik, M; Braine, J

    2002-01-01

    We present three-frequency VLA observations of the flocculent spiral galaxy NGC 4414 made in order to study the magnetic field structure in absence of strong density wave flows. NGC 4414 shows a regular spiral pattern of observed polarization B-vectors with a radial component comparable in strength to the azimuthal one. The average pitch angle of the magnetic field is about 20$\\degr$, similar to galaxies with a well-defined spiral pattern. This provides support for field generation by a turbulent dynamo without significant ``contamination'' from streaming motions in spiral arms. While the stellar light is very axisymmetric, the magnetic field structure shows a clear asymmetry with a stronger regular field and a smaller magnetic pitch angle in the northern disk. Extremely strong Faraday rotation is measured in the southern part of the disk, becoming Faraday thick at 6cm. The distribution of Faraday rotation suggests a mixture of axisymmetric and higher-mode magnetic fields. The strong Faraday effects in the so...

  11. Dependence of ferroelectric and magnetic properties on measuring temperatures for polycrystalline BiFeO(3) films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, H; Inoue, Y; Okamura, S

    2008-05-01

    A multiferroic BiFeO(3) film was fabricated on a Pt/Ti/SiO(3)/Si(100) substrate by a chemical solution deposition (CSD) method, and this was followed by postdeposition annealing at 923 K for 10 min in air. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of the polycrystalline single phase of the BiFeO(3) film. A high remanent polarization of 89 microC/cm(2) was observed at 90 K together with a relatively low electric coercive field of 0.32 MV/cm, although the ferroelectric hysteresis loops could not be observed at room temperature due to a high leakage current density. The temperature dependence of the ferroelectric hysteresis loops indicated that these hysteresis loops lose their shape above 165 K, and the nominal remanent polarization drastically increased due to the leakage current. Magnetic measurements indicated that the saturation magnetization was less than 1 emu/cm(3) at room temperature and increased to approximately 2 emu/cm(3) at 100 K, although the spontaneous magnetization could not appear. The magnetization curves of polycrystalline BiFeO3 film were nonlinear at both temperatures, which is different with BiFeO3 single crystal.

  12. Electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges over liquid water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, M.; Roettgen, A.; Petrishchev, V.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved electron density, electron temperature, and gas temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium and O2-He mixtures near liquid water surface are measured using Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering, in two different geometries, (a) ‘diffuse filament’ discharge between a spherical high-voltage electrode and a grounded pin electrode placed in a reservoir filled with distilled water, with the tip exposed, and (b) dielectric barrier discharge between the high-voltage electrode and the liquid water surface. A diffuse plasma filament generated between the electrodes in helium during the primary discharge pulse exhibits noticeable constriction during the secondary discharge pulse several hundred ns later. Adding oxygen to the mixture reduces the plasma filament diameter and enhances constriction during the secondary pulse. In the dielectric barrier discharge, diffuse volumetric plasma occupies nearly the entire space between the high voltage electrode and the liquid surface, and extends radially along the surface. In the filament discharge in helium, adding water to the container results in considerable reduction of plasma lifetime compared to the discharge in dry helium, by about an order of magnitude, indicating rapid electron recombination with water cluster ions. Peak electron density during the pulse is also reduced, by about a factor of two, likely due to dissociative attachment to water vapor during the discharge pulse. These trends become more pronounced as oxygen is added to the mixture, which increases net rate of dissociative attachment. Gas temperature during the primary discharge pulse remains near room temperature, after which it increases up to T ~ 500 K over 5 µs and decays back to near room temperature before the next discharge pulse several tens of ms later. As expected, electron density and electron temperature in diffuse DBD plasmas are considerably lower compared to peak values in the filament discharge. Use of Thomson

  13. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Litnovsky, A.; Philipps, V.; Van Oost, G.; Möller, S.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER - relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER - like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux

  14. Interpretation of fast measurements of plasma potential, temperature and density in SOL of ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Adamek, J.; Müller, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on interpretation of fast (1 µs) and local (2–4 mm) measurements of plasma density, potential and electron temperature in the edge plasma of tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Steady-state radial profiles demonstrate the credibility of the ball-pen probe. We demonstrate that floating poten...

  15. Temperature stability and microstructure of ultra-high intrinsic coercivity Nd-Fe-B magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhihua; CHENG Xinghua; ZHU Minggang; LI Wei; LIAN Fazeng

    2008-01-01

    The variations of intrinsic coercivity and remanence of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with ultra-high intrinsic coercivity were investigated.The results showed that the intrinsic coercivity and remanence declined simultaneously with increasing temperature,but the squareness of the magnets has hardly been changed.The temperature coefficients of remanence (α) and coercivity (β) for the magnets were calculated by two different methods,and the variations of the temperature coefficients and the microstructure of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets were analyzed.The temperature coefficients of remanence (α) and coercivity (β) for the sintered magnets are very small,and the existence of free microstructure is necessary to obtain sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with ultra-high intrinsic coercivity.

  16. Ultralow temperature terahertz magnetic thermodynamics of perovskite-like SmFeO3 ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Wang, Dongyang; Chi Zhang, Hao; Han, Jiaguang; Jun Cui, Tie

    2015-10-01

    The terahertz magnetic properties of perovskite-like SmFeO3 ceramic are investigated over a broad temperature range, especially at ultralow temperatures, using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. It is shown that both resonant frequencies of quasi-ferromagnetic and quasi-antiferromagnetic modes have blue shifts with the decreasing temperature due to the enhancement of effective magnetic field. The temperature-dependent magnetic anisotropy constants are further estimated using the resonant frequencies, under the approximation of omitting the contribution of Sm(3+) magnetic moments to the effective field. Specially, the effective anisotropy constants in the ca and cb planes at 3 K are 6.63 × 10(5) erg/g and 8.48 × 10(5) erg/g, respectively. This thoroughly reveals the terahertz magnetic thermodynamics of orthoferrites and will be beneficial to the application in terahertz magnetism.

  17. Theory of the Jitter radiation in a magnetized plasma accompanying temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The linear stability of a magnetized plasma accompanying temperature gradient was reexamined by using plasma kinetic theory. The anisotropic velocity distribution function was decomposed into two components. One is proportional to the temperature gradient parallel to and the other is proportional to the temperature gradient perpendicular to the back ground magnetic field. Since the amplitude of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is proportional to the heat conductivity and the heat conductivities perpendicular to the magnetic field is strongly reduced, the first component of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is predominant. The anisotropic velocity distribution function induced by the temperature gradient along the back ground magnetic field drives plasma kinetic instability and the circular polarized magnetic plasma waves are excited. The instability is almost identical to Weibel instability in weakly magnetized plasma. However, depending on whether wave vectors of modes are parallel...

  18. Influence of temperature on the magnetic structure of HoCu2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smetana, S.; Sima, V.; Lebech, Bente

    1985-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction measurements of orthorhombic HoCu2 are reported. The results confirm that the two cusps observed at ~7K and 10K in the magnetization data reflect a change of the magnetic structure and the Neel temperature. In the temperature range 7K...

  19. Determining magnetic phase transitions temperatures in working magnetocaloric coolers bodies and gas cryorefrigerators regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagusov, V. I.; Mayankov, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    Due to magnetic phase transitions rare-earth materials possess unique properties near the Curie and Neel temperatures, such as the magneto-caloric effect, the abnormally high heat capacity, the magnetic susceptibility and permeability extremes. Using rare earth materials in gas cryogenic refrigerators regenerators increases the efficiency, reduces the power consumption and allows reaching helium temperatures. The magneto-caloric effect has also extreme values near the Curie and Neel temperatures. The paper presents theoretical and experimental methods allowing to determine magnetic phase transitions temperatures in a wide range of low temperature materials with a various rare-earth components content and expected thermophysical properties of a certain rare-earth materials composition at the temperatures based on starting pure metals characteristics. The results analysis has shown that magnetic phase transitions temperatures are a linear function of the components concentration. Moreover, heat capacity values and MCE also depend linearly on the starting components concentration, which simplifies calculations significantly.

  20. Dissociation and ionization equilibria of deuterium fluid over a wide range of temperatures and densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R. [Department of Physics, College of Science, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 15551, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the dissociation and ionization equilibria of deuterium fluid over a wide range of temperatures and densities. The partition functions for molecular and atomic species are evaluated, in a statistical-mechanically consistent way, implementing recent developments in the literature and taking high-density effects into account. A new chemical model (free energy function) is introduced in which the fluid is considered as a mixture of diatomic molecules, atoms, ions, and free electrons. Intensive short range hard core repulsion is taken into account together with partial degeneracy of free electrons and Coulomb interactions among charged particles. Samples of computational results are presented as a set of isotherms for the degree of ionization, dissociated fraction of molecules, pressure, and specific internal energy for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Predictions from the present model calculations show an improved and sensible physical behavior compared to other results in the literature.