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Sample records for density specific gravity

  1. Density and Specific Gravity Metrics in Biomass Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheal C. Wiemann; G. Bruce Williamson

    2012-01-01

    Following the 2010 publication of Measuring Wood Specific Gravity… Correctly in the American Journal of Botany, readers contacted us to inquire about application of wood density and specific gravity to biomass research. Here we recommend methods for sample collection, volume measurement, and determination of wood density and specific gravity for...

  2. Urine specific gravity test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  3. Standard Test Method for Water Absorption, Bulk Density, Apparent Porosity, and Apparent Specific Gravity of Fired Whiteware Products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for determining water absorption, bulk density, apparent porosity, and apparent specific gravity of fired unglazed whiteware products. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety problems associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Antarctic marine gravity field from high-density satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    High-density (about 2-km profile spacing) Geosat/GM altimetry profiles were obtained for Antarctic waters (6-deg S to 72 deg S) and converted to vertical gravity gradient, using Laplace's equation to directly calculate gravity gradient from vertical deflection grids and Fourier analysis to construct gravity anomalies from two vertical deflection grids. The resultant gravity grids have resolution and accuracy comparable to shipboard gravity profiles. The obtained gravity maps display many interesting and previously uncharted features, such as a propagating rift wake and a large 'leaky transform' along the Pacific-Antarctic Rise.

  5. 7 CFR 51.3417 - Optional test for specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Optional test for specific gravity. 51.3417 Section 51... specific gravity. Tests to determine specific gravity shall be made in accordance with the procedures set.... The specific gravity for any lot of potatoes shall be the average of at least 3 corrected readings on...

  6. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  7. Massive Nordstr\\"om Scalar (Density) Gravities from Universal Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Pitts, J Brian

    2010-01-01

    Both particle physics and the 1890s Seeliger-Neumann modification of Newtonian gravity suggest considering a "mass term" for gravity, yielding a finite range due to an exponentially decaying Yukawa potential. Unlike Nordstr\\"{o}m's "massless" theory, massive scalar gravities are strictly Special Relativistic, being invariant under the Poincar\\'{e} group but not the conformal group. Geometry is a poor guide to understanding massive scalar gravities: matter sees a conformally flat metric, but gravity also sees the rest of the flat metric, barely, in the mass term. Infinitely many theories exhibit this bimetric 'geometry,' all with the total stress-energy's trace as source. All are new except the Freund-Nambu theory. The smooth massless limit indicates underdetermination of theories by data between massless and massive scalar gravities. The ease of accommodating electrons, protons and other fermions using density-weighted Ogievetsky-Polubarinov spinors in scalar gravity is noted.

  8. SPECIFIC GRAVITY DETERMINATION OF TEN OVER-THE-COUNTER PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Al-Achi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available products serve as good examples for the compounding pharmacist to produce quality compounded dosage forms. Their physical and chemical properties, when known, can provide valuable information for preparing similar dosage forms to patients. One of the important physical characteristics of preparations is their specific gravity. The specific gravity is defined as the density of the substance divided by the density of water at a given temperature. We purchased ten non-prescription products from a store in North Carolina. We tested three bottles of each product for their specific gravity using Densito 30PX (Metter Toledo; Switzerland. The instrument is easy to use and allows calibration with a standard liquid (purified water or alcohol, U.S.P. at different temperatures (0oC to 40oC. We measured each bottle of the same product thrice. The following products were tested for their specific gravity at room temperature: Alka-seltzer Plus (Bayer Health Care; Lot#-276698L; Children’s Advil (Wyeth Consumer Healthcare; Lot#-B58397; Children’s Motrin (McNeil Consumer Healthcare; Lot#-ABM011; Children’s Tylenol (McNeil Consumer Healthcare; Lot#-SSM015; Children’s Zyrtec (McNeil Consumer Healthcare; Lot# for bottle 1-809301; Lot# for bottles 2 and 3- 809302; Listerine (Lot#-0619LZ; Oral Health Rinse (TopCare; Lot#-90F1001; Scope (Proctor & Gamble; Lot#-95609187; Theraflu (Novartis Consumer Health; Lot# for bottles 1 and 3-10061769; Lot# for bottle 2-10063059; Tylenol Cold (McNeil Consumer Healthcare; Lot# for bottles 1 and 2-900009; Lot# for bottle 3-808311. The results are summarized in Table 1. The specific gravity for Children’s Motrin, Children’s Tylenol, Listerine, and Scope agree with previously published values using a pycnometer (1.164, 1.306, 1.042, and 1.009, respectively.1 In general, the presence of suspended solid particles increases the specific gravity (e.g., Childrens Tylenol, whereas diluted hydroalcoholic

  9. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the Earth¡¦s crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The Earth¡¦s gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  10. Does gravity help to improve seismic inversion for density?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Nienke; Böhm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Density is one of the most important material properties that influence the dynamics of our planet's interior, and knowledge of it alongside with knowledge of seismic velocities will help constrain composition more directly. However, the variation of density inside the Earth is poorly known. The travel times of seismic waves, the classical tool to probe the Earth's interior, are barely sensitive to density (with large tradeoffs) and gravity is so extremely non-unique that very little information can be extracted from it without placing very strong prior constraints. As a result, density has, up until now, usually only been regarded as a derived quantity, which may lead to erroneous interpretations. Here, we aim to determine to what extent it is possible to image density as an independent parameter using modern geophysical techniques. The main technique is seismic (full) waveform inversion, which is more sensitive to density than travel-times alone, for the simple reason that more information of the seismogram is being used: basically the amplitude and phase of every wiggle. We construct synthetic tests in 2-D where density is a completely independent parameter from S-wave velocity and P-wave velocity - this setup (albeit physically unrealistic) has the advantage that our ability to image density independently is assessed in an unbiased way. We find that it is indeed possible to image density using waveform inversion. If prior information, such as constraints on S- and P-velocity structure, is included in the inversion, the results for density are markedly improved. The use of gravity data as an additional observable, however, deteriorates the inversion results. This is because of the significant non-uniqueness of potential field measurements, so that an unconstrained update based on gravity will only almost definitely work to push the inversion in the wrong direction.

  11. Measurement of the Specific Heat Using a Gravity Cancellation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fang

    2003-01-01

    The specific heat at constant volume C(sob V) of a simple fluid diverges near its liquid-vapor critical point. However, gravity-induced density stratification due to the divergence of isothermal susceptibility hinders the direct comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of renormalization group theory. In the past, a microgravity environment has been considered essential to eliminate the density stratification. We propose to perform specific heat measurements of He-3 on the ground using a method to cancel the density stratification. A He-3 fluid layer will be heated from below, using the thermal expansion of the fluid to cancel the hydrostatic compression. A 6% density stratification at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -5) can be cancelled to better than 0.1% with a steady 1.7 micro K temperature difference across a 0.05 cm thick fluid layer. A conventional AC calorimetry technique will be used to determine the heat capacity. The minimized bulk density stratification with a relaxation time 6500 sec at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -5) will stay unchanged during 1 Hz AC heating. The smear of the specific heat divergence due to the temperature difference across the cell is about 0.1% at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -6). The combination of using High Resolution Thermometry with a 0.5 n K temperature resolution in the AC technique and the cancellation of the density stratification will enable C(sub V) to be measured down to a reduced temperature of 10(exp -6) with less than a 1% systematic error.

  12. Moho Density Contrast in Central Eurasia from GOCE Gravity Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Eshagh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth’s inner structure. Since large parts of the world are not yet sufficiently covered by seismic surveys, products from the Earth’s satellite observation systems have more often been used for this purpose in recent years. In this study we use the gravity-gradient data derived from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE, the elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and other global datasets to determine the Moho density contrast at the study area which comprises most of the Eurasian plate (including parts of surrounding continental and oceanic tectonic plates. A regional Moho recovery is realized by solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz’s (VMM inverse problem of isostasy and a seismic crustal model is applied to constrain the gravimetric solution. Our results reveal that the Moho density contrast reaches minima along the mid-oceanic rift zones and maxima under the continental crust. This spatial pattern closely agrees with that seen in the CRUST1.0 seismic crustal model as well as in the KTH1.0 gravimetric-seismic Moho model. However, these results differ considerably from some previously published gravimetric studies. In particular, we demonstrate that there is no significant spatial correlation between the Moho density contrast and Moho deepening under major orogens of Himalaya and Tibet. In fact, the Moho density contrast under most of the continental crustal structure is typically much more uniform.

  13. Synthetic inversions for density using seismic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Nienke; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Density variations drive mass transport in the Earth from plate tectonics to convection in the mantle and core. Nevertheless, density remains poorly known because most geophysical measurements used to probe the Earth's interior either have little sensitivity to density, suffer from trade-offs or from non-uniqueness. With the ongoing expansion of computational power, it has become possible to accurately model complete seismic wavefields in a 3-D heterogeneous Earth, and to develop waveform inversion techniques that account for complicated wavefield effects. This may help to improve resolution of density. Here, we present a pilot study where we explore the extent to which waveform inversion may be used to better recover density as a separate, independent parameter. We perform numerical simulations in 2-D to investigate under which conditions, and to what extent density anomalies may be recovered in the Earth's mantle. We conclude that density can indeed be constrained by seismic waveforms, mainly as a result of scattering effects at density contrasts. As a consequence, the low-frequency part of the wavefield is the most important for constraining the actual extent of anomalies. While the impact of density heterogeneities on the wavefield is small compared to the effects of velocity variations, it is likely to be detectable in modern regional- to global-scale measurements. We also conclude that the use of gravity data as additional information does not help to further improve the recovery of density anomalies unless strong a priori constraints on the geometry of density variations are applied. This is a result of the inherent physical non-uniqueness of potential-field inverse problems. Finally, in the limited numerical setup that we employ, we find that the initially supplied anomalies in S- and P-velocity models are of minor importance.

  14. Synthetic inversions for density using seismic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Nienke; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Density variations drive mass transport in the Earth from plate tectonics to convection in the mantle and core. Nevertheless, density remains poorly known because most geophysical measurements used to probe the Earth's interior either have little sensitivity to density, suffer from trade-offs or from nonuniqueness. With the ongoing expansion of computational power, it has become possible to accurately model complete seismic wavefields in a 3-D heterogeneous Earth, and to develop waveform inversion techniques that account for complicated wavefield effects. This may help to improve resolution of density. Here we present a pilot study where we explore the extent to which waveform inversion may be used to better recover density as a separate, independent parameter. We perform numerical simulations in 2-D to investigate under which conditions, and to what extent density anomalies may be recovered in the Earth's mantle. We conclude that density can indeed be constrained by seismic waveforms, mainly as a result of scattering effects at density contrasts. As a consequence, the low-frequency part of the wavefield is the most important for constraining the actual extent of anomalies. While the impact of density heterogeneities on the wavefield is small compared to the effects of velocity variations, it is likely to be detectable in modern regional to global scale measurements. We also conclude that the use of gravity data as additional information does not help to further improve the recovery of density anomalies unless strong a priori constraints on the geometry of density variations are applied. This is a result of the inherent physical non-uniqueness of potential-field inverse problems. Finally, in the limited numerical setup that we employ, we find that the initially supplied anomalies in S- and P-velocity models are of minor importance.

  15. Fast Density Inversion Solution for Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhenlong; Wei, Xiaohui; Huang, Danian

    2016-02-01

    We modify the classical preconditioned conjugate gradient method for full tensor gravity gradiometry data. The resulting parallelized algorithm is implemented on a cluster to achieve rapid density inversions for various scenarios, overcoming the problems of computation time and memory requirements caused by too many iterations. The proposed approach is mainly based on parallel programming using the Message Passing Interface, supplemented by Open Multi-Processing. Our implementation is efficient and scalable, enabling its use with large-scale data. We consider two synthetic models and real survey data from Vinton Dome, US, and demonstrate that our solutions are reliable and feasible.

  16. Specific gravity and API gravity of biodiesel and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from vegetable oils and animal fats. In 2006, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency mandated a maximum sulfur content of 15 ppm in on-road diesel fuels. Processing to produce the new ultra-low sulfur petrodiesel (ULSD) alters specific gravity (SG) and othe...

  17. Density heterogeneity of the North American upper mantle from satellite gravity and a regional crustal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by highquality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. Given a relatively small range of expected density......We present a regional model for the density structure of the North American upper mantle. The residual mantle gravity anomalies are based on gravity data derived from the GOCE geopotential models with crustal correction to the gravity field being calculated from a regional crustal model. We analyze...... how uncertainties and errors in the crustal model propagate from crustal densities to mantle residual gravity anomalies and the density model of the upper mantle. Uncertainties in the residual upper (lithospheric) mantle gravity anomalies result from several sources: (i) uncertainties in the velocity-density...

  18. Wood Specific Gravity Variations and Biomass of Central African Tree Species: The Simple Choice of the Outer Wood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Bastin

    Full Text Available Wood specific gravity is a key element in tropical forest ecology. It integrates many aspects of tree mechanical properties and functioning and is an important predictor of tree biomass. Wood specific gravity varies widely among and within species and also within individual trees. Notably, contrasted patterns of radial variation of wood specific gravity have been demonstrated and related to regeneration guilds (light demanding vs. shade-bearing. However, although being repeatedly invoked as a potential source of error when estimating the biomass of trees, both intraspecific and radial variations remain little studied. In this study we characterized detailed pith-to-bark wood specific gravity profiles among contrasted species prominently contributing to the biomass of the forest, i.e., the dominant species, and we quantified the consequences of such variations on the biomass.Radial profiles of wood density at 8% moisture content were compiled for 14 dominant species in the Democratic Republic of Congo, adapting a unique 3D X-ray scanning technique at very high spatial resolution on core samples. Mean wood density estimates were validated by water displacement measurements. Wood density profiles were converted to wood specific gravity and linear mixed models were used to decompose the radial variance. Potential errors in biomass estimation were assessed by comparing the biomass estimated from the wood specific gravity measured from pith-to-bark profiles, from global repositories, and from partial information (outer wood or inner wood.Wood specific gravity profiles from pith-to-bark presented positive, neutral and negative trends. Positive trends mainly characterized light-demanding species, increasing up to 1.8 g.cm-3 per meter for Piptadeniastrum africanum, and negative trends characterized shade-bearing species, decreasing up to 1 g.cm-3 per meter for Strombosia pustulata. The linear mixed model showed the greater part of wood specific gravity

  19. Comparison of different gravity field implied density models of the topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Morteza; Tabatabaee, Seied; Najafi-Alamdari, Mehdi

    2009-06-01

    Density within the Earth crust varies between 1.0 and 3.0 g/cm3. The Bouguer gravity field measured in south Iran is analyzed using four different regional-residual separation techniques to obtain a residual map of the gravity field suitable for density modeling of topography. A density model of topography with radial and lateral distribution of density is required for an accurate determination of the geoid, e.g., in the Stokes-Helmert approach. The apparent density mapping technique is used to convert the four residual Bouguer anomaly fields into the corresponding four gravity im-plied subsurface density (GRADEN) models. Although all four density models showed good correlation with the geological density (GEODEN) model of the region, the GRADEN models obtained by high-pass filter-ing and GGM high-pass filtering show better numerical correlation with GEODEN model than the other models.

  20. Estimating Janka hardness from specific gravity for tropical and temperate species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Wiemann; David W. Green

    2007-01-01

    Using mean values for basic (green) specific gravity and Janka side hardness for individual species obtained from the world literature, regression equations were developed to predict side hardness from specific gravity. Statistical and graphical methods showed that the hardness–specific gravity relationship is the same for tropical and temperate hardwoods, but that the...

  1. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  2. 30 CFR 15.22 - Tolerances for performance, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... specific gravity. 15.22 Section 15.22 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... performance, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The rate of detonation of the explosive shall be within ±15... within ±2 grams of that specified in the approval. (c) The apparent specific gravity of the explosive...

  3. Age-dependent radial increases in wood specific gravity of tropical pioneers in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce G. Williamson; Michael C. Wiemann

    2010-01-01

    Wood specific gravity is the single best descriptor of wood functional properties and tree life-history traits, and it is the most important variable in estimating carbon stocks in forests. Tropical pioneer trees produce wood of increasing specific gravity across the trunk radius as they grow in stature. Here, we tested whether radial increases in wood specific gravity...

  4. Estimation of Bouguer Density Precision: Development of Method for Analysis of La Soufriere Volcano Gravity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Gunawan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol3no3.20084The precision of topographic density (Bouguer density estimation by the Nettleton approach is based on a minimum correlation of Bouguer gravity anomaly and topography. The other method, the Parasnis approach, is based on a minimum correlation of Bouguer gravity anomaly and Bouguer correction. The precision of Bouguer density estimates was investigated by both methods on simple 2D syntetic models and under an assumption free-air anomaly consisting of an effect of topography, an effect of intracrustal, and an isostatic compensation. Based on simulation results, Bouguer density estimates were then investigated for a gravity survey of 2005 on La Soufriere Volcano-Guadeloupe area (Antilles Islands. The Bouguer density based on the Parasnis approach is 2.71 g/cm3 for the whole area, except the edifice area where average topography density estimates are 2.21 g/cm3 where Bouguer density estimates from previous gravity survey of 1975 are 2.67 g/cm3. The Bouguer density in La Soufriere Volcano was uncertainly estimated to be 0.1 g/cm3. For the studied area, the density deduced from refraction seismic data is coherent with the recent Bouguer density estimates. New Bouguer anomaly map based on these Bouguer density values allows to a better geological intepretation.    

  5. Estimation of Bouguer Density Precision: Development of Method for Analysis of La Soufriere Volcano Gravity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Gunawan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol3no3.20084The precision of topographic density (Bouguer density estimation by the Nettleton approach is based on a minimum correlation of Bouguer gravity anomaly and topography. The other method, the Parasnis approach, is based on a minimum correlation of Bouguer gravity anomaly and Bouguer correction. The precision of Bouguer density estimates was investigated by both methods on simple 2D syntetic models and under an assumption free-air anomaly consisting of an effect of topography, an effect of intracrustal, and an isostatic compensation. Based on simulation results, Bouguer density estimates were then investigated for a gravity survey of 2005 on La Soufriere Volcano-Guadeloupe area (Antilles Islands. The Bouguer density based on the Parasnis approach is 2.71 g/cm3 for the whole area, except the edifice area where average topography density estimates are 2.21 g/cm3 where Bouguer density estimates from previous gravity survey of 1975 are 2.67 g/cm3. The Bouguer density in La Soufriere Volcano was uncertainly estimated to be 0.1 g/cm3. For the studied area, the density deduced from refraction seismic data is coherent with the recent Bouguer density estimates. New Bouguer anomaly map based on these Bouguer density values allows to a better geological intepretation.    

  6. Improvement of density models of geological structures by fusion of gravity data and cosmic muon radiographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jourde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how the resolution of small-scale geological density models is improved through the fusion of information provided by gravity measurements and density muon radiographies. Muon radiography aims at determining the density of geological bodies by measuring their screening effect on the natural flux of cosmic muons. Muon radiography essentially works like medical X-ray scan and integrates density information along elongated narrow conical volumes. Gravity measurements are linked to density by a 3-D integration encompassing the whole studied domain. We establish the mathematical expressions of these integration formulas – called acquisition kernels – and derive the resolving kernels that are spatial filters relating the true unknown density structure to the density distribution actually recovered from the available data. The resolving kernels approach allows to quantitatively describe the improvement of the resolution of the density models achieved by merging gravity data and muon radiographies. The method developed in this paper may be used to optimally design the geometry of the field measurements to perform in order to obtain a given spatial resolution pattern of the density model to construct. The resolving kernels derived in the joined muon/gravimetry case indicate that gravity data are almost useless to constrain the density structure in regions sampled by more than two muon tomography acquisitions. Interestingly the resolution in deeper regions not sampled by muon tomography is significantly improved by joining the two techniques. The method is illustrated with examples for La Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcano.

  7. Cluster Density Profiles as a Test of Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lombriser, Lucas; Baldauf, Tobias; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uros; Smith, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    We present a new test of gravitational interactions at the r\\simeq(0.2-20)Mpc scale, around the virial radius of dark matter halos measured through cluster-galaxy lensing of maxBCG clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We employ predictions from self-consistent simulations of f(R) gravity to find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of f_R0<3.5x10^-3 at the 1D-marginalized 95% confidence level. We also constrain the amplitude F_0 of a phenomenological fit modeled on the profile enhancement induced by f(R) gravity when not including effects from the increased cluster abundance in f(R). In both scenarios, dark-matter-only simulations of the concordance model corresponding to f_R0=0 and F_0=0 are consistent with the lensing measurements at the 68% confidence level.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of crustal correction for calculation of lithospheric mantle density from gravity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how uncertainties in seismic and density structure of the crust propagate to uncertainties in mantle density structure. The analysis is based on interpretation of residual upper-mantle gravity anomalies which are calculated by subtracting (stripping) the gravitational effect of the...

  9. Cluster density profiles as a test of modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Schmidt, Fabian; Baldauf, Tobias; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uroš; Smith, Robert E.

    2012-05-01

    We present a new test of gravitational interactions at the r≃(0.2-20)Mpc scale, around the virial radius of dark matter halos measured through cluster-galaxy lensing of maxBCG clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We employ predictions from self-consistent simulations of f(R) gravity to find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |fR0|confidence level. As a model-independent assessment of the constraining power of cluster profiles measured through weak gravitational lensing, we also constrain the amplitude F0 of a phenomenological modification based on the profile enhancement induced by f(R) gravity when not including effects from the increased cluster abundance in f(R). In both scenarios, dark-matter-only simulations of the concordance model corresponding to |fR0|=0 and F0=0 are consistent with the lensing measurements, i.e., at the 68% and 95% confidence level, respectively.

  10. Application of 3D variation-density interface inversion of gravity anomalies in South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuling; Meng, Xiaohong

    2017-04-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is a marginal basin with extremely complicated crustal structure and whose evolutional history is associated with continental rifting and seafloor spreading. The gravity data are among the most important data sets for studying deep crustal structures and the tectonic evolution. Density interface inversion by gravity anomalies can effectively estimate the depth of Moho interface. However, the Moho interface inversion in SCS are facing challenges due to the density contract of crust-mantle vary in three dimensions, which are associated with the complicated crustal structure (co-existing oceanic crust, continental crust and transitional crust). The regular inversion methods always assume the density contract on both sides of the interface would be constant, which is quite unrealistic since actual strata densities vary both vertically and laterally. To meet the challenges of 3D variation of density in SCS, we present an improved 3D variation-density interface inversion of gravity anomalies based on Parker-Oldenburg method. We first construct two variation density models with exponential density-depth relationships, which expressed the variation of stratum density depending on the depth in oceanic and continental crust respectively. Meanwhile, to minimize multiple solutions for potential field inversion, we collect deep seismic sounding data and employ the gravity inversion by joint using seismic data to be constraint for depth of Moho. Finally, we have estimated the depth of Moho interface which infers the tectonic significance in SCS. The inversion results agree well with seismic data in SCS show this approach is more effective and precise to quantitative estimate the depth of interface. Keywords: South China Sea; Gravity anomalies; Density interface inversion;

  11. Influence of Electric Charge and Modified Gravity on Density Irregularities

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatti, M Zaeem Ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to identify some inhomogeneity factors for plane symmetric topology with anisotropic and dissipative fluid under the effects of both electromagnetic field as well as Palatini $f(R)$ gravity. We construct the modified field equations, kinematical quantities and mass function to continue our analysis. We have explored the dynamical quantities, conservation equations and modified Ellis equations with the help of a viable $f(R)$ model. Some particular cases are discussed with and without dissipation to investigate the corresponding inhomogeneity factors. For non-radiating scenario, we examine such factors with dust, isotropic and anisotropic matter in the presence of charge. For dissipative fluid, we investigate the inhomogeneity factor with charged dust cloud. We conclude that electromagnetic field increases the inhomogeneity in matter while the extra curvature terms make the system more homogeneous with the evolution of time.

  12. Influence of electric charge and modified gravity on density irregularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, M.Z. Ul Haq; Yousaf, Z. [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2016-04-15

    This work aims to identify some inhomogeneity factors for a plane symmetric topology with anisotropic and dissipative fluid under the effects of both electromagnetic field as well as Palatini f(R) gravity. We construct the modified field equations, kinematical quantities, and mass function to continue our analysis. We have explored the dynamical quantities, conservation equations and modified Ellis equations with the help of a viable f(R) model. Some particular cases are discussed with and without dissipation to investigate the corresponding inhomogeneity factors. For a non-radiating scenario, we examine such factors as dust, and isotropic and anisotropic matter in the presence of charge. For a dissipative fluid, we investigate the inhomogeneity factor with a charged dust cloud. We conclude that the electromagnetic field increases the inhomogeneity in matter while the extra curvature terms make the system more homogeneous with the evolution of time. (orig.)

  13. Using gravity data to estimate the density of surface rocks of Taiwan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Y. T.; Horng-Yen, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Surface rock density within terrain correction step is one of the important parameters for obtaining Bouguer anomaly map. In the past study, we obtain the Bouguer anomaly map considering the average density correction of a wide range of the study area. In this study, we will be the better estimate for the correction of the density of each observation point. A correction density that coincides with surface geology is in order to improve the accuracy of the cloth cover anomaly map. The main idea of estimating correction of the density using gravity data statistics are two method, g-H relationship and Nettleton density profile method, respectively. The common advantages of these methods are in the following: First, density estimating is calculated using existing gravity observations data, it may be avoided the trouble of directly measure the rock density. Second, after the establishment the measuring point s of absolute gravity value, latitude, longitude and elevation into the database, you can always apply its database of information and terrain data with the value to calculate the average rock density on any range. In addition, each measuring point and numerical data of each terrain mesh are independent, if found to be more accurate gravity or terrain data, simply update a document data alone, without having to rebuild the entire database. According the results of estimating density distribution map, the trends are broadly distributed close to Taiwan Geology Division. The average density of the backbone mountain region is about 2.5 to 2.6 g/cm^3, the average density of east Central Mountain Range and Hsuehshan Range are about 2.3 to 2.5 g/cm^3, compared with the western foothills of 2.1-2.3 g/cm^3, the western plains is from 1.8 to 2.0 g/cm^3.

  14. Constructing multiscale gravitational energy spectra from molecular cloud surface density PDF - interplay between turbulence and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Gravity is believed to be important on multiple physical scales in molecular clouds. However, quantitative constraints on gravity are still lacking. We derive an analytical formula which provides estimates on multiscale gravitational energy distribution using the observed surface density probability distribution function (PDF). Our analytical formalism also enables one to convert the observed column density PDF into an estimated volume density PDF, and to obtain average radial density profile ρ(r). For a region with N_col ˜ N^{-γ _N}, the gravitational energy spectra is E_p(k)˜ k^{-4(1 - 1/γ _N)}. We apply the formula to observations of molecular clouds, and find that a scaling index of -2 of the surface density PDF implies that ρ ˜ r-2 and Ep(k) ˜ k-2. The results are valid from the cloud scale (a few parsec) to around ˜ 0.1 pc. Because of the resemblance the scaling index of the gravitational energy spectrum and the that of the kinetic energy power spectrum of the Burgers turbulence (where E ˜ k-2), our result indicates that gravity can act effectively against turbulence over a multitude of physical scales. This is the critical scaling index which divides molecular clouds into two categories: clouds like Orion and Ophiuchus have shallower power laws, and the amount of gravitational energy is too large for turbulence to be effective inside the cloud. Because gravity dominates, we call this type of cloud g-type clouds. On the other hand, clouds like the California molecular cloud and the Pipe nebula have steeper power laws, and turbulence can overcome gravity if it can cascade effectively from the large scale. We call this type of cloud t-type clouds. The analytical formula can be used to determine if gravity is dominating cloud evolution when the column density PDF can be reliably determined.

  15. The Kummer tensor density in electrodynamics and in gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baekler, Peter [University of Appl. Sciences, 40474 Düsseldorf (Germany); Favaro, Alberto [Inst. Physics, Carl-von-Ossietzky-Univ., 26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Itin, Yakov [Inst. Mathematics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Jerusalem College of Technology (Israel); Hehl, Friedrich W., E-mail: hehl@thp.uni-koeln.de [Inst. Theor. Physics, University of Cologne, 50923 Köln (Germany); Department of Physics and Astron., University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Guided by results in the premetric electrodynamics of local and linear media, we introduce on 4-dimensional spacetime the new abstract notion of a Kummer tensor density of rank four, K{sup ijkl}. This tensor density is, by definition, a cubic algebraic functional of a tensor density of rank four T{sup ijkl}, which is antisymmetric in its first two and its last two indices: T{sup ijkl}=−T{sup jikl}=−T{sup ijlk}. Thus, K∼T{sup 3}, see Eq. (46). (i) If T is identified with the electromagnetic response tensor of local and linear media, the Kummer tensor density encompasses the generalized Fresnel wave surfaces for propagating light. In the reversible case, the wave surfaces turn out to be Kummer surfaces as defined in algebraic geometry (Bateman 1910). (ii) If T is identified with the curvature tensor R{sup ijkl} of a Riemann–Cartan spacetime, then K∼R{sup 3} and, in the special case of general relativity, K reduces to the Kummer tensor of Zund (1969). This K is related to the principal null directions of the curvature. We discuss the properties of the general Kummer tensor density. In particular, we decompose K irreducibly under the 4-dimensional linear group GL(4,R) and, subsequently, under the Lorentz group SO(1,3)

  16. The Kummer tensor density in electrodynamics and in gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Baekler, Peter; Itin, Yakov; Hehl, Friedrich W

    2014-01-01

    Guided by results in the premetric electrodynamics of local and linear media, we introduce on 4-dimensional spacetime the new abstract notion of a Kummer tensor density of rank four, ${\\cal K}^{ijkl}$. This tensor density is, by definition, a cubic algebraic functional of a tensor density of rank four ${\\cal T}^{ijkl}$, which is antisymmetric in its first two and its last two indices: ${\\cal T}^{ijkl} = - {\\cal T}^{jikl} = - {\\cal T}^{ijlk}$. Thus, ${\\cal K}\\sim {\\cal T}^3$, see Eq.(46). (i) If $\\cal T$ is identified with the electromagnetic response tensor of local and linear media, the Kummer tensor density encompasses the generalized {\\it Fresnel wave surfaces} for propagating light. In the reversible case, the wave surfaces turn out to be {\\it Kummer surfaces} as defined in algebraic geometry (Bateman 1910). (ii) If $\\cal T$ is identified with the {\\it curvature} tensor $R^{ijkl}$ of a Riemann-Cartan spacetime, then ${\\cal K}\\sim R^3$ and, in the special case of general relativity, ${\\cal K}$ reduces to t...

  17. Joint-inversion of gravity data and cosmic ray muon flux to detect shallow subsurface density structure beneath volcanoes: Testing the method at a well-characterized site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M.; Lewis, M.; George, N. K.; Johnson, A.; Dichter, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Guardincerri, E.

    2016-12-01

    The joint-inversion of gravity data and cosmic ray muon flux measurements has been utilized by a number of groups to image subsurface density structure in a variety of settings, including volcanic edifices. Cosmic ray muons are variably-attenuated depending upon the density structure of the material they traverse, so measuring muon flux through a region of interest provides an independent constraint on the density structure. Previous theoretical studies have argued that the primary advantage of combining gravity and muon data is enhanced resolution in regions not sampled by crossing muon trajectories, e.g. in sensing deeper structure or structure adjacent to the region sampled by muons. We test these ideas by investigating the ability of gravity data alone and the joint-inversion of gravity and muon flux to image subsurface density structure, including voids, in a well-characterized field location. Our study area is a tunnel vault located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory within Quaternary ash-flow tuffs on the Pajarito Plateau, flanking the Jemez Volcano in New Mexico. The regional geology of the area is well-characterized (with density measurements in nearby wells) and the geometry of the tunnel and the surrounding terrain is known. Gravity measurements were made using a Lacoste and Romberg D meter and the muon detector has a conical acceptance region of 45 degrees from the vertical and track resolution of several milliradians. We obtain individual and joint resolution kernels for gravity and muon flux specific to our experimental design and plan to combine measurements of gravity and muon flux both within and above the tunnel to infer density structure. We plan to compare our inferred density structure against the expected densities from the known regional hydro-geologic framework.

  18. Density perturbations in f (R ,ϕ ) gravity with an application to the varying-power-law model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Fayçal

    2017-09-01

    Density perturbations in the cosmic microwave background within general f (R ,ϕ ) models of gravity are investigated. The general dynamical equations for the tensor and scalar modes in any f (R ,ϕ )-gravity model are derived. An application of the equations to the varying-power-law modified gravity toy model is then made. Formulas and numerical values for the tensor-to-scalar ratio, the scalar tilt, and the tensor tilt are all obtained within this specific model. While the model cannot provide a theoretical reason for the value of the energy scale at which inflation should occur, it is found, based on the latest observations of the density perturbations in the sky, that the model requires inflation to occur at an energy scale less than the grand unified theory scale, namely, ˜1014 GeV . The different energy intervals examined here show that the density perturbations recently obtained from observations are recovered naturally, with very high precision, and without fine tuning the model's parameters.

  19. Theory of gravity admitting arbitrary choice of the energy density level

    CERN Document Server

    Cherkas, S L

    2016-01-01

    We suggest a five-vectors theory of gravity admitting arbitrary choice of the energy density level. This theory is formulated as the constraint theory of the second kind, where the concrete values of Lagrange multipliers are evaluated. Cosmological implications of the model could be that the residual vacuum fluctuations dominate over all the universe evolution that resembles the Milne's universe.

  20. Determining the 3D Subsurface Density Structure of Taurus Littrow Valley Using Apollo 17 Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbancic, N.; Ghent, R.; Stanley, S,; Johnson, C. L.; Carroll, K. A.; Hatch, D.; Williamson, M. C.; Garry, W. B.; Talwani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Surface gravity surveys can detect subsurface density variations that can reveal subsurface geologic features. In 1972, the Apollo 17 (A17) mission conducted the Traverse Gravimeter Experiment (TGE) using a gravimeter that measured the local gravity field near Taurus Littrow Valley (TLV), located on the south-eastern rim of the Serenitatis basin. TLV is hypothesized to be a basaltfilled radial graben resulting from the impact that formed Mare Serenitatis. It is bounded by both the North and South Massifs (NM and SM) as well as other smaller mountains to the East that are thought to be mainly composed of brecciated highland material. The TGE is the first and only successful gravity survey on the surface of the Moon. Other more recent satellite surveys, such as NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission (2011- 2012), have produced the best global gravity field to date (approx. 13km resolution). However, these satellite surveys are not sensitive enough to detect fine-scale (structures. This underscores the value of the data collected at the surface by A17. In the original analysis of the data a 2D forward-modelling approach was used to derive a thickness of the subsurface basalt layer of 1.0 km by assuming a simple flat-faced rectangular geometry and using densities derived from Apollo lunar samples. We are investigating whether modern 3D modelling techniques in combination with high-resolution topographical and image datasets can reveal additional fine-scale subsurface structure in TLV.

  1. Is specific gravity a good estimate of urine osmolality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Sethi; Eva, Goldwater; Christopher, Shutty; Flynn, Ethan; Henner, David

    2010-01-01

    Urine specific gravity (USG) is often used by clinicians to estimate urine osmolality. USG is measured either by refractometry or by reagent strip. We studied the correlation of USG obtained by either method with a concurrently obtained osmolality. Using our laboratory's records, we retrospectively gathered data on 504 urine specimens on patients on whom a simultaneously drawn USG and an osmolality were available. Out of these, 253 USG's were measured by automated refractometry and 251 USG's were measured by reagent strip. Urinalysis data on these subjects were used to determine the correlation between USG and osmolality, adjusting for other variables that may impact the relationship. The other variables considered were pH, protein, glucose, ketones, nitrates, bilirubin, urobilinogen, hemoglobin, and leukocyte esterase. The relationships were analyzed by linear regression. This study demonstrated that USG obtained by both reagent strip and refractometry had a correlation of approximately 0.75 with urine osmolality. The variables affecting the correlation included pH, ketones, bilirubin, urobilinogen, glucose, and protein for the reagent strip and ketones, bilirubin, and hemoglobin for the refractometry method. At a pH of 7 and with an USG of 1.010 predicted osmolality is approximately 300  mosm/kg/H(2)O for either method. For an increase in SG of 0.010, predicted osmolality increases by 182  mosm/kg/H(2) O for the reagent strip and 203  mosm/kg/H(2)O for refractometry. Pathological urines had significantly poorer correlation between USG and osmolality than "clean" urines. In pathological urines, direct measurement of urine osmolality should be used. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Energy and angular momentum densities of stationary gravity fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lynden-Bell, D; Bicak, Jiri; 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.024040

    2009-01-01

    We give physical explanations of explicit invariant expressions for the energy and angular momentum densities of gravitational fields in stationary space-times. These expressions involve non-locally defined conformal factors. In certain coordinates these become locally defined in terms of the metric. These results are derived via expressions for total gravitational potential energy from the difference between the total energy and the mechanical energy. The latter involves kinetic energy seen in the frame of static observers. When in the axially symmetric case we consider zero angular momentum observers (who move orthogonally to surfaces of constant time), we find that the angular momentum they attribute to the gravitational field is solely due to their motion.

  3. Newtonian semiclassical gravity in the Ghirardi–Rimini–Weber theory with matter density ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derakhshani, Maaneli, E-mail: maanelid@yahoo.com

    2014-03-01

    We propose a Newtonian semiclassical gravity theory based on the GRW collapse theory with matter density ontology (GRWm), which we term GRWmN. The theory is proposed because, as we show from previous arguments in the literature, the standard Newtonian semiclassical gravity theory based on the Schroedinger–Newton equations does not have a consistent Born rule probability interpretation for gravitationally self-interacting particles and implies gravitational cat states for macroscopic mass superpositions. By contrast, we show that GRWmN has a consistent statistical description of gravitationally self-interacting particles and adequately suppresses the cat states for macroscopic superpositions. Two possible routes to experimentally testing GRWmN are also considered. We conclude with a discussion of possible variants of GRWmN, what a general relativistic extension would involve, and various objections that might be raised against semiclassical gravity theories like GRWmN.

  4. Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gamow, George

    2003-01-01

    A distinguished physicist and teacher, George Gamow also possessed a special gift for making the intricacies of science accessible to a wide audience. In Gravity, he takes an enlightening look at three of the towering figures of science who unlocked many of the mysteries behind the laws of physics: Galileo, the first to take a close look at the process of free and restricted fall; Newton, originator of the concept of gravity as a universal force; and Einstein, who proposed that gravity is no more than the curvature of the four-dimensional space-time continuum.Graced with the author's own draw

  5. Current density and conductivity through modified gravity in the graphene with defects

    CERN Document Server

    Sepehri, Alireza; Bamba, Kazuharu; Capozziello, Salvatore; Saridakis, Emmanuel N

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model describing the evolution of the free electron current density in graphene. Based on the concept of Mp-branes, we perform the analysis using the difference between curvatures of parallel and antiparallel spins. In such a framework an effective graviton emerges in the form of gauge field exchange between electrons. In a plain graphene system, the curvatures produced by both kinds of spins neutralize each other. However, in the presence of defects, the inequality between curvatures leads to the emergence of current density, modified gravity and conductivity. Depending on the type of the defects, the resulting current density can be negative or positive.

  6. [Comparative measurement of urine specific gravity: reagent strips, refractometry and hydrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christian Elías; Bettendorff, Carolina; Bupo, Sol; Ayuso, Sandra; Vallejo, Graciela

    2010-06-01

    The urine specific gravity is commonly used in clinical practice to measure the renal concentration/dilution ability. Measurement can be performed by three methods: hydrometry, refractometry and reagent strips. To assess the accuracy of different methods to measure urine specific gravity. We analyzed 156 consecutive urine samples of pediatric patients during April and May 2007. Urine specific gravity was measured by hydrometry (UD), refractometry (RE) and reagent strips (TR), simultaneously. Urine osmolarity was considered as the gold standard and was measured by freezing point depression. Correlation between different methods was calculated by simple linear regression. A positive and acceptable correlation was found with osmolarity for the RE as for the UD (r= 0.81 and r= 0.86, respectively). The reagent strips presented low correlation (r= 0.46). Also, we found good correlation between measurements obtained by UD and RE (r= 0.89). Measurements obtained by TR, however, had bad correlation when compared to UD (r= 0.46). Higher values of specific gravity were observed when measured with RE with respect to UD. Reagent strips are not reliable for measuring urine specific gravity and should not be used as an usual test. However, hydrometry and refractometry are acceptable alternatives for measuring urine specific gravity, as long as the same method is used for follow-up.

  7. Energy-momentum and angular momentum densities in gauge theories of gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Toshiharu

    2000-01-01

    In the $\\bar{\\mbox{\\rm Poincar\\'{e}}}$ gauge theory of gravity, which has been formulated on the basis of a principal fiber bundle over the space-time manifold having the covering group of the proper orthochronous Poincar\\'{e} group as the structure group, we examine the tensorial properties of the dynamical energy-momentum density ${}^{G}{\\mathbf T}_{k}{}^{\\mu}$ and the ` ` spin" angular momentum density ${}^{G}{\\mathbf S}_{kl}{}^{\\mu}$ of the gravitational field. They are both space-time ve...

  8. Ghost dark energy models in specific modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Abdul; Salako, Ines G.; Sohail, Ayesha

    2016-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the cosmic acceleration through ghost dark energy models (its simple and generalized form) in the dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity. In order to check the reliability of this scenario, we explore different cosmological parameters, such as deceleration, equation of state parameters and squared speed of sound. The cosmological planes ωD - 'D and r- s are also investigated in this framework. The obtained results are consistent with observational data of various schemes (WMAP+eCAMB+BAO+H0).

  9. Causes of Irregular Energy Density in $f(R,T)$ Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yousaf, Z; Bhatti, M Zaeem ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    We investigate irregularity factors for a self-gravitating spherical star evolving in the presence of imperfect fluid. We explore the gravitational field equations and the dynamical equations with the systematic construction in $f(R,T)$ gravity, where $T$ is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Furthermore, we analyze two well-known differential equations (which occupy principal importance in the exploration of causes of energy density inhomogeneities) with the help of the Weyl tensor and the conservation laws. The irregularity factors for a spherical star are examined for particular cases of dust, isotropic and anisotropic fluids in dissipative and non-dissipative regimes in the framework of $f(R,T)$ gravity. It is found that as the complexity in the matter with the anisotropic stresses increases, the inhomogeneity factor has more correspondences to one of the structure scalars.

  10. Requirement for specific gravity and creatinine adjustments for urinary steroids and luteinizing hormone concentrations in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet K S; Balzer, Ben W R; Desai, Reena; Jimenez, Mark; Steinbeck, Katharine S; Handelsman, David J

    2015-11-01

    Urinary hormone concentrations are often adjusted to correct for hydration status. We aimed to determine whether first morning void urine hormones in growing adolescents require adjustments and, if so, whether urinary creatinine or specific gravity are better adjustments. The study population was adolescents aged 10.1 to 14.3 years initially who provided fasting morning blood samples at 0 and 12 months (n = 343) and first morning urine every three months (n = 644). Unadjusted, creatinine and specific gravity-adjusted hormonal concentrations were compared by Deming regression and Bland-Altman analysis and grouped according to self-rated Tanner stage or chronological age. F-ratios for self-rated Tanner stages and age groups were used to compare unadjusted and adjusted hormonal changes in growing young adolescents. Correlations of paired serum and urinary hormonal concentration of unadjusted and creatinine and specific gravity-adjusted were also compared. Fasting first morning void hormone concentrations correlated well and were unbiased between unadjusted or adjusted by either creatinine or specific gravity. Urine creatinine concentration increases with Tanner stages, age and male gender whereas urine specific gravity was not influenced by Tanner stage, age or gender. Adjustment by creatinine or specific gravity of urinary luteinizing hormone, estradiol, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone concentrations did not improve correlation with paired serum concentrations. Urine steroid and luteinizing hormone concentrations in first morning void samples of adolescents are not significantly influenced by hydration status and may not require adjustments; however, if desired, both creatinine and specific gravity adjustments are equally suitable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. 21 CFR 864.9320 - Copper sulfate solution for specific gravity determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper sulfate solution for specific gravity determinations. 864.9320 Section 864.9320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9320 Copper sulfate solution for specific...

  12. Rancang Bangun Sensor Specific Gravity pada Crude Oil Menggunakan Serat Optik Plastik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Wahyu Rizky W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tingkat kebutuhan energi minyak bumi di dunia semakin meningkat seiring berkembangnya teknologi. Untuk memenuhi kebutuhan tersebut, pihak produsen harus menambah jumlah produksinya dengan meningkatkan efisiensi pada saat proses produksi. Salah satu hal yang harus dilakukan adalah melakukan uji specific gravity pada minyak bumi. Uji specific gravity pada minyak bumi penting untuk dilakukan karena berdasarkan oAPI , hal ini menentukan apakah minyak bumi tersebut diklasifikasikan dalam heavy oil, medium oil atau light oil. Selain itu, nilai specific gravity juga akan menentukan nilai kapasitas kapal tanker untuk pengangkutan minyak mentah tersebut. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah dengan menggunakan sensor serat optik plastik yang dikelupas cladding-nya dengan variasi panjang sensor 1 cm, 2 cm, 4 cm dan 8 cm. Prinsip kerja dari sensor ini adalah pemanfaatan dari perubahan medan evanescent apabila dilakukan penggantian cladding serat optik oleh crude oil. Daya keluaran serat optik sebelum dan sesudah diberikan minyak mentah diukur menggunakan powermeter, dan beda daya yang dihasilkan nantinya akan dikonversi menjadi nilai specific gravity. Dari hasil uji karakteristik statis sensor, sensor dengan panjang 2 cm adalah sensor dengan respon terbaik yang memiliki sensitivitas sebesar 74,65µW per satuan specfic gravity, dengan span pengukuran terbesar yaitu sebesar 5,048µW, nilai koefisien determinasi sebesar 91,6% dan nilai error maksimal sebesar 0,86%.

  13. Self-gravity density waves in Saturn's rings A, B, and C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griv, Evgeny

    The presence of fine-scale of the order of 100 m density structure in Saturn's brightest rings A and B with the appearance of record-grooves has been revealed by Voyager PPS stellar occultation, and Cassini scince images, UVIS and radio occultations. Both spacecraft missions have shown that these relatively large "irregular variations" in optical depth are not associated with any resonances with known or embedded satellites. This microstructure explains an azimuthal brightness assymetry in Saturn's A ring observed first by Camichel in 1958. We examine the problem of the linear stability of the Saturnian ring system of mutually gravitating particles with special emphasis on its fine-scale density wave structure (almost regularly spaced, aligned cylindric density enhancements and rarefications). In our theory, the density pattern is the manifestation of a compression (longitudinal) density wave propagating around the ring disk at a fixed angular phase velocity despite the general differential rotation of a system; the density enhancements consist of different material at different times. Jeans' gravitational instabilities of small-amolitude gravity perturbations (e.g., those produced by a spontaneous disturbance) are analysed through the use of hydrodynamic equations. An essential feature of this study is that the theory is not restricted by any assumptions regarding the thickness of the system. The ring disk is considered to be thin and its vertical structure is considered in a horizontally local approximation. In the dynamically equilibrium state, the density is regarded as nonuniform between two sharp surfaces, with a vacuum exterior. A plasma physics analytical method is given for the solution of the self-consistent system of the gasdynamical equations and the Poisson equation describing the stability of Saturn's rings when the system is perturbed in an arbitrary manner. That is, when a gravity perturbation does not distort the rings' plane (modes of even

  14. Basement depth estimation from gravity anomalies: two 2.5D approaches coupled with the exponential density contrast model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, V.; Mallesh, K.; Ramamma, B.

    2017-03-01

    We develop two automatic techniques in the spatial domain using the exponential density contrast model (EDCM) to trace the bottom surface of a 2.5D sedimentary basin from the observed gravity anomalies. The interface between the sediments and basement is described with a finite strike polygonal source, whose depth ordinates become the unknown parameters to be estimated. The proposed automatic modeling technique makes use of the forward difference approximation and the inversion solves a system of normal equations using the ridge regression to estimate the unknown parameters. Furthermore, the proposed inversion technique simultaneously estimates the regional gravity background that is associated with the residual gravity anomaly. In either case, forward modeling is realized in the spatial domain through a method that combines both analytical and numerical approaches. The utility of each algorithm was successfully tested on a theoretically produced noisy residual gravity dataset. The validity of the inversion technique is also exemplified with the noisy gravity anomalies attributable to a synthetic structure in the presence of regional gravity background. We demonstrate that the magnitude of gravity anomaly is offset dependent and that it would influence the modeling result. Additionally, some applications with real gravity datasets from the Gediz and Büyük Menderes grabens in western Turkey using the derived EDCMs have produced geologically reasonable results which are in close agreement with those reported previously.

  15. Buffer Rod Design for Measurement of Specific Gravity in the Processing of Industrial Food Batters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Paul D.; Smith, Penny Probert

    2002-01-01

    A low cost perspex buffer rod design for the measurement of specific gravity during the processing of industrial food batters is reported. Operation was conducted in pulsed mode using a 2.25 MHz, 15 mm diameter transducer and the intensity and an analytic calibration curve relating buffer rod...

  16. Wood Specific Gravity Variation with Height and Its Implications for Biomass Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Wiemann; G. Bruce Williamson

    2014-01-01

    Wood specific gravity (SG) is widely employed by ecologists as a key variable in estimates of biomass. When it is important to have nondestructive methods for sampling wood for SG measurements, cores are extracted with an increment borer. While boring is a relatively difficult task even at breast height sampling, it is impossible at ground level and arduous at heights...

  17. Assessing specific gravity of young Eucalyptus plantation trees using a resistance drilling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Tarcísio da Silva Oliveira; Xiping Wang; Graziela Baptista Vidaurre

    2017-01-01

    The resistance drilling technique has been in focus for assessing the specific gravity (SG) of young Eucalyptus trees from plantations for pulpwood production. Namely, the data of 50 34-month-old and 50 62-monthold trees from Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus urophylla clonal plantations was evaluated, while...

  18. Reliability of measurement and genotype x environment 1 interaction for potato specific gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dry matter content of potatoes used to make potato chips and French fries strongly influences fry oil absorption and texture of the finished product. Specific gravity (SpGr) is often used to assess the processing quality of potatoes tubers because of its strong correlation with dry matter conten...

  19. Purple Pelisse: A specialty fingerling potato with purple skin and flesh and medium specific gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purple Pelisse is a specialty fingerling potato with purple skin and dark purple flesh. It has medium maturity and sets a large number of smooth, small, fingerling-shaped tubers. The tubers have medium specific gravity and high levels of antioxidants. This potato variety is mainly intended for the f...

  20. Modeling corewood-outerwood transition in loblolly pine using wood specific gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian R. Mora; H. Lee Allen; Richard F. Daniels; Alexander Clark

    2007-01-01

    A modified logistic function was used for modeling specific-gravity profiles obtained from X-ray densitometry analysis in 675 loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees in four regeneration trials. Trees were 21 or 22 years old at the time of the study. The function was used for demarcating corewood, transitional, and outerwood zones. Site and silvicultural effects were...

  1. Efficacy of specific gravity as a tool for prediction of biodiesel-petroleum diesel blend ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediction of volumetric biodiesel/petrodiesel blend ratio (VBD) from specific gravity (SG) data was the subject of the current investigation. Fatty acid methyl esters obtained from soybean, palm, and rapeseed oils along with chicken fat (SME-1, SME-2, PME, RME, and CFME) were blended (0 to 20 volum...

  2. The effects of irrigation and fertilization on specific gravity of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. R. Love-Myers; Alexander Clark; L. R. Schimleck; P. M. Dougherty; R. F. Daniels

    2010-01-01

    The effects of two treatments, irrigation and fertilization, were examined on specific gravity (SG)-related wood properties of loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) grown in Scotland County, North Carolina. The effects on the core as a whole, on the juvenile core, on the mature core, and from year to year were all analyzed. The results indicate that fertilization...

  3. Variations in wood anatomical properties and specific gravity of half sib progenies of Populus deltoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. K. Pande; R. C. Dhiman

    2012-01-01

    We studied radial and inter-progeny variations in the dimensions of the wood elements and specific gravity of 21 half sib progenies of Populus deltoides Bartr.ex Marsh.The female parents of half sib progenies were G48 and S7C13 clones.Variance ratio (F) test indicated that inter-progeny variations in the dimensions of wood elements and specific gravity were significant for all wood traits while variations were significant for radial location for specific gravity only.Hierarchical cluster analysis was done by Squared Euclidean Distance for all of 21 progenies considering six wood traits.21 progenies were grouped into 4 clusters.Cluster 1 was the largest cluster with 11 progenies,whereas cluster 3 had only one progeny.Selected progenies in dusters 3 (progeny 155,male) and 4 (progeny 108,196,both female) were highly divergent from the other progenies so they were used in combinations as parents of hybrids to develop new clones with desired characters.Progeny 155 showed higher growth,fiber dimensions,and specific gravity,thus,should be used for the development of new clones.

  4. Gravity data inversion to determine 3D topographycal density contrast of Banten area, Indonesia based on fast Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhari, Ayuty; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-01

    The 3D inversion gravity anomaly to estimate topographical density using a matlab source code from gridded data provided by Parker Oldenburg algorithm based on fast Fourier transform was computed. We extend and improved the source code of 3DINVERT.M invented by Gomez Ortiz and Agarwal (2005) using the relationship between Fourier transform of the gravity anomaly and the sum of the Fourier transform from the topography density. We gave density contrast between the two media to apply the inversion. FFT routine was implemented to construct amplitude spectrum to the given mean depth. The results were presented as new graphics of inverted topography density, the gravity anomaly due to the inverted topography and the difference between the input gravity data and the computed ones. It terminates when the RMS error is lower than pre-assigned value used as convergence criterion or until maximum of iterations is reached. As an example, we used the matlab program on gravity data of Banten region, Indonesia.

  5. MODEL FOR THE CORRECTION OF THE SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF BIODIESEL FROM RESIDUAL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Aparecida Rosa da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a important fuel with economic benefits, social and environmental. The production cost of the biodiesel can be significantly lowered if the raw material is replaced by a alternative material as residual oil. In this study, the variation of specific gravity with temperature increase for diesel and biodiesel from residual oil obtained by homogeneous basic catalysis. All properties analyzed for biodiesel are within specification Brazil. The determination of the correction algorithm for the specific gravity function of temperature is also presented, and the slope of the line to diesel fuel, methylic biodiesel (BMR and ethylic biodiesel (BER from residual oil were respectively the values -0.7089, -0.7290 and -0.7277. This demonstrates the existence of difference of the model when compared chemically different fuels, like diesel and biodiesel from different sources, indicating the importance of determining the specific algorithm for the operations of conversion of volume to the reference temperature.

  6. Negative specific heat of black-holes from Fluid-Gravity Correspondence

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Swastik; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2017-01-01

    Black-holes in asymptotically flat space-times have negative specific heat --- they get hotter as they loose energy. A clear statistical mechanical understanding of this has remained a challenge. In this work, we address this issue using fluid-gravity correspondence which aims to associate fluid degrees of freedom to the horizon. Using linear response theory and the teleological nature of event horizon, we show explicitly that the fluctuations of the horizon-fluid lead to negative specific he...

  7. Three-dimensional density structures of Taiwan and tectonic implications based on the analysis of gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsien-Hsiang; Yen, Horng-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Taiwan is located in a collision and subduction area and has a complex tectonic history. To better understand the complicated structure beneath Taiwan, gravity studies, in addition to seismic and geological studies, provide useful geophysical information for studying shallow depths. Previous gravity studies of Taiwan in the last 30 years focused on local regionalized explanations and 2-D profile modeling. This study is the first to complete a 3-D gravity inversion of Taiwan, and it provides a more comprehensive and large-scale tectonic analysis. Following 3-D gravity inversion using the least squares method, we sliced horizontal and vertical profiles from the 3-D density model to visualize tectonic changes. The low Bouguer anomaly was caused by thick sediment and crust layers. The high-density layers are located in special tectonic areas such as the Peikang and Kuanying basement highs. The deepest Moho depth beneath the middle of the Central Range is 45-50 km. The high gradient changes of the eastern section of the Moho relief are shown by the complex mechanism of plate collision. The geometry of plate subduction is apparent in northeastern Taiwan, and the oceanic crust is observable under eastern Taiwan, showing arc-collision boundaries. Our 3-D density model, when combined with updated gravity data and seismic tomography, offers better resolution for deep structures than the previous 2-D forward results and serves as a physical property reference to better understand the tectonic structure beneath Taiwan.

  8. A Constrained 3D Density Model of the Upper Crust from Gravity Data Interpretation for Central Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar H. Lücke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The map of complete Bouguer anomaly of Costa Rica shows an elongated NW-SE trending gravity low in the central region. This gravity low coincides with the geographical region known as the Cordillera Volcánica Central. It is built by geologic and morpho-tectonic units which consist of Quaternary volcanic edifices. For quantitative interpretation of the sources of the anomaly and the characterization of fluid pathways and reservoirs of arc magmatism, a constrained 3D density model of the upper crust was designed by means of forward modeling. The density model is constrained by simplified surface geology, previously published seismic tomography and P-wave velocity models, which stem from wide-angle refraction seismic, as well as results from methods of direct interpretation of the gravity field obtained for this work. The model takes into account the effects and influence of subduction-related Neogene through Quaternary arc magmatism on the upper crust.

  9. Holographic fluid with bulk viscosity, perturbation of pressure and energy density at finite cutoff surface in the Einstein gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Using the gravity/fluid correspondence in our paper, we investigate the holographic fluid at finite cutoff surface in the Einstein gravity. After constructing the first order perturbative solution of the Schwarzschild-AdS black brane solution in the Einstein gravity, we focus on the stress-energy tensor of the dual fluid with transport coefficients at the finite cutoff surface. Besides the pressure and energy density of dual fluid are obtained, the shear viscosity is also obtained. The most important results are that we find that if we adopt different conditions to fix the undetermined parameters contained in the stress-energy tensor of the dual fluid, the pressure and energy density of the dual fluid can be perturbed. Particularly, the bulk viscosity of the dual fluid can also be given in this case.

  10. Turbulent behaviour of non-cohesive sediment gravity flows at unexpectedly high flow density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Megan; Baas, Jaco H.; Malarkey, Jonathan; Kane, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Experimental lock exchange-type turbidity currents laden with non-cohesive silica-flour were found to be highly dynamic at remarkably high suspended sediment concentrations. These experiments were conducted to produce sediment gravity flows of volumetric concentrations ranging from 1% to 52%, to study how changes in suspended sediment concentration affects the head velocities and run-out distances of these flows, in natural seawater. Increasing the volumetric concentration of suspended silica-flour, C, up to C = 46%, within the flows led to a progressive increase in the maximum head velocity. This relationship suggests that suspended sediment concentration intensifies the density difference between the turbulent suspension and the ambient water, which drives the flow, even if almost half of the available space is occupied by sediment particles. However, from C = 46% to C = 52% a rapid reduction in the maximum head velocity was measured. It is inferred that at C = 46%, friction from grain-to-grain interactions begins to attenuate turbulence within the flows. At C > 46%, the frictional stresses become progressively more dominant over the turbulent forces and excess density, thus producing lower maximum head velocities. This grain interaction process started to rapidly reduce the run-out distance of the silica-flour flows at equally high concentrations of C ≥ 47%. All flows with C 9%. Yet, the critical flow concentration at which turbulence modulation commenced for these silica-flour laden flows appeared to be much higher. We suggest that Bagnold's 9% criterion cannot be applied to flows that carry fine-grained sediment, because turbulent forces are more important than dispersive forces, and frictional forces start to affect the flows only at concentrations just below the cubic packing density of spheres of C = 52%. These experimental results also imply that natural flows may be able to transport vast volumes of non-cohesive sediment with relative ease, especially

  11. Research on lithospheric density distributions beneath North China Craton and its destruction mechanism by gravity and seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Fang, J.; Hsu, H.

    2011-12-01

    North China Craton (NCC) has been a research hotspot for geoscientists all over the world. Partial North China Craton (NCC) has lost its lithospheric keel since Mesozoic. Researchers have reached a consensus on destruction of NCC' lithosphere, however, the destruction mechanism and dynamic processes still remain controversy. In this study, a three-dimensional density distribution of lithosphere beneath NCC is determined using gravity datum combined with P-wave travel times by sequential inversion method. After the analyses and discussions on our density results referred to other geophysical and geochemical researches and then gave our viewpoint about destruction mechanisms of NCC lithosphere from the standpoint of density distribution. A linear velocity-density relationship is used to achieve mutual transformations and constraints between density and velocity. As we know, the gravity anomalies measured on the ground surface are the integrated reflection of the interface undulations and underground density inhomogeneous. In order to invert the lithospheric density structures, we firstly separated the gravity effects of lithospheric density inhomogeneous by removing the effects of other contributions to the gravity field from the observed integrated gravity filed before density inversion. The method of Zhao et al.,(1994) is used for seismic tomography, while Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) is applied in density inversion, which highly improved the calculation velocity compared to common least squares method. The inversion results indicate that, the lithospheric density beneath NCC is extremely inhomogeneous and its distributions are coherent with surface regional tectonics; Low density anomalies exist in lower crust beneath rift basins around Ordos block. High poisson' ratios are found in these regions (about 3.0), which may indicate partial melting occurred. Receive function studies prevailed thinned ( 8.2km/s) is also found in this region. The prominent

  12. Continuous gravity measurements reveal a low-density lava lake at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael P.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    On 5 March 2011, the lava lake within the summit eruptive vent at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, began to drain as magma withdrew to feed a dike intrusion and fissure eruption on the volcanoʼs east rift zone. The draining was monitored by a variety of continuous geological and geophysical measurements, including deformation, thermal and visual imagery, and gravity. Over the first ∼14 hours of the draining, the ground near the eruptive vent subsided by about 0.15 m, gravity dropped by more than 100 μGal, and the lava lake retreated by over 120 m. We used GPS data to correct the gravity signal for the effects of subsurface mass loss and vertical deformation in order to isolate the change in gravity due to draining of the lava lake alone. Using a model of the eruptive vent geometry based on visual observations and the lava level over time determined from thermal camera data, we calculated the best-fit lava density to the observed gravity decrease — to our knowledge, the first geophysical determination of the density of a lava lake anywhere in the world. Our result, 950 +/- 300 kg m-3, suggests a lava density less than that of water and indicates that Kīlaueaʼs lava lake is gas-rich, which can explain why rockfalls that impact the lake trigger small explosions. Knowledge of such a fundamental material property as density is also critical to investigations of lava-lake convection and degassing and can inform calculations of pressure change in the subsurface magma plumbing system.

  13. Inferring lateral density variations in Great Geneva Basin, western Switzerland from wells and gravity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Aurore; Lupi, Matteo; Clerc, Nicolas; Rusillon, Elme; Do Couto, Damien

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of sustainable energy development Switzerland supports the growth of renewable energies. SIG (Services Industriels de Genève) and the Canton of Geneva intend to develop the use of hydrothermal energy in western Switzerland. As a Mesozoïc-formed sedimentary basin, the Great Geneva Basin (GGB) shares geological and petrophysical similarities with the Munich area (Baviera, Germany) and Paris Basin (France). The latter already provide significant amounts of geothermal energy for district heating. The prospection phase has been launched in 2014 by SIG and aims at identifying relevant geological units and defining their geometries. Lower Cretaceous and Tertiary geological units have first been targeted as potential layers. At the depth we find these units (and according to the normal geothermal gradient), low enthalpy geothermal resources are rather expected. In this framework, our study aims at constraining and refining lateral and vertical heterogeneities of Quaternary to Cretaceous sedimentary layers in GGB. Linear velocity law is inverted at wells and then interpolated to the whole basin for each geological layer. Using time pickings from available data and Quaternary information from previous studies time to depth conversion is performed. Thickness map of every geological unit is then produced. Tertiary thickness ranges from 0 m at the NW border of the GGB at the foothill of the Jura Mountains to 3000 m in the SE of the GGB at the border with the French Alps. These observations are consistent with field and well observations. The produced thickness map will be used as a geometry support for gravity data inversion and then density lateral variations estimation. Unconstrained, and a priori constrained inversion has been performed in GGB using Gauss-Newton algorithms. Velocity versus density relationships will then enable to refine velocity law interpolation. Our procedure allowed us to reduce the uncertainty of key target formation and represents an

  14. Constraint on dark matter central density in the eddington inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity with input from Weyl gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Potapov, Alexander A; Mikolaychuk, Olga; Mikolaychuk, Nikolay; Ghosh, Mithun; Nandi, Kamal K

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Harko {et al.} (2014) derived an approximate metric of the galactic halo in the Eddington inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity. In this metric, we show that there is an upper limit $\\rho_{0}^{\\text{upper}}$ on the central density $\\rho_{0}$ of dark matter such that stable circular orbits are possible only when the constraint $\\rho_{0}\\leq \\rho_{0}^{\\text{upper}}$ is satisfied in each galactic sample. To quantify different $\\rho_{0}^{\\text{upper}}$ for different samples, we follow the novel approach of Edery & Paranjape (1998), where we use as input the geometric halo boundary from Weyl gravity $R_{\\text{WR}}$ and equate it with the dark matter radius $R_{\\text{DM}}$ from EiBI gravity for the same halo boundary. This input then shows that the known fitted values of $\\rho_{0}$ obey the constraint $\\rho_{0}\\leq \\rho_{0}^{\\text{upper}}\\propto $($R_{\\text{WR}}$)$^{-2}$. Using the mass-to-light ratios giving $\\alpha $, we shall also evaluate $\\rho_{0}^{\\text{lower}}$ $\\propto $ $(\\alpha -1)M_{\\text{lum...

  15. Constructing multi-scale gravitational energy spectra from molecular cloud surface density PDF -- Interplay between turbulence and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guang-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Gravity is believed to be important on multiple physical scales in molecular clouds. However, quantitative constraints on gravity are still lacking. We derive an analytical formula which provides estimates on multi-scale gravitational energy distribution using the observed surface density PDF. Our analytical formalism also enables one to convert the observed column density PDF into an estimated volume density PDF, and to obtain average radial profile $\\rho(r)$. For a region with $N_{\\rm col} \\sim N^{-\\gamma_{\\rm N}}$, the gravitational energy spectra is $E_{\\rm p}(k)\\sim k^{-4(1 - 1/\\gamma_{\\rm N})}$. We apply the formula to observations of molecular clouds, and find that a scaling index of $-2$ of the surface density PDF implies that $\\rho \\sim r^{-2}$ and $E_{\\rm p}(k) \\sim k^{-2}$. This indicates that gravity can act effectively against turbulence over a multitude of physical scales. This is the critical scaling index which divides molecular clouds into two categories: clouds like Orion and Ophiuchus have ...

  16. Matter density perturbations in modified gravity models with arbitrary coupling between matter and geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesseris, Savvas

    2009-01-01

    of the matter density are useful to constrain the theory from growth factor and weak lensing observations. Finally, we use a completely solvable toy model which exhibits nontrivial phenomenology to investigate specific features of the theory. We obtain the analytic solution of the modified Friedmann equation...... for the scale factor $a$ in terms of time $t$ and use the age of the oldest star clusters and the primordial nucleosynthesis bounds in order to constrain the parameters of our toy model....

  17. MODTOHAFSD — A GUI based JAVA code for gravity analysis of strike limited sedimentary basins by means of growing bodies with exponential density contrast-depth variation: A space domain approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, V.; Sastry, S. Rajeswara; Ramamma, B.

    2013-07-01

    Based on the principles of modeling and inversion, two interpretation methods are developed in the space domain along with a GUI based JAVA code, MODTOHAFSD, to analyze the gravity anomalies of strike limited sedimentary basins using a prescribed exponential density contrast-depth function. A stack of vertical prisms all having equal widths, but each one possesses its own limited strike length and thickness, describes the structure of a sedimentary basin above the basement complex. The thicknesses of prisms represent the depths to the basement and are the unknown parameters to be estimated from the observed gravity anomalies. Forward modeling is realized in the space domain using a combination of analytical and numerical approaches. The algorithm estimates the initial depths of a sedimentary basin and improves them, iteratively, based on the differences between the observed and modeled gravity anomalies within the specified convergence criteria. The present code, works on Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern, reads the Bouguer gravity anomalies, constructs/modifies regional gravity background in an interactive approach, estimates residual gravity anomalies and performs automatic modeling or inversion based on user specification for basement topography. Besides generating output in both ASCII and graphical forms, the code displays (i) the changes in the depth structure, (ii) nature of fit between the observed and modeled gravity anomalies, (iii) changes in misfit, and (iv) variation of density contrast with iteration in animated forms. The code is used to analyze both synthetic and real field gravity anomalies. The proposed technique yielded information that is consistent with the assumed parameters in case of synthetic structure and with available drilling depths in case of field example. The advantage of the code is that it can be used to analyze the gravity anomalies of sedimentary basins even when the profile along which the interpretation is intended fails to

  18. Negative specific heat of black-holes from fluid-gravity correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Swastik; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2017-04-01

    Black holes in asymptotically flat space-times have negative specific heat—they get hotter as they loose energy. A clear statistical mechanical understanding of this has remained a challenge. In this work, we address this issue using fluid-gravity correspondence which aims to associate fluid degrees of freedom to the horizon. Using linear response theory and the teleological nature of event horizon, we show explicitly that the fluctuations of the horizon-fluid lead to negative specific heat for a Schwarzschild black Hole. We also point out how the specific heat can be positive for Kerr–Newman or AdS black holes. Our approach constitutes an important advance as it allows us to apply the canonical ensemble approach to study thermodynamics of asymptotically flat black hole space-times.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of crustal correction and its error propagation to upper mantle residual gravity and density anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the crustal structure heterogeneity and uncertainty in its determination on stripped gravity field. The analysis is based on interpretation of residual upper mantle gravity anomalies which are calculated by subtracting (stripping) the gravitational effect of the crust...... a relatively small range of expected density variations in the lithospheric mantle, knowledge on the uncertainties associated with incomplete knowledge of density structure of the crust is of utmost importance for further progress in such studies......) uncertainties in the velocity-density conversion and (ii) uncertainties in knowledge of the crustal structure (thickness and average Vp velocities of individual crustal layers, including the sedimentary cover). In this study, we address both sources of possible uncertainties by applying different conversions...... from velocity to density and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by high-quality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. The residual...

  20. Hot water and dilute acid pretreatment of high and low specific gravity Populus deltoides clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Bunnell, Kris A; Lau, Ching-Shuan; Pelkki, Matthew H; Patterson, David W; Clausen, Edgar C; Smith, James A; Carrier, Danielle Julie

    2011-02-01

    Populus sp. are hardwood feedstocks that grow in forest management areas that are logged for softwoods; however, they are also being considered as an energy-destined feedstock. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of xylose yield from dilute acid and hot water pretreatments performed in unstirred batch stainless steel reactors at temperatures ranging from 140 to 200°C. Populus deltoides clones S13C20 and S7C15 used in this study originated from Eastern Texas and were cultivated for 14 years in Pine Tree, AR. P. deltoides clones S13C20 and S7C15 had specific gravities of 0.48 and 0.40, respectively. Bark and wood were examined separately. As expected, hot water pretreatments, in the tested temperature range, resulted in very little direct xylose recovery. However, the 140°C dilute acid pretreatment of the lower specific gravity clone, S7C15, wood yielded the highest average xylose recovery of 56%. This condition also yielded the highest concentration of furfural, 9 mg/g sample, which can be inhibitory to the fermentation step. The highest xylose recovery from bark samples, 31%, was obtained with clone S7C15, using the 160°C dilute acid pretreatment for 60 min.

  1. Growth ring characteristics, specific gravity and fiber length of rapidly grown loblolly pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, F.W.; Burton, J.D.

    1982-07-01

    Intensive thinning, understory control, and green pruning of loblolly pine trees growing on a test area near Crossett, Arkansas, have produced trees with a diameter of 18.9 inches at breast heights in 35 years. Large increment borings extracted from experimental trees and control trees were examined for growth patterns and wood properties alterations related to growth rate differences. During some growth periods, radial growth of test trees was almost three times as great as radial growth of control trees. In the outer juvenile wood formed after the first thinning, growth rate differences were greatest between experimental trees. During the last 10 years of the study (mature wood zone), growth rate differences between treated and control trees were not as great, and there were no significant differences in latewood percentage or tracheid length. Specific gravity was not significantly influenced by growth rate differences in any growth zone. This result leads to the conclusion that trees can be rapidly grown without affecting specific gravity. (Refs. 19).

  2. Flexible and Lightweight Fuel Cell with High Specific Power Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Fandi; He, Xudong; Shen, Yangbin; Jin, Hehua; Li, Qingwen; Li, Da; Li, Shuping; Zhan, Yulu; Du, Ying; Jiang, Jingjing; Yang, Hui; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2017-06-27

    Flexible devices have been attracting great attention recently due to their numerous advantages. But the energy densities of current energy sources are still not high enough to support flexible devices for a satisfactory length of time. Although proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) do have a high-energy density, traditional PEMFCs are usually too heavy, rigid, and bulky to be used in flexible devices. In this research, we successfully invented a light and flexible air-breathing PEMFC by using a new design of PEMFC and a flexible composite electrode. The flexible air-breathing PEMFC with 1 × 1 cm(2) working area can be as light as 0.065 g and as thin as 0.22 mm. This new PEMFC exhibits an amazing specific volume power density as high as 5190 W L(-1), which is much higher than traditional (air-breathing) PEMFCs. Also outstanding is that the flexible PEMFC retains 89.1% of its original performance after being bent 600 times, and it retains its original performance after being dropped five times from a height of 30 m. Moreover, the research has demonstrated that when stacked, the flexible PEMFCs are also useful in mobile applications such as mobile phones. Therefore, our research shows that PEMFCs can be made light, flexible, and suitable for applications in flexible devices. These innovative flexible PEMFCs may also notably advance the progress in the PEMFC field, because flexible PEMFCs can achieve high specific power density with small size, small volume, low weight, and much lower cost; they are also much easier to mass produce.

  3. The density of the rock covering Gran Sasso Laboratories in Central Apennines, Italy by underground gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, P.; De Luca, G.; Di Sena, F.; Gasparini, P.; Scarpa, R.

    1998-05-01

    Various nuclear physics experiments are being carried out in the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratories that have been excavated in the Gran Sasso Massif in the Italian Apennines. These experiments make use of the shield effect provided by a 1400-m-thick rock cover that absorb cosmic rays. It is important to know the real density of the rock cover and the extent of its lateral variation. The density of different sections of the rock cover was determined using the correlation between measured underground gravity data and thickness of the rock cover. Observed gravity was corrected using a 3D model, for the mass deficiency covered by excavation of highway tunnels and the cavities that house the laboratories. The average density of the rock cover was found to be 2720±50 kg m -3. Lateral variations are contained within the uncertainty for most of the sections, except for two sections where densities are lowered by as much as 11% because of the presence of a shallow layer formed by loose Quaternary sediments.

  4. Frequency and Temperature Characteristics of an Ultrasonic Method for Measuring the Specific Gravity of Lead-Acid Battery Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaxin; Li, Guofeng

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present an ultrasonic method for measuring the specific gravity of lead-acid battery electrolyte and study its frequency and temperature characteristics. This method uses an improved frequency scanning ultrasonic pulse echo reflectometer with a two-transducer configuration. The velocity and attenuation coefficient (1 to 30 MHz) of electrolytes with different specific gravities (1.05 to 1.30) are obtained at 25 °C. It has been shown that the ultrasonic velocity changes little with frequency, and there is low attenuation at approximately 5 MHz. The velocities of several electrolytes with different specific gravities are measured in the temperature range from 10 to 50 °C. The thermal transient of the measurement cell is analyzed, showing 0.1% accuracy in specific gravity measurement for a steady temperature and 0.5% accuracy under thermal gradient conditions after temperature compensation. This method is suitable for the on-line, rapid, and accurate measurement of the specific gravity of a lead-acid battery electrolyte.

  5. Storage stability of poultry fat and diesel fuel mixtures: Specific gravity and viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Geller; Thomas T. Adams; John W. Goodrum; Joshua Pendergrass [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Faculty of Engineering

    2008-01-15

    Poultry fat (biofuel) and its 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% mixtures with no. 2 pump diesel fuel were stored for 1 year at bench scale (1 L) under controlled laboratory conditions at 4, 38, 54.4{sup o}C and at ambient room temperature. Poultry fat (100%) was studied under these same conditions with and without an antioxidant additive. Poultry fat mixtures (20% and 80%) were also stored at pilot scale (250 gallons) under outdoor, ambient conditions. Physical properties and phenomenon relevant to the use of these mixtures as biofuels for industrial boilers were studied and tracked. These properties include specific gravity, dynamic viscosity, sedimentation accumulation and separation (layering). Corrosive effects of these fuels on various metals were also examined. Viscosity and specific gravity of these biofuels changed very little over the course of the 1 year storage period. Sediment accumulation was present in all treatments, with increasing sedimentation correlating with increasing biofuel concentrations. The addition of antioxidant to 100% biofuel minimized changes in physical properties and sedimentation over the course of this study. Layering occurred in all mixtures of poultry fat and diesel fuel. Results also include the approximate amount of energy required to insure proper mixing of each treatment. After mixing, homogenization was maintained for considerable time periods. This suggests that mixing should only be performed immediately before the fuels are utilized. Corrosive properties of these biofuels were generally as expected; brass and copper were susceptible to attack by these fuels where as 316 stainless steel and carbon steel were not. 13 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Gravity investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healey, D.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)

    1983-12-31

    A large density contrast exists between the Paleozoic rocks (including the rocks of Climax stock) and less dense, Tertiary volcanic rocks and alluvium. This density contrast ranges widely, and herein for interpretive purposes, is assumed to average 0.85 Mg/m{sup 3} (megagrams per cubic meter). The large density contrast makes the gravity method a useful tool with which to study the interface between these rock types. However, little or no density contrast is discernible between the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks that surround the Climax stock and the intrusive rocks of the stock itself. Therefore the gravity method can not be used to define the configuration of the stock. Gravity highs coincide with outcrops of the dense Paleozoic rocks, and gravity lows overlie less-dense Tertiary volcanic rocks and Quaternary alluvium. The positions of three major faults (Boundary, Yucca, and Butte faults) are defined by steep gravity gradients. West of the Climax stock, the Tippinip fault has juxtaposed Paleozoic rocks of similar density, and consequently, has no expression in the gravity data in that area. The gravity station spacing, across Oak Spring Butte, is not sufficient to adequately define any gravity expression of the Tippinip fault. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Element-specific density profiles in interacting biomembrane models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Bertinetti, Luca; Marin, Egor; Novikov, Dmitri; Konovalov, Oleg; Gochev, Georgi

    2017-03-01

    Surface interactions involving biomembranes, such as cell–cell interactions or membrane contacts inside cells play important roles in numerous biological processes. Structural insight into the interacting surfaces is a prerequisite to understand the interaction characteristics as well as the underlying physical mechanisms. Here, we work with simplified planar experimental models of membrane surfaces, composed of lipids and lipopolymers. Their interaction is quantified in terms of pressure–distance curves using ellipsometry at controlled dehydrating (interaction) pressures. For selected pressures, their internal structure is investigated by standing-wave x-ray fluorescence (SWXF). This technique yields specific density profiles of the chemical elements P and S belonging to lipid headgroups and polymer chains, as well as counter-ion profiles for charged surfaces.

  8. Computational methods for the discrete downward continuation of the Earth gravity and effects of lateral topographical mass density variation on gravity and the geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianliang

    In this thesis, computational methods for the discrete Poisson downward continuation of the Earth gravity are studied. In addition, the effect of the lateral topographical mass density variation on gravity and the geoid is systematically investigated. A solution in the spherical harmonic form for the Poisson integral equation is derived. It is pointed out that the solution of the discrete inverse Poisson problem exists, but may not be unique and stable. For a small input error, a large output error is introduced. It is in this sense that the inverse Poisson problem is said to be an ill-posed problem. It is found that the modified spheroidal Poisson kernel reduces the 'real' far-zone contribution with respect to using the spheroidal Poisson kernel significantly, but it cannot perform better than the standard Poisson kernel in reducing it. A fast algorithm is developed for the evaluation of the far-zone contribution. Heiskanen and Moritz's (1967) radius condition gives a critical radius of the near-zone cap that is too small for the determination of the cm-geoid, while Martinec's (1996) condition gives an unnecessarily large radius. It is proposed that the critical near-zone radius be determined as a function of the accuracy of the global geopotential model from which the far-zone contribution is evaluated. The combined iterative method is proposed to speed up the convergence of the solution of the discrete inverse Poisson problem. The truncated singular value decomposition method is introduced to solve the discrete Poisson integral equation that may be ill-conditioned for a small discrete step. The three discrete models for the Poisson integral, namely the point-point, point-mean and mean-mean models are assessed against synthetic data. It is shown that the mean-mean model can produce a sufficiently accurate solution when the so called 'averaging error' is properly corrected for.

  9. Crustal density structure in northwestern South America derived from analysis and 3-D modeling of gravity and seismicity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Rojas, J.; Palma, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation of new gravity and seismicity datasets for northern South America. A 3-D forward density model was constructed on the basis of deep wide-angle seismic refraction sections, Moho depth from receiver functions, and surface geology. Density values were estimated from published borehole data for sediments by using empirical velocity-density functions and considering mineralogical-chemical composition variations under typical pressure-temperature conditions for upper and lower crustal rocks. The modeled 3-D density structure was kept as simple as possible. The continental and oceanic plates were formed by two sedimentary bodies, one crustal body, and one mantle lithosphere body overlying a sub-lithospheric mantle. The Caribbean plate was modeled with an atypical crustal thickness of ~ 18 km (including sediments). The geometry of the Caribbean plate was modeled using a combination of gravity modeling and analyses of the seismicity and focal-mechanism solutions. Intermediate seismicity and the orientation of the T-axes appeared aligned along the predicted position of the slab. As a result, the estimated slab dip angle under Maracaibo and the Mérida Andes was ~ 15° and increases up to ~ 20° after 100 km depth. The model shows two orientations in the slab strike: ~ N150°E ± 5 in western Colombia and southward underneath the Maracaibo block. The modeling results suggest that the northern South American upper and lower crusts are relatively light and the density of the Caribbean crust is typical for an oceanic crust.

  10. Data on the weights, specific gravities and chemical compositions of potato (Solanum tuberosum tubers for food processing from different areas of Hokkaido, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Sato

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This data article provides the weights, specific gravities and chemical compositions (moisture, protein, fat, ash, and carbohydrate of potato tubers, for food processing use, from the Tokachi, Kamikawa and Abashiri areas of Hokkaido, Japan. Potato tubers of four cultivars (‘Toyoshiro’, ‘Kitahime’, ‘Snowden’ and ‘Poroshiri’ were employed in the current study. The weights and specific gravities of potato tubers from each cultivar, harvested from three areas, were measured, and those of near average weight and specific gravity from each group were analyzed for their chemical composition. In this article, weight, specific gravity, and chemical composition data are provided in tables.

  11. 3D Density Modeling with Gravity and Muon-Radiographic Observations in Showa-Shinzan Lava Dome, Usu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Miyamoto, Seigo; Okubo, Shuhei; Oshima, Hiromitsu; Maekawa, Tokumitsu

    2017-03-01

    We performed three-dimensional density modeling of Showa-Shinzan lava dome, Usu, Japan, by joint inversion of the gravity anomaly and recently obtained muon radiography data. Our multilayer emulsion muon detector significantly reduces the background noise in our measurements of the muon flux through the dome. The high-quality muon data enables us to more accurately reconstruct the density structure of the lava dome compared with our own previous work. We find that the lava dome consists of a cylindrical column of massive lava with a diameter of 300 m, and that there is no evidence of magma intrusion in the shallow part of the plateau, located east of the dome.

  12. Einstein-Cartan Gravity with Torsion Field Serving as Origin for Cosmological Constant or Dark Energy Density

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A N

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the Einstein-Cartan gravity in its standard form cal-R = R + cal-K^2, where cal-R and R are the Ricci scalar curvatures in the Einstein-Cartan and Einstein gravity, respectively, and cal-K^2 is the quadratic contribution of torsion in terms of the contorsion tensor cal-K. We treat torsion as an external (or a background) field and show that the contribution of torsion to the Einstein equations can be interpreted in terms of the torsion energy-momentum tensor, local conservation of which in a curved spacetime with an arbitrary metric or an arbitrary gravitational field demands a proportionality of the torsion energy--momentum tensor to a metric tensor, a covariant derivative of which vanishes because of the metricity condition. This allows to claim that torsion can serve as origin for vacuum energy density, given by cosmological constant or dark energy density in the Universe. This is a model-independent result may explain a small value of cosmological constant, which is a long--standing problem of ...

  13. Einstein-Cartan Gravity with Torsion Field Serving as an Origin for the Cosmological Constant or Dark Energy Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2016-09-01

    We analyse the Einstein-Cartan gravity in its standard form { R }=R+{{ K }}2, where { R } {and} R are the Ricci scalar curvatures in the Einstein-Cartan and Einstein gravity, respectively, and {{ K }}2 is the quadratic contribution of torsion in terms of the contorsion tensor { K }. We treat torsion as an external (or background) field and show that its contribution to the Einstein equations can be interpreted in terms of the torsion energy-momentum tensor, local conservation of which in a curved spacetime with an arbitrary metric or an arbitrary gravitational field demands a proportionality of the torsion energy-momentum tensor to a metric tensor, a covariant derivative of which vanishes owing to the metricity condition. This allows us to claim that torsion can serve as an origin for the vacuum energy density, given by the cosmological constant or dark energy density in the universe. This is a model-independent result that may explain the small value of the cosmological constant, which is a long-standing problem in cosmology. We show that the obtained result is valid also in the Poincaré gauge gravitational theory of Kibble, where the Einstein-Hilbert action can be represented in the same form: { R }=R+{{ K }}2.

  14. Cosmological Perturbation Theory to second order for curvature, density, and gravity waves on FRW background; and the WMAP results of inhomogeneity and clustering in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Patwardhan, Ajay; Kumar, M S R

    2008-01-01

    The second order perturbation calculations for gravity wave and Einstein equation for space time and matter are presented for the FRW metric cosmological model. While exact equations are found, suitable approximations are made to obtain definite results. In the gravity wave case the small wavelength case allows nearly locally flat background for obtaining a fit to the WMAP data. In the density and curvature case the FRW background is retained for the length scale of WMAP. Clustering and inhomogeneity are understood. The gravity wave ripples from Big Bang couple nonlinearly and redistribute the modes to higher values of 'l' giving consistency with the WMAP results. The order by order consistency of Einstein equations relate the second order perturbations in the curvature and density and the wrinkles in spacetime caused by the gravity wave modes reorganize these distributions. The radiation data of WMAP gives the picture of a FRW spacetime deformed and wrinkled consistent with matter distribution to one hundred...

  15. Gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David

    1987-02-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  16. A continuing discussion about the correlation of tidal gravity anomalies and heat flow densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, P.

    1995-04-01

    On the basis of several objections, Rydelek et al. (Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 68: 215-219, 1991) (hereafter noted RZH) denied the existence of a correlation between residuals of tidal gravity ( R) and heat flow ( H) suggested by other workers. To re-examine the whole matter on safe grounds, we previously revised and reanalysed all the original tidal data from 300 stations, taking care of the RZH objections by eliminating what they considered as the important sources of errors in the data, essentially calibration errors of the instruments in amplitude and phase. Using this new data base, we meet here, one by one, the other criticisms not related to the original tidal measurements and show that most of them are not valid, in particular those concerning oceanic load and attraction corrections. The findings are as follows: (1) no correlation between diurnal tide and semi-diurnal tide residuals is normal; (2) distance from the sea is not a valid criterion for elimination of several excellent stations; (3) unexpected residues at the South Pole are not due to imperfections of the cotidal Schwiderski maps but to ice-shelf tides not considered by RZH; (4) the correlation of the tidal gravity residues with the age of tectonic provinces is proposed as an alternative to the correlation with heat flow. The data used in 1991 having been corrected are recalculated for comparison with 1986-1991 statistics: the correlation is confirmed with the same degree of probability. Also, new tidal gravity data obtained since 1990 with 'nullified' instruments, as recommended by RZH, in Africa (31 stations) and Latin America (34 stations), are included in new statistics which also confirm the correlation. The global result, obtained from 174 revised and new stations on all continents, gives a correlation coefficient k = 0.691 with a linear regression R = 0.0201( H - 57) - 0.063 ± 0.0013 (where R is in microgals, and H is in mW m -2). As there is at present no practical or theoretical means

  17. Halo Gravity Traction Is Associated with Reduced Bone Mineral Density of Patients with Severe Kyphoscoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Han; Weixiang Sun; Yong Qiu; Leilei Xu; Shifu Sha; Benlong Shi; Huang Yan; Zhen Liu; Zezhang Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Halo gravity traction (HGT) is one of the most commonly used perioperative techniques for the treatment of severe kyphoscoliosis. This study was to explore the influence of HGT on the BMD of these patients. Methods. Patients with severe kyphoscoliosis treated by preoperative HGT for at least 2 months were included. Patients' BMD were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine (LS, L2–L4) and femur neck (FN) of the nondominant side. The weight and duration of trac...

  18. Specific gravity and other properties of wood and bark for 156 tree species found in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick D. Miles; W. Brad. Smith

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports information for the estimation of biomass for 156 tree species found in North America for use in national forest inventory applications. We present specific gravities based on average green volume as well as 12 percent moisture content volume for calculation of oven-dry biomass....

  19. Modeling the longitudinal variation in wood specific gravity of planted loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Antony; L. R. Schimleck; R. F. Daniels; Alexander Clark; D. B. Hall

    2010-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) is a major plantation species grown in the southern United States, producing wood having a multitude of uses including pulp and lumber production. Specific gravity (SG) is an important property used to measure the quality of wood produced, and it varies regionally and within the tree with height and radius. SG at different height levels...

  20. Normalization to specific gravity prior to analysis improves information recovery from high resolution mass spectrometry metabolomic profiles of human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmands, William M B; Ferrari, Pietro; Scalbert, Augustin

    2014-11-04

    Extraction of meaningful biological information from urinary metabolomic profiles obtained by liquid-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) necessitates the control of unwanted sources of variability associated with large differences in urine sample concentrations. Different methods of normalization either before analysis (preacquisition normalization) through dilution of urine samples to the lowest specific gravity measured by refractometry, or after analysis (postacquisition normalization) to urine volume, specific gravity and median fold change are compared for their capacity to recover lead metabolites for a potential future use as dietary biomarkers. Twenty-four urine samples of 19 subjects from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort were selected based on their high and low/nonconsumption of six polyphenol-rich foods as assessed with a 24 h dietary recall. MS features selected on the basis of minimum discriminant selection criteria were related to each dietary item by means of orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis models. Normalization methods ranked in the following decreasing order when comparing the number of total discriminant MS features recovered to that obtained in the absence of normalization: preacquisition normalization to specific gravity (4.2-fold), postacquisition normalization to specific gravity (2.3-fold), postacquisition median fold change normalization (1.8-fold increase), postacquisition normalization to urinary volume (0.79-fold). A preventative preacquisition normalization based on urine specific gravity was found to be superior to all curative postacquisition normalization methods tested for discovery of MS features discriminant of dietary intake in these urinary metabolomic datasets.

  1. Gender specific changes in cortical activation patterns during exposure to artificial gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stefan; Robinson, Ryan; Smith, Craig; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Goswami, Nandu

    2014-11-01

    Keeping astronauts healthy during long duration spaceflight remains a challenge. Artificial gravity (AG) generated by a short arm human centrifuges (SAHC) is proposed as the next generation of integrated countermeasure devices that will allow human beings to safely spend extended durations in space, although comparatively little is known about any psychological side effects of AG on brain function. 16 participants (8 male and 8 female, GENDER) were exposed to 10 min at a baseline gravitational load (G-Load) of +.03 Gz, then 10 min at +.6 Gz for females and +.8 Gz for males, before being exposed to increasing levels of AG in a stepped manner by increasing the acceleration by +.1 Gz every 3 min until showing signs of pre-syncope. EEG recordings were taken of brain activity during 2 min time periods at each AG level. Analysing the results of the mixed total population of participants by two way ANOVA, a significant effect of centrifugation on alpha and beta activity was found (p<.01). Furthermore results revealed a significant interaction between G-LOAD and GENDER alpha-activity (p<.01), but not for beta-activity. Although the increase in alpha and beta activity with G-LOAD does not reflect a general model of cortical arousal and therefore cannot support previous findings reporting that AG may be a cognitively arousing environment, the gender specific responses identified in this study may have wider implications for EEG and AG research.

  2. Transient flexural-and capillary-gravity waves due to disturbances in two-layer density-stratified fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Dong-qiang; SUN Cui-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Generation of the transient flexural-and capillary-gravity waves by impulsive disturbances in a two-layer fluid is investigated analytically.The upper fluid is covered by a thin elastic plate or by an inertial surface with the capillary effect.The density of each of the two immiscible layers is constant.The fluids are assumed to be inviscid and incompressible and the motion be irrotational.A point force on the surface and simple mass sources in the upper and lower fluid layers are considered.A linear system is established within the framework of potential theory.The integral solutions for the surface and interfacial waves are obtained by means of the Laplace-Fourier transform.A new representation for the dispersion relation of flexural-and capillary-gravity waves in a two-layer fluid is derived.The asymptotic representations of the wave motions are derived for large time with a fixed distance-to-time ratio with the Stokes and Scorer methods of stationary phase.It is shown that there are two different modes,namely the surface and interfacial wave modes.The wave systems observed depend on the relation between the observer's moving speed and the intrinsic minimal and maximal group velocities.

  3. Specific gravity of hybrid poplars in the north-central region, USA: within-tree variability and site × genotype effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    William L. Headlee; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Richard B. Hall; Edmund O. Bauer; Bradford Bender; Bruce A. Birr; Raymond O. Miller; Jesse A. Randall; Adam H. Wiese

    2013-01-01

    Specific gravity is an important consideration for traditional uses of hybrid poplars for pulp and solid wood products, as well as for biofuels and bioenergy production. While specific gravity has been shown to be under strong genetic control and subject to within-tree variability, the role of genotype × environment interactions is poorly understood. Most...

  4. A gravity study along a profile across the Sichuan Basin, the Qinling Mountains and the Ordos Basin (central China): Density, isostasy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqian; Teng, Jiwen; Wang, Qianshen; Lü, Qingtian; Si, Xiang; Xu, Tao; Badal, José; Yan, Jiayong; Hao, Zhaobing

    2017-10-01

    In order to investigate the structure of the crust beneath the Middle Qinling Mountains (MQL) and neighboring areas in the North China Block and South China Block, a north-south gravity profile from Yuquan in the Sichuan Basin to Yulin in the Ordos Basin was conducted in 2011. The Bouguer gravity anomaly is determined from a high-quality gravity dataset collected between 31°N and 36°N of latitude, and varies between -200 and -110 mGal in the study region. Using accredited velocity density relationships, an initial crust-mantle density model is constructed for MQL and adjacent areas, which is later refined interactively to simulate the observed gravity anomaly. The present study reveals the features of the density and Bouguer gravity with respect to the tectonic units sampled by the profile. The lithosphere density model shows typical density values that depict a layered structure and allow differentiate the blocks that extend along the reference profile. The gravity field calculated by forward modeling from the final density distribution model correlates well with the measured gravity field within a standard deviation of 1.26 mGal. The density in the crystalline crust increases with depth from 2.65 g/cm3 up to the highest value of 2.95 g/cm3 near the bottom of the crust. The Conrad interface is identified as a density jump of about 0.05 g/cm3. The average density of the crust in MQL is clearly lower than the density in the formations on both sides. Starting from a combined Airy-Pratt isostatic compensation model, a partly compensated crust is found below MQL, suggesting future growth of the crust, unlike the Ordos and Sichuan basins that will remain stable. On the basis of the density and isostatic state of the crust and additional seismological research, such as the P-wave velocity model and Poisson's ratio, it is concluded that the lower crust delamination is a reasonable interpretation for the geophysical characteristics below the Qinling Orogen.

  5. Halo Gravity Traction Is Associated with Reduced Bone Mineral Density of Patients with Severe Kyphoscoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Halo gravity traction (HGT is one of the most commonly used perioperative techniques for the treatment of severe kyphoscoliosis. This study was to explore the influence of HGT on the BMD of these patients. Methods. Patients with severe kyphoscoliosis treated by preoperative HGT for at least 2 months were included. Patients’ BMD were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine (LS, L2–L4 and femur neck (FN of the nondominant side. The weight and duration of traction, as well as baseline characteristics, were recorded. Results. Twenty patients were recruited. The average traction duration was 77.9±13.0 days while the mean traction weight was 39.9%±11.1% of total body weight. Remarkable decrease of BMD was observed at LS of 17 (85% patients and at FN of 18 (90% patients. After HGT, 75% of patients were found to have osteoporosis, the incidence of which was significantly higher than that before HGT (35%. The correlation analysis revealed BMD reduction was only significantly correlated with the traction duration. Conclusions. The current study showed that preoperative HGT can have obvious impact on the BMD. The BMD reduction is associated with traction duration, suggesting that long traction duration may bring more bone mineral loss.

  6. Discussion of the specific method of power spectral density

    CERN Document Server

    Ren Huan; Jiang Xiao Dong; Peng Jing; Ye Lin; Huang Zu Xin; Tang Can

    2002-01-01

    The wavefront power spectral density (PSD) can give the spatial frequency distribution of wavefront aberration, limit the waviness and the roughness, and specify the large components employed in high power density solid-state laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The definition and the calculation of the PSD are given. In experiment, a large phase shifting Fizeau interferometer was used to test the transmissive wavefront of a Nd glass, creating the one dimension wavefront PSD. Same time, relationship between the PSD and the RMS is shown

  7. Stability of regular energy density in Palatini f(R) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Yousaf, Z. [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2015-02-01

    The present work explores the effects of the three-parametric f(R) model on the stability of the regular energy density of planar fluid configurations with the Palatini f(R) formalism. For this purpose, we develop a link between the Weyl scalar and structural properties of the system by evaluating a couple of differential equations. We also see the effects of Palatini f(R) terms in the formulation of structure scalars obtained by orthogonal splitting of the Riemann tensor in general relativity. We then identify the parameters which produce energy density irregularities in expansive and expansion-free dissipative as well as non-dissipative matter distributions. It is found that particular combinations of the matter variables lead to irregularities in an initially homogeneous fluid distribution. We conclude that Palatini f(R) extra corrections tend to decrease the inhomogeneity, thereby imparting stability to the self-gravitating system. (orig.)

  8. Density- and viscosity-stratified gravity currents: Insight from laboratory experiments and implications for submarine flow deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, L. A.; Peakall, J.; Talling, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Vertical stratification of particle concentration is a common if not ubiquitous feature of submarine particulate gravity flows. To investigate the control of stratification on current behaviour, analogue stratified flows were studied using laboratory experiments. Stratified density currents were generated by releasing two-layer glycerol solutions into a tank of water. Flows were sustained for periods of tens of seconds and their velocity and concentration measured. In a set of experiments the strength of the initial density and viscosity stratification was increased by progressively varying the lower-layer concentration, CL. Two types of current were observed indicating two regimes of behaviour. Currents with a faster-moving high-concentration basal region that outran the upper layer were produced if CL < 75%. Above this critical value of CL, currents were formed with a relatively slow, high-concentration base that lagged behind the flow front. The observed transition in behaviour is interpreted to indicate a change from inertia- to viscosity-dominated flow with increasing concentration. The reduction in lower-layer velocity at high concentrations is explained by enhanced drag at low Reynolds numbers. Results show that vertical stratification produces longitudinal stratification in the currents. Furthermore, different vertical and temporal velocity and concentration profiles characterise the observed flow types. Implications for the deposit character of particle-laden currents are discussed and illustrated using examples from ancient turbidite systems.

  9. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-10-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry in Costa Rica is presented based on 3-D density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. Contrary to commonly assumed, to the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a maximum depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth (> 75 km) intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  10. Lithospheric density structure beneath the Tarim basin and surroundings, northwestern China, from the joint inversion of gravity and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yangfan; Levandowski, Will; Kusky, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Intraplate strain generally focuses in discrete zones, but despite the profound impact of this partitioning on global tectonics, geodynamics, and seismic hazard, the processes by which deformation becomes localized are not well understood. Such heterogeneous intraplate strain is exemplified in central Asia, where the Indo-Eurasian collision has caused widespread deformation while the Tarim block has experienced minimal Cenozoic shortening. The apparent stability of Tarim may arise either because strain is dominantly accommodated by pre-existing faults in the continental suture zones that bound it-essentially discretizing Eurasia into microplates-or because the lithospheric-scale strength (i.e., viscosity) of the Tarim block is greater than its surroundings. Here, we jointly analyze seismic velocity, gravity, topography, and temperature to develop a 3-D density model of the crust and upper mantle in this region. The Tarim crust is characterized by high density, vs, vp, and vp /vs, consistent with a dominantly mafic composition and with the presence of an oceanic plateau beneath Tarim. Low-density but high-velocity mantle lithosphere beneath southern (southwestern) Tarim underlies a suite of Permian plume-related mafic intrusions and A-type granites sourced in previously depleted mantle lithosphere; we posit that this region was further depleted, dehydrated, and strengthened by Permian plume magmatism. The actively deforming western and southern margins of Tarim-the Tien Shan, Kunlun Shan, and Altyn Tagh fault-are underlain by buoyant upper mantle with low velocity; we hypothesize that this material has been hydrated by mantle-derived fluids that have preferentially migrated along Paleozoic continental sutures. Such hydrous material should be weak, and herein strain focuses there because of lithospheric-scale variations in rheology rather than the pre-existence of faults in the brittle crust. Thus this world-class example of strain partitioning arises not simply from

  11. Shear Viscosity to Entropy Density Ratio in Higher Derivative Gravity with Momentum Dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi-Li

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that there is a new bound for the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio that reads $\\eta/s\\gtrsim (T/\\Delta)^2$ as $T/\\Delta\\to 0$, where $\\Delta$ is a scale present in the zero temperature IR theory. In this paper, we investigate $\\eta/s$ in linear scalar fields modified Gauss-Bonnet theory that breaks translation invariance. We first calculate $\\eta/s$ both analytically and numerically and show its relationship with temperature in log-log plot. Our results are in good agreement with the new viscosity bound above. The causality is also considered in this work. We then find that there will be no causality violation if the linear scalar field is added and hence the constraint for the Gauss-Bonnet coupling $\\lambda$ vanishes.

  12. Using Newton's law and geophysical bounds on mass density contrast to ensure consistency between gravity and height data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strykowski, Gabriel; Larsen, Jacob Norby

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we advocate the use of Newton's law of gravitational attraction to ensure perfect consistency between gravity and height data. Starting with the absolute gravity on the topography we decompose this signal into a number of quantities associated with physics of the system. To model...... gravitational attraction from topography we use DTM and Newton's law of gravitational attraction. A residual part of the gravity signal is interpreted as inconsistency between gravity and heights. In the paper we discuss a method by which such inconsistency (at least in principle) can be decomposed...... into a "gravity error" and a "terrain error". In practice such separation is not possible because the two types of error are nearly 100% correlated. The inconsistency can be interpreted as a measure of ambiguity of the gravity-terrain models which are consistent with a set of measured/interpolated data. We...

  13. Sensitivity analysis of crustal correction and its error propagation to upper mantle residual gravity and density anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the crustal structure heterogeneity and uncertainty in its determination on stripped gravity field. The analysis is based on interpretation of residual upper mantle gravity anomalies which are calculated by subtracting (stripping) the gravitational effect of the crust...... (including topography) from the observed satellite gravity field data (GOCE Direct release 3). We apply our analysis to Siberia for which a new regional crustal model has recently become available. Uncertainties in the residual upper (lithospheric) mantle gravity anomalies result from several sources: (i...

  14. Neutral wind and density perturbations in the thermosphere created by gravity waves observed by the TIDDBIT sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadas, Sharon L.; Crowley, Geoff

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the 10 traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) observed at zobs˜283 km by the TIDDBIT ionospheric sounder on 30 October 2007 at 0400-0700 UT near Wallops Island, USA. These TIDs propagated northwest/northward and were previously found to be secondary gravity waves (GWs) from tropical storm Noel. An instrumented sounding rocket simultaneously measured a large neutral wind peak uH' with a similar azimuth at z ˜ 325 km. Using the measured TID amplitudes and wave vectors from the TIDDBIT system, together with ion-neutral theory, GW dissipative polarization relations and ray tracing, we determine the GW neutral horizontal wind and density perturbations as a function of altitude from 220 to 380 km. We find that there is a serious discrepancy between the GW dissipative theory and the observations unless the molecular viscosity, μ, decreases with altitude in the middle to upper thermosphere. Assuming that μ∝ρ¯q, where ρ¯ is the density, we find using GW dissipative theory that the GWs could have been observed at zobs and that one or more of the GWs could have caused the uH' wind peak at z≃325 km if q ˜ 0.67 for z≥220 km. This implies that the kinematic viscosity, ν=μ/ρ¯, increases less rapidly with altitude for z≥220 km: ν∝1/ρ¯0.33. This dependence makes sense because as ρ¯→0, the distance between molecules goes to infinity, which implies no molecular collisions and therefore no molecular viscosity μ.

  15. Global surface density of water mass variations by using a two-step inversion by cumulating daily satellite gravity information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramillien, Guillaume; Frappart, Frédéric; Seoane, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new method to produce time series of global maps of surface mass variations by progressive integration of daily geopotential variations measured by orbiting satellites. In the case of the GRACE mission, these geopotential variations can be determined from very accurate inter-satellite K-Band Range Rate (KBRR) measurements of 5-second daily orbits. In particular, the along-track gravity contribution of hydrological mass changes is extracted by removing de-aliasing models for static field, atmosphere, oceans mass variations (including periodical tides), as well as polar movements. Our determination of surface mass sources is composed of two successive dependent Kalman filter stages. The first one consists of reducing the satellite-based potential anomalies by adjusting the longest spatial wavelengths (i.e., low-degree spherical harmonics lower than 2). In the second stage, the residual potential anomalies from the previous stage are used to recover surface mass density changes - in terms of Equivalent-Water Height (EWH) - over a global network of juxtaposed triangular elements. These surface tiles of ~100,000 km x km (or equivalently 330 km by 330 km) are defined to be of equal areas over the terrestrial sphere. However they can be adapted to the local geometry of the surface mass. Our global approach was tested by inverting geopotential data, and successfully applied to estimate time-varying surface mass densities from real GRACE-based residuals. This strategy of combined Kalman filter-type inversions can also be useful for exploring the possibility of improving time and space resolutions for ocean and land studies that would be hopefully brought by future low altitude geodetic missions.

  16. Specific Gravity of Hybrid Poplars in the North-Central Region, USA: Within-Tree Variability and Site × Genotype Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse A. Randall

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific gravity is an important consideration for traditional uses of hybrid poplars for pulp and solid wood products, as well as for biofuels and bioenergy production. While specific gravity has been shown to be under strong genetic control and subject to within-tree variability, the role of genotype × environment interactions is poorly understood. Most specific gravity reports are for a limited number of locations, resulting in a lack of information about the interactions between clones and sites over a wide range of climate and soil conditions. The objective of the current study was to characterize the effects of bole position, site, clone, and site × clone interactions for twelve hybrid poplar genotypes grown in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, USA. Observed specific gravities ranged from 0.267 to 0.495 (mean = 0.352 ± 0.001 for 612 samples taken from 204 trees, with bole position and site × clone interactions having significant effects on specific gravity. Further investigation of the site × clone interactions indicated that environmental conditions related to water stress were key predictors of specific gravity. These data are important for informing genotypic selection and silvicultural management decisions associated with growing hybrid poplars.

  17. Effect of Growth Rate on Wood Specific Gravity of Three Alternative Timber Species in Sri Lanka; Swietenia macrophylla, Khaya senegalensis and Paulownia fortunei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyan Perera

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With increasing private sector investments in commercial forestry, it is apparent that plantationforestry in Sri Lanka is moving in the direction of managing fast growing timber species for shorterrotations. However, there’s a perceptionthat accelerated growth rates induced by improved forestmanagement practices can result in inferior wood quality. This study tested this perceptionby studyingthe effect of growth rate on the specific gravity, as a proxy for wood quality, of three alternative timberspecies grown in Sri Lanka; Swietenia macrophylla, Khaya senegalensis and Paulownia fortunei.Specific gravity remained more or less uniform from pith to bark regardless of the fluctuation of ringwidth in K. senegalensis while S. macrophylla exhibited a slight increase in specific gravity from pith tobark. This increasing trend was more prominent in P. fortunei. Results revealed growth rates representedby ring width showed poor correlations with specific gravity in both S. macrophylla, and K.senegalensis. Although P. fortunei showed a statistically significant positive correlation, regressionanalysis indicated a poor relationship between growth rate and specific gravity. Hence it is unlikely thatwood specific gravity of the studied species to be influenced by accelerated growth rates.

  18. Factors affecting urine specific gravity in apparently healthy cats presenting to first opinion practice for routine evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishniw, Mark; Bicalho, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Evidence suggests that apparently healthy cats presenting for routine evaluation should have a randomly sampled urine specific gravity (USG) >1.035. A USG cats presenting to first opinion practice in an observational study, using either in-clinic refractometers or measurements provided by reference laboratories, and examined factors that might affect USG. In-clinic refractometers were calibrated using distilled water (specific gravity = 1.000). The USG was >1.030 in 91% of cats and >1.035 in 88% of cats; 121 adult cats (⩾6 months old) and five young cats (cats, a pathological cause was identified in 27 adult cats - of these, 26 were >9 years old - but no young cats. No cause was identified in 43 adult cats, and further investigation was not pursued in 51 adult cats. Factors that affected USG included age, diet type, sex, fasting status, drinking avidity, refractometer type, and the interaction between sex and diet - increasing dietary moisture content lowered USG only in female cats. Most factors minimally affected USG. The odds of having a USG cats presenting to first-opinion practice should have a USG >1.035. Dietary management strategies to lower USG might be less effective than anticipated, and warrant monitoring of USG to determine efficacy. Older cats with USG cats for possible pathology. A lack of stringent refractometer calibration could have caused some errors in estimates of USG by some observers, but would be unlikely to alter markedly the findings.

  19. Do sex-specific densities affect local survival of free-ranging great tits?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michler, Stephanie P. M.; Nicolaus, Marion; Ubels, Richard; van der Velde, Marco; Both, Christiaan; Tinbergen, Joost M.; Komdeur, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Competition within sexes is expected when resources are sex specific, whereas competition between sexes can occur when similar resources are exploited. Local population density and sex ratio will determine the amount of sex-specific interactions and thus the potential degree of sex-specific

  20. Joint Tomographic Imaging of 3-­-D Density Structure Using Cosmic Ray Muons and High-­-Precision Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. A.; Guardincerri, E.; Roy, M.; Dichter, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the CO2 reservoir muon imaging project headed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboraory (PNNL) under the U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Technology and Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration (SubTER) iniative, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) plan to leverage the recently decommissioned and easily accessible Tunnel Vault on LANL property to test the complementary modeling strengths of muon radiography and high-precision gravity surveys. This tunnel extends roughly 300 feet into the hillside, with a maximum depth below the surface of approximately 300 feet. We will deploy LANL's Mini Muon Tracker (MMT), a detector consisting of 576 drift tubes arranged in alternating parallel planes of orthogonally oriented tubes. This detector is capable of precise determination of trajectories for incoming muons with angular resolution of a few milliradians. We will deploy the MMT at several locations within the tunnel, to obtain numerous crossing muon trajectories and permit a 3D tomographic image of the overburden to be built. In the same project, UNM will use a Scintrex digital gravimeter to collect high-precision gravity data from a dense grid on the hill slope above the tunnel as well as within the tunnel itself. This will provide both direct and differential gravity readings for density modeling of the overburden. By leveraging detailed geologic knowledge of the canyon and the lithology overlying the tunnel, as well as the structural elements, elevations and blueprints of the tunnel itself, we will evaluate the muon and gravity data both independently and in a simultaneous, joint inversion to build a combined 3D density model of the overburden.

  1. Decreases in urine specific gravity and urinary creatinine in dogs with different diseases but with normal renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojut-Pałka, B; Winnicka, A

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this study was to determine urine specific gravity (USg) and urinary creatinine (UCrn) in dogs with different diseases but with normal renal function. Sick dogs with different diseases were divided into nine groups. Dogs suffering from polyuria/polydipsia, vomits, diarrhoea and females in oestrus or pregnant were excluded from the studies. The healthy dogs served as a control group. Over a three-year period, a total of 267 dogs were examined clinically as well as using imaging and laboratory diagnostics methods. In sick dogs, USg and UCrn were found to be essentially decreased (except animals with neurological and uterine diseases, and neurological diseases, respectively), as compared with normal dogs. In clinically healthy animals of the control group, UCrn and USg did not significantly differ between the females and males. As for the control group, no correlation between UCrn/USg and the body weight/age was found, either.

  2. Diagnostic Value of Measurement Specific Gravity by Refractometric and Dipstick Method in Differentiation between Transudate and Exudate in Pleural and Peritoneal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Alireza; Nozarian, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of pleural and peritoneal fluid is seen in some diseases. In order to diagnose the disease and start the treatment, one of the most important actions will be to differentiate between exudates and transudates. The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of measuring the specific gravity of the fluid through refractometer and strip in differentiation of exudates from transudates. Methods: The serum of patients was evaluated for protein, LDH, cholesterol, bilirubin and albumin. The fluid was evaluated for the number of white blood cells, protein, LDH, cholesterol, bilirubin and albumin. Then the fluids were divided into exduate and transudate categories based on Light and Gradient criteria. Finally, the specific gravity of the fluids was measured by refractometer, Erma, Japan and Medi-Test Combi II. The categorized fluids were compared with Gold Standards (final diagnosis) so that the sensitivity and specificity of Light and Gradient criteria in the transudate-exudate differentiation were specified. Results: In comparison with Light criteria, the cut off level of 1022 specific gravity measured by refractometer for pleural effusion has sensitivity, specificity of 92.1%, 68.1%respectively. In evaluation of peritoneal fluid considering cut off point 1023, measured by refractometer has reliable sensitivity 92.4%, specificity 70.4 compared with standard gradient method. Conclusion: Differentiating transudate from exudates by measuring its special gravity by refractometer will have acceptable sensitivity and specificity, and when rapidity is necessary or access to lab equipment is limited, this method could be used. PMID:28855928

  3. Assessing the likely value of gravity and drawdown measurements to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity and specific yield during unconfined aquifer testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blainey, J.B.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Cordova, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Pumping of an unconfined aquifer can cause local desaturation detectable with high-resolution gravimetry. A previous study showed that signal-to-noise ratios could be predicted for gravity measurements based on a hydrologic model. We show that although changes should be detectable with gravimeters, estimations of hydraulic conductivity and specific yield based on gravity data alone are likely to be unacceptably inaccurate and imprecise. In contrast, a transect of low-quality drawdown data alone resulted in accurate estimates of hydraulic conductivity and inaccurate and imprecise estimates of specific yield. Combined use of drawdown and gravity data, or use of high-quality drawdown data alone, resulted in unbiased and precise estimates of both parameters. This study is an example of the value of a staged assessment regarding the likely significance of a new measurement method or monitoring scenario before collecting field data. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. On the Specification of the Gravity Model of Trade: Zeros, Excess Zeros and Zero-Inflated Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Burger (Martijn); F.G. van Oort (Frank); G.J.M. Linders (Gert-Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractConventional studies of bilateral trade patterns specify a log-normal gravity equation for empirical estimation. However, the log-normal gravity equation suffers from three problems: the bias created by the logarithmic transformation, the failure of the homoscedasticity assumption, and t

  5. Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

    2009-03-16

    The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

  6. A multivariate mixed model system for wood specific gravity and moisture content of planted loblolly pine stands in the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finto Antony; Laurence R. Schimleck; Alex Clark; Richard F. Daniels

    2012-01-01

    Specific gravity (SG) and moisture content (MC) both have a strong influence on the quantity and quality of wood fiber. We proposed a multivariate mixed model system to model the two properties simultaneously. Disk SG and MC at different height levels were measured from 3 trees in 135 stands across the natural range of loblolly pine and the stand level values were used...

  7. Critical cavitation coefficient analysis of a space low specific centrifugal pump with micro gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, Y.; Hu, Q.; Zhou, C.; Wu, Y. L.

    2016-05-01

    Centrifugal pump was used in the loop as a baselined unit. The flow rate of the pump was very small, while the head was high. This space pump must work stable for a long time (more than a year), so the performance of the pump attracted public attention. The rotational speed of the impeller was limited for stability, so the pump belonged to low specific centrifugal pump. In this paper, a single-phase centrifugal pump, which was designed for single-phase fluid loops in satellites, was modeled for numerical simulation. The hydraulic region of the pump was discretized by structured mesh. Three dimensional (3-D) flow in the pump was studied by the use of computational fluid dynamics. Partially-Averaged Navier- Stokes (PANS) model based on RNG k-ε turbulence model was developed for the simulation of the unsteady flow. Velocity inlet and pressure outlet was used as the boundary conditions. Interface was used between the impeller and the casing, as well as the impeller and inlet pipe. Performances and pressure fluctuation of the pump were investigated. The dominant frequency of the pressure fluctuation is blade passing frequency at the region close to the tongue of the casing, while it is twice of blade passing frequency at the other region.

  8. Assessment of the Impact of Middle-Atmosphere Solar Tides on Gravity Waves in a WKB Gravity-Wave Model Based on Wave-Action Phase-Space Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribstein, Bruno; Achatz, Ulrich; Senf, Fabian

    2014-05-01

    abstract Gravity waves (GWs) and solar tides (STs) are main constituents of the dynamical coupling between troposphere and mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT). Via momentum deposition, GWs control to a large extent the mesospheric mean circulation. STs are large scale waves, mostly due to tropospheric and stratospheric diurnal heating processes, that modulate all dynamical fields in the mesosphere. GWs ant STs also interact strongly with each other. Conventional GW parameterizations used to describe this interaction (e.g. [1]) neglect the time-dependence and horizontal gradients of the background flow, with fatal effects (e.g. [2]). We study here the propagation of GWs in a time-dependent middle-atmosphere background flow, using a new (caustics free) WKB GW model (ray tracer). The background flow is composed by a climatological mean and tidal fields extracted from a general circulation model (HAMMONIA, see [3]). In order to avoid caustics, inevitable in classic ray-tracer implementations, we implemented a new wave-action phase-space density conservation scheme [4, 5]. The scheme attaches to each ray a finite volume in the location & wavenumber phase-space. The location-wavenumber volume is conserved during the propagation, responding in shape to the local stretching and squeezing in wave-number space. From the propagation of GWs we evaluate the deposition of momentum and buoyancy. Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients are also evaluated. In this extension of the study by [2] it is shown, with an amplitude scheme more stable against numerical instabilities, due to the avoidance of caustics, that STs (and so the time dependence of the background flow) modulate the propagation of GWs. Via Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients, we also quantify how the pseudo-momentum-, momentum-, and enthalpy-deposition of GWs can influence the amplitude and the phase structure of STs. Finally, we compare momentum and buoyancy fluxes from the

  9. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, Colleen; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay; Collins, Gareth S.; Blair, David M.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Nimmo, Francis; Phillips, Roger J.; Bierson, Carver J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-11-01

    As a result of NASA’s dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; doi:10.1002/2015GL065022]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary crustal porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with the same mean porosity, but that vary with depth. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. We reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km only for simulations where the pre-impact porosity is zero or low. Our results support the observation that SPA has lower

  10. Demonstrating Martian Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pirkola, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    The surface gravity on Mars is smaller than the surface gravity on Earth, resulting in longer falling times. This effect can be simulated on Earth by taking advantage of air resistance and buoyancy, which cause low density objects to fall slowly enough to approximate objects falling on the surface of Mars. We describe a computer simulation based on an experiment that approximates Martian gravity, and verify our numerical results by performing the experiment.

  11. Comparison of a digital and an optical analogue hand-held refractometer for the measurement of canine urine specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, J K; Bennett, A D; Dodkin, S J; Gunn-Moore, D A

    2012-05-05

    Urine specific gravity (USG) is used clinically as a measure of urine concentration, and is routinely assessed by refractometry. A comparison between optical analogue and digital refractometers for evaluation of canine urine has not been reported. The aim of this study was to compare a digital and an optical analogue hand-held refractometer for the measurement of canine USG, and to assess correlation with urine osmolality. Prospective study. Free-catch urine samples were collected from 285 hospitalised adult dogs, and paired USG readings were obtained with a digital and an optical analogue refractometer. In 50 dogs, urine osmolality was also measured using a freezing point depression osmometer. There was a small but statistically significant difference between the two refractometers (P<0.001), with the optical analogue refractometer reading higher than the digital refractometer (mean difference 0.0006, sd 0.0012). Paired refractometer measurements varied by <0.002 in 91.5 per cent of cases. The optical analogue and digital refractometer readings showed excellent correlation with osmolality (r=0.980 and r=0.977, respectively, P<0.001 in both cases). Despite statistical significance, the difference between the two refractometers is unlikely to be clinically significant. Both instruments provide an accurate assessment of USG in dogs.

  12. Uropathogens and diagnostic potential of pH and specific gravity in a rural community of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyetunde Oyeyemi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the association between urine pH and specific gravity (SG and occurrence of urinary tract pathogens involved in urinary tract infection (UTI in school pupils. Methods: Laboratory culture techniques and biochemical tests were carried out to identify the UTI-associated bacteria in school pupils’ urine of United Nursery and Primary School, IlaraRemo, in Ikenne Local Government area, Ogun State, Nigeria. Urine dip-stick tests were carried out on the samples to take pH and SG measurements. Results: The prevalence of urinary tract pathogens in the study population was 82.4%. This prevalence was not gender and age dependent (P > 0.05. Escherichia coli (E. coli (37.0% and Klebsiella (0.9% were the highest and least prevalent uropathogens. There was significant increase in proportion of subjects diagnosed with E. coli (37.5%, Staphylococcus aureus (32.0%, Klebsiella (57.1% in pH 9, pH 6 and pH 8, respectively (P 0.05. There were significant increase in proportion of subjects diagnosed with E. coli (50.0%, Proteus (56.3%, Staphylococcus aureus (44.0%, Klebsiella (71.4% in SG 1.010, 1.015, 1.015 and 1.010, respectively (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Therefore, the urine pH 9 and SG 1.010–1.015 are the best diagnostic indicators of UTI-associated uropathogens in school children.

  13. Wood specific gravity and anatomy of branches and roots in 113 Amazonian rainforest tree species across environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunel, Claire; Ruelle, Julien; Beauchêne, Jacques; Fine, Paul V A; Baraloto, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    Wood specific gravity (WSG) is a strong predictor of tree performance across environmental gradients. Yet it remains unclear how anatomical elements linked to different wood functions contribute to variation in WSG in branches and roots across tropical forests. We examined WSG and wood anatomy in white sand, clay terra firme and seasonally flooded forests in French Guiana, spanning broad environmental gradients found throughout Amazonia. We measured 15 traits relating to branches and small woody roots in 113 species representing the 15 most abundant species in each habitat and representative species from seven monophyletic lineages occurring in all habitats. Fiber traits appear to be major determinants of WSG, independent of vessel traits, in branches and roots. Fiber traits and branch and root WSG increased from seasonally flooded species to clay terra firme species and lastly to white sand species. Branch and root wood traits were strongly phylogenetically constrained. Lineages differed in wood design, but exhibited similar variation in wood structure across habitats. We conclude that tropical trees can invest differently in support and transport to respond to environmental conditions. Wind disturbance and drought stress represent significant filters driving tree distribution of Amazonian forests; hence we suggest that biophysical explanations should receive more attention.

  14. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters as Seen by GRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H., IV; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a result of NASA's dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; submitted]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. By including (pre-impact) vertical porosity/density gradients in our impact simulations, we reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km, and the observed difference between the BAs of SPA and highland craters. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary density/porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with varying porosity. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. Larger

  15. beta-adrenoceptor density in chronic infarcted myocardium : a subtype specific decrease of beta(1)-adrenoceptor density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthonio, RL; Brodde, OE; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Crijns, HJGM; van Gilst, WH

    2000-01-01

    beta-adrenoceptor density is altered in different cardiac diseases. In heart failure beta-adrenoceptor density is down regulated but in acute myocardial ischemia beta-adrenoceptor density is up regulated. In hearts with myocardial infarction total beta-adrenoceptor density is decreased shortly after

  16. Computational modeling of bone density profiles in response to gait: a subject-specific approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Henry; Shiwalkar, Abhishek P; Madormo, Chris M; Taylor, Rebecca E; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this study is to explore the potential of computational growth models to predict bone density profiles in the proximal tibia in response to gait-induced loading. From a modeling point of view, we design a finite element-based computational algorithm using the theory of open system thermodynamics. In this algorithm, the biological problem, the balance of mass, is solved locally on the integration point level, while the mechanical problem, the balance of linear momentum, is solved globally on the node point level. Specifically, the local bone mineral density is treated as an internal variable, which is allowed to change in response to mechanical loading. From an experimental point of view, we perform a subject-specific gait analysis to identify the relevant forces during walking using an inverse dynamics approach. These forces are directly applied as loads in the finite element simulation. To validate the model, we take a Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry scan of the subject's right knee from which we create a geometric model of the proximal tibia. For qualitative validation, we compare the computationally predicted density profiles to the bone mineral density extracted from this scan. For quantitative validation, we adopt the region of interest method and determine the density values at fourteen discrete locations using standard and custom-designed image analysis tools. Qualitatively, our two- and three-dimensional density predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. Quantitatively, errors are less than 3% for the two-dimensional analysis and less than 10% for the three-dimensional analysis. The proposed approach has the potential to ultimately improve the long-term success of possible treatment options for chronic diseases such as osteoarthritis on a patient-specific basis by accurately addressing the complex interactions between ambulatory loads and tissue changes.

  17. From hot rocks to glowing avalanches: Numerical modelling of gravity-induced pyroclastic density currents and hazard maps at the Stromboli volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatici, Teresa; Di Roberto, Alessio; Di Traglia, Federico; Bisson, Marina; Morelli, Stefano; Fidolini, Francesco; Bertagnini, Antonella; Pompilio, Massimo; Hungr, Oldrich; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-11-01

    Gravity-induced pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) can be produced by the collapse of volcanic crater rims or due to the gravitational instability of materials deposited in proximal areas during explosive activity. These types of PDCs, which are also known as "glowing avalanches", have been directly observed, and their deposits have been widely identified on the flanks of several volcanoes that are fed by mafic to intermediate magmas. In this research, the suitability of landslide numerical models for simulating gravity-induced PDCs to provide hazard assessments was tested. This work also presents the results of a back-analysis of three events that occurred in 1906, 1930 and 1944 at the Stromboli volcano by applying a depth-averaged 3D numerical code named DAN-3D. The model assumes a frictional internal rheology and a variable basal rheology (i.e., frictional, Voellmy and plastic). The numerical modelling was able to reproduce the gravity-induced PDCs' extension and deposit thicknesses to an order of magnitude of that reported in the literature. The best results when compared with field data were obtained using a Voellmy model with a frictional coefficient of f = 0.19 and a turbulence parameter ξ = 1000 m s- 1. The results highlight the suitability of this numerical code, which is generally used for landslides, to reproduce the destructive potential of these events in volcanic environments and to obtain information on hazards connected with explosive-related, mass-wasting phenomena in Stromboli Island and at volcanic systems characterized by similar phenomena.

  18. Vertical density contrast and mapping of basement, Conrad and Moho morphologies through 2D spectral analysis of gravity data in and around Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arbind; S. Roy, P. N.; Das, L. K.

    2016-07-01

    Power spectrum analysis of Complete Bouguer Anomaly (CBA) map of Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB) and its surroundings in India through Two Dimensional (2D) spectral analysis has provided estimates of the ensemble average depths for the density discontinuities which represent crustal inhomogeneities. The spectral analysis method has helped to estimate the depths of a perturbing body sources which are obtained from the negative slopes of the linear relationship between the logarithmic power spectrum and the wave-numbers of the gravity field. The detailed analysis reveals three horizontal discontinuities (i) Phanerozoic sediment thickness (ii) Basement depth and (iii) Conrad discontinuity. The average thickness of Phanerozoic sediments is estimated to be 3 km whereas depth of basement and Conrad discontinuity are at 7 km and 14.5 km respectively. Additionally Mohorovicic discontinuity also estimated at a depth of 32.8 km in the study region.

  19. A special case of the Poisson PDE formulated for Earth's surface and its capability to approximate the terrain mass density employing land-based gravity data, a case study in the south of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    AllahTavakoli, Yahya; Safari, Abdolreza; Vaníček, Petr

    2016-12-01

    This paper resurrects a version of Poisson's Partial Differential Equation (PDE) associated with the gravitational field at the Earth's surface and illustrates how the PDE possesses a capability to extract the mass density of Earth's topography from land-based gravity data. Herein, first we propound a theorem which mathematically introduces this version of Poisson's PDE adapted for the Earth's surface and then we use this PDE to develop a method of approximating the terrain mass density. Also, we carry out a real case study showing how the proposed approach is able to be applied to a set of land-based gravity data. In the case study, the method is summarized by an algorithm and applied to a set of gravity stations located along a part of the north coast of the Persian Gulf in the south of Iran. The results were numerically validated via rock-samplings as well as a geological map. Also, the method was compared with two conventional methods of mass density reduction. The numerical experiments indicate that the Poisson PDE at the Earth's surface has the capability to extract the mass density from land-based gravity data and is able to provide an alternative and somewhat more precise method of estimating the terrain mass density.

  20. Methane dissociation on Pt(111): Searching for a specific reaction parameter density functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nattino, Francesco, E-mail: f.nattino@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Migliorini, Davide; Kroes, Geert-Jan [Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Gorlaeus Laboratories, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bonfanti, Matteo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2016-01-28

    The theoretical description of methane dissociating on metal surfaces is a current frontier in the field of gas-surface dynamics. Dynamical models that aim at achieving a highly accurate description of this reaction rely on potential energy surfaces based on density functional theory calculations at the generalized gradient approximation. We focus here on the effect that the exchange-correlation functional has on the reactivity of methane on a metal surface, using CHD{sub 3} + Pt(111) as a test case. We present new ab initio molecular dynamics calculations performed with various density functionals, looking also at functionals that account for the van der Waals (vdW) interaction. While searching for a semi-empirical specific reaction parameter density functional for this system, we find that the use of a weighted average of the PBE and the RPBE exchange functionals together with a vdW-corrected correlation functional leads to an improved agreement with quantum state-resolved experimental data for the sticking probability, compared to previous PBE calculations. With this semi-empirical density functional, we have also investigated the surface temperature dependence of the methane dissociation reaction and the influence of the rotational alignment on the reactivity, and compared our results with experiments.

  1. Upper Limit on the Central Density of Dark Matter in the Eddington inspired Born-Infield (EiBI) Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Izmailov, Ramil; Filippov, Alexander I; Ghosh, Mithun; Nandi, Kamal K

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the stability of circular material orbits in the analytic galactic metric recently derived by Harko \\textit{et al.} (2014). It turnsout that stability depends more strongly on the dark matter central density $%\\rho_{0}$ than on other parameters of the solution. This property then yields an upper limit on $\\rho _{0}$ for each individual galaxy, which we call here $\\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}$, such that stable circular orbits are possible \\textit{only} when the constraint $\\rho _{0}\\leq \\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}$ is satisfied. This is our new result. To approximately quantify the upper limit, we consider as a familiar example our Milky Way galaxy that has a projected dark matter radius $R_{\\text{DM}}\\sim 180$ kpc and find that $\\rho _{0}^{\\text{upper}}\\sim 2.37\\times 10^{11}$ $M_{\\odot }$kpc$^{-3}$. This limit turns out to be about four orders of magnitude larger than the latest data on central density $\\rho _{0}$ arising from the fit to the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) and Burkert density profiles. Su...

  2. Grammatical treatment and specific language impairment: neighbourhood density & third person singular -s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Jill R; Storkel, Holly L

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effect of manipulating verb neighbourhood density in treatment targeting the third person singular lexical affix. Using a single-subject experimental design, six pre-schoolers with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (1) treatment with sparse verbs or (2) treatment with dense verbs in 12 sessions. The third person singular lexical affix was targeted for 12 sessions of treatment in both conditions. Treatment gain and generalization were measured as the dependent variables. Third person singular % correct change from pre-treatment to post-treatment was measured using sentence production tasks with comparisons across the two treatment conditions. Treatment gain and generalization were greater for children enrolled in the sparse condition. Preliminary clinical recommendations are made and theoretical implications are discussed relative to neighbourhood density effects on lexical activation and storage in children with SLI.

  3. Single stage to orbit mass budgets derived from propellant density and specific impulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1996-06-06

    The trade between specific impulse (Isp) and density is examined in view of Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) requirements. Mass allocations for vehicle hardware are derived from these two properties, for several propellant combinations and a dual-fuel case. This comparative analysis, based on flight-proven hardware, indicates that the higher density of several alternative propellants compensates for reduced Isp, when compared with cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen. Approximately half the orbiting mass of a rocket- propelled SSTO vehicle must be allocated to propulsion hardware and residuals. Using hydrogen as the only fuel requires a slightly greater fraction of orbiting mass for propulsion, because hydrogen engines and tanks are heavier than those for denser fuels. The advantage of burning both a dense fuel and hydrogen in succession depends strongly on tripropellant engine weight. The implications of the calculations for SSTO vehicle design are discussed, especially with regard to the necessity to minimize non-tankage structure.

  4. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  5. Site specific passive acoustic detection and densities of humpback whale calls off the coast of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helble, Tyler Adam

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. Automated methods are needed to aid in the analyses of the recorded data. When a mammal vocalizes in the marine environment, the received signal is a filtered version of the original waveform emitted by the marine mammal. The waveform is reduced in amplitude and distorted due to propagation effects that are influenced by the bathymetry and environment. It is important to account for these effects to determine a site-specific probability of detection for marine mammal calls in a given study area. A knowledge of that probability function over a range of environmental and ocean noise conditions allows vocalization statistics from recordings of single, fixed, omnidirectional sensors to be compared across sensors and at the same sensor over time with less bias and uncertainty in the results than direct comparison of the raw statistics. This dissertation focuses on both the development of new tools needed to automatically detect humpback whale vocalizations from single-fixed omnidirectional sensors as well as the determination of the site-specific probability of detection for monitoring sites off the coast of California. Using these tools, detected humpback calls are "calibrated" for environmental properties using the site-specific probability of detection values, and presented as call densities (calls per square kilometer per time). A two-year monitoring effort using these calibrated call densities reveals important biological and ecological information on migrating humpback whales off the coast of California. Call density trends are compared between the monitoring sites and at the same monitoring site over time. Call densities also are compared to several natural and human-influenced variables including season, time of day, lunar illumination, and ocean noise. The results reveal substantial differences in call densities

  6. Gravity Driven Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Roy

    2010-03-01

    Flowing global gravitation initially produced space without time or mass. Space-time and mass are properties of flowing global gravitation. From its fabric, primal mass spins spontaneously giving rise to local gravitational space-time curvatures. Global gravity is the unifying background field. Gravity began flowing from its singularity with a big whoosh. It curves with angular rotational precession, creating a spatial geometry similar to the windings of a ball of string. Three-dimensional global gravity swirls locally into massive densities. Concurrently with these densities, local gravity curvatures of space-time arise. The expanse between celestial objects is not completely empty, void space as generally believed; it is antecedent gravity, a prerequisite associated field necessary for originating the first quantum particles. Gravity is dark energy; gravity's spin, as the second fundamental force, is electromagnetic dark matter. Electromagnetic masses attract then gravity compresses hot, dense and small---then bang, the first hydrogen star of which there are many. There may have been many big bangs, but no Big Bang that ultimately created the universe.

  7. The generalization of charged AdS black hole specific volume and number density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Liang; He, Miao; Fang, Chao; Sun, Dao-Quan; Deng, Jian-Bo

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, by proposing a generalized specific volume, we restudy the P- V criticality of charged AdS black holes in the extended phase space. The results show that most of the previous conclusions can be generalized without change, but the ratio {\\tilde{ρ }}_c should be 3 {\\tilde{α }}/16 in general case. Further research on the thermodynamical phase transition of black hole leads us to a natural interpretation of our assumption, and more black hole properties can be generalized. Finally, we study the number density for charged AdS black hole in higher dimensions, the results show the necessity of our assumption.

  8. LEVEL DENSITY AND FINITE-TEMPERATURE SPECIFIC HEATOF NUCLEUS 104pd UNDER MICROSCOPIC IBM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石筑一; 刘庸; 桑建平

    2001-01-01

    By using the microscopic sdgIBM-Fmax approach, the procedure of canonical ensemble average and the saddle point approximation, the thermodynamics of the nucleus is established under microscopic IBM. Calculations of spectrum, level density and finite-temperature specific heat for the nucleus 104pd are carried out. The calculated values are coincident with the experimental data reported recently. The results predict that the shape phase transition in the groundstate band appears at about T ≈0.230MeV and the phase transition of the thermal excitation mode takes place at T ≈0.630 MeV for the nucleus 104pd.

  9. A Symmetrical, Planar SOFC Design for NASA's High Specific Power Density Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Thomas L.; Sofie, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for aircraft applications require an order of magnitude increase in specific power density (1.0 kW/kg) and long life. While significant research is underway to develop anode supported cells which operate at temperatures in the range of 650-800 C, concerns about Cr-contamination from the metal interconnect may drive the operating temperature down further, to 750 C and lower. Higher temperatures, 900-1000 C, are more favorable for SOFC stacks to achieve specific power densities of 1.0 kW/kg. Since metal interconnects are not practical at these high temperatures and can account for up to 75% of the weight of the stack, NASA is pursuing a design that uses a thin, LaCrO3-based ceramic interconnect that incorporates gas channels into the electrodes. The bi-electrode supported cell (BSC) uses porous YSZ scaffolds, on either side of a 10-20 microns electrolyte. The porous support regions are fabricated with graded porosity using the freeze-tape casting process which can be tailored for fuel and air flow. Removing gas channels from the interconnect simplifies the stack design and allows the ceramic interconnect to be kept thin, on the order of 50 -100 microns. The YSZ electrode scaffolds are infiltrated with active electrode materials following the high temperature sintering step. The NASA-BSC is symmetrical and CTE matched, providing balanced stresses and favorable mechanical properties for vibration and thermal cycling.

  10. A numerical investigation into the ability of the Poisson PDE to extract the mass-density from land-based gravity data: A case study of salt diapirs in the north coast of the Persian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    AllahTavakoli, Yahya; Safari, Abdolreza

    2017-08-01

    This paper is counted as a numerical investigation into the capability of Poisson's Partial Differential Equation (PDE) at Earth's surface to extract the near-surface mass-density from land-based gravity data. For this purpose, first it focuses on approximating the gradient tensor of Earth's gravitational potential by means of land-based gravity data. Then, based on the concepts of both the gradient tensor and Poisson's PDE at the Earth's surface, certain formulae are proposed for the mass-density determination. Furthermore, this paper shows how the generalized Tikhonov regularization strategy can be used for enhancing the efficiency of the proposed approach. Finally, in a real case study, the formulae are applied to 6350 gravity stations located within a part of the north coast of the Persian Gulf. The case study numerically indicates that the proposed formulae, provided by Poisson's PDE, has the ability to convert land-based gravity data into the terrain mass-density which has been used for depicting areas of salt diapirs in the region of the case study.

  11. Kinetic Gravity Separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kooy, L.; Mooij, M.; Rem, P.

    2004-01-01

    Separations by density, such as the separation of non-ferrous scrap into light and heavy alloys, are often realized by means of heavy media. In principle, kinetic gravity separations in water can be faster and cheaper, because they do not rely on suspensions or salt solutions of which the density

  12. Specific interaction of postsynaptic densities with membrane rafts isolated from synaptic plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Yao, Wei-Dong; Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    Postsynaptic membrane rafts are believed to play important roles in synaptic signaling, plasticity, and maintenance. We recently demonstrated the presence, at the electron microscopic level, of complexes consisting of membrane rafts and postsynaptic densities (PSDs) in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) prepared from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) ( Suzuki et al., 2011 , J Neurochem, 119, 64-77). To further explore these complexes, here we investigated the nature of the binding between purified SPM-DRMs and PSDs in vitro. In binding experiments, we used SPM-DRMs prepared after treating SPMs with n-octyl-β-d-glucoside, because at concentrations of 1.0% or higher it completely separates SPM-DRMs and PSDs, providing substantially PSD-free unique SPM-DRMs as well as DRM-free PSDs. PSD binding to PSD-free DRMs was identified by mass spectrometry, Western blotting, and electron microscopy. PSD proteins were not incorporated into SPMs, and significantly less PSD proteins were incorporated into DRMs prepared from liver membranes, providing in vitro evidence that binding of PSDs to DRMs is specific and suggestion of the presence of specific interacting molecules. These specific interactions may have important roles in synaptic development, function, and plasticity in vivo. In addition, the binding system we developed may be a good tool to search for binding molecules and binding mechanisms between PSDs and rafts.

  13. Measurements of Specific Heat and Density of Al2O3 Nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajjha, Ravikanth S.; Das, Debendra K.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents measurements of specific heat and density of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles suspended in 60:40 (by mass) ethylene glycol and water mixture (EG/W). These property values are necessary to determine the fluid dynamic and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids. These properties have been measured over a range of temperatures for nanoparticle volumetric concentrations of 0 to 10%. From the experimental results, empirical correlations have been developed as a function of temperature and particle volume concentration. These correlations will be valuable in studying the heat transfer performance and the pumping power requirement of Al2O3 nanofluid in various applications such as industrial heat exchangers, building heating and automotive cooling.

  14. Age-specific density-dependent survival in Mediterranean Gulls Larus melanocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Marvelde, Luc; Meininger, Peter L.; Flamant, Renaud; Dingemanse, Niels J.

    2009-01-01

    Survival and reproductive rates often decrease with increasing population density. Such negative density dependence reflects a changing net balance between the benefits and costs of presence of others with increasing density. When densities are low, however, survival and reproductive rates might

  15. Age-specific density-dependent survival in Mediterranean Gulls Larus melanocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Marvelde, Luc; Meininger, Peter L.; Flamant, Renaud; Dingemanse, Niels J.

    2009-01-01

    Survival and reproductive rates often decrease with increasing population density. Such negative density dependence reflects a changing net balance between the benefits and costs of presence of others with increasing density. When densities are low, however, survival and reproductive rates might inc

  16. Improved Orbit Determination and Forecasts with an Assimilative Tool for Atmospheric Density and Satellite Drag Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, G.; Pilinski, M.; Sutton, E. K.; Codrescu, M.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Matsuo, T.; Fedrizzi, M.; Solomon, S. C.; Qian, L.; Thayer, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Much as aircraft are affected by the prevailing winds and weather conditions in which they fly, satellites are affected by the variability in density and motion of the near earth space environment. Drastic changes in the neutral density of the thermosphere, caused by geomagnetic storms or other phenomena, result in perturbations of LEO satellite motions through drag on the satellite surfaces. This can lead to difficulties in locating important satellites, temporarily losing track of satellites, and errors when predicting collisions in space. We describe ongoing work to build a comprehensive nowcast and forecast system for specifying the neutral atmospheric state related to orbital drag conditions. The system outputs include neutral density, winds, temperature, composition, and the satellite drag derived from these parameters. This modeling tool is based on several state-of-the-art coupled models of the thermosphere-ionosphere as well as several empirical models running in real-time and uses assimilative techniques to produce a thermospheric nowcast. This software will also produce 72 hour predictions of the global thermosphere-ionosphere system using the nowcast as the initial condition and using near real-time and predicted space weather data and indices as the inputs. Features of this technique include: • Satellite drag specifications with errors lower than current models • Altitude coverage up to 1000km • Background state representation using both first principles and empirical models • Assimilation of satellite drag and other datatypes • Real time capability • Ability to produce 72-hour forecasts of the atmospheric state In this paper, we will summarize the model design and assimilative architecture, and present preliminary validation results. Validation results will be presented in the context of satellite orbit errors and compared with several leading atmospheric models including the High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model, which is currently used

  17. Massive Gravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP...

  18. Finding Horndeski theories with Einstein gravity limits

    CERN Document Server

    McManus, Ryan; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The Horndeski action is the most general scalar-tensor theory with at most second-order derivatives in the equations of motion, thus evading Ostrogradsky instabilities and making it of interest when modifying gravity at large scales. To pass local tests of gravity, these modifications predominantly rely on nonlinear screening mechanisms that recover Einstein's Theory of General Relativity in regions of high density. We derive a set of conditions on the four free functions of the Horndeski action that examine whether a specific model embedded in the action possesses an Einstein gravity limit or not. For this purpose, we develop a new and surprisingly simple scaling method that identifies dominant terms in the equations of motion by considering formal limits of the couplings that enter through the new terms in the modified action. This enables us to find regimes where nonlinear terms dominate and Einstein's field equations are recovered to leading order. Together with an efficient approximation of the scalar fi...

  19. Unconventional superconductors under a rotating magnetic field. I. Density of states and specific heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, A. B.; Vekhter, I.

    2007-06-01

    We develop a fully microscopic theory for the calculations of the angle-dependent properties of unconventional superconductors under a rotated magnetic field. We employ the quasiclassical Eilenberger equations and use a variation of the Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt (BPT) method to obtain a closed-form solution for the Green’s function. The equations are solved self-consistently for quasi-two-dimensional dx2-y2(dxy) superconductors with the field rotated in the basal plane. The solution is used to determine the density of states and the specific heat. We find that applying the field along the gap nodes may result in minima or maxima in the angle-dependent specific heat, depending on the location in the T-H plane. This variation is attributed to the scattering of the quasiparticles on vortices, which depends on both the field and the quasiparticle energy, and is beyond the reach of the semiclassical approximation. We investigate the anisotropy across the T-H phase diagram and compare our results with the experiments on heavy fermion CeCoIn5 .

  20. Massive gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia de Rham

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  1. Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  2. Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  3. Spinfoam Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Eugenio

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Topological Field Theory and Gravity * Classical Spinfoam Gravity: Degrees of Freedom and Foams * Unitary Representations of the Rotation and the Lorentz Group * Boundary Variables and the Loop Quantum Gravity Hilbert Space * Spinfoam Partition Function and the Vertex Amplitude * Cellular Quantum Geometry: A Single Atom of Space * Cellular Quantum Geometry: Coherent Spin-networks * Vertex-amplitude Asymptotics and Regge Gravity * Reconstructing a Semiclassical Spacetime * Conclusions * References

  4. Specific IgE density assay: A new reverse enzyme allergosorbent test-based procedure for the quantitative detection of allergen-specific IgE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Falagiani

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is described for the quantitative detection of IgE antibodies, based on IgE capture with a specific antibody, reaction with liquid-biotinylated allergens and biotinylated anti-IgE and immunoenzymatic development of the reaction (reverse enzyme allergosorbent test. Using a reference system based on the World Health Organization IgE International standard, this method determines total IgE in the range 2-100kU/L and specific IgE in the range 0.2-100 kU/L, from which the specific/total ratio, called 'specific IgE density', can be calculated. This procedure has been applied to the study of specific IgE in 23 sera from patients polysensitized to pollen and mite allergens: 11 with asthma and 12 with rhinitis. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the method were evaluted. Sera from asthmatic patients showed higher cumulative levels of specific IgE (mean density 57.7% than sera from rhinitic patients (mean density 32.6%. The clinical significance of specific IgE density in patients with multiple sensitizations is discussed.

  5. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell density is the critical parameter controlling tendon morphogenesis. Knowing its neighbors allows a cell to regulate correctly its proliferation and collagen production. A missing link to understanding this process is a molecular description of the sensing mechanism. Previously, this mechanism was shown in cell culture to rely on a diffusible factor (SNZR [sensor] with an affinity for the cell layer. This led to purifying conditioned medium over 4 columns and analyzing the final column fractions for band intensity on SDS gels versus biological activity – a 16 kD band strongly correlated between assays. N-terminal sequencing – EPLAVVDL – identified a large gene (424 AA, extremely conserved between chicken and human. In this paper we probe whether this is the correct gene. Can the predicted large protein be cleaved to a smaller protein? EPLAVVDL occurs towards the C-terminus and cleavage would create a small 94 AA protein. This protein would run at ∼10 kD, so what modifications or cofactor binding accounts for its running at 16 kD on SDS gels? This protein has no prominent hydrophobic regions, so can it be secreted? To validate its role, the chicken cDNA for this gene was tagged with myc and his and transfected into a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS. U2OS cells expressed the gene but not passively: differentiating into structures resembling spongy bone and expressing alkaline phosphatase, an early bone marker. Intracellularly, two bands were observed by Western blotting: the full length protein and a smaller form (26 kD. Outside the cell, a small band (28 kD was detected, although it was 40% larger than expected, as well as multiple larger bands. These larger forms could be converted to the predicted smaller protein (94 AA + tags by changing salt concentrations and ultrafiltering – releasing a cofactor to the filtrate while leaving a protein factor in the retentate. Using specific degradative enzymes and mass spectrometry, the

  6. Analysis of DNA strand-specific differential expression with high density tiling microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antequera Francisco

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarray technology allows the analysis of genome structure and dynamics at genome-wide scale. Expression microarrays (EMA contain probes for annotated open reading frames (ORF and are widely used for the analysis of differential gene expression. By contrast, tiling microarrays (TMA have a much higher probe density and provide unbiased genome-wide coverage. The purpose of this study was to develop a protocol to exploit the high resolution of TMAs for quantitative measurement of DNA strand-specific differential expression of annotated and non-annotated transcripts. Results We extensively filtered probes present in Affymetrix Genechip Yeast Genome 2.0 expression and GeneChip S. pombe 1.0FR tiling microarrays to generate custom Chip Description Files (CDF in order to compare their efficiency. We experimentally tested the potential of our approach by measuring the differential expression of 4904 genes in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe growing under conditions of oxidative stress. The results showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.943 between both platforms, indicating that TMAs are as reliable as EMAs for quantitative expression analysis. A significant advantage of TMAs over EMAs is the possibility of detecting non-annotated transcripts generated only under specific physiological conditions. To take full advantage of this property, we have used a target-labelling protocol that preserves the original polarity of the transcripts and, therefore, allows the strand-specific differential expression of non-annotated transcripts to be determined. By using a segmentation algorithm prior to generating the corresponding custom CDFs, we identified and quantitatively measured the expression of 510 transcripts longer than 180 nucleotides and not overlapping previously annotated ORFs that were differentially expressed at least 2-fold under oxidative stress. Conclusions We show that the information derived from TMA

  7. Specification of Density Functional Approximation by Radial Distribution Function of Bulk Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUShi-Qi

    2002-01-01

    A systematic methodology is proposed to deal with the weighted density approximation version of classical density functional theory by employing the knowledge of radial distribution function of bulk fluid.The present methodology results from the concept of universality of the free energy density functional combined with the test particle method.It is shown that the new method is very accurate for the predictions of density distribution of a hard sphere fluid at different confining geometries.The physical foundation of the present methodology is also applied to the quantum density functional theory.

  8. Comparison of marine gravity from shipboard and high-density satellite altimetry along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30.5-35.5 deg S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Sandwell, David

    1993-01-01

    We compare new marine gravity fields derived from satellite altimetry with shipboard measurements over a region of more than 120,000 sq km in the central South Atlantic. Newly declassified satellite data were employed to construct free-air anomaly maps on 0.05 degree grids. An extensive gravity and bathymetry data set from four cruises along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from 30.5-35.5 deg S provides a benchmark for testing the 2D resolution and accuracy of the satellite measurements where their crosstrack spacing is near their widest. The satellite gravity signal is coherent with bathymetry in this region down to wavelengths of 26 km, compared to 12.5 km for shipboard gravity. Residuals between the shipboard and satellite data sets have a roughly normal distribution. The standard deviation of satellite gravity with respect to shipboard measurements is nearly 7 mGal in a region of 140 mGal total variation, whereas the internal standard deviation at crossovers for GPS-navigated shipboard data is 1.8 mGal. The differences between shipboard and satellite data are too large to use satellite gravity to determine crustal thickness variations within a typical ridge segment.

  9. Specification of Density Functional Approximation by Radial Distribution Function of Bulk Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi

    2002-01-01

    A systematic methodology is proposed to deal with the weighted density approximation version of clas-sical density functional theory by employing the knowledge of radial distribution function of bulk fluid. The presentmethodology results from the concept of universality of the free energy density functional combined with the test particlemethod. It is shown that the new method is very accurate for the predictions of density distribution ofa hard sphere fluidat different confining geometries. The physical foundation of the present methodology is also applied to the quantumdensity functional theory.

  10. Related physicochemical properties to microstructure of hard and soft wheat grains with different kernel thickness and specific density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinian; Wang, Jun; Xie, Weizhong; Lu, Daxin; Ding, Weimin

    2013-10-01

    Physicochemical properties of wheat grains with largest kernel thickness always was lowest than the other sections, examination of microstructure of wheat grains can help us understand this phenomena. Two varieties of wheat, soft white winter wheat Yangmai 11 and hard white winter wheat Zhengmai 9023, were fractionated into five sections by kernel thickness. Then the fractionated wheat grains in 2.7-3.0 mm section were separated into three fractions by kernel specific density sequentially. Microstructure of the fractured surface were evaluated at different scale level to two varieties wheat with different kernel thickness and specific density by using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Compactness and size of endosperm cell tended to decrease with decreasing wheat kernel thickness and specific density. Protein matrix tended to increase with decreasing wheat kernel thickness and specific density. Size of starch granules and proportion for different type starch granules also varied with different wheat kernel thickness and specific density. Those microstructure properties of the fractured surface, formation of endosperm cells, protein matrix and starch granules were close related to rheological properties and pasting properties of wheat grains.

  11. Impact of obesity on the predictive accuracy of prostate-specific antigen density and prostate-specific antigen in native Korean men undergoing prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Heon; Doo, Seung Whan; Yang, Won Jae; Lee, Kwang Woo; Lee, Chang Ho; Song, Yun Seob; Jeon, Yoon Su; Kim, Min Eui; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of obesity on the biopsy detection of prostate cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data of 1182 consecutive Korean patients (≥50 years) with serum prostate-specific antigen levels of 3-10 ng/mL who underwent initial extended 12-cores biopsy from September 2009 to March 2013. Patients who took medications that were likely to influence the prostate-specific antigen level were excluded. Receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted for prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen density predicting cancer status among non-obese and obese men. A total of 1062 patients (mean age 67.1 years) were enrolled in the analysis. A total of 230 men (21.7%) had a positive biopsy. In the overall study sample, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of serum prostate-specific antigen for predicting prostate cancer on biopsy were 0.584 and 0.633 for non-obese and obese men, respectively (P = 0.234). However, the area under the curve for prostate-specific antigen density in predicting cancer status showed a significant difference (non-obese 0.696, obese 0.784; P = 0.017). There seems to be a significant difference in the ability of prostate-specific antigen density to predict biopsy results between non-obese and obese men. Obesity positively influenced the overall ability of prostate-specific antigen density to predict prostate cancer. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Age-specific, density-dependent and environment-based mortality of a short-lived perennial herb

    OpenAIRE

    Picó, F Xavier; Retana, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Density-independent and density-dependent processes affect plant mortality. Although less well understood, age-specific mortality can also play an important role in plant mortality. The goal of this study was to analyse sev- eral factors accounting for mortality in the Mediterranean short-lived peren- nial herb Lobularia maritima. We followed three cohorts of plants (from emergence to death) during 4 years in field conditions. We collected data on plant mortality ...

  13. Bounce Loop Quantum Cosmology Corrected Gauss-Bonnet Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Haro, J; Myagky, A N; Odintsov, S D; Oikonomou, V K

    2015-01-01

    We develop a Gauss-Bonnet extension of Loop Quantum Cosmology, by introducing holonomy corrections in modified $F(\\mathcal{G})$ theories of gravity. Within the context of our formalism, we provide a perturbative expansion in the critical density, a parameter characteristic of Loop Quantum Gravity theories, and we result in having leading order corrections to the classical $F(\\mathcal{G})$ theories of gravity. After extensively discussing the formalism, we present a reconstruction method that makes possible to find the Loop Quantum Cosmology corrected $F(\\mathcal{G})$ theory that can realize various cosmological scenarios. Specifically, we studied exponential and power-law bouncing cosmologies, emphasizing on the behavior near the bouncing point and in some cases, the behavior for all the values of the cosmic time is obtained. We exemplify our theoretical constructions by using bouncing cosmologies, and we investigate which Loop Quantum Cosmology corrected Gauss-Bonnet modified gravities can successfully reali...

  14. Neutron stars structure in the context of massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, S. H.; Bordbar, G. H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the recent interests in spin-2 massive gravitons, we study the structure of neutron star in the context of massive gravity. The modifications of TOV equation in the presence of massive gravity are explored in 4 and higher dimensions. Next, by considering the modern equation of state for the neutron star matter (which is extracted by the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method with the AV18 potential), different physical properties of the neutron star (such as Le Chatelier's principle, stability and energy conditions) are investigated. It is shown that consideration of the massive gravity has specific contributions into the structure of neutron star and introduces new prescriptions for the massive astrophysical objects. The mass-radius relation is examined and the effects of massive gravity on the Schwarzschild radius, average density, compactness, gravitational redshift and dynamical stability are studied. Finally, a relation between mass and radius of neutron star versus the Planck mass is extracted.

  15. Modification in CSF specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure independent of encephalopathy, evidences for an early blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nicolas; Rosselli, Matteo; Mouri, Sarah; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Agarwal, Banwari; Thabut, Dominique; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) on the background of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with high mortality rates, it is unknown whether this is due to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Specific gravity of cerebrospinal fluid measured by CT is able to estimate blood-cerebrospinal fluid-barrier permeability. This study aimed to assess cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and to compare it in patients with or without ACLF and with or without hepatic encephalopathy. We identified all the patients admitted for acute decompensation of cirrhosis who underwent a brain CT-scan. Those patients could present acute decompensation with or without ACLF. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy was noted. They were compared to a group of stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. Quantitative brain CT analysis used the Brainview software that gives the weight, the volume and the specific gravity of each determined brain regions. Results are given as median and interquartile ranges and as relative variation compared to the control/baseline group. 36 patients presented an acute decompensation of cirrhosis. Among them, 25 presented with ACLF and 11 without ACLF; 20 presented with hepatic encephalopathy grade ≥ 2. They were compared to 31 stable cirrhosis patients and 61 healthy controls. Cirrhotic patients had increased cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity (CSF-SG) compared to healthy controls (+0.4 %, p gravity did not differ between different brain regions according to the presence or absence of either ACLF or HE. In patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, and those with ACLF, CSF specific gravity is modified compared to both stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. This pattern is observed even in the absence of hepatic encephalopathy suggesting that blood-CSF barrier impairment is manifest even in absence of overt hepatic encephalopathy.

  16. Infrared Modifications Of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rombouts, J

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we study theories that modify gravity at very large distances. Motivated by recent observations in cosmology, such as the dimming of type Ia supernovae and flattening of rotation curves of galaxies, we study two classes of theories that attempt to explain these observations as due to a change in the laws of gravity at large distances rather than due to the presence of new forms of exotic energy and matter. The first class of theories is massive gravity, obtained by adding a mass term to the action for the gravitational fluctuation in Einstein's general relativity. The second class of models we study are braneworlds that provide infrared modified gravity, in specific the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model and its extension to higher codimensional branes. We stress in our discussion the field theoretical consistency, both classically and quantum-mechanically, of these models.

  17. Extended Theories of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Extended Theories of Gravity can be considered a new paradigm to cure shortcomings of General Relativity at infrared and ultraviolet scales. They are an approach that, by preserving the undoubtedly positive results of Einstein's Theory, is aimed to address conceptual and experimental problems recently emerged in Astrophysics, Cosmology and High Energy Physics. In particular, the goal is to encompass, in a self-consistent scheme, problems like Inflation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Large Scale Structure and, first of all, to give at least an effective description of Quantum Gravity. We review the basic principles that any gravitational theory has to follow. The geometrical interpretation is discussed in a broad perspective in order to highlight the basic assumptions of General Relativity and its possible extensions in the general framework of gauge theories. Principles of such modifications are presented, focusing on specific classes of theories like f (R)-gravity and scalar-tensor gravity in the metric and Pala...

  18. Phenomenological Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kimberly, D; Kimberly, Dagny; Magueijo, Joao

    2005-01-01

    These notes summarize a set of lectures on phenomenological quantum gravity which one of us delivered and the other attended with great diligence. They cover an assortment of topics on the border between theoretical quantum gravity and observational anomalies. Specifically, we review non-linear relativity in its relation to loop quantum gravity and high energy cosmic rays. Although we follow a pedagogic approach we include an open section on unsolved problems, presented as exercises for the student. We also review varying constant models: the Brans-Dicke theory, the Bekenstein varying $\\alpha$ model, and several more radical ideas. We show how they make contact with strange high-redshift data, and perhaps other cosmological puzzles. We conclude with a few remaining observational puzzles which have failed to make contact with quantum gravity, but who knows... We would like to thank Mario Novello for organizing an excellent school in Mangaratiba, in direct competition with a very fine beach indeed.

  19. Nonlocal gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Relativity theory is based on a postulate of locality, which means that the past history of the observer is not directly taken into account. This book argues that the past history should be taken into account. In this way, nonlocality---in the sense of history dependence---is introduced into relativity theory. The deep connection between inertia and gravitation suggests that gravity could be nonlocal, and in nonlocal gravity the fading gravitational memory of past events must then be taken into account. Along this line of thought, a classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation has recently been developed. A significant consequence of this theory is that the nonlocal aspect of gravity appears to simulate dark matter. According to nonlocal gravity theory, what astronomers attribute to dark matter should instead be due to the nonlocality of gravitation. Nonlocality dominates on the scale of galaxies and beyond. Memory fades with time; therefore, the nonlocal aspect of gravity becomes wea...

  20. Investigation of electron density changes at the onset of a chemical reaction using the state-specific dual descriptor from conceptual density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Proft, Frank; Forquet, Valérian; Ourri, Benjamin; Chermette, Henry; Geerlings, Paul; Morell, Christophe

    2015-04-14

    The electron density changes from reactants towards the transition state of a chemical reaction is expressed as a linear combination of the state-specific dual descriptors (SSDD) of the corresponding reactant complexes. Consequently, the SSDD can be expected to bear important resemblance to the so-called natural orbitals for chemical valence (NOCV), introduced as the orbitals that diagonalize the deformation density matrix of interacting molecules. This agreement is shown for three case studies: the complexation of a Lewis acid with a Lewis base, a SN2 nucleophilic substitution reaction and a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. As such, the SSDD computed for reactant complexes are shown to provide important information about charge transfer interactions during a chemical reaction.

  1. Fluid phase thermodynamics : I) nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically enhanced gravity and II) superconducting cavity resonators for high-stability frequency references and precision density measurements of helium-4 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcovilos, Theodore Allen

    Although fluids are typically the first systems studied in undergraduate thermodynamics classes, we still have only a rudimentary phenomenological understanding of these systems outside of the classical and equilibrium regimes. Two experiments will be presented. First, we present progress on precise measurements of helium-4 gas at low temperatures (1 K-5 K). We study helium because at low densities it is an approximately ideal gas but at high densities the thermodynamic properties can be predicted by numerical solutions of Schroedinger's equation. By utilizing the high resolution and stability in frequency of a superconducting microwave cavity resonator we can measure the dielectric constant of helium-4 to parts in 109, corresponding to an equivalent resolution in density. These data will be used to calculate the virial coefficients of the helium gas so that we may compare with numerical predictions from the literature. Additionally, our data may allow us to measure Boltzmann's constant to parts in 108, a factor of 100 improvement over previous measurements. This work contains a description of the nearly-completed apparatus and the methods of operation and data analysis for this experiment. Data will be taken by future researchers.The second experiment discussed is a study of nucleate pool boiling. To date, no adequate quantitative model exists of this everyday phenomenon. In our experiment, we vary one parameter inaccessible to most researchers, gravity, by applying a magnetic force to our test fluid, oxygen. Using this technique, we may apply effective gravities of 0-80 times Earth's gravitational acceleration (g). In this work we present heat transfer data for the boiling of oxygen at one atmosphere ambient pressure for effective gravity values between 1g and 16g . Our data describe two relationships between applied heat flux and temperature differential: at low heat flux the system obeys a power law and at high heat flux the behavior is linear. We find that the

  2. Wolbachia age-sex-specific density in Aedes albopictus: a host evolutionary response to cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Tortosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolbachia bacteria have invaded many arthropod species by inducing Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI. These symbionts represent fascinating objects of study for evolutionary biologists, but also powerful potential biocontrol agents. Here, we assess the density dynamics of Wolbachia infections in males and females of the mosquito Aedes albopitcus, an important vector of human pathogens, and interpret the results within an evolutionary framework. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wolbachia densities were measured in natural populations and in age controlled mosquitoes using quantitative PCR. We show that the density dynamics of the wAlbA Wolbachia strain infecting Aedes albopictus drastically differ between males and females, with a very rapid decay of infection in males only. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Theory predicts that Wolbachia and its hosts should cooperate to improve the transmission of infection to offspring, because only infected eggs are protected from the effects of CI. However, incompatible matings effectively lower the fertility of infected males, so that selection acting on the host genome should tend to reduce the expression of CI in males, for example, by reducing infection density in males before sexual maturation. The rapid decay of one Wolbachia infection in Aedes albopictus males, but not in females, is consistent with this prediction. We suggest that the commonly observed reduction in CI intensity with male age reflects a similar evolutionary process. Our results also highlight the importance of monitoring infection density dynamics in both males and females to assess the efficiency of Wolbachia-based control strategies.

  3. Cascading Gravity is Ghost Free

    CERN Document Server

    de Rham, Claudia; Tolley, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    We perform a full perturbative stability analysis of the 6D cascading gravity model in the presence of 3-brane tension. We demonstrate that for sufficiently large tension on the (flat) 3-brane, there are no ghosts at the perturbative level, consistent with results that had previously only been obtained in a specific 5D decoupling limit. These results establish the cascading gravity framework as a consistent infrared modification of gravity.

  4. Forest aboveground biomass estimates in a tropical rainforest in Madagascar:new insights from the use of wood specific gravity data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tahiana Ramananantoandro; Herimanitra P. Rafidimanantsoa; Miora F. Ramanakoto

    2015-01-01

    To generate carbon credits under the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation program (REDD+), accurate estimates of forest carbon stocks are needed. Carbon accounting efforts have focused on carbon stocks in aboveground biomass (AGB). Although wood specific gravity (WSG) is known to be an important variable in AGB estimates, there is currently a lack of data on WSG for Malagasy tree species. This study aimed to determine whether estimates of carbon stocks calculated from literature-based WSG values differed from those based on WSG values measured on wood core samples. Carbon stocks in forest biomass were assessed using two WSG data sets: (i) values measured from 303 wood core samples extracted in the study area, (ii) values derived from international databases. Results suggested that there is difference between the field and literature-based WSG at the 0.05 level. The latter data set was on average 16% higher than the former. However, carbon stocks calculated from the two data sets did not differ significantly at the 0.05 level. Such findings could be attributed to the form of the allometric equation used which gives more weight to tree diameter and tree height than to WSG. The choice of dataset should depend on the level of accuracy (Tier II or III) desired by REDD+. As higher levels of accuracy are rewarded by higher prices, species-specific WSG data would be highly desirable.

  5. Artificial Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term reduced gravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity, which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by short-radius human centrifuge devices within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient

  6. On the Resolvability of Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage Reservoirs Using Time-Lapse Gravity Gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E. Judith; Braun, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Unconventional heavy oil resource plays are important contributors to oil and gas production, as well as controversial for posing environmental hazards. Monitoring those reservoirs before, during, and after operations would assist both the optimization of economic benefits and the mitigation of potential environmental hazards. This study investigates how gravity gradiometry using superconducting gravimeters could resolve depletion areas in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) reservoirs. This is achieved through modelling of a SAGD reservoir at 1.25 and 5 years of operation. Specifically, the density change structure identified from geological, petrological, and seismic observations is forward modelled for gravity and gradients. Three main parameters have an impact on the resolvability of bitumen depletion volumes and are varied through a suitable parameter space: well pair separation, depth to the well pairs, and survey grid sampling. The results include a resolvability matrix, which identifies reservoirs that could benefit from time-lapse gravity gradiometry monitoring. After 1.25 years of operation, during the rising phase, the resolvable maximum reservoir depth ranges between the surface and 230 m, considering a well pair separation between 80 and 200 m. After 5 years of production, during the spreading phase, the resolvability of depletion volumes around single well pairs is greatly compromised as the depletion volume is closer to the surface, which translates to a larger portion of the gravity signal. The modelled resolvability matrices were derived from visual inspection and spectral analysis of the gravity gradient signatures and can be used to assess the applicability of time-lapse gradiometry to monitor reservoir density changes.

  7. Cosmological Tests of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2010-01-01

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the universe. We review recent developments in modified gravity theories, focusing on higher dimensional approaches and chameleon/f(R) theories. We classify these models in terms of the screening mechanisms that enable such theories to approach general relativity on small scales (and thus satisfy solar system constraints). We describe general features of the modified Friedman equation in such theories. The second half of this review describes experimental tests of gravity in light of the new theoretical approaches. We summarize the high precision tests of gravity on laboratory and solar system scales. We describe in some detail tests on astrophysical scales ranging from ~kpc (galaxy scales) to ~Gpc (large-scale structure). These tests rely on the growth and inter-relationship of perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields which can be measured using gravitational lensi...

  8. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  9. An Improved Model for Operational Specification of the Electron Density Structure up to Geosynchronous Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    tracking of spacecraft as part of space surveillance programmes; the use of space-based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) to carry out remote sensing of...Profiler (TSMP) and the TSMP-assisted Digisonde (TaD) model b) To validate the results using ISR and topside electron density profiles, GNSS TEC and...derived from ground-based GNSS receivers ............................ 20  2.3 Comparison with data from Malvern ISR

  10. Gravity brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  11. Herbivore-specific, density-dependent induction of plant volatiles: honest or "cry wolf" signals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Shiojiri

    Full Text Available Plants release volatile chemicals upon attack by herbivorous arthropods. They do so commonly in a dose-dependent manner: the more herbivores, the more volatiles released. The volatiles attract predatory arthropods and the amount determines the probability of predator response. We show that seedlings of a cabbage variety (Brassica oleracea var. capitata, cv Shikidori also show such a response to the density of cabbage white (Pieris rapae larvae and attract more (naive parasitoids (Cotesia glomerata when there are more herbivores on the plant. However, when attacked by diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella larvae, seedlings of the same variety (cv Shikidori release volatiles, the total amount of which is high and constant and thus independent of caterpillar density, and naive parasitoids (Cotesia vestalis of diamondback moth larvae fail to discriminate herbivore-rich from herbivore-poor plants. In contrast, seedlings of another cabbage variety of B. oleracea (var. acephala: kale respond in a dose-dependent manner to the density of diamondback moth larvae and attract more parasitoids when there are more herbivores. Assuming these responses of the cabbage cultivars reflect behaviour of at least some genotypes of wild plants, we provide arguments why the behaviour of kale (B. oleracea var acephala is best interpreted as an honest signaling strategy and that of cabbage cv Shikidori (B. oleracea var capitata as a "cry wolf" signaling strategy, implying a conflict of interest between the plant and the enemies of its herbivores: the plant profits from being visited by the herbivore's enemies, but the latter would be better off by visiting other plants with more herbivores. If so, evolutionary theory on alarm signaling predicts consequences of major interest to students of plant protection, tritrophic systems and communication alike.

  12. Does lower urine-specific gravity predict decline in renal function and hypernatremia in older adults exposed to psychotropic medications? An exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Sahar; Yu, Ching; Sylvestre, Jean-Daniel; Looper, Karl J; Segal, Marilyn; Rej, Soham

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to psychotropic agents, including lithium, antipsychotics and antidepressants, has been associated with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). This is especially concerning in older adults already at risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypernatremia with advanced aging. This study investigates whether commonly performed random urine-specific gravity (USG) tests can predict adverse NDI outcomes (CKD and hypernatremia) in psychotropic-exposed older adults. This was a retrospective longitudinal study of 173 geriatric psychiatry patients (age ≥65 years) exposed to psychotropic medications. Our main continuous outcome was 'decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >10 mL/min/1.73 m(2)' over 5-year follow-up. Hypernatremia and acute kidney injury (AKI) were secondary outcomes. Whether baseline USG 10 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Patients with a single baseline sodium concentration of ≥140 mmol/L and USG <1.010 have a 26.3% incidence of AKI and a 57.9% incidence of hypernatremia over the ensuing 5 years. In psychotropic-exposed older adults, there appears to be a clinically important association between low USG and developing both hypernatremia and CKD. USG may be a useful surrogate measure for NDI-related outcomes in large administrative database studies, where ideal measures such as 24-h urine volume may not be available.

  13. Ensemble Averaged Gravity Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Khosravi, Nima

    2016-01-01

    We put forward the idea that all the theoretically consistent models of gravity have a contribution to the observed gravity interaction. In this formulation each model comes with its own Euclidean path integral weight where general relativity (GR) automatically has the maximum weight in high-curvature regions. We employ this idea in the framework of Lovelock models and show that in four dimensions the result is a specific form of $f(R,G)$ model. This specific $f(R,G)$ satisfies the stability conditions and has self-accelerating solution. Our model is consistent with the local tests of gravity since its behavior is same as GR for high-curvature regimes. In low-curvature regime the gravity force is weaker than GR which can interpret as existence of a repulsive fifth force for very large scales. Interestingly there is an intermediate-curvature regime where the gravity force is stronger in our model than GR. The different behavior of our model in comparison with GR in both low- and intermediate-curvature regimes ...

  14. Lattice specific heat and local density of states of Ni-based dilute alloys at low temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P D Semlaty; Kapil Dev; P N Ram

    2006-06-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the low-temperature lattice specific heat of Ni-based dilute alloys has been carried out. Lattice Green's function method has been used to calculate the local density of states of substitutional impurities and lattice specific heat in different alloys. The resonance condition has been investigated for possible occurrence of resonance modes. Except in NiCr and NiMn, low-frequency resonance modes have been obtained in all the alloys. However, no localized mode was obtained. The impurity-induced increase in lattice specific heat is explained on the basis of the obtained resonance modes. The calculation shows an excellent agreement with the measured lattice specific heat in these alloys

  15. Low temperature specific heat of the spin-density-wave compound (TMTSF)2PF6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odin, J.; Lasjaunias, J.C.; Biljakovic, K.;

    1994-01-01

    We report on specific heat measurements of the SDW compound (TMTSF)2PF6 between 2 and 25 K, performed by two different techniques. We discuss the two successive transitions which occur in this T-range : the SDW ordering transition at T = 12.1 K, and a glass transition around-3-3.5 K. The latter...

  16. Intra-Amniotic LPS Induced Region-Specific Changes in Presynaptic Bouton Densities in the Ovine Fetal Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Strackx

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Chorioamnionitis has been associated with increased risk for fetal brain damage. Although, it is now accepted that synaptic dysfunction might be responsible for functional deficits, synaptic densities/numbers after a fetal inflammatory challenge have not been studied in different regions yet. Therefore, we tested in this study the hypothesis that LPS-induced chorioamnionitis caused profound changes in synaptic densities in different regions of the fetal sheep brain. Material and Methods. Chorioamnionitis was induced by a 10 mg intra-amniotic LPS injection at two different exposure intervals. The fetal brain was studied at 125 days of gestation (term = 150 days either 2 (LPS2D group or 14 days (LPS14D group after LPS or saline injection (control group. Synaptophysin immunohistochemistry was used to quantify the presynaptic density in layers 2-3 and 5-6 of the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, entorhinal cortex, and piriforme cortex, in the nucleus caudatus and putamen and in CA1/2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Results. There was a significant reduction in presynaptic bouton densities in layers 2-3 and 5-6 of the motor cortex and in layers 2-3 of the entorhinal and the somatosensory cortex, in the nucleus caudate and putamen and the CA1/2 and CA3 of the hippocampus in the LPS2D compared to control animals. Only in the motor cortex and putamen, the presynaptic density was significantly decreased in the LPS14 D compared to the control group. No changes were found in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the piriforme cortex. Conclusion. We demonstrated that LPS-induced chorioamnionitis caused a decreased density in presynaptic boutons in different areas in the fetal brain. These synaptic changes seemed to be region-specific, with some regions being more affected than others, and seemed to be transient in some regions.

  17. Riding Gravity Away from Doomsday

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Ashoke

    2015-01-01

    The discovery that most of the energy density in the universe is stored in the form of dark energy has profound consequences for our future. In particular our current limited understanding of quantum theory of gravity indicates that some time in the future our universe will undergo a phase transition that will destroy us and everything else around us instantaneously. However the laws of gravity also suggest a way out -- some of our descendants could survive this catastrophe by riding gravity away from the danger. In this essay I describe the tale of this escape from doomsday.

  18. High hydrostatic pressure specifically affects molecular dynamics and shape of low-density lipoprotein particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M.; Lehofer, B.; Martinez, N.; Ollivier, J.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Prassl, R.; Peters, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lipid composition of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its physicochemical characteristics are relevant for proper functioning of lipid transport in the blood circulation. To explore dynamical and structural features of LDL particles with either a normal or a triglyceride-rich lipid composition we combined coherent and incoherent neutron scattering methods. The investigations were carried out under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), which is a versatile tool to study the physicochemical behavior of biomolecules in solution at a molecular level. Within both neutron techniques we applied HHP to probe the shape and degree of freedom of the possible motions (within the time windows of 15 and 100 ps) and consequently the flexibility of LDL particles. We found that HHP does not change the types of motion in LDL, but influences the portion of motions participating. Contrary to our assumption that lipoprotein particles, like membranes, are highly sensitive to pressure we determined that LDL copes surprisingly well with high pressure conditions, although the lipid composition, particularly the triglyceride content of the particles, impacts the molecular dynamics and shape arrangement of LDL under pressure.

  19. $BF$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Celada, Mariano; Montesinos, Merced

    2016-01-01

    $BF$ gravity comprises all the formulations of gravity that are based on deformations of $BF$ theory. Such deformations consist of either constraints or potential terms added to the topological $BF$ action that turn some of the gauge degrees of freedom into physical ones, particularly giving rise to general relativity. The $BF$ formulations have provided new and deep insights into many classical and quantum aspects of the gravitational field, setting the foundations for the approach to quantum gravity known as spinfoam models. In this review, we present a self-contained and unified treatment of the $BF$ formulations of $D$-dimensional general relativity and other related models, focusing on the classical aspects of them and including some new results.

  20. Quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The search for a quantum theory of the gravitational field is one of the great open problems in theoretical physics. This book presents a self-contained discussion of the concepts, methods and applications that can be expected in such a theory. The two main approaches to its construction - the direct quantisation of Einstein's general theory of relativity and string theory - are covered. Whereas the first attempts to construct a viable theory for the gravitational field alone, string theory assumes that a quantum theory of gravity will be achieved only through a unification of all the interactions. However, both employ the general method of quantization of constrained systems, which is described together with illustrative examples relevant for quantum gravity. There is a detailed presentation of the main approaches employed in quantum general relativity: path-integral quantization, the background-field method and canonical quantum gravity in the metric, connection and loop formulations. The discussion of stri...

  1. BF gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, Mariano; González, Diego; Montesinos, Merced

    2016-11-01

    BF gravity comprises all the formulations of gravity that are based on deformations of BF theory. Such deformations consist of either constraints or potential terms added to the topological BF action that turn some of the gauge degrees of freedom into physical ones, particularly giving rise to general relativity. The BF formulations have provided new and deep insights into many classical and quantum aspects of the gravitational field, setting the foundations for the approach to quantum gravity known as spinfoam models. In this review, we present a self-contained and unified treatment of the BF formulations of D-dimensional general relativity and other related models, focusing on the classical aspects of them and including some new results.

  2. U.S. Gravity Data per 2 min Cell (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity density grid for the conterminous United States displays the distribution of the about 1.8 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the...

  3. Hawaiian Islands Gravity Data per 2 min Cell (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity density grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands displays the distribution of about 61,000 terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the National...

  4. Alaska Gravity Data per 2 x 4 min Cell (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' gravity density grid for Alaska displays the distribution of about 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the National Geodetic Survey...

  5. PR/VI Gravity Data per 2 min Cell (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity density grid for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands displays the distribution of about 26,000 terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the...

  6. Study of Stable Cathodes and Electrolytes for High Specific Density Lithium-Air Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lugo, Dionne M.; Wu, James; Bennett, William; Ming, Yu; Zhu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Future NASA missions require high specific energy battery technologies, greater than 400 Wh/kg. Current NASA missions are using "state-of-the-art" (SOA) Li-ion batteries (LIB), which consist of a metal oxide cathode, a graphite anode and an organic electrolyte. NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the physical and electrochemical properties of the anode-electrolyte interface for ionic liquid based Li-air batteries. The voltage-time profiles for Pyr13FSI and Pyr14TFSI ionic liquids electrolytes studies on symmetric cells show low over-potentials and no dendritic lithium morphology. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicate that these ionic liquids have a wide electrochemical window. As a continuation of this work, sp2 carbon cathode and these low flammability electrolytes were paired and the physical and electrochemical properties were studied in a Li-air battery system under an oxygen environment.

  7. Allele-specific expression of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnich, A.; Lussier-Cacan, S.; Roy, M. [Clincial Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 60% of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in French Canadians is due to a > 10 kb deletion of the promoter region of the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDL-R), allowing determination of the influence of a single LDL-R allele on phenotypic expression of FH. Normal allele haplotypes of approximately 250 heterozygotes were determined with 7 RFLPs. In vitro maximal LDL-R activity of blood lymphocytes from a subset of approximately 150 heterozygotes, measured by immunocytofluorometry, was significantly higher (20 to 30%) in subjects with LDL-R normal allele haplotype G (n=11), and O (n=7) compared to the most frequent haplotype F (n=43), while no differences were observed among F, E (n=11), and the 2 other most prevalent haplotypes (n=43). LDL-R mRNA in these lymphocytes was significantly elevated 2.3-, 1.7-, and 1.8- fold, in G, O, and E, respectively, compared to F, while no significant differences were apparent between F and the other two most frequent haplotyes. Large interindividual variability in lymphocyte LDL-R mRNA levels and activity was observed even among subjects with the same LDL-R normal allele haplotype. However, maximally induced lymphocyte LDL-R mRNA levels correlated poorly with levels measured in freshly isolated cells (n=14). Relative to haplotype F (n=47 women (W), 39 men (M)), mean plasma LDL cholesterol levels adjusted for age and apolipoprotein E genotype were 5-10% lower in men and women with haplotypes G (n=16 W, 12 M) and O (n=8 W, 6 M), and 20% lower in 7 W with haplotype E. These results suggest that (1) normal LDL-R allele haplotype G and O may contain sequence variations which confer relatively high gene expression and (2) environmental and genetic influences other than the LDL-R gene contribute substantially to variability in LDL-R expression and plasma LDL cholesterol levels in French Canadian FH heterozygotes.

  8. Contravariant Gravity on Poisson Manifolds and Einstein Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Yukio; Watamura, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    A relation between a gravity on Poisson manifolds proposed in arXiv:1508.05706 and the Einstein gravity is investigated. The compatibility of the Poisson and Riemann structures defines a unique connection, the contravariant Levi-Civita connection, and leads to the idea of the contravariant gravity. The Einstein-Hilbert-type action includes couplings between the metric and the Poisson tensor. The Weyl transformation is studied to reveal properties of those interactions. It is argued that the theory can have an equivalent description in terms of the Einstein gravity coupled to matter. As an example, it is shown that the contravariant gravity on a two-dimensional Poisson manifold has another description by a real scalar field coupling to the metric in a specific manner.

  9. Influence of anatomy and basic density on specific cutting force for wood from Corymbia citriodora Hill & Johnson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz-E. de L. Melo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of xylem tissue cell structure, determined through biometry and basic density of the wood from Corymbia citriodora Hill & Johnson on consumption of specific 90º-0º longitudinal cutting force.Area of study: The study area was in the region of the Vale do Rio Doce - Minas Gerais, Brazil.Material and methods: A diametrical board with dimensions of 60 x 18 x 5 cm (length x width x thickness, respectively, with more than 1.3 m from the ground, was removed. In machining trials, a 400 mm diameter circular saw was used, with 24 “WZ” teeth, feed rate of 10 m.min-1, cutting speed of 61 m.s-1, and maximum instantaneous torque of 92.5 N.m. During cutting, test specimens were removed with alternated and parallel 1.5 cm edges in 6 radial positions, which were used for biometric determination of cell structure and basic density.Main results: It was observed that wood basic density, vessel diameter, fiber wall thickness, fiber wall fraction and fiber wall portion were directly proportional to the specific cutting force. In contrast, vessel frequency and fiber lumen diameter proved to be inversely proportional to cutting force.Research highlights: This work provides important values of quantification of influence of xylem tissue cell structure, determined through biometry and physical properties of the wood that may be used to prediction of consumption of specific cutting force.Keywords: wood machining; wood properties; optimization of the process.

  10. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  11. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  12. Specific heat and phonon density of state of cubic phase of protonic conductor LaAlO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anupam Deep; Sinha, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    Perovskite oxides find wide range of applications like oxygen sensors, catalyst support, high frequency capacitors, high temperature superconducting microwave devices, solid state oxide fuel cell (SOFC) etc. LaAlO3 is one of such type of prominent perovskite oxides and very prominent material for protonic conductions. Therefore knowledge of the thermal properties of LaAlO3 is most significant. Hence in the present study we have studied phonon density of states and specific heat of LaAlO3 in cubic structure by applying lattice dynamical theoretical model. The calculated results are interpreted with existing experimental or theoretical results.

  13. Self-sustained traversable wormholes in modified gravity theories

    CERN Document Server

    Garattini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    We consider the possibility that wormhole geometries are sustained by their own quantum fluctuations, in the context of noncommutative geometry and Gravity's Rainbow models. More specifically, the energy density of the graviton one-loop contribution to a classical energy in a wormhole background is considered as a self-consistent source for wormholes. In this semi-classical context, we consider the effects of a smeared particle-like source in noncommutative geometry and of the Rainbow's functions in sustaining wormhole geometries.

  14. Impact of elevated temperatures on specific leaf weight, stomatal density, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumrani, Kanchan; Bhatia, Virender Singh; Pandey, Govind Prakash

    2017-03-01

    High-temperature stress is a major environmental stress and there are limited studies elucidating its impact on soybean (Glycine max L. Merril.). The objectives of present study were to quantify the effect of high temperature on changes in leaf thickness, number of stomata on adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and seed yield in soybean. Twelve soybean genotypes were grown at day/night temperatures of 30/22, 34/24, 38/26 and 42/28 °C with an average temperature of 26, 29, 32 and 35 °C, respectively, under greenhouse conditions. One set was also grown under ambient temperature conditions where crop season average maximum, minimum and mean temperatures were 28.0, 22.4 and 25.2 °C, respectively. Significant negative effect of temperature was observed on specific leaf weight (SLW) and leaf thickness. Rate of photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and water use efficiency declined as the growing temperatures increased; whereas, intercellular CO2 and transpiration rate were increased. With the increase in temperature chlorophyll fluorescence parameters such as Fv/Fm, qP and PhiPSII declined while there was increase in qN. Number of stomata on both abaxial and adaxial surface of leaf increased significantly with increase in temperatures. The rate of photosynthesis, PhiPSII, qP and SPAD values were positively associated with leaf thickness and SLW. This indicated that reduction in photosynthesis and associated parameters appears to be due to structural changes observed at higher temperatures. The average seed yield was maximum (13.2 g/pl) in plants grown under ambient temperature condition and declined by 8, 14, 51 and 65% as the temperature was increased to 30/22, 34/24, 38/26 and 42/28 °C, respectively.

  15. Histograms showing variations in oil yield, water yield, and specific gravity of oil from Fischer assay analyses of oil-shale drill cores and cuttings from the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, John D.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado contains over 1.5 trillion barrels of oil in place, making the basin the largest known oil-shale deposit in the world. Previously published histograms display oil-yield variations with depth and widely correlate rich and lean oil-shale beds and zones throughout the basin. Histograms in this report display oil-yield data plotted alongside either water-yield or oil specific-gravity data. Fischer assay analyses of core and cutting samples collected from exploration drill holes penetrating the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin can aid in determining the origins of those deposits, as well as estimating the amount of organic matter, halite, nahcolite, and water-bearing minerals. This report focuses only on the oil yield plotted against water yield and oil specific gravity.

  16. Prostate-specific Antigen Mass Density--A Measure Predicting Prostate Cancer Volume and Accounting for Overweight and Obesity-related Prostate-specific Antigen Hemodilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Diaz, Mireya; Matoso, Andres; Kates, Max; Cohen, Jason; Swanson, Gregory P; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-04-01

    To test prostate-specific antigen mass density (PSAMD) as a predictor of total tumor volume (TTV) at radical prostatectomy (RP). We conducted a detailed pathologic analysis of 469 RP from men with NCCN low-risk prostate cancer who had Gleason score of 3 + 3 = 6 (grade group 1) at RP. We then compared the ability of PSA, PSA density (PSAD), PSA mass (PSAM-absolute amount of PSA in patient's circulation), and PSAM density (PSAM divided by prostate weight without seminal vesicles) to predict TTV at RP. PSAM was calculated by multiplying plasma volume (estimated body surface [weight, kg(0.425) × height, m(0.72) × 0.007184] × 1.67) by PSA. Performance of the above measures in different BMI categories was assessed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the means and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient to assess the correlations. The 469 men were normal weight (n = 129), overweight (n = 253), and obese (n = 87). Mean age of the patients' was 57.4 years and PSA of 4.53 ng/ml. Increase of prostate weight with body mass index (BMI) was reflected in PSAM (both P Prostate weight had stronger (negative) association with PSAMD (r = -0.394; <.001) than TTV. PSAMD is the biochemical measure with the best correlation with TTV at RP. Unlike other measures, it is not affected by BMI-related hemodilution. Thresholds should be established to use this more objective measure clinically in surveillance algorithms and in planning radical prostatectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies.

  18. Earth's density flattening and hypothesis of latitudinal normal density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the definition of latitudinal density and density flattening of the level ellipsoid is given, and integral formulas of latitudinal density for pole gravity and equator gravity are derived. According to the pole gravity condition and equator gravity condition for the level ellipsoid, latitudinal density distribution function of the level ellipsoid is obtained. It is proved mathematically that latitudinal density of the earth's equator is larger than that of the pole, the earth's density flat-tening calculated preliminarily is 1/322, and hypothesis of the earth's latitudinal normal density is further proposed, so that theoretical preparation for studying the forming cause of the earth gravity in problems such as continent drift, mantle convection, and submarine extension is made well.

  19. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  20. Stochastic gravity: beyond semiclassical gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdaguer, E [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and CER en Astrofisica, Fisica de Particules i Cosmologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    The back-reaction of a classical gravitational field interacting with quantum matter fields is described by the semiclassical Einstein equation, which has the expectation value of the quantum matter fields stress tensor as a source. The semiclassical theory may be obtained from the quantum field theory of gravity interacting with N matter fields in the large N limit. This theory breaks down when the fields quantum fluctuations are important. Stochastic gravity goes beyond the semiclassical limit and allows for a systematic and self-consistent description of the metric fluctuations induced by these quantum fluctuations. The correlation functions of the metric fluctuations obtained in stochastic gravity reproduce the correlation functions in the quantum theory to leading order in an 1/N expansion. Two main applications of stochastic gravity are discussed. The first, in cosmology, to obtain the spectrum of primordial metric perturbations induced by the inflaton fluctuations, even beyond the linear approximation. The second, in black hole physics, to study the fluctuations of the horizon of an evaporating black hole.

  1. Region-specific associations between sex, social status, and oxytocin receptor density in the brains of eusocial rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, S J; Coen, C W; Holmes, M M; Beery, A K

    2015-09-10

    Naturally occurring variations in neuropeptide receptor distributions in the brain contribute to numerous mammalian social behaviors. In naked mole-rats, which live in large social groups and exhibit remarkable reproductive skew, colony-related social behaviors vary with reproductive status. Here we examined whether variation in social status is associated with variations in the location and/or density of oxytocin binding in this species. Autoradiography was performed to assess forebrain oxytocin receptor (OTR) densities in breeding and non-breeding naked mole-rats of both sexes. Overall, males exhibited higher OTR binding in the medial amygdala in comparison to females. While there were no main effects of reproductive status in any region, a sex difference in OTR binding in the nucleus accumbens was mediated by status. Specifically, breeding males tended to have more OTR binding than breeding females in the nucleus accumbens, while no sex difference was observed in subordinates. These effects suggest that oxytocin may act in a sex- and region-specific way that corresponds to reproductive status and associated social behaviors.

  2. Jeans instability in classical and modified gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Arbuzova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational instability in classical Jeans theory, General Relativity, and modified gravity is considered. The background density increase leads to a faster growth of perturbations in comparison with the standard theory. The transition to the Newtonian gauge in the case of coordinate dependent background metric functions is studied. For modified gravity a new high frequency stable solution is found.

  3. Jeans instability in classical and modified gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzova, E.V., E-mail: arbuzova@uni-dubna.ru [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Department of Higher Mathematics, University “Dubna”, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Dolgov, A.D., E-mail: dolgov@fe.infn.it [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); ITEP, Bol. Cheremushkinsaya ul., 25, 113259 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico – Edificio C, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Reverberi, L., E-mail: reverberi@fe.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico – Edificio C, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Ferrara, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico – Edificio C, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy)

    2014-12-12

    Gravitational instability in classical Jeans theory, General Relativity, and modified gravity is considered. The background density increase leads to a faster growth of perturbations in comparison with the standard theory. The transition to the Newtonian gauge in the case of coordinate dependent background metric functions is studied. For modified gravity a new high frequency stable solution is found.

  4. Higher dimensional nonlinear massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Tuan Q

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by a recent ghost-free nonlinear massive gravity in four-dimensional spacetime, we study its higher dimensional scenarios. As a result, we are able to show the constant-like behavior of massive graviton terms for some well-known metrics such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini-(A)dS metrics in a specific five-dimensional nonlinear massive gravity under an assumption that its fiducial metrics are compatible with physical ones. In addition, some simple cosmological solutions of the five-dimensional massive gravity will be figured out consistently.

  5. Severe Challenges In Gravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Ha, Yuan K

    2011-01-01

    Gravity is specifically the attractive force between two masses separated at a distance. Is this force a derived or a fundamental interaction? We believe that all fundamental interactions are quantum in nature but a derived interaction may be classical. Severe challenges have appeared in many quantum theories of gravity. None of these theories has thus far attained its goal in quantizing gravity and some have met remarkable defeat. We are led to ponder whether gravitation is intrinsically classical and that there would exist a deeper and structurally different underlying theory which would give rise to classical gravitation, in the sense that statistical mechanics, quantum or classical, provides the underlying theory of classical thermodynamics.

  6. Finding Horndeski theories with Einstein gravity limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Ryan; Lombriser, Lucas; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    The Horndeski action is the most general scalar-tensor theory with at most second-order derivatives in the equations of motion, thus evading Ostrogradsky instabilities and making it of interest when modifying gravity at large scales. To pass local tests of gravity, these modifications predominantly rely on nonlinear screening mechanisms that recover Einstein's Theory of General Relativity in regions of high density. We derive a set of conditions on the four free functions of the Horndeski action that examine whether a specific model embedded in the action possesses an Einstein gravity limit or not. For this purpose, we develop a new and surprisingly simple scaling method that identifies dominant terms in the equations of motion by considering formal limits of the couplings that enter through the new terms in the modified action. This enables us to find regimes where nonlinear terms dominate and Einstein's field equations are recovered to leading order. Together with an efficient approximation of the scalar field profile, one can then further evaluate whether these limits can be attributed to a genuine screening effect. For illustration, we apply the analysis to both a cubic galileon and a chameleon model as well as to Brans-Dicke theory. Finally, we emphasise that the scaling method also provides a natural approach for performing post-Newtonian expansions in screened regimes.

  7. Effective Dark Matter Halo Catalog in f(R) Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian-Hua; Hawken, Adam J; Li, Baojiu; Guzzo, Luigi

    2015-08-14

    We introduce the idea of an effective dark matter halo catalog in f(R) gravity, which is built using the effective density field. Using a suite of high resolution N-body simulations, we find that the dynamical properties of halos, such as the distribution of density, velocity dispersion, specific angular momentum and spin, in the effective catalog of f(R) gravity closely mimic those in the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM). Thus, when using effective halos, an f(R) model can be viewed as a ΛCDM model. This effective catalog therefore provides a convenient way for studying the baryonic physics, the galaxy halo occupation distribution and even semianalytical galaxy formation in f(R) cosmologies.

  8. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Holtz

    Full Text Available Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2 and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur. Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays.

  9. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Yan; Ardisson, Morgane; Ranwez, Vincent; Besnard, Alban; Leroy, Philippe; Poux, Gérard; Roumet, Pierre; Viader, Véronique; Santoni, Sylvain; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2) and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur). Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays.

  10. Optimal density assignment to 2D diode array detector for different dose calculation algorithms in patient specific VMAT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Yeon; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Chun, MinSoo; Han, Ji Hye; Cho, Jin Dong; Kim, Jung In [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to assign an appropriate density to virtual phantom for 2D diode array detector with different dose calculation algorithms to guarantee the accuracy of patient-specific QA. Ten VMAT plans with 6 MV photon beam and ten VMAT plans with 15 MV photon beam were selected retrospectively. The computed tomography (CT) images of MapCHECK2 with MapPHAN were acquired to design the virtual phantom images. For all plans, dose distributions were calculated for the virtual phantoms with four different materials by AAA and AXB algorithms. The four materials were polystyrene, 455 HU, Jursinic phantom, and PVC. Passing rates for several gamma criteria were calculated by comparing the measured dose distribution with calculated dose distributions of four materials. For validation of AXB modeling in clinic, the mean percentages of agreement in the cases of dose difference criteria of 1.0% and 2.0% for 6 MV were 97.2%±2.3%, and 99.4%±1.1%, respectively while those for 15 MV were 98.5%±0.85% and 99.8%±0.2%, respectively. In the case of 2%/2 mm, all mean passing rates were more than 96.0% and 97.2% for 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively, regardless of the virtual phantoms of different materials and dose calculation algorithms. The passing rates in all criteria slightly increased for AXB as well as AAA when using 455 HU rather than polystyrene. The virtual phantom which had a 455 HU values showed high passing rates for all gamma criteria. To guarantee the accuracy of patent-specific VMAT QA, each institution should fine-tune the mass density or HU values of this device.

  11. GEODYNAMIC WAVES AND GRAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vikulin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  Gravity phenomena related to the Earth movements in the Solar System and through the Galaxy are reviewed. Such movements are manifested by geological processes on the Earth and correlate with geophysical fields of the Earth. It is concluded that geodynamic processes and the gravity phenomena (including those of cosmic nature are related.  The state of the geomedium composed of blocks is determined by stresses with force moment and by slow rotational waves that are considered as a new type of movements [Vikulin, 2008, 2010]. It is shown that the geomedium has typical rheid properties [Carey, 1954], specifically an ability to flow while being in the solid state [Leonov, 2008]. Within the framework of the rotational model with a symmetric stress tensor, which is developed by the authors [Vikulin, Ivanchin, 1998; Vikulin et al., 2012a, 2013], such movement of the geomedium may explain the energy-saturated state of the geomedium and a possibility of its movements in the form of vortex geological structures [Lee, 1928]. The article discusses the gravity wave detection method based on the concept of interactions between gravity waves and crustal blocks [Braginsky et al., 1985]. It is concluded that gravity waves can be recorded by the proposed technique that detects slow rotational waves. It is shown that geo-gravitational movements can be described by both the concept of potential with account of gravitational energy of bodies [Kondratyev, 2003] and the nonlinear physical acoustics [Gurbatov et al., 2008]. Based on the combined description of geophysical and gravitational wave movements, the authors suggest a hypothesis about the nature of spin, i.e. own moment as a demonstration of the space-time ‘vortex’ properties.  

  12. Experimental semiclassical gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, C C; Scully, S

    2015-01-01

    We show that optomechanical systems can provide definitive tests of the many-body Schrodinger-Newton equation of gravitational quantum mechanics. This equation is motivated by semiclassical gravity, a widely used theory of interacting gravitational and quantum fields. The many-body equation implies an approximate Schrodinger-Newton equation for the center-of-mass dynamics of macroscopic objects. It predicts a distinctive double-peaked signature in the output optical quadrature spectral density of certain optomechanical systems. Since the many-body Schrodinger-Newton equation lacks free parameters, these will allow its experimental confirmation or refutation.

  13. Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Sarah; Ruiz-Benito, Paloma; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Lloret, Francisco; Kitzberger, Thomas; Allen, Craig D; Fensham, Rod; Laughlin, Daniel C; Kattge, Jens; Bönisch, Gerhard; Kraft, Nathan J B; Jump, Alistair S

    2017-04-01

    Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncertainties, we performed a global meta-analysis of 58 studies of drought-induced forest mortality. Mortality rates were modelled as a function of drought, temperature, biomes, phylogenetic and functional groups and functional traits. We identified a consistent global-scale response, where mortality increased with drought severity [log mortality (trees trees(-1)  year(-1) ) increased 0.46 (95% CI = 0.2-0.7) with one SPEI unit drought intensity]. We found no significant differences in the magnitude of the response depending on forest biomes or between angiosperms and gymnosperms or evergreen and deciduous tree species. Functional traits explained some of the variation in drought responses between species (i.e. increased from 30 to 37% when wood density and specific leaf area were included). Tree species with denser wood and lower specific leaf area showed lower mortality responses. Our results illustrate the value of functional traits for understanding patterns of drought-induced tree mortality and suggest that mortality could become increasingly widespread in the future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  14. CYLD, a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins, accumulates at the postsynaptic density in an activity-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dosemeci, Ayse, E-mail: dosemeca@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Neurobiology, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Thein, Soe; Yang, Yijung; Reese, Thomas S. [Laboratory of Neurobiology, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa [EM Facility, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of CYLD in PSDs is established by biochemistry and immunoEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD accumulates on PSDs upon depolarization of neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accumulation of CYLD at PSDs may regulate trafficking/degradation of synaptic proteins. -- Abstract: Polyubiquitin chains on proteins flag them for distinct fates depending on the type of polyubiquitin linkage. While lysine48-linked polyubiquitination directs proteins to proteasomal degradation, lysine63-linked polyubiquitination promotes different protein trafficking and is involved in autophagy. Here we show that postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions from adult rat brain contain deubiquitinase activity that targets both lysine48 and lysine63-linked polyubiquitins. Comparison of PSD fractions with parent subcellular fractions by Western immunoblotting reveals that CYLD, a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins, is highly enriched in the PSD fraction. Electron microscopic examination of hippocampal neurons in culture under basal conditions shows immunogold label for CYLD at the PSD complex in approximately one in four synapses. Following depolarization by exposure to high K+, the proportion of CYLD-labeled PSDs as well as the labeling intensity of CYLD at the PSD increased by more than eighty percent, indicating that neuronal activity promotes accumulation of CYLD at the PSD. An increase in postsynaptic CYLD following activity would promote removal of lysine63-polyubiquitins from PSD proteins and thus could regulate their trafficking and prevent their autophagic degradation.

  15. Ghost quintessence in fractal gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Habib Abedi; Mustafa Salti

    2015-04-01

    In this study, using the time-like fractal theory of gravity, we mainly focus on the ghost dark energy model which was recently suggested to explain the present acceleration of the cosmic expansion. Next, we establish a connection between the quintessence scalar field and fractal ghost dark energy density. This correspondence allows us to reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of a fractal canonical scalar field (the fractal quintessence) according to the evolution of ghost dark energy density.

  16. High-precision gravity network to monitor temporal variations in gravity across Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.N.; Ponce, D.A.

    1988-12-31

    Repeatable high-precision gravity surveys provide a method of monitoring temporal variations in the gravity field. Fluctuations in the gravity field may indicate water table changes, crustal deformation, or precursors to volcanism and earthquakes. This report describes a high-precision gravity loop which has been established across Yucca Mountain, Nevada in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program. The purpose of this gravity loop is to monitor temporal variations in gravity across Yucca Mountain in an effort to interpret and predict the stability of the tectonic framework and changes in the subsurface density field. Studies of the tectonic framework which include volcanic hazard seismicity, and faulting studies are in progress. Repeat high-precision gravity surveys are less expensive and can be made more rapidly than a corresponding leveling survey. High-precision gravity surveys are capable of detecting elevation changes of 3 to 5 cm, and thus can be employed as an efficient tool for monitoring vertical crustal movements while supplementing or partially replacing leveling data. The Yucca Mountain gravity network has been tied to absolute gravity measurements established in southern Nevada. These ties provide an absolute datum for comparing repeat occupations of the gravity network, and provide a method of monitoring broad-scale changes in gravity. Absolute gravity measurements were also made at the bottom and top of the Charleston Peak calibration loop in southern Nevada. These absolute gravity measurements provide local control of calibrating gravity meters over the gravity ranges observed at Yucca Mountain. 13 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Artificial Gravity: Effects on Bone Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, M.; Zwart, S /R.; Baecker, N.; Smith, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of microgravity on the human body is a significant concern for space travelers. Since mechanical loading is a main reason for bone loss, artificial gravity might be an effective countermeasure to the effects of microgravity. In a 21-day 6 head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) pilot study carried out by NASA, USA, the utility of artificial gravity (AG) as a countermeasure to immobilization-induced bone loss was tested. Blood and urine were collected before, during, and after bed rest for bone marker determinations. Bone mineral density was determined by DXA and pQCT before and after bed rest. Urinary excretion of bone resorption markers (n-telopeptide and helical peptide) were increased from pre-bed rest, but there was no difference between the control and the AG group. The same was true for serum c-telopeptide measurements. Bone formation markers were affected by bed rest and artificial gravity. While bone-specific alkaline phosphatase tended to be lower in the AG group during bed rest (p = 0.08), PINP, another bone formation marker, was significantly lower in AG subjects than CN before and during bed rest. PINP was lower during bed rest in both groups. For comparison, artificial gravity combined with ergometric exercise was tested in a 14-day HDBR study carried out in Japan (Iwase et al. J Grav Physiol 2004). In that study, an exercise regime combined with AG was able to significantly mitigate the bed rest-induced increase in the bone resorption marker deoxypyridinoline. While further study is required to more clearly differentiate bone and muscle effects, these initial data demonstrate the potential effectiveness of short-radius, intermittent AG as a countermeasure to the bone deconditioning that occurs during bed rest and spaceflight. Future studies will need to optimize not only the AG prescription (intensity and duration), but will likely need to include the use of exercise or other combined treatments.

  18. Influence of landscape heterogeneity on spatial patterns of wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Anderson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies using the RAINFOR network of forest plots have generated significant insights into the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest carbon cycling in Amazonia. In this work, we map and explore the landscape context of several major RAINFOR plot clusters using Landsat ETM+ satellite data. In particular, we explore how representative the plots are of their landscape context, and test whether bias in plot location within landscapes may be influencing the regional mean values obtained for important forest biophysical parameters. Specifically, we evaluate whether the regional variations in wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass derived from the RAINFOR network could be driven by systematic and unintentional biases in plot location. Remote sensing data covering 45 field plots were aggregated to generate landscape maps to identify the specific physiognomy of the plots. In the Landsat ETM+ data, it was possible to spectrally differentiate three types of terra firme forest, three types of forests over Paleovarzea geomorphologycal formation, two types of bamboo-dominated forest, palm forest, Heliconia monodominant vegetation, swamp forest, disturbed forests and land use areas. Overall, the plots were generally representative of the forest physiognomies in the landscape in which they are located. Furthermore, the analysis supports the observed regional trends in those important forest parameters. This study demonstrates the utility of landscape scale analysis of forest physiognomies for validating and supporting the finds of plot based studies. Moreover, the more precise geolocation of many key RAINFOR plot clusters achieved during this research provides important contextual information for studies employing the RAINFOR database.

  19. Influence of landscape heterogeneity on spatial patterns of wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. O.; Malhi, Y.; Ladle, R. J.; Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Shimabukuro, Y.; Phillips, O. L.; Baker, T.; Costa, A. C. L.; Espejo, J. S.; Higuchi, N.; Laurance, W. F.; López-González, G.; Monteagudo, A.; Núñez-Vargas, P.; Peacock, J.; Quesada, C. A.; Almeida, S.

    2009-09-01

    Long-term studies using the RAINFOR network of forest plots have generated significant insights into the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest carbon cycling in Amazonia. In this work, we map and explore the landscape context of several major RAINFOR plot clusters using Landsat ETM+ satellite data. In particular, we explore how representative the plots are of their landscape context, and test whether bias in plot location within landscapes may be influencing the regional mean values obtained for important forest biophysical parameters. Specifically, we evaluate whether the regional variations in wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass derived from the RAINFOR network could be driven by systematic and unintentional biases in plot location. Remote sensing data covering 45 field plots were aggregated to generate landscape maps to identify the specific physiognomy of the plots. In the Landsat ETM+ data, it was possible to spectrally differentiate three types of terra firme forest, three types of forests over Paleovarzea geomorphologycal formation, two types of bamboo-dominated forest, palm forest, Heliconia monodominant vegetation, swamp forest, disturbed forests and land use areas. Overall, the plots were generally representative of the forest physiognomies in the landscape in which they are located. Furthermore, the analysis supports the observed regional trends in those important forest parameters. This study demonstrates the utility of landscape scale analysis of forest physiognomies for validating and supporting the finds of plot based studies. Moreover, the more precise geolocation of many key RAINFOR plot clusters achieved during this research provides important contextual information for studies employing the RAINFOR database.

  20. Influence of landscape heterogeneity on spatial patterns of wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Anderson

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies using the RAINFOR network of forest plots have generated significant insights into the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest carbon cycling in Amazonia. In this work, we map and explore the landscape context of several major RAINFOR plot clusters using Landsat ETM+ satellite data. In particular, we explore how representative the plots are of their landscape context, and test whether bias in plot location within landscapes may be influencing the regional mean values obtained for important forest biophysical parameters. Specifically, we evaluate whether the regional variations in wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass derived from the RAINFOR network could be driven by systematic and unintentional biases in plot location. Remote sensing data covering 45 field plots were aggregated to generate landscape maps to identify the specific physiognomy of the plots. In the Landsat ETM+ data, it was possible to spectrally differentiate three types of terra firme forest, three types of alluvial terrain forest, two types of bamboo-dominated forest, palm forest, Heliconia monodominant vegetation, swamp forest, disturbed forests and land use areas. Overall, the plots were generally representative of the forest physiognomies in the landscape in which they are located. Furthermore, the analysis supports the observed regional trends in those important forest parameters. This study demonstrates the utility of landscape scale analysis of forest physiognomies for validating and supporting the finds of plot based studies. Moreover, the more precise geolocation of many key RAINFOR plot clusters achieved during this research provides important contextual information for studies employing the RAINFOR database.

  1. Southern Africa Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data base (14,559 records) was received in January 1986. Principal gravity parameters include elevation and observed gravity. The observed gravity values are...

  2. NGS Absolute Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Absolute Gravity data (78 stations) was received in July 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Gravity Value, Uncertainty, and Vertical Gradient. The...

  3. A High-Density Genetic Map of Tetraploid Salix matsudana Using Specific Length Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available As a salt-tolerant arbor tree species, Salix matsudana plays an important role in afforestation and greening in the coastal areas of China. To select superior Salix varieties that adapt to wide saline areas, it is of paramount importance to understand and identify the mechanisms of salt-tolerance at the level of the whole genome. Here, we describe a high-density genetic linkage map of S. matsudana that represents a good coverage of the Salix genome. An intraspecific F1 hybrid population was established by crossing the salt-sensitive "Yanjiang" variety as the female parent with the salt-tolerant "9901" variety as the male parent. This population, along with its parents, was genotyped by specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq, leading to 277,333 high-quality SLAF markers. By marker analysis, we found that both the parents and offspring were tetraploid. The mean sequencing depth was 53.20-fold for "Yanjiang", 47.41-fold for "9901", and 11.02-fold for the offspring. Of the SLAF markers detected, 42,321 are polymorphic with sufficient quality for map construction. The final genetic map was constructed using 6,737 SLAF markers, covering 38 linkage groups (LGs. The genetic map spanned 5,497.45 cM in length, with an average distance of 0.82 cM. As a first high-density genetic map of S. matsudana constructed from salt tolerance-varying varieties, this study will provide a foundation for mapping quantitative trait loci that modulate salt tolerance and resistance in Salix and provide important references for molecular breeding of this important forest tree.

  4. A High-Density Genetic Map of Tetraploid Salix matsudana Using Specific Length Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Huwei; Li, Min; Li, Yujuan; Wang, Ying; Ma, Xiangjian; Zhang, Yuan; Tan, Feng; Wu, Rongling

    2016-01-01

    As a salt-tolerant arbor tree species, Salix matsudana plays an important role in afforestation and greening in the coastal areas of China. To select superior Salix varieties that adapt to wide saline areas, it is of paramount importance to understand and identify the mechanisms of salt-tolerance at the level of the whole genome. Here, we describe a high-density genetic linkage map of S. matsudana that represents a good coverage of the Salix genome. An intraspecific F1 hybrid population was established by crossing the salt-sensitive "Yanjiang" variety as the female parent with the salt-tolerant "9901" variety as the male parent. This population, along with its parents, was genotyped by specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), leading to 277,333 high-quality SLAF markers. By marker analysis, we found that both the parents and offspring were tetraploid. The mean sequencing depth was 53.20-fold for "Yanjiang", 47.41-fold for "9901", and 11.02-fold for the offspring. Of the SLAF markers detected, 42,321 are polymorphic with sufficient quality for map construction. The final genetic map was constructed using 6,737 SLAF markers, covering 38 linkage groups (LGs). The genetic map spanned 5,497.45 cM in length, with an average distance of 0.82 cM. As a first high-density genetic map of S. matsudana constructed from salt tolerance-varying varieties, this study will provide a foundation for mapping quantitative trait loci that modulate salt tolerance and resistance in Salix and provide important references for molecular breeding of this important forest tree.

  5. Lovelock-Brans-Dicke gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, David Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    According to Lovelock's theorem, the Hilbert-Einstein and the Lovelock actions are indistinguishable from their field equations. However, they have different scalar-tensor counterparts, which correspond to the Brans-Dicke and the \\emph{Lovelock-Brans-Dicke} (LBD) gravities, respectively. In this paper the LBD model of alternative gravity with the Lagrangian density $\\mathscr{L}_{\\text{LBD}}=\\frac{1}{16\\pi}\\left[\\phi\\left(R+\\frac{a}{\\sqrt{-g}}{}^*RR + b\\mathcal{G}\\right)-\\frac{\\omega_{\\text L}}{\\phi}\

  6. Second Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, Patrick Lee

    2010-01-01

    A theory of a new gravitational interaction is described. This theory follows naturally from a new Lagrangian formulation of Maxwell's theory for photons and electrons (and positrons) whose associated Euler Lagrange equations imply the conventional Maxwell equations, but which possesses new \\textbf{\\emph{bosonic}} spinor degrees of freedom that may be associated with a new type of fundamental gravitational interaction. The precise character of this gravitational interaction with a photon vector potential is explicitly defined in terms of a local U(1)-invariant Lagrangian in Eq.[\\ref{Lagrangian3}]. However in Section \\ref{ssec:Simple-Cosmolo-Model}, in order to parallel the well known Friedmann model in cosmology, a phenomenological description of the new gravitational interaction coupled to Newton-Einstein gravity that is sourced by an ideal fluid is discussed. % % To lay the foundation for a description of the new gravitational interaction our new formulation of Maxwell's theory must first be described. It i...

  7. Gravity's Rainbow

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Magueijo, Joao; Smolin, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Non-linear special relativity (or doubly special relativity) is a simple framework for encoding properties of flat quantum space-time. In this paper we show how this formalism may be generalized to incorporate curvature (leading to what might be called ``doubly general relativity''). We first propose a dual to non-linear realizations of relativity in momentum space, and show that for such a dual the space-time invariant is an energy-dependent metric. This leads to an energy-dependent connection and curvature, and a simple modification to Einstein's equations. We then examine solutions to these equations. We find the counterpart to the cosmological metric, and show how cosmologies based upon our theory of gravity may solve the ``horizon problem''. We discuss the Schwarzchild solution, examining the conditions for which the horizon is energy dependent. We finally find the weak field limit.

  8. Network Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lombard, John

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the construction of a new framework for probing discrete emergent geometry and boundary-boundary observables based on a fundamentally a-dimensional underlying network structure. Using a gravitationally motivated action with Forman weighted combinatorial curvatures and simplicial volumes relying on a decomposition of an abstract simplicial complex into realized embeddings of proper skeletons, we demonstrate properties such as a minimal volume-scale cutoff, the necessity of a positive-definite cosmological constant as a regulator for non-degenerate geometries, and naturally emergent simplicial structures from Metropolis network evolution simulations with no restrictions on attachment rules or regular building blocks. We see emergent properties which echo results from both the spinfoam formalism and causal dynamical triangulations in quantum gravity, and provide analytical and numerical results to support the analogy. We conclude with a summary of open questions and intent for future work in develop...

  9. Newtonian gravity in loop quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Smolin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We apply a recent argument of Verlinde to loop quantum gravity, to conclude that Newton's law of gravity emerges in an appropriate limit and setting. This is possible because the relationship between area and entropy is realized in loop quantum gravity when boundaries are imposed on a quantum spacetime.

  10. Newtonian gravity in loop quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Smolin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We apply a recent argument of Verlinde to loop quantum gravity, to conclude that Newton's law of gravity emerges in an appropriate limit and setting. This is possible because the relationship between area and entropy is realized in loop quantum gravity when boundaries are imposed on a quantum spacetime.

  11. Skeletal site-specific response to ovariectomy in a rat model: change in bone density and microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi Ling; Li, Chun Lei; Lu, Weijia William; Cai, Wei Xin; Zheng, Li Wu

    2015-04-01

    Ovariectomized (OVX) rat model has been widely used in osteoporosis-related studies. However, the discrepancies in age and skeletal sites being investigated make it difficult to compare the results from different studies. The purpose of this study was to provide information of systemic skeletal site-specific changes in a stable OVX rat model. Thirty-three 6-month Spraque-Dawley female rats were used. Fifteen rats underwent ovariectomy, and fifteen received sham surgery. Three animals without any surgery were sacrificed at week 0 to serve as baseline. Three animals in the OVX and sham group, respectively, were euthanized at week 2, 4, 12, 24 and 36 post-surgery. Ten bone sites, including parietal bone, interparietal bone, maxilla, mandible, humerus, ulna, femur, tibia, lumber vertebra, and ilium, were subjected to micro-CT. Overall, long bones, lumber vertebra, and ilium showed similar trend of bone loss post-OVX, with tibia and femur suffered the most bone loss and spine the least (decreased by 75.0%, 70.4% and 36.6% in bone mineral density BMD at week 36 from base line, respectively). Upon OVX, jaw bones and cranial bones only showed a minor reduction in BMD (decreased by 1~3% from baseline) at week 36. Significant deterioration of trabecular structure was detected in long bones, lumber vertebra, and ilium post-OVX, while jaw bones remained relatively stable. This study for the first time assessed the systemic site-specific bone loss and microarchitecture changes in OVX rat model. It provided valuable information for selecting bone site and observation time in osteoporosis-related study. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Full density-matrix numerical renormalization group calculation of impurity susceptibility and specific heat of the Anderson impurity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, L.; Weichselbaum, A.; Costi, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    Recent developments in the numerical renormalization group (NRG) allow the construction of the full density matrix (FDM) of quantum impurity models [see A. Weichselbaum and J. von Delft, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.076402 99, 076402 (2007)] by using the completeness of the eliminated states introduced by F. B. Anders and A. Schiller [F. B. Anders and A. Schiller, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.196801 95, 196801 (2005)]. While these developments prove particularly useful in the calculation of transient response and finite-temperature Green's functions of quantum impurity models, they may also be used to calculate thermodynamic properties. In this paper, we assess the FDM approach to thermodynamic properties by applying it to the Anderson impurity model. We compare the results for the susceptibility and specific heat to both the conventional approach within NRG and to exact Bethe ansatz results. We also point out a subtlety in the calculation of the susceptibility (in a uniform field) within the FDM approach. Finally, we show numerically that for the Anderson model, the susceptibilities in response to a local and a uniform magnetic field coincide in the wide-band limit, in accordance with the Clogston-Anderson compensation theorem.

  13. Electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction of native thin filaments reveal species-specific differences in regulatory strand densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarato, Anthony, E-mail: acammara@burnham.org [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Craig, Roger [Department of Cell Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States); Lehman, William [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom striated muscle contraction is regulated by the thin filament troponin-tropomyosin complex. Homologous regulatory components are shared among vertebrate and arthropod muscles; however, unique protein extensions and/or components characterize the latter. The Troponin T (TnT) isoforms of Drosophila indirect flight and tarantula femur muscle for example contain distinct C-terminal extensions and are {approx}20% larger overall than their vertebrate counterpart. Using electron microscopy and three-dimensional helical reconstruction of native Drosophila, tarantula and frog muscle thin filaments we have identified species-specific differences in tropomyosin regulatory strand densities. The strands on the arthropod thin filaments were significantly larger in diameter than those from vertebrates, although not significantly different from each other. These findings reflect differences in the regulatory troponin-tropomyosin complex, which are likely due to the larger TnT molecules aligning and extending along much of the tropomyosin strands' length. Such an arrangement potentially alters the physical properties of the regulatory strands and may help establish contractile characteristics unique to certain arthropod muscles.

  14. Depth-specific optogenetic control in vivo with a scalable, high-density μLED neural probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Robert; Tsunematsu, Tomomi; McAlinden, Niall; Dawson, Martin D.; Sakata, Shuzo; Mathieson, Keith

    2016-06-01

    Controlling neural circuits is a powerful approach to uncover a causal link between neural activity and behaviour. Optogenetics has been widely adopted by the neuroscience community as it offers cell-type-specific perturbation with millisecond precision. However, these studies require light delivery in complex patterns with cellular-scale resolution, while covering a large volume of tissue at depth in vivo. Here we describe a novel high-density silicon-based microscale light-emitting diode (μLED) array, consisting of up to ninety-six 25 μm-diameter μLEDs emitting at a wavelength of 450 nm with a peak irradiance of 400 mW/mm2. A width of 100 μm, tapering to a 1 μm point, and a 40 μm thickness help minimise tissue damage during insertion. Thermal properties permit a set of optogenetic operating regimes, with ~0.5 °C average temperature increase. We demonstrate depth-dependent activation of mouse neocortical neurons in vivo, offering an inexpensive novel tool for the precise manipulation of neural activity.

  15. Coframe geometry and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Itin, Yakov

    2007-01-01

    The possible extensions of GR for description of fermions on a curved space, for supergravity and for loop quantum gravity require a richer set of 16 independent variables. These variables can be assembled in a coframe field, i.e., a local set of four linearly independent 1-forms. In the ordinary formulation, the coframe gravity does not have any connection to a specific geometry even being constructed from the geometrical meaningful objects. A geometrization of the coframe gravity is an aim of this paper. We construct a complete class of the coframe connections which are linear in the first order derivatives of the coframe field on an $n$ dimensional manifolds with and without a metric. The subclasses of the torsion-free, metric-compatible and flat connections are derived. We also study the behavior of the geometrical structures under local transformations of the coframe. The remarkable fact is an existence of a subclass of connections which are invariant when the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the Ma...

  16. Lineal gravity from planar gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Achúcarro, A

    1993-01-01

    We show how to obtain the two-dimensional black hole action by dimensional reduction of the three-dimensional Einstein action with a non-zero cosmological constant. Starting from the Chern-Simons formulation of 2+1 gravity, we obtain the 1+1 dimensional gauge formulation given by Verlinde. Remarkably, the proposed reduction shares the relevant features of the formulation of Cangemi and Jackiw, without the need for a central charge in the algebra. We show how the Lagrange multipliersin these formulations appear naturally as the remnants of the three dimensional connection associated to symmetries that have been lostin the dimensional reduction. The proposed dimensional reduction involves a shift in the three dimensional connection whose effect is to make the length of the extra dimension infinite.

  17. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    In this study, the GOCE (Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gradiometry data were used to study geologic structures and mass variations within the lithosphere in areas of known subduction zones. The advantage of gravity gradiometry over other gravity methods is that gradie......In this study, the GOCE (Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gradiometry data were used to study geologic structures and mass variations within the lithosphere in areas of known subduction zones. The advantage of gravity gradiometry over other gravity methods...... is that gradients are extremely sensitive to localized density contrasts within regional geological settings, which makes it ideally suited for detecting subduction zones. Second order gravity gradients of disturbing potential were extracted from global geopotential model, the fifth release GOCE model ‘EGM_TIM_RL05......’. In order to remove the signal which mainly corresponds to the gravity signal of the lower mantle, long wavelength part of the gravity signal was removed up to degree and order 60. Because the areas with notable topography differences coincide with subduction zones, topography correction was also performed...

  18. Comparison of various isostatic marine gravity disturbances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Robert Tenzer; Mohammad Bagherbandi; Lars E Sjöberg

    2015-08-01

    We present and compare four types of the isostatic gravity disturbances compiled at sea level over the world oceans and marginal seas. These isostatic gravity disturbances are computed by applying the Airy–Heiskanen (AH), Pratt–Hayford (PH) and Vening Meinesz–Moritz (VMM) isostatic models. In addition, we compute the complete crust-stripped (CCS) isostatic gravity disturbances which are defined based on a principle of minimizing their spatial correlation with the Moho geometry. We demonstrate that each applied compensation scheme yields a distinctive spatial pattern in the resulting isostatic marine gravity field. The AH isostatic gravity disturbances provide the smoothest gravity field (by means of their standard deviation). The AH and VMM isostatic gravity disturbances have very similar spatial patterns due to the fact that the same isostatic principle is applied in both these definitions expect for assuming a local (in the former) instead of a global (in the latter) compensation mechanism. The PH isostatic gravity disturbances are highly spatially correlated with the ocean-floor relief. The CCS isostatic gravity disturbances reveal a signature of the ocean-floor spreading characterized by an increasing density of the oceanic lithosphere with age.

  19. Development of an Underwater Gravity Measurement System Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, M.; Ishihara, T.; Yamada, T.; Araya, A.; Kanazawa, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Tsukioka, S.; Omika, S.; Uehira, K.; Iizasa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gravity survey is one of powerful methods to obtain density structure in crust, especially for exploration of underground deposits. Recent technology of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) enables us measure gravity in underwater environment. Measurement of both gravity and gravity gradient is useful to estimate structure. From a model calculation, resolution of 0.1 mGal for gravity and 10 Etoves (E) for gradient measurement is needed for detection of seafloor deposits. From these objectives and specification, we have developed an underwater gravity measurement system for exploration below a seafloor using an AUV. For the gravimeter system, a gravimeter is mounted on a levelling mechanism to keep vertical. Depth rating of the system is 4,200 m. We confirmed that our gravity measurement system has an accuracy of less than 0.04 mGal on a land experiment. The gradiometer has two identical gravimeter aligned vertically 44 cm apart. Difference between two gravimeters is calculated for gravity gradient and a levelling system is also used to keep vertical. We estimate accuracy of 10 E from background noise spectra. We chose AUV Urashima belonging to JAMSTEC, because stable navigation is possible. All the power is supplied from the Urashima and acoustic communication system enables real-time monitoring of the system. The first observation was carried out in September 2012 in Sagami-Bay, Japan. The Urashima made round trip along a single profile. We succeeded in obtaining gravity data and other data for compensation. Information to measure gravity gradient is also obtained. After the data processing, our gravity system is estimated to have accuracy of 0.1 mGal. In August 2014, we carried out the second gravity survey using our system in Izena caldera, the middle Okinawa Trough, where seafloor deposits had been found. The Urashima was navigated on 15 profiles in the survey area at constant speed and depth. We obtained the data from both the gravimeter and gradiometer with

  20. A High-Density Genetic Map for Cucumber (Cucumis Sativus L. Based on Specific Length Amplified Fragment (SLAF Sequencing and QTL Analysis of Fruit Traits in Cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying eZhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available High-density genetic linkage map plays an important role in genome assembly and QTL fine mapping. Since the coming of next-generation sequencing (NGS, makes the structure of high-density linkage maps much more convenient and practical, which simplifies SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping. In this research, a high-density linkage map of cucumber was structured using specific length amplified fragment sequencing, using 153 F2 populations of S1000×S1002. The high-density genetic map composed 3,057 SLAFs, including 4,475 SNP markers on 7 chromosomes, and spanned 1061.19cM. The average genetic distance is 0.35cM. Based on this high-density genome map, QTL analysis was performed on two cucumber fruit traits, fruit length and fruit diameter. There are 15 QTLs for the two fruit traits were detected.

  1. Population-specific haplotype association of the postsynaptic density gene DLG4 with schizophrenia, in family-based association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeesh Balan

    Full Text Available The post-synaptic density (PSD of glutamatergic synapses harbors a multitude of proteins critical for maintaining synaptic dynamics. Alteration of protein expression levels in this matrix is a marked phenomenon of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, where cognitive functions are impaired. To investigate the genetic relationship of genes expressed in the PSD with schizophrenia, a family-based association analysis of genetic variants in PSD genes such as DLG4, DLG1, PICK1 and MDM2, was performed, using Japanese samples (124 pedigrees, n = 376 subjects. Results showed a significant association of the rs17203281 variant from the DLG4 gene, with preferential transmission of the C allele (p = 0.02, although significance disappeared after correction for multiple testing. Replication analysis of this variant, found no association in a Chinese schizophrenia cohort (293 pedigrees, n = 1163 subjects or in a Japanese case-control sample (n = 4182 subjects. The DLG4 expression levels between postmortem brain samples from schizophrenia patients showed no significant changes from controls. Interestingly, a five marker haplotype in DLG4, involving rs2242449, rs17203281, rs390200, rs222853 and rs222837, was enriched in a population specific manner, where the sequences A-C-C-C-A and G-C-C-C-A accumulated in Japanese (p = 0.0009 and Chinese (p = 0.0007 schizophrenia pedigree samples, respectively. However, this could not be replicated in case-control samples. None of the variants in other examined candidate genes showed any significant association in these samples. The current study highlights a putative role for DLG4 in schizophrenia pathogenesis, evidenced by haplotype association, and warrants further dense screening for variants within these haplotypes.

  2. Population-Specific Haplotype Association of the Postsynaptic Density Gene DLG4 with Schizophrenia, in Family-Based Association Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Yamada, Kazuo; Hattori, Eiji; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Maekawa, Motoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    The post-synaptic density (PSD) of glutamatergic synapses harbors a multitude of proteins critical for maintaining synaptic dynamics. Alteration of protein expression levels in this matrix is a marked phenomenon of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, where cognitive functions are impaired. To investigate the genetic relationship of genes expressed in the PSD with schizophrenia, a family-based association analysis of genetic variants in PSD genes such as DLG4, DLG1, PICK1 and MDM2, was performed, using Japanese samples (124 pedigrees, n = 376 subjects). Results showed a significant association of the rs17203281 variant from the DLG4 gene, with preferential transmission of the C allele (p = 0.02), although significance disappeared after correction for multiple testing. Replication analysis of this variant, found no association in a Chinese schizophrenia cohort (293 pedigrees, n = 1163 subjects) or in a Japanese case-control sample (n = 4182 subjects). The DLG4 expression levels between postmortem brain samples from schizophrenia patients showed no significant changes from controls. Interestingly, a five marker haplotype in DLG4, involving rs2242449, rs17203281, rs390200, rs222853 and rs222837, was enriched in a population specific manner, where the sequences A-C-C-C-A and G-C-C-C-A accumulated in Japanese (p = 0.0009) and Chinese (p = 0.0007) schizophrenia pedigree samples, respectively. However, this could not be replicated in case-control samples. None of the variants in other examined candidate genes showed any significant association in these samples. The current study highlights a putative role for DLG4 in schizophrenia pathogenesis, evidenced by haplotype association, and warrants further dense screening for variants within these haplotypes. PMID:23936182

  3. A combined polarizing microscope, XRD, SEM, and specific gravity study of the petrified woods of volcanic origin from the Çamlıdere-Çeltikçi-Güdül fossil forest, in Ankara, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoğlu, Murat; Türk, Necdet

    2009-03-01

    The fossil forest in the Çamlıdere-Çeltikçi-Güdül region of the province of Ankara in Turkey has a large number of petrified coniferous and oak tree remains. Petrification occurred in volcanic ashes and tuffs with permineralization, and Fe, Mg, Ca and Ni ions played important roles in the substitution of Si for C. However, the petrified wood samples are heterogeneous in colouration, weight, toughness, and durability, despite being obtained from the same source. Those features are very important for end-users because petrified woods, if cut and polished, are used widely as both decorative indoor tiles and gemstone objects, but heterogeneous materials suffer large wastage while they are being worked and used. Chemical analyses, specific gravity measurements, polarizing microscope studies, X-ray diffraction patterns, and scanning electron image evaluations were performed to classify and identify the homogenous material of the petrified woods relating to its physical and mineralogical characteristics. The different characteristics of the petrified wood samples are due to their varying inner structures, which depend on the replacement silica-building phases and their ratios, and silica particle sizes. Thin sections and XRD patterns revealed that petrified woods in the region were silicified by replacement with both chalcedonic quartz components, including chalcedony (length-fast quartz), moganite and orthorhombic-silica (length-slow quartz), and opalline quartz components including opal-CT and opal-C (length-slow quartz). The scanning electron microscope images were shown that the internal structures of the petrified woods consist of mostly submicron-sized (100-800 nm), and partially nano-sized (60-120 nm) silica-building particles. So, the petrified wood samples can be firstly classified into five main-groups based on their colourations and specific gravity values, then, into three sub-groups based on the principal chalcedonic and opalline quartz silica

  4. E-gravity theory

    OpenAIRE

    Linker, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A couple of quantum gravity theories were proposed to make theoretical predictions about the behavior of gravity. The most recent approach to quantum gravity, called E-theory, is proposed mathematical, but there is not formulated much about what dynamics of gravity this theory proposes. This research paper treats the main results of the application of E-theory to General relativity involving conservation laws and scattering of particles in presence of gravity. Also the low-energy limit of thi...

  5. A Comparison Between Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes in Observations and Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Alexadner, M. Joan; Love, Peter T.; Bacmeister, Julio; Ern, Manfred; Hertzog, Albert; Manzini, Elisa; Preusse, Peter; Sato, Kaoru; Scaife, Adam A.; hide

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, a formal comparison is made between gravity wave momentum fluxes in models and those derived from observations. Although gravity waves occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, the focus of this paper is on scales that are being parameterized in present climate models, sub-1000-km scales. Only observational methods that permit derivation of gravity wave momentum fluxes over large geographical areas are discussed, and these are from satellite temperature measurements, constant-density long-duration balloons, and high-vertical-resolution radiosonde data. The models discussed include two high-resolution models in which gravity waves are explicitly modeled, Kanto and the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5), and three climate models containing gravity wave parameterizations,MAECHAM5, Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model 3 (HadGEM3), and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) model. Measurements generally show similar flux magnitudes as in models, except that the fluxes derived from satellite measurements fall off more rapidly with height. This is likely due to limitations on the observable range of wavelengths, although other factors may contribute. When one accounts for this more rapid fall off, the geographical distribution of the fluxes from observations and models compare reasonably well, except for certain features that depend on the specification of the nonorographic gravity wave source functions in the climate models. For instance, both the observed fluxes and those in the high-resolution models are very small at summer high latitudes, but this is not the case for some of the climate models. This comparison between gravity wave fluxes from climate models, high-resolution models, and fluxes derived from observations indicates that such efforts offer a promising path toward improving specifications of gravity wave sources in climate models.

  6. Gravity current jump conditions, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungarish, Marius; Hogg, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Consider the flow of a high-Reynolds-number gravity current of density ρc in an ambient fluid of density ρa in a horizontal channel z ∈ [ 0 , H ] , with gravity in - z direction. The motion is often modeled by a two-layer formulation which displays jumps (shocks) in the height of the interface, in particular at the leading front of the dense layer. Various theoretical models have been advanced to predict the dimensionless speed of the jump, Fr = U /√{g' h } ; g' , h are reduced gravity and jump height. We revisit this problem and using the Navier-Stokes equations, integrated over a control volume embedding the jump, derive balances of mass and momentum fluxes. We focus on understanding the closures needed to complete this model and we show the vital need to understand the pressure head losses over the jump, which we show can be related to the vorticity fluxes at the boundaries of the control volume. Our formulation leads to two governing equations for three dimensionless quantities. Closure requires one further assumption, depending on which we demonstrate that previous models for gravity current fronts and internal bores can be recovered. This analysis yield new insights into existing results, and also provides constraints for potential new formulae.

  7. Geological Mapping of Sabah, Malaysia, Using Airborne Gravity Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauzi Nordin, Ahmad; Jamil, Hassan; Noor Isa, Mohd;

    2016-01-01

    using airborne gravity surveys. Airborne gravity data over land areas of Sabah has been combined with the marine airborne gravity data to provide a seamless land-to-sea gravity field coverage in order to produce the geological mapping. Free-air and Bouguer anomaly maps (density 2.67 g/cm3) have been......Airborne gravimetry is an effective tool for mapping local gravity fields using a combination of airborne sensors, aircraft and positioning systems. It is suitable for gravity surveys over difficult terrains and areas mixed with land and ocean. This paper describes the geological mapping of Sabah...... gravity data were 5-6 km. The airborne gravity survey database for landand marine areas has been compiled using ArcGIS geodatabase format in order to produce the update geological map of Sabah....

  8. A comparison of conventional maximum intensity projection with a new depth-specific topographic mapping technique in the CT analysis of proximal tibial subchondral bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, James D. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); University of British Columbia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kontulainen, Saija A. [University of Saskatchewan, College of Kinesiology, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Masri, Bassam A.; Wilson, David R. [University of British Columbia, Department of Orthopaedics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-09-15

    The objective was to identify subchondral bone density differences between normal and osteoarthritic (OA) proximal tibiae using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM) and computed tomography topographic mapping of subchondral density (CT-TOMASD). Sixteen intact cadaver knees from ten donors (8 male:2 female; mean age:77.8, SD:7.4 years) were categorized as normal (n = 10) or OA (n = 6) based upon CT reconstructions. CT-OAM assessed maximum subchondral bone mineral density (BMD). CT-TOMASD assessed average subchondral BMD across three layers (0-2.5, 2.5-5 and 5-10 mm) measured in relation to depth from the subchondral surface. Regional analyses of CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD included: medial BMD, lateral BMD, and average BMD of a 10-mm diameter area that searched each medial and lateral plateau for the highest ''focal'' density present within each knee. Compared with normal knees, both CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD demonstrated an average of 17% greater whole medial compartment density in OA knees (p < 0.016). CT-OAM did not distinguish focal density differences between OA and normal knees (p > 0.05). CT-TOMASD focal region analyses revealed an average of 24% greater density in the 0- to 2.5-mm layer (p = 0.003) and 36% greater density in the 2.5- to 5-mm layer (p = 0.034) in OA knees. Both CT-OAM and TOMASD identified higher medial compartment density in OA tibiae compared with normal tibiae. In addition, CT-TOMASD indicated greater focal density differences between normal and OA knees with increased depth from the subchondral surface. Depth-specific density analyses may help identify and quantify small changes in subchondral BMD associated with OA disease onset and progression. (orig.)

  9. Signature change events: A challenge for quantum gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    White, Angela; Visser, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of either Euclidian (functional-integral) quantum gravity or canonical general relativity the signature of the manifold is a priori unconstrained. Furthermore, recent developments in the emergent spacetime programme have led to a physically feasible implementation of signature change events. This suggests that it is time to revisit the sometimes controversial topic of signature change in general relativity. Specifically, we shall focus on the behaviour of a quantum field subjected to a manifold containing regions of different signature. We emphasise that, regardless of the underlying classical theory, there are severe problems associated with any quantum field theory residing on a signature-changing background. (Such as the production of what is naively an infinite number of particles, with an infinite energy density.) From the viewpoint of quantum gravity phenomenology, we discuss possible consequences of an effective Lorentz symmetry breaking scale. To more fully understand the physics ...

  10. Strong-coupling scale and frame-dependence of the initial conditions for chaotic inflation in models with modified (coupling to) gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbunov, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    A classical evolution in chaotic inflationary models starts at high energy densities with semi-classical initial conditions presumably consistent with universal quantum nature of all the fundamental forces. That is each quantum contributes the same amount to the energy density. We point out the upper limit on this amount inherent in this approach, so that all the quanta are inside the weak-coupling domain. We discuss this issue in realistic models with modified gravity, $R^2$- and Higgs-inflations, emphasizing the specific change of the initial conditions with metric frame, while all the quanta still contribute equal parts. The analysis can be performed straightforwardly in any model with modified gravity ($F(R)$-gravity, scalars with non-minimal couplings to gravity, etc).

  11. Variação do teor de umidade e da densidade básica na madeira de sete espécies de eucalipto Variation of the moisture content and specific gravity in the wood of seven eucalypt species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tarcísio da Silva Oliveira

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available As variações de umidade e da densidade do lenho das árvores são as principais causas dos defeitos de secagem, como o empenamento e fendilhamento das peças de madeira. Os tipos de madeira presentes em um tronco estão relacionados com as variações dessas duas importantes propriedades físicas. Os gradientes de umidade e da densidade da madeira de sete espécies de eucalipto foram avaliados nas direções radial e longitudinal do tronco de árvores recém-abatidas. Os resultados apontaram uma maior homogeneidade de distribuição de umidade dentro das árvores de E. paniculata e E. citriodora, indicada pelos coeficientes de variação e desvio-padrão. O diferencial de umidade da madeira nas regiões internas do tronco de E. paniculata e E. citriodora foi de 20% e de E. urophylla e E. grandis, de 80%. A densidade básica da madeira aumentou na direção radial do tronco, e cada espécie de eucalipto apresentou um modelo de variação.The occurrence of high moisture and density gradients inside of the tree is related with drying defects, especially those characterized by warp and split of the wood. The unequal behavior of wood pieces due to variation of these two properties can be attributed to differences within the wood that constitutes the log. Considering the importance of knowing the moisture and density gradients in eucalyptus trees, this work had as objective evaluating the variations of the moisture content and specific gravity in the radial and longitudinal directions of the trees of seven eucalypts species. Based on the results concerning the moisture distribution inside the tree, there was a great homogeneity in the species of E. paniculata and E. citriodora, sustained by the low values of variation coefficient and standard deviation. In these species, the moisture differential among the inner and outer parts of the log rarely reached 20%, while for the logs of E. urophylla and E. grandis, this diferencial reached 80%. In spite of

  12. Turbulent lock release gravity current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The time evolution of a turbulent lock release gravity current, formed by a finite volume ofhomogeneous fluid released instantaneously into another fluid of slightly lower density, was studied byexperimental measurements of the density structure via elaborate digital image processing and by a nu-merical simulation of the flow and mixing using a two-equation turbulence model. The essential fact thatthe gravity current passes through an initial slumping phase in which the current head advances steadilyand a second self-similar phase in which the front velocity decreases like the negative third power of thetime after release is satisfactorily presented by the laboratory observation. An overall entrainment ratioproportional to the distance from the release point is found by the numerical simulation. The renormal-ization group (RNG) k- ε model for Reynolds-stress closure is validated to characterize the gravitycurrent with transitional and localized turbulence.

  13. Non-Gaussian Stochastic Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new, non-Gaussian formulation of stochastic gravity by incorporating the higher moments of the fluctuations of the quantum stress energy tensor for a free quantum scalar field in a consistent way. A scheme is developed for obtaining realizations of these fluctuations in terms of the Wightman function, and the behavior of the fluctuations is investigated. The resulting probability distribution for fluctuations of the energy density in Minkowski spacetime is found to be si...

  14. Vorticity in analogue gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cropp, Bethan; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    In the analogue gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in a curved spacetime. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric which depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity free. In this work we provide an straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged --- relativistic and non-relativistic --- Bose--Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d'Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on a flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  15. Vorticity in analog gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose-Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  16. Effect of Phonotactic Probability and Neighborhood Density on Word-Learning Configuration by Preschoolers with Typical Development and Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Shelley; Pittman, Andrea; Weinhold, Juliet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors assessed the effects of phonotactic probability and neighborhood density on word-learning configuration by preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI) and typical language development (TD). Method: One hundred thirty-one children participated: 48 with SLI, 44 with TD matched on age and gender, and 39…

  17. Minimal parameterizations for modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Ali Narimani Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The increasing precision of cosmological data provides us with an opportunity to test general relativity (GR) on the largest accessible scales. Parameterizing modified gravity models facilitates the systematic testing of the predictions of GR, and gives a framework for detecting possible deviations from it. Several different parameterizations have already been suggested, some linked to classifications of theories, and others more empirically motivated. Here we describe a particular new approach which casts modifications to gravity through two free functions of time and scale, which are directly linked to the field equations, but also easy to confront with observational data. We compare our approach with other existing methods of parameterizing modied gravity, specifically the parameterized post-Friedmann approach and the older method using the parameter set $\\{\\mu,\\gamma\\}$. We explain the connection between our parameters and the physics that is most important for generating cosmic microwave background aniso...

  18. Energy conditions in modified gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozziello, Salvatore, E-mail: capozzie@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); INFN Sez. di Napoli, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126, Napoli (Italy); Lobo, Francisco S.N., E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.pt [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edifício C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Mimoso, José P., E-mail: jpmimoso@cii.fc.ul.pt [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edifício C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Edifício C8, Campo Grande, P-1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-03-07

    We consider generalized energy conditions in modified theories of gravity by taking into account the further degrees of freedom related to scalar fields and curvature invariants. The latter are usually recast as generalized geometrical fluids that have different meanings with respect to the standard matter fluids generally adopted as sources of the field equations. More specifically, in modified gravity the curvature terms are grouped in a tensor H{sup ab} and a coupling g(Ψ{sup i}) that can be reorganized in effective Einstein field equations, as corrections to the energy–momentum tensor of matter. The formal validity of such inequalities does not assure some basic requirements such as the attractive nature of gravity, so that the energy conditions have to be considered in a wider sense.

  19. Energy conditions in modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Mimoso, José P

    2014-01-01

    We consider generalized energy conditions in modified theories of gravity by taking into account the further degrees of freedom related to scalar fields and curvature invariants. The latter are usually recast as generalized {\\it geometrical fluids} that have different meanings with respect to the standard matter fluids generally adopted as sources of the field equations. More specifically, in modified gravity the curvature terms are grouped in a tensor $H^{ab}$ and a coupling $g(\\Psi^i)$ that can be reorganized in effective Einstein field equations, as corrections to the energy-momentum tensor of matter. The formal validity of such inequalities does not assure some basic requirements such as the attractive nature of gravity, so that the energy conditions have to be considered in a wider sense.

  20. Quantum gravity corrections in Chandrasekhar limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    It is agreed that Chandrasekhar mass and central density of white dwarfs are independent, which means that there is a whole series of stars having radius and central density as parameters that all have the same Chandrasekhar mass. In this article the influence of a quantum gravity is shown so the Chandrasekhar limits (mass and radius) depend explicitly on the central density and gravity parameters. A new polytropic relation between degenerate pressure of the star and its density is investigated. This leads to a modification in Lane-Emden equation and mass and radius formulas of the star. A modified Lane-Emden equation is solved numerically with consideration to the mass density of the star depends on its radius. The solution was used in calculating the mass and radius limit of the white dwarf. It was found that mass and radius limits decrease due to increase in central density and gravity parameters in a comparison with the original values. We can say that central density and quantum gravity constitute a new tool that can help to make the theoretical values corresponding to experimental observations apply in a better manner.

  1. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observed through ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during

  2. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observed through ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during T

  3. Reexamining cluster radioactivity in trans-lead nuclei with consideration of specific density distributions in daughter nuclei and clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou; Ni, Dongdong

    2016-08-01

    We further investigate the cluster emission from heavy nuclei beyond the lead region in the framework of the preformed cluster model. The refined cluster-core potential is constructed by the double-folding integral of the density distributions of the daughter nucleus and the emitted cluster, where the radius or the diffuseness parameter in the Fermi density distribution formula is determined according to the available experimental data on the charge radii and the neutron skin thickness. The Schrödinger equation of the cluster-daughter relative motion is then solved within the outgoing Coulomb wave-function boundary conditions to obtain the decay width. It is found that the present decay width of cluster emitters is clearly enhanced as compared to that in the previous case, which involved the fixed parametrization for the density distributions of daughter nuclei and clusters. Among the whole procedure, the nuclear deformation of clusters is also introduced into the calculations, and the degree of its influence on the final decay half-life is checked to some extent. Moreover, the effect from the bubble density distribution of clusters on the final decay width is carefully discussed by using the central depressed distribution.

  4. Idaho State Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (24,284 records) were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey. This data base was received on February 23, 1993. Principal gravity...

  5. Northern Oklahoma Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (710 records) were compiled by Professor Ahern. This data base was received in June 1992. Principal gravity parameters include latitude,...

  6. Andes 1997 Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Central Andes gravity data (6,151 records) were compiled by Professor Gotze and the MIGRA Group. This data base was received in April, 1997. Principal gravity...

  7. DNAG Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) gravity grid values, spaced at 6 km, were used to produce the Gravity Anomaly Map of North America (1987; scale...

  8. Cadiz, California Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (32 records) were gathered by Mr. Seth I. Gutman for AridTech Inc., Denver, Colorado using a Worden Prospector gravity meter. This data base...

  9. Classical Weyl Transverse Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally-invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally-invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a "fake" symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields,...

  10. The potential of at-home prediction of the formation of urolithiasis by simple multi-frequency electrical conductivity of the urine and the comparison of its performance with urine ion-related indices, color and specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverio, Angelito A; Chung, Wen-Yaw; Cheng, Cheanyeh; Wang, Hai-Lung; Kung, Chien-Min; Chen, Jun; Tsai, Vincent F S

    2016-04-01

    It is important to control daily diet, water intake and life style as well as monitor the quality of urine for urolithiasis prevention. For decades, many ion-related indices have been developed for predicting the formation of urinary stones or urolithiasis, such as EQUILs, relative supersaturation (RSS), Tiselius indices (TI), Robertson risk factor algorithms (RRFA) and more recently, the Bonn risk index. However, they mostly demand robust laboratory analysis, are work-intensive, and even require complex computational programs to get the concentration patterns of several urine analytes. A simple and fast platform for measuring multi-frequency electrical conductivity (MFEC) of morning spot urine (random urine) to predict the onset of urolithiasis was implemented in this study. The performance thereof was compared to ion-related indices, urine color and specific gravity. The concentrations of relevant ions, color, specific gravity (SG) and MFEC (MFEC tested at 1, 10, 100, 5001 KHz and 1 MHz) of 80 random urine samples were examined after collection. Then, the urine samples were stored at 4 °C for 24 h to determine whether sedimentation would occur or not. Ion-activity product index of calcium oxalate (AP(CaOx) EQ2) was calculated. The correlation between AP(CaOx) EQ2, urine color, SG and MFEC were analyzed. AP(CaOx) EQ2, urine color and MFEC (at 5 frequencies) all demonstrated good prediction (p = 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, respectively) for stone formation. The positive correlation between AP(CaOx) EQ2 and MFEC is also significant (p = 0.01). MFEC provides a good metric for predicting the onset of urolithiasis, which is comparable to conventional ion-related indices and urine color. This technology can be implemented with much ease for objectively monitoring the quality of urine at points-of-care or at home.

  11. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  12. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  13. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10(-23) Hz(-1/2) above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  14. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  15. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  16. Covariant w∞ gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Pope, C.N.; Stelle, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the notion of higher-spin covariance in w∞ gravity. We show how a recently proposed covariant w∞ gravity action can be obtained from non-chiral w∞ gravity by making field redefinitions that introduce new gauge-field components with corresponding new gauge transformations.

  17. The Pauli potential in one-dimensional density functional theory: general result for two-level systems and specific example for N harmonically confined Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, I A

    2003-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in the kinetic energy functional T sub s [rho] in density functional theory. The present study lies in this area and concerns the Pauli potential V sub P [rho]. A differential equation is obtained here for V sub P (x) in one dimension for a general two-level system. Also, as a specific example, such a functional of rho(x), the ground-state Fermion density, is given for the case of N Fermions which are harmonically confined. (letter to the editor)

  18. Casimir effect in Extended Theories of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lambiase, G; Stabile, An

    2016-01-01

    We study the Casimir vacuum energy density and the Casimir pressure for a massless scalar field confined between two nearby parallel plates in a slightly curved, static spacetime background, employing the weak field approximation in the framework of Extended Theories of Gravity (ETG). Following a perturbative approach upto second order, we find the gravity correction in the ETG to Casimir vacuum energy density and pressure. The corrections to the vacuum energy density in presence of curved spacetime in the framework of General Relativity (GR) are small and today they are still undetected with the current technology. However, future sensitivity improvement in gravitational interferometer experiments will give an useful tool to detect such effect induced by gravity. For these reason we retain interesting from a theoretical point of view generalize the outcomes of GR in the context of ETG. Finally, we find the general relation to constraining the free parameters of the ETG.

  19. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezares Roder, Nils Manuel

    2010-07-01

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous

  20. Aspects of Quadratic Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Kounnas, Costas; Lust, Dieter; Riotto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We discuss quadratic gravity where terms quadratic in the curvature tensor are included in the action. After reviewing the corresponding field equations, we analyze in detail the physical propagating modes in some specific backgrounds. First we confirm that the pure $R^2$ theory is indeed ghost free. Then we point out that for flat backgrounds the pure $R^2$ theory propagates only a scalar massless mode and no spin-two tensor mode. However, the latter emerges either by expanding the theory around curved backgrounds like de Sitter or anti-de Sitter, or by changing the long-distance dynamics by introducing the standard Einstein term. In both cases, the theory is modified in the infrared and a propagating graviton is recovered. Hence we recognize a subtle interplay between the UV and IR properties of higher order gravity. We also calculate the corresponding Newton's law for general quadratic curvature theories. Finally, we discuss how quadratic actions may be obtained from a fundamental theory like string- or M-...

  1. The Impact of Geological Structures On The Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, U.

    In general, a uniform standard density value is used for the calculation of topographic effects for gravity field modelling in Switzerland. Only a limited number of promi- nent mass anomalies is treated with an individual density. In some regions this causes problems in predicting the surface gravity or the deflections of the vertical. An actual example is the construction of a new 57 km railway tunnel, where accurate deflec- tions of the vertical are needed for the orientation of gyroscope measurements. It was rather doubtful if our standard national gravity field model would fulfil the accuracy demands. Therefore, a refinement of the gravity field model was performed by digi- tising all the relevant geological structures in the vicinity of the planned tunnel. This lead to a 3D density model of irregularly shaped polyhedrons. Their influence on the gravity field (potential, gravity, deflections of the vertical and their first derivatives) are calculated rigorously. First results of this study are now available and reveal that the influences of the geological structures on the deflections of the vertical and on gravity are rather small (1 - 2 arcsec, 3 - 5 mgal) in the investigated region and they are at the limit of significance for the technical applications of levelling or gyroscope mea- surements. The largest effects are caused by quaternary sediments with a large density contrast and by some gneiss structures, which show only a small density contrast but their total mass can cause considerable anomalies in the gravity field.

  2. SU-E-J-72: Dosimetric Study of Cone-Beam CT-Based Radiation Treatment Planning Using a Patient-Specific Stepwise CT-Density Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S; Le, Q; Mutaf, Y; Yi, B; D’Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to define different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy.

  3. Synthesis of grafted phosphorylcholine polymer layers as specific recognition ligands for C-reactive protein focused on grafting density and thickness to achieve highly sensitive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamon, Yuri; Kitayama, Yukiya; Itakura, Akiko N; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-04-21

    We studied the effects of layer thickness and grafting density of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) thin layers as specific ligands for the highly sensitive binding of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMPC layer thickness was controlled by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). PMPC grafting density was controlled by utilizing mixed self-assembled monolayers with different incorporation ratios of the bis[2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)undecyl] disulfide ATRP initiator, as modulated by altering the feed molar ratio with (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the modified surfaces. PMPC grafting densities were estimated from polymer thickness and the molecular weight obtained from sacrificial initiator during surface-initiated AGET ATRP. The effects of thickness and grafting density of the obtained PMPC layers on CRP binding performance were investigated using surface plasmon resonance employing a 10 mM Tris-HCl running buffer containing 140 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2 (pH 7.4). Furthermore, the non-specific binding properties of the obtained layers were investigated using human serum albumin (HSA) as a reference protein. The PMPC layer which has 4.6 nm of thickness and 1.27 chains per nm(2) of grafting density showed highly sensitive CRP detection (limit of detection: 4.4 ng mL(-1)) with low non-specific HSA adsorption, which was improved 10 times than our previous report of 50 ng mL(-1).

  4. Quantization of Emergent Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2013-01-01

    Emergent gravity is based on a novel form of the equivalence principle known as the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma in symplectic geometry stating that the electromagnetic force can always be eliminated by a local coordinate transformation as far as spacetime admits a symplectic structure, in other words, a microscopic spacetime becomes noncommutative (NC). If gravity emerges from U(1) gauge theory on NC spacetime, this picture of emergent gravity suggests a completely new quantization scheme where quantum gravity is defined by quantizing spacetime itself, leading to a dynamical NC spacetime. Therefore the quantization of emergent gravity is radically different from the conventional approach trying to quantize a phase space of metric fields. This approach for quantum gravity allows a background independent formulation where spacetime as well as matter fields is equally emergent from a universal vacuum of quantum gravity.

  5. Quantization of emergent gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2015-02-01

    Emergent gravity is based on a novel form of the equivalence principle known as the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma in symplectic geometry stating that the electromagnetic force can always be eliminated by a local coordinate transformation as far as space-time admits a symplectic structure, in other words, a microscopic space-time becomes noncommutative (NC). If gravity emerges from U(1) gauge theory on NC space-time, this picture of emergent gravity suggests a completely new quantization scheme where quantum gravity is defined by quantizing space-time itself, leading to a dynamical NC space-time. Therefore the quantization of emergent gravity is radically different from the conventional approach trying to quantize a phase space of metric fields. This approach for quantum gravity allows a background-independent formulation where space-time and matter fields are equally emergent from a universal vacuum of quantum gravity.

  6. Microtubule self-organisation depends upon gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabony, J.; Pochon, N.; Papaseit, C.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular processes by which gravity is transduced into biological systems are poorly, if at all, understood. Under equilibrium conditions, chemical and biochemical structures do not depend upon gravity. It has been proposed that biological systems might show a gravity dependence by way of the bifurcation properties of certain types of non-linear chemical reactions that are far-from-equilibrium. We have found that in-vitro preparations of microtubules, an important element of the cellular cytoskeleton, show this type of behaviour. On earth, the solutions show macroscopic self-ordering, and the morphology of the structures that form depend upon the orientation of the sample with respect to gravity at a critical moment at an early stage in the development of the self-organised state. An experiment carried out in a sounding rocket, showed that as predicted by theories of this type, no self-organisation occurs when the microtubules are assembled under low gravity conditions. This is an experimental demonstration of how a very simple biochemical system, containing only two molecules, can be gravity sensitive. At a molecular level this behaviour results from an interaction of gravity with macroscopic concentration and density fluctuations that arise from the processes of microtubule contraction and elongation.

  7. Western Ross Sea continental slope gravity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Arnold L.; Orsi, Alejandro H.; Muench, Robin; Huber, Bruce A.; Zambianchi, Enrico; Visbeck, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Antarctic Bottom Water of the world ocean is derived from dense Shelf Water that is carried downslope by gravity currents at specific sites along the Antarctic margins. Data gathered by the AnSlope and CLIMA programs reveal the presence of energetic gravity currents that are formed over the western continental slope of the Ross Sea when High Salinity Shelf Water exits the shelf through Drygalski Trough. Joides Trough, immediately to the east, offers an additional escape route for less saline Shelf Water, while the Glomar Challenger Trough still farther east is a major pathway for export of the once supercooled low-salinity Ice Shelf Water that forms under the Ross Ice Shelf. The Drygalski Trough gravity currents increase in thickness from ˜100 to ˜400 m on proceeding downslope from ˜600 m (the shelf break) to 1200 m (upper slope) sea floor depth, while turning sharply to the west in response to the Coriolis force during their descent. The mean current pathway trends ˜35° downslope from isobaths. Benthic-layer current and thickness are correlated with the bottom water salinity, which exerts the primary control over the benthic-layer density. A 1-year time series of bottom-water current and hydrographic properties obtained on the slope near the 1000 m isobath indicates episodic pulses of Shelf Water export through Drygalski Trough. These cold (34.75) pulses correlate with strong downslope bottom flow. Extreme examples occurred during austral summer/fall 2003, comprising concentrated High Salinity Shelf Water (-1.9 °C; 34.79) and approaching 1.5 m s -1 at descent angles as large as ˜60° relative to the isobaths. Such events were most common during November-May, consistent with a northward shift in position of the dense Shelf Water during austral summer. The coldest, saltiest bottom water was measured from mid-April to mid-May 2003. The summer/fall export of High Salinity Shelf Water observed in 2004 was less than that seen in 2003. This difference, if real

  8. Experimental investigation of gravity effects on sediment sorting on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Kuhn, Brigitte; Gartmann, Andres

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: Sorting of sedimentary rocks is a proxy for the environmental conditions at the time of deposition, in particular the runoff that moved and deposited the material forming the rocks. Settling of sediment in water is strongly influenced by the gravity of a planetary body. As a consequence, sorting of a sedimentary rock varies with gravity for a given depth and velocity of surface runoff. Theoretical considerations for spheres indicate that sorting is more uniform on Mars than on Earth for runoff of identical depth. In reality, such considerations have to be applied with great caution because the shape of a particle strongly influences drag. Drag itself can only be calculated directly for an irregularly shaped particle with great computational effort, if at all. Therefore, even for terrestrial applications, sediment settling velocities are often determined directly, e.g. by measurements using settling tubes. Experiments: In this study the results of settling tube tests conducted under reduced gravity during three Mars Sedimentation Experiment (MarsSedEx I, II and III) flights, conducted between 2012 and 2015, are presented. Ten types of sediment, ranging in size, shape and density were tested in custom-designed settling tubes during parabolas of Martian gravity lasting 20 to 25 seconds. Results: The experiments conducted during the MarsSedEx reduced gravity experiments showed that the violation of fluid dynamics caused by using empirical models and parameter values developed for sediment transport on Earth lead to significant miscalculations for Mars, specifically an underetsimation of settling velcoity because of an overestimation of turbulant drag. The error is caused by the flawed representation of particle drag on Mars. Drag coefficients are not a property of a sediment particle, but a property of the flow around the particle, and thus strongly affected by gravity. Conlcusions: The observed errors in settling velocity when using terrestrial models

  9. Particle Image Velocimetry Study of Density Current Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Juan Ezequiel

    2009-01-01

    Gravity currents are flows that occur when a horizontal density difference causes fluid to move under the action of gravity; density currents are a particular case, for which the scalar causing the density difference is conserved. Flows with a strong effect of the horizontal density difference, even if only partially driven by it--such as the…

  10. Quasiparticle density of states of 2H-NbSe2 single crystals revealed by low-temperature specific heat measurements according to a two-component model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jing; Shan Lei; Wang Yue; Xiao Zhi-Li; Wen Hai-Hu

    2008-01-01

    Low-temperature specific heat in a dichalcogenide superconductor 2H-NbSe2 is measured in various magnetic fields. It is found that the specific heat can be described very well by a simple model concerning two components corresponding to vortex normal core and ambient superconducting region, separately. For calculating the specific heat outside the vortex core region, we use the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) formalism under the assumption of a narrow distribution of the superconducting gaps. The field-dependent vortex core size in the mixed state of 2H-NbSe2, determined by using this model, can explain the nonlinear field dependence of specific heat coefficient γ(H), which is in good agreement with the previous experimental results and more formal calculations. With the high-temperature specific heat data, we can find that, in the multi-band superconductor 2H-NbSe2, the recovered density of states (or Fermi surface) below Tc under a magnetic field seems not to be gapped again by the charge density wave (CDW) gap, which suggests that the superconducting gap and the CDW gap may open on different Fermi surface sheets.

  11. Operational specification and forecasting advances for Dst, LEO thermospheric densities, and aviation radiation dose and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the magnetosphere, thermosphere, and even troposphere are key regions that are affected. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed and is producing innovative space weather applications. Key operational systems for providing timely information about the effects of space weather on these domains are SET’s Magnetosphere Alert and Prediction System (MAPS), LEO Alert and Prediction System (LAPS), and Automated Radiation Measurements for Aviation Safety (ARMAS) system. MAPS provides a forecast Dst index out to 6 days through the data-driven, redundant data stream Anemomilos algorithm. Anemomilos uses observational proxies for the magnitude, location, and velocity of solar ejecta events. This forecast index is used by satellite operations to characterize upcoming geomagnetic storms, for example. In addition, an ENLIL/Rice Dst prediction out to several days has also been developed and will be described. LAPS is the SET fully redundant operational system providing recent history, current epoch, and forecast solar and geomagnetic indices for use in operational versions of the JB2008 thermospheric density model. The thermospheric densities produced by that system, driven by the LAPS data, are forecast to 72-hours to provide the global mass densities for satellite operators. ARMAS is a project that has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on aircraft to capture the real-time radiation environment due to Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The dose and dose-rates are captured on aircraft, downlinked in real-time via the Iridium satellites, processed on the ground, incorporated into the most recent NAIRAS global radiation climatology data runs, and made available to end users via the web and

  12. Prostate-specific antigen density as a parameter for the prediction of positive lymph nodes at radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Yiakoumos

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The most widely used nomogram is of high value in therapy decision-making, although it remains an auxiliary means. Considering the performance of lymph node dissection, surgeons should be aware of the specifics of the applied nomogram. PSAD appears as a useful adjunctive parameter for preoperative prostate risk estimation and warrants further evaluation.

  13. Evaluation of atmospheric density models and preliminary functional specifications for the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.; Boland, D. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This document presents the results of an extensive survey and comparative evaluation of current atmosphere and wind models for inclusion in the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS). It includes recommended models for use in LAIRS, estimated accuracies for the recommended models, and functional specifications for the development of LAIRS.

  14. Research on Energy Efficiency Specific Gravity of Air Cooling System for Oil Injection Screw Air Compressor%喷油螺杆空压机风冷却系统能效比重研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭强; 沈坤华; 肖银娥; 朱海峰; 郑鹏程; 章正峰

    2013-01-01

    根据当前螺杆空压机能效标准和产品标准的规定,结合螺杆空压机实际应用的具体条件,依据物质能量守恒定律,推导出螺杆空压机风冷却系统能效比重的计算公式,得出具体的计算结果,供风冷却螺杆空压机设计、节能管理、标准化工作者参考.%According to the specifications of current energy and product standards for screw compressor,combined with the concrete conditions of practical application of screw compressor,the calculating formula for energy efficiency specific gravity of air cooling system for screw compressor is deduced and the concrete calculating results are obtained based on law of energy conservation,which provides references for design,energy-saving management and standardization staff of air cooling screw compressor.

  15. Visual detection of filaria-specific IgG4 in urine using red-colored high density latex beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Fumiaki; Itoh, Makoto; Samad, Mohammad S; Takagi, Hidekazu; Weerasooriya, Mirani V; Yahathugoda, Thishan C; Hossain, Moazzem; Moji, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Eisaku

    2013-02-01

    The use of urine for the immunodiagnosis of lymphatic filariasis has a definite advantage: the sample collection is not invasive and thus well accepted by people. Urine-based ELISA to detect filaria-specific IgG4 has been used successfully. However, ELISA requires equipment such as a microplate reader, which is often not available in most endemic areas. We have developed a new visual immunodiagnosis that detects urinary IgG4 using red-colored latex beads (bead test). The sensitivity was 87.2% when ICT antigen test positive people were regarded as the standard (136/156), and the specificity was 97.2% with the non-endemic people in Japan and Bangladesh, and the urine ELISA negatives in Sri Lanka (1264/1300). In a prevalence study, the bead test could detect filarial infection more effectively than ICT test among young children in Sri Lanka, indicating the usefulness of the visual test in epidemiological studies.

  16. Global stability of self-gravitating discs in modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafourian, Neda; Roshan, Mahmood

    2017-07-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the global stability of a self-gravitating disc in the context of modified gravity (MOG). This theory is a relativistic scalar-tensor-vector theory of gravity and it is presented to address the dark matter problem. In the weak field limit, MOG possesses two free parameters α and μ0, which have already been determined using the rotation curve data of spiral galaxies. The evolution of a stellar self-gravitating disc and, more specifically, the bar instability in MOG are investigated and compared to a Newtonian case. Our models have exponential and Mestel-like surface densities as Σ ∝ exp (-r/h) and Σ ∝ 1/r. It is found that, surprisingly, the discs are more stable against the bar mode in MOG than in Newtonian gravity. In other words, the bar growth rate is effectively slower than the Newtonian discs. Also, we show that both free parameters (i.e. α and μ0) have stabilizing effects. In other words, an increase in these parameters will decrease the bar growth rate.

  17. One-Loop Divergences in 6D Conformal Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Using Exact Renormalization Group Equation approach and background field method, we investigate the one-loop problem in a six-dimensional conformal gravity theory whose Lagrangian takes the same form as holographic Weyl anomaly of multiple coincident M5-branes. We choose the backgrounds to be the symmetric Einstein spaces including S6, CP3, S2 \\times S4, S2 \\times CP2, S3 \\times S3 and S2 \\times S2 \\times S2. Evaluating the functional sums gives power-law and logarithmic divergences. We extract from the specific values of logarithmic divergence on above backgrounds, the coefficient in front of Euler density and two linear equations constraining the coefficients in front of three type-B conformal invariants. As a test of the effectiveness of Exact Renormalization Group Equation approach to quantum conformal gravity, we reexaminethe one-loop problem in four-dimensional conformal gravity and confirm the logarithmic divergence derived from generalized Schwinger-DeWitt method.

  18. Image quality analysis of high-density diffuse optical tomography incorporating a subject-specific head model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxuan eZhan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available High-density diffuse optical tomography (HD-DOT methods have shown significant improvement in localization accuracy and image resolution compared to traditional topographic near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS of the human brain. In this work we provide a comprehensive evaluation of image quality in visual cortex mapping via a simulation study with the use of an anatomical head model derived from MRI data of a human subject. A model of individual head anatomy provides the surface shape and internal structure that allow for the construction of a more realistic physical model for the forward problem, as well as the use of a structural constraint in the inverse problem. The HD-DOT model utilized here incorporates multiple source-detector separations with continuous-wave data with added noise based on experimental results. To evaluate image quality we quantify the localization error and localized volume at half maximum (LVHM throughout a region of interest (ROI within the visual cortex and systematically analyze the use of whole brain tissue spatial constraint within image reconstruction. Our results demonstrate that an image quality with less than 10 mm in localization error and 1000 m3 in LVHM can be obtained up to 13 mm below the scalp surface with a typical unconstrained reconstruction and up to 18 mm deep when a spatial constraint based on the brain tissue is utilized.

  19. Is Gravity Entropic Force?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjia Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available If we assume that the source of thermodynamic system, ρ and p, are also the source of gravity, then either thermal quantities, such as entropy, temperature, and chemical potential, can induce gravitational effects, or gravity can induce thermal effects. We find that gravity can be seen as entropic force only for systems with constant temperature and zero chemical potential. The case for Newtonian approximation is discussed.

  20. Combinatorial Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Trugenberger, Carlo A

    2016-01-01

    In a recently developed approach, geometry is modelled as an emergent property of random networks. Here I show that one of these models I proposed is exactly quantum gravity defined in terms of the combinatorial Ricci curvature recently derived by Ollivier. Geometry in the weak (classical) gravity regime arises in a phase transition driven by the condensation of short graph cycles. The strong (quantum) gravity regime corresponds to "small world" random graphs with logarithmic distance scaling.

  1. Anomalies and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W

    2006-01-01

    Anomalies in Yang-Mills type gauge theories of gravity are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the relation between the Dirac spin, the axial current j_5 and the non-covariant gauge spin C. Using diagrammatic techniques, we show that only generalizations of the U(1)- Pontrjagin four--form F^ F= dC arise in the chiral anomaly, even when coupled to gravity. Implications for Ashtekar's canonical approach to quantum gravity are discussed.

  2. Pathophysiology of myasthenia gravis with antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Huijbers, Maartje G; Plomp, Jaap J; Niks, Erik H; Molenaar, Peter C; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Gomez, Alejandro M; De Baets, Marc H; Losen, Mario

    2013-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is caused by antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4, or possibly yet unidentified antibodies. The mechanisms by which these antibodies interfere with the function of postsynaptic proteins include complement activation, antigenic modulation by crosslinking of the target proteins, competition with ligand binding sites, or steric hindrance which inhibits conformational changes or binding to associated proteins. Screening for auto-antibodies to different postsynaptic targets, and also for low-affinity antibodies, is contributing to a more accurate diagnosis of MG patients. Further studies into the specific pathophysiological pathways of the several MG subforms might help to develop new, more antigen specific, therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gravity currents at Ormen Lange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikeboe, Frode; Berntsen, Jarle; Furnes, Gunnar

    2001-12-01

    Time series of temperature and velocities at Ormen Lange, located in the Storegga region off mid-Norway, indicate that close to the seabed, at depths ranging from 500-1000 m, large temperature fluctuations are accompanied by short peak values in speed. The extreme events are driven by strong pressure gradients, due to strong atmospheric low pressures and/or internal pressure fronts between warmer Atlantic Water (AW) and colder Norwegian Sea Water (NSW). Along the shelf slope at OL we may get steepening of the iso surfaces of density, separating AW and NSW, due to strong Ekman veering during storms or approaching internal density fronts. During such events the density surfaces tend to undershoot their equilibrium level, and as the forcing weakens, the suppressed water may run up along the shelf slope. In this run up phase, peak values in the velocities are often found. As a result of the run up phase, heavy water may be elevated onto the shelf. Subsequently dense fluid will spread under the influence of forces produced by its own buoyancy and motions of this form are often referred to as gravity currents. They are characterised by the distinctive nature of the front, which consists of a raised head leading a shallower flow behind. The shape of the head and body of the gravity current, along with velocity, depend on a range of parameters. This report investigates the velocities that may occur with parameters of relevance for Ormen Lange. (author)

  4. Gravity Independent Compressor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and demonstrate a small, gravity independent, vapor compression refrigeration system using a linear motor compressor which effectively...

  5. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Ichiro [University of the Ryukyus, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a ''fake'' symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions. (orig.)

  6. influence of gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Mukherjee

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Based upon Biot's [1965] theory of initial stresses of hydrostatic nature produced by the effect of gravity, a study is made of surface waves in higher order visco-elastic media under the influence of gravity. The equation for the wave velocity of Stonely waves in the presence of viscous and gravitational effects is obtained. This is followed by particular cases of surface waves including Rayleigh waves and Love waves in the presence of viscous and gravity effects. In all cases the wave-velocity equations are found to be in perfect agreement with the corresponding classical results when the effects of gravity and viscosity are neglected.

  7. Mexico Gravity Data per 2 min Cell (97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity density grid for Mexico, North-Central America, and the Western Caribbean Sea shows the distribution of about one million terrestrial and marine...

  8. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    sequence identity as well as a conserved pattern of transcript abundance changes after gravity stimulation between corn pulvinus tissue and Arabidopsis root apices. The functions of these genes in gravitropic responses are currently being analyzed and should give us important information about evolutionary conserved elements in plant gravity signal transduction. (This research was funded by NASA). Kimbrough, J. M., R. Salinas-Mondragon, et al. (2004). "The Fast and Transient Transcriptional Network of Gravity and Mechanical Stimulation in the Arabidopsis Root Apex." Plant Physiol. 136(1): 2790-2805. Moseyko, N., T. Zhu, et al. (2002). "Transcription profiling of the early gravitropic response in Arabidopsis using high-density oligonucleotide probe microarrays." Plant Physiol 130(2): 720-8. Salinas-Mondragon, R., A. Brogan, et al. (2005). "Gravity and light: integrating transcriptional regulation in roots." Gravit Space Biol Bull 18(2): 121-2.

  9. Manifold invariants affect dynamics in ADS gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Liko, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The first-order Holst action with negative cosmological constant is rendered finite by requiring functional differentiability on the configuration space of tetrads and connections. The surface terms that arise in the action for ADS gravity are equivalent to the Euler and Pontryagin densities with fixed weight factors; these terms modify the Noether charges that arise from diffeomorphism invariance of the action.

  10. Geologic Interpretation of Gravity Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-19

    the density of the crystalline rocks virtually depends only on their chemical -mineralogical composition and structural special features. 0 DOC...point out that deep analog of gabbro (a-2.9 - 3.1 g/cm3) is eclogite, in essence not differing from it by chemical composition, but which is...qrivity interpretation. Geophys.. vol. X XV, No 3, I II0. If is g hs e s D. The analitic bas’ic of gravity interpirrtation. Geophys., J sin g K

  11. Effect of high energy electron beam (10MeV) on specific heat capacity of low-density polyethylene/hydroxyapatite nano-composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Z; Ziaie, F; Ghaffari, M; Beigzadeh, A M

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, thermal properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE) and its nano composites are investigated. For this purpose LDPE reinforced with different weight percents of hydroxyapatite (HAP) powder which was synthesized via hydrolysis method are produced. The samples were irradiated with 10MeV electron beam at doses of 75 to 250kGy. Specific heat capacity measurement have been carried out at different temperatures, i.e. 25, 50, 75 and 100°C using modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC) apparatus and the effect of three parameters include of temperature, irradiation dose and the amount of HAP nano particles as additives on the specific heat capacity of PE/HAP have been investigated precisely. The MTDSC results indicate that the specific heat capacity have decreased by addition of nano sized HAP as reinforcement for LDPE. On the other hand, the effect of radiation dose is reduction in the specific heat capacity in all materials including LDPE and its nano composites. The HAP nano particles along with cross-link junctions due to radiation restrain the movement of the polymer chains in the vicinity of each particle and improve the immobility of polymer chains and consequently lead to reduction in specific heat capacity. Also, the obtained results confirm that the radiation effect on the specific heat capacity is more efficient than the reinforcing effect of nano-sized hydroxyapatite.

  12. Cosmological Hints of Modified Gravity ?

    CERN Document Server

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The recent measurements of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarization anisotropies made by the Planck satellite have provided impressive confirmation of the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. However interesting hints of slight deviations from $\\Lambda$CDM have been found, including a $95 \\%$ c.l. preference for a "modified gravity" structure formation scenario. In this paper we confirm the preference for a modified gravity scenario from Planck 2015 data, find that modified gravity solves the so-called $A_{lens}$ anomaly in the CMB angular spectrum, and constrains the amplitude of matter density fluctuations to $\\sigma_8=0.815_{-0.048}^{+0.032}$, in better agreement with weak lensing constraints. Moreover, we find a lower value for the reionization optical depth of $\\tau=0.059\\pm0.020$ (to be compared with the value of $\\tau= 0.079 \\pm 0.017$ obtained in the standard scenario), more consistent with recent optical and UV data. We check the stability of this result by considering possible degeneraci...

  13. Exposure to Altered Gravity During Specific Developmental Periods Differentially Affects Growth, Development, the Cerebellum and Motor Functions in Male and Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that neonatal cerebellar structure and motor coordination may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of hypergravity during specific developmental stages. To test this hypothesis, we compared neurodevelopment, motor behavior and cerebellar structure in rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge during discrete periods of time: the 2nd week of pregnancy [gestational day (G) 8 through G15; group A], the 3rd week of pregnancy (G15 through birth on G22/G23; group B), the 1st week of nursing [birth through postnatal day (P) 6; group C], the 2nd and 3rd weeks of nursing (P6 through P21; group D), the combined 2nd and 3rd weeks of pregnancy and nursing (G8 through P21; group E) and stationary control (SC) neonates (group F). Prenatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in intrauterine growth retardation as reflected by a decrease in the number of pups in a litter and lower average mass at birth. Exposure to hypergravity immediately after birth impaired the righting response on P3, while the startle response in both males and females was most affected by exposure during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth. Hypergravity exposure also impaired motor functions, as evidenced by poorer performance on a rotarod; while both males and females exposed to hypergravity during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth performed poorly on P21, male neonates were most dramatically affected by exposure to hypergravity during the second week of gestation, when the duration of their recorded stay on the rotarod was one half that of SC males. Cerebellar mass was most reduced by later postnatal exposure. Thus, for the developing rat cerebellum, the postnatal period that overlaps the brain growth spurt is the most vulnerable to hypergravity. However, male motor behavior is also affected by midpregnancy exposure to

  14. Exposure to altered gravity during specific developmental periods differentially affects growth, development, the cerebellum and motor functions in male and female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that neonatal cerebellar structure and motor coordination may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of hypergravity during specific developmental stages. To test this hypothesis, we compared neurodevelopment, motor behavior and cerebellar structure in rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge during discrete periods of time: the 2nd week of pregnancy [gestational day (G) 8 through G15; group A], the 3rd week of pregnancy (G15 through birth on G22/G23; group B), the 1st week of nursing [birth through postnatal day (P) 6; group C], the 2nd and 3rd weeks of nursing (P6 through P21; group D), the combined 2nd and 3rd weeks of pregnancy and nursing (G8 through P21; group E) and stationary control (SC) neonates (group F). Prenatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in intrauterine growth retardation as reflected by a decrease in the number of pups in a litter and lower average mass at birth. Exposure to hypergravity immediately after birth impaired the righting response on P3, while the startle response in both males and females was most affected by exposure during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth. Hypergravity exposure also impaired motor functions, as evidenced by poorer performance on a rotarod; while both males and females exposed to hypergravity during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth performed poorly on P21, male neonates were most dramatically affected by exposure to hypergravity during the second week of gestation, when the duration of their recorded stay on the rotarod was one half that of SC males. Cerebellar mass was most reduced by later postnatal exposure. Thus, for the developing rat cerebellum, the postnatal period that overlaps the brain growth spurt is the most vulnerable to hypergravity. However, male motor behavior is also affected by midpregnancy exposure to

  15. Comparação de métodos de determinação da gravidade específica de ovos de poedeiras comerciais Comparison of methods to measure the specific gravity of laying hen eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednardo Rodrigues Freitas

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar um aparelho desenvolvido para a determinação da gravidade específica (GE do ovo em água, comparando-o ao método de imersão em solução salina. Foram coletados 200 ovos de duas linhagens de poedeiras comerciais, divididos ao acaso em dois grupos de 50 ovos por linhagem e submetidos a duas seqüências de determinação da GE. Não foram observadas diferenças significativas entre os métodos utilizados. A determinação da GE dos ovos utilizando o aparelho desenvolvido pode ser realizada com a mesma precisão da determinação em solução salina.The objective of this work was to compare the results of measuring the specific gravity (SG of laying hen eggs by using a weighing apparatus and the saline flotation method (SFM. Two hundred eggs from two genetic lines were distributed randomly into two groups of 50 eggs per genetic line and were submitted to two different sequences of SG measurement. Not significant differences were found between the two methods. The weighing apparatus measured the SG of the eggs accurately as the SFM.

  16. Réflexions sur l'évolution de la densité des réserves pétrolières Reflections on the Evolution of the Specific Gravity of Oil Reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacour J. J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La présente étude a pour but d'analyser l'évolution 1972-1982 de la densité des réserves prouvées de pétrole conventionnel du monde occidental et d'approcher quantitativement par grandes zones géographiques les principaux déterminants de cette évolution : nouvelles découvertes et production. Elle repose en particulier sur l'examen et le suivi d'un ensemble comportant près de 500 champs pétroliers. This article analyzes the 1972-1982 evolution of the specific gravity of proven reserves of conventional oil in the Western World by major geographic zones and considers the determinant factors in this evolution, i. e. new discoveries and production. This survey is mainly based on the examination and follow-up of the overall behavior of nearly 500 oil fields.

  17. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. Only those grid cells within 10 kilometers of a gravity data point have gravity values....

  18. High-Density Real-Time PCR-Based in Vivo Toxicogenomic Screen to Predict Organ-Specific Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo G. Puskas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxicogenomics, based on the temporal effects of drugs on gene expression, is able to predict toxic effects earlier than traditional technologies by analyzing changes in genomic biomarkers that could precede subsequent protein translation and initiation of histological organ damage. In the present study our objective was to extend in vivo toxicogenomic screening from analyzing one or a few tissues to multiple organs, including heart, kidney, brain, liver and spleen. Nanocapillary quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR was used in the study, due to its higher throughput, sensitivity and reproducibility, and larger dynamic range compared to DNA microarray technologies. Based on previous data, 56 gene markers were selected coding for proteins with different functions, such as proteins for acute phase response, inflammation, oxidative stress, metabolic processes, heat-shock response, cell cycle/apoptosis regulation and enzymes which are involved in detoxification. Some of the marker genes are specific to certain organs, and some of them are general indicators of toxicity in multiple organs. Utility of the nanocapillary QRT-PCR platform was demonstrated by screening different references, as well as discovery of drug-like compounds for their gene expression profiles in different organs of treated mice in an acute experiment. For each compound, 896 QRT-PCR were done: four organs were used from each of the treated four animals to monitor the relative expression of 56 genes. Based on expression data of the discovery gene set of toxicology biomarkers the cardio- and nephrotoxicity of doxorubicin and sulfasalazin, the hepato- and nephrotoxicity of rotenone, dihydrocoumarin and aniline, and the liver toxicity of 2,4-diaminotoluene could be confirmed. The acute heart and kidney toxicity of the active metabolite SN-38 from its less toxic prodrug, irinotecan could be differentiated, and two novel gene markers for hormone replacement therapy were identified

  19. Noether symmetry approach in f(G,T) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, M. Farasat; Ahmad, Mushtaq

    2017-01-01

    We explore the recently introduced modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity (Sharif and Ikram in Eur Phys J C 76:640, 2016), f(G,T) pragmatic with G, the Gauss-Bonnet term, and T, the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Noether symmetry approach has been used to develop some cosmologically viable f(G,T) gravity models. The Noether equations of modified gravity are reported for flat FRW universe. Two specific models have been studied to determine the conserved quantities and exact solutions. In particular, the well known deSitter solution is reconstructed for some specific choice of f(G,T) gravity model.

  20. Noether Symmetry Approach in $f(\\mathcal{G},T)$ Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Shamir, M Farasat

    2016-01-01

    We explore the recently introduced modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity, $f(\\mathcal{G},T)$ pragmatic with $\\mathcal{G}$, the Gauss-Bonnet term, and ${T}$, the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Noether symmetry approach has been used to develop some cosmologically viable $f(\\mathcal{G},T)$ gravity models. The Noether equations of modified gravity are reported for flat FRW universe. Two specific models have been studied to determine the conserved quantities and exact solutions. In particular, the well known deSitter solution is reconstructed for some specific choice of $f(\\mathcal{G},T)$ gravity model.

  1. Noether symmetry approach in f(G,T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamir, M.F.; Ahmad, Mushtaq [National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, Lahore Campus (Pakistan)

    2017-01-15

    We explore the recently introduced modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity (Sharif and Ikram in Eur Phys J C 76:640, 2016), f(G,T) pragmatic with G, the Gauss-Bonnet term, and T, the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Noether symmetry approach has been used to develop some cosmologically viable f(G,T) gravity models. The Noether equations of modified gravity are reported for flat FRW universe. Two specific models have been studied to determine the conserved quantities and exact solutions. In particular, the well known deSitter solution is reconstructed for some specific choice of f(G,T) gravity model. (orig.)

  2. Ensemble average theory of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Nima

    2016-12-01

    We put forward the idea that all the theoretically consistent models of gravity have contributions to the observed gravity interaction. In this formulation, each model comes with its own Euclidean path-integral weight where general relativity (GR) has automatically the maximum weight in high-curvature regions. We employ this idea in the framework of Lovelock models and show that in four dimensions the result is a specific form of the f (R ,G ) model. This specific f (R ,G ) satisfies the stability conditions and possesses self-accelerating solutions. Our model is consistent with the local tests of gravity since its behavior is the same as in GR for the high-curvature regime. In the low-curvature regime the gravitational force is weaker than in GR, which can be interpreted as the existence of a repulsive fifth force for very large scales. Interestingly, there is an intermediate-curvature regime where the gravitational force is stronger in our model compared to GR. The different behavior of our model in comparison with GR in both low- and intermediate-curvature regimes makes it observationally distinguishable from Λ CDM .

  3. Hybrid theory of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Nahomi; Maki, Takuya; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a model of gravity in which a General Relativity metric tensor and an effective metric generated from a single scalar formulated in geometric scalar gravity are mixed. We show that the model yields the exact Schwarzschild solution, along with accelerating behavior of scale factors in cosmological solutions.

  4. No consistent bimetric gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, S; Waldron, A

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for a consistent, nonlinear, partially massless (PM), gauge symmetry of bimetric gravity (BMG). Just as for single metric massive gravity, ultimate consistency of both BMG and the putative PM BMG theory relies crucially on this gauge symmetry. We argue, however, that it does not exist.

  5. Self-Dual Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Self-dual gravity is a diffeomorphism invariant theory in four dimensions that describes two propagating polarisations of the graviton and has a negative mass dimension coupling constant. Nevertheless, this theory is not only renormalisable but quantum finite, as we explain. We also collect various facts about self-dual gravity that are scattered across the literature.

  6. Hydrological Effects in Gravity: From a Disturbing Influence to a Desired Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, C.; Jentzsch, G.; Jahr, T.; Naujoks, M.; Weise, A.

    2006-12-01

    as well as for the development of reduction algorithms two irrigation and one injection experiment have been carried out. Each time a defined amount of water was added to a specific area in the gravimeter vicinity and the resulting gravity and hydrological variations were observed. The gravity changes due to the propagation and dispersion of a water front which runs downhill can successfully be described by time-dependent changes in the water-filled pore volume. In addition around our observatory a local gravity network was established. Using excellent LCR field gravimeters the gravity differences between these observation points were measured in nine campaigns so far. The hydrological variations observed by the SG as well as by water level, soil moisture and run off measurements are significantly provable as gravity changes in the range of some μGal between different observation points of the network by repeated gravity measurements. Changes in gravity differences are observed between points in the valley and at the steep slope to the east of the observatory: bigger during dry weather and smaller during wet weather conditions. This indicates significant hydrological variations in the slope. Further, 3D gravity modelling is carried out based on the free air anomaly. In the model the measured hydrological variations are converted to density changes of the subsoil. Areas contributing significantly to gravity changes are identified. First results indicate a good agreement in the range of the measured and modelled gravity changes. jena.de/geophysik/

  7. Gravity survey of the southwestern part of the sourthern Utah geothermal belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.T.; Cook, K.L.

    1981-03-01

    A gravity survey covering an area of 6200 km/sup 2/ was made over the southwestern part of the southern Utah geothermal belt. The objective of the gravity survey is to delineate the geologic structures and assist in the understanding of the geothermal potential of the area. A total of 726 new gravity stations together with 205 existing gravity stations, are reduced to give: (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, and (2) a fourth-order residual gravity anomaly map; both maps have a 2-mgal contour interval. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map shows an east-trending regional gravity belt with a total relief of about 70 mgal which crosses the central portion of the survey area. The gravity belt is attributed to a crustal lateral density variation of 0.1 gm/cc from a depth of 5 to 15 km.

  8. The mechanics of gravity-driven faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, L.; Barrows, V.

    2010-04-01

    Faulting can result from either of two different mechanisms. These involve fundamentally different energetics. In elastic rebound, locked-in elastic strain energy is transformed into the earthquake (seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone). In force-driven faulting, the forces that create the stress on the fault supply work or energy to the faulting process. Half of this energy is transformed into the earthquake and half goes into an increase in locked-in elastic strain. In elastic rebound the locked-in elastic strain drives slip on the fault. In force-driven faulting it stops slip on the fault. Tectonic stress is reasonably attributed to gravity acting on topography and the Earth's lateral density variations. This includes the thermal convection that ultimately drives plate tectonics. Mechanical analysis has shown the intensity of the gravitational tectonic stress that is associated with the regional topography and lateral density variations that actually exist is comparable with the stress drops that are commonly associated with tectonic earthquakes; both are in the range of tens of bar to several hundred bar. The gravity collapse seismic mechanism assumes the fault fails and slips in direct response to the gravitational tectonic stress. Gravity collapse is an example of force-driven faulting. In the simplest case, energy that is released from the gravitational potential of the stress-causing topography and lateral density variations is equally split between the earthquake and the increase in locked-in elastic strain. The release of gravitational potential energy requires a change in the Earth's density distribution. Gravitational body forces are solely dependent on density so a change in the density distribution requires a change in the body forces. This implies the existence of volumetric body-force displacements. The volumetric body-force displacements are in addition to displacements generated by slip on the fault. They must exist if gravity

  9. The mechanics of gravity-driven faulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barrows

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Faulting can result from either of two different mechanisms. These involve fundamentally different energetics. In elastic rebound, locked-in elastic strain energy is transformed into the earthquake (seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone. In force-driven faulting, the forces that create the stress on the fault supply work or energy to the faulting process. Half of this energy is transformed into the earthquake and half goes into an increase in locked-in elastic strain. In elastic rebound the locked-in elastic strain drives slip on the fault. In force-driven faulting it stops slip on the fault.

    Tectonic stress is reasonably attributed to gravity acting on topography and the Earth's lateral density variations. This includes the thermal convection that ultimately drives plate tectonics. Mechanical analysis has shown the intensity of the gravitational tectonic stress that is associated with the regional topography and lateral density variations that actually exist is comparable with the stress drops that are commonly associated with tectonic earthquakes; both are in the range of tens of bar to several hundred bar.

    The gravity collapse seismic mechanism assumes the fault fails and slips in direct response to the gravitational tectonic stress. Gravity collapse is an example of force-driven faulting. In the simplest case, energy that is released from the gravitational potential of the stress-causing topography and lateral density variations is equally split between the earthquake and the increase in locked-in elastic strain.

    The release of gravitational potential energy requires a change in the Earth's density distribution. Gravitational body forces are solely dependent on density so a change in the density distribution requires a change in the body forces. This implies the existence of volumetric body-force displacements. The volumetric body-force displacements are in addition to displacements generated by slip on

  10. Infrared lessons for ultraviolet gravity: the case of massive gravity and Born-Infeld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Olmo, Gonzalo J.

    2014-11-01

    We generalize the ultraviolet sector of gravitation via a Born-Infeld action using lessons from massive gravity. The theory contains all of the elementary symmetric polynomials and is treated in the Palatini formalism. We show how the connection can be solved algebraically to be the Levi-Civita connection of an effective metric. The non-linearity of the algebraic equations yields several branches, one of which always reduces to General Relativity at low curvatures. We explore in detail a minimal version of the theory, for which we study solutions in the presence of a perfect fluid with special attention to the cosmological evolution. In vacuum we recover Ricci-flat solutions, but also an additional physical solution corresponding to an Einstein space. The existence of two physical branches remains for non-vacuum solutions and, in addition, the branch that connects to the Einstein space in vacuum is not very sensitive to the specific value of the energy density. For the branch that connects to the General Relativity limit we generically find three behaviours for the Hubble function depending on the equation of state of the fluid, namely: either there is a maximum value for the energy density that connects continuously with vacuum, or the energy density can be arbitrarily large but the Hubble function saturates and remains constant at high energy densities, or the energy density is unbounded and the Hubble function grows faster than in General Relativity. The second case is particularly interesting because it could offer an interesting inflationary epoch even in the presence of a dust component. Finally, we discuss the possibility of avoiding certain types of singularities within the minimal model.

  11. The 2D Density Distribution Inversion of Gravity Data Based on the Differential Form of Tikhonov Regularization and Its Application in Poyang Basin%基于Tikhonov正则化微分形式的重力2D密度反演方法及其在鄱阳盆地的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷卓

    2013-01-01

    详细讨论了用于计算重力密度分布的2D密度模型方法.该方法将已知地质地球物理数据作为先验信息以相对和绝对约束的形式引入反演方程中,从而在很大程度上减少了反演的多解性.首次利用洪吉诺夫正则化方法的微分形式处理重力数据的反问题,解决了方程解的病态性的同时进一步提高了反演结果的精度.将该反演方法应用于鄱阳湖盆地的剖面重力数据反演中,根据反演结果及重震综合解释结果将该盆地划分为三个构造分区.%The method of 2D density model of gravity data to calculate the density distribution is discussed in detail. The known geological and geophysical data is as the priori information in the form of relative and absolute constraints which are introduced into the inversion equations, so the multiplicity of solutions is reduced. The differential form of the Tikhonov Regularization method is firstly applied in the inversion of the gravity data. The illness of the equations is solved while the calculation accuracy is improved. The gravity data inversion method is applied to the cross-section of the Poyang Lake basin. According to the interpretation about the results of the basin of the inversion results and re-shock, the Poyang basin is divided into three tectonic divisions.

  12. How to make old and dense gravity data consistent with the latest gravity data? -Example in Japan-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, T.

    2016-12-01

    Generally, old gravity data aren't consistent with newer data even if there markers remain intact. Such discrepancy often reaches more than 100 micro Gal, which is much larger than measurement errors. Therefore, to make use of the historic gravity data together with current gravity data for various uses e.g. geoid construction, estimation of subsurface structure, precise land gravity survey etc., the adjustment of old data to the latest gravity value. Here, we developed such a conversion method. Simple interpolation method isn't useful for this purpose because raw gravity difference data include local contribution that reduce spatial coherence of gravity data. So we must correct the local tectonic effect assimilating other geodetic observations. We assume that differences between new and old gravity data are composed of contribution of crustal deformation effect and that of data processing method/reference system. Moreover, crustal deformation effect is decomposed into height variation and density variation of crust caused by earthquakes. First, we estimated effect of height variation at a marker between the observations. We use continuous GNSS observation data to estimate contribution after 2003, and spirit leveling data before 2003. These data are interpolated in space and time. The gravity change by height variation was calculated using a bouguer gravity gradient depending old observation period of each marker. Second, effect of density variation is estimated by a rectangle fault model using half-space elastic dislocation theory. Then we assumed that residuals represent systematic offset caused by the difference of data processing method/reference system. Now the offset distribution may be evaluated by spatial interpolation thanks to the enhanced spatial coherence of residuals after correcting for local tectonic effect. Consequently, we got a gravity difference distribution which can make old gravity data consistent with new one within 45 micro Gal in precision.

  13. Eddington's theory of gravity and its progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañados, Máximo; Ferreira, Pedro G

    2010-07-01

    We resurrect Eddington's proposal for the gravitational action in the presence of a cosmological constant and extend it to include matter fields. We show that the Newton-Poisson equation is modified in the presence of sources and that charged black holes show great similarities with those arising in Born-Infeld electrodynamics coupled to gravity. When we consider homogeneous and isotropic space-times, we find that there is a minimum length (and maximum density) at early times, clearly pointing to an alternative theory of the big bang. We thus argue that the modern formulation of Eddington's theory, Born-Infeld gravity, presents us with a novel, nonsingular description of the Universe.

  14. Terminating black holes in quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bambi, Cosimo; Modesto, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    We study the homogeneous gravitational collapse of a spherical cloud composed of radiation or dust in a super-renormalizable and asymptotically free theory of gravity. The central singularity appearing in classical general relativity is resolved in both cases. The singularity is replaced by a bounce, after which the cloud re-expands indefinitely. In this model, strictly speaking, a black hole never forms and the high density state governed by quantum-gravitational physics is visible to faraway observers. Our result is quite general, and it holds for gravity theories with form factors suggested by string field theory and non-commutative geometries.

  15. A possible gauge formulation for gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Gaitan, R

    2001-01-01

    A possible Yang-Mills like lagrangian formulation for gravity is explored. The starting point consists on two next assumptions. First, the metric is assumed as a real map from a given gauge group. Second, a gauge invariant lagrangian density is considered with the condition that it is related to the Einstein one up to a bound term. We study a stationary solution of the abelian case for the spherical symmetry, which is connected to the M\\"oller's Maxwell like formulation for gravity. Finally, it is showed the consistence of this formulation with the Newtonian limit.

  16. Palatini Actions and Quantum Gravity Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Olmo, Gonzalo J

    2011-01-01

    We show that a quadratic gravitational Lagrangian in the Palatini formulation is able to capture different aspects of quantum gravity phenomenology in a single framework. In particular, we show that in this theory field excitations propagating with different energy-densities perceive different background metrics, which is a fundamental characteristic of the DSR and Rainbow Gravity approaches. Also, the resulting isotropic and anisotropic cosmologies are free from the big bang singularity. This singularity avoidance occurs non-perturbatively and shares some similitudes with the effective dynamics of loop quantum cosmology.

  17. Exploring the Nature of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, T

    2016-01-01

    I clarify the differences between various approaches in the literature which attempt to link gravity and thermodynamics. I then describe a new perspective based on the following features: (1) As in the case of any other matter field, the gravitational field equations should also remain unchanged if a constant is added to the Lagrangian; in other words, the field equations of gravity should remain invariant under the transformation $T^a_b \\to T^a_b + \\delta^a_b $(constant). (2) Each event of spacetime has a certain number ($f$) of microscopic degrees of freedom (`atoms of spacetime'). This quantity $f$ is proportional to the area measure of an equi-geodesic surface, centered at that event, when the geodesic distance tends to zero. The spacetime should have a zero-point length in order for $f$ to remain finite. (3) The dynamics is determined by extremizing the heat density at all events of the spacetime. The heat density is the sum of a part contributed by matter and a part contributed by the atoms of spacetime...

  18. Fab 5: Noncanonical Kinetic Gravity, Self Tuning, and Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, Stephen A; Linder, Eric V

    2012-01-01

    We investigate circumstances under which one can generalize Horndeski's most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Specifically we demonstrate that a nonlinear combination of purely kinetic gravity terms can give rise to an accelerating universe without the addition of extra propagating degrees of freedom on cosmological backgrounds, and exhibit self tuning to bring a large cosmological constant under control. This nonlinear approach leads to new properties that may be instructive for exploring the behaviors of gravity.

  19. Density Spectrums from Kinetic Inflations

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, J

    1996-01-01

    The pole-like accelerated expansion stages purely driven by the coupling between the gravity and the dilaton field without referring to the potential term can be realized in a class of generalized gravity theories. We consider three such scenarios based on the scalar-tensor gravity, the induced gravity and the string theory. Quantum fluctuations during the expansion stages (including more general situations) can be derived in exact analytic forms. Assuming that the pole-like acceleration stage provides a viable inflation scenario in the early universe we derive the generated classical density spectrums. The generated classical density field shows a generic tilted spectrum with $n \\simeq 4$ which differs from the observed spectrum supporting $n \\simeq 1$.

  20. Antarctic Crustal Thickness from Gravity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive regional maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning (1-1/β) and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. The continental lithosphere thinning distribution, used to define the initial thermal model temperature perturbation is derived from the gravity inversion and uses no a priori isochron information; as a consequence the gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition location, which is independent of ocean isochron information. The gravity anomaly contribution from ice thickness is included in the gravity inversion, as is the contribution from sediments which assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. Data used in the gravity inversion are elevation and bathymetry, free-air gravity anomaly, the most recent Bedmap2 ice thickness and bedrock topography compilation south of 60 degrees south (Fretwell et al., 2013) and relatively sparse constraints on sediment thickness. Our gravity inversion study predicts thick crust (> 45 km) under interior East Antarctica penetrated by narrow continental rifts that feature relatively thinner crust. The East Antarctic Rift System (EARS) is a major Permian to Cretaceous age rift system that appears to extend from the continental margin at the Lambert Rift to the South Pole region, a distance of 2500 km. This is comparable in scale to the well-studied East African rift system. Intermediate crustal thickness with an inferred linear rift fabric is predicted under Coates Land. An extensive region of either thick oceanic crust or highly thinned continental crust is predicted offshore Oates Land and north Victoria Land, and also off West Antarctica

  1. Effect of Disk Self-Gravity on Planetary Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, T.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2005-08-01

    We carry out hydrodynamic simulations of a proto-planetary disk with an embedded low-mass proto-planet in order to investigate the effect of self gravity of the disk on the migration velocity of the planet. For the disk model, we adopt power functions for the surface density profile and the temperature profile. We investigate the dependence on various parameters, such as the exponents of power functions of temperature and surface density, disk mass, and planet mass. We find that, without self gravity, the dependence of the planet mass on the torque is qualitatively agree with linear analysis of Tanaka, Takeuchi and Ward 2002. With self-gravity cases, the dependence of the disk surface density on the torque is slightly stronger than linear relationship, which infers that the effect of self gravity could accelerate inward migration of planets. This research is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT 16077202).

  2. Titan's gravity: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, D.; Iess, L.; Racioppa, P.; Armstrong, J. W.; Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2016-12-01

    Since its arrival at Saturn in 2004, Cassini performed nine flybys devoted to the determination of Titan's gravity field and its tidal variations. The last gravity flyby of the mission (T122) took place on Aug. 10, 2016. We will present an updated gravity solution, based on all available data. These include also an additional flyby (T110, March 2015, primarily devoted to the imaging Titan's north polar lakes) carried out with the low gain antenna. This flyby was particularly valuable because closest approach occurred at high latitude (75°N), over an area not previously sampled. Published gravity results (Iess et al., 2012) indicated that Titan is subject to large eccentricity tides in response to Saturn's time varying forcing field. The magnitude of the response quadrupole field, controlled by the Love number k2, was used to infer the existence of an internal ocean. The new gravity field determination provides a better estimate of k2, to a level of a few percent. In addition to a full 3x3 field, the new solution includes also higher degree and order harmonic coefficients (such as J4) and offers an improved map of gravity anomalies. The updated geoid and its associated uncertainty could be used to refine the gravity-altimetry correlative analysis and for improved interpretation of radar altimetric data.

  3. The Energetics of Gravity Driven Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, L.

    2007-12-01

    Faulting can result from either of two different mechanisms. These involve fundamentally different energetics. In displacement-bounded faulting, locked-in elastic strain energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone. Elastic rebound is an example of displacement-bounded faulting. In force-driven faulting, the forces that create the stress on the fault supply work or energy to the faulting process. Half of this energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and half goes into an increase in locked-in elastic strain. In displacement-bounded faulting the locked-in elastic strain drives slip on the fault. In force-driven faulting it stops slip on the fault. Tectonic stress is reasonably attributed to gravity acting on topography and the Earth's lateral density variations. This includes the thermal convection that ultimately drives plate tectonics. The gravity collapse seismic mechanism assumes the fault fails and slips in direct response to the gravitational tectonic stress. Gravity collapse is an example of force-driven faulting. In the simplest case, energy that is released from the gravitational potential of the topography and internal stress-causing density variations is equally split between the seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and the increase in locked-in elastic strain. The release of gravitational potential energy requires a change in the Earth's density distribution. Gravitational body forces are solely dependent on density so a change in the density distribution requires a change in the body forces. This implies the existence of volumetric body-force displacements. The volumetric body-force displacements are in addition to displacements generated by slip on the fault. They must exist if gravity participates in the energetics of the faulting process. From the perspective of gravitational tectonics, the gravity collapse mechanism is direct and simple. The related mechanics are a little more

  4. The study and applications of photochemical-dynamical gravity wave model Ⅱ-- The effects of stable gravity wave on chemical species distribution in mesosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao(徐寄遥); MA; Ruiping(马瑞平); A.K.Smith

    2002-01-01

    A nonlinear, compressible, non-isothermal gravity wave model that involves photochemistry is used to study the effects of gravity wave on atmospheric chemical species distributions in this paper. The changes in the distributions of oxygen compound and hydrogen compound density induced by gravity wave propagation are simulated. The results indicate that when a gravity wave propagates through a mesopause region, even if it does not break, it can influence the background distributions of chemical species. The effect of gravity wave on chemical species at night is larger than in daytime.

  5. World gravity standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uotila, U. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to use gravity anomalies in geodetic computations and geophysical interpretations, the observed gravity values from which anomalies are derived should be referred to one consistent world wide system. The International Gravity Standardization Net 1971 was adapted by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics at Moscow in 1971, the network was result of extensive cooperation by many organizations and individuals around the world. The network contains more than 1800 stations around the world. The data used in the adjustment included more than 25,000 gravimetry, pendulum and absolute measurements.

  6. Phenomenological Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    If the history of science has taught us anything, it's that persistence and creativity makes the once impossible possible. It has long been thought experimental tests of quantum gravity are impossible. But during the last decade, several different approaches have been proposed that allow us to test, if not the fundamental theory of quantum gravity itself, so at least characteristic features this theory can have. For the first time we can probe experimentally domains in which quantum physics and gravity cohabit, in spite of our failure so far to make a convincing marriage of them on a theoretical level.

  7. Spacetime Singularities in Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Eric A.

    2000-04-01

    Recent advances in 2+1 dimensional quantum gravity have provided tools to study the effects of quantization of spacetime on black hole and big bang/big crunch type singularities. I investigate effects of quantization of spacetime on singularities of the 2+1 dimensional BTZ black hole and the 2+1 dimensional torus universe. Hosoya has considered the BTZ black hole, and using a "quantum generalized affine parameter" (QGAP), has shown that, for some specific paths, quantum effects "smear" the singularities. Using gaussian wave functions as generic wave functions, I found that, for both BTZ black hole and the torus universe, there are families of paths that still reach the singularities with a finite QGAP, suggesting that singularities persist in quantum gravity. More realistic calculations, using modular invariant wave functions of Carlip and Nelson for the torus universe, offer further support for this conclusion. Currently work is in progress to study more realistic quantum gravity effects for BTZ black holes and other spacetime models.

  8. On a symmetry relating gravity with antigravity

    CERN Document Server

    Quiros, Israel

    2014-01-01

    I investigate the impact of a "would be" fundamental symmetry of the laws of nature under the interchange of gravity and antigravity, on the understanding of negative energies in general relativity. For this purpose a toy model that is based on Einstein-Hilbert gravity with two minimally coupled self-interacting scalar fields is explored, where the second (exotic) scalar field with negative energy density may be regarded, alternatively, as an antigravitating field with positive energy. Spontaneous breakdown of reflection symmetry is then considered in order to discuss the implications the proposed "would be" fundamental symmetry might have for the vanishing of the cosmological constant. A possible connection of the gravity-antigravity symmetry with the so called quintom field is also explored.

  9. Loop quantum gravity as an effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2012-01-01

    As a canonical and generally covariant gauge theory, loop quantum gravity requires special techniques to derive effective actions or equations. If the proper constructions are taken into account, the theory, in spite of considerable ambiguities at the dynamical level, allows for a meaningful phenomenology to be developed, by which it becomes falsifiable. The tradiational problems plaguing canonical quantum-gravity theories, such as the anomaly issue or the problem of time, can be overcome or are irrelevant at the effective level, resulting in consistent means of physical evaluations. This contribution presents aspects of canonical equations and related notions of (deformed) space-time structures and discusses implications in loop quantum gravity, such as signature change at high density from holonomy corrections, and falsifiability thanks to inverse-triad corrections.

  10. Global map of the isostatic gravity disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzer, Robert; Chen, Wenjin; Novák, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    We compile and compare global maps of the isostatic gravity disturbances for different isostatic models. The Airy-Heiskanen, Prat-Hayford and Vening-Meinesz Moritz models of isostasy are taken into consideration. These isostatic gravity data are then used to interpret the Earth's inner density structures and geophysical processes occurring within the lithosphere and sub-lithosphere mantle. The investigation is done separately for the oceanic and continental crustal structures. The isostatic gravity disturbances are computed globally using the global geopotential model (GOCO-03c), global topographic/bathymetric model (DTM2006.0) including ice-thickness data, and sediment data taken form the global crustal model (CRUST2.0).

  11. Optimization schemes for the inversion of Bouguer gravity anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Azucena

    associated with structural changes [16]; therefore, it complements those geophysical methods with the same depth resolution that sample a different physical property (e.g. electromagnetic surveys sampling electric conductivity) or even those with different depth resolution sampling an alternative physical property (e.g. large scale seismic reflection surveys imaging the crust and top upper mantle using seismic velocity fields). In order to improve the resolution of Bouguer gravity anomalies, and reduce their ambiguity and uncertainty for the modeling of the shallow crust, we propose the implementation of primal-dual interior point methods for the optimization of density structure models through the introduction of physical constraints for transitional areas obtained from previously acquired geophysical data sets. This dissertation presents in Chapter 2 an initial forward model implementation for the calculation of Bouguer gravity anomalies in the Porphyry Copper-Molybdenum (Cu-Mo) Copper Flat Mine region located in Sierra County, New Mexico. In Chapter 3, we present a constrained optimization framework (using interior-point methods) for the inversion of 2-D models of Earth structures delineating density contrasts of anomalous bodies in uniform regions and/or boundaries between layers in layered environments. We implement the proposed algorithm using three different synthetic gravitational data sets with varying complexity. Specifically, we improve the 2-dimensional density structure models by getting rid of unacceptable solutions (geologically unfeasible models or those not satisfying the required constraints) given the reduction of the solution space. Chapter 4 shows the results from the implementation of our algorithm for the inversion of gravitational data obtained from the area surrounding the Porphyry Cu-Mo Cooper Flat Mine in Sierra County, NM. Information obtained from previous induced polarization surveys and core samples served as physical constraints for the

  12. Stress-energy-momentum of affine-metric gravity generalized Komar superpotential

    CERN Document Server

    Giachetta, G

    1995-01-01

    In case of the Einstein's gravitation theory and its first order Palatini reformulation, the stress-energy-momentum of gravity has been proved to reduce to the Komar superpotential. We generalize this result to the affine-metric theory of gravity in case of general connections and arbitrary Lagrangian densities invariant under general covariant transformations. In this case, the stress-energy-momentum of gravity comes to the generalized Komar superpotential depending on a Lagrangian density in a precise way.

  13. Improving compact gravity inversion using new weighting functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalehnoee, Mohammad Hossein; Ansari, Abdolhamid; Ghorbani, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a method to estimate the geometry, location and densities of anomalies coming from 2-D gravity data based on compact gravity inversion technique. Compact gravity inversion is simple, fast and user friendly but severely depends on the number of model parameters, that is, by increasing the model parameters, the anomalies tend to concentrate near the surface. To overcome this ambiguity new weighting functions based on density contrast, depth, and compactness models have been introduced. Variable compactness factors have been defined here to get either a sharp or a smooth model based on the depth of the source or existence of prior information. Depth weighting derived from one station of gravity data whereas the effect of gravity data is 2-D and 3-D. To compensate this limitation an innovating weighting function namely kernel function has been introduced which multiplies with weight and compactness matrixes to yield a general model weighting function. The method is tested using three different sets of synthetic examples: a body at various depths (20, 40, 80 and 140 m), two bodies at the same depth but various distances to estimate lateral resolution and three bodies with negative and positive density contrast in different depths. The method is also applied to three real gravity data of Woodlawn massive sulphide body, sulphides mineralization of British Colombia and iron ore body of Missouri. The method produces solutions consistent with the known geologic attributes of the gravity sources, illustrating its potential practicality.

  14. Improving compact gravity inversion based on new weighting functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalehnoee, Mohammad Hossein; Ansari, Abdolhamid; Ghorbani, Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a method to estimate the geometry, location and densities of anomalies coming from two-dimensional gravity data based on compact gravity inversion technique. Compact gravity inversion is simple, fast and user friendly but severely depends on the number of model parameters, i.e. by increasing the model parameters, the anomalies tend to concentrate near the surface. To overcome this ambiguity new weighting functions based on density contrast, depth, and compactness models have been introduced. Variable compactness factors have been defined here to get either a sharp or a smooth model based on the depth of the source or existence of prior information. Depth weighting derived from one station of gravity data whereas the effect of gravity data is two- and three-dimensional. To compensate this limitation an innovating weighting function namely kernel function has been introduced which multiplies with weight and compactness matrixes to yield a general model weighting function. The method is tested using three different sets of synthetic examples: a body at various depths (20, 40, 80 and 140 m), two bodies at the same depth but various distances to estimate lateral resolution and three bodies with negative and positive density contrast in different depths. The method is also applied to three real gravity data of Woodlawn massive sulfide body, sulfides mineralization of British Colombia and iron ore body of Missouri. The method produces solutions consistent with the known geologic attributes of the gravity sources, illustrating its potential practicality.

  15. Gravity Analysis of the Jeffera Basin, Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickus, K.; Gabtni, H.; Jallouli, C.

    2004-12-01

    boundaries of subsurface density contrasts and emphasizes that the Jeffera basin is dominated by northwest-trending anomalies while the Saharan Platform consists of a series of northeast- and east-trending anomalies. The final interpretation of the gravity data will consist of constructing a series of two and one-half dimensional gravity models across the Jeffera basin.

  16. Topological Induced Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We propose a topological model of induced gravity (pregeometry) where both Newton's coupling constant and the cosmological constant appear as integration constants in solving field equations. The matter sector of a scalar field is also considered, and by solving field equations it is shown that various types of cosmological solutions in the FRW universe can be obtained. A detailed analysis is given of the meaning of the BRST transformations, which make the induced gravity be a topological field theory, by means of the canonical quantization analysis, and the physical reason why such BRST transformations are needed in the present formalism is clarified. Finally, we propose a dynamical mechanism for fixing the Lagrange multiplier fields by following the Higgs mechanism. The present study clearly indicates that the induced gravity can be constructed at the classical level without recourse to quantum fluctuations of matter and suggests an interesting relationship between the induced gravity and the topological qu...

  17. Gravity Data for Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (55,907 records) were gathered by various governmental organizations (and academia) using a variety of methods. This data base was received...

  18. Causal Newton Gravity Law

    CERN Document Server

    Zinoviev, Yury M

    2012-01-01

    The equations of the relativistic causal Newton gravity law for the planets of the solar system are studied in the approximation when the Sun rests at the coordinates origin and the planets do not iteract between each other.

  19. DMA Antarctic Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (65,164 records) were gathered by various governmental organizations (and academia) using a variety of methods. The data base was received...

  20. Einsteinian cubic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Pablo; Cano, Pablo A.

    2016-11-01

    We drastically simplify the problem of linearizing a general higher-order theory of gravity. We reduce it to the evaluation of its Lagrangian on a particular Riemann tensor depending on two parameters, and the computation of two derivatives with respect to one of those parameters. We use our method to construct a D -dimensional cubic theory of gravity which satisfies the following properties: (1) it shares the spectrum of Einstein gravity, i.e., it only propagates a transverse and massless graviton on a maximally symmetric background; (2) it is defined in the same way in general dimensions; (3) it is neither trivial nor topological in four dimensions. Up to cubic order in curvature, the only previously known theories satisfying the first two requirements are the Lovelock ones. We show that, up to cubic order, there exists only one additional theory satisfying requirements (1) and (2). Interestingly, this theory is, along with Einstein gravity, the only one which also satisfies (3).

  1. Haxby Worldwide Gravity Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1985, Dr. William F. Haxby of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University prepared this data base of free-air gravity anomalies, based on the...

  2. Gravity Data for Egypt

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (71 records) were gathered by various governmental organizations (and academia) using a variety of methods. This data base was received in...

  3. Euclidean gravity attracts

    CERN Document Server

    De Bakker, B V; Bakker, Bas de; Smit, Jan

    1994-01-01

    We look at gravitational attraction in simplicial gravity using the dynamical triangulation method. On the dynamical triangulation configurations we measure quenched propagators of a free massive scalar field. The masses measured from these propagators show that gravitational attraction is present.

  4. The earth's shape and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, G D; Wilson, J T

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Shape and Gravity focuses on the progress of the use of geophysical methods in investigating the interior of the earth and its shape. The publication first offers information on gravity, geophysics, geodesy, and geology and gravity measurements. Discussions focus on gravity measurements and reductions, potential and equipotential surfaces, absolute and relative measurements, and gravity networks. The text then elaborates on the shape of the sea-level surface and reduction of gravity observations. The text takes a look at gravity anomalies and structures in the earth's crust; interp

  5. Towards unification of terrestrial gravity data sets in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellmann, Artu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravity data in Estonia have been collected by different institutions over many decades. This study assesses the suitability of available gravity data for ensuring a 1 cm geoid modelling accuracy over Estonia and in the Baltic Sea region in general. The main focus of this study is on the determination and elimination of discrepancies between three nationwide datasets. It was detected that one tested historic gravity dataset contained inadmissible systematic biases with respect to other tested datasets. Possible ways of gravity data improvement are discussed. More specifically, new field observation campaigns and aspects of using their outcomes in subsequent regional geoid modelling are suggested.

  6. `Iconoclastic', Categorical Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Raptis, I

    2005-01-01

    This is a two-part, `2-in-1' paper. In Part I, the introductory talk at `Glafka--2004: Iconoclastic Approaches to Quantum Gravity' international theoretical physics conference is presented in paper form (without references). In Part II, the more technical talk, originally titled ``Abstract Differential Geometric Excursion to Classical and Quantum Gravity'', is presented in paper form (with citations). The two parts are closely entwined, as Part I makes general motivating remarks for Part II.

  7. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, F.F. [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Purely affine Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2014-01-01

    We develop a topological theory of gravity with torsion where metric has a dynamical rather than a kinematical origin. This approach towards gravity resembles pre-geometrical approaches in which a fundamental metric does not exist, but the affine connection gives place to a local inertial structure. Such feature reminds us of Mach's principle, that assumes the inertial forces should have dynamical origin. Additionally, a Newtonian gravitational force is obtained in the non-relativistic limit of the theory.

  9. Application of linear inverse theory to borehole gravity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhard, N.R.

    1991-09-01

    Traditional borehole gravity interpretations are based upon an earth model which assumes horizontal, laterally infinite, uniformly thick, and constant density layers. I apply discrete stabilized linear inverse theory to determine the density distribution directly from borehole gravity observations that have been corrected for drift, tide, and terrain. The stabilization is the result of including a priori data about the free-air gradient and the density structure in the inversion process. The discrete generalized linear inverse approach enables one to solve for a density distribution using all of the borehole gravity data. Moreover, the data need not be free-air corrected. An important feature of the approach is that density estimates are not required to be density averages between adjacent borehole gravity observations as in the traditional method. This approach further permits the explicit incorporation of independent density information from gamma-gamma logging tools or laboratory core measurements. Finally, explicit linear constraints upon the density and/or free-air gradient can also be handled. The non-uniqueness of the density structure determined by the inversion process is represented in a resolution matrix. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  11. Scaling Exponents for Lattice Quantum Gravity in Four Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hamber, Herbert W

    2015-01-01

    In this work nonperturbative aspects of quantum gravity are investigated using the lattice formulation, and some new results are presented for critical exponents, amplitudes and invariant correlation functions. Values for the universal scaling dimensions are compared with other nonperturbative approaches to gravity in four dimensions, and specifically to the conjectured value for the universal critical exponent $\

  12. Muscle-specific AMPK β1β2-null mice display a myopathy due to loss of capillary density in nonpostural muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melissa M.; Wang, David C.; D'Souza, Donna M.; Krause, Matthew P.; Layne, Andrew S.; Criswell, David S.; O'Neill, Hayley M.; Connor, Michael K.; Anderson, Judy E.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Hawke, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of metabolism. While muscle-specific AMPK β1β2 double-knockout (β1β2M-KO) mice display alterations in metabolic and mitochondrial capacity, their severe exercise intolerance suggested a secondary contributor to the observed phenotype. We find that tibialis anterior (TA), but not soleus, muscles of sedentary β1β2M-KO mice display a significant myopathy (decreased myofiber areas, increased split and necrotic myofibers, and increased centrally nucleated myofibers. A mitochondrial- and fiber-type-specific etiology to the myopathy was ruled out. However, β1β2M-KO TA muscles displayed significant (Pmuscle resulted from impaired AMPK-nNOSμ signaling, causing increased platelet aggregation, impaired vasodilation, and, ultimately, ischemic injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, AMPK-specific phosphorylation (Ser1446) of nNOSμ was decreased in β1β2M-KO compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The AMPK-nNOSμ relationship was further demonstrated by administration of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) to β1β2-MKO muscles and C2C12 myotubes. AICAR significantly increased nNOSμ phosphorylation and nitric oxide production (Pmuscles and C2C12 myotubes but not in β1β2M-KO muscles. These findings highlight the importance of the AMPK-nNOSμ pathway in resting skeletal muscle.—Thomas, M. M., Wang, D. C., D'Souza, D. M., Krause, M. P., Layne, A. S., Criswell, D. S., O'Neill, H. M., Connor, M. K., Anderson, J. E., Kemp, B. E., Steinberg, G. R., and Hawke, T. J. Muscle-specific AMPK β1β2-null mice display a myopathy due to loss of capillary density in nonpostural muscles. PMID:24522207

  13. The inverse gravimetric problem in gravity modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanso, F.; Tscherning, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main purposes of geodesy is to determine the gravity field of the Earth in the space outside its physical surface. This purpose can be pursued without any particular knowledge of the internal density even if the exact shape of the physical surface of the Earth is not known, though this seems to entangle the two domains, as it was in the old Stoke's theory before the appearance of Molodensky's approach. Nevertheless, even when large, dense and homogeneous data sets are available, it was always recognized that subtracting from the gravity field the effect of the outer layer of the masses (topographic effect) yields a much smoother field. This is obviously more important when a sparse data set is bad so that any smoothing of the gravity field helps in interpolating between the data without raising the modeling error, this approach is generally followed because it has become very cheap in terms of computing time since the appearance of spectral techniques. The mathematical description of the Inverse Gravimetric Problem (IGP) is dominated mainly by two principles, which in loose terms can be formulated as follows: the knowledge of the external gravity field determines mainly the lateral variations of the density; and the deeper the density anomaly giving rise to a gravity anomaly, the more improperly posed is the problem of recovering the former from the latter. The statistical relation between rho and n (and its inverse) is also investigated in its general form, proving that degree cross-covariances have to be introduced to describe the behavior of rho. The problem of the simultaneous estimate of a spherical anomalous potential and of the external, topographic masses is addressed criticizing the choice of the mixed collection approach.

  14. High-density genetic map construction and QTLs identification for plant height in white jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) using specific locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Aifen; Huang, Long; Wu, Guifen; Afshar, Reza Keshavarz; Qi, Jianmin; Xu, Jiantang; Fang, Pingping; Lin, Lihui; Zhang, Liwu; Lin, Peiqing

    2017-05-08

    Genetic mapping and quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection are powerful methodologies in plant improvement and breeding. White jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) is an important industrial raw material fiber crop because of its elite characteristics. However, construction of a high-density genetic map and identification of QTLs has been limited in white jute due to a lack of sufficient molecular markers. The specific locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) strategy combines locus-specific amplification and high-throughput sequencing to carry out de novo single nuclear polymorphism (SNP) discovery and large-scale genotyping. In this study, SLAF-seq was employed to obtain sufficient markers to construct a high-density genetic map for white jute. Moreover, with the development of abundant markers, genetic dissection of fiber yield traits such as plant height was also possible. Here, we present QTLs associated with plant height that were identified using our newly constructed genetic linkage groups. An F8 population consisting of 100 lines was developed. In total, 69,446 high-quality SLAFs were detected of which 5,074 SLAFs were polymorphic; 913 polymorphic markers were used for the construction of a genetic map. The average coverage for each SLAF marker was 43-fold in the parents, and 9.8-fold in each F8 individual. A linkage map was constructed that contained 913 SLAFs on 11 linkage groups (LGs) covering 1621.4 cM with an average density of 1.61 cM per locus. Among the 11 LGs, LG1 was the largest with 210 markers, a length of 406.34 cM, and an average distance of 1.93 cM between adjacent markers. LG11 was the smallest with only 25 markers, a length of 29.66 cM, and an average distance of 1.19 cM between adjacent markers. 'SNP_only' markers accounted for 85.54% and were the predominant markers on the map. QTL mapping based on the F8 phenotypes detected 11 plant height QTLs including one major effect QTL across two cultivation locations, with each QTL

  15. Mariana Arc structure inferred from gravity and seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, W. W.

    1980-10-01

    A two-dimensional gravity model of the lithosphere was constructed along a seismic refraction line near 18°N latitude. Included in the model are crustal layers constrained by seismic refraction results, an estimate of the gravity anomaly caused by the subducting slab, and a model of the low-density mantle beneath the Mariana Trough. With a reasonable anomaly assumed for the slab it is shown that the gravity anomaly caused by the low-density mantle is greatest over the axial bathymetric high and tapers off to the sides. With the bottom of the low-density mantle set at 200 km the density contrast is -0.033 g/cm3. Other depths and densities are tried as well. Several notable anomalies are found on the crustal layers. East of the trench, the crust has been thinned slightly to account for an outer gravity high. Behind the landward wall of the trench, a small, low-density body is modeled to explain a slight offset of the minimum of the free air anomaly from the trench axis. A 50-mGal jump on the observed gravity over the volcanic line is explained by an unusual configuration of the frontal arc Moho.

  16. Gravity data from the San Pedro River Basin, Cochise County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Winester, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Arizona Water Science Center in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Geodetic Survey has collected relative and absolute gravity data at 321 stations in the San Pedro River Basin of southeastern Arizona since 2000. Data are of three types: observed gravity values and associated free-air, simple Bouguer, and complete Bouguer anomaly values, useful for subsurface-density modeling; high-precision relative-gravity surveys repeated over time, useful for aquifer-storage-change monitoring; and absolute-gravity values, useful as base stations for relative-gravity surveys and for monitoring gravity change over time. The data are compiled, without interpretation, in three spreadsheet files. Gravity values, GPS locations, and driving directions for absolute-gravity base stations are presented as National Geodetic Survey site descriptions.

  17. On the combined gravity gradient modeling for applied geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Veryaskin, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    Gravity gradiometry research and development has intensified in recent years to the extent that technologies providing a resolution of about 1 Eotvos per 1 sec average shall likely soon be available for multiple critical applications such as natural resources exploration, oil reservoir monitoring and defence establishment. Much of the content of this paper was composed a decade ago, and only minor modifications were required for the conclusions to be just as applicable today. In this paper we demonstrate how gravity gradient data can be modeled, and show some examples of how gravity gradient data can be combined in order to extract valuable information. In particular, this study demonstrates the importance of two gravity gradient components, Txz and Tyz which, when processed together, can provide more information on subsurface density contrasts than that derived solely from the vertical gravity gradient (Tzz).

  18. An electric current associated with gravity sensing in maize roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The study of gravisensing would be greatly enhanced if physiological events associated with gravity sensing could be detected separately from subsequent growth processes. This report presents a means to discriminate sensing from the growth processes. By using a vibrating probe, we have found an electric current generated by the gravity sensing region of the root cap of maize (Zea mays cv Merit) in response to gravistimulation. On the upper surface of the root cap, the change from the endogenous current has a density of 0.55 microampere per square centimeter away from gravity. The onset of the current shift has a characteristic of lag of three to four minutes after gravistimulation, which corresponds to the presentation time for gravity sensing in this tissue. A description of the current provides some information about the sensing mechanism, as well as being a valuable means to detect gravity sensing independently of differential growth.

  19. Boson Stars in a Theory of Complex Scalar Field coupled to Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kulshreshtha, Daya Shankar

    2016-01-01

    We study boson stars in a theory of complex scalar field coupled to Einstein gravity with the potential: $V(|\\Phi|) := m^{2} |\\Phi|^2 +2 \\lambda |\\Phi|$ (where $m^2$ and $\\lambda$ are positive constant parameters). This could be considered either as a theory of massive complex scalar field coupled to gravity in a conical potential or as a theory in the presence of a potential which is an overlap of a parabolic and a conical potential. We study our theory with positive as well as negative values of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. Boson stars are found to come in two types, having either ball-like or shell-like charge density. We have studied the properties of these solutions and have also determined their domains of existence for some specific values of the parameters of the theory. Similar solutions have also been obtained by Hartmann, Kleihaus, Kunz, and Schaffer, in a V-shaped scalar potential.

  20. The Bransfield Gravity Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangrà, Pablo; Stegner, Alexander; Hernández-Arencibia, Mónica; Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Salinas, Carolina; Aguiar-González, Borja; Henríquez-Pastene, Cristian; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Using in situ data and laboratory experiments, we show that the circulation of the Bransfield Current (BC) around the South Shetland Islands (SSI) may be characterized in terms of a propagating buoyant gravity current. First, we describe the SSI hydrography and some drifter trajectories, paying special attention to the recirculation of the BC at the northeastern tip and northern slopes of the SSI. We observed that when the northeastward-flowing BC reaches the northeastern tip of the SSI, it recirculates around an anticyclonic mesoscale eddy that has not previously been reported in this region. Part of this recirculating water then proceeds southwest along the northern SSI shelf break as a narrow baroclinic jet and another part join the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Consequently, the cross-slope gradients of properties strengthen, and the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current becomes a nearly submesoscale ( 10 km) front. Second, we compare the observations with buoyant gravity current laboratory experiments in an open basin setup where the SSI topographic barrier is represented by a central wall. The resulting circulation of the buoyant gravity current around the wall mirrors our in situ observations. First, a narrow buoyant gravity current flows northeastward along the southern boundary of the wall. Once the head of the buoyant gravity current reaches the tip of the wall, a recirculating anticyclonic vortex is generated, and the buoyant gravity current then proceeds westward along the north side of the wall. This circulation of the BC around the SSI as a buoyant gravity current may contribute to the fertilization of the waters around the SSI, as suggested by previously reported distributions of nutrients and phytoplankton.

  1. Grain dynamics in zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B. T.; Haff, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of granular materials has proved difficult to model, primarily because of the complications arising from inelastic losses, friction, packing, and the effect of many grains being in contact simultaneously. One interesting limit for which it was recently possible to construct a theory is that where the grain-grain interactions are dominated by binary collisions. The kinetic model of granular systems if similar to the kinetic theory of gases, except that collisional energy losses are always present in the former and must be treated explicitly. Few granular materials on Earth are describable by this limiting model, since gravity tends to collapse the grains into a high-density state where Coulombic friction effects are dominant. The planned Space Station offers an unusual opportunity to test the kinetic grain model and to explore its predictions. Without gravity, the regime of low interparticle velocities, where an elastic description of the collision is still valid, is investigated. This will allow direct interpretation by dynamical computer simulations as well as by kinetic theory.

  2. Venus gravity - A high-resolution map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasenberg, R. D.; Goldberg, Z. M.; Macneil, P. E.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The Doppler data from the radio tracking of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) have been used in a two-stage analysis to develop a high-resolution map of the gravitational potential of Venus, represented by a central mass and a surface mass density. The two-stage procedure invokes a Kalman filter-smoother to determine the orbit of the spacecraft, and a stabilized linear inverter to estimate the surface mass density. The resultant gravity map is highly correlated with the topographic map derived from the PVO radar altimeter data. However, the magnitudes of the gravity variations are smaller than would be expected if the topography were uncompensated, indicating that at least partial compensation has taken place.

  3. Gravity and topography. [of planet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P. B.; Banerdt, W. B.; Lindal, G. F.; Sjogren, W. L.; Slade, M. A.; Bills, B. G.; Smith, D. E.; Balmino, G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper summarizes the fundamental gravity field constants for Mars and a brief historical review of early determinations and current-day accurate estimates. These include the planetary gravitational constant, global figure, dynamical oblateness, mean density, and rotational period. Topographic results from data acquired from the 1967 opposition to the most recent, 1988, opposition are presented. Both global and selected local topographic variations and features are discussed. The inertia tensor and the nonhydrostatic component of Mars are examined in detail. The dimensionless moment of inertia about the rotational axis is 0.4 for a body of uniform density and 0.37621 if Mars were in hydrostatic equilibrium. By comparing models of both gravity and topography, inferences are made about the degree and depth of compensation in the interior and stresses in the lithosphere.

  4. Altered orientation and flight paths of pigeons reared on gravity anomalies: a GPS tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Nicole; Guskov, Sergei I; Meskenaite, Virginia; Kanevskyi, Valerii A; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of pigeon homing are still not understood, in particular how they determine their position at unfamiliar locations. The "gravity vector" theory holds that pigeons memorize the gravity vector at their home loft and deduct home direction and distance from the angular difference between memorized and actual gravity vector. However, the gravity vector is tilted by different densities in the earth crust leading to gravity anomalies. We predicted that pigeons reared on different gravity anomalies would show different initial orientation and also show changes in their flight path when crossing a gravity anomaly. We reared one group of pigeons in a strong gravity anomaly with a north-to-south gravity gradient, and the other group of pigeons in a normal area but on a spot with a strong local anomaly with a west-to-east gravity gradient. After training over shorter distances, pigeons were released from a gravitationally and geomagnetically normal site 50 km north in the same direction for both home lofts. As expected by the theory, the two groups of pigeons showed divergent initial orientation. In addition, some of the GPS-tracked pigeons also showed changes in their flight paths when crossing gravity anomalies. We conclude that even small local gravity anomalies at the birth place of pigeons may have the potential to bias the map sense of pigeons, while reactivity to gravity gradients during flight was variable and appeared to depend on individual navigational strategies and frequency of position updates.

  5. Altered orientation and flight paths of pigeons reared on gravity anomalies: a GPS tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Blaser

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of pigeon homing are still not understood, in particular how they determine their position at unfamiliar locations. The "gravity vector" theory holds that pigeons memorize the gravity vector at their home loft and deduct home direction and distance from the angular difference between memorized and actual gravity vector. However, the gravity vector is tilted by different densities in the earth crust leading to gravity anomalies. We predicted that pigeons reared on different gravity anomalies would show different initial orientation and also show changes in their flight path when crossing a gravity anomaly. We reared one group of pigeons in a strong gravity anomaly with a north-to-south gravity gradient, and the other group of pigeons in a normal area but on a spot with a strong local anomaly with a west-to-east gravity gradient. After training over shorter distances, pigeons were released from a gravitationally and geomagnetically normal site 50 km north in the same direction for both home lofts. As expected by the theory, the two groups of pigeons showed divergent initial orientation. In addition, some of the GPS-tracked pigeons also showed changes in their flight paths when crossing gravity anomalies. We conclude that even small local gravity anomalies at the birth place of pigeons may have the potential to bias the map sense of pigeons, while reactivity to gravity gradients during flight was variable and appeared to depend on individual navigational strategies and frequency of position updates.

  6. Charged Black Holes in New Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodsi, Ahmad; Moghadassi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    We construct charged black hole solutions to three-dimensional New Massive Gravity (NMG), by adding electromagnetic Maxwell and Chern-Simons actions. We find charged black holes in the form of warped AdS_3 and "log" solutions in specific critical point. The entropy, mass and angular momentum of these black holes are computed.

  7. MeCP2 mutation results in compartment-specific reductions in dendritic branching and spine density in layer 5 motor cortical neurons of YFP-H mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Stuss

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominantly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2. A primary feature of the syndrome is the impaired maturation and maintenance of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS. Different RTT mouse models have shown that particular Mecp2 mutations have highly variable effects on neuronal architecture. Distinguishing MeCP2 mutant cellular phenotypes therefore demands analysis of specific mutations in well-defined neuronal subpopulations. We examined a transgenically labeled subset of cortical neurons in YFP-H mice crossed with the Mecp2(tm1.1Jae mutant line. YFP(+ Layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the motor cortex of wildtype and hemizygous mutant male mice were examined for differences in dendrite morphology and spine density. Total basal dendritic length was decreased by 18.6% due to both shorter dendrites and reduced branching proximal to the soma. Tangential dendrite lengths in the apical tuft were reduced by up to 26.6%. Spine density was reduced by 47.4% in the apical tuft and 54.5% in secondary apical dendrites, but remained unaffected in primary apical and proximal basal dendrites. We also found that MeCP2 mutation reduced the number of YFP(+ cells in YFP-H mice by up to 72% in various cortical regions without affecting the intensity of YFP expression in individual cells. Our results support the view that the effects of MeCP2 mutation are highly context-dependent and cannot be generalized across mutation types and cell populations.

  8. Planck 2015 results. XIV. Dark energy and modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Desert, F.X.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Ma, Y.Z.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Martin, P.G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Salvatelli, V.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B.M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-20

    We study the implications of Planck data for models of dark energy (DE) and modified gravity (MG), beyond the cosmological constant scenario. We start with cases where the DE only directly affects the background evolution, considering Taylor expansions of the equation of state, principal component analysis and parameterizations related to the potential of a minimally coupled DE scalar field. When estimating the density of DE at early times, we significantly improve present constraints. We then move to general parameterizations of the DE or MG perturbations that encompass both effective field theories and the phenomenology of gravitational potentials in MG models. Lastly, we test a range of specific models, such as k-essence, f(R) theories and coupled DE. In addition to the latest Planck data, for our main analyses we use baryonic acoustic oscillations, type-Ia supernovae and local measurements of the Hubble constant. We further show the impact of measurements of the cosmological perturbations, such as redshif...

  9. Observational tests of Galileon gravity with growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    We compare observational data of growth rate with the prediction by Galileon theory. For the same value of the energy density parameter Ω_{m,0}, the growth rate in Galileon models is enhanced compared with the Λ CDM case, due to the enhancement of Newton's constant. The smaller Ω_{m,0} is, the more suppressed growth rate is. Hence the best fit value of Ω_{m,0} in the Galileon model is 0.16 from only the growth rate data, which is considerably smaller than such value obtained from observations of supernovae Ia, the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations. We also find the upper limit of the Brans-Dicke parameter to be ω < -1000 (1σ ), from the growth rate data. In this paper, specific galileon models are considered, not the entire class. More and better growth rate data are required to distinguish between dark energy and modified gravity.

  10. Viscosity in Modified Gravity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shownthat, based on a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found forquantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions mayincorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition inthe cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided. 

  11. Observational Constraints on Exponential Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Louis; Luo, Ling-Wei; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    We study the observational constraints on the exponential gravity model of f(R)=-beta*Rs(1-e^(-R/Rs)). We use the latest observational data including Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) Union2 compilation, Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) and Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) in our analysis. From these observations, we obtain a lower bound on the model parameter beta at 1.27 (95% CL) but no appreciable upper bound. The constraint on the present matter density parameter is 0.245< Omega_m^0<0.311 (95% CL). We also find out the best-fit value of model parameters on several cases.

  12. Thermodynamics in Modified Gravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that there does exist an equilibrium description of thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in the expanding cosmological background for a wide class of modified gravity theories with the Lagrangian density $f(R, \\phi, X)$, where $R$ is the Ricci scalar and $X$ is the kinetic energy of a scalar field $\\phi$. This comes from a suitable definition of an energy momentum tensor of the "dark" component obeying the local energy conservation law in the Jordan frame. It is shown that the equilibrium description in terms of the horizon entropy $S$ is convenient because it takes into account the contribution of the horizon entropy $\\hat{S}$ in non-equilibrium thermodynamics as well as an entropy production term.

  13. Modifying Gravity at Low Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    We consider the growth of cosmological perturbations in modified gravity models where a scalar field mediates a non-universal Yukawa force between different matter species. The growth of the density contrast is altered for scales below the Compton wave-length of the scalar field. As the universe expands, the Compton wave-length varies in time in such a way that scales which where outside the range of the scalar field force may feel it at a lower redshift. In this case, both the exponent $\\gamma$ measuring the growth of Cold Dark Matter perturbations and the shift function representing the ratio of the two Newtonian potentials $\\psi$ and $\\phi$ may differ from their values in General Relativity at low redshift.

  14. GRAVITY ANOMALIES OF THE MOON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Pugacheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The source of gravity anomalies of the Moon are large mascons with a high mass concentration at a depth of volcanic plains and lunar Maria. New data on the gravitational field of the Moon were obtained from two Grail spacecrafts. The article presents the data of physical and mechanical properties of the surface soil layer of the lunar Maria and gives an assessment of the chemical composition of the soil. There have been calculated heterogeneity parameters of the surface macro-relief of the lunar Maria: albedo, soil density, average grain diameter of the particles forming the surface layer and the volume fraction occupied by particles. It can be assumed that mascons include rich KREEP rocks with a high content of thorium and iron oxide. Formation of mascons is connected with intensive development of basaltic volcanism on the Moon in the early periods of its existence.

  15. Gravity Fields and Interiors of the Saturnian Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, N. J.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, Sami W.; Iess, L.; Tortora, P.; Somenzi, L.; Zingoni, F.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Gravity Science Objectives and accomplishments of the Cassini Radio Science Team: (1) Mass and density of icy satellites (2) Quadrupole field of Titan and Rhea (3) Dynamic Love number of Titan (4) Moment of inertia of Titan (in collaboration with the Radar Team) (5) Gravity field of Saturn. The proposed measurements for the extended tour are: (1) Quadrupole field of Enceladus (2) More accurate measurement of Titan k2 (3) Local gravity/topography correlations for Iapetus (4) Verification/disproof of "Pioneer anomaly".

  16. Pressuron mechanism from $f(R,\\mathcal{L}_m)$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, Hendrik; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    We show that a Lagrangian density proportional to $\\sqrt{-g} \\mathcal{L}_m^2/R$ reduces to a pressuron theory of gravity that is indistinguishable from General Relativity in weak pressure regimes. The unification of matter and geometry in the same Lagrangian term intrinsically satisfies Mach's Principle --- since matter cannot exist without curvature and vice versa --- while it may have the correct phenomenology in order to describe actual gravity.

  17. Gravity field modelling and gravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krynski Jan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The summary of research activities concerning gravity field modelling and gravimetric works performed in Poland in the period of 2011-2014 is presented. It contains the results of research on geoid modelling in Poland and other countries, evaluation of global geopotential models, determination of temporal variations of the gravity field with the use of data from satellite gravity space missions, absolute gravity surveys for the maintenance and modernization of the gravity control in Poland and overseas, metrological aspects in gravimetry, maintenance of gravimetric calibration baselines, and investigations of the nontidal gravity changes. The bibliography of the related works is given in references.

  18. Gravity survey in the San Luis Valley area, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaca, J. Robert; Karig, Daniel E.

    1965-01-01

    During the summers of 1963 and 1964, a regional gravity survey covering 6,000 square miles of the San Luis Valley and surrounding areas was made to determine subsurface basement configurations and to guide future crustal studies. The San Luis Valley, a large intermontane basin, is a segment of the Rio Grande trough, a reef system characterized by volcanism, normal faulting, and tilted fault blocks. The gravity data, accurate to about 0.5 mgal, were reduced to complete-Bouguer anomaly values. The Bouguer-anomaly gravity map delineates a series of en-echelon gravity highs in the central and western San Luis Valley. These gravity highs are interpreted as horsts of Precambrian rock buried by basin fill. A series of en-echelon gravity lows along the eastern edge of the Valley is interpreted as a graben filled with sedimentary and igneous rock estimated to be up to 30,000 ft thick. The relatively high regional gravity over the Sangre de Cristo Mountains suggests that these mountains are locally uncompensated. A subcircular gravity low in the Bonanza area is interpreted as an indication of low-density volcanic rocks within a caldera structure.

  19. Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA Density and Free to Total PSA Ratio in Diagnosing Prostate Cancer with Prostate-Specific Anti¬gen Levels of 4.0 ng/ml or Less

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin LIU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to value the usefulness of free to total prostate-specific antigen and Prostate-specific antigen (PSA density for prostate cancer in the patients with PSA levels of 4.0 ng/ml or less.Methods: A total of 343 subjects with PSA levels of 4.0 ng/ml or less were biopsied. All patients were divided into four groups according to the PSA levels: 0 to 1.0 ng/ml, 1.1 to 2.0 ng/ml, 2.1 to 3.0 ng/ml, and 3.1 to 4.0 ng/ml. The reliability of cancer detection in relation to the f/t PSA ratio and PSAD were estimated.Results: Overall, 65 people were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The detection rate was 16.28%、17.17%, 21.82%, 25.00% in subjects with PSA levels of 0 to 1.0 ng/ml, 1.1 to 2.0 ng/ml, 2.1 to 3.0 ng/ml, and 3.1 to 4.0 ng/ml, respectively. The f/t PSA ratio was significantly lower in patients with prostate cancer and PSA levels of 2.1 to 4.0 ng/ml (P<0.05. The PSAD had no statistical significance between the two groups.Conclusions: Routine prostate biopsy should be undertaken if the f/t PSA ratio less than 15% with /without abnormal DRE/TRUS findings. Keywords: Biopsy, Prostate cancer, Prostate-specific antigen, PSA ratio, PSAD 

  20. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN08 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusettes, Maine, and Canada collected in 2013 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity...

  1. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN01 (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for New York, Canada, and Lake Ontario collected in 2011 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  2. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS01 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alabama and Florida collected in 2008 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  3. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CN02 (2013 & 2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Nebraska collected in 2013 & 2014 over 3 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  4. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS03 (2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Texas and Louisiana collected in 2009 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  5. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for TS01 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands collected in 2009 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  6. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN04 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Michigan and Lake Huron collected in 2012 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American...

  7. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AN03 (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2010 and 2012 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum...

  8. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN06 (2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Maine, Canada, and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2012 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  9. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN05 (2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan collected in 2012 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  10. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for PN01 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for California and Oregon collected in 2011 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  11. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for ES01 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Florida, the Bahamas, and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2013 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of...

  12. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CN03 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Nebraska collected in 2014 over one survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum...

  13. Quantum Gravity Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new quantum gravity experiment is reported with the data confirming the generali- sation of the Schrödinger equation to include the interaction of the wave function with dynamical space. Dynamical space turbulence, via this interaction process, raises and lowers the energy of the electron wave function, which is detected by observing conse- quent variations in the electron quantum barrier tunnelling rate in reverse-biased Zener diodes. This process has previously been reported and enabled the measurement of the speed of the dynamical space flow, which is consistent with numerous other detection experiments. The interaction process is dependent on the angle between the dynamical space flow velocity and the direction of the electron flow in the diode, and this depen- dence is experimentally demonstrated. This interaction process explains gravity as an emergent quantum process, so unifying quantum phenomena and gravity. Gravitational waves are easily detected.

  14. Ghosts of Critical Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Porrati, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Recently proposed "critical" higher-derivative gravities in $AdS_D$ $D>3$ are expected to carry logarithmic representation of the Anti de Sitter isometry group. In this note, we quantize linear fluctuations of these critical gravities, which are known to be either identical with linear fluctuations of Einstein's gravity or else satisfy logarithmic boundary conditions at spacial infinity. We identify the scalar product uniquely defined by the symplectic structure implied by the classical action, and show that it does not posses null vectors. Instead, we show that the scalar product between any two Einstein modes vanishes, while the scalar product of an Einstein mode with a logarithmic mode is generically nonzero. This is the basic property of logarithmic representation that makes them neither unitary nor unitarizable.

  15. GRAVITY detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrgan, Leander H.; Finger, Gert; Eisenhauer, Frank; Panduro, Johana

    2016-08-01

    GRAVITY is a second generation instrument for the VLT Interferometer, designed for high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging in the K-band. It will combine the AO corrected beams of the four VLT telescopes. In total, the GRAVITY instrument uses five eAPD detectors four for the infrared wavefront sensors of each telescope and one for the fringe tracker. In addition two Hawaii2RG arrays are installed, one for the acquisition camera and one for the spectrometer. The SAPHIRA eAPD array is a newly developed near-infrared detector with sub-electron noise performance at frame rates > 1Kfps. For all seven detectors the ESO common controller, NGC, is used. This paper presents an overview and comparison of GRAVITY detector systems and their final performances at the telescope

  16. Finite Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Modesto, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We hereby present a class of multidimensional higher derivative theories of gravity that realizes an ultraviolet completion of Einstein general relativity. This class is marked by a "non-polynomal" entire function (form factor), which averts extra degrees of freedom (including ghosts) and improves the high energy behavior of the loop amplitudes. By power counting arguments, it is proved that the theory is super-renormalizable in any dimension, i.e. only one-loop divergences survive. Furthermore, in odd dimensions there are no counter terms for pure gravity and the theory turns out to be "finite." Finally, considering the infinite tower of massive states coming from dimensional reduction, quantum gravity is finite in even dimension as well.

  17. Generalizing unimodular gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Saez-Gomez, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The so-called unimodular version of General Relativity is revisited, which assumes the trace-free part of the equations instead of the usual Einstein equations, what leads naturally to a cosmological constant that may compensate the large value of quantum fluctuations. Here we extend such formalism to some extensions of General Relativity that have drawn a lot of attention over the last years, as $f(R)$ gravity (or its equivalent scalar-tensor picture) and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. The corresponding unimodular version of such theories is constructed. From the classical point of view, the unimodular versions of such extensions are completely equivalent to their originals, but an effective cosmological constant arises naturally, what may provide a richer description of the universe evolution. Moreover, conformal transformations within unimodular gravities lead to some corrections that may affect their solutions. Here we analyze the case of Starobisnky inflation and compared with the original one.

  18. Intrinsic Time Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi Lai

    2016-01-01

    Correct identification of the true gauge symmetry of General Relativity being 3d spatial diffeomorphism invariant(3dDI) (not the conventional infinite tensor product group with principle fibre bundle structure), together with intrinsic time extracted from clean decomposition of the canonical structure yields a self-consistent theory of quantum gravity. A new set of fundamental commutation relations is also presented. The basic variables are the eight components of the unimodular part of the spatial dreibein and eight SU(3) generators which correspond to Klauder's momentric variables that characterize a free theory of quantum gravity. The commutation relations are not canonical, but have well defined group theoretical meanings. All fundamental entities are dimensionless; and the quantum wave functionals are preferentially in the dreibein representation. The successful quantum theory of gravity involves only broad spectrum of knowledge and deep insights but no exotic idea.

  19. Gravity's Rainbow induces topology change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garattini, Remo [Universita degli Studi di Bergamo, Facolta di Ingegneria, Dalmine, Bergamo (Italy); I.N.F.N.-sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Lobo, Francisco S.N. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we explore the possibility that quantum fluctuations induce a topology change, in the context of Gravity's Rainbow. A semiclassical approach is adopted, where the graviton one-loop contribution to a classical energy in a background spacetime is computed through a variational approach with Gaussian trial wave functionals. The energy density of the graviton one-loop contribution, or equivalently the background spacetime, is then let to evolve, and consequently the classical energy is determined. More specifically, the background metric is fixed to be Minkowskian in the equation governing the quantum fluctuations, which behaves essentially as a backreaction equation, and the quantum fluctuations are let to evolve; the classical energy, which depends on the evolved metric functions, is then evaluated. Analyzing this procedure, a natural ultraviolet cutoff is obtained, which forbids the presence of an interior spacetime region, and this may result in a multiply connected spacetime. Thus, in the context of Gravity's Rainbow, this process may be interpreted as a change in topology, and in principle it results in the presence of a planckian wormhole. (orig.)

  20. Quantitative interpretation of airborne gravity gradiometry data for mineral exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Cericia D.

    In the past two decades, commercialization of previously classified instrumentation has provided the ability to rapidly collect quality gravity gradient measurements for resource exploration. In the near future, next-generation instrumentation are expected to further advance acquisition of higher-quality data not subject to pre-processing regulations. Conversely, the ability to process and interpret gravity gradiometry data has not kept pace with innovations occurring in data acquisition systems. The purpose of the research presented in this thesis is to contribute to the understanding, development, and application of processing and interpretation techniques available for airborne gravity gradiometry in resource exploration. In particular, this research focuses on the utility of 3D inversion of gravity gradiometry for interpretation purposes. Towards this goal, I investigate the requisite components for an integrated interpretation workflow. In addition to practical 3D inversions, components of the workflow include estimation of density for terrain correction, processing of multi-component data using equivalent source for denoising, quantification of noise level, and component conversion. The objective is to produce high quality density distributions for subsequent geological interpretation. I then investigate the use of the inverted density model in orebody imaging, lithology differentiation, and resource evaluation. The systematic and sequential approach highlighted in the thesis addresses some of the challenges facing the use of gravity gradiometry as an exploration tool, while elucidating a procedure for incorporating gravity gradient interpretations into the lifecycle of not only resource exploration, but also resource modeling.

  1. Generalized Parametrization Dependence in Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, Holger; Lippoldt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We critically examine the gauge, and field-parametrization dependence of renormalization group flows in the vicinity of non-Gau\\ss{}ian fixed points in quantum gravity. While physical observables are independent of such calculational specifications, the construction of quantum gravity field theories typically relies on off-shell quantities such as $\\beta$ functions and generating functionals and thus face potential stability issues with regard to such generalized parametrizations. We analyze a two-parameter class of covariant gauge conditions, the role of momentum-dependent field rescalings and a class of field parametrizations. Using the product of Newton and cosmological constant as an indicator, the principle of minimum sensitivity identifies stationary points in this parametrization space which show a remarkable insensitivity to the parametrization. In the most insensitive cases, the quantized gravity system exhibits a non-Gau\\ss{}ian UV stable fixed point, lending further support to asymptotically free q...

  2. Quantum gravity from theory to experimental search

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Claus; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2003-01-01

    The relation between quantum theory and the theory of gravitation remains one of the most outstanding unresolved issues of modern physics. According to general expectation, general relativity as well as quantum (field) theory in a fixed background spacetime cannot be fundamentally correct. Hence there should exist a broader theory comprising both in appropriate limits, i.e., quantum gravity. This book gives readers a comprehensive introduction accessible to interested non-experts to the main issues surrounding the search for quantum gravity. These issues relate to fundamental questions concerning the various formalisms of quantization; specific questions concerning concrete processes, like gravitational collapse or black-hole evaporation; and the all important question concerning the possibility of experimental tests of quantum-gravity effects.

  3. Seeking the Light: Gravity Without the Influence of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Fred; Kern, Volker; Reed, Dave; Etheridge, Guy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All living things sense gravity like humans might sense light or sound. The Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC-14) experiment, explores how moss cells sense and respond to gravity and light. This experiment studies how gravity influences the internal structure of moss cells and seeks to understand the influences of the spaceflight environment on cell growth. This knowledge will help researchers understand the role of gravity in the evolution of cells and life on earth.

  4. Position from gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for obtaining position from surface gravity observations are reviewed and their relevance assessed in the context of the application of modern geodetic techniques to programs of Earth and ocean physics. Solutions based on the use of surface layer techniques, the discrete value approach, and the development from Green's theorem are stated in summary, the latter being extended to order e cubed in the height anomaly. The representation of the surface gravity field which is required in order that this accuracy may be achieved is discussed. Interim techniques which could be used in the absence of such a representation are also outlined.

  5. Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) -- a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the article, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  6. Charges for linearized gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Aksteiner, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Maxwell test fields as well as solutions of linearized gravity on the Kerr exterior admit non-radiating modes, i.e. non-trivial time-independent solutions. These are closely related to conserved charges. In this paper we discuss the non-radiating modes for linearized gravity, which may be seen to correspond to the Poincare Lie-algebra. The 2-dimensional isometry group of Kerr corresponds to a 2-parameter family of gauge-invariant non-radiating modes representing infinitesimal perturbations of mass and azimuthal angular momentum. We calculate the linearized mass charge in terms of linearized Newman-Penrose scalars.

  7. Problems of Massive Gravities

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, S; Ong, Y C; Waldron, A

    2014-01-01

    The method of characteristics is a key tool for studying consistency of equations of motion; it allows issues such as predictability, maximal propagation speed, superluminality, unitarity and acausality to be addressed without requiring explicit solutions. We review this method and its application to massive gravity theories to show the limitations of these models' physical viability: Among their problems are loss of unique evolution, superluminal signals, matter coupling inconsistencies and micro-acausality (propagation of signals around local closed timelike/causal curves). We extend previous no-go results to the entire three-parameter range of massive gravity theories. It is also argued that bimetric models suffer a similar fate.

  8. Influence of parasite density and sample storage time on the reliability of Entamoeba histolytica-specific PCR from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frickmann, Hagen; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Eggert, Petra; Schwarz, Norbert G; Poppert, Sven; Tannich, Egbert; Hagen, Ralf M

    2013-12-01

    We report on the reliability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue in comparison with microscopy and have determined predictors that may influence PCR results. E. histolytica-specific and Entamoeba dispar-specific real-time PCR and microscopy from adjacent histologic sections were performed using a collection of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens obtained from patients with invasive amebiasis. Specimens had been collected during the previous 4 decades. Association of sample age, parasite density, and reliability of PCR was analyzed. E. histolytica PCR was positive in 20 of 34 biopsies (58.8%); 2 of these 20 were microscopically negative for amebae in neighboring tissue sections. PCR was negative in 9 samples with visible amebae in neighboring sections and in 5 samples without visible parasites in neighboring sections. PCR was negative in all specimens that were older than 3 decades. Low parasite counts and sample ages older than 20 years were predictors for false-negative PCR results. All samples were negative for E. dispar DNA. PCR is suitable for the detection of E. histolytica in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples that are younger than 2 decades and that contain intermediate to high parasite numbers. Negative results in older samples were due to progressive degradation of DNA over time as indicated by control PCRs targeting the human 18S rRNA gene. Moreover, our findings support previous suggestions that only E. histolytica but not E. dispar is responsible for invasive amebiasis.

  9. Brans–Dicke gravity theory from topological gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inostroza, C.; Salazar, A.; Salgado, P.

    2014-06-27

    We consider a model that suggests a mechanism by which the four dimensional Brans–Dicke gravity theory may emerge from the topological gravity action. To achieve this goal, both the Lie algebra and the symmetric invariant tensor that define the topological gravity Lagrangian are constructed by means of the Lie algebra S-expansion procedure with an appropriate abelian semigroup S.

  10. SATELLITE GRAVITY SURVEYING TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH OF EARTH'S GRAVITY FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Jinsheng

    2003-01-01

    This is a summarized paper. Two topics are discussed: Firstly, the concept, development and application of four kinds of satellite gravity surveying technology are introduced; Secondly, some problems of theory and method, which must be considered in the study of the Earth's gravity field based on satellite gravity data, are expounded.

  11. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. “Jin-Hwang” and M. indica L. “Irwin” and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango. PMID:27625670

  12. Applications of acoustic-gravity waves numerical modelling to tsunami signals observed by gravimetry satellites in very low orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Martin, Roland; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Sladen, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground all the way to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale we introduce a high-order finite- difference time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). We present applications of these simulations to the propagation of gravity waves generated by tsunamis for realistic cases for which atmospheric models are extracted from empirical models including 3D variations of atmospheric parameters, and tsunami forcing at the ocean surface is extracted from finite-fault dislocation simulations. We describe the specific difficulties induced by the size of the simulation, the boundary conditions and the spherical geometry and compare the simulation outputs to data gathered by gravimetric satellites crossing gravity waves generated by tsunamis.

  13. Gravity Data for South America

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (152,624 records) were compiled by the University of Texas at Dallas. This data base was received in June 1992. Principal gravity parameters...

  14. Scalable Gravity Offload System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A scalable gravity offload device simulates reduced gravity for the testing of various surface system elements such as mobile robots, excavators, habitats, and...

  15. Gravity Station Data for Portugal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data total 3064 records. This data base was received in April 1997. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air Anomalies which have been...

  16. Interior Alaska Gravity Station Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data total 9416 records. This data base was received in March 1997. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air Anomalies which have been...

  17. Gravity Station Data for Spain

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data total 28493 records. This data base was received in April 1997. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air Anomalies which have been...

  18. Gravity separation for oil wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Golomeova, Mirjana; Zendelska, Afrodita; Krstev, Boris; Krstev, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the applications of gravity separation for oil wastewater treatment are presented. Described is operation on conventional gravity separation and parallel plate separation. Key words: gravity separation, oil, conventional gravity separation, parallel plate separation.

  19. Gravity separation for oil wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Golomeova, Mirjana; Zendelska, Afrodita; Krstev, Boris; Krstev, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the applications of gravity separation for oil wastewater treatment are presented. Described is operation on conventional gravity separation and parallel plate separation. Key words: gravity separation, oil, conventional gravity separation, parallel plate separation.

  20. PREFACE: Conceptual and Technical Challenges for Quantum Gravity 2014 - Parallel session: Noncommutative Geometry and Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinetti, P.; Wallet, J.-C.; Amelino-Camelia, G.

    2015-08-01

    The conference Conceptual and Technical Challenges for Quantum Gravity at Sapienza University of Rome, from 8 to 12 September 2014, has provided a beautiful opportunity for an encounter between different approaches and different perspectives on the quantum-gravity problem. It contributed to a higher level of shared knowledge among the quantum-gravity communities pursuing each specific research program. There were plenary talks on many different approaches, including in particular string theory, loop quantum gravity, spacetime noncommutativity, causal dynamical triangulations, asymptotic safety and causal sets. Contributions from the perspective of philosophy of science were also welcomed. In addition several parallel sessions were organized. The present volume collects contributions from the Noncommutative Geometry and Quantum Gravity parallel session4, with additional invited contributions from specialists in the field. Noncommutative geometry in its many incarnations appears at the crossroad of many researches in theoretical and mathematical physics: • from models of quantum space-time (with or without breaking of Lorentz symmetry) to loop gravity and string theory, • from early considerations on UV-divergencies in quantum field theory to recent models of gauge theories on noncommutative spacetime, • from Connes description of the standard model of elementary particles to recent Pati-Salam like extensions. This volume provides an overview of these various topics, interesting for the specialist as well as accessible to the newcomer. 4partially funded by CNRS PEPS /PTI ''Metric aspect of noncommutative geometry: from Monge to Higgs''

  1. Gravity and non-locality

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, Pablo; Walton, Mark

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of investigating the relation between gravity and non-locality at the classical level, we study a bilocal scalar field model. Bilocality introduces new (internal) degrees of freedom that can potentially reproduce gravity. We show that the equations of motion of the massless branch of the free bilocal model match those of linearized gravity. We also discuss higher orders of perturbation theory, where there is self-interaction in both gravity and the bilocal field sectors.

  2. Introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Mercuri, Simone

    2010-01-01

    The questions I have been asked during the 5th International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, have compelled me to give an account of the premises that I consider important for a beginner's approach to Loop Quantum Gravity. After a description of some general arguments and an introduction to the canonical theory of gravity, I review the background independent approach to quantum gravity, giving only a brief survey of Loop Quantum Gravity.

  3. Einstein Gravity and Beyond: Aspects of Higher-Curvature Gravity and Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Saugata

    This thesis explores the different aspects of higher curvature gravity. The "membrane paradigm" of black holes in Einstein gravity is extended to black holes in f(R) gravity and it is shown that the higher curvature effects of f( R) gravity causes the membrane fluid to become non-Newtonian. Next a modification of the null energy condition in gravity is provided. The purpose of the null energy condition is to filter out ill-behaved theories containing ghosts. Conformal transformations, which are simple redefinitions of the spacetime, introduces serious violations of the null energy condition. This violation is shown to be spurious and a prescription for obtaining a modified null energy condition, based on the universality of the second law of thermodynamics, is provided. The thermodynamic properties of the black holes are further explored using merger of extremal black holes whose horizon entropy has topological contributions coming from the higher curvature Gauss-Bonnet term. The analysis refutes the prevalent belief in the literature that the second law of black hole thermodynamics is violated in the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term in four dimensions. Subsequently a specific class of higher derivative scalar field theories called the galileons are obtained from a Kaluza-Klein reduction of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Galileons are null energy condition violating theories which lead to violations of the second law of thermodynamics of black holes. These higher derivative scalar field theories which are non-minimally coupled to gravity required the development of a generalized method for obtaining the equations of motion. Utilizing this generalized method, it is shown that the inclusion of the Gauss-Bonnet term made the theory of gravity to become higher derivative, which makes it difficult to make any statements about the connection between the violation of the second law of thermodynamics and the galileon fields.

  4. Determining upper mantle structures using gravity, seismology, and GIA modelling in Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, B. C.; van der Wal, W.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The 3D structure of the upper mantle plays a large role in Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Finite-element software is able to model this 3D structure, but knowledge of the upper mantle is needed to make these models realistic. Nowadays, global maps are made of the crustal structure and temperature of the upper mantle from seismic observations. Also, satellite gravity missions, such as GOCE and GRACE, determine global gravity fields. Combining these data sets could give new insights in Glacial Isostatic Adjustment and explain some discrepancies seen in currents geological observations with 1D rheology Earth models. We obtain upper mantle models that fit gravity observations. Then, the upper mantle seismic velocities are converted to temperature profiles; that are used to determine the amount of strain according to diffusion and dislocation creep in the upper mantle. The obtained 3D rheology models are used in a finite element GIA model to observe the effect of the 3D structures during GIA. The GIA model results are compared to geological observations of the sea level change, GPS uplift rates, and ongoing gravity change in the area. This study specifically studies the effect of compositional differences in the upper mantle on the modelled remaining uplift and gravity signal. Molecular conversion relations for primitive mantle rock composition, Garnet Lherzolite rock composition, and Archon, iron depleted rock composition are used to compute the temperature and density profiles. The Fennoscandian lithosphere is believed to contain these three types of composition, yet, it is not yet known in what relative amounts and locations. An iterative approach is used to find the best compositional structure to fit the GIA observables in the Fenoscandian upper mantle.

  5. Construction of a high-density genetic map for sesame based on large scale marker development by specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetics and molecular biology of sesame has only recently begun to be studied even though sesame is an important oil seed crop. A high-density genetic map for sesame has not been published yet due to a lack of sufficient molecular markers. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-resolution strategy for large-scale de novo SNP discovery and genotyping. SLAF-seq was employed in this study to obtain sufficient markers to construct a high-density genetic map for sesame. Results In total, 28.21 Gb of data containing 201,488,285 pair-end reads was obtained after sequencing. The average coverage for each SLAF marker was 23.48-fold in the male parent, 23.38-fold in the female parent, and 14.46-fold average in each F2 individual. In total, 71,793 high-quality SLAFs were detected of which 3,673 SLAFs were polymorphic and 1,272 of the polymorphic markers met the requirements for use in the construction of a genetic map. The final map included 1,233 markers on the 15 linkage groups (LGs) and was 1,474.87 cM in length with an average distance of 1.20 cM between adjacent markers. To our knowledge, this map is the densest genetic linkage map to date for sesame. 'SNP_only’ markers accounted for 87.51% of the markers on the map. A total of 205 markers on the map showed significant (P sesame. The map was constructed using an F2 population and the SLAF-seq approach, which allowed the efficient development of a large number of polymorphic markers in a short time. Results of this study will not only provide a platform for gene/QTL fine mapping, map-based gene isolation, and molecular breeding for sesame, but will also serve as a reference for positioning sequence scaffolds on a physical map, to assist in the process of assembling the sesame genome sequence. PMID:24060091

  6. Construction of a high-density genetic map for sesame based on large scale marker development by specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxin; Wang, Linhai; Xin, Huaigen; Li, Donghua; Ma, Chouxian; Ding, Xia; Hong, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiurong

    2013-09-24

    The genetics and molecular biology of sesame has only recently begun to be studied even though sesame is an important oil seed crop. A high-density genetic map for sesame has not been published yet due to a lack of sufficient molecular markers. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-resolution strategy for large-scale de novo SNP discovery and genotyping. SLAF-seq was employed in this study to obtain sufficient markers to construct a high-density genetic map for sesame. In total, 28.21 Gb of data containing 201,488,285 pair-end reads was obtained after sequencing. The average coverage for each SLAF marker was 23.48-fold in the male parent, 23.38-fold in the female parent, and 14.46-fold average in each F2 individual. In total, 71,793 high-quality SLAFs were detected of which 3,673 SLAFs were polymorphic and 1,272 of the polymorphic markers met the requirements for use in the construction of a genetic map. The final map included 1,233 markers on the 15 linkage groups (LGs) and was 1,474.87 cM in length with an average distance of 1.20 cM between adjacent markers. To our knowledge, this map is the densest genetic linkage map to date for sesame. 'SNP_only' markers accounted for 87.51% of the markers on the map. A total of 205 markers on the map showed significant (P sesame. The map was constructed using an F2 population and the SLAF-seq approach, which allowed the efficient development of a large number of polymorphic markers in a short time. Results of this study will not only provide a platform for gene/QTL fine mapping, map-based gene isolation, and molecular breeding for sesame, but will also serve as a reference for positioning sequence scaffolds on a physical map, to assist in the process of assembling the sesame genome sequence.

  7. Colossal creations of gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skielboe, Andreas

    Gravity governs the evolution of the universe on the largest scales, and powers some of the most extreme objects at the centers of galaxies. Determining the masses and kinematics of galaxy clusters provides essential constraints on the large-scale structure of the universe, and act as direct probes...

  8. A Trick of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    It's both surprising and rewarding when an old, standard problem reveals a subtlety that expands its pedagogic value. I realized recently that the role of gravity in the range equation for a projectile is not so simple as first appears. This realization may be completely obvious to others but was quite new to me.

  9. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  10. Noncommutative Symmetries and Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Aschieri, P

    2006-01-01

    Spacetime geometry is twisted (deformed) into noncommutative spacetime geometry, where functions and tensors are now star-multiplied. Consistently, spacetime diffeomorhisms are twisted into noncommutative diffeomorphisms. Their deformed Lie algebra structure and that of infinitesimal Poincare' transformations is defined and explicitly constructed. This allows to construct a noncommutative theory of gravity.

  11. The Bransfield Gravity Current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangrà, P.; Stegner, A.; Hernández-Arencibia, Mónica; Márrero-Díaz, A.; Salinas, C.; Aguiar-González, B.; Henríquez-Pastene, C.H.; Mouriño-Carballido, B.

    2017-01-01

    Using in situ data and laboratory experiments, we show that the circulation of the Bransfield Current (BC) around the South Shetland Islands (SSI) may be characterized in terms of a propagating buoyant gravity current. First, we describe the SSI hydrography and some drifter trajectories, paying spec

  12. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  13. Revamped braneworld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ruoyu; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U.; Carena, Marcela; /Fermilab; Lykken, Joseph; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Park, Minjoon; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U.; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the vDVZ discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit ''straight'' gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e. the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of DGP-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.

  14. Colossal creations of gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skielboe, Andreas

    Gravity governs the evolution of the universe on the largest scales, and powers some of the most extreme objects at the centers of galaxies. Determining the masses and kinematics of galaxy clusters provides essential constraints on the large-scale structure of the universe, and act as direct probes...

  15. A Trick of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    It's both surprising and rewarding when an old, standard problem reveals a subtlety that expands its pedagogic value. I realized recently that the role of gravity in the range equation for a projectile is not so simple as first appears. This realization may be completely obvious to others but was quite new to me.

  16. Torsion formulation of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lledo, M A; Sommovigo, L, E-mail: Maria.Lledo@ific.uv.e, E-mail: Luca.Sommovigo@mfn.unipmn.i [Departament de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia, and IFIC (Centro mixto CSIC-UVEG) C/Dr Moliner, 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2010-03-21

    We explain precisely what it means to have a connection with torsion as a solution of the Einstein equations. While locally the theory remains the same, the new formulation allows for topologies that would have been excluded in the standard formulation of gravity. In this formulation it is possible to couple arbitrary torsion to gauge fields without breaking the gauge invariance.

  17. The Bransfield Gravity Current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangrà, P.; Stegner, A.; Hernández-Arencibia, Mónica; Márrero-Díaz, A.; Salinas, C.; Aguiar-González, B.; Henríquez-Pastene, C.H.; Mouriño-Carballido, B.

    2017-01-01

    Using in situ data and laboratory experiments, we show that the circulation of the Bransfield Current (BC) around the South Shetland Islands (SSI) may be characterized in terms of a propagating buoyant gravity current. First, we describe the SSI hydrography and some drifter trajectories, paying

  18. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  19. Variable gravity research facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  20. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Barrau, A

    2014-01-01

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  1. Energy Density Bounds in Cubic Quasi-Topological Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    dS, U Camara; Sotkov, G M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamical and causal consistency of cosmological models of the cubic Quasi-Topological Gravity (QTG) in four dimensions, as well as their phenomenological consequences. Specific restrictions on the maximal values of the matter densities are derived by requiring the apparent horizon's entropy to be a non-negative, non-decreasing function of time. The QTG counterpart of the Einstein-Hilbert (EH) gravity model of linear equation of state is studied in detail. An important feature of this particular QTG cosmological model is the new early-time acceleration period of the evolution of the Universe, together with the standard late-time acceleration present in the original EH model. The QTG correction to the causal diamond's volume is also calculated.

  2. Borehole Gravity Meter Surveys at the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Jeffrey D.; Mann, Ethan

    2007-04-06

    Microg-LaCoste (MGL) was contracted by Pacfic Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to record borehole gravity density data in 3 wells at the HanfordWaste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The survey was designed to provide highly accurate density information for use in seismic modeling. The borehole gravity meter (BHGM) tool has a very large depth of investigation (hundreds of feet) compared to other density tools so it is not influenced by casing or near welbore effects, such as washouts.

  3. Sorting cells by their density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Nazila; Bhakta, Heran C.

    2017-01-01

    Sorting cells by their type is an important capability in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, most cell sorting techniques rely on labels or tags, which may have limited availability and specificity. Sorting different cell types by their different physical properties is an attractive alternative to labels because all cells intrinsically have these physical properties. But some physical properties, like cell size, vary significantly from cell to cell within a cell type; this makes it difficult to identify and sort cells based on their sizes alone. In this work we continuously sort different cells types by their density, a physical property with much lower cell-to-cell variation within a cell type (and therefore greater potential to discriminate different cell types) than other physical properties. We accomplish this using a 3D-printed microfluidic chip containing a horizontal flowing micron-scale density gradient. As cells flow through the chip, Earth’s gravity makes each cell move vertically to the point where the cell’s density matches the surrounding fluid’s density. When the horizontal channel then splits, cells with different densities are routed to different outlets. As a proof of concept, we use our density sorter chip to sort polymer microbeads by their material (polyethylene and polystyrene) and blood cells by their type (white blood cells and red blood cells). The chip enriches the fraction of white blood cells in a blood sample from 0.1% (in whole blood) to nearly 98% (in the output of the chip), a 1000x enrichment. Any researcher with access to a 3D printer can easily replicate our density sorter chip and use it in their own research using the design files provided as online Supporting Information. Additionally, researchers can simulate the performance of a density sorter chip in their own applications using the Python-based simulation software that accompanies this work. The simplicity, resolution, and throughput of this

  4. Full Tensor Gradient of Simulated Gravity Data for Prospect Scale Delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Grandis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gravity gradiometry measurement allows imaging of anomalous sources in more detail than conventional gravity data. The availability of this new technique is limited to airborne gravity surveys using very specific instrumentation. In principle, the gravity gradients can be calculated from the vertical component of the gravity commonly measured in a ground-based gravity survey. We present a calculation of the full tensor gradient (FTG of the gravity employing the Fourier transformation. The calculation was applied to synthetic data associated with a simple block model and also with a more realistic model. The latter corresponds to a 3D model in which a thin coal layer is embedded in a sedimentary environment. Our results show the utility of the FTG of the gravity for prospect scale delineation.

  5. Modeling Human Perception of Orientation in Altered Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torin K. Clark

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Altered gravity environments, such as those experienced by astronauts, impact spatial orientation perception and can lead to spatial disorientation and sensorimotor impairment. To more fully understand and quantify the impact of altered gravity on orientation perception, several mathematical models have been proposed. The utricular shear, tangent, and the idiotropic vector models aim to predict static perception of tilt in hyper-gravity. Predictions from these prior models are compared to the available data, but are found to systematically err from the perceptions experimentally observed. Alternatively, we propose a modified utricular shear model for static tilt perception in hyper-gravity. Previous dynamic models of vestibular function and orientation perception are limited to 1 G. Specifically, they fail to predict the characteristic overestimation of roll tilt observed in hyper-gravity environments. To address this, we have proposed a modification to a previous observer-type canal otolith interaction model based upon the hypothesis that the central nervous system treats otolith stimulation in the utricular plane differently than stimulation out of the utricular plane. Here we evaluate our modified utricular shear and modified observer models in four altered gravity motion paradigms: a static roll tilt in hyper-gravity, b static pitch tilt in hyper-gravity, c static roll tilt in hypo-gravity, and d static pitch tilt in hypo-gravity. The modified models match available data in each of the conditions considered. Our static modified utricular shear model and dynamic modified observer model may be used to help quantitatively predict astronaut perception of orientation in altered gravity environments.

  6. Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spires Tara L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder predominantly affecting the cerebral cortex and striatum. Transgenic mice (R6/1 line, expressing a CAG repeat encoding an expanded polyglutamine tract in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein, closely model HD. We have previously shown that environmental enrichment of these HD mice delays the onset of motor deficits. Furthermore, wheel running initiated in adulthood ameliorates the rear-paw clasping motor sign, but not an accelerating rotarod deficit. Results We have now examined the effects of enhanced physical activity via wheel running, commenced at a juvenile age (4 weeks, with respect to the onset of various behavioral deficits and their neuropathological correlates in R6/1 HD mice. HD mice housed post-weaning with running wheels only, to enhance voluntary physical exercise, have delayed onset of a motor co-ordination deficit on the static horizontal rod, as well as rear-paw clasping, although the accelerating rotarod deficit remains unaffected. Both wheel running and environmental enrichment rescued HD-induced abnormal habituation of locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in the open field. We have found that neither environment enrichment nor wheel running ameliorates the shrinkage of the striatum and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC in HD mice, nor the overall decrease in brain weight, measured at 9 months of age. At this age, the density of ubiquitinated protein aggregates in the striatum and ACC is also not significantly ameliorated by environmental enrichment or wheel running. Conclusion These results indicate that enhanced voluntary physical activity, commenced at an early presymptomatic stage, contributes to the positive effects of environmental enrichment. However, sensory and cognitive stimulation, as well as motor stimulation not associated with running, may constitute major components of the therapeutic benefits associated with enrichment

  7. Industrial processes influenced by gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1988-01-01

    In considering new directions for low gravity research with particular regard to broadening the number and types of industrial involvements, it is noted that transport phenomena play a vital role in diverse processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and biotech industries. Relatively little attention has been given to the role of gravity in such processes. Accordingly, numerous industrial processes and phenomena are identified which involve gravity and/or surface tension forces. Phase separations and mixing are examples that will be significantly different in low gravity conditions. A basis is presented for expanding the scope of the low gravity research program and the potential benefits of such research is indicated.

  8. Gravity a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Clifton, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions that exist in nature and is essential for understanding the behaviour of the Universe, and all astrophysical bodies within it. Yet it remains puzzling. Gravity: A Very Short Introduction looks at the development of our understanding of gravity since the early observations of Kepler, Newtonian theory, and Einstein’s theory of gravity. It also discusses the recent detection of waves of gravitational radiation that were predicted by Einstein. This VSI concludes by considering the testing and application of General Relativity in astrophysics and cosmology, and looks at dark energy and efforts such as string theory to combine gravity with quantum mechanics.

  9. Infrared lessons for ultraviolet gravity: the case of massive gravity and Born-Infeld

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Olmo, Gonzalo J

    2014-01-01

    We generalize the ultraviolet sector of gravitation via a Born-Infeld action using lessons from massive gravity. The theory contains all of the elementary symmetric polynomials and is treated in the Palatini formalism. We show how the connection can be solved algebraically to be the Levi-Civita connection of an effective metric. The non-linearity of the algebraic equations yields several branches, one of which always reduces to General Relativity at low curvatures. We explore in detail a minimal version of the theory, for which we study solutions in the presence of a perfect fluid with special attention to the cosmological evolution. In vacuum we recover Ricci-flat solutions, but also an additional physical solution corresponding to an Einstein space. The existence of two physical branches remains for non-vacuum solutions and, in addition, the branch that connects to the Einstein space in vacuum is not very sensitive to the specific value of the energy density. For the branch that connects to the General Rela...

  10. Quantum gravity from noncommutative spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jungjai [Daejin University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyunseok [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We review a novel and authentic way to quantize gravity. This novel approach is based on the fact that Einstein gravity can be formulated in terms of a symplectic geometry rather than a Riemannian geometry in the context of emergent gravity. An essential step for emergent gravity is to realize the equivalence principle, the most important property in the theory of gravity (general relativity), from U(1) gauge theory on a symplectic or Poisson manifold. Through the realization of the equivalence principle, which is an intrinsic property in symplectic geometry known as the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma, one can understand how diffeomorphism symmetry arises from noncommutative U(1) gauge theory; thus, gravity can emerge from the noncommutative electromagnetism, which is also an interacting theory. As a consequence, a background-independent quantum gravity in which the prior existence of any spacetime structure is not a priori assumed but is defined by using the fundamental ingredients in quantum gravity theory can be formulated. This scheme for quantum gravity can be used to resolve many notorious problems in theoretical physics, such as the cosmological constant problem, to understand the nature of dark energy, and to explain why gravity is so weak compared to other forces. In particular, it leads to a remarkable picture of what matter is. A matter field, such as leptons and quarks, simply arises as a stable localized geometry, which is a topological object in the defining algebra (noncommutative *-algebra) of quantum gravity.

  11. Gravity-Driven Hydraulic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Garagash, D.; Murdoch, L. C.; Robinowitz, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study is motived by a new method for disposing of nuclear waste by injecting it as a dense slurry into a hydraulic fracture that grows downward to great enough depth to permanently isolate the waste. Disposing of nuclear waste using gravity-driven hydraulic fractures is mechanically similar to the upward growth of dikes filled with low density magma. A fundamental question in both applications is how the injected fluid controls the propagation dynamics and fracture geometry (depth and breadth) in three dimensions. Analog experiments in gelatin [e.g., Heimpel and Olson, 1994; Taisne and Tait, 2009] show that fracture breadth (the short horizontal dimension) remains nearly stationary when the process in the fracture "head" (where breadth is controlled) is dominated by solid toughness, whereas viscous fluid dissipation is dominant in the fracture tail. We model propagation of the resulting gravity-driven (buoyant or sinking), finger-like fracture of stationary breadth with slowly varying opening along the crack length. The elastic response to fluid loading in a horizontal cross-section is local and can be treated similar to the classical Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model of hydraulic fracturing. The propagation condition for a finger-like crack is based on balancing the global energy release rate due to a unit crack extension with the rock fracture toughness. It allows us to relate the net fluid pressure at the tip to the fracture breadth and rock toughness. Unlike the PKN fracture, where breadth is known a priori, the final breadth of a finger-like fracture is a result of processes in the fracture head. Because the head is much more open than the tail, viscous pressure drop in the head can be neglected leading to a 3D analog of Weertman's hydrostatic pulse. This requires relaxing the local elasticity assumption of the PKN model in the fracture head. As a result, we resolve the breadth, and then match the viscosity-dominated tail with the 3-D, toughness

  12. The Interpretation of Enceladus Gravity (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Iess, L.; Parisi, M.; Ducci, M.; Asmar, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    The determination of the gravity field by Cassini is challenging because of the small mass and short duration of the gravitational interaction, even with data from three encounters. E19 data have been successfully integrated into the multiarc analysis, providing a stable and consistent gravity field. This required inclusion of the effect of atmospheric drag due to Enceladus' plumes. This presentation will deal only with the interpretation of these data. The dominant features of the non-central gravity are large values for the harmonic coefficients J2 and C22 and a much smaller but statistically significant negative J3. The value of J2/C22=3.55×0.05 is moderately in excess of the value of 10/3 that applies to a synchronously rotating body with no lateral variation in material properties. Given the obvious latitudinal variation of Enceladus' physical characteristics, primarily expressed by the activity centered on the South Pole, it is plausible that the deviation from 10/3 arises primarily because of a positive anomaly in J2 rather than any anomaly in C22. However, applying Radau-Darwin to the value of C22/q (where q is the usual dimensionless measure of the centrifugal effect on gravity) implies that the moment of inertia is about 0.34MR^2. The high heat output and indirect inference for liquid water suggests a fully differentiated Enceladus. For the known mean density and any plausible mantle density, this would require an unreasonably low core density of 2.5 g/cc or less. A more realistic interpretation is that both J2 and C22 are modestly non-hydrostatic, but that J2 is affected more because of a negative mass anomaly in the Southern hemisphere, consistent with the observed negative J3. One non-unique way to reconcile the observed gravity with a realistic MOI of 0.32 to 0.33MR^2 is to assume that the rocky core of Enceladus has retained some memory of a previous faster rotational state. Even if the ice shell is perfectly relaxed, this reconciles the data for a

  13. Matter Loops Corrected Modified Gravity in Palatini Formulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xin-He; WANG Peng

    2008-01-01

    Recently,corrections to the standard Einstein Hilbert action were proposed to explain the current cosmic acceleration in stead of introducing dark energy.In the Palatini formulation of those modified gravity models,there is an important observation due to Arkani-Hamed:matter loops will give rise to a correction to the modified gravity action proportional to the Ricci scalar of the metric.In the presence of such a term,we show that the current forms of modified gravity models in Palatini formulation,specifically,the 1/ R gravity and in R gravity,will have phantoms.Then we study the possible instabilities due to the presence of phantom fields.We show that the strong instability in the metric formulation of 1/ R gravity indicated by Dolgov and Kawasaki will not appear and the decay timescales for the phantom fields may be long enough for the theories to make sense as effective field theory.On the other hand,if we change the sign of the modification terms to eliminate the phantoms,some other inconsistencies will arise for the various versions of the modified gravity models.Finally,we comment on the universal property of the Palatini formulation of the matter loops corrected modified gravity models and its implications.

  14. The gravity field and GGOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Sideris, M.G.; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The gravity field of the earth is a natural element of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). Gravity field quantities are like spatial geodetic observations of potential very high accuracy, with measurements, currently at part-per-billion (ppb) accuracy, but gravity field quantities are also...... unique as they can be globally represented by harmonic functions (long-wavelength geopotential model primarily from satellite gravity field missions), or based on point sampling (airborne and in situ absolute and superconducting gravimetry). From a GGOS global perspective, one of the main challenges...... is to ensure the consistency of the global and regional geopotential and geoid models, and the temporal changes of the gravity field at large spatial scales. The International Gravity Field Service, an umbrella "level-2" IAG service (incorporating the International Gravity Bureau, International Geoid Service...

  15. Gravity Science with The JUICE Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, M.; Finocchiaro, S.; Iess, L.

    2012-04-01

    JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) is a European mission to the Jovian system, proposed in the frame of the ESA Cosmic Vision program. The spacecraft will reach the Jovian system and fly several times by the moons Callisto and Europa before being inserted in a nearly circular, polar orbit around Ganymede. After its arrival in 2030, the mission timeline entails two Europa flybys (2030), twelve Callisto flybys (2031) and the orbital phase at Ganymede (2033) [1]. Gravity measurements will provide crucial information on the interior structure of the three satellites. If the bodies are in hydrostatic equilibrium, the radial density distribution may be constrained from their moment of inertia factor and low-degree gravity field coefficients [2]. Furthermore, the determination of the high-degree harmonics will provide the distribution of gravity anomalies. Evidence for subsurface oceans within Ganymede and Callisto, one of the main scientific goals of the mission, will be obtained by the determination of the tidal Love number k2 as part of a global solution for the static and variable gravity field. Gravity fields and tidal deformations will be determined by means of precise Doppler tracking of the spacecraft in Ka-band (32.5-34 GHz). The Radio Science Instrument (RSI) is enabled by a Ka-band transponder which, complemented by suitable ground instrumentation, will enable a radio link with a very high phase stability. The main observable quantity for gravity field determination is the range rate (to 3 micron/s at 1000 s integration time, two-way). The spacecraft range (accurate to 20 cm, two-way) will be used to improve the ephemerides of the Jupiter system. Gravity science at Ganymede will be carried out during the orbital phase. According to the mission profile (subject to change), the first 102 days will be spent at an altitude of 500 km. The orbit will be lowered to 200 km in the last 32 days of the mission. If the spacecraft will be endowed with a steerable medium gain

  16. Localizing the Angular Momentum of Linear Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Butcher, Luke M; Hobson, Michael; 10.1103/PhysRevD.86.084012

    2012-01-01

    In a previous article [Phys. Rev. D 82 104040 (2010)], we derived an energy-momentum tensor for linear gravity that exhibited positive energy density and causal energy flux. Here we extend this framework by localizing the angular momentum of the linearized gravitational field, deriving a gravitational spin tensor which possesses similarly desirable properties. By examining the local exchange of angular momentum (between matter and gravity) we find that gravitational intrinsic spin is localized, separately from orbital angular momentum, in terms of a gravitational spin tensor. This spin tensor is then uniquely determined by requiring that it obey two simple physically motivated algebraic conditions. Firstly, the spin of an arbitrary (harmonic-gauge) gravitational plane wave is required to flow in the direction of propagation of the wave. Secondly, the spin tensor of any transverse-traceless gravitational field is required to be traceless. (The second condition ensures that local field redefinitions suffice to ...

  17. Cosmography in testing loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Szydlowski, Marek; Stachowiak, Tomasz

    2007-01-01

    It was recently suggested by Martin Bojowald that quantum gravity effects give rise to new, potentially observable effects. We check whether this is the case for astronomical tests by trying to constrain the density parameters of the Friedmann equation with a $(-)(1+z)^6$ type of contribution. We describe different interpretations of such an additional term: geometric effects of Loop Quantum Cosmology, effects of braneworld cosmological models, non-standard cosmological models in metric-affine gravity, and models with spinning fluid. Kinematical (or geometrical) tests based on null geodesics are insufficient to separate individual matter components when they behave like perfect fluid and scale in the same way. Still, it is possible to measure their overall effect. We use recent measurements of the coordinate distances from Fanaroff-Riley type IIb (FRIIb) radio galaxy (RG) data, supernovae type Ia (SNIa) data, baryon oscillation peak and cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) observations to obtain stron...

  18. Eddington's Theory of Gravity and Its Progeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañados, Máximo; Ferreira, Pedro G.

    2010-07-01

    We resurrect Eddington’s proposal for the gravitational action in the presence of a cosmological constant and extend it to include matter fields. We show that the Newton-Poisson equation is modified in the presence of sources and that charged black holes show great similarities with those arising in Born-Infeld electrodynamics coupled to gravity. When we consider homogeneous and isotropic space-times, we find that there is a minimum length (and maximum density) at early times, clearly pointing to an alternative theory of the big bang. We thus argue that the modern formulation of Eddington’s theory, Born-Infeld gravity, presents us with a novel, nonsingular description of the Universe.

  19. f(Lovelock) theories of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, Pablo; A., Oscar Lasso; Ramirez, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    f(Lovelock) gravities are simple generalizations of the usual f(R) and Lovelock theories in which the gravitational action depends on some arbitrary function of the corresponding dimensionally-extended Euler densities. In this paper we study several aspects of these theories in general dimensions. We start by identifying the generalized boundary term which makes the gravitational variational problem well-posed. Then, we show that these theories are equivalent to certain scalar-tensor theories and how this relation is characterized by the Hessian of f. We also study the linearized equations of the theory on general maximally symmetric backgrounds. Remarkably, we find that these theories do not propagate the usual ghost-like massive gravitons characteristic of higher-derivative gravities on such backgrounds. In some non-trivial cases, the additional scalar associated to the trace of the metric perturbation is also absent, being the usual graviton the only dynamical field. In those cases, the linearized equation...

  20. Palatini actions and quantum gravity phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmo, Gonzalo J., E-mail: gonzalo.olmo@csic.es [Departamento de Física Teórica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, Facultad de Física, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot-46100, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    We show that an invariant an universal length scale can be consistently introduced in a generally covariant theory through the gravitational sector using the Palatini approach. The resulting theory is able to capture different aspects of quantum gravity phenomenology in a single framework. In particular, it is found that in this theory field excitations propagating with different energy-densities perceive different background metrics, which is a fundamental characteristic of the DSR and Rainbow Gravity approaches. We illustrate these properties with a particular gravitational model and explicitly show how the soccer ball problem is avoided in this framework. The isotropic and anisotropic cosmologies of this model also avoid the big bang singularity by means of a big bounce.